WorldWideScience

Sample records for central sleep apnoea

  1. Sleep apnoea

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Jonathan C.; Swati Chopra; Schwartz, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep apnoea is a disorder characterised by repetitive pauses in breathing during sleep caused by airway occlusion (obstructive sleep apnoea) or altered control of breathing (central sleep apnoea). In this Clinical Year in Review, we summarise high-impact research from the past year pertaining to management, diagnosis and cardio-metabolic consequences of sleep apnoea.

  2. Sleep apnoea

    OpenAIRE

    Hensley, Michael; Ray, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    Sleep apnoea is the popular term for obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). OSAHS is abnormal breathing during sleep that causes recurrent arousals, sleep fragmentation, daytime sleepiness, and nocturnal hypoxaemia. Apnoea may be "central", in which there is cessation of inspiratory effort, or "obstructive", in which inspiratory efforts continue but are ineffective because of upper airway obstruction.OSAHS affects up to 4% of men and 2% of women in the USA, with obesity being...

  3. Epidemiology of central sleep apnoea in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Matthew T

    2016-03-01

    Central sleep apnoea occurs in about a third of patients with reduced systolic heart failure and is a marker of increased mortality. Such patients usually are older males with advanced heart failure (i.e., high pulmonary wedge pressure), often in atrial fibrillation, with evidence of hyperventilation (i.e., low PaCO2) in the absence of hypoxemia. Characteristically, ventilation waxes and wanes in a sinusoidal pattern, with mild hypoxemia, occurring in the lighter levels of sleep usually when supine. Snoring may also occur in central sleep apnoea, often at the peak of hyperventilation, sometimes contributing to the confusion or overlap with obstructive sleep apnoea. Central sleep apnoea is associated with orthopnoea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea and an oscillatory respiratory pattern with an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise study. Importantly, heart failure therapies (e.g., afterload reduction, diuresis, pacemakers, transplantation) attenuate central sleep apnoea. Night to night variability in severity of central sleep apnoea may occur with changes in patients' posture during sleep (less severe when sleeping on-side or upright). PMID:26948168

  4. Primary sleep apnoea syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Chokroverty, S.; Sharp, J T

    1981-01-01

    Polygraphic study in 18 men with the sleep apnoea syndrome showed central, upper airway obstructive, and mixed apnoeas. Fifty per cent of the total apnoea time was central, 33% was obstructive, and 17% was mixed. Apnoeic episodes were accompanied by oxygen desaturation, relative bradycardia and hypotonia of orofacial muscles innervated by ponto-medullary neurons. During regular breathing these muscles revealed tonic and phasic inspiratory EMG activities. The data suggest that the primary slee...

  5. Sleep apnoea in acromegaly.

    OpenAIRE

    Perks, W H; Horrocks, P M; Cooper, R A; Bradbury, S; Allen, A; Baldock, N; Prowse, K.; Van't Hoff, W

    1980-01-01

    Day time somnolence or excessive snoring, or both, occurred in five out of 11 patients with acromegaly. All five had episodes of sleep apnoea, and three had the sleep apnoea syndrome. Growth hormone concentrations were higher (p less than 0.025) in these patients than in the six patients without these symptoms. One patient with daytime somnolence and one asymptomatic patient had flow loop evidence of upper airways obstruction. Two of the patients with the sleep apnoea syndrome had cardiomegal...

  6. Ventilatory support and pharmacological treatment of patients with central apnoea or hypoventilation during sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pevernagie

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of central sleep apnoea or hypoventilation encompasses hypercapnic central hypoventilation, such as obesity hypoventilation syndrome and eucapnic or hypocapnic central sleep apnoea. Among subjects with eucapnic or hypocapnic central sleep apnoea, several therapeutic options are available for those with Cheyne–Stokes respiration (CSR. CSR is frequent in patients with New York Heart Association stage III and IV chronic heart failure, and in various neurological disorders. In these patients, treatment modalities include optimising cardiac condition and drugs, such as theophylline, acetazolamide and/or oxygen. Ventilatory support, such as nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, bi-level pressure support, or adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV, has been shown to improve CSR in patients with cardiac failure; however, convincing evidence that nasal CPAP improves life expectancy in these patients is lacking. Nevertheless, the treatment of associated obstructive sleep-disordered breathing is indicated per se, as it may improve cardiac function. There is currently no proof that bi-level ventilation is superior to nasal CPAP. The few available studies that have focused on ASV have shown satisfactory control of CSR in cardiac failure patients. While ASV is not a first-line treatment choice, it appears to be superior to oxygen, CPAP and bi-level pressure ventilation in controlling the apnoea/hypopnea index and probably sleep fragmentation. As yet there are no data on mortality and, as such, firm conclusions cannot be drawn as to the role of ASV in the management of cardiac failure patients suffering from CSR. Obesity-related hypoventilation has increased dramatically over recent decades due to the epidemic increase in obesity in the developed countries. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome predisposes to the development of pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale. Noninvasive home ventilation is increasingly applied in obese patients with

  7. PILL series. Recognising sleep apnoea

    OpenAIRE

    How, Choon How; Hsu, Pon Poh; Tan, Kah Leong Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Most people spend a third of their lives sleeping, and thus, sleep has a major impact on all of us. As sleep is a function and not a structure, it is challenging to treat and prevent its complications. Sleep apnoea is one such complication, with serious and potentially life-threatening consequences. Local studies estimate that about 15% of Singapore’s population is afflicted with sleep apnoea. The resulting sleep fragmentation may result in poor quality of sleep, leading to daytime sleepiness...

  8. Mandibular advancement appliance for obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Niels; Svanholt, Palle; Solow, Beni;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a mandibular advancement appliance (MAA) for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Ninety-three patients with OSA and a mean apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of 34.7 were centrally randomised into three, parallel groups: (a) MAA; (b) mandibular non-adva...... to CPAP in subsets of OSA patients....

  9. Sleep · 8: Paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    OpenAIRE

    Nixon, G; Brouillette, R

    2005-01-01

    In the past 25 years there has been increasing recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as a common condition of childhood. Morbidity includes impairment of growth, cardiovascular complications, learning impairment, and behavioural problems. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition in children differs in many respects from that in adults. We review here the key features of paediatric OSA, highlighting differences from adult OSA, and suggest future directions for research.

  10. Carotid body chemoreflex: a driver of autonomic abnormalities in sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This article presents emerging evidence for heightened carotid body chemoreflex activity as a major driver of sympathetic activation and hypertension in sleep apnoea patients. What advances does it heighlight? This article discusses the recent advances on cellular, molecular and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the exaggerated chemoreflex in experimental models of sleep apnoea. The carotid bodies are the principal peripheral chemoreceptors for detecting changes in arterial blood oxygen concentration, and the resulting chemoreflex is a potent regulator of the sympathetic tone, blood pressure and breathing. Sleep apnoea is a disease of the respiratory system that affects several million adult humans. Apnoeas occur during sleep, often as a result of obstruction of the upper airway (obstructive sleep apnoea) or because of defective respiratory rhythm generation by the CNS (central sleep apnoea). Patients with sleep apnoea exhibit several co-morbidities, with the most notable among them being heightened sympathetic nerve activity and hypertension. Emerging evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia resulting from periodic apnoea stimulates the carotid body, and the ensuing chemoreflex mediates the increased sympathetic tone and hypertension in sleep apnoea patients. Rodent models of intermittent hypoxia that simulate the O2 saturation profiles encountered during sleep apnoea have provided important insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the heightened carotid body chemoreflex. This article describes how intermittent hypoxia affects the carotid body function and discusses the cellular, molecular and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the exaggerated chemoreflex. PMID:27474260

  11. Postoperative episodic oxygen desaturation in the sleep apnoea syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1991-01-01

    We describe a patient with sleep apnoea syndrome who showed severe episodic hypoxaemia in the late postoperative period. The sleep apnoea syndrome should be studied further to evaluate its significance as a surgical risk factor.......We describe a patient with sleep apnoea syndrome who showed severe episodic hypoxaemia in the late postoperative period. The sleep apnoea syndrome should be studied further to evaluate its significance as a surgical risk factor....

  12. Sleep apnoea: Finnish National guidelines for prevention and treatment 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, L A; Anttalainen, U; Pietinalho, A; Hämäläinen, P; Koskela, K

    2003-04-01

    (1) After negotiations with the Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, a national programme to promote prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of sleep apnoea for the years 2002-2012 has been prepared by the Finnish Lung Health Association on the basis of extensive collaboration. The programme needs to be revised as necessary, because of the rapid development in medical knowledge, and in appliance therapy in particular. (2) Sleep apnoea deteriorates slowly. Its typical features are snoring, interruptions of breathing during sleep and daytime tiredness. Sleep apnoea affects roughly 3% of middle-aged men and 2% of women. In Finland, there are approx. 150,000 sleep apnea patients, of which 15,000 patients have a severe disease, 50,000 patients are moderate and 85,000 have a mild form of the disease. Children are also affected by sleep apnea. A typical sleep apnea patient is a middle-aged man or a postmenopausal woman. (3) The obstruction of upper airways is essential in the occurrence of sleep apnoea. The obstruction can be caused by structural and/or functional factors. As for structural factors, there are various methods of intervention, such as to secure children's nasal respiration, to remove redundant soft tissue, as well as to correct malocclusions. It is possible to have an effect on the functional factors by treating well diseases predisposing to sleep apnoea, by reducing smoking, the consumption of alcohol and the use of medicines impairing the central nervous system. The most important single risk factor for sleep apnoea is obesity. (4) Untreated sleep apnoea leads to an increase morbidity and mortality through heart circulatory diseases and through accidents by tiredness. Untreated or undertreated sleep apnoea deteriorates a person's quality of life and working capacity. (5) The goals of the Programme for the prevention and treatment of sleep apnoea are as follows: (1) to decrease the incidence of sleep apnoea, (2) to ensure that as many patients

  13. Independent validation of the Sleep Apnoea Quality of Life Index

    OpenAIRE

    Lacasse, Y; Godbout, C; Series, F

    2002-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) affects important domains of quality of life which remain unexplored by conventional sleep recordings. The objective of this study was to examine the measurement properties (both discriminative and evaluative) of the Sleep Apnoea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI), a new OSA specific quality of life questionnaire.

  14. Tooth loss and obstructive sleep apnoea

    OpenAIRE

    Gai Valerio; Pera Paolo; Erovigni Francesco; Graziano Alessandra; Arienti Andrea; Brussino Luisa; Cicolin Alessandro; Bucca Caterina; Mutani Roberto; Preti Giulio; Rolla Giovanni; Carossa Stefano

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Complete tooth loss (edentulism) produces anatomical changes that may impair upper airway size and function. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether edentulism favours the occurrence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Methods Polysomnography was performed in 48 edentulous subjects on two consecutive nights, one slept with and the other without dentures. Upper airway size was assessed by cephalometry and by recording forced mid-inspiratory airflow rate (FIF50). Exhale...

  15. Morbidity and mortality in children with obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Ibsen, Rikke Falkner; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the diagnostic patterns of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in children. A study was undertaken to evaluate morbidity and mortality in childhood OSA.......Little is known about the diagnostic patterns of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in children. A study was undertaken to evaluate morbidity and mortality in childhood OSA....

  16. Tooth loss and obstructive sleep apnoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai Valerio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete tooth loss (edentulism produces anatomical changes that may impair upper airway size and function. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether edentulism favours the occurrence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA. Methods Polysomnography was performed in 48 edentulous subjects on two consecutive nights, one slept with and the other without dentures. Upper airway size was assessed by cephalometry and by recording forced mid-inspiratory airflow rate (FIF50. Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO and oral NO (oNO, were measured as markers of airway and oropharyngeal inflammation. Results The apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI without dentures was significantly higher than with dentures (17·4 ± 3·6 versus 11·0 ± 2·3. p = 0·002, and was inversely related to FIF50 (p = 0·017 and directly related to eNO (p = 0·042. Sleeping with dentures, 23 subjects (48% had an AHI over 5, consistent with OSA, but sleeping without dentures the number of subjects with abnormal AHI rose to 34 (71%. At cephalometry, removing dentures produced a significant decrease in retropharyngeal space (from 1·522 ± 0·33 cm to 1·27 ± 0·42 cm, p = 0·006. Both morning eNO and oNO were higher after the night slept without dentures (eNO 46·1 ± 8·2 ppb versus 33·7 ± 6·3 ppb, p = 0·035, oNO 84·6 ± 13·7 ppb versus 59·2 ± 17·4 ppb, p = 0·001. Conclusion These findings suggest that complete tooth loss favours upper airway obstruction during sleep. This untoward effect seems to be due to decrease in retropharyngeal space and is associated with increased oral and exhaled NO concentration.

  17. Sleep apnoea: Finnish National guidelines for prevention and treatment 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, L A; Anttalainen, U; Pietinalho, A; Hämäläinen, P; Koskela, K

    2003-04-01

    (1) After negotiations with the Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, a national programme to promote prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of sleep apnoea for the years 2002-2012 has been prepared by the Finnish Lung Health Association on the basis of extensive collaboration. The programme needs to be revised as necessary, because of the rapid development in medical knowledge, and in appliance therapy in particular. (2) Sleep apnoea deteriorates slowly. Its typical features are snoring, interruptions of breathing during sleep and daytime tiredness. Sleep apnoea affects roughly 3% of middle-aged men and 2% of women. In Finland, there are approx. 150,000 sleep apnea patients, of which 15,000 patients have a severe disease, 50,000 patients are moderate and 85,000 have a mild form of the disease. Children are also affected by sleep apnea. A typical sleep apnea patient is a middle-aged man or a postmenopausal woman. (3) The obstruction of upper airways is essential in the occurrence of sleep apnoea. The obstruction can be caused by structural and/or functional factors. As for structural factors, there are various methods of intervention, such as to secure children's nasal respiration, to remove redundant soft tissue, as well as to correct malocclusions. It is possible to have an effect on the functional factors by treating well diseases predisposing to sleep apnoea, by reducing smoking, the consumption of alcohol and the use of medicines impairing the central nervous system. The most important single risk factor for sleep apnoea is obesity. (4) Untreated sleep apnoea leads to an increase morbidity and mortality through heart circulatory diseases and through accidents by tiredness. Untreated or undertreated sleep apnoea deteriorates a person's quality of life and working capacity. (5) The goals of the Programme for the prevention and treatment of sleep apnoea are as follows: (1) to decrease the incidence of sleep apnoea, (2) to ensure that as many patients

  18. The genetics of obstructive sleep apnoea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Brian D

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a highly prevalent disorder associated with reduced quality of life and adverse cardiovascular and metabolic sequelae. Recent years have seen an intensification of the research effort to establish the genetic contribution to the development of OSAS and its sequelae. This review explores emerging evidence in this field. RECENT FINDINGS: A genetic basis for sleep-disordered breathing has been demonstrated for discrete disorders such as Treacher-Collins and Down syndromes, but the picture is less clear in so-called idiopathic OSAS. A degree of heritability appears likely in some of the intermediate phenotypes that lead to OSAS, particularly craniofacial morphology. However, only sparse and often contradictory evidence exists regarding the role of specific polymorphisms in causing OSAS in the general population. Similarly, investigations of the cardiovascular sequelae of OSAS have in general failed to consistently find single causative genetic mutations. Nonetheless, evidence suggests a role for tumour necrosis factor-alpha polymorphisms in particular, and large-scale family studies have suggested shared pathogenetic pathways for the development of obesity and OSAS. SUMMARY: As with other common disorders, OSAS is likely to result from multiple gene-gene interactions occurring in a suitable environment. The application of modern genetic investigative techniques, such as genome-wide association studies, may facilitate new discoveries in this field.

  19. Sexual function in male patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marian; Kristensen, Ellids; Berg, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate general and functional aspects of sexuality in male patients with a confirmed diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and compare the results with normative data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated 308 male patients (age 30-69) admitted to a sleep...

  20. Central sleep apnoea—a clinical review

    OpenAIRE

    Muza, Rexford T.

    2015-01-01

    Central sleep apnoea (CSA) is characterised by recurrent apnoeas during sleep with no associated respiratory effort. It mostly results from withdrawal of the wakefulness drive in sleep leaving ventilation under metabolic control. A detailed physiological understanding of the control of breathing in wakefulness and sleep is essential to the understanding of CSA. It encompasses a diverse group of conditions with differing aetiologies and pathophysiology. Likewise treatment varies according to u...

  1. Sleep apnoea and the brain: a complex relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Ivana; Glasser, Martin; Polsek, Dora; Leschziner, Guy D; Williams, Steve C R; Morrell, Mary J

    2015-05-01

    Intermittent hypoxia, reoxygenation, and hypercapnia or hypocapnia occur in both adults and children during untreated apnoea and hypopnoea, along with changes in cerebral blood flow and sleep fragmentation. These effects can result in cognitive deficits with functional effects on work and school efficiency. The assessment of how obstructive sleep apnoea affects cognition depends on the specificity and sensitivity of the tests, which are rarely developed specifically for obstructive sleep apnoea. In this Review, we discuss both the neural adaptive and maladaptive processes in response to hypoxaemia. The net result on cognitive and emotional performance depends on the stage of this dynamic process, effects on other body systems, cognitive reserve, and idiosyncratic susceptibility. We also explore the contribution of fragmented sleep, and the disruption of sleep structure, with focus on the effect at different times in the development of disease. This Review will address the gap in the underlying pathophysiology of new clinical and translational findings, and argue their contribution to the inherent complexity of the association between obstructive sleep apnoea and the brain. PMID:25887982

  2. Can you die from obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS)?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Carroll, G

    2015-02-01

    Studies suggest an independent association between Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome (OSAS) and cardiovascular death. The purpose of our study is to examine doctors\\' awareness of this association and to determine whether this correlates with recording of OSAS on death certificates. We contacted the Central Statistics Office (CSO) and obtained relevant mention of OSAS on death certificates. We surveyed doctors on their view of OSAS-related deaths, CSO data from 2008-2011 reveal two deaths with OSAS documented as a direct cause and 52 deaths with OSAS as a contributory cause. Seventy-five doctors\\' surveyed (41%) believe OSAS can be a direct cause of death and 177 (96%) believe OSAS can be an indirect cause of death. Only 22 (12%) had putdown OSAS as a cause of death. OSAS is seldom recorded on death certificates. This is at odds with epidemiological forecasts and contrary to an opinion poll from a selection of doctors.

  3. An ECG oximetry system for identifying obstructive and central apnoea events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chazal, Philip; Sadr, Nadi; Jayawardhana, Madhuka

    2015-08-01

    An automatic algorithm for processing simultaneously acquired electrocardiogram (ECG) and oximetry signals that identifies epochs of pure central apnoea, epochs containing obstructive apnoea and epochs of normal breathing is presented. The algorithm uses time and spectral features from the ECG derived heart-rate and respiration information, as well as features capturing desaturations from the oximeter sensor. Evaluation of performance of the system was achieved by using leave-one-record-out cross validation on the St. Vincent's University Hospital / University College Dublin Sleep Apnea Database from the Physionet collections of recorded physiologic signals. When classifying the three epoch types, our system achieved a specificity of 80%, a sensitivity to central apnoea of 44% and sensitivity to obstructive apnoea of 35%. A sensitivity of 81% was achieved when the central and obstructive epochs were combined into one class. PMID:26738069

  4. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children and anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rudra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS is a common medical disorder among adults, which is increasingly being recognized in children too. It is a breathing disorder characterized by upper airway obstruction with or without intermittent complete obstruction that disrupts normal breathing during sleep. Anatomical and neuromuscular disorders are mainly responsible for this disorder. This disorder leads to a state of chronic hypoxemia, which has significant cardiac, pulmonary and central nervous system implications. Diagnosis of OSAS is based on thorough history and clinical examination along with appropriate sleep studies including polysomnography. The mainstay of treatment of paediatric OSAS is adenotonsillectomy. Good anaesthetic practice in Paediatric patients with OSAS revolves around good and ideal airway management. Early detection of airway obstruction, intense monitoring to warn of impending airway problems and appropriate and early intervention of airway compromise are good anaesthetic practices. Coexisting medical problems should be adequately addressed and safe analgesic techniques in the perioperative period go towards improving outcomes in patients with paediatric OSAS.

  5. Craniofacial morphology and obstructive sleep apnoea : a cephalometric analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A; Hovinga, B; Stegenga, B; De Bont, LGM

    2003-01-01

    The craniofacial morphology of 31 male patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) and 37 healthy male subjects were compared using cephalometric evaluation of lateral skull radiographs. The aim was to evaluate which cephalometric variables related to craniofacial morphology dis

  6. Impact of rail medical standard on obstructive sleep apnoea prevalence

    OpenAIRE

    Colquhoun, C. P.; Casolin, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The 2004 edition of the National Standard for Health Assessment of Rail Safety Workers (the standard) used the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) to screen for excessive daytime sleepiness related to obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The 2012 edition of the standard expanded the OSA screening matrix to include body mass index, comorbid hypertension and type 2 diabetes as triggers requiring a sleep study to be undertaken irrespective of the ESS. Aims To assess the impact of the new standa...

  7. Mandibular advancement appliance for obstructive sleep apnoea: results of a randomised placebo controlled trial using parallel group design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, N.; Svanholt, P.; Solow, B.;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a mandibular advancement appliance (MAA) for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Ninety-three patients with OSA and a mean apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of 34.7 were centrally randomised into three, parallel groups: (a) MAA; (b) mandibular non-adva...... is essential for the effect. MNA has no placebo effect. MAA may be a good alternative to CPAP in subsets of OSA patients Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6...

  8. Novel method for detection of Sleep Apnoea using respiration signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristine Carmes; Kempfner, Lykke; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing;

    2014-01-01

    Polysomnography (PSG) studies are considered the “gold standard” for the diagnosis of Sleep Apnoea (SA). Identifying cessations of breathing from long-lasting PSG recordings manually is a labour-intensive and time-consuming task for sleep specialist, associated with inter-scorer variability...... desaturations > 3%, extracted from the thorax and abdomen respiration effort belts, and the oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2), fed to an Elastic Net classifier and validated according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) using the patients' AHI value. The method was applied to 109 patient recordings...

  9. Treatment effects of sleep apnoea: where are we now?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Buyse

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article summarises some of the topics of discussion held during one of the workshops in preparation for the 7th International Symposium of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven on "Respiratory somnology: a clinical update; March 2006". Participants discussed the effectiveness of treatment in obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS. Of the topics discussed, the following are considered in the present article. 1 Sleepiness and attention deficit, as well as higher cognitive/executive defects in OSAHS, and the closely related clinical dilemma of "how to deal with the car-driving-ability problem in OSAHS". 2 Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP in post-stroke patients. The most important data discussed during the workshop for 1 and 2 are presented in the present article. 3 The effects of CPAP on metabolic outcome. One metabolic dysfunction of OSAHS is the change in leptin and ghrelin levels, which represent the "yin and yang" of an appetite regulatoion system that has developed to inform the brain about the current energy balance state. Data on the impact of sleep loss, either behavioural or OSAHS-related, on this neuroendocrine regulation of appetite are also presented. The participants ended the workshop with a discussion session on the results of more "controversial" treatment strategies for obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome, such as cardiac pacing, hyoid bone expansion (a preliminary surgical technique, drug treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome, female hormone replacement therapy and the role of stimulants for refractory sleepiness in already treated obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome patients.

  10. Cardiovascular risk in patients with sleep apnoea with or without continuous positive airway pressure therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberts, Morten; Nielsen, O W; Lip, G Y H;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic significance of age and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on cardiovascular disease in patients with sleep apnoea has not been assessed previously. METHODS: Using nationwide databases, the entire Danish population was followed from 2000 until 2011. First......-time sleep apnoea diagnoses and use of CPAP therapy were determined. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of ischaemic stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) were analysed using Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Amongst 4.5 million individuals included in the study, 33 274 developed sleep apnoea (mean age 53, 79......% men) of whom 44% received persistent CPAP therapy. Median time to initiation of CPAP therapy was 88 days (interquartile range 34-346). Patients with sleep apnoea had more comorbidities compared to the general population. Crude rates of MI and ischaemic stroke were increased for sleep apnoea patients...

  11. Cervical column morphology in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Petri, Niels; Kjaer, Inger; Svanholt, Palle

    2008-10-01

    Cervical column morphology was examined in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and compared with the cervical morphology of an adult control group with neutral occlusion, normal craniofacial morphology, and no history of sleep apnoea. The sleep apnoea group consisted of 91 patients, 16 females aged 29-59 years (mean 49.4 years) and 75 males aged 27-65 years (mean 49.0 years). All patients were diagnosed with OSA by overnight polysomnography. The control group consisted of 21 subjects, 15 females aged 23-40 years (mean 29.2 years) and 6 males aged 25-44 years (mean 32.8 years). From each individual, a visual assessment of the cervical column was performed on the radiograph. Differences in the cervical column morphology, between the genders and the groups were assessed by Fisher's exact test and the effect of age by logistic regression analysis. In the OSA group, 46.2 per cent had fusion anomalies of the cervical column and 5.5 per cent a posterior arch deficiency. Fusion anomalies occurred in 26.4 per cent as fusions between two cervical vertebrae. Block fusions occurred in 12.1 per cent and occipitalization in 14.3 per cent. A posterior arch deficiency occurred in 2.2 per cent as a partial cleft of C1 and in 3.3 per cent as dehiscence of C3 and C4. No statistical gender differences were found in the occurrence of morphological characteristics of the cervical column. The fusion anomalies of the cervical column occurred significantly more often in the OSA group. The results indicate that the morphological deviations of the upper cervical vertebrae play a role in the phenotypical subdivision and diagnosis of OSA.

  12. Metabolic disturbances in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Harsch

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic disturbances in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS include insulin resistance and elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and vascular adhesion molecules, as well as an elevation of hormones derived from the adipose tissue as leptin. These phenomena might, in part, be an explanation for the excess morbidity and mortality of OSAS patients concerning cardiovascular disease. Several of these factors have been described as being independently associated with OSAS and not only related to its comorbidities, including obesity. A promising approach to studying the metabolic phenomena in these OSAS patients would be to monitor patients before and during the course of continuous positive airway pressure therapy, as nocturnal sleep disturbances are treatable and may revert the impact of OSAS on the metabolic phenomena; however, patients do frequently (and unfortunately maintain their body weight. Although not confirmed by all investigations, a tendency towards an improvement in some of the above-mentioned metabolic parameters has been reported in several studies in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome patients and may be reflected by the decreased occurrence of new cardiovascular events, the reduction of systolic blood pressure and the improvement of left ventricular systolic function.

  13. Decision making is affected in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daurat, Agnès; Ricarrère, Matthieu; Tiberge, Michel

    2013-03-01

    We assessed decision making in 20 patients newly diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and 20 healthy controls with the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), which evaluates the ability to learn to sacrifice immediate rewards in favour of long-term gains. A standard neuropsychological battery was administered. Switching scores tended to be lower in patients. Patients persisted in selecting risky decks throughout the IGT, whereas controls behaved normally. Performance was correlated with hypoxaemia. Brain regions underlying decision making may be affected by OSA-related hypoxaemia.

  14. Inflammatory cardiovascular risk markers in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Silke

    2012-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) represents a highly prevalent disease and is recognized as a major public health burden. Large-scale epidemiological studies have demonstrated an independent relationship between OSAS and various cardiovascular disorders. The pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in OSAS is not completely understood, but given the complexity of the disorder, a multifactorial etiology is likely. Inflammatory processes have emerged as critical in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in general and they mediate many of the stages of atheroma formation. Circulating levels of several markers of inflammation have been associated with future cardiovascular risk. These markers include cell adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and selectins, cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), chemokines such as IL-8, and C-reactive protein (CRP). There is increasing evidence that inflammatory processes also play a central role in the cardiovascular pathophysiology of OSAS. This is supported by cell culture and animal studies identifying a preferential activation of inflammatory pathways by intermittent hypoxia (IH), the hallmark of OSAS. A number of studies have selectively examined the expression of inflammatory factors in OSAS patients with different conclusions. These different findings may have been contributed to by a number of methodological factors such as small subject numbers, inadequately matched study populations, particularly in terms of body mass index (BMI), and inclusion of patients with pre-existing cardiovascular or metabolic diseases. This review will focus on the potential role of various inflammatory markers in OSAS with a critical analysis of the current literature.

  15. Early detection possibilities of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Predrag

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA syndrome represents a significant medical problem due to numerous consequences that may follow it. Objective. The aim of the study was to analyze morphology of the maxilla in children with mouth breathing, and to assess possible characteristics in persons with marked clinical features of OSA. Methods. The sample comprised of 60 examinees aged from 8-10 years, all mouth-breathers. The following X-ray cephalometric parameters were measured: angle of maxillary pragmatism, cranial base angle, angle between the palatal plane and the anterior cranial base, maxillary length, distance from the most prominent labial surface of the maxillary central incisor to NA line, angle between the axis of the upper maxillary incisor and NA line. Following parameters were obtained from the casts: anterior and posterior width of the maxillary arch, height of the maxillary arch, index of the palatal height, as well as the apical base length. Assessed values were then compared to the corresponding norms. Results. Compared to the corresponding norms, statistically significant lower values were determined for the following parameters of the sample: SpP/SN, AW, PW, AB. Conclusion. Analysis of the morphological characteristics of the maxilla in mouth breathing children showed characteristics also present in persons with marked clinical features of OSA syndrome, such as a narrow maxilla, insufficient apical base length, as well as the reduced angle of the palatal plane angle to the anterior cranial base. All these suggest a possible increased risk of developing OSA syndrome in children’s later age.

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea, Intermittent Hypoxia and Respiratory Muscle Structure and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford, Aidan; O'Halloran, Ken D.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is a common condition associated with significant morbidity and increased mortality. During sleep, the sub atmospheric pressure developed in the extra thoracic airway by the contraction of the thoracic pump muscles during inspiration causes collapse of the compliant upper airway, resulting in an episode of apnoea. Normally, upper airway collapse is prevented by contraction of upper airway muscles and if the airway does collapse, it is re-opened by a reflex augmented n...

  17. Sleep apnoea and driving risk: the need for regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter T. McNicholas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS is a highly prevalent chronic respiratory disorder with prevalence among adult males of ≥10%. The most common daytime symptom associated with OSAS is excessive sleepiness, which in more severe manifestations can result in sleepiness at the wheel while driving and probably contributes to the substantial increase in accident risk among patients with OSAS. Fortunately, current evidence indicates that successful therapy of OSAS, particularly with continuous positive airway pressure, can bring the accident risk down to levels similar to an equivalent general population. The recognition of the increased driving accident risk in OSAS prompted the Transport and Mobility Directorate of the European Commission to establish a working group on this topic in 2012, which ultimately led to a revision of Annex III of the EU Driving Licence Directive, which is subject to mandatory implementation by European Union member states by December 2015. This directive specifies that patients with moderate or severe OSAS associated with significant daytime sleepiness should be prohibited from driving until effective therapy is established. These new regulations are designed to balance the legitimate objective of public safety with not penalising OSAS patients who are complying with effective therapy. Successful implementation of regulations on driving in OSAS patients must also include measures to educate relevant stakeholders including patients, medical personnel, traffic police and employers in the transport industry. The key objective is to encourage patients with possible OSAS to seek diagnosis and treatment and not to inhibit OSAS patients from coming forward.

  18. Relationship between chemosensitivity, obesity and blood pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, I; Collins, F L; Grunstein, R R; Hedner, J; Kelly, D T; Sullivan, C E

    1994-03-01

    It has previously been documented that patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) have an abnormal blood pressure (pressor) response to acute hypoxia when awake. The relationship between hypoxic chemosensitivity and 24 h blood pressure in OSA is not known. Twenty-four hour ambulatory BP (ABP) was measured at 15 min intervals for 24 h using a non-invasive device (Oxford Medilog ABP or Spacelabs 90207 recorder) in 49 men (mean age 51 +/- 9 years), with OSA. The BP response to acute hypoxia was measured either directly (radial arterial line) or indirectly (Finapress) during wakefulness. The pressor response to hypoxia (expressed as the slope of the regression line of mean BP on % fall in arterial oxygen saturation) was compared with the results of the ABP recording, sleep study data and clinical variables. A pressor response to acute hypoxia was present in all patients (mean 1.4 +/- 1.1 mmHg/% delta SaO2, range 0.1-4.5). There was a relationship between the magnitude of the pressor response to hypoxia, severity of sleep apnoea (RDI and minimum SaO2) and central obesity (waist measurement). In contrast, there was no relationship between BP response to hypoxia during wakefulness and 24-h BP. However, increasing obesity and severity of OSA were associated with loss of the normal fall in BP at night. We conclude that enhanced chemosensitivity is common in OSA but there is no demonstrable link between chemosensitivity and mean daytime or night-time ABP. PMID:8199720

  19. Pattern recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea and Cheyne–Stokes respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity of an artificial neural network based on flow-related spectral entropy as a diagnostic test for obstructive sleep apnoea and Cheyne–Stokes respiration. A data set of 37 subjects was used for spectral analysis of the airflow by performing a fast Fourier transform. The examined intervals were divided into epochs of 3 min. Spectral entropy S was applied as a measure for the spread of the related power spectrum. The spectrum was divided into several frequency areas with various subsets of spectral entropy. We studied 11 subjects with obstructive apnoeas (n = 267 epochs), 10 subjects with obstructive hypopnoeas (n = 80 epochs), 11 subjects with Cheyne–Stokes respiration (n = 253 epochs) and 5 subjects with normal breathing in non-REM sleep (n = 174 epochs). Based on spectral entropy an artificial neural network was built, and we obtained a sensitivity of 90.2% and a specificity of 90.9% for distinguishing between obstructive apnoeas and Cheyne–Stokes respiration, and a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 94.6% for discriminating between obstructive hypopnoeas and normal breathing in non-REM sleep. This resulted in an accuracy of 91.5% for identifying flow patterns of obstructive sleep apnoea, Cheyne–Stokes respiration and normal breathing in non-REM sleep. It is concluded that the use of an artificial neural network relying on spectral analysis of the airflow could be a useful method as a diagnostic test for obstructive sleep apnoea and Cheyne–Stokes respiration

  20. The Assessment of Sleep Apnoea as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Khandgave, Tejaswini Prashant; Puthran, Neelam; Ingole, Avinash B.; Nicholson, Anjali D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The risk of developing open angle glaucoma increases in the presence of associated disorders such as hypertension, Diabetes mellitus and migraine. In recent years, sleep apnoea is also being investigated as a risk factor in the development of open angle glaucoma.

  1. Comparison of three auto-adjusting positive pressure devices in patients with sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, G M; Ryan, S; O'connor, T M; McNicholas, W T

    2006-07-01

    Auto-adjustable continuous positive airway pressure (APAP) devices are an emerging treatment alternative to fixed-pressure continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. They have been engineered to automatically adjust the pressure to the optimal level on a continuous basis. However, not all APAP technologies use the same algorithm. Three different APAP devices (Autoset Spirit, Breas PV 10i and RemStar Auto) were compared in a randomised crossover trial in patients already established on fixed-pressure CPAP therapy. The outcome measures were compliance, quality of life and side-effects. Twenty-seven middle-aged patients (25 male) previously diagnosed with severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (median (interquartile range) apnoea/hypopnoea index 48 (29-76)), established on CPAP therapy for >3 yrs, were randomised to each APAP device for 4 weeks. Mean pressure and patient compliance were significantly lower on the Breas PV 10i than on the other APAP devices. The devices were similar in terms of quality of life, daytime sleepiness and upper airway side-effects, but patients evaluated them significantly differently in terms of device features, sleep quality and pressure comfort, with the Breas PV 10i being the least popular. Auto-adjustable positive airway pressure devices differ in pressure delivery and patient compliance in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome patients. PMID:16571610

  2. Executive functions and cognitive subprocesses in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Lis (Stefanie); S. Krieger (Stephan); D. Hennig (Dorothee); C.H. Röder (Christian); P. Kirsch (Peter); W. Seeger (Werner); B. Gallhofer (Bernd); R. Schulz (Richard)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years, special interest has been focused on impairments of executive functions in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, the majority of studies have not clearly separated deficits in executive functions from impairments in other cognitive processes in

  3. Anterior mandibular positioning device for treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Christian; Grymer, Luisa; Hjorth, Tine

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the severity of side effects and the influence on snoring and the AHI (apnoea-hypopnoea index = number of apnoeas and hypopnoeas per hour recording) of an anterior mandibular positioning device (AMP device) for treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea...... of the AMP device treatment, but there was no increase in the degree of facial pain, salivation, or temporomandibular joint pain. The AMP device treatment resulted in a statistically significant reduction (p ....05). Twenty-two patients out of 30 were still using the device at the time of follow-up. In conclusion, AMP device treatment was associated with only mild side effects and resulted in a statistically significant reduction of the AHI and of the percentage of the recording time with loud snoring....

  4. The effect of adenotonsillectomy for childhood sleep apnoea on cardiorespiratory control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Baumert

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of adenotonsillectomy for relieving obstructive sleep apnoea symptoms in children has been firmly established, but its precise effects on cardiorespiratory control are poorly understood. In 375 children enrolled in the Childhood Adenotonsillectomy Trial, randomised to undergo either adenotonsillectomy (n=194 or a strategy of watching waiting (n=181, respiratory rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia and heart rate were analysed during quiet, non-apnoeic and non-hypopnoeic breathing throughout sleep at baseline and at 7 months using overnight polysomnography. Children who underwent early adenotonsillectomy demonstrated an increase in respiratory rate post-surgery while the watchful waiting group showed no change. Heart rate and respiratory sinus arrhythmia were comparable between both arms. On assessing cardiorespiratory variables with regard to normalisation of clinical polysomnography findings during follow-up, heart rate was reduced in children who had resolution of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, while no differences in their respiratory rate or respiratory sinus arrhythmia were observed. Adenotonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnoea increases baseline respiratory rate during sleep. Normalisation of apnoea–hypopnoea index, spontaneously or via surgery, lowers heart rate. Considering the small average effect size, the clinical significance is uncertain.

  5. Daytime sleepiness, cognitive performance and mood after continuous positive airway pressure for the sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Engleman, H. M.; Cheshire, K. E.; Deary, I.J.; Douglas, N.J.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Patients with the sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome often receive continuous positive airway pressure to improve their symptoms and daytime performance, yet objective evidence of the effect of this treatment on cognitive performance is lacking. METHODS--A prospective parallel group study was performed comparing the change in objective daytime sleepiness as assessed by multiple sleep latency, cognitive function, and mood in 21 patients (mean (SE) number of apnoeas and hypopnoeas/hour...

  6. At least one in three people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus referred to a diabetes centre has symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Mortensen, B; Almdal, T;

    2014-01-01

    %. Patients with symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea had significantly higher BMI, poorer glycaemic control and lower plasma HDL cholesterol levels as compared with patients unlikely to have obstructive sleep apnoea. The groups were not different with respect to sex, age, diabetes duration, blood pressure......AIMS: To investigate the prevalence of symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea in unselected patients with Type 2 diabetes referred to a tertiary diabetes clinic. METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, all newly referred patients were offered a stepwise screening for obstructive sleep apnoea with: (1......, diabetes duration 8.3 ± 6.3 years and BMI 31.7 ± 6.7 kg/m(2) ). According to the questionnaire, 106 patients showed 'high risk' of obstructive sleep apnoea, and 72 of these were referred to polygraphy based on ApneaLink screening corresponding to a prevalence of symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea of 39...

  7. Sleep apnoea episodes recognition by a committee of ELM classifiers from ECG signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Nadi; de Chazal, Philip; van Schaik, Andre; Breen, Paul

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes a system for the recognition of sleep apnoea episodes from ECG signals using a committee of extreme learning machine (ELM) classifiers. RR-interval parameters (heart rate variability) have been used as the identifying features as they are directly affected by sleep apnoea. The MIT PhysioNet Apnea-ECG database was used. A committee of five ELM classifiers has been employed to classify one-minute epochs of ECG into normal or apnoeic epochs. Our results show that the classification performance from the committee of networks was superior to the results of a single ELM classifier for fan-outs from 1 to 100. Classification performance reached a plateau at a fan-out of 10. The maximum accuracy was 82.5% with a sensitivity of 81.9% and a specificity of 82.8%. The results were comparable to other published research with the same input data. PMID:26738070

  8. Executive functions and cognitive subprocesses in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

    OpenAIRE

    Lis, Stefanie; Krieger, Stephan; Hennig, Dorothee; Röder, Christian; Kirsch, Peter; Seeger, Werner; Gallhofer, Bernd; Schulz, Richard

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years, special interest has been focused on impairments of executive functions in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, the majority of studies have not clearly separated deficits in executive functions from impairments in other cognitive processes involved in task solving. In the present study, working memory (WM) functions of 20 patients with OSAS were compared with those of 10 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy subjects. Cognitive func...

  9. Subjective assessment of facial aesthetics after maxillofacial orthognathic surgery for obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Shofiq; Aleem, Fahd; Ormiston, Ian W

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the subjective perception of facial appearance by patients after maxillofacial surgery for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), and explored the possible correlation between satisfaction and surgical outcome. A total of 26 patients, 24 men and 2 women (mean (SD) age 45 (7) years), subjectively assessed their facial appearance before and after operation using a visual analogue scale (VAS). To investigate a possible association between postoperative facial appearance and surgical outcome, we analysed postoperative scores for the apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) and Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). Postoperatively, 14 (54%) indicated that their facial appearance had improved, 4 (15%) recorded a neutral score, and 8 (31%) a lower score. The rating of facial appearance did not correlate with changes in the AHI or ESS following surgery. This study supports the view that most patients are satisfied with their appearance after maxillofacial orthognathic surgery for OSA. The subjective perception of facial aesthetics was independent of the surgical outcome.

  10. The Management of Iatrogenic Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome Following Bimaxillary Surgery in a Patient with Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbino, Giovanni; Gervasio, Fernando Carmine; Blythe, John; Bianchi, Francesca Antonella

    2016-07-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with a 6-year history of severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome followed a bimaxillary osteotomy procedure for a class III skeletal pattern. The patient was born with a unilateral cleft lip and palate and underwent primary lip and palate repair and later a pharyngeal flap for severe velopharyngeal insufficiency. Surgical management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome with conventional osteotomy, in cleft lip and palate patients, is a difficult problem. Distraction osteogenesis may provide a safer alternative. The authors describe and discuss the indications and the technical challenge of a multistage treatment protocol with distraction osteogenesis. PMID:27391499

  11. Sleep apnoea, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation—quo vadis?

    OpenAIRE

    Chahal, C. Anwar A.; Somers, Virend K.

    2015-01-01

    Strong associations exist between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and both heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF). Burgeoning epidemics of obesity, SDB, HF, and AF make these conditions priorities for health-care policymakers. Two observational studies now suggest outcome benefits from screening and treating for SDB in AF and HF.

  12. Genetic aspects of hypertension and metabolic disease in the obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riha, R.L.; Diefenbach, K.; Jennum, P.;

    2008-01-01

    Though it has long been recognised that there is a hereditary component to the obstructive steep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS), identifying its genetic basis remains elusive. Hypertension and metabolic syndrome, Like OSAHS, are polygenic disorders, physiologically complex and the product...... phenotyping, which has hampered genetic dissection of these diseases; in addition, sleep-disordered breathing has not been factored into most studies dealing with essential hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Genome-wide scans have yielded inconsistent results in all three disorders under discussion...... for the expression of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome in the context of OSAHS. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  13. Morbidly obese patient with obstructive sleep apnoea for major spine surgery: An anaesthetic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Redhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morbidly obese patients with clinical features of obstructive sleep apnoea can present a myriad of challenges to the anaesthesiologists which must be addressed to minimise the perioperative risks. Initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy early in the pre- and post-operative period along with appropriate anaesthetic planning is of paramount importance in such patients. This case report emphasises the usefulness of CPAP therapy, even for a short duration, to minimise morbidity, improve recovery and hasten early discharge from the hospital after major surgery.

  14. The role of nasal CPAP in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome due to mandibular hypoplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Miller, Stanley D W

    2012-02-01

    Melnick Needles syndrome (MNS), Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) and Pierre Robin syndrome (PRS) are congenital abnormalities with characteristic facial appearances that include micrognathia. A 20-year-old girl with MNS, a 16-year-old boy with TCS and a 12-year-old girl with PRS attended the sleep apnoea clinic at our institution at different times. Diagnostic sleep studies were initially performed on all three patients to confirm the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). They subsequently commenced nasal CPAP (nCPAP) treatment and their progress was followed. A limited sleep study on the patient with MNS demonstrated moderate\\/severe OSAS with an AHI of 33 events\\/h. Commencement of nCPAP resulted in symptomatic improvement. Overnight oximetry in the patient with TCS showed repeated desaturation to SpO2<90%. Subsequent treatment by nCPAP almost completely abolished the desaturation events. Overnight polysomnography in the patient with PRS demonstrated severe OSAS with an AHI of 49 events\\/h. After 3 years of nCPAP therapy, this patient requested discontinuation of treatment. Subsequent polysomnography without nCPAP revealed an AHI of <5 events\\/h. The use of nCPAP in the patients with MNS and TCS resulted in effective control of their sleep abnormalities. Mandibular growth and enlargement of the posterior airway space led to resolution of OSAS in the patient with PRS. There is a definite role for nCPAP therapy in patients with congenital micrognathia and OSAS. The use of nCPAP may obviate the need for more invasive corrective surgery for OSAS and is not necessarily a life-long requirement.

  15. Recommendations for the management of patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parati, Gianfranco; Lombardi, Carolina; Hedner, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    This article is aimed at addressing the current state-of-the-art in epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic procedures and treatment options for appropriate management of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in cardiovascular (in particular hypertensive) patients, as well as for the management...... Respiratory Society and the European Society of Hypertension. In particular, these recommendations are aimed at reminding cardiovascular experts to consider the occurrence of sleep-related breathing disorders in patients with high blood pressure. They are also aimed at reminding respiration experts...... of cardiovascular diseases (in particular arterial hypertension) in OSA patients. The present document is the result of work performed by a panel of experts participating in the European Union COST (Cooperation in Scientific and Technological research) Action B26 on OSA, with the endorsement of the European...

  16. Simulated driving in obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea : effects of oral appliances and continuous positive airway pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, Aarnoud; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Bakker, Marije; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; de Bont, Lambert G. M.; Wijkstra, Peter J.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired simulated driving performance has been demonstrated in obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) patients. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) generally improves simulated driving performance, the effects of oral-appliance (OA) therapy are unknown. The aims of this

  17. Management of the obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: More knowledge required for an optimal choice of treatment modality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A

    2006-01-01

    In the management of the obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), clinicians may consider various conservative, non-invasive and surgical treatment modalities. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is regarded as the treatment of choice for, especially, moderate to severe OSAS. However, due to

  18. Craniofacial morphology, head posture, and nasal respiratory resistance in obstructive sleep apnoea : An inter-ethnic comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, M.L.; Sandham, John; Ang, PK; Wong, DC; Tan, WC; Huggare, J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure craniofacial morphology and nasal respiratory resistance (NRR) in Malay, Indian and Chinese subjects with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The sample consisted of 34 male subjects, 27-52 years of age (Malay n = 11, which included five mild and six moderate-severe

  19. Comparison of Standard and Novel Signal Analysis Approaches to Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife eRoebuck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is a disorder characterised by repeated pauses in breathing during sleep, which leads to deoxygenation and voiced chokes at the end of each episode. OSA is associated by daytime sleepiness and an increased risk of serious conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and stroke. Between 2-7% of the adult population globally has OSA, but it is estimated that up to 90% of those are undiagnosed and untreated. Diagnosis of OSA requires expensive and cumbersome screening. Audio offers a potential non-contact alternative, particularly with the ubiquity of excellent signal processing on every phone.Previous studies have focused on the classification of snoring and apnoeic chokes. However, such approaches require accurate identification of events. This leads to limited accuracy and small study populations. In this work we propose an alternative approach which uses multiscale entropy (MSE coefficients presented to a classifier to identify disorder in vocal patterns indicative of sleep apnoea. A database of 858 patients was used, the largest reported in this domain. Apnoeic choke, snore, and noise events encoded with speech analysis features were input into a linear classifier. Coefficients of MSE derived from the first 4 hours of each recording were used to train and test a random forest to classify patients as apnoeic or not.Standard speech analysis approaches for event classification achieved an out of sample accuracy (Ac of 76.9% with a sensitivity (Se of 29.2% and a specificity (Sp of 88.7% but high variance. For OSA severity classification, MSE provided an out of sample Ac of 79.9%, Se of 66.0% and Sp = 88.8%. Including demographic information improved the MSE-based classification performance to Ac = 80.5%, Se = 69.2%, Sp = 87.9%. These results indicate that audio recordings could be used in screening for OSA, but are generally under-sensitive.

  20. Cephalometric analysis and long-term outcomes of orthognathic surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaldo, E D; Greenlee, G M; Moore, J; Sommers, E; Bollen, A-M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe skeletal and posterior airway changes after orthodontic treatment and surgical jaw advancement, and to evaluate whether there is a correlation between increasing advancement and a long-term reduction in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Lateral cephalograms and polysomnography (apnoea-hypopnoea index, AHI) were collected from patients treated with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) or maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) in combination with orthodontics. Patients completed a questionnaire and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) to assess long-term outcomes. Descriptive statistics for cephalometric measurements and linear regression were performed to find estimates of the final OSA (AHI and ESS) as a function of mandibular advancement. Forty-three patients with surgical advancement of the maxilla (5.2mm) and mandible (8.3mm) had a 4-mm increase in posterior airway. Thirty-three patients completed the long-term survey (6.3±2.6 years after treatment); 91% reported a reduction of OSA and were pleased with their facial appearance. The maxillomandibular and posterior airway increased. There was no evidence of a linear relationship between greater amounts of mandibular advancement and improvement of OSA. Patients with less than 10mm advancement had successful objective short-term and subjective long-term OSA reduction. PMID:25703596

  1. Combined surgical treatment for severe sleep apnoea, to improve BiPAP compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başal, Yeşim; Akyıldız, Utku Oğan; Eryilmaz, Aylin

    2015-01-01

    Positive airway pressure (PAP) devices are used in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). In cases of PAP failure, many different surgical methods can be used for the treatment. The authors present an unusual case of a patient with Bi-level PAP (BiPAP)-intolerant severe OSAS who was treated with combined surgical methods. A 55-year-old man was treated with BiPAP due to OSAS; he was admitted to the clinic with nose stuffiness, respiratory distress and BiPAP adherence with tolerance and compliance problems. Septal deviation, concha hypertrophy, lateral pharyngeal band hypertrophy and Thornwaldt cyst were determined in the examination. Combined surgical methods were administered. The patient's apnoea hypopnoea index (AHI) was 72.8 in diagnostic polysomnography. Preoperative AHI was 7.3 and postoperative AHI was 2.3 while using BiPAP and, after the surgery, the BiPAP intolerance was eliminated. The authors suggest that a combination of different surgical methods would be an adjuvant treatment to increase BiPAP compliance. PMID:26546622

  2. Cholesterol Metabolism and Weight Reduction in Subjects with Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnoea: A Randomised, Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarit Hallikainen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether parameters of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA associate with cholesterol metabolism before and after weight reduction, 42 middle-aged overweight subjects with mild OSA were randomised to intensive lifestyle intervention (N=23 or to control group (N=18 with routine lifestyle counselling only. Cholesterol metabolism was evaluated with serum noncholesterol sterol ratios to cholesterol, surrogate markers of cholesterol absorption (cholestanol and plant sterols and synthesis (cholestenol, desmosterol, and lathosterol at baseline and after 1-year intervention. At baseline, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2 was associated with serum campesterol (P<0.05 and inversely with desmosterol ratios (P<0.001 independently of gender, BMI, and homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI was not associated with cholesterol metabolism. Weight reduction significantly increased SaO2and serum cholestanol and decreased AHI and serum cholestenol ratios. In the groups combined, the changes in AHI were inversely associated with changes of cholestanol and positively with cholestenol ratios independent of gender and the changes of BMI and HOMA-IR (P<0.05. In conclusion, mild OSA seemed to be associated with cholesterol metabolism independent of BMI and HOMA-IR. Weight reduction increased the markers of cholesterol absorption and decreased those of cholesterol synthesis in the overweight subjects with mild OSA.

  3. The neuropharmacology of upper airway motor control in the awake and asleep states: implications for obstructive sleep apnoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horner Richard L

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obstructive sleep apnoea is a common and serious breathing problem that is caused by effects of sleep on pharyngeal muscle tone in individuals with narrow upper airways. There has been increasing focus on delineating the brain mechanisms that modulate pharyngeal muscle activity in the awake and asleep states in order to understand the pathogenesis of obstructive apnoeas and to develop novel neurochemical treatments. Although initial clinical studies have met with only limited success, it is proposed that more rational and realistic approaches may be devised for neurochemical modulation of pharyngeal muscle tone as the relevant neurotransmitters and receptors that are involved in sleep-dependent modulation are identified following basic experiments.

  4. Flextube reflectometry for level diagnosis in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and snoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, C E; Hilberg, O; Grymer, L

    2002-01-01

    per hour recording and the RDI (respiratory disturbance index = apnoeas and hypopneas per hour recording) by ResMed AutoSet (AS), which is a device based on nasal pressure variations. We performed sleep studies on 54 patients referred for snoring or OSA; 1) at home with AS; 2) in hospital using...... flextube reflectometry and AS simultaneously. The predominant obstructive level of the upper airway was retropalatal in 15 of the patients and retrolingual in 25 of the patients determined by flextube reflectometry. In 14 there was no predominant level of narrowing. We found a statistically significant...... correlation between the number of flextube narrowings per hour recording and the RDIs by the AS (Spearman's correlation coefficient r = 0.62, p

  5. Sexual function in male patients with obstructive sleep apnoea after 1 year of CPAP treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marian Christin; Kristensen, Ellids; Berg, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate what impact 1 year of effective nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment had on general and functional aspects of sexuality in male patients with a confirmed diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). METHODS: Before and after 1...... year of CPAP treatment, a total of 207 CPAP-compliant male patients (age 26-77) received a survey with questions drawn from two self-administered questionnaires on sexuality - Life Satisfaction 11 (LiSat-11) and brief sexual function inventory (BSFI). For assessment of daytime sleepiness, we used...... of CPAP treatment. ESS score decreased significantly after 1 year of CPAP treatment. CONCLUSION: One year of CPAP treatment improves all aspects of sexual function in male patients with OSA. Our data indirectly suggest that organic factors are the most likely explanation to these improvements....

  6. Cardiovascular disease in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: the role of intermittent hypoxia and inflammation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Garvey, J F

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that intermittent hypoxia plays a role in the development of cardiovascular risk in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) through the activation of inflammatory pathways. The development of translational models of intermittent hypoxia has allowed investigation of its role in the activation of inflammatory mechanisms and promotion of cardiovascular disease in OSAS. There are noticeable differences in the response to intermittent hypoxia between body tissues but the hypoxia-sensitive transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB appear to play a key role in mediating the inflammatory and cardiovascular consequences of OSAS. Expanding our understanding of these pathways, the cross-talk between them and the activation of inflammatory mechanisms by intermittent hypoxia in OSAS will provide new avenues of therapeutic opportunity for the disease.

  7. Acute respiratory failure, due to severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, managed with nasal positive pressure ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturani, C; Galavotti, V; Scarduelli, C; Sella, D; Rosa, A; Cauzzi, R; Buzzi, G

    1994-12-01

    The complications of endotracheal intubation are particularly frequent in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). We prospectively tested nasal ventilation in such patients admitted for acute respiratory failure. Six consecutive patients, aged 17-70 yrs, were selected for the study. All patients were confused or severely obtunded, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 10 (SD 2). With nasal bi-level positive airways pressure (BiPAP) all these patients improved clinical status and arterial blood gas values, avoiding intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation. The median pH increased from 7.26 (SD 0.06) to 7.36 (0.01) and to 7.43 (0.02) after, 1-3 and 24 h of nasal ventilation, respectively. Nasal ventilation lasted an average of 21 (3) h on the first day. All patients were discharged home after a median hospital stay of 28 (11) days. PMID:7711717

  8. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Modulates Airway Inflammation and Remodelling in Severe Asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Taillé

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is frequently observed in severe asthma but the causal link between the 2 diseases remains hypothetical. The role of OSA-related systemic and airway neutrophilic inflammation in asthma bronchial inflammation or remodelling has been rarely investigated. The aim of this study was to compare hallmarks of inflammation in induced sputum and features of airway remodelling in bronchial biopsies from adult patients with severe asthma with and without OSA.An overnight polygraphy was performed in 55 patients referred for difficult-to-treat asthma, who complained of nocturnal respiratory symptoms, poor sleep quality or fatigue. We compared sputum analysis, reticular basement membrane (RBM thickness, smooth muscle area, vascular density and inflammatory cell infiltration in bronchial biopsies.In total, 27/55 patients (49% had OSA diagnosed by overnight polygraphy. Despite a moderate increase in apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI; 14.2 ± 1.6 event/h [5-35], the proportion of sputum neutrophils was higher and that of macrophages lower in OSA than non-OSA patients, with higher levels of interleukin 8 and matrix metalloproteinase 9. The RBM was significantly thinner in OSA than non-OSA patients (5.8 ± 0.4 vs. 7.8 ± 0.4 μm, p<0.05. RBM thickness and OSA severity assessed by the AHI were negatively correlated (rho = -0.65, p<0.05. OSA and non-OSA patients did not differ in age, sex, BMI, lung function, asthma control findings or treatment.Mild OSA in patients with severe asthma is associated with increased proportion of neutrophils in sputum and changes in airway remodelling.

  9. Indices from flow-volume curves in relation to cephalometric, ENT- and sleep-O2 saturation variables in snorers with and without obstructive sleep-apnoea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Bogaard (Jan); F.G.A. van der Meché; R.M.L. Poublon (René); A.Z. Ginai (Abida); P.I.M. Schmitz (Paul); A. Bubberman; A.M. Slappendel; H. Boot (Hendrik)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn a group of 37 heavy snorers with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA, Group 1) and a group of 23 heavy snorers without OSA (Group 2) cephalometric indices, ENT indices related to upper airway collapsibility, and nocturnal O2 desaturation indices were related to

  10. Auto-servoventilation in heart failure with sleep apnoea: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzt, Michael; Schroll, Stephan; Series, Frederic; Lewis, Keir; Benjamin, Amit; Escourrou, Pierre; Luigart, Ruth; Kehl, Victoria; Pfeifer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    We tested the hypotheses that in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) auto-servoventilation (ASV) improves cardiac function and quality of life. Between March 2007 and September 2009, patients with stable CHF (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 40%) and SDB (apnoea/hypopnoea index ≥ 20 events · h(-1)) were randomised to receive either ASV (BiPAP ASV (Philips Respironics, Murrysville, PA, USA), n=37) and optimal medical management, or optimal medical management alone (n=35). Outcomes were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks. The apnoea/hypopnoea index assessed with polysomnography scored in one core laboratory was significantly more reduced in the ASV group (-39 ± 16 versus -1 ± 13 events · h(-1); p<0.001) with an average use of 4.5 ± 3.0 h · day(-1). Both groups showed similar improvements of the primary end-point LVEF (+3.4 ± 5 versus +3.5 ± 6%; p=0.915) assessed with echocardiography. In the ASV group, reduction of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) was significantly greater (-360 ± 569 versus +135 ± 625 ng · mL(-1); p=0.010). No differences were observed between the groups in subjective quality of life. In patients with CHF and SDB, ASV reduced NT-proBNP levels, but improvement of LVEF or quality of life was not greater than in the control group. The data support that such patients can be randomised in large-scale, long-term trials of positive airway pressure therapy versus control to determine effects on cardiovascular outcome. PMID:23222879

  11. Ambulatory monitoring in the diagnosis and management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Corral-Peñafiel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is a highly prevalent disorder associated with complications such as arterial hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and traffic accidents. The resources allocated for OSA are insufficient and OSA is a significant public health problem. Portable recording devices have been developed for the detection of OSA syndrome and have proved capable of providing an equivalent diagnosis to in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG, at least in patients with a high pre-test probability of OSA syndrome. PSG becomes important in patients who have symptoms and certain comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or stroke, as well as in patients with a clinical history suggesting a different sleep disorder. Continuous positive airway pressure is the most effective treatment in OSA. Ambulatory monitoring of the therapeutic modalities has been evaluated to enhance the care process and reduce costs compared to the conventional approach, without sacrificing efficiency. This review evaluates the role of portable monitoring devices in the diagnostic process of OSA and the search for alternative strategies based on ambulatory management protocols.

  12. Obstructive sleep apnoea in Treacher Collins syndrome: prevalence, severity and cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomp, R G; Bredero-Boelhouwer, H H; Joosten, K F M; Wolvius, E B; Hoeve, H L J; Poublon, R M L; Mathijssen, I M J

    2012-06-01

    This cohort study in 35 patients (13 children) evaluates the prevalence, severity and anatomical cause of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. Ambulatory polysomnography was performed cross-sectionally to determine OSAS prevalence and severity. All upper airway related surgical interventions were evaluated retrospectively. In 11 patients, sleep endoscopy, and flexible and rigid endoscopy were applied to determine the level of anatomical obstruction of the upper airway. The overall prevalence of OSAS in Treacher Collins patients was 46% (54% in children; 41% in adults). Thirty-eight upper airway related surgical interventions were performed in 17 patients. Examination of the upper airway revealed various anatomical levels of obstruction, from the nasal septum to the trachea. Most significant obstruction was found at the level of the oro/hypopharynx. OSAS in Treacher Collins patients is an important problem so all patients should be screened for OSAS by polysomnography. Endoscopy of the upper airways was helpful in determining the level of obstruction. Surgical treatment at one level will not resolve OSAS in most patients because OSAS in Treacher Collins has a multilevel origin. Non-invasive ventilation (continuous positive airway pressure or bilevel positive airway pressure) or tracheotomy should be considered as a treatment modality.

  13. Unusual presentation of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome due to a giant mandible osteoma: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarsitano, A; Marchetti, C

    2013-02-01

    Osteomas are benign lesions composed of mature compact and/or cancellous bone that grow continuously. Their pathogenesis is unknown. It has been considered to be a neoplasm, a developmental or reactive osteogenic lesion resulting from muscle traction on the periosteum, or due to trauma. Herein, we report an unusual case of giant osteoma of the mandible depressing the lateral pharyngeal wall, interfering with normal respiration during the night. The uniqueness of this case is related to snoring and sleep apnoea symptoms. In fact, he presented to our Department because daytime sleepiness hindered his work, and not for the evident facial swelling. We reported our experience in diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of this uncommon disease. Polysomnography, CT scan and 3-D PAS volume analysis are useful tools to study in detail the aetiology of apnoea and assess outcomes.

  14. Epidemiology of sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome and sleep-disordered breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, P; Riha, R L

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed a high prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing in the community (up to 20%). A subset of these patients has concurrent symptoms of excessive daytime sleepiness attributable to their nocturnal breathing disorder and is classified as having obstructive sleep a...

  15. Computed tomographic cephalometric analysis of chinese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variations of craniofacial and upper airway structures are recognized to contribute to the phenomenon of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Most previous cephalometric studies were performed using erect lateral radiographs in Caucasian patients. The present project aims to determine cephalometric measurements, utilizing CT, in normal Chinese subjects and in Chinese patients with OSA. Computed tomography of 25 patients with OSA (proven using overnight polysomnography), and of 25 age-, sex-, height-, bodyweight- and body mass index (BMI)-matched control subjects were prospectively performed. Thirteen standard bony and soft-tissue measurements were obtained from the CT lateral scout view of the head and neck, taken with each subject in the neutral supine position. The cross-sectional area was calculated at two axial levels (velopharynx and hypopharynx). The measurements in the two groups, OSA and control subjects, were compared. The measurements for hyoid position (P=0.00), nasal cavity length (P=0.01), mandibular prognathism (P = 0.05), tongue size (P = 0.02), oropharyngeal airway space (P = 0.02), posterior tongue airway space (P = 0.04) and cross-sectional areas at the level of the velopharynx (P = 0.00) and hypopharynx (P = 0.01) differed significantly between the two groups. In conclusion, CT cephalometric measurements show that certain anatomical variations in the head and neck are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of OSA in Chinese patients. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. A manic episode after CPAP in a patient with obstructive sleep apnoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Lobo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive slee apnoea (OSA is a common sleep disorder. It has been recognized a link between OSA and depression , which is most of the times resistant to treatment. Other aspects of OSA are metabolic: insulin resistance, hypertension and obesity. A common treatment for OSA is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP. This treatment may reverse the cognitive and affective dysfunction but in some cases with residual impairment. The author reports a case of a 48 years old man with family history of bipolar disorder but no past history of psychiatric disorders. A diagnosis of OSA led to the use of CPAP. Ten days later he started hypomanic symptoms and 15 days later he was strongly manic. He was hospitalized and treated with olanzapine, lorazepam and divalproate. CPAP treatment was interrupted. After recovery the patient became depressed and, since then, although he doesn't meet the criteria for major depression, depressive symptoms persisted even with olanzapine and lamotrigibne. Meanwhile he was diagnosed with diabettes mellitus 2 and olanzapine was discontinued and he was put on ziprasidone. The author discusses the contribution of the OSA and treatment with CPAC to the appearance and maintenance of the affective disorder in a patient with family susceptibility. The discussion also includes the metabolic aspects of OSA that can be worsened with the medication to control the affective disorder.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in a patient with retrosternal goiter: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with a large number of predisposing factors (obesity, nasal obstruction, adenoid hypertrophy, macroglossia etc.). In addition to these factors goiter and hypothyroidism have been reported to be associated with OSAS. Objectives and tasks: In our case with retrosternal goiter, values of OSAS before and after thyroidectomy were shown. Materials and methods: Seventy-two years old, BMI: 26,8 kg/m2, female patient was admitted our hospital because of complaints to stop breathing during sleep, snoring, morning headache and daytime drowsiness. Results: Thorax CT and ultrasonography of thyroid shown retrosternal goiter and left tracheal deviation. Severe OSAS was diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG). Thyroid function tests were normal. Apneahypopnea index (AHI) was 63,1/h. Patients was performed 7 cm H2O nasal continuous positive airway pressure (gvrnCPAP). AHI was 11,4/h under nCPAP. One month after OSAS diagnosis the patient underwent thyroidectomy operation. Pathological examination was reported as multinodular GOITER. In postoperative period CPAP treatment couldn't continue, because patient was not compliant. In postoperative 8-th weeks, PSG was performed; AHI was 34,8/h. The patient's weight and BMI didn't change. Conclusion: In our case, despite absence of continued CPAP treatment after thyroidectomy, symptoms and PSG values improved partially. As a result of these findings, especially, compression of upper airway and deterioration of venous circulation of patients with large goiter may lead to an increase in OSAS symptoms. During patients with OSAS are treated with CPAP, goiter needs to be investigated

  18. Effects of maternal obstructive sleep apnoea on fetal growth: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M Fung

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to determine whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is associated with reduced fetal growth, and whether nocturnal oxygen desaturation precipitates acute fetal heart rate changes. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a prospective observational study, screening 371 women in the second trimester for OSA symptoms. 41 subsequently underwent overnight sleep studies to diagnose OSA. Third trimester fetal growth was assessed using ultrasound. Fetal heart rate monitoring accompanied the sleep study. Cord blood was taken at delivery, to measure key regulators of fetal growth. RESULTS: Of 371 women screened, 108 (29% were high risk for OSA. 26 high risk and 15 low risk women completed the longitudinal study; 14 had confirmed OSA (cases, and 27 were controls. The median (interquartile range respiratory disturbance index (number of apnoeas, hypopnoeas or respiratory related arousals/hour of sleep was 7.9 (6.1-13.8 for cases and 2.2 (1.3-3.5 for controls (p<0.001. Impaired fetal growth was observed in 43% (6/14 of cases, vs 11% (3/27 of controls (RR 2.67; 1.25-5.7; p = 0.04. Using logistic regression, only OSA (OR 6; 1.2-29.7, p = 0.03 and body mass index (OR 2.52; 1.09-5.80, p = 0.03 were significantly associated with impaired fetal growth. After adjusting for body mass index on multivariate analysis, the association between OSA and impaired fetal growth was not appreciably altered (OR 5.3; 0.93-30.34, p = 0.06, although just failed to achieve statistical significance. Prolonged fetal heart rate decelerations accompanied nocturnal oxygen desaturation in one fetus, subsequently found to be severely growth restricted. Fetal growth regulators showed changes in the expected direction- with IGF-1 lower, and IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 higher- in the cord blood of infants of cases vs controls, although were not significantly different. CONCLUSION: OSA may be associated with reduced fetal growth in late pregnancy. Further

  19. Investigation of sequential properties of snoring episodes for obstructive sleep apnoea identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, 'snore regularity' is studied in terms of the variations of snoring sound episode durations, separations and average powers in simple snorers and in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients. The goal was to explore the possibility of distinguishing among simple snorers and OSA patients using only sleep sound recordings of individuals and to ultimately eliminate the need for spending a whole night in the clinic for polysomnographic recording. Sequences that contain snoring episode durations (SED), snoring episode separations (SES) and average snoring episode powers (SEP) were constructed from snoring sound recordings of 30 individuals (18 simple snorers and 12 OSA patients) who were also under polysomnographic recording in Gülhane Military Medical Academy Sleep Studies Laboratory (GMMA-SSL), Ankara, Turkey. Snore regularity is quantified in terms of mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation values for the SED, SES and SEP sequences. In all three of these sequences, OSA patients' data displayed a higher variation than those of simple snorers. To exclude the effects of slow variations in the base-line of these sequences, new sequences that contain the coefficient of variation of the sample values in a 'short' signal frame, i.e., short time coefficient of variation (STCV) sequences, were defined. The mean, the standard deviation and the coefficient of variation values calculated from the STCV sequences displayed a stronger potential to distinguish among simple snorers and OSA patients than those obtained from the SED, SES and SEP sequences themselves. Spider charts were used to jointly visualize the three parameters, i.e., the mean, the standard deviation and the coefficient of variation values of the SED, SES and SEP sequences, and the corresponding STCV sequences as two-dimensional plots. Our observations showed that the statistical parameters obtained from the SED and SES sequences, and the corresponding STCV sequences, possessed a strong

  20. Associations between Macronutrient Intake and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea as Well as Self-Reported Sleep Symptoms: Results from a Cohort of Community Dwelling Australian Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingting Cao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: macronutrient intake has been found to affect sleep parameters including obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA in experimental studies, but there is uncertainty at the population level in adults. Methods: cross-sectional analysis was conducted of participants in the Men Androgen Inflammation Lifestyle Environment and Stress cohort (n = 784, age 35–80 years. Dietary intake was measured by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Self-reported poor sleep quality and daytime sleepiness were measured by questionnaires. Overnight in-home polysomnography (PSG was conducted among participants with without previously diagnosed OSA. Results: after adjusting for demographic, lifestyle factors, and chronic diseases, the highest quartile of fat intake was positively associated with excessive daytime sleepiness (relative risk ratio (RRR = 1.78, 95% CI 1.10, 2.89 and apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI ≥20, (RRR = 2.98, 95% CI 1.20–7.38. Body mass index mediated the association between fat intake and AHI (30%, but not daytime sleepiness. There were no associations between other intake of macronutrient and sleep outcomes. Conclusion: high fat is associated with daytime sleepiness and AHI. Sleep outcomes are generally not assessed in studies investigating the effects of varying macronutrient diets on weight loss. The current result highlights the potential public health significance of doing so.

  1. Systemic inflammation: a key factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, S

    2012-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a highly prevalent disease and is recognised as a major public health burden. Large-scale epidemiological studies have demonstrated an independent relationship between OSAS and various cardiovascular disorders. The pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in OSAS is not completely understood but a multifactorial aetiology is likely. Inflammatory processes have emerged as critical in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis at all stages of atheroma formation. Increased levels of various circulating markers of inflammation including tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 6 (IL6), IL-8 and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been reported as associated with future cardiovascular risk. There is increasing evidence of elevated inflammatory markers in OSAS with a significant fall after effective treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. This evidence is particularly strong for TNFalpha, whereas studies on IL6 and CRP have yielded conflicting results possibly due to the confounding effects of obesity. Cell culture and animal studies have significantly contributed to our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the association between OSAS and inflammation. Intermittent hypoxia, the hallmark of OSAS, results in activation of pro-inflammatory transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and activator protein (AP)-1. These promote activation of various inflammatory cells, particularly lymphocytes and monocytes, with the downstream consequence of expression of pro-inflammatory mediators that may lead to endothelial dysfunction. This review provides a critical analysis of the current evidence for an association between OSAS, inflammation and cardiovascular disease, discusses basic mechanisms that may be responsible for this association and proposes future research possibilities.

  2. Non-invasive ventilation in obesity hypoventilation syndrome without severe obstructive sleep apnoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masa, Juan F; Corral, Jaime; Caballero, Candela; Barrot, Emilia; Terán-Santos, Joaquin; Alonso-Álvarez, Maria L; Gomez-Garcia, Teresa; González, Mónica; López-Martín, Soledad; De Lucas, Pilar; Marin, José M; Marti, Sergi; Díaz-Cambriles, Trinidad; Chiner, Eusebi; Egea, Carlos; Miranda, Erika; Mokhlesi, Babak; García-Ledesma, Estefanía; Sánchez-Quiroga, M-Ángeles; Ordax, Estrella; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Troncoso, Maria F; Martinez-Martinez, Maria-Ángeles; Cantalejo, Olga; Ojeda, Elena; Carrizo, Santiago J; Gallego, Begoña; Pallero, Mercedes; Ramón, M Antonia; Díaz-de-Atauri, Josefa; Muñoz-Méndez, Jesús; Senent, Cristina; Sancho-Chust, Jose N; Ribas-Solís, Francisco J; Romero, Auxiliadora; Benítez, José M; Sanchez-Gómez, Jesús; Golpe, Rafael; Santiago-Recuerda, Ana; Gomez, Silvia; Bengoa, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is an effective form of treatment in patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) who have concomitant severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). However, there is a paucity of evidence on the efficacy of NIV in patients with OHS without severe OSA. We performed a multicentre randomised clinical trial to determine the comparative efficacy of NIV versus lifestyle modification (control group) using daytime arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) as the main outcome measure. Methods Between May 2009 and December 2014 we sequentially screened patients with OHS without severe OSA. Participants were randomised to NIV versus lifestyle modification and were followed for 2 months. Arterial blood gas parameters, clinical symptoms, health-related quality of life assessments, polysomnography, spirometry, 6-min walk distance test, blood pressure measurements and healthcare resource utilisation were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using intention-to-treat analysis. Results A total of 365 patients were screened of whom 58 were excluded. Severe OSA was present in 221 and the remaining 86 patients without severe OSA were randomised. NIV led to a significantly larger improvement in PaCO2 of −6 (95% CI −7.7 to −4.2) mm Hg versus −2.8 (95% CI −4.3 to −1.3) mm Hg, (p<0.001) and serum bicarbonate of −3.4 (95% CI −4.5 to −2.3) versus −1 (95% CI −1.7 to −0.2 95% CI)  mmol/L (p<0.001). PaCO2 change adjusted for NIV compliance did not further improve the inter-group statistical significance. Sleepiness, some health-related quality of life assessments and polysomnographic parameters improved significantly more with NIV than with lifestyle modification. Additionally, there was a tendency towards lower healthcare resource utilisation in the NIV group. Conclusions NIV is more effective than lifestyle modification in improving daytime PaCO2, sleepiness and polysomnographic parameters. Long

  3. Craniofacial differences according to AHI scores of children with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: cephalometric study in 39 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezdemir, Hueseyin; Mahmutyaziciglu, Kamran; Davsancimath, Halit; Guendogdu, Sadi [Department of Radiology, Medical School, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Kozlu, 67600, Zonguldak (Turkey); Altin, Remzi; Kart, Levent [Department of Pulmonology, Medical School, Zonguldak Karaelmas University (Turkey); Soeguet, Ayhan; Tomac, Nazan [Department of Paediatrics, Medical School, Zonguldak Karaelmas University (Turkey); Cinar, Fikret; Uzun, Lokman [Department of Otolaryngology, Medical School, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, (Turkey)

    2004-05-01

    Cephalometry is useful as a screening test for anatomical abnormalities in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). To evaluate comprehensively the cephalo metric features of children with OSAS, with or without adenotonsillar hypertrophy, and to elucidate the relationship between cephalometric variables and apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) severity. The study population consisted of 39 children, aged 4-12 years, with OSAS. Cephalometry was analysed using 11 measurements of the bony structures, their relationships and the size of the airways. Additionally, adenoid and tonsillar hypertrophy were graded. Cranial base angles (BaSN and BaSPNS) were found to correlate with increasing levels of AHI scores (P<0.001). Protrusion of the maxilla (SNA) and mandible (SNB) did not correlate with AHI scores (P>0.05). The length of the mandibular plane (GnGo) and the minimal posterior airway space (MPAS) were inversely correlated with AHI scores (P<0.001). There was positive correlation between MPAS and GnGo (r=0.740, P<0.001), and negative correlation between MPAS and gonial angle (ArGoGn) (r=-0.541, P<0.001). There was significant correlation between cephalometric data and adenotonsillar hypertrophy concerning BaSN, BaSPNS, ArGoGn, GnGoH, BaN-GnGo, MPAS, GnGO and MPH. (orig.)

  4. Influence of craniofacial and upper spine morphology on mandibular advancement device treatment outcome in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanholt, Palle; Petri, Niels; Wildschiødtz, Gordon;

    2015-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to assess cephalometric predictive markers in terms of craniofacial morphology including posterior cranial fossa and upper spine morphology for mandibular advancement device (MAD) treatment outcome in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea...... patients and the no success treatment group of 19 patients. Before MAD treatment lateral cephalograms were taken and analyses of the craniofacial morphology including the posterior cranial fossa and upper spine morphology were performed. Differences between the groups were analysed by Fisher's exact test......, t-test, and multiple regression analysis. RESULTS: Upper spine morphological deviations occurred non-significantly in 25 per cent in the success treatment group and in 42.1 per cent in the no success treatment group. Body mass index (BMI; P

  5. Pathophysiology of central sleep apneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Adam B; Patil, Susheel P

    2016-05-01

    The transition from wake to sleep is accompanied by a host of physiologic changes, which result in major alterations in respiratory control and may result in sleep-related breathing disorders. The central sleep apneas are a group of sleep-related breathing disorders that are characterized by recurrent episodes of airflow reduction or cessation due to a temporary reduction or absence of central respiratory drive. The fundamental hallmark of central sleep apnea (CSA) disorders is the presence of ventilatory control instability; however, additional mechanisms play a role in one or more specific manifestations of CSA. CSA may manifest during conditions of eucapnia/hypocapnia or chronic hypercapnia, which is a useful clinical classification that lends understanding to the underlying pathophysiology and potential therapies. In this review, an overview of normal breathing physiology is provided, followed by a discussion of pathophysiologic mechanisms that promote CSA and the mechanisms that are specific to different manifestations of CSA. PMID:26782104

  6. Flextube reflectometry and pressure-recordings for level diagnosis in obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, C E; Grymer, L; Hilberg, O;

    2002-01-01

    (SD) between the number of flextube narrowings per hour recording and the RDIs determined by the ApneaGraph was not statistically significantly different from 0. There was no statistically significant correlation between the percentage of retropalatal narrowing of the total narrowing (retropalatal...... and retrolingual narrowing) measured by flextube reflectometry and the percentage of retropalatal ("upper") obstructive apnoeas and hypopnoeas of the total number ("upper", "intermediate" and "lower") measured by ApneaGraph (Spearman's correlation coefficient r = 0.24, p = 0.36, N = 17). In conclusion diverging...... syndrome (OSAS) were included in the study. The mean (standard deviation = SD) number of flextube narrowings per hour recording was 50.2 (20.4) and the mean (SD) RDI (respiratory disturbance index = apnoeas and hypopnoeas per hour recording) determined by the ApneaGraph was 45.7 (20.2). The mean difference...

  7. Effect of reduced expiratory pressure on pharyngeal size during nasal positive airway pressure in patients with sleep apnoea: evaluation by continuous computed tomography.

    OpenAIRE

    Gugger, M.; Vock, P

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to determine whether reducing the expiratory pressure during nasal positive airway pressure for reasons of comfort causes a substantial decrease in the upper airway calibre. METHODS: Eight patients with obstructive sleep apnoea were studied. Continuous computed tomography (each run lasting 12 seconds) was used to measure minimum and maximum pharyngeal cross sectional areas at the velopharynx and the hypopharynx. Pharyngeal areas were measured while patients were a...

  8. An algorithm of dental/dentofacial-based options for managing patients with obstructive sleep apnoea referred to a dentist/dental specialist by a physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılınç, D D; Didinen, S

    2016-07-01

    There are so many documents in the literature discoursing the aetiology, nature, diagnosis and treatment planning of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Almost all of them mention that OSA has to be evaluated and treated through the multidisciplinary teamwork of physicians and dentists. Due to a lack in the literature, this article focuses on dentists' and dental specialists' role in the treatment algorithm of OSA. PMID:27388089

  9. Nasal pillows as an alternative interface in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome initiating continuous positive airway pressure therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Silke

    2012-02-01

    Side-effects directly due to the nasal mask are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) commencing continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Recently, nasal pillows have been designed to overcome these issues. Limited evidence exists of the benefits and effectiveness of these devices. Twenty-one patients (19 male, 49+\\/-10years) with the established diagnosis of OSAS [apnoea\\/hypopnoea index (AHI): 52+\\/-22] and who had a successful CPAP titration were commenced on CPAP therapy (10+\\/-2cmH2O), and randomized to 4weeks of a nasal pillow (P) and a standard nasal mask (M) in a crossover design. Outcome measures were objective compliance, AHI, quality of life, Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) and CPAP side-effects. There was no difference in compliance (M versus P: 5.1+\\/-1.9h versus 5.0+\\/-1.7h; P=0.701) and AHI (2.6+\\/-2.7 versus 3.0+\\/-2.9; P=0.509). Quality of life and ESS improved with CPAP, but there was no difference in the extent of improvement between both devices. Usage of nasal pillows resulted in less reported pressure on the face and more subjects found the nasal pillow the more comfortable device. However, there was no clear overall preference for either device at the end of the study (mask=57%, pillow=43%; P=0.513). The applied CPAP pressure did not correlate with compliance, AHI and ESS. Furthermore, no differences in outcome parameters were noted comparing groups with CPAP pressure <10 and >\\/=10cm H(2) O. Nasal pillows are equally effective in CPAP therapy, but do not generally lead to improved compliance.

  10. Effect of CPAP therapy on endothelial function in obstructive sleep apnoea: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Esther I; Puhan, Milo A; Schlatzer, Christian; Stradling, John R; Kohler, Malcolm

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a prevalent sleep-related breathing disorder associated with adverse cardiovascular outcome. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the proposed mechanistic links between OSA and the increased cardiovascular risk. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may reverse this detrimental pathophysiological consequence of OSA. Most studies on the effect of CPAP on endothelial function in OSA are limited by their low sample size. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effect CPAP therapy on endothelial function in patients with OSA. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis searching literature databases up to August 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effect of CPAP on endothelial function in OSA, assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and other validated techniques. The primary outcome for the meta-analysis (DerSimonian/Laird random-effects method) was the treatment effect on FMD. Eight RCTs comparing the effects of therapeutic CPAP versus subtherapeutic CPAP (or no intervention) on endothelial function involving 245 OSA patients were included in the systematic review. The studies are consistent in effect direction, showing an improvement of endothelial function by CPAP. Four RCTs involving 150 patients could be used for the meta-analysis. Compared to the control group, CPAP therapy (range 2-24 weeks) significantly increased absolute % FMD by 3.87% (95% confidence interval: 1.93-5.80, P CPAP therapy improves endothelial function significantly and to a clinically important extent.

  11. Effect of 3 weeks of continuous positive airway pressure treatment on mood in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea: a randomized placebo-controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Soo; Bardwell, Wayne; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Loredo, Jose S.; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) commonly have mood symptoms such as depression and anxiety. However, the results of randomized controlled trials on the therapeutic effect of CPAP on mood symptoms have been inconsistent. The present study examined whether 3 weeks of CPAP treatment had specific therapeutic effects on mood symptoms in patients with OSA compared with placebo. Methods A double-blind, parallel, randomized controlled trial using therapeutic and placebo CPAP was performed in 71 patients newly diagnosed with OSA [apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) ≥10]. Mood was assessed by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) Scale, the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) before and after 3 weeks of treatment. AHI was used to assess the severity of apnoea. The two groups were compared using a simple comparison of the changes within each arm and repeated measures analysis of variance. Results Fifty-six subjects completed the study: 26 in the CPAP group and 30 in the placebo group. The two groups were well matched at baseline, with no significant differences in demographic, mood and apnoea variables. Both groups had severe apnoea, and mild depression and anxiety at baseline. After 3 weeks of treatment, AHI decreased significantly in the CPAP group. The mean change in AHI was −30.7 [standard deviation (SD) 23.1] in the CPAP group and −5.8 (SD 18.3) in the placebo group (difference between groups P0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, 3 weeks of CPAP treatment did not show a specific therapeutic effect on mood symptoms in patients with OSA. PMID:22172966

  12. The role of drug-induced sleep endoscopy in the diagnosis and management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: our personal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Corso, E; Fiorita, A; Rizzotto, G; Mennuni, G F; Meucci, D; Giuliani, M; Marchese, M R; Levantesi, L; Della Marca, G; Paludetti, G; Scarano, E

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) is performed widely and its validity and reliability has been demonstrated by several studies; in fact, it provides clinical information not available by routine clinical inspection alone. Its safety and utility are promising, but still needs to be improved to reach the level of excellence expected of gold standard tests used in clinical practice. Our study compares the results of clinical and diagnostic evaluation with those of sleep endoscopy, evaluating the correlation between clinical indexes of routine clinical diagnosis and sites of obstruction in terms of number of sites involved, entity of obstruction and pattern of closure. This study consists in a longitudinal prospective evaluation of 138 patients who successfully underwent sleep endoscopy at our institution. Patients were induced to sleep with a low dose of midazolam followed by titration with propofol. Sedation level was monitored using bispectral index monitoring. Our results suggest that the multilevel complete collapse was statistically significantly associated with higher apnoea hypopnea index values. By including partial sites of obstruction greater than 50%, our results also suggest that multilevel collapse remains statistically and significantly associated with higher apnoea hypopnoea index values. Analyzing BMI distribution based on number of sites with complete and partial obstruction there was no significant difference. Finally, analyzing Epworth Sleepiness Score distribution based on number of sites with complete obstruction, there was a statistically significant difference between patients with 3-4 sites of obstruction compared to those with two sites or uni-level obstruction. In conclusion, our data suggest that DISE is safe, easy to perform, valid and reliable, as previously reported. Furthermore, we found a good correlation between DISE findings and clinical characteristics such as AHI and EPS. Consequently, adequate assessment by DISE of all

  13. Exenatide improves excessive daytime sleepiness and wakefulness in obese patients with type 2 diabetes without obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Iskandar; Abdulla, Haitham; Tilbrook, Sean; Dean, Roy; Ali, Nabeel

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the effects of exenatide on excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), driving performance and depression score in patients with type 2 diabetes with EDS. Eight obese patients with diabetes but without obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) participated in a placebo-controlled single-blind study during which multiple wakefulness and sleep latency test, Epworth score, driving performance, depression score, fasting glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels were assessed at baseline, end of placebo and treatment phase at baseline and after 22 weeks of treatment. Mean (±standard error of the mean) age, body mass index (kg m(2) ) and HbA1c [mmol mol(-1) (%)] of patients at baseline were 50 ± 4.9 years, 37.6 ± 1.1 and 65 ± 19 (8.06 ± 0.41), respectively. When compared to placebo, exenatide treatment was associated with a decrease in both subjective and objective sleepiness, based on the Epworth score reduction and the sleep latency increase assessed by multiple objective sleepiness and sustained attention (OSLER) tests, respectively. Mean sleep latency time (adjusted for change in HbA1c and weight) were 32.1 ± 1.7, 29.1 ± 1.7 and 37.7 ± 1.7, respectively (P = 0.002). Modelling for covariates suggested that improvement in mean sleep latency time is predicted by changes in weight (P = 0.003), but not by changes in HbA1c (P = 0.054). Epworth sleepiness score was reduced significantly (values for placebo versus exenatide: 11.3 ± 1.2 versus 5.7 ± 1.3; P = 0.003). No significant change was noted in the depression score and driving performance. Exenatide is associated with a significant reduction in objective sleepiness in obese patients with type 2 diabetes without OSA, independent of HbA1c levels. These findings could form a basis for further studies to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms of sleepiness in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:22716195

  14. Oxidative stress mediated arterial dysfunction in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Ben Maria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies suggest an increase of oxidative stress and a reduction of endothelial function in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS. We assessed the association between OSAS, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Further aim was to evaluate the effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP on oxidative stress and arterial dysfunction. Methods We studied 138 consecutive patients with heavy snoring and possible OSAS. Patients underwent unattended overnight home polysomnography. Ten patients with severe OSAS were revaluated after 6 months of nCPAP therapy. To assess oxidative stress in vivo, we measured urinary 8-iso-PGF2α and serum levels of soluble NOX2-derived peptide (sNOX2-dp. Serum levels of nitrite/nitrate (NOx were also determined. Flow-mediated brachial artery dilation (FMD was measured to asses endothelial function. Results Patients with severe OSAS had higher urinary 8-iso-PGF2α (p Conclusions The results of our study indicate that patients with OSAS and cardiometabolic comorbidities have increased oxidative stress and arterial dysfunction that are partially reversed by nCPAP treatment.

  15. Cervical vertebral column morphology in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea assessed using lateral cephalograms and cone beam CT. A comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, L; Jensen, K E; Petersson, A R;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Few studies have described morphological deviations in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients on two-dimensional (2D) lateral cephalograms, and the reliability of 2D radiographs has been discussed. The objective is to describe the morphology of the cervical vertebral column on cone...... beam CT (CBCT) in adult patients with OSA and to compare 2D lateral cephalograms with three-dimensional (3D) CBCT images. METHODS: For all 57 OSA patients, the cervical vertebral column morphology was evaluated on lateral cephalograms and CBCT images and compared according to fusion anomalies...

  16. Computed tomographic angiography study of the relationship between the lingual artery and lingual markers in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, T.-N., E-mail: dr-htn@hotmail.co [Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated SIR RUN RUN SHAW Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Zhou, L.-N.; Hu, H.-J. [Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated SIR RUN RUN SHAW Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Aim: To determine the relationship between the lingual artery and lingual markers for preoperative evaluation of the lingual artery in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). Methods: A 16-section computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the lingual artery was performed in 87 inpatient cases with OSAHS, from December 2007 to May 2009. The course of the lingual artery and the anatomic relationship between the lingual artery and the lingual markers were analyzed using CTA imaging. Results: The course of the lingual artery with the tongue in a resting position was similar to that of the Big Dipper constellation (Plough) in the sagittal view of CTA imaging. The first segment of the lingual artery declined approximately 19.27 {+-} 5.24 mm, the middle segment of the lingual artery was forward approximately 19.30 {+-} 6.79 mm, and the ascending segment of the lingual artery rose approximately 52.49 {+-} 10.98 mm. The entry point where the lingual artery entered into the tongue was adjacent to the tip of the greater horn of the hyoid bone. The relationship between the second segment of the lingual artery and the greater horn of the hyoid bone was relatively steady with the tongue in whatever position. The interval between the bilateral greater horn of the hyoid bone equalled that between the bilateral lingual arteries. Conclusions: Recognizing some lingual markers in the patients with OSAHS, such as the greater horn of the hyoid bone, foramen cecum, circumvallate papilla, lingual vein and tongue midline, may facilitate the surgeon's ability to define the course of the lingual artery accurately in the treatment of OSAHS.

  17. Correlation between associating factors of obstructive airway disease with obstructive sleep apnoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samta

    2016-08-01

    Methods: Pulmonary Function Test was done for assessing air flows and measuring absolute and predicted values of FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC and MMEF. PFT was interpreted as normal if FEV1/FVC >70 as per GOLD and >75 as per GINA, with normal FEV1 and normal FVC. Decreased FEV1, Decreased FVC, Decreased FEV1/ FVC, predicted (0.05. The Sleep Stages in the study group (OAD and No OAD group was also statistically insignificant except for Stage III. The PFT-FEV1was found to be statistically significant (p=0.043 when compared between OAD group and in the No OAD group. Conclusions: Due to the consequences of the overlap syndrome, it is recommended to actively search for existence of OSA, and to treat it with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP concurrently with oxygen and optimal pharmacological treatment. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(8.000: 3282-3287

  18. Use of an individual mandibular advancement device for an?obstructive sleep apnoea patient with facial paralysis: a short-term follow-up case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pişkin, B; Sipahi, C; Köse, M; Karakoç, Ö; Şevketbeyoğlu, H; Ataç, G K

    2012-06-01

    This case report aimed to describe the fabrication procedure and treatment efficacy of an individual, one-piece, non-adjustable mandibular advancement device (MAD) for a moderate obstructive sleep apnoea patient with facial paralysis (FP). Mandibular advancement device was fabricated with autopolymerising acrylic resin. The intermaxillary relations were recorded such as to fix the mandible at a protruded position with increased vertical dimension. Initial evaluation of the MAD was made with axial magnetic resonance imaging and polysomnography on the first day of usage. Following evaluations were made on the third and sixth month. After a follow-up period of 6 months, Apnoea/Hypopnea Index (AHI) significantly decreased from 26·7 to 3·0. However, the average oxygen saturation did not improve as expected initially. The MAD therapy decreased the AHI scores of a patient with FP. At the end of a follow-up period of 6 months, the patient did not report any serious complaint except temporary tooth pains.

  19. Central sleep apnea – a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dybala Andrzej; Dyczko Monika; Makaruk Boguslaw; Kicinski Pawel; Bartoszek Elzbieta; Myslinski Wojciech; Rahnama Mansur; Mosiewicz Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a disease characterized by repetitive episodes of the socalled central apneas during sleep. The disease has a very complex etiology. In clinical practice, the most important causes of CSA are disorders of the central nervous system, congestive heart failure or certain pathological changes of the respiratory muscles. We present a case of a 43-year-old male with severe CSA, who was successfully treated with BiPAP ST equipment.

  20. Central sleep apnea – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dybala Andrzej

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central sleep apnea (CSA is a disease characterized by repetitive episodes of the socalled central apneas during sleep. The disease has a very complex etiology. In clinical practice, the most important causes of CSA are disorders of the central nervous system, congestive heart failure or certain pathological changes of the respiratory muscles. We present a case of a 43-year-old male with severe CSA, who was successfully treated with BiPAP ST equipment.

  1. Pilot Study of a New Adjustable Thermoplastic Mandibular Advancement Device for the Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea-Hypopnoea Syndrome: A Brief Research Letter

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ibrahimi, Mohammed; Laabouri, Mounir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prefabricated adjustable thermoplastic mandibular advancement devices (PAT-MADs) are a practical short-term treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) in patients who have failed or refused continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of a new professionally-fitted PAT-MAD in patients with OSAHS in Morocco. Method: Twenty-four adults with mild, moderate or severe OSAHS were fitted with the PAT-MAD (BluePro®; BlueSom, France). Respiratory parameters (apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), oxygen desaturation index (ODI)) and daytime sleepiness using the Epworth Sleepiness scale (ESS) were assessed before and after treatment. Adverse events were recorded. Results: Mean treatment duration was 106.3 ± 73.4 days. Mean AHI score decreased from 21.4 ± 7.4 to 9.3 ± 4.1 after treatment (p<0.0001) (mean reduction of 57.0 ± 12.3%). Mean ESS and ODI also decreased at EOS (from 10.4 ± 2.8 to 7.3 ± 2.3, mean reduction 30.3 ± 12.2%, p=0.0001; and 7.0 ± 6.9 to 4.7 ± 4.0, mean reduction 30.5 ± 25.0%, p=0.2, respectively). Treatment was considered to have been successful in 22 patients (91.7%) who had mild OSAHS or an AHI score of ≤5 at the end of the study. The device was well-tolerated. Conclusion: This new PAT-MAD appears to be effective at reducing respiratory parameters and improving daytime alertness in patients with OSAHS. Long term studies in a larger number of patients are warranted to assess the long-term efficacy, retention and side-effects of this device. PMID:27499821

  2. THE SUFFERING OF PATIENTS WITH RESPIRATORY DISORDERS DURING SLEEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Lech

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Assumption : Respiratory disorders during sleep involving the occurrence of sleep apnoea leading to a reduction in arterial oxygen saturation are classified as: obstructive sleep apnoea, central sleep apnoea and sleep-related hypoventilation with hypoxaemia. A close correlation has been proved between the occurrence of apnoea and obesity. This problem concerns 2–4% of the population, and is more likely to affect men. Aim : Presentation of the problem of respiratory disorders during sleep as a chronic disease causing much suffering. Its symptoms may lead to sleep fragmentation and somatic consequences (such as dysfunction of the cardiovascular system as well as mental consequences (personality changes. Method : An analysis of literature concerning the subject-matter from the perspective of a doctor conducting ventilation therapy of patients with respiratory sleep disorders. Summary : The problem of sleep apnoea is most often diagnosed and treated too late due to the number of symptoms with a simultaneous absence of pathognomonic symptoms. Despite its commonness, recognition of this disease is still insufficient.

  3. Obstructive apnoeas in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Y.; Heckmatt, J Z

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--In order to clarify the treatment of sleep hypoxaemias in Duchenne muscular dystrophy polysomnographic studies were performed on patients at home with the purpose of recruiting them into two clinical therapeutic trials. Observations concerning the nature of sleep hypoxaemia in these patients are presented. METHODS--Twenty one non-ambulant patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy aged 13-23 years with no symptoms of sleep hypoventilation or apnoea were studied for two consecutive ...

  4. Central Sleep Apnea at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Keith R; Ainslie, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of central sleep apnea (CSA) at high altitude is usually attributed to Angelo Mosso who published in 1898. It can occur in susceptible individuals at altitude above 2000 m, but at very high altitude, say above 5000 m, it will occur in most subjects. Severity is correlated with ventilatory responsiveness, particularly to hypoxia. Theoretically, it should spontaneously improve with time and acclimatization. Although the time course of resolution is not well described, it appears to persist for more than a month at 5000 m.It occurs due to the interaction of hypocapnia with stages 1 and 2 NREM sleep, in the presence of increased loop-gain. The hypocapnia is secondary to hypoxic ventilatory drive. With acclimatization, one might expect that the increase in PaO2 and cerebral blood flow (CBF) would mitigate the CSA. However, over time, both the hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses increase, causing an increase in loop gain which is a counteracting force.The severity of the CSA can be reduced by descent, supplemental oxygen therapy, oral or intravenous acetazolamide. Recent studies suggest that acute further increases in cerebral blood flow will substantially, but temporarily, reduce central sleep apnea, without altering acid based balance. Very recently, bi-level noninvasive ventilation has also been shown to help (mechanism unknown). Sleep quality can be improved independent of the presence of CSA by the use of benzodiazepine sedation. PMID:27343103

  5. Effect of Patient Sex on the Severity of Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Newly Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Admitted by an Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Abad, Jorge; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Mediano, Olga; Cabriada, Valentín; Masdeu, María José; Terán, Joaquín; Masa, Juan Fernando; de la Peña, Mónica; Aldomá, Albina; Worner, Fernando; Valls, Joan; Barbé, Ferran; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background The cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) differ by sex. We hypothesized that sex influences the severity of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with OSA. OSA was defined as an apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI)>15 events·h-1. We evaluated the severity of ACS according to the ejection fraction, Killip class, number of diseased vessels, number of stents implanted and plasma peak troponin level. Methods We included 663 men (mean±SD, AHI 37±18 events·h-1) and 133 women (AHI 35±18 events·h-1) with OSA. Results The men were younger than the women (59±11 versus 66±11 years, p<0.0001), exhibited a higher neck circumference (p<0.0001), and were more likely to be smokers and alcohol users than women (p<0.0001, p = 0.0005, respectively). Body mass index and percentage of hypertensive patients or diabetics were similar between sexes. We observed a slight tendency for a higher Killip classification in women, although it was not statistically significant (p = 0.055). For men, we observed that the number of diseased vessels and the number of stents implanted were higher (p = 0.02, p = 0.001, respectively), and a decrease in the ejection fraction (p = 0.002). Conclusions This study shows that sex in OSA influences the severity of ACS. Men show a lower ejection fraction and an increased number of diseased vessels and number of stents implanted. PMID:27416494

  6. Effects of a Pragmatic Lifestyle Intervention for Reducing Body Mass in Obese Adults with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Moss

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of a pragmatic lifestyle intervention in obese adults with continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS. Sixty patients were randomised 1 : 1 to either a 12-week lifestyle intervention or an advice-only control group. The intervention involved supervised exercise sessions, dietary advice, and the promotion of lifestyle behaviour change using cognitive-behavioural techniques. Outcomes were assessed at baseline (week 0, intervention end-point (week 13, and follow-up (week 26. The primary outcome was 13-week change in body mass. Secondary outcomes included anthropometry, blood-borne biomarkers, exercise capacity, and health-related quality of life. At end-point, the intervention group exhibited small reductions in body mass (−1.8 [−3.0, −0.5] kg; P=0.007 and body fat percentage (−1 [−2, 0]%; P=0.044 and moderate improvements in C-reactive protein (−1.3 [−2.4, −0.2] mg·L−1; P=0.028 and exercise capacity (95 [50, 139] m; P<0.001. At follow-up, changes in body mass (−2.0 [−3.5, −0.5] kg; P=0.010, body fat percentage (−1 [−2, 0]%; P=0.033, and C-reactive protein (−1.3 [−2.5, −0.1] mg·L−1; P=0.037 were maintained and exercise capacity was further improved (132 [90, 175] m; P<0.001. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01546792.

  7. Evaluation of the upper airway measurements by multi-slice CT before and after operations in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the changes of the upper airway of the patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) before and after operations and to know the effects of operations by MSCT. Methods: The upper airway dimensions of 26 patients with OSAS were measured on multiplanar reformatted (MPR), curved-planar reformatted (CPR), volume rendering (VR) images of 16-slice spiral CT. The measurements include the anteroposterior calibres and the areas on the reformatted axial images on the pharyngeal cavity levels, the calibres and the minimum areas in retropalatal and retroglossal regions, the areas of the soft palate and uvula on the reformatted sagittal view with maximum thickness, the maximum wall thickness of the right and left the upper airway on the coronary images, the volume of the upper airway before and after the operations. The measurements were correlated with the polysomnography (PSG) records. The data were analyzed paired-samples t-test and Pearson correlations. Results: By comparison, the anteroposterior calibres and the cross-sectional areas on the reformatted axial view of the lower retropalatal region (slice 4) of the upper airway increased significantly after operations. The anteroposterior diameter increased from 5.9 mm before operations to 12.8 mm after operations, where t=-5.506, P2 before operations to 275.0 mm2 after operations, where t=-5.011, P2 before operations to 128.0 mm2 after operations, where t=3.087, P2 before operation to 10.9 mm, 76.0 mm2 after operation, where t=-3.413, -2.216, respectively and P2 before operations to 76.0 mm2 after operations, were t=-4.932, P<0.05. The anteroposterior calibres increased from 4.6 mm before operations to 6.6 mm after operations, where t=-7.308, P<0.05. The L-R calibres increased from 8.3 mm before operations to 13.6 mm after operations, where t=-4.320, P<0.05. Conclusions: MPR, CPR, VR of MSCT can evaluate the not only the morphology but the function changes of the upper airways on the OSAS

  8. Effects of sleep deprivation on central auditory processing

    OpenAIRE

    Liberalesso Paulo Breno; D’Andrea Karlin Fabianne; Cordeiro Mara L; Zeigelboim Bianca; Marques Jair; Jurkiewicz Ari

    2012-01-01

    AbstractBackgroundSleep deprivation is extremely common in contemporary society, and is considered to be a frequent cause of behavioral disorders, mood, alertness, and cognitive performance. Although the impacts of sleep deprivation have been studied extensively in various experimental paradigms, very few studies have addressed the impact of sleep deprivation on central auditory processing (CAP). Therefore, we examined the impact of sleep deprivation on CAP, for which there is sparse informat...

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF SLEEP APNOEA SYNDROME ON AMBULATORY BLOOD PRESSURE%睡眠呼吸暂停综合征对血压的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾海玉; 牛云枫; 曹中朝

    2011-01-01

    Objective;To investigate the influence of sleep apnoea syndrome(SAS) on 24 - hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in order to provide evidence in hypertension treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in SAS patients. Methods; 30 SAS patients with no cardiovascular complication and 30 normal volunteers were enrolled in the study. Polysomography (PSG) during sleep,24 hours ABP and some vasoactive substances, nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin (ET) , were monitored in SAS and control groups before and after nCPAP treatment. Results: Before the treatment, ET, dMSP, RDI, LAT, nMSP, dMDP, nMDP, dMAP and nMAP were higher in SAS patients compared with the controls;however, NO, NO/ET and LSaO2 were lower than that of the controls.. Except for dMSP, all other parameters were improved after nCPAP. Conclutions: SAS patients may have the tendency of hypertension which can be prevented and treated with nCPAP.%目的:探讨睡眠呼吸暂停综合征(SAS)对24h动态血压的影响,为经鼻持续气道正压通气(nCPAP)治疗SAS引起的高血压提供依据.方法:选择无心血管疾病的SAS病人和正常对照组各30例进行多导睡眠图(PSG)、24h动态血压(ABPM)及血管活性物质一氧化氮(NO)和内皮素(ET)的监测;同时对SAS病人施以nC-PAP治疗,并进行上述指标的监测.结果:nCPAP治疗前,SAS病人ET、白天平均收缩压(dMSP)高于正常对照(P<0.05);呼吸紊乱指数(RDI)、最长呼吸暂停时间(LAT)、夜间平均收缩压(nMSP)、白天平均舒张压(dMDP)、夜间平均舒张压(nMDP)、白天平均动脉压(dMAP)、夜间平均动脉压(nMAP)明显高于正常对照(P<0.01);24h血压曲线呈非勺型;NO低于正常对照(P<0.05);NO/ET、最低血氧饱和度(LSaO2)较正常对照明显降低(P<0.01);SAS病人dMAP、nMAP与LSaO2呈负相关(Beta=-0.561 P<0.05;Beta=-0.388 P<0.05),RDI与nMAP呈显著正相关(Beta =0.512 P<0.01).nCPAP治疗后,除dMSP无变化外(P>0.05),上

  10. Radiation necrosis causing failure of automatic ventilation during sleep with central sleep apnea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udwadia, Z.F.; Athale, S.; Misra, V.P.; Wadia, N.H.

    1987-09-01

    A patient operated upon for a midline cerebellar hemangioblastoma developed failure of automatic respiration during sleep, together with central sleep apnea syndrome, approximately two years after receiving radiation therapy to the brain. Clinical and CT scan findings were compatible with a diagnosis of radiation necrosis as the cause of his abnormal respiratory control.

  11. Radiation necrosis causing failure of automatic ventilation during sleep with central sleep apnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A patient operated upon for a midline cerebellar hemangioblastoma developed failure of automatic respiration during sleep, together with central sleep apnea syndrome, approximately two years after receiving radiation therapy to the brain. Clinical and CT scan findings were compatible with a diagnosis of radiation necrosis as the cause of his abnormal respiratory control

  12. Type I Chiari malformation presenting central sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Takuro; Miyazaki, Soichiro; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Takashi; Okawa, Masako; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Komada, Ichiro; Hatano, Taketo; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Sleep apnea is a rare but a well-known clinical feature of type I Chiari malformation. It may be obstructive or central in nature. Sleep apnea in patients with type I Chiari malformation rarely presents without accompanying neurological signs or symptoms. We here report a case of a 10-year-old girl who presented with central sleep apnea without any other neurological signs but was ultimately diagnosed with type I Chiari malformation. The patient initially showed mild improvement in symptoms after administration of an acetazolamide. Finally, posterior fossa decompression dramatically improved her respiratory status during sleep, both clinically and on polysomnography. This case suggests that type I Chiari malformation should be considered in the differential diagnoses of central apneas in children, even if there are no other neurological signs and symptoms. Furthermore, sagittal craniocervical magnetic resonance imaging may be necessary for a definitive diagnosis.

  13. Heart failure and sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parati, Gianfranco; Lombardi, Carolina; Castagna, Francesco; Mattaliano, Paola; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Awareness of the importance of sleep-related disorders in patients with cardiovascular diseases is growing. In particular, sleep-disordered breathing, short sleep time, and low sleep quality are frequently reported by patients with heart failure (HF). Sleep-disordered breathing, which includes obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and central sleep apnoea (CSA), is common in patients with HF and has been suggested to increase the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Both OSA and CSA are associated with increased sympathetic activation, vagal withdrawal, altered haemodynamic loading conditions, and hypoxaemia. Moreover, OSA is strongly associated with arterial hypertension, the most common risk factor for cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Intrathoracic pressure changes are also associated with OSA, contributing to haemodynamic alterations and potentially affecting overexpression of genes involved in ventricular remodelling. HF treatment can decrease the severity of both OSA and CSA. Indeed, furosemide and spironolactone administration, exercise training, cardiac resynchronization therapy, and eventually heart transplantation have shown a positive effect on OSA and CSA in patients with HF. At present, whether CSA should be treated and, if so, which is the optimal therapy is still debated. By contrast, more evidence is available on the beneficial effects of OSA treatment in patients with HF. PMID:27173772

  14. Health, social and economical consequences of sleep-disordered breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The objective direct and indirect costs of sleep-disordered breathing (snoring, sleep apnoea (SA) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)) and the treatment are incompletely described.......The objective direct and indirect costs of sleep-disordered breathing (snoring, sleep apnoea (SA) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)) and the treatment are incompletely described....

  15. Assessment of Severe Apnoea through Voice Analysis, Automatic Speech, and Speaker Recognition Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Pozo, Rubén; Blanco Murillo, Jose Luis; Hernández Gómez, Luis; López Gonzalo, Eduardo; Alcázar Ramírez, José; Toledano, Doroteo T.

    2009-12-01

    This study is part of an ongoing collaborative effort between the medical and the signal processing communities to promote research on applying standard Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) techniques for the automatic diagnosis of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Early detection of severe apnoea cases is important so that patients can receive early treatment. Effective ASR-based detection could dramatically cut medical testing time. Working with a carefully designed speech database of healthy and apnoea subjects, we describe an acoustic search for distinctive apnoea voice characteristics. We also study abnormal nasalization in OSA patients by modelling vowels in nasal and nonnasal phonetic contexts using Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) pattern recognition on speech spectra. Finally, we present experimental findings regarding the discriminative power of GMMs applied to severe apnoea detection. We have achieved an 81% correct classification rate, which is very promising and underpins the interest in this line of inquiry.

  16. Assessment of Severe Apnoea through Voice Analysis, Automatic Speech, and Speaker Recognition Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Fernández Pozo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is part of an ongoing collaborative effort between the medical and the signal processing communities to promote research on applying standard Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR techniques for the automatic diagnosis of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA. Early detection of severe apnoea cases is important so that patients can receive early treatment. Effective ASR-based detection could dramatically cut medical testing time. Working with a carefully designed speech database of healthy and apnoea subjects, we describe an acoustic search for distinctive apnoea voice characteristics. We also study abnormal nasalization in OSA patients by modelling vowels in nasal and nonnasal phonetic contexts using Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM pattern recognition on speech spectra. Finally, we present experimental findings regarding the discriminative power of GMMs applied to severe apnoea detection. We have achieved an 81% correct classification rate, which is very promising and underpins the interest in this line of inquiry.

  17. Effects of sleep deprivation on central auditory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberalesso Paulo Breno

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep deprivation is extremely common in contemporary society, and is considered to be a frequent cause of behavioral disorders, mood, alertness, and cognitive performance. Although the impacts of sleep deprivation have been studied extensively in various experimental paradigms, very few studies have addressed the impact of sleep deprivation on central auditory processing (CAP. Therefore, we examined the impact of sleep deprivation on CAP, for which there is sparse information. In the present study, thirty healthy adult volunteers (17 females and 13 males, aged 30.75 ± 7.14 years were subjected to a pure tone audiometry test, a speech recognition threshold test, a speech recognition task, the Staggered Spondaic Word Test (SSWT, and the Random Gap Detection Test (RGDT. Baseline (BSL performance was compared to performance after 24 hours of being sleep deprived (24hSD using the Student’s t test. Results Mean RGDT score was elevated in the 24hSD condition (8.0 ± 2.9 ms relative to the BSL condition for the whole cohort (6.4 ± 2.8 ms; p = 0.0005, for males (p = 0.0066, and for females (p = 0.0208. Sleep deprivation reduced SSWT scores for the whole cohort in both ears [(right: BSL, 98.4 % ± 1.8 % vs. SD, 94.2 % ± 6.3 %. p = 0.0005(left: BSL, 96.7 % ± 3.1 % vs. SD, 92.1 % ± 6.1 %, p  Conclusion Sleep deprivation impairs RGDT and SSWT performance. These findings confirm that sleep deprivation has central effects that may impair performance in other areas of life.

  18. Hippocampal Hypertrophy and Sleep Apnea: A Role for the Ischemic Preconditioning?

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana Rosenzweig; Kempton, Matthew J.; Crum, William R; Martin Glasser; Milan Milosevic; Sandor Beniczky; Corfield, Douglas R; Williams, Steven C.; Morrell, Mary J.

    2013-01-01

    The full impact of multisystem disease such as obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) on regions of the central nervous system is debated, as the subsequent neurocognitive sequelae are unclear. Several preclinical studies suggest that its purported major culprits, intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, can differentially affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Although the prospective biphasic nature of chronic intermittent hypoxia in animal models of OSA has been acknowledged, so far the evide...

  19. Relationship between central sleep apnea and Cheyne-Stokes Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinta, Irena; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) in patients with heart failure (HF) occurs frequently and shows a serious influence on prognosis in this population. The key elements in the pathophysiology of CSA are respiratory instability with chronic hyperventilation, changes of arterial carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) and elongated circulation time. The main manifestation of CSA in patients with HF is Cheyne-Stokes Respiration (CSR). The initial treatment is the optimization of HF therapy. However, many other options of the therapeutic management have been studied, particularly those based on positive airway pressure methods. In patients with heart failure we often can observe the overlap of CSA and CSR; we will discuss the differences between these forms of breathing disorders during sleep. We will also discuss when CSA and CSR occur independently of each other and the importance of CSR occurring during the daytime in context of CSA during the nighttime.

  20. Relationship between central sleep apnea and Cheyne-Stokes Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinta, Irena; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) in patients with heart failure (HF) occurs frequently and shows a serious influence on prognosis in this population. The key elements in the pathophysiology of CSA are respiratory instability with chronic hyperventilation, changes of arterial carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) and elongated circulation time. The main manifestation of CSA in patients with HF is Cheyne-Stokes Respiration (CSR). The initial treatment is the optimization of HF therapy. However, many other options of the therapeutic management have been studied, particularly those based on positive airway pressure methods. In patients with heart failure we often can observe the overlap of CSA and CSR; we will discuss the differences between these forms of breathing disorders during sleep. We will also discuss when CSA and CSR occur independently of each other and the importance of CSR occurring during the daytime in context of CSA during the nighttime. PMID:26961739

  1. Chiari malformation and central sleep apnea syndrome: efficacy of treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Marques do Vale

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Chiari malformation type I (CM-I has been associated with sleep-disordered breathing, especially central sleep apnea syndrome. We report the case of a 44-year-old female with CM-I who was referred to our sleep laboratory for suspected sleep apnea. The patient had undergone decompressive surgery 3 years prior. An arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercapnia. Polysomnography showed a respiratory disturbance index of 108 events/h, and all were central apnea events. Treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation was initiated, and central apnea was resolved. This report demonstrates the efficacy of servo-ventilation in the treatment of central sleep apnea syndrome associated with alveolar hypoventilation in a CM-I patient with a history of decompressive surgery.

  2. Sleep in trigeminal autonomic cephalagias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barløse, Mads; Lund, Nunu; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2014-01-01

    and eventually to more effective therapeutic regimens. This review aims to evaluate the existing literature on the subject of TACs and sleep. An association between episodic CH and distinct macrostructural sleep phases, especially the relation to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, has been described in some older...... studies but could not be confirmed in other, more recent studies. Investigations into the microstructure of sleep in these patients are lacking. Only a few case reports exist on the relation between sleep and other TACs. SUMMARY: Recent studies do not find an association between CH and REM sleep. One...... older study suggests chronic paroxysmal hemicranias may be locked to REM sleep but otherwise the relation is unknown. Reports indicate that CH and obstructive sleep apnoea are associated in some individuals but results are diverging. Single cases show improvement of CH upon treatment of sleep apnoea...

  3. Severe apnoeas following immunisation in premature infants

    OpenAIRE

    Slack, M; Schapira, D

    1999-01-01

    Four premature infants developed apnoeas severe enough to warrant resuscitation after immunisation with diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus (DPT), and Haemophilus influenzae B (Hib). One required re-intubation and ventilation.
 Although apnoeas after immunisation are recognised, they are not well documented. It is time for further research to elucidate the best time to immunise such infants.



  4. Sleep Deprivation Impairs the Human Central and Peripheral Nervous System Discrimination of Social Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea N; Greer, Stephanie M; Saletin, Jared M; Walker, Matthew P

    2015-07-15

    Facial expressions represent one of the most salient cues in our environment. They communicate the affective state and intent of an individual and, if interpreted correctly, adaptively influence the behavior of others in return. Processing of such affective stimuli is known to require reciprocal signaling between central viscerosensory brain regions and peripheral-autonomic body systems, culminating in accurate emotion discrimination. Despite emerging links between sleep and affective regulation, the impact of sleep loss on the discrimination of complex social emotions within and between the CNS and PNS remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate in humans that sleep deprivation impairs both viscerosensory brain (anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala) and autonomic-cardiac discrimination of threatening from affiliative facial cues. Moreover, sleep deprivation significantly degrades the normally reciprocal associations between these central and peripheral emotion-signaling systems, most prominent at the level of cardiac-amygdala coupling. In addition, REM sleep physiology across the sleep-rested night significantly predicts the next-day success of emotional discrimination within this viscerosensory network across individuals, suggesting a role for REM sleep in affective brain recalibration. Together, these findings establish that sleep deprivation compromises the faithful signaling of, and the "embodied" reciprocity between, viscerosensory brain and peripheral autonomic body processing of complex social signals. Such impairments hold ecological relevance in professional contexts in which the need for accurate interpretation of social cues is paramount yet insufficient sleep is pervasive.

  5. Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Sleep: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is sleep? Sleep is a period of unconsciousness during which ...

  6. Central autonomic control in spontaneously hypertensive rats: a study on phasic phenomena during rapid-eye-movement sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Berteotti, Chiara

    2007-01-01

    The cardiovascular regulation undergoes wide changes in the different states of sleepwake cycle. In particular, the relationship between spontaneous fluctuations in heart period and arterial pressure clearly shows differences between the two sleep states. In non rapid-eye-movement sleep, heart rhythm is under prevalent baroreflex control, whereas in rapid-eye-movement sleep central autonomic commands prevail (Zoccoli et al., 2001). Moreover, during rapid-eye-movement sleep the cardiovascul...

  7. Sleep-Wake Cycle and Daytime Sleepiness in the Myotonic Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Romigi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy is the most common type of muscular dystrophy in adults and is characterized by progressive myopathy, myotonia, and multiorgan involvement. Two genetically distinct entities have been identified, myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 or Steinert’s Disease and myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2. Myotonic dystrophies are strongly associated with sleep dysfunction. Sleep disturbances in DM1 are common and include sleep-disordered breathing (SDB, periodic limb movements (PLMS, central hypersomnia, and REM sleep dysregulation (high REM density and narcoleptic-like phenotype. Interestingly, drowsiness in DM1 seems to be due to a central dysfunction of sleep-wake regulation more than SDB. To date, little is known regarding the occurrence of sleep disorders in DM2. SDB (obstructive and central apnoea, REM sleep without atonia, and restless legs syndrome have been described. Further polysomnographic, controlled studies are strongly needed, particularly in DM2, in order to clarify the role of sleep disorders in the myotonic dystrophies.

  8. Clinical predictors of central sleep apnea evoked by positive airway pressure titration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Marilyn; Gannon, Karen; Lovell, Kathy; Merlino, Margaret; Mojica, James; Bianchi, Matt T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Treatment-emergent central sleep apnea (TECSA), also called complex apnea, occurs in 5%–15% of sleep apnea patients during positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, but the clinical predictors are not well understood. The goal of this study was to explore possible predictors in a clinical sleep laboratory cohort, which may highlight those at risk during clinical management. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 728 patients who underwent PAP titration (n=422 split-night; n=306 two-night). Demographics and self-reported medical comorbidities, medications, and behaviors as well as standard physiological parameters from the polysomnography (PSG) data were analyzed. We used regression analysis to assess predictors of binary presence or absence of central apnea index (CAI) ≥5 during split-night PSG (SN-PSG) versus full-night PSG (FN-PSG) titrations. Results CAI ≥5 was present in 24.2% of SN-PSG and 11.4% of FN-PSG patients during titration. Male sex, maximum continuous positive airway pressure, and use of bilevel positive airway pressure were predictors of TECSA, and rapid eye movement dominance was a negative predictor, for both SN-PSG and FN-PSG patients. Self-reported narcotics were a positive predictor of TECSA, and the time spent in stage N2 sleep was a negative predictor only for SN-PSG patients. Self-reported history of stroke and the CAI during the diagnostic recording predicted TECSA only for FN-PSG patients. Conclusion Clinical predictors of treatment-evoked central apnea spanned demographic, medical history, sleep physiology, and titration factors. Improved predictive models may be increasingly important as diagnostic and therapeutic modalities move away from the laboratory setting, even as PSG remains the gold standard for characterizing primary central apnea and TECSA. PMID:27555802

  9. A role of melanin-concentrating hormone producing neurons in the central regulation of paradoxical sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salin Paul

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidergic neurons containing the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH and the hypocretins (or orexins are intermingled in the zona incerta, perifornical nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area. Both types of neurons have been implicated in the integrated regulation of energy homeostasis and body weight. Hypocretin neurons have also been involved in sleep-wake regulation and narcolepsy. We therefore sought to determine whether hypocretin and MCH neurons express Fos in association with enhanced paradoxical sleep (PS or REM sleep during the rebound following PS deprivation. Next, we compared the effect of MCH and NaCl intracerebroventricular (ICV administrations on sleep stage quantities to further determine whether MCH neurons play an active role in PS regulation. Results Here we show that the MCH but not the hypocretin neurons are strongly active during PS, evidenced through combined hypocretin, MCH, and Fos immunostainings in three groups of rats (PS Control, PS Deprived and PS Recovery rats. Further, we show that ICV administration of MCH induces a dose-dependant increase in PS (up to 200% and slow wave sleep (up to 70% quantities. Conclusion These results indicate that MCH is a powerful hypnogenic factor. MCH neurons might play a key role in the state of PS via their widespread projections in the central nervous system.

  10. Sleep Disturbances and Behavioural Problems in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, A. P. H. M.; Sinnema, M.; Didden, R.; Maaskant, M. A.; Smits, M. G.; Schrander-Stumpel, C. T. R. M.; Curfs, L. M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are at risk of sleep disturbances, such as excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and sleep apnoea, and behavioural problems. Sleep disturbances and their relationship with other variables had not been researched extensively in adults with PWS. Method: Sleep disturbances and behavioural problems…

  11. Inhibition of central Na+/H+ exchanger type 3 can alleviate sleep apnea in Sprague-Dawley rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qimin; Zhou Rong; Zhang Cheng; Dong Hui; Ma Jing; Wang Guangfa

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies showed the central Na+/H+ exchanger type 3 (NHE3) has a close relationship with ventilation control.The objective of the study is to investigate the role of NHE3 in sleep apnea in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats.Methods A sleep study was performed on 20 male SD rats to analyze the correlation between the sleep apneic events and total NHE3 protein content and inactive NHE3(pS552) in the brainstem measured by Western blotting.Another 20 adult male SD rats received 3 days of sleep and respiration monitoring for 6 hours a day,with adaption on the first day,0.5% DMSO microinjection into the fourth ventricle on the second day,and AVE0657 (specific inhibitor of NHE3) microinjection on the third day.Rats were divided into two groups with injection of 5 μmol/L or 8 μmol/L AVE0657 before the sleep study.The effects of AVE0657 on sleep apnea and sleep structure of rats were analyzed through self-control.Results The total post-sigh apnea index (TPSAI) and post-sigh apnea index in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep (NPSAI) and total apnea index (AI) in NREM sleep (NAI) were negatively correlated with NHE3(pS552) protein contents in the brainstem (r=-0.534,-0.547 and-0.505,respectively,P<0.05).The spontaneous apnea index in REM sleep (RSPAI) was positively correlated with the level of NHE3(pS552) protein expression in the brainstem (r=0.556,P<0.05).However,the sleep AI had no relationship with total NHE3 protein.Compared with the blank control and microinjection of 0.5% DMSO,5 μmol/L AVE0657 significantly reduced the total AI and NPSAI (both P<0.05) without a significant effect on sleep architecture.In contrast to blank control and microinjection of 0.5% DMSO,injection of 8 μmol/L AVE0657 significantly reduced the AI and PSAI in NREM and REM sleep (all P<0.05).Conclusions The severity of sleep apnea was negatively correlated with central inactive NHE3.A specific inhibitor of NHE3 decreased the sleep AI.Thus,our results indicate that central

  12. Contemporary Insights and Novel Treatment Approaches to Central Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Grayburn, Ryan L.; Kaka, Yaquta; Wilson Tang, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a common and under-diagnosed condition commonly associated with Cheyne-Stokes respiration. It is particularly prevalent in the heart failure population affecting up to 40% of all patients with heart failure. The pathophysiology associated with CSA is based on the underlying effects of hypoventilation and hyperventilation, with neurologic dysregulation of respiratory control as the primary defect. However, therapeutic options are limited due to the prevailing perce...

  13. An assistive device for congenital central hypoventilation syndrome outpatients during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Emilia; Piazza, Caterina; Cavalleri, Matteo; Taddeo, Peter; Carcano, Alessandro; Morandi, Francesco; Reni, Gianluigi

    2014-10-01

    Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome is a genetic disease characterized by alveolar hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation. Patients have hypoventilations, especially during sleep, conditioning hypercapnia which can lead to neurological damage and death. They therefore need mechanical ventilators, that provide sufficient gas exchange, and pulse-oximeters that monitor oxy-hemoglobin blood concentration. Due to the restrictions regarding domiciliary assistive devices, the presence of a caregiver is required all night long. Currently, the only alarm systems available are the ones integrated in the ventilators and monitoring systems. During the night, multiple false alarms may occur, interrupting the sleep and causing anxiety. In this work we describe an assistive device that acquires real-time data from a pulse-oximeter, provides a multisensory stimulation if oxygen saturation falls under a certain threshold, and wakes up the patient if the hypoxia is severe. Tests on healthy subjects have shown that the device guarantees rapid awakenings, with a stimulator-dependent efficacy, and that it does not affect sleep efficiency. The purpose of the device is to determine a gentle awakening if mild hypoxia conditions persist, and to assure rapid awakening when a severe hypoxia occurs, reducing false alarms, improving the quality of sleep and increasing the self-sufficiency of the patients. PMID:25069973

  14. Medium Increased Risk for Central Sleep Apnea but Not Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Long-Term Opioid Users: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiatrault, Marie-Lou; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Daoust, Raoul; Roy, Marie-Pier; Denis, Ronald; Lavigne, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Opioids are associated with higher risk for ataxic breathing and sleep apnea. We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to assess the influence of long-term opioid use on the apnea-hypopnea and central apnea indices (AHI and CAI, respectively). Methods: A systematic review protocol (Cochrane Handbook guidelines) was developed for the search and analysis. We searched Embase, Medline, ACP Journal Club, and Cochrane Database up to November 2014 for three topics: (1) narcotics, (2) sleep apnea, and (3) apnea-hypopnea index. The outcome of interest was the variation in AHI and CAI in opioid users versus non-users. Two reviewers performed the data search and extraction, and disagreements were resolved by discussion. Results were combined by standardized mean difference using a random effect model, and heterogeneity was tested by χ2 and presented as I2 statistics. Results: Seven studies met the inclusion criteria, for a total of 803 patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We compared 2 outcomes: AHI (320 opioid users and 483 non-users) and 790 patients with CAI (315 opioid users and 475 non-users). The absolute effect size for opioid use was a small increased in apnea measured by AHI = 0.25 (95% CI: 0.02–0.49) and a medium for CAI = 0.45 (95% CI: 0.27–0.63). Effect consistency across studies was calculated, showing moderate heterogeneity at I2 = 59% and 29% for AHI and CAI, respectively. Conclusions: The meta-analysis results suggest that long-term opioid use in OSA patients has a medium effect on central sleep apnea. Citation: Filiatrault ML, Chauny JM, Daoust R, Roy MP, Denis R, Lavigne G. Medium increased risk for central sleep apnea but not obstructive sleep apnea in long-term opioid users: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(4):617–625. PMID:26943709

  15. Ictal central apnea and bradycardia in temporal lobe epilepsy complicated by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Nishimura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 12-year-old boy who developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE with daily complex partial seizures (CPS and monthly generalized seizures. Moreover, he frequently snored while asleep since early childhood. Polysomnography (PSG revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea with apnea–hypopnea index (AHI of 37.8/h. Video-PSG with simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG recording captured two ictal apneic episodes during sleep, without any motor manifestations. The onset of rhythmic theta activity in the midtemporal area on EEG was preceded by the onset of apnea by several seconds and disappeared soon after cessation of central apnea. One episode was accompanied by ictal bradycardia of <48 beats/min which persisted for 50 s beyond the end of epileptic activity. After treatment with carbamazepine and tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, the seizures were well controlled and AHI decreased to 2.5/h. Paroxysmal discharges also disappeared during this time. Uncontrolled TLE complicated by sleep apnea should be evaluated for the presence of ictal central apnea/bradycardia.

  16. Influence of neighbourhood-level crowding on sleep-disordered breathing severity: mediation by body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dayna A; Drake, Christopher; Joseph, Christine L M; Krajenta, Richard; Hudgel, David W; Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E

    2015-10-01

    Neighbourhood-level crowding, a measure of the percentage of households with more than one person per room, may impact the severity of sleep-disordered breathing. This study examined the association of neighbourhood-level crowding with apnoea-hypopnoea index in a large clinical sample of diverse adults with sleep-disordered breathing. Sleep-disordered breathing severity was quantified as the apnoea-hypopnoea index calculated from overnight polysomnogram; analyses were restricted to those with apnoea-hypopnoea index ≥5. Neighbourhood-level crowding was defined using 2000 US Census tract data as percentage of households in a census tract with >1 person per room. Multivariable linear mixed models were fit to examine the associations between the percentage of neighbourhood-level crowding and apnoea-hypopnoea index, and a causal mediation analysis was conducted to determine if body mass index acted as a mediator between neighbourhood-level crowding and apnoea-hypopnoea index. Among 1789 patients (43% African American; 68% male; 80% obese), the mean apnoea-hypopnoea index was 29.0 ± 25.3. After adjusting for race, age, marital status and gender, neighbourhood-level crowding was associated with apnoea-hypopnoea index; for every one-unit increase in percentage of neighbourhood-level crowding mean, the apnoea-hypopnoea index increased by 0.40 ± 0.20 (P = 0.04). There was a statistically significant indirect effect of neighbourhood-level crowding through body mass index on the apnoea-hypopnoea index (P crowding is associated with severity of sleep-disordered breathing. Body mass index partially mediated the association between neighbourhood-level crowding and sleep-disordered breathing. Investigating prevalent neighbourhood conditions impacting breathing in urban settings may be promising.

  17. Severe Central Sleep Apnea Associated With Chronic Baclofen Therapy: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Pierre-Yves; Joyeux-Faure, Marie; Gentina, Thibaut; Launois, Sandrine H; d'Ortho, Marie Pia; Pépin, Jean-Louis; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid-B agonist with muscle-relaxant properties, is widely used in patients with severe spasticity. In animals, baclofen has been shown to decrease respiratory drive. In humans, however, use of baclofen at the standard dose did not significantly impair sleep-disordered breathing in a susceptible population of snorers. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the role of baclofen for the treatment of alcohol dependence. We describe severe central sleep apnea (CSA) in four patients with none of the conditions commonly associated with CSA who were receiving chronic baclofen therapy for alcohol withdrawal. In one patient, baclofen withdrawal was associated with a complete resolution of CSA. Three patients were treated by adaptive servo-ventilation while continuing their treatment with baclofen. Given the increasing number of patients receiving baclofen for alcohol withdrawal treatment, physicians should be aware that these patients might be affected by severe CSA. Future studies are required to determine the mechanisms, prevalence, and treatment modalities of sleep-disordered breathing associated with baclofen usage. PMID:27157226

  18. Eclampsia as a cause of secondary non-obstructive central sleep hypoventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štourač, P; Hradilová, T; Straževská, E; Turčáni, P; Štouračová, A; Janků, P; Skřičková, J; Gál, R

    2015-01-01

    The central alveolar hypoventilation of Ondine's curse is a disorder characterized by absent or diminished ventilatory response to hypercapnia, hypoxia or both, with parallel decrease in saturation to 50%. The secondary form may begin mainly after insult that affects the brain stem. We present a case of a 24-years old primipara in the 41st gestational week with an uncomplicated course of pregnancy and with secondary non-obstructive sleeping hypoventilation which occurred after eclamptic seizure. This obstetric case provides evidence for the benefit of home BiPAP use for patients with secondary Ondine's curse. PMID:25723073

  19. Centrally administered ouabain aggravates rapid-eye-movement-sleep-related bradyarrhythmias in freely moving rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, T.; Seto, K.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of continuous infusions of ouabain on bradyarrhythmias (cardiac pauses for 0.5 s or longer) during sleep were examined in freely moving Wistar-Kyoto rats. 2. In a control group (n = 7), saline was infused into both the lateral ventricle and the femoral vein. In an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) ouabain group (n = 7), ouabain was infused centrally, such that each rat received three stepped doses of 1, 10, and 100 ng kg-1 h-1 for 3 days at each dose, while saline was infused sy...

  20. Selective indication for positive airway pressure (PAP in sleep-related breathing disorders with obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stasche, Norbert

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Positive airway pressure (PAP is the therapy of choice for most sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD. A variety of PAP devices using positive airway pressure (CPAP, BiPAP, APAP, ASV must be carefully considered before application. This overview aims to provide criteria for choosing the optimal PAP device according to severity and type of sleep-related breathing disorder. In addition, the range of therapeutic applications, constraints and side effects as well as alternative methods to PAP will be discussed. This review is based on an analysis of current literature and clinical experience. The data is presented from an ENT-sleep-laboratory perspective and is designed to help the ENT practitioner initiate treatment and provide support. Different titration methods, current devices and possible applications will be described. In addition to constant pressure devices (CPAP, most commonly used for symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA without complicating conditions, BiPAP models will be introduced. These allow two different positive pressure settings and are thus especially suitable for patients with cardiopulmonary diseases or patients with pressure intolerance, increasing compliance in this subgroup considerably. Compliance can also be increased in patients during first night of therapy, patients with highly variable pressure demands or position-dependent OSA, by using self-regulating Auto-adjust PAP devices (Automatic positive airway pressure, APAP. Patients with Cheyne-Stokes breathing, a subtype of central sleep apnoea, benefit from adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV, which analyzes breathing patterns continually and adjusts the actual ventilation pressure accordingly. This not only reduces daytime sleepiness, but can also influence heart disease positively. Therapy with positive airway pressure is very effective in eliminating obstruction-related sleep diseases and symptoms. However, because therapy is generally applied for life, the optimal

  1. The role of sleep problems in central pain processing in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yvonne C.; Lu, Bing; Edwards, Robert R.; Wasan, Ajay D.; Nassikas, Nicholas J.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, pain may exist out of proportion to peripheral inflammation. This observation suggests that central nervous system pain amplification mechanisms, such as diminished conditioned pain modulation (CPM), may play a role in enhancing pain perception among some RA patients. We examined CPM, pressure pain threshold and pressure pain tolerance among RA patients compared to controls. Methods Fifty-eight female RA patients and 54 age-matched controls without chronic pain underwent quantitative sensory testing (QST) to assess CPM, pressure pain threshold and pressure pain tolerance. CPM was induced using a cold water bath, and pain threshold (when patients first felt pain) and tolerance (when pain was too much to bear) were assessed with an algometer. Associations between RA and QST measures were analyzed using linear regression. Sleep problems, mental health and inflammation were assessed as mediators of the relationship between RA and QST measures. Results Median CPM levels were 0.5 kg/cm2 (interquartile range (IQR) −0.1, 1.6) among RA patients compared to 1.5 kg/cm2 (IQR −0.1, 2.5) among controls (P = 0.04). Relative to controls, RA patients had lower pain threshold and tolerance at the wrists (P ≤ 0.05). Compared to controls, RA patients had greater problems with sleep, catastrophizing, depression and anxiety (P < 0.0001). Mediation analyses suggested that low CPM levels may be partially attributable to sleep disturbance (P = 0.04). Conclusion RA patients have impaired CPM relative to pain-free controls. Sleep problems may mediate the association between RA and attenuated CPM. PMID:23124650

  2. [Sleep psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disorders are serious issues in modern society. There has been marked scientific interest in sleep for a century, with the discoveries of the electrical activity of the brain (EEG), sleep-wake system, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and circadian rhythm system. Additionally, the advent of video-polysomnography in clinical research has revealed some of the consequences of disrupted sleep and sleep deprivation in psychiatric disorders. Decades of clinical research have demonstrated that sleep disorders are intimately tied to not only physical disease (e. g., lifestyle-related disease) but psychiatric illness. According to The International Classification of Sleep Disorders (2005), sleep disorders are classified into 8 major categories: 1) insomnia, 2) sleep-related breathing disorders, 3) hypersomnias of central origin, 4) circadian rhythm sleep disorders, 5) parasomnias, 6) sleep-related movement disorders, 7) isolated symptoms, and 8) other sleep disorders. Several sleep disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder, sleepwalking, REM sleep behavior disorder, and narcolepsy, may be comorbid or possibly mimic numerous psychiatric disorders, and can even occur due to psychiatric pharmacotherapy. Moreover, sleep disorders may exacerbate underlying psychiatric disorders when left untreated. Therefore, psychiatrists should pay attention to the intimate relationship between sleep disorders and psychiatric symptoms. Sleep psychiatry is an academic field focusing on interrelations between sleep medicine and psychiatry. This mini-review summarizes recent findings in sleep psychiatry. Future research on the bidirectional relation between sleep disturbance and psychiatric symptoms will shed light on the pathophysiological view of psychiatric disorders and sleep disorders. PMID:24050022

  3. AASM standards of practice compliant validation of actigraphic sleep analysis from SOMNOwatch(TM) versus polysomnographic sleep diagnostics shows high conformity also among subjects with sleep disordered breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent AASM practice, parameter actimetry is cited to measure total sleep time in obstructive sleep apnoea patients, when polysomnography is not available. An actigraph was therefore compared to polysomnographic data in 28 subjects with known sleep disordered breathing. Total sleep time (TST), sleep period time (SPT), sleep efficiency (SE), sustained sleep efficiency (SSE), sleep onset latency (SL) and sleep/wake pattern were compared to gold standard polysomnography. The results of an epoch-by-epoch comparison of sleep/wake from actigraphy to sleep stages from polysomnography gave a sensitivity of 90.2%, a specificity of 95.2% and an overall accuracy of 85.9%. Correlations were moderately strong for SE (0.71, p < 0.001) and SSE (0.65, p < 0.001) and high for TST (0.89, p < 0.001), SPT (0.91, p < 0.001) and SL (0.89, p < 0.001). It was concluded that actigraphy is not identical with PSG recording but gives good results in sleep/wake patterns and predicting TST, SPT, SSE, SE and SL also in sleep apnoea patients not suffering from other sleep disorders. The difficult detection of correct sleep onset causes SSE and SL to be less predictable. Therefore a 15-epoch criterion was introduced and resulted in high correlation of 0.89 for sleep latency, but has to be tested on a bigger population

  4. Sleep disordered breathing in community psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstie N. Anderson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Sleep disturbance is prominent in many neuropsychiatric disorders and may precipitate or exacerbate a range of psychiatric conditions. Few studies have investigated sleep disordered breathing and in particular obstructive sleep apnoea in community psychiatric patients and the commonly used screening instruments have not been evaluated in patients with psychiatric disorders. The objective is to evaluate the prevalence of sleep disordered breathing in a community cohort with chronic mental illness on long term psychotropic medication, and to assess the effectiveness of commonly used screening instruments to detect abnormal sleep. Methods: 52 patients completed sleep questionnaires and 50 undertook overnight oximetry. Results: 52% (n = 26 had sleep-disordered breathing; 20% (n = 10 had moderate/severe sleep apnoea. The Epworth Sleepiness Score and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory did not predict sleep disordered breathing. Conclusions: Patients with psychiatric disorders in the community have a high rate of undiagnosed sleep disordered breathing, which is not reliably detected by established sleep disorder screening questionnaires.

  5. Management of obstructive sleep apnea in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fietze, I; Penzel, T; Alonderis, A;

    2011-01-01

    In Europe, the services provided for the investigation and management of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) varies from country to country. The aim of this questionnaire-based study was to investigate the current status of diagnostic pathways and therapeutic approaches applied in the treatment of OSA...

  6. [Sleep disturbances and spatial memory deficits in post-traumatic stress disorder: the case of L'Aquila (Central Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Michele; Mazza, Monica; Curcio, Giuseppe; Iaria, Giuseppe; De Gennaro, Luigi; Tempesta, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Altered sleep is a common and central symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In fact, sleep disturbances are included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) diagnostic criteria for PTSD. However, it has been hypothesized that sleep disturbances are crucially involved in the aetiology of PTSD, rather than being solely a symptom arising secondarily from this disorder. Therefore, knowing the long-term effects of a trauma can be essential to establish the need of specific interventions for the prevention and treatment of mental disorders that may persist years after a traumatic experience. In one study we showed, for the first time, that even after a period of two years people exposed to a catastrophic disaster such as the L'Aquila earthquake continue to suffer from a reduced sleep quality. Moreover, we observed that sleep quality scores decreased as a function of the proximity to the epicentre, suggesting that the psychological effects of an earthquake may be pervasive and long-lasting. It has been widely shown that disruption of sleep by acute stress may lead to deterioration in memory processing. In fact, in a recent study we observed alterations in spatial memory in PTSD subjects. Our findings indicated that PTSD is accompanied by an impressive deficit in forming a cognitive map of the environment, as well as in sleep-dependent memory consolidation. The fact that this deterioration was correlated to the subjective sleep disturbances in our PTSD group demonstrates the existence of an intimate relationship between sleep, memory consolidation, and stress. PMID:27291208

  7. Apnoea testing to confirm brain death in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Donselaar, C A; Meerwaldt, J D; van Gijn, J

    1986-09-01

    In six patients an apnoea test was carried out to confirm brain death according to a protocol recommended in the USA. After ten minutes' apnoea the pCO2 did not reach the target value of 7.98 kPa (60 mm Hg) in any of these patients. This was caused by the low initial value and the slow increase of the pCO2. Moreover, we could not confirm the belief that the necessary duration of the apnoea test can be predicted by assuming a rise of the pCO2 of 0.33 kPa (2.5 mm Hg) per minute.

  8. Apnoea testing to confirm brain death in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Donselaar, C A; Meerwaldt, J D; van Gijn, J

    1986-01-01

    In six patients an apnoea test was carried out to confirm brain death according to a protocol recommended in the USA. After ten minutes' apnoea the pCO2 did not reach the target value of 7.98 kPa (60 mm Hg) in any of these patients. This was caused by the low initial value and the slow increase of the pCO2. Moreover, we could not confirm the belief that the necessary duration of the apnoea test can be predicted by assuming a rise of the pCO2 of 0.33 kPa (2.5 mm Hg) per minute. PMID:3093640

  9. Population genetics of Glossina palpalis palpalis from central African sleeping sickness foci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solano Philippe

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glossina palpalis palpalis (Diptera: Glossinidae is widespread in west Africa, and is the main vector of sleeping sickness in Cameroon as well as in the Bas Congo Province of the Democratic Republic of Congo. However, little is known on the structure of its populations. We investigated G. p. palpalis population genetic structure in five sleeping sickness foci (four in Cameroon, one in Democratic Republic of Congo using eight microsatellite DNA markers. Results A strong isolation by distance explains most of the population structure observed in our sampling sites of Cameroon and DRC. The populations here are composed of panmictic subpopulations occupying fairly wide zones with a very strong isolation by distance. Effective population sizes are probably between 20 and 300 individuals and if we assume densities between 120 and 2000 individuals per km2, dispersal distance between reproducing adults and their parents extends between 60 and 300 meters. Conclusions This first investigation of population genetic structure of G. p. palpalis in Central Africa has evidenced random mating subpopulations over fairly large areas and is thus at variance with that found in West African populations of G. p. palpalis. This study brings new information on the isolation by distance at a macrogeographic scale which in turn brings useful information on how to organise regional tsetse control. Future investigations should be directed at temporal sampling to have more accurate measures of demographic parameters in order to help vector control decision.

  10. Chiari 1 malformation presenting as central sleep apnea during pregnancy: a case report, treatment considerations, and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik K. St. Louis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Chiari malformation (CM type 1 frequently causes obstructive or central sleep-disordered breathing (SDB in both adults and children, although SDB is relatively rare as a presenting manifestation in the absence of other neurological symptoms. The definitive treatment of symptomatic CM is surgical decompression. We report a case that is, to our knowledge, a novel manifestation of central sleep apnea (CSA due to CM type 1 with severe exacerbation and initial clinical presentation during pregnancy.Methods: Case report from tertiary care comprehensive sleep medicine center with literature review of sleep-disordered breathing manifestations associated with CM type 1. PubMed search was conducted between January 1982 and October 2013. Results: We report a 25-year-old woman with severe central sleep apnea initially presenting during her first pregnancy that eventually proved to be caused by CM type 1. The patient was successfully treated preoperatively by adaptive servoventilation (ASV, with effective resolution of sleep-disordered breathing following surgical decompression, and without recurrence in a subsequent pregnancy.Our literature review found that 58% of CM patients with SDB had OSA alone, 28% had CSA alone, 8 (10% had mixed OSA/CSA, and 6 (8% had hypoventilation. Of CM patients presenting with SDB, 50% had OSA, 42% had CSA, 8% had mixed OSA/CSA, and 10.4% had hypoventilation. We speculate that CSA may develop in CM patients in whom brainstem compression results in excessive central chemoreflex sensitivity with consequent hypocapnic CSA.Conclusions: CM type 1 may present with a diversity of SDB manifestations, and timely recognition and surgical referral are necessary to prevent further neurological deficits. ASV therapy can effectively manage CSA caused by CM type 1, which may initially present during pregnancy.

  11. Perioperative Management of Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzia A Khan

    2008-01-01

    The anaesthetic implications include the presence of comorbidities like cardiovascular, respiratory and cerebrovascular sequelae. Obesity is a commonly associated condition. Effects of sedatives, hypnotics and other anaesthetic drugs are of major concern and there are potential complications associated with the postoperative period. The purpose of this review is to update the readers on the recent literature available on the topic. The American Society of Anesthesiologists has recently suggested guidelines on the perioperative management of these patients.

  12. Sleep disordered breathing in interstitial lung disease: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, Lauren K; Corte, Tamera J

    2014-12-16

    Patients with interstitial lung disease commonly exhibit abnormal sleep architecture and increased sleep fragmentation on polysomnography. Fatigue is a frequent complaint, and it is likely that poor sleep quality is a significant contributor. A number of studies have shown that sleep disordered breathing is prevalent in this population, particularly in the idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis subgroup. The factors that predispose these patients to obstructive sleep apnoea are not well understood, however it is believed that reduced caudal traction on the upper airway can enhance collapsibility. Ventilatory control system instability may also be an important factor, particularly in those with increased chemo-responsiveness, and in hypoxic conditions. Transient, repetitive nocturnal oxygen desaturation is frequently observed in interstitial lung disease, both with and without associated obstructive apnoeas. There is increasing evidence that sleep-desaturation is associated with increased mortality, and may be important in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension in this population. PMID:25516856

  13. Cross-sectional Association between Walking Pace and Sleep-disordered Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, S V; Batterham, A M; Ells, L; Danjoux, G; Atkinson, G

    2015-10-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing is an important comorbidity for several diseases, including stroke. Initial screening tools comprise simple yes/no questions about known risk factors for sleep-disordered breathing, e.g., obesity, sex. But walking speed has not been investigated in this context. We examined the cross-sectional association between walking pace and sleep-disordered breathing in the population-level Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. A sample of 2912 men and 3213 women (46-87 years) reported perceived walking pace outside their homes. A walking pacesleep apnoea (3.5%), self-reported apnoeas (8.4%), loud snoring (20.5%), daytime tiredness (22.2%) and slow-walking pace (26.9%). The 95% CI risk differences (multivariable-adjusted) for slow vs. faster walking pace were; sleep apnoea (0.4-2.5%), self-reported apnoeas (0.1-3.8%), loud snoring (1.2-8.3%), and daytime tiredness (3.0-7.8%). Risk differences were similar between sexes. The multivariable-adjusted risk ratio indicated that slower walkers had 1.5 (95% CI: 1.0 to 2.1) times the risk of sleep apnoea vs. faster walkers. In conclusion, a slower walking speed was associated with a greater prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing, independently from other common screening factors. Therefore, a simple walking speed question may help consolidate screening for this disorder. PMID:26090878

  14. Sleep apnea syndrome: central sleep apnea and pulmonary hypertension worsened during treatment with auto-CPAP, but improved by adaptive servo-ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Kudoh, Shoji; Gemma, Akihiko

    2010-01-01

    In this 71-year-old man diagnosed as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome initially, the apnea-hypopnea index in polysomnography was 31.3/hour. He started auto-adjusted continuous positive airway pressure (auto-CPAP) treatment in July 2005 but developed congestive heart failure in December 2007. Pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), estimated by echocardiography, was 71 mmHg. In January 2008, during simplified sleep examination with a breath-movement sensor under auto-CPAP, many central-type apneas were recognized. After replacing auto-CPAP with adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV), the apnea-hypopnea index was 5.3/hour and PAP became 36 mmHg after 3 months. It was thought that the increase of PAP was due to long-term inadequate use of auto-CPAP.

  15. Sleep, obesity and physicians' education

    OpenAIRE

    Ratneswaran, Culadeeban; Kadhum, Murtaza; Pengo, Martino F.; Steier, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    More than two thirds of the US population is obese or overweight, with worldwide obesity rates doubling since 1980. Obesity causes serious health risks including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer (1). It is also associated with respiratory conditions like obesity hypoventilation syndrome, asthma and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Obesity causes a 6-fold increase in OSA prevalence (2) and over the last two decades, has caused a rise in the prevalence of OSA to 10% in middle-aged mal...

  16. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p3H](-) quinuclidinylbenzilate ([3H](-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, [3H]pirenzepine ([3H]PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and [3H]11-2-[[2-[(diethylamino) methyl]-1-piperidinyl] acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, ([3H]AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (Kd) and density (Bmax) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) [3H](-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity

  17. Tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy versus non-surgical management for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venekamp, Roderick P; Hearne, Benjamin J; Chandrasekharan, Deepak; Blackshaw, Helen; Lim, Jerome; Schilder, Anne G M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep-disordered breathing (oSDB) is a condition that encompasses breathing problems when asleep, due to an obstruction of the upper airways, ranging in severity from simple snoring to obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). It affects both children and adults. In children,

  18. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice. [Ethanol effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, M.; Ming, X.; McArdle, J.J. (Univ of Medical, Newark, NJ (USA))

    1989-02-09

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p<.01) greater. Binding assays for ({sup 3}H)(-) quinuclidinylbenzilate (({sup 3}H)(-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine (({sup 3}H)PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and ({sup 3}H)11-2-((2-((diethylamino) methyl)-1-piperidinyl) acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, (({sup 3}H)AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (K{sub d}) and density (B{sub max}) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) ({sup 3}H)(-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity.

  19. Sleep apnea and sleep : diagnostic aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Sahlin, Carin

    2009-01-01

    Background: Patients with sleep apnea have frequent apneas and hypopneas during sleep. Apneas can be either central or obstructive. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) is the mean number of apneas and hypopneas per hour of sleep. Aims: 1) To evaluate the effect of a mandibular advancement device on obstructive apneas and sleep; 2) to evaluate the influence of body position on central apnea frequency; 3) to investigate whether obstructive or central apnea is related to mortality in patients with st...

  20. Environmental noise and sleep disturbance: Research in central, eastern and south-eastern Europe and newly independent states

    OpenAIRE

    Gordana Ristovska; Jurgita Lekaviciute

    2013-01-01

    Countries from South-East Europe (SEE), Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and Newly Independent States (NIS) are in the process of harmonization with European environmental noise legislation. However, research work on noise and health was performed in some countries independently of harmonization process of adoption and implementation of legislation for environmental noise. Aim of this review is to summarize available evidence for noise induced sleep disturbance in population of CEE, SEE and N...

  1. Targeting the central nervous system with herpes simplex virus / Sleeping Beauty hybrid amplicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Suresh; Bowers, William J

    2011-10-01

    The pursuits of sustainable treatments for diseases and disorders that afflict the central nervous system (CNS) have proven challenging for the field of viral vector-based gene therapy. However, recent advances in viral vector technology coupled with efficient delivery methods have opened up new avenues that show promise at the preclinical testing stage. The development of the Herpes Simplex Virus/Sleeping Beauty (HSV/SB) hybrid vector represents such an advance for devising treatments targeting the CNS with its potential for stably integrating large transgenomic segments of DNA within the genomes of transduced cells. In utero administration of this hybrid vector into the embryonic mouse brain has revealed the capacity for widespread transgene dissemination due to the targeting of a neuronal precursor cell population. This unique feature has provided the means to stably express a transgene throughout the brain for prolonged periods, which is a prerequisite for the treatment of progressive CNS disorders. In this review we provide a comprehensive breakdown of the characteristics of the HSV/SB vector system and how it can be efficiently employed in the derivation of CNS-targeted gene therapeutic strategies.

  2. Sleep in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Disorders of sleep are an integral part of neurodegenerative diseases and include insomnia, sleep-wake cycle disruption, excessive daytime sleepiness that may be manifested as persistent somnolence or sudden onset of sleep episodes, obstructive and central sleep apnea, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, and restless legs syndrome. The origin of these sleep disorders is multifactorial including degeneration of the brain areas that modulate sleep, the symptoms of the disease, and the effect of medications. Treatment of sleep disorders in patients with neurodegenerative diseases should be individualized and includes behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, bright light therapy, melatonin, hypnotics, waking-promoting agents, and continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26972029

  3. Central nervous system and peripheral immune functions and the sleep-wake system.

    OpenAIRE

    Moldofsky, H

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the relationship of aspects of the immune system to the sleep-wake system in animals and humans. In addition to the influence of certain cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) on the sleeping-waking brain, circadian measures of plasma IL-1 and peripheral immune cellular functions, for example, natural killer cell activities and cortisol are related to the sleep-wake system in humans. Changes in the circadian patterns of immune functions over the menstrual cycle are associat...

  4. Sleep disorders in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santo, R M; Perna, A; Di Iorio, B R; Cirillo, M

    2010-03-01

    Sleep disorders are common in patients with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. However also a well functioning renal graft does not cure the poor sleep pattern which now emerges as a problem even in early chronic kidney disease (CKD). When patients are made aware for the first time of a disease such as CKD, which may brink to dialysis or at the best to a renal transplant patients begin to experience a disordered sleep. Sleeping disorders include insomnia (I), sleep apnoea (SAS), restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), excessive daily sleeping (EDS), sleepwalking, nightmares, and narcolepsy. Disordered sleep did not meet the clinical and scientific interest it deserves, in addition and we do not have a well defined solution for sleeping complaints. However, awareness that a poor sleep is associated with poor quality of life and carries an increase in mortality risk has recently stimulated interest in the field. There are many putative causes for a disordered sleep in chronic kidney disease and in end-stage renal disease. For a unifying hypothesis demographic factors, lifestyles, disease related factors, psychological factors, treatment related factors, and social factor must be taken into consideration. PMID:20424573

  5. A novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of central sleep apnea: The remedē® system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) occurs primarily in cardiovascular patients and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The disorder often is unrecognized due to the overlap of symptoms with those of the underlying cardiac disease. CSA can be easily diagnosed with a sleep study. Following optimization of all co-morbidities, the therapeutic approach available currently focuses on mask-based therapies which suffer from poor patient adherence. A new therapy, the remedē® System, has been developed; it utilizes a transvenous, fully implantable system providing phrenic nerve stimulation intended to restore a more normal breathing pattern. The therapy demonstrated promising results based on an initial chronic study and a randomized trial is underway to further evaluate safety and efficacy of this novel system in patients with CSA

  6. A novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of central sleep apnea: The remedē{sup ®} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germany, Robin, E-mail: rgermany@respicardia.com [University of Oklahoma School of Medicine (United States); Joseph, Susan [Washington University School of Medicine (United States); James, Kristofer [Respicardia, Inc., Hopkins, MN (United States); Kao, Andrew [University of Missouri School of Medicine, Kansas City (United States); St. Luke' s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) occurs primarily in cardiovascular patients and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The disorder often is unrecognized due to the overlap of symptoms with those of the underlying cardiac disease. CSA can be easily diagnosed with a sleep study. Following optimization of all co-morbidities, the therapeutic approach available currently focuses on mask-based therapies which suffer from poor patient adherence. A new therapy, the remedē{sup ®} System, has been developed; it utilizes a transvenous, fully implantable system providing phrenic nerve stimulation intended to restore a more normal breathing pattern. The therapy demonstrated promising results based on an initial chronic study and a randomized trial is underway to further evaluate safety and efficacy of this novel system in patients with CSA.

  7. Otorhinolaryngological aspects of sleep-related breathing disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Virk, Jagdeep S.; Kotecha, Bhik

    2016-01-01

    Snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) are disorders within a wide spectrum of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD). Given the obesity epidemic, these conditions will become increasingly prevalent and continue to serve as a large economic burden. A thorough clinical evaluation and appropriate investigations will allow stratification of patients into appropriate treatment groups. A multidisciplinary team is required to manage these patients. Patient selection is critical in ensuring su...

  8. Doxapram Use for Apnoea of Prematurity in Neonatal Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Prins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Apnoea of prematurity is treated with noninvasive respiratory therapy and methylxanthines. For therapy unresponsive apnoea doxapram is often prescibed in preterm neonates. The duration, dosage and route of administration of doxapram together with its efficacy was evaluated in two Dutch neonatal intensive care. Outcome concerning short-term safety and neonatal morbidity were evaluated. During 5 years, 122 of 1,501 admitted newborns <32 weeks of gestational age received doxapram. 64.8% of patients did not need intubation after doxapram. 25% of treated neonates were <27 weeks of gestation. A positive response to doxapram therapy on apnoea was associated with longer duration of doxapram usage (P<0.001, lower mean doses (P<0.003, and less days of intensive care (median 33 versus 42 days; P<0.002. No patients died during doxapram therapy. Incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis, intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, retinopathy of prematurity, persistent ductus arteriosus, or worsening of pulmonary condition did not increase during doxapram therapy. Doxapram is frequently used for apnoea of prematurity, despite a lack of data on short-term efficacy and long-term safety. Until efficacy and safety are confirmed in prospective trials, doxapram should be used with caution.

  9. Reorganization of neuronal circuits of the central olfactory system during postprandial sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eYamaguchi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plastic changes in neuronal circuits often occur in association with specific behavioral states. In this review, we focus on an emerging view that neuronal circuits in the olfactory system are reorganized along the wake-sleep cycle. Olfaction is crucial to sustaining the animals’ life, and odor-guided behaviors have to be newly acquired or updated to successfully cope with a changing odor world. It is therefore likely that neuronal circuits in the olfactory system are highly plastic and undergo repeated reorganization in daily life. A remarkably plastic feature of the olfactory system is that newly generated neurons are continually integrated into neuronal circuits of the olfactory bulb (OB throughout life. New neurons in the OB undergo an extensive selection process, during which many are eliminated by apoptosis for the fine tuning of neuronal circuits. The life and death decision of new neurons occurs extensively during a short time window of sleep after food consumption (postprandial sleep, a typical daily olfactory behavior. We review recent studies that explain how olfactory information is transferred between the OB and the olfactory cortex (OC along the course of the wake-sleep cycle. Olfactory sensory input is effectively transferred from the OB to the OC during waking, while synchronized top-down inputs from the OC to the OB are promoted during the slow-wave sleep. We discuss possible neuronal circuit mechanisms for the selection of new neurons in the OB, which involves the encoding of olfactory sensory inputs and memory trace formation during waking and internally generated activities in the OC and OB during subsequent sleep. The plastic changes in the OB and OC are well coordinated along the course of olfactory behavior during wakefulness and postbehavioral rest and sleep. We therefore propose that the olfactory system provides an excellent model in which to understand behavioral state-dependent plastic mechanisms of the neuronal

  10. Sleep Sleeping Patch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Sleep Sleeping Patch is a new kind of external patch based on modern sleep medicine research achievements, which uses the internationally advanced transdermal therapeutic system (TTS). The Sleep Sleeping Patch transmits natural sleep inducers such as peppermint and liquorice extracts and melatonin through the skin to induce sleep. Clinical research proves that the Sleep Sleeping Patch can effectively improve insomnia and the quality of sleep. Highly effective: With the modern TTS therapy,

  11. Sleep and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Debt Sleep Deprivation Sleep Disorders Sleep history Sleep hygiene sleep length Sleep Need Sleep talking Sleeping Pills ... culture Immune System military travel CDC Healthy Sleep Sleep hygiene sleep length Sleep Debt Sleep Deprivation Sleep Need ...

  12. Sleeping arrangements and mass distribution of bed nets in six districts in central and northern Mozambique

    OpenAIRE

    Plucinski, M. M.; Chicuecue, S.; Macete, E.; Chambe, G. A.; Muguande, O.; Matsinhe, G.; Colborn, J.; Yoon, S. S.; Doyle, T J; Kachur, S. P.; Aide, P; Alonso, P. L.; Guinovart, C.; Morgan, J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Universal coverage with insecticide-treated bed nets is a cornerstone of modern malaria control. Mozambique has developed a novel bed net allocation strategy, where the number of bed nets allocated per household is calculated on the basis of household composition and assumptions about who sleeps with whom. We set out to evaluate the performance of the novel allocation s...

  13. Social consequences of sleep disordered breathing on patients and their partners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Ibsen, Rikke Falkner; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the total costs to patients and their partners of sleep apnoea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) and their treatment, as this is poorly described in families. Using data from the Danish National Patient Registry and other public databases, all patients and their part......We aimed to evaluate the total costs to patients and their partners of sleep apnoea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) and their treatment, as this is poorly described in families. Using data from the Danish National Patient Registry and other public databases, all patients...... and their partners with a diagnosis of sleep apnoea (n=30,278) or OHS (n=1562) were included. They were compared with age-, sex- and community location-matched citizens at a ratio 1:4 (120,506 and 6241 control subjects, respectively). Direct and indirect costs were evaluated for patients and their partners. Sleep...... apnoea and OHS patients and their partners had higher rates of health-related contact, medication use and unemployment, and lower income levels. Excess yearly direct net health and foregone earnings (indirect costs) were €2174 and €7981 prior to diagnosis, and €3988 and €12,022 after diagnosis for sleep...

  14. Assessment of central chemosensitivity and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity using I-123 MIBG imaging in central sleep apnea syndrome in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine-123 m-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging has been used to study cardiac sympathetic function in various cardiac diseases. Central sleep apnea syndrome (CSAS) occurs frequently in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and is reported to be associated with a poor prognosis. One of the mechanisms of its poor prognosis may be related to impaired cardiac sympathetic activity. However, the relationship between chemosensitivity to carbon dioxide, which is reported to correlate with the severity of CSAS, and cardiac sympathetic activity has not been investigated. Therefore, this study was undertaken to assess cardiac sympathetic function and chemosensitivity to carbon dioxide in CHF patients. The oxygen desaturation index (ODI) was evaluated in 21 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (male/female: 19/2, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)5 times/h underwent polysomnography. Patients with an apnea hypopnea index >15/h but without evidence of obstructive apnea were defined as having CSAS. Early (15 min) and delayed (4 hr) planar MIBG images were obtained from these patients. The mean counts in the whole heart and the mediastinum were obtained. The heart-to-mediastinum count ratio of the delayed image (H/M) and the corrected myocardial washout rate (WR) were also calculated. The central chemoreflex was assessed with the rebreathing method using a hypercapnic gas mixture (7% CO2 and 93% O2). Ten of the 21 patients had CSAS. The H/M ratio was similar in patients both with and without CSAS (1.57±0.18 vs. 1.59±0.14, p=0.82). However, the WR was higher in patients with CSAS than in patients without CSAS (40±8% vs. 30±12%, p<0.05). ODI significantly correlated with central chemosensitivity to carbon dioxide. Moreover, there was a highly significant correlation between WR and central chemosensitivity (r=0.65, p<0.05). However, there was no correlation between ODI and the WR (r=0.36, p=0.11). Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with CHF and CSAS is

  15. Complexity measures of the central respiratory networks during wakefulness and sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragomir, Andrei; Akay, Yasemin; Curran, Aidan K.; Akay, Metin

    2008-06-01

    Since sleep is known to influence respiratory activity we studied whether the sleep state would affect the complexity value of the respiratory network output. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that the complexity values of the diaphragm EMG (EMGdia) activity would be lower during REM compared to NREM. Furthermore, since REM is primarily generated by a homogeneous population of neurons in the medulla, the possibility that REM-related respiratory output would be less complex than that of the awake state was also considered. Additionally, in order to examine the influence of neuron vulnerabilities within the rostral ventral medulla (RVM) on the complexity of the respiratory network output, we inhibited respiratory neurons in the RVM by microdialysis of GABAA receptor agonist muscimol. Diaphragm EMG, nuchal EMG, EEG, EOG as well as other physiological signals (tracheal pressure, blood pressure and respiratory volume) were recorded from five unanesthetized chronically instrumented intact piglets (3-10 days old). Complexity of the diaphragm EMG (EMGdia) signal during wakefulness, NREM and REM was evaluated using the approximate entropy method (ApEn). ApEn values of the EMGdia during NREM and REM sleep were found significantly (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively) lower than those of awake EMGdia after muscimol inhibition. In the absence of muscimol, only the differences between REM and wakefulness ApEn values were found to be significantly different.

  16. Sleep disorders and acute nocturnal delirium in the elderly: a comorbidity not to be overlooked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzaghi, Michele; Sartori, Ivana; Rustioni, Valter; Manni, Raffaele

    2014-04-01

    Delirium is a disturbance of consciousness and cognition that results in a confusional state. It tends to fluctuate in intensity and is often observed in older patients. Sleep is a window of vulnerability for the occurrence of delirium and sleep disorders can play a role in its appearance. In particular, delirious episodes have been associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, which is reported to be frequent in the elderly. Hereby, we present a case-report documenting the sudden onset of a confusional state triggered by obstructive sleep apnoea-induced arousal, together with a review of the literature on the topic. We emphasise that, among the many pathogenic factors implicated in delirium, it is worth considering the possible link between nocturnal delirium and the occurrence of impaired arousals. Indeed, the complex confusional manifestations of delirium could be due, in part, to persistence of dysfunctional sleep activity resulting in an inability to sustain full arousal during behavioural wakefulness. Arousals can be triggered by sleep disturbances or other medical conditions. Clinicians should be aware that older patients may present disordered sleep patterns, and make investigation of sleep patterns and disorders potentially affecting sleep continuity a key part of their clinical workup, especially in the presence of cognitive comorbidities. Correct diagnosis and optimal treatment of sleep disorders and disrupted sleep can have a significant impact in the elderly, improving sleep quality and reducing the occurrence of abnormal sleep-related behaviours. PMID:24636782

  17. [The NHG guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damen-van Beek, Zamire; Lucassen, Peter L B J; Gorgels, Wim; Smelt, Antonette F H; Knuistingh Neven, Arie; Bouma, Margriet

    2015-01-01

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' (NHG) guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills' provides recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of the most prevalent sleep problems and for the management of chronic users of sleeping pills. The preferred approach for sleeplessness is not to prescribe medication but to give information and behavioural advice. Practice assistants of the Dutch Association of Mental Health and Addiction Care are also expected to be able to undertake this management. The GP may consider prescribing sleeping pills for a short period only in cases of severe insomnia with considerable distress. Chronic users of sleeping pills should be advised by the GP to stop using them or to reduce the dose gradually (controlled dose reduction). The GP may refer patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) to a pulmonary or ear, nose and throat specialist or neurologist for further diagnosis depending on the regional arrangements. The GP may then consider the cardiovascular risk factors commonly present with OSA. In patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) who continue to experience major distress despite being given advice without the prescription of medication, the GP may consider prescribing a dopamine agonist. PMID:25804114

  18. Automated detection of sleep apnea from electrocardiogram signals using nonlinear parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sleep apnoea is a very common sleep disorder which can cause symptoms such as daytime sleepiness, irritability and poor concentration. To monitor patients with this sleeping disorder we measured the electrical activity of the heart. The resulting electrocardiography (ECG) signals are both non-stationary and nonlinear. Therefore, we used nonlinear parameters such as approximate entropy, fractal dimension, correlation dimension, largest Lyapunov exponent and Hurst exponent to extract physiological information. This information was used to train an artificial neural network (ANN) classifier to categorize ECG signal segments into one of the following groups: apnoea, hypopnoea and normal breathing. ANN classification tests produced an average classification accuracy of 90%; specificity and sensitivity were 100% and 95%, respectively. We have also proposed unique recurrence plots for the normal, hypopnea and apnea classes. Detecting sleep apnea with this level of accuracy can potentially reduce the need of polysomnography (PSG). This brings advantages to patients, because the proposed system is less cumbersome when compared to PSG

  19. The Clinical Usefulness of Sleep Studies in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Virginia X Noronha; Teng, Arthur Y

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disordered breathing is common in children and has the potential to have a significant impact on cognition, activity and social interaction. The overnight in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) continues to be the gold standard instrument for the investigation of sleep-disordered breathing in children. It has the ability to rule in or rule out the need for intervention for common conditions such as obstructive sleep apnoea, assess the role of sleep quality in children and adolescents with hypersomnolence, provide physiologic data in children with hypoventilation as may be seen in neuromuscular disease and assist in the assessment of children with structural airway and lung abnormalities. Polysomnography is valuable and the only reliable method to differentiate habitual snoring from many levels of sleep apnoea syndrome [1]. The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends that, in order to diagnose and manage OSA syndrome, all children should be screened for snoring and complex cases should be referred to a specialist. PSG is the diagnostic gold standard and adenotonsillectomy is the first line of treatment [2]. There is no evidence to support nap studies or ambulatory sleep studies in children [3]. With adequate staffing, expertise, and a child and family-friendly environment, children of any age can undergo a sleep study.

  20. Effects of body mass index on sleep patterns during pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennelly, M M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to profile sleep patterns during pregnancy according to body mass index (BMI) and to correlate labour outcomes with both BMI and hours sleep. Data were collected from 200 postpartum women detailing sleep characteristics before and during pregnancy. A validated sleep questionnaire was employed, which comprised of questions about sleep apnoea, snoring, subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, use of sleeping medication and daytime dysfunction. Descriptive analyses were used. With advancing gestation, the mean (SD) number of hours sleep per night declined: pre-pregnancy 8.1 (SD 1.4); 1st trimester 8.3 (SD 1.8); 2nd trimester 7.7 (SD 1.7) and 3rd trimester 6.7 (SD 2.2). In the 18.5-24.9 BMI group, there was a marked difference in hours sleep per night from pre-pregnancy to 1st (8.6 h, p = 0.007), 2nd (7.9 h, p = 0.023) and 3rd (6.4 h, p = 0.000) trimesters in primiparous women. In the 25-29.9 BMI group, there was a difference from pre-pregnancy to 3rd trimester (p = 0.000). These changes were not reflected in a clinically significant difference in birth weight or mode of delivery.

  1. OBSERVATION OF MOVEMENTS DURING SLEEP IN ALTE (APPARENT LIFE-THREATENING EVENT) AND APNEIC INFANTS - A PILOT-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EINSPIELER, C; PRECHTL, HFR; VANEYKERN, L; DEROOS, B

    1994-01-01

    Fourteen infants of 2 months or 6 months of age were video-recorded during polysomnography. Four were normal infants, five had a history of ALTE (apparent life threatening event) and five had repeated and prolonged apnoea during sleep. Two ALTE infants have been recorded at 2 months as well as at 6

  2. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziebło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. Material/Methods In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I–III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e’) assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR – CSR_ [−] (n=110). Results CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (pCSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, pCSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR. PMID:27558771

  3. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziębło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. MATERIAL AND METHODS In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I-III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e') assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR - CSR_ [-] (n=110). RESULTS CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (pCSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, pCSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR. PMID:27558771

  4. Abnormal Intrinsic Functional Hubs in Severe Male Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Evidence from a Voxel-Wise Degree Centrality Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi; Gong, Honghan; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Xianjun; Ye, Chenglong; Nie, Si; Chen, Liting; Peng, Dechang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with changes in brain structure and regional function in certain brain areas. However, the functional features of network organization in the whole brain remain largely uncertain. The purpose of this study was to identify the OSA-related spatial centrality distribution of the whole brain functional network and to investigate the potential altered intrinsic functional hubs. Methods Forty male patients with newly confirmed severe OSA on polysomnography, and well-matched good sleepers, participated in this study. All participants underwent a resting-state functional MRI scan and clinical and cognitive evaluation. Voxel-wise degree centrality (DC) was measured across the whole brain, and group difference in DC was compared. The relationship between the abnormal DC value and clinical variables was assessed using a linear correlation analysis. Results Remarkably similar spatial distributions of the functional hubs (high DC) were found in both groups. However, OSA patients exhibited a pattern of significantly reduced regional DC in the left middle occipital gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, left superior frontal gyrus, and bilateral inferior parietal lobule, and DC was increased in the right orbital frontal cortex, bilateral cerebellum posterior lobes, and bilateral lentiform nucleus, including the putamen, extending to the hippocampus, and the inferior temporal gyrus, which overlapped with the functional hubs. Furthermore, a linear correlation analysis revealed that the DC value in the posterior cingulate cortex and left superior frontal gyrus were positively correlated with Montreal cognitive assessment scores, The DC value in the left middle occipital gyrus and bilateral inferior parietal lobule were negatively correlated with apnea-hypopnea index and arousal index in OSA patients. Conclusion Our findings suggest that OSA patients exhibited specific abnormal intrinsic functional hubs including relatively

  5. A systematic review on prevalence and risk factors associated with treatment- emergent central sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Nigam

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The aggregate point prevalence of TECSA is about 8% with the estimated range varying from 5% to 20% in patients with untreated OSA. The prevalence tends to be higher for split-night studies compared to full night titration studies. TECSA can occur at any CPAP setting although extremely high CPAP settings could increase the likelihood. Male gender, higher baseline apnea-hypopnea index, and central apnea index at the time of diagnostic study could be associated with the development of TECSA at a subsequent titration study.

  6. Hippocampal hypertrophy and sleep apnea: a role for the ischemic preconditioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Ivana; Kempton, Matthew J; Crum, William R; Glasser, Martin; Milosevic, Milan; Beniczky, Sandor; Corfield, Douglas R; Williams, Steven C; Morrell, Mary J

    2013-01-01

    The full impact of multisystem disease such as obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) on regions of the central nervous system is debated, as the subsequent neurocognitive sequelae are unclear. Several preclinical studies suggest that its purported major culprits, intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, can differentially affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Although the prospective biphasic nature of chronic intermittent hypoxia in animal models of OSA has been acknowledged, so far the evidence for increased 'compensatory' neurogenesis in humans is uncertain. In a cross-sectional study of 32 patients with mixed severity OSA and 32 non-apnoeic matched controls inferential analysis showed bilateral enlargement of hippocampi in the OSA group. Conversely, a trend for smaller thalami in the OSA group was noted. Furthermore, aberrant connectivity between the hippocampus and the cerebellum in the OSA group was also suggested by the correlation analysis. The role for the ischemia/hypoxia preconditioning in the neuropathology of OSA is herein indicated, with possible further reaching clinical implications. PMID:24349453

  7. Hippocampal hypertrophy and sleep apnea: a role for the ischemic preconditioning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Rosenzweig

    Full Text Available The full impact of multisystem disease such as obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA on regions of the central nervous system is debated, as the subsequent neurocognitive sequelae are unclear. Several preclinical studies suggest that its purported major culprits, intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, can differentially affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Although the prospective biphasic nature of chronic intermittent hypoxia in animal models of OSA has been acknowledged, so far the evidence for increased 'compensatory' neurogenesis in humans is uncertain. In a cross-sectional study of 32 patients with mixed severity OSA and 32 non-apnoeic matched controls inferential analysis showed bilateral enlargement of hippocampi in the OSA group. Conversely, a trend for smaller thalami in the OSA group was noted. Furthermore, aberrant connectivity between the hippocampus and the cerebellum in the OSA group was also suggested by the correlation analysis. The role for the ischemia/hypoxia preconditioning in the neuropathology of OSA is herein indicated, with possible further reaching clinical implications.

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea in severe mental disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Szaulińska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is estimated to be 3–7.5% in men and 2–3% in women. In mentally ill population it is even higher, as these patients are a high risk OSA group. The aim of the paper was a review of literature about the prevalence of sleep apnoea in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and recurrent depressive disorder.The available data show that OSA is present in 15–48% of patients with schizophrenia, 21–43% of patients with bipolar disorder and 11–18% of patients with recurrent depressive disorder. The lack of diagnosis of OSA in people with mental illnesses has multiple negative consequences. The symptoms of sleep apnoea might imitate the symptoms of mental illnesses such as negative symptoms of schizophrenia and symptoms of depression, they might as well aggravate the cognitive impairment. A number of the drugs used in mental disorders may aggravate the symptoms of OSA. OSA is as well the risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases which are a serious clinical problem in mentally ill people and contribute to shortening of their expected lifespan. From the point of view of the physicians treating OSA it is important to pay attention to the fact that co-existing depression is the most common reason for resistant daytime sleepiness in OSA patients treated effectively with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP. CPAP therapy leads to significant improvement of mood. However, in schizophrenia and bipolar patients it may rarely lead to acute worsening of mental state, exacerbation of psychotic symptoms or phase shift from depression to mania.

  9. Sleep disorders in COPD: the forgotten dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter T. McNicholas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is commonly associated with oxygen desaturation, which may exceed the degree of desaturation during maximum exercise, both subjectively and objectively impairing sleep quality. The mechanisms of desaturation include hypoventilation and ventilation to perfusion mismatching. The consequences of this desaturation include cardiac arrhythmias, pulmonary hypertension and nocturnal death, especially during acute exacerbations. Coexistence of COPD and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA, referred to as overlap syndrome, has been estimated to occur in 1% of the general adult population. Overlap patients have worse sleep-related hypoxaemia and hypercapnia than patients with COPD or OSA alone. OSA has a similar prevalence in COPD as in a general population of similar age, but oxygen desaturation during sleep is more pronounced when the two conditions coexist. Management of sleep-related problems in COPD should particularly focus on minimising sleep disturbance via measures to limit cough and dyspnoea; nocturnal oxygen therapy is not generally indicated for isolated nocturnal hypoxaemia. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure alleviates hypoxaemia, reduces hospitalisation and pulmonary hypertension, and improves survival.

  10. Sleep Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Sleep Problems Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... PDF 474KB) En Español Medicines to Help You Sleep Tips for Better Sleep Basic Facts about Sleep ...

  11. Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the day, even if you have had enough sleep? You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Insomnia - a hard time falling or staying asleep Sleep apnea - breathing interruptions during sleep Restless legs syndrome - ...

  12. Sleep disturbances in menopausal women: Aetiology and practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyneel, Marie

    2015-07-01

    Sleep deteriorates with age. The menopause is often a turning point for women's sleep, as complaints of insomnia increase significantly thereafter. Insomnia can occur as a secondary disorder to hot flashes, mood disorders, medical conditions, psychosocial factors, underlying intrinsic sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) or restless legs syndrome (RLS), or it can be a primary disorder. Since unrecognized OSA can have dramatic health-related consequences, menopausal women complaining of persisting sleep disturbances suggesting primary insomnia or intrinsic sleep disorders should be referred to a sleep specialist for a comprehensive sleep assessment. Patients suffering from primary insomnia will be preferentially treated with non-benzodiazepine hypnotics or melatonin, or with cognitive behavioural therapy. Insomnia related to vasomotor symptoms can be improved with hormone replacement therapy. Gabapentin and isoflavones have also shown efficacy in small series but their precise role has yet to be established. In patients suffering from OSA, non-pharmacological therapy will be applied: continuous positive airway pressure or an oral appliance, according to the severity of the disorder. In the case of RLS, triggering factors must be avoided; dopaminergic agonists are the first-line treatment for moderate to severe disease. In conclusion, persisting sleep complaints should be addressed in menopausal women, in order to correctly diagnose the specific causal disorder and to prescribe treatments that have been shown to improve sleep quality, quality of life and long-term health status. PMID:26002789

  13. End-Tidal CO2 Tension Is Predictive of Effective Nocturnal Oxygen Therapy in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Koichiro; Shinozaki, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ogawa, Hiromasa; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is characterized by recurring cycles of crescendo-decrescendo ventilation during sleep, and enhances sympathetic nerve activity. Thus CSA has a prognostic impact in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Although nocturnal oxygen (O2) therapy decreases frequency of CSA and improves functional exercise capacity, it is also known that some non-responders to the therapy exist. We thus aimed to identify predictors of responders to nocturnal O2 therapy in CHF patients with CSA. In 12 CHF patients with CSA hospitalized at our department, sleep study was performed at 2 consecutive nights. Patients nasally inhaled O2 at either the first or second night in a randomized manner. To predict the percentage reduction in apnea-hypopnea index (%ΔAHI) in response to the nocturnal O2 therapy, we performed multiple regression analysis with a stepwise method with variables including age, brain-natriuretic peptide, circulation time, baseline AHI, hypercapnic ventilatory response and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PETCO2). Nocturnal O2 therapy significantly decreased AHI (from 32 ± 13 /h to 12 ± 10 /h, P 50% reduction of AHI), with 88.9% of sensitivity and 66.7% of specificity. In conclusion, PETCO2 is useful to predict the efficacy of O2 therapy in CHF patients with CSA, providing important information to the current nocturnal O2 therapy.

  14. miRNA profiles in plasma from patients with sleep disorders reveal dysregulation of miRNAs in narcolepsy and other central hypersomnias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anja; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Knudsen, Stine;

    2014-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human diseases including neurological disorders. The aim is to address the involvement of miRNAs in the pathophysiology of central hypersomnias including autoimmune narcolepsy with cataplexy and hypocretin deficiency...... controls using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) panels. SETTING: University hospital based sleep clinic and research laboratories. PATIENTS: Twelve patients with type 1 narcolepsy, 12 patients with type 2 narcolepsy, 12 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia, and 12 healthy controls...

  15. Association between Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Neuropsychological Performance in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpening, Zoe; Lewis, Simon J G; Yee, Brendon J; Grunstein, Ron R; Hickie, Ian B; Naismith, Sharon L

    2015-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing in middle-age and older adults has been shown to be linked to a range of neuropsychological deficits, but the extent to which these relationships are evident in older people 'at risk' of developing dementia in unknown. In this study, we aimed to determine whether changes in sleep-disordered breathing and sleep fragmentation during nocturnal sleep were related to neuropsychological dysfunction in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Forty-six patients with MCI (mean age = 66.1 y, sd = 8.4) and 40 age-matched healthy controls (mean age = 63.5 y, sd = 8.9) underwent psychiatric, medical, and neuropsychological assessment, in addition to overnight polysomnography and self-report questionnaires. Measures of hypoxemia, sleep fragmentation, and sleep quality were derived including the apnoea-hypopnea index, oxygen desaturation index, percentage of total sleep time spent below 90% oxygen saturation, arousal index, sleep efficiency, and wake after sleep onset. Patients with MCI did not differ from healthy aging on any measure of sleep-disordered breathing or sleep fragmentation. In MCI, processing speed was negatively correlated with greater sleep time spent below 90% oxygen saturation and a higher apnoea-hypopnea index. In contrast, in the healthy aging, processing speed was negatively correlated with an increased oxygen desaturation index and the arousal index. Sleep-disordered breathing is evident in both healthy aging and MCI with associated decrements in processing speed. Future research is needed to determine the unique and synergistic effects of these differential associations, their potential to inform disease trajectory, and possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:25720400

  16. Robust classification of neonatal apnoea-related desaturations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory signals monitored in the neonatal intensive care units are usually ignored due to the high prevalence of noise and false alarms (FA). Apneic events are generally therefore indicated by a pulse oximeter alarm reacting to the subsequent desaturation. However, the high FA rate in the photoplethysmogram may desensitize staff, reducing the reaction speed. The main reason for the high FA rates of critical care monitors is the unimodal analysis behaviour. In this work, we propose a multimodal analysis framework to reduce the FA rate in neonatal apnoea monitoring. Information about oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiratory rate and signal quality was extracted from electrocardiogram, impedance pneumogram and photoplethysmographic signals for a total of 20 features in the 5 min interval before a desaturation event. 1616 desaturation events from 27 neonatal admissions were annotated by two independent reviewers as true (physiologically relevant) or false (noise-related). Patients were divided into two independent groups for training and validation, and a support vector machine was trained to classify the events as true or false. The best classification performance was achieved on a combination of 13 features with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 100% in the training set, and a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 91% and an accuracy of 90% in the validation set. (paper)

  17. Variability of human upper airway collapsibility during sleep and the influence of body posture and sleep stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jeremy S L; Touyz, Gabby; Tanner, Sue; Hillman, David R; Eastwood, Peter R; Walsh, Jennifer H

    2011-12-01

    The critical pressure at which the pharynx collapses (Pcrit) is an objective measurement of upper airway collapsibility, an important pathogenetic factor in obstructive sleep apnoea. This study examined the inherent variability of passive Pcrit measurement during sleep and evaluated the effects of sleep stage and body posture on Pcrit. Repeated measurements of Pcrit were assessed in 23 individuals (15 male) with diagnosed obstructive sleep apnoea throughout a single overnight sleep study. Body posture and sleep stage were unrestricted. Applied upper airway pressure was repetitively reduced to obtain multiple measurements of Pcrit. In 20 subjects multiple measurements of Pcrit were obtained. The overall coefficient of repeatability for Pcrit measurement was 4.1 cm H₂O. Considering only the lateral posture, the coefficient was 4.8 cm H₂O. It was 3.3 cm H₂O in the supine posture. Pcrit decreased from the supine to lateral posture [supine mean 2.5 cm H₂O, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-3.6; lateral mean 0.3 cm H₂O, 95% CI -0.8-1.4, P = 0.007] but did not vary with sleep stage (P = 0.91). This study has shown that the overall coefficient of repeatability was 4.1 cm H₂O, implying that the minimum detectable difference, with 95% probability, between two repeated Pcrit measurements in an individual is 4.1 cm H₂O. Such variability in overnight measures of Pcrit indicates that a single unqualified value of Pcrit cannot be used to characterize an individual's overall collapsibility during sleep. When within-subject variability is accounted for, change in body posture from supine to lateral significantly decreases passive pharyngeal collapsibility. PMID:21554464

  18. Complex Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Talha Khan; Rose Amy Franco

    2014-01-01

    Complex sleep apnea is the term used to describe a form of sleep disordered breathing in which repeated central apneas (>5/hour) persist or emerge when obstructive events are extinguished with positive airway pressure (PAP) and for which there is not a clear cause for the central apneas such as narcotics or systolic heart failure. The driving forces in the pathophysiology are felt to be ventilator instability associated oscillation in PaCO2 arterial partial pressure of Carbon Dioxide, continu...

  19. Treatment of sleep central apnea with non-invasive mechanical ventilation with 2 levels of positive pressure (bilevel) in a patient with myotonic dystrophy type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamine, Ricardo Tera; Grossklauss, Luís Fernando; Moreira, Gustavo Antonio; Pradella-Hallinan, Marcia; Chiéia, Marco Antônio; Mesquita, Denis; Bulle Oliveira, Acary Souza; Tufik, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting a case of a 29 year-old female with diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (Steinert’s disease) with excessive daytime sleepiness, muscle fatigue, snoring, frequent arousals, non-restorative sleep, and witnessed apneas. Pulmonary function tests revealed a mild decrease of forced vital capacity. Nocturnal polysomnography showed an increase of apnea/hypopnea index (85.9 events/h), mainly of central type (236), minimal oxygen saturation of 72%, and end-tidal carbon dioxide values that varied from 45 to 53 mmHg. Bi-level positive airway pressure titration was initiated at an inspiratory pressure (IPAP) of 8 and an expiratory pressure (EPAP) of 4 cm H2O. IPAP was then gradually increased to eliminate respiratory events and improve oxygen saturation. An IPAP of 12cm H20 and an EPAP of 4cm H2O eliminated all respiratory events, and the oxygen saturation remained above 90%. Bi-level positive airway pressure treatment at spontaneous/timed mode showed an improvement in snoring, apneas, and Epworth sleepiness scale decreased from 20 to 10. This case illustrates the beneficial effects of Bi-level positive airway pressure support in central sleep apnea syndrome of a patient with myotonic dystrophy type 1. PMID:26483914

  20. Dental treatment of a patient with central sleep apnea and phobic anxiety under sedation: report of a case and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılınç, Yeliz; Işık, Berrin

    2012-11-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) results from a reduction in lack of output from the central respiratory generator in the brainstem, manifesting as apneas and hypopneas without discernible efforts. CSA can lead to hypercarbia, arrhythmias, pulmonary hypertension, and heart failure. Indeed, the patient may develop a disturbed breathing during sedation procedures. We report a patient who was diagnosed with CSA and had been on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for 5 years. He was referred for multiple tooth extractions under sedation owing to severe gag reflex and phobic anxiety disorder. The treatment was completed uneventfully under N(2)O and sevoflurane inhalation accompanied by midazolam and ketamine induction. The role of sedative, analgesic, and anesthetic agents as a precipitating factor for CSA is of particular concern. The combined administration of midazolam, ketamine, sevoflurane, and N(2)O/O(2) is a useful and safe option for patients requiring sedation. PMID:23083486

  1. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunao eUchida

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. Thus, research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960’s, with a focus primarily on sleep EEG (CNS sleep changes. Those early studies found only small effects of exercise on sleep. More recent sleep research has explored not only CNS functioning, but somatic physiology as well. As physical exercise mostly affects somatic functions, endocrine and autonomic nervous system (ANS changes that occur during sleep should be affected by daytime exercise. Since endocrinological, metabolic and autonomic changes can be measured during sleep, it should be possible to assess exercise effects on somatic physiology in addition to CNS sleep quality, building from standard polysomnographic (PSG techniques. Incorporating measures of somatic physiology in the quantitative assessment of sleep could further our understanding of sleep's function as an auto-regulatory, global phenomenon.

  2. Rhythm disturbances in childhood obstructive sleep apnea during apnea-hypopnea episodes

    OpenAIRE

    Anant Khositseth; Jittamas Chokechuleekorn; Teeradej Kuptanon; Anchalee Leejakpai

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) can result in cardiovascular complications. Nocturnal arrhythmias are reported up to 50% of adult OSA patients. Arrhythmias and heart rate variability in children with OSA have not been well studied. Aims: We sought to study rhythm disturbances in childhood OSA and also to analyze the relationship of heart rate variability to the severity of OSA in children. Methods: In a retrospective cross sectional study, records of children aged < 15 years ...

  3. The involvement of central corticotropin-releasing hormone and its receptors in sleep-wake regulation of mice

    OpenAIRE

    Romanowski, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    The corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is widely recognised as the major activator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, thereby mediating neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioural responses to stress. Dysregulation of the release of stress hormones, caused by excessive CRH secretion from the hypothalamus, is frequently observed in patients with affective disorders such as depression. One of the cardinal symptoms of major depression is a severe impairment of sleep (e.g....

  4. Association of Sleep Disordered Breathing with Mono-Symptomatic Nocturnal Enuresis: A Study among School Children of Central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhare, Abhijit P.; Goyal, Abhishek; P, Aswin; Dhingra, Bhavna; Tamaria, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the prevalence of primary monosymptopomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE) in children aged 5–10 year and to find its association with sleep disordered breathing (SDB) by using a 22 item pediatric sleep related breathing disorder (SRBD) scale. Methods This was a school based cross sectional epidemiological study from July 2015 to November 2015. A questionnaire seeking information on socio-demographic variables, nocturnal enuresis (NE) frequency, school performance and a validated 22 item pediatric sleep related breathing disorder scale (SRBDs) was distributed to 1820 pupils in three primary schools. Results A total of 1528(83.95%) questionnaires were retrieved. Out of 1528 forms, 182(11.9%) forms were incomplete for requested information and hence 1346 (73.9%) questionnaires were finally analyzed. The prevalence of NE was found to be 12.7% (95% CI; 11–14.6), whereas prevalence of primary nocturnal enuresis (PMNE) was 8.2% (95% CI; 7.1–10.1). SRBD scale score >0.33 (adjusted OR: 2.87; 95%CI: 1.67–4.92), paternal history of enuresis in childhood (adjusted OR:4.96; 95% CI: 2.36–10.45), and inappropriate toilet training (adjusted OR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.01–2.66) were independently associated with PMNE. Conclusion Sleep disordered breathing, inappropriate toilet training and a history of childhood NE in father were found to be significant risk factors for PMNE in the present study. Thus, these findings suggest that it is imperative to rule out SDB in PMNE patients as they may require different therapeutic interventions. PMID:27191620

  5. [A 14-day-old boy with jaundice and apnoea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerud, Ole-Jørgen Olsøy; Solevåg, Anne Lee; Hansen, Thor Willy Ruud; Grønn, Morten

    2015-12-15

    We describe an infant who was readmitted from home at 14 days of age with jaundice and a history of apnoea and episodes of retrocollis/opisthotonos. He had been only mildly jaundiced on discharge from the maternity clinic at 2 days of age. The total serum bilirubin (TSB) on admission was 542 µmol/L, and the infant was treated intensively with triple phototherapy and exchange transfusion. In contrast to what is recommended in Norwegian national guidelines for management of neonatal jaundice, the parents had apparently neither received oral nor written information about jaundice and its follow-up at the time of discharge from maternity. They therefore contacted their child healthcare centre when they had questions about jaundice, though the national guidelines specifically state that follow-up for neonatal jaundice during the first 2 weeks of life is the responsibility of the birth hospital. Inappropriate advice resulted in delayed referral, and the child has been diagnosed with chronic kernicterus, probably the first such case in Norway since national guidelines were formalised in 2006. Genetic work-up disclosed compound heterozygosity for Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I, to the best of our knowledge the first instance of this disorder ever to have been diagnosed in Norway. The incidence of kernicterus is Norway is much lower than in other industrialised countries. This is most likely due to national guidelines for management of neonatal jaundice, which place the responsibility for management and follow-up of jaundice with the birth hospital during the crucial first 2 weeks of life. This case report reminds us that tragedies may occur when guidelines are disregarded. PMID:26674039

  6. Sleep and Breathing at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Himanshu; Anholm, James D.

    1999-01-01

    Sleep at high altitude is characterized by poor subjective quality, increased awakenings, frequent brief arousals, marked nocturnal hypoxemia, and periodic breathing. A change in sleep architecture with an increase in light sleep and decreasing slow-wave and REM sleep have been demonstrated. Periodic breathing with central apnea is almost universally seen amongst sojourners to high altitude, although it is far less common in long-standing high altitude dwellers. Hypobaric hypoxia in concert with periodic breathing appears to be the principal cause of sleep disruption at altitude. Increased sleep fragmentation accounts for the poor sleep quality and may account for some of the worsened daytime performance at high altitude. Hypoxic sleep disruption contributes to the symptoms of acute mountain sickness. Hypoxemia at high altitude is most severe during sleep. Acetazolamide improves sleep, AMS symptoms, and hypoxemia at high altitude. Low doses of a short acting benzodiazepine (temazepam) may also be useful in improving sleep in high altitude. PMID:11898114

  7. Medico-legal implications of sleep apnoea syndrome: Driving license regulations in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alonderis, A.; Barbee, F.; Bonsignore, M.;

    2008-01-01

    regulations, and especially at its medical aspects in the European region. Methods: We obtained data from Transport Authorities in 25 countries (Austria, AT; Belgium, BE; Czech Republic, CZ; Denmark, DK; Estonia, EE; Finland, FI; France, FR; Germany, DE; Greece, GR; Hungary, HU; Ireland, IE; Italy, IT...

  8. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and HLA in the North of Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luís; Lopes, João; Ramalheira, João; Cunha, Daniela; Carvalho, Cláudia; Bettencourt, Andreia; Bras, Sandra; Costa, Sandra; Silva, M Berta; Martins-da-Silva, António

    2015-10-01

    Introduccion. El sindrome de apnea obstructiva del sueño (SAOS) es una enfermedad frecuente, compleja y poligenica, con diversas etiologias que interaccionan originando un fenotipo unico. El SAOS puede ocurrir a cualquier edad del individuo y se presume la existencia de agregacion familiar. Han sido descritos diversos factores de predisposicion, como la edad, el sexo y la obesidad. La relacion entre los polimorfismos del antigeno leucocitario humano (HLA) y trastornos del sueño esta confirmada, tanto en poblaciones europeas como no europeas. No obstante, las relaciones descritas entre los alelos HLA y SAOS no han sido coherentes y carecen de valor informativo para la clasificacion del trastorno del sueño. Objetivo. Explorar la asociacion genetica del HLA con el SAOS en una poblacion del norte de Portugal y evaluar el papel de la obesidad en el contexto del HLA en el SAOS. Pacientes y metodos. Se estudio una cohorte de 131 pacientes con SAOS. Los pacientes fueron atendidos en una clinica del sueño ambulatoria donde se valoraron los antecedentes clinicos, se les practico una polisomnografia nocturna, una prueba de latencia multiple del sueño (si lo exigio el diagnostico diferencial), analiticas y estudios demograficos. A efectos comparativos, se utilizo una poblacion de control de 223 personas sanas. Se efectuo el genotipado del HLA-DRB1 con la reaccion en cadena de la polimerasa mediante cebadores de secuencia especifica. Resultados. En esta cohorte, el alelo HLA-DRB1*03 fue identificado como un factor de predisposicion para el SAOS (24% del SAOS frente a 15% de la poblacion de control; p = 0,025; odds ratio = 1,861; intervalo de confianza al 95% = 1,081-3,205). No hubo diferencias significativas en lo referente a otros alelos HLA-DBR1*. Conclusion. El HLA-DRB1*03 es un factor de predisposicion para el SAOS en la poblacion portuguesa.

  9. Co-morbidities and sleep apnoea severity. A study in a cohort of Portuguese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L; Cunha, D; Lopes, J; Ramalheira, J; Freire, M; Novio, S; Nunez, M J; Mendonca, D; Martins-da-Silva, A

    2016-05-16

    Introduccion. El sindrome de apnea obstructiva del sueño (SAOS) se asocia frecuentemente a otras enfermedades que actuan como factores de riesgo que influyen en la morbilidad y mortalidad del SAOS. Objetivos. Analizar la presencia de comorbilidades en pacientes con SAOS, seleccionados en una clinica del sueño ambulatoria en el norte de Portugal y clasificados atendiendo a la gravedad del SAOS. Pacientes y metodos. Una cohorte de 319 pacientes con trastornos del sueño fueron evaluados mediante estudios clinicos y registro videopoligrafico durante el sueño. Del total de pacientes (n = 209) con distres respiratorio durante el sueño, 145 tenian SAOS con gravedad definida segun el indice de apnea/hipopnea (IAH); 64 presentaban ronquidos primarios o distres respiratorio con IAH respiratorio durante el sueño, la comorbilidad aparece normalmente relacionada con el SAOS (p = 0,0196). Conclusion. Las comorbilidades se asocian con frecuencia al SAOS, independientemente de la gravedad de la enfermedad. Entre las comorbilidades presentes, la obesidad resulto ser la mas comun en los casos mas graves de SAOS.

  10. Determinants of sexual dysfunction and interventions for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinke, E; Palm Johansen, P; Fridlund, B;

    2016-01-01

    dysfunction, while for men factors included BMI, hormonal status and inflammatory markers. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) not only improved clinical measures such as excessive daytime sleepiness but also the erectile and orgasmic function. Nevertheless, sildenafil was superior CPAP with regard...

  11. Sleep Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Sleep Quiz Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents ... on. Photo: iStock Take the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research Sleep Quiz TRUE OR FALSE ? _____1. ...

  12. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  13. Obstructive sleep disordered breathing in 2- to 18-year-old children: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaditis, Athanasios G; Alonso Alvarez, Maria Luz; Boudewyns, An; Alexopoulos, Emmanouel I; Ersu, Refika; Joosten, Koen; Larramona, Helena; Miano, Silvia; Narang, Indra; Trang, Ha; Tsaoussoglou, Marina; Vandenbussche, Nele; Villa, Maria Pia; Van Waardenburg, Dick; Weber, Silke; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the conclusions of a European Respiratory Society Task Force on the diagnosis and management of obstructive sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in childhood and refers to children aged 2-18 years. Prospective cohort studies describing the natural history of SDB or randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials regarding its management are scarce. Selected evidence (362 articles) can be consolidated into seven management steps. SDB is suspected when symptoms or abnormalities related to upper airway obstruction are present (step 1). Central nervous or cardiovascular system morbidity, growth failure or enuresis and predictors of SDB persistence in the long-term are recognised (steps 2 and 3), and SDB severity is determined objectively preferably using polysomnography (step 4). Children with an apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) >5 episodes·h(-1), those with an AHI of 1-5 episodes·h(-1) and the presence of morbidity or factors predicting SDB persistence, and children with complex conditions (e.g. Down syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome) all appear to benefit from treatment (step 5). Treatment interventions are usually implemented in a stepwise fashion addressing all abnormalities that predispose to SDB (step 6) with re-evaluation after each intervention to detect residual disease and to determine the need for additional treatment (step 7). PMID:26541535

  14. Obstructive sleep disordered breathing in 2- to 18-year-old children: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaditis, Athanasios G; Alonso Alvarez, Maria Luz; Boudewyns, An; Alexopoulos, Emmanouel I; Ersu, Refika; Joosten, Koen; Larramona, Helena; Miano, Silvia; Narang, Indra; Trang, Ha; Tsaoussoglou, Marina; Vandenbussche, Nele; Villa, Maria Pia; Van Waardenburg, Dick; Weber, Silke; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the conclusions of a European Respiratory Society Task Force on the diagnosis and management of obstructive sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in childhood and refers to children aged 2-18 years. Prospective cohort studies describing the natural history of SDB or randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials regarding its management are scarce. Selected evidence (362 articles) can be consolidated into seven management steps. SDB is suspected when symptoms or abnormalities related to upper airway obstruction are present (step 1). Central nervous or cardiovascular system morbidity, growth failure or enuresis and predictors of SDB persistence in the long-term are recognised (steps 2 and 3), and SDB severity is determined objectively preferably using polysomnography (step 4). Children with an apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) >5 episodes·h(-1), those with an AHI of 1-5 episodes·h(-1) and the presence of morbidity or factors predicting SDB persistence, and children with complex conditions (e.g. Down syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome) all appear to benefit from treatment (step 5). Treatment interventions are usually implemented in a stepwise fashion addressing all abnormalities that predispose to SDB (step 6) with re-evaluation after each intervention to detect residual disease and to determine the need for additional treatment (step 7).

  15. Chronic Cardiac Failure and Central Sleep Apnea%慢性心力衰竭与中枢性睡眠呼吸暂停

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆云

    2010-01-01

    @@ 慢性心力衰竭发生率和死亡率均较高,夜间睡眠中反复发生的呼吸暂停和缺氧是促进心力衰竭恶化的因素之一.中枢性睡眠呼吸暂停(central sleep apnea,CSA)为起源于脑干呼吸控制中枢障碍的呼吸暂停,表现为呼吸减弱或停止.在普通人群中CSA患病率很低,但在慢性心力衰竭患者中则很高,且常常以陈-施呼吸(Cheyne-Stokes respiration,CSR),即CSR-CSA形式出现.CSA可进一步加重心力衰竭,因此越来越受到重视[1].

  16. The effect of adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) on objective and subjective outcomes in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF): A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyunju; Sawyer, Amy M

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the current evidence for adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF) and advance a research agenda and clinical considerations for ASV-treated CSR-CSA in HF. CSR-CSA in HF is associated with higher overall mortality, worse outcomes and lower quality of life (QOL) than HF without CSR-CSA. Five databases were searched using key words (n = 234). Randomized controlled trials assessed objective sleep quality, cardiac, and self-reported outcomes in adults (≥18 years) with HF (n = 10). ASV has a beneficial effect on the reduction of central sleep apnea in adult patients with CSR-CSA in HF, but it is not be superior to CPAP, bilevel PPV, or supplemental oxygen in terms of sleep quality defined by polysomnography, cardiovascular outcomes, subjective daytime sleepiness, and quality of life. ASV is not recommended for CSR-CSA in HF. It is important to continue to refer HF patients for sleep evaluation to clearly discern OSA from CSR-CSA. Symptom management research, inclusive of objective and subjective outcomes, in CSR-CSA in HF adults is needed.

  17. The effect of adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) on objective and subjective outcomes in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF): A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyunju; Sawyer, Amy M

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the current evidence for adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF) and advance a research agenda and clinical considerations for ASV-treated CSR-CSA in HF. CSR-CSA in HF is associated with higher overall mortality, worse outcomes and lower quality of life (QOL) than HF without CSR-CSA. Five databases were searched using key words (n = 234). Randomized controlled trials assessed objective sleep quality, cardiac, and self-reported outcomes in adults (≥18 years) with HF (n = 10). ASV has a beneficial effect on the reduction of central sleep apnea in adult patients with CSR-CSA in HF, but it is not be superior to CPAP, bilevel PPV, or supplemental oxygen in terms of sleep quality defined by polysomnography, cardiovascular outcomes, subjective daytime sleepiness, and quality of life. ASV is not recommended for CSR-CSA in HF. It is important to continue to refer HF patients for sleep evaluation to clearly discern OSA from CSR-CSA. Symptom management research, inclusive of objective and subjective outcomes, in CSR-CSA in HF adults is needed. PMID:26995256

  18. X-ray upper airway changes in individuals suffering from obstructive respiratory disorders during sleep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obstructive respiratory disorders during sleep present an important medical and social problem. Serious dysfunctions of cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine and other vital systems of the body reduce longevity and life quality. On the other hand, load nocturnal snore and abnormal during sleepiness cause great damage to family life, reduce working capacity and induce accidents. X-ray visualization of the upper airways is essential in diagnosing obstructive upper airway states and selecting patients for surgical treatment. The paper presents the author's own experience in using various X-ray diagnostic methods in patients with chronic snore and obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome

  19. Sleep disordered breathing at the extremes of age: infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don S. Urquhart

    2016-03-01

    Appreciate disorders of respiratory control; Normal sleep in infancy is a time of change with alterations in sleep architecture, sleep duration, sleep patterns and respiratory control as an infant grows older. Interactions between sleep and respiration are key to the mechanisms by which infants are vulnerable to sleep disordered breathing. This review discusses normal sleep in infancy, as well as normal sleep breathing in infancy. Sleep disordered breathing (obstructive and central as well as disorders of ventilatory control and infant causes of hypoventilation are all reviewed in detail.

  20. 慢性充血性心力衰竭与中枢性睡眠呼吸障碍研究进展%Research advence of central sleep apnea with chronic heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    海花; 刘晖

    2009-01-01

    慢件充血性心力衰竭伴有睡眠障碍有很高的发生率,其中中枢性睡眠呼吸障碍及陈-施式呼吸发生率40%左右.本文从流行病学、分类、发病机制、临床表现、治疗等方面进行综述.%Central sleep apnea with cheyne-stokes respiration during sleep affects about 40% of patients with chronic heart failure. The article reviews the role of epidemiology,classification,pathogenesis, clincial performance and treatment.

  1. November 2012 sleep journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Crawford MR, Bartlett DJ, Coughlin SR, et al. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure usage on sleepiness in obstructive sleep apnoea: real effects or expectation of benefit? Thorax. 2012;67:920-4. Abstract With continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, greater hours of CPAP use are associated with reduced sleepiness. However, these open-label studies have not controlled for patient expectation of benefit. The authors performed a meta-analysis combining data on sleepiness measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale from three randomized placebo-controlled crossover trials including use of low dose CPAP. High use of CPAP reduced sleepiness more than placebo and more than low use. The authors calculated that 29% of the effect of high usage of CPAP was explained by the expectation of benefit with CPAP. In retrospect it should not be surprising that there was a significant placebo effect. The primary end point used, improvement in the Epworth …

  2. The impact of nocturnal CPAP-treatment on sexuality and closeness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Sleep has a major impact on our wellbeing and how we perform.OSA has an estimated prevalence of 2 % in women and 4 % in male and is characterized by repetitive complete (apnoea) or partial (hypopnoea) cessation of breathing. I wondered how the patients managed sexuality and closeness when suffering from OSA and in particular how the Continuous Positive Airways Pressure (CPAP) treatment affected their sexuality and closeness. A review of the literature showed there was little published informa...

  3. Use of thoracic impedance sensors to screen for sleep-disordered breathing in patients with cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Screening patients for the possibility of sleep apnoea, one of the most common forms of sleep-disordered breathing, requires measurement of respiration. We propose a simple method to estimate the amplitude modulation of a respiratory tidal volume, using a semi-quantitative measure of respiration based on thoracic impedance (TI). Because respiratory volume changes may be accommodated by varying displacements of the rib cage (RC) and abdomen (AB), the latter produced by outward motion of the diaphragm, it is necessary for any useful measure of respiration to be closely related to both RC and AB displacements. Because the relative contributions of RC and AB displacements to respiratory tidal volume vary in different body positions, the present measurements were recorded from subjects in supine, and right and left lateral decubitus postures. We observed a clear linear relationship between TI and both RC and AB signals in all three body positions. There were no statistically significant differences between observed relationships between TI and AB and between TI and RC, and these relationships were independent of the body position. TI sensors appear to be a useful candidate for a simple method of screening for sleep apnoea, especially in a cardiology clinical setting. Further investigation is warranted for the refinement of algorithms to detect changes in amplitude modulation occurring with apnoeas and to remove artefacts due to gross body movements

  4. Respiratory changes and structure of sleep in young high-altitude dwellers in the Andes of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coote, J H; Tsang, G; Baker, A; Stone, B

    1993-01-01

    Sleep organisation in eight young [mean (SD); 20.9 (2.6) years] Peruvian high-altitude residents was studied in a laboratory in Cerro de Pasco at 4300 m. Electroencephalograms, electromyograms, electro-oculograms, electrocardiograms, respiratory movements and arterial oxygen saturation were recorded on an 8-channel Medilog recorder and analysed later in England. Haematocrits ranged from 48% to 64% [57.9 (5.6)%]. The amount of slow wave rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was similar to that reported in young lowlanders sleeping at sea level but very different to the disturbed sleep in visitors sleeping at high altitude. All the Peruvians showed episodes of periodic breathing and respiratory apnoeas [29 (15) night-1] resulting in marked arterial oxygen desaturation [81 (4.5)%; changes of 6 (2.5)%]. These events occurred either during stage 2 or REM sleep and were more frequent in those with lower haematocrits. The amount of wakefulness during the night was 2-3 times greater than would be expected in an age-matched lowland population at sea level. The awakenings were strongly associated with apnoeas (P < 0.02) but were negatively correlated with haematocrit, although this was only significant for seven of the subjects (P < 0.05).

  5. [How does sleeping restore our brain?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigren, Henna-Kaisa; Stenberg, Tarja

    2015-01-01

    The central function of sleep is to keep our brain functional, but what is the restoration that sleep provides? Sleep after learning improves learning outcomes. According to the theory of synaptic homeostasis the total strength of synapses, having increased during the day, is restored during sleep, making room for the next day's experiences. According to the theory of active synaptic consolidation, repetition during sleep strengthens the synapses, and these strengthened synapses form a permanent engram. According to a recent study, removal of waste products from the brain may also be one of the functions of sleep. PMID:26237917

  6. Healthy Sleep Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Apnea Testing CPAP Healthy Sleep Habits Healthy Sleep Habits Your behaviors can have a major impact ... team at an AASM accredited sleep center. Quick Sleep Tips Follow these tips to establish healthy sleep ...

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious ... to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious ...

  8. Sleep smart-optimizing sleep for declarative learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Gordon B; Diekelmann, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a spurt of new publications documenting sleep's essential contribution to the brains ability to form lasting memories. For the declarative memory domain, slow wave sleep (the deepest sleep stage) has the greatest beneficial effect on the consolidation of memories acquired during preceding wakefulness. The finding that newly encoded memories become reactivated during subsequent sleep fostered the idea that reactivation leads to the strengthening and transformation of the memory trace. According to the active system consolidation account, trace reactivation leads to the redistribution of the transient memory representations from the hippocampus to the long-lasting knowledge networks of the cortex. Apart from consolidating previously learned information, sleep also facilitates the encoding of new memories after sleep, which probably relies on the renormalization of synaptic weights during sleep as suggested by the synaptic homeostasis theory. During wakefulness overshooting potentiation causes an imbalance in synaptic weights that is countered by synaptic downscaling during subsequent sleep. This review briefly introduces the basic concepts and central findings of the research on sleep and memory, and discusses implications of this lab-based work for everyday applications to make the best possible use of sleep's beneficial effect on learning and memory. PMID:26029150

  9. Complex Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Talha Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex sleep apnea is the term used to describe a form of sleep disordered breathing in which repeated central apneas (>5/hour persist or emerge when obstructive events are extinguished with positive airway pressure (PAP and for which there is not a clear cause for the central apneas such as narcotics or systolic heart failure. The driving forces in the pathophysiology are felt to be ventilator instability associated oscillation in PaCO2 arterial partial pressure of Carbon Dioxide, continuous cositive airway pressure (CPAP related increased CO2 carbon dioxide elimination, and activation of airway and pulmonary stretch receptors triggering these central apneas. The prevalence ranges from 0.56% to 18% with no clear predictive characteristics as compared to simple obstructive sleep apnea. Prognosis is similar to obstructive sleep apnea. The central apnea component in most patients on followup using CPAP therap, has resolved. For those with continued central apneas on simple CPAP therapy, other treatment options include bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, permissive flow limitation and/or drugs.

  10. Sleeping sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001362.htm Sleeping sickness To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sleeping sickness is an infection caused by germs carried ...

  11. Exercise & Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feature: Back to School, the Healthy Way Exercise & Sleep Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents At ... healthy weight Build sturdy muscles, bones, and joints Sleep better at night More time in front of ...

  12. Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea is a common disorder that causes your breathing to stop or get very shallow. Breathing ... an hour. The most common type is obstructive sleep apnea. It causes your airway to collapse or ...

  13. Role of IL-6 trans-signalling for sleep-wake behaviour of rats : generation of brain-specific sgp130-Fc transgenic mice ; central blockade of IL-6 trans-signalling

    OpenAIRE

    May, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    The cytokine Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is involved in many biological functions of the immune system, metabolism and the central nervous system, and in the bidirectional communication between these systems. In the brain, IL-6 is considered to affect the modulation of sleep-wake behaviour and synaptic plasticity. IL-6 is further well characterised for its dual role to maintain homeostasis as well as to contribute to inflammatory and autoimmune processes, both in brain and periphery. Signal transduc...

  14. The Effects of Lamotrigine on Pain, Sleep, and Mood in Refractory Form of Central Post-Stroke Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Petramfar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Central post-stroke pain (CPSP is a distressingpain syndrome, sometimes become refractory to the conventionalpain managements. Anticonvulsants have been used toalleviate different central pains. Lamotrigine is a novel anticonvulsantand its proper dosage and its efficacy have notbeen well studied yet. The aim of this study was to evaluatethe effect of 100 mg lamotrigine on refractory form of CPSP.Methods: The medical files of 17 patients with CPSP who hadnot responded to the other drugs and were treated with lamotriginewere studied. Using Brief Pain Inventory, pain, sleepand mood were assessed before, and after 8 and 24 weeks oftreatment.Results: After 24 weeks, 70.5 % of the patients responded tolamotrigine, and there was an improvement of 2.41 in themean score of average pain (P=0.001.Conclusion: Lamotrigine 100 mg daily was effective in thetreatment of refractory CPSP, and might be prescribed beforeplanning for more aggressive surgical managements.Iran J Med Sci 2010; 35(4: 299-303.

  15. Why Sleep?

    OpenAIRE

    Manoach, Dara S.; Stickgold, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We human beings spend about a third of our lives sleeping. That means that if you live to 90, you'll sleep for about 30 years – probably more time than you'll spend doing anything else. Sleep is really important since we cannot live without it and spend so much time doing it. Yet unlike the other basic biological drives such as eating and reproducing, we still don't understand exactly why we need to sleep. It used to be thought that sleep was mainly to rest and restore the body and the mind, ...

  16. Mammalian sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  17. Total sleep deprivation, chronic sleep restriction and sleep disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Amy C; Banks, Siobhan

    2010-01-01

    Sleep loss may result from total sleep deprivation (such as a shift worker might experience), chronic sleep restriction (due to work, medical conditions or lifestyle) or sleep disruption (which is common in sleep disorders such as sleep apnea or restless legs syndrome). Total sleep deprivation has been widely researched, and its effects have been well described. Chronic sleep restriction and sleep disruption (also known as sleep fragmentation) have received less experimental attention. Recently, there has been increasing interest in sleep restriction and disruption as it has been recognized that they have a similar impact on cognitive functioning as a period of total sleep deprivation. Sleep loss causes impairments in cognitive performance and simulated driving and induces sleepiness, fatigue and mood changes. This review examines recent research on the effects of sleep deprivation, restriction and disruption on cognition and neurophysiologic functioning in healthy adults, and contrasts the similarities and differences between these three modalities of sleep loss.

  18. Sleep quality of professional firefighters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Firefighting is a unique job with contradictious demands that expose firefighters to many well documented causal factors of sleep debt, but no studies in Iran and only a few worldwide studies have investigated their sleep quality while sleep problems may lead to catastrophes especially in critical service workers. The aim of this study is to evaluate sleep quality and its related factors among a sample of professional Iranian firefighters. Methods: Using simple random sampling method in a cross-sectional study, 427 personnel of fire and rescue service were invited. They completed the Persian version of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and a data collection sheet about their demographic and occupational features during an individual face to face interview in central office and firehouses throughout Tehran. Response rate was 88.7%. Results: The mean ± SD global PSQI score was 7.97 ± 3.77. Sleep latency was the component of PSQI with the greatest degree of abnormality. 69.9% of participants were poor sleepers. Interestingly, we found no significant differences between sleep quality of shift workers and non shift workers. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, only having another job, smoking and years of job experience were predictors of poor sleep. Conclusions: In comparison with adult population of Tehran, sleep quality deterioration is notably more common in Tehran firefighters which require health promotion interventions to prevent its serious adverse outcomes.

  19. Sleep extension normalizes ERP of waking auditory sensory gating in healthy habitually short sleeping individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumenyuk, Valentina; Korzyukov, Oleg; Roth, Thomas; Bowyer, Susan M; Drake, Christopher L

    2013-01-01

    Chronic sleep loss has been associated with increased daytime sleepiness, as well as impairments in memory and attentional processes. In the present study, we evaluated the neuronal changes of a pre-attentive process of wake auditory sensory gating, measured by brain event-related potential (ERP)--P50 in eight normal sleepers (NS) (habitual total sleep time (TST) 7 h 32 m) vs. eight chronic short sleeping individuals (SS) (habitual TST ≤6 h). To evaluate the effect of sleep extension on sensory gating, the extended sleep condition was performed in chronic short sleeping individuals. Thus, one week of time in bed (6 h 11 m) corresponding to habitual short sleep (hSS), and one week of extended time (∼ 8 h 25 m) in bed corresponding to extended sleep (eSS), were counterbalanced in the SS group. The gating ERP assessment was performed on the last day after each sleep condition week (normal sleep and habitual short and extended sleep), and was separated by one week with habitual total sleep time and monitored by a sleep diary. We found that amplitude of gating was lower in SS group compared to that in NS group (0.3 µV vs. 1.2 µV, at Cz electrode respectively). The results of the group × laterality interaction showed that the reduction of gating amplitude in the SS group was due to lower amplitude over the left hemisphere and central-midline sites relative to that in the NS group. After sleep extension the amplitude of gating increased in chronic short sleeping individuals relative to their habitual short sleep condition. The sleep condition × frontality interaction analysis confirmed that sleep extension significantly increased the amplitude of gating over frontal and central brain areas compared to parietal brain areas. PMID:23520548

  20. Sleep extension normalizes ERP of waking auditory sensory gating in healthy habitually short sleeping individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Gumenyuk

    Full Text Available Chronic sleep loss has been associated with increased daytime sleepiness, as well as impairments in memory and attentional processes. In the present study, we evaluated the neuronal changes of a pre-attentive process of wake auditory sensory gating, measured by brain event-related potential (ERP--P50 in eight normal sleepers (NS (habitual total sleep time (TST 7 h 32 m vs. eight chronic short sleeping individuals (SS (habitual TST ≤6 h. To evaluate the effect of sleep extension on sensory gating, the extended sleep condition was performed in chronic short sleeping individuals. Thus, one week of time in bed (6 h 11 m corresponding to habitual short sleep (hSS, and one week of extended time (∼ 8 h 25 m in bed corresponding to extended sleep (eSS, were counterbalanced in the SS group. The gating ERP assessment was performed on the last day after each sleep condition week (normal sleep and habitual short and extended sleep, and was separated by one week with habitual total sleep time and monitored by a sleep diary. We found that amplitude of gating was lower in SS group compared to that in NS group (0.3 µV vs. 1.2 µV, at Cz electrode respectively. The results of the group × laterality interaction showed that the reduction of gating amplitude in the SS group was due to lower amplitude over the left hemisphere and central-midline sites relative to that in the NS group. After sleep extension the amplitude of gating increased in chronic short sleeping individuals relative to their habitual short sleep condition. The sleep condition × frontality interaction analysis confirmed that sleep extension significantly increased the amplitude of gating over frontal and central brain areas compared to parietal brain areas.

  1. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Sleep About Us About Sleep Key Sleep Disorders Sleep ... Sheets Data & Statistics Projects and Partners Resources Events Sleep and Chronic Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  2. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency? Sleep deprivation (DEP-rih-VA- ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February 22, 2012 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through ...

  3. National Sleep Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Turkish Ukrainian Urdu Vietnamese Welsh Yiddish Choose a Sleep Topic sleep.org Sleep Disorders View More Items ... it. More Join Now Become a Professional Member Sleep.org Footer Redirect Learn about how sleep impacts ...

  4. Sleep disorders - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insomnia; Narcolepsy; Hypersomina; Daytime sleepiness; Sleep rhythm; Sleep disruptive behaviors; Jet lag ... excessive daytime sleepiness) Problems sticking to a regular sleep schedule (sleep rhythm problem) Unusual behaviors during sleep ( ...

  5. Sleep problems and internet addiction among children and adolescents: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Lung; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2016-08-01

    Although the literature has documented associations between sleep problems and internet addiction, the temporal direction of these relationships has not been established. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the bidirectional relationships between sleep problems and internet addiction among children and adolescents longitudinally. A four-wave longitudinal study was conducted with 1253 children and adolescents in grades 3, 5 and 8 from March 2013 to January 2014. The sleep problems of the student participants were measured by parental reports on the Sleep Habit Questionnaire, which catalogues early insomnia, middle insomnia, disturbed circadian rhythm, periodic leg movements, sleep terrors, sleepwalking, sleep talking, nightmares, bruxism, snoring and sleep apnoea. The severity of internet addiction was measured by students' self-reports on the Chen Internet Addiction Scale. Based on the results of time-lag models, dyssomnias (odds ratio = 1.31), especially early and middle insomnias (odds ratio = 1.74 and 2.24), sequentially predicted internet addiction, and internet addiction sequentially predicted disturbed circadian rhythm (odds ratio = 2.40), regardless of adjustment for gender and age. This is the first study to demonstrate the temporal relationship of early and middle insomnia predicting internet addiction, which subsequently predicts disturbed circadian rhythm. These findings imply that treatment strategies for sleep problems and internet addiction should vary according to the order of their occurrence. PMID:26854132

  6. Sleep problems and internet addiction among children and adolescents: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Lung; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2016-08-01

    Although the literature has documented associations between sleep problems and internet addiction, the temporal direction of these relationships has not been established. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the bidirectional relationships between sleep problems and internet addiction among children and adolescents longitudinally. A four-wave longitudinal study was conducted with 1253 children and adolescents in grades 3, 5 and 8 from March 2013 to January 2014. The sleep problems of the student participants were measured by parental reports on the Sleep Habit Questionnaire, which catalogues early insomnia, middle insomnia, disturbed circadian rhythm, periodic leg movements, sleep terrors, sleepwalking, sleep talking, nightmares, bruxism, snoring and sleep apnoea. The severity of internet addiction was measured by students' self-reports on the Chen Internet Addiction Scale. Based on the results of time-lag models, dyssomnias (odds ratio = 1.31), especially early and middle insomnias (odds ratio = 1.74 and 2.24), sequentially predicted internet addiction, and internet addiction sequentially predicted disturbed circadian rhythm (odds ratio = 2.40), regardless of adjustment for gender and age. This is the first study to demonstrate the temporal relationship of early and middle insomnia predicting internet addiction, which subsequently predicts disturbed circadian rhythm. These findings imply that treatment strategies for sleep problems and internet addiction should vary according to the order of their occurrence.

  7. Pre-oxygenation and apnoea in pregnancy: changes during labour and with obstetric morbidity in a computational simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, S H; Bogod, D G; Hardman, J G

    2009-04-01

    Using the Nottingham Physiology Simulator, we investigated the effects on pre-oxygenation and apnoea during rapid sequence induction of labour, obesity, sepsis, pre-eclampsia, maternal haemorrhage and multiple pregnancy in term pregnancy. Pre-oxygenation with 100% oxygen was followed by simulated rapid sequence induction when end-tidal nitrogen tension was less than 1 kPa, and apnoea. Labour, morbid obesity and sepsis accelerated pre-oxygenation and de-oxygenation during apnoea. Fastest pre-oxygenation was in labour, with 95% of the maximum change in expired oxygen tension occurring in 47 s, compared to 97 s in a standard pregnant subject. The labouring subject with a body mass index of 50 kg x m(-2) demonstrated the fastest desaturation, the time taken to fall to an arterial saturation prolonged pre-oxygenation and tolerance to apnoea. Maternal haemorrhage and multiple pregnancy had minor effects. Our results inform the risk-benefit comparison of the anaesthetic options for Caesarean section.

  8. Ancestral sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Moreno, Claudia; Lowden, Arne; Louzada, Fernando; Marqueze, Elaine; Levandovski, Rosa; Pilz, Luisa K; Valeggia, Claudia; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Golombek, Diego A; Czeisler, Charles A; Skene, Debra J; Duffy, Jeanne F; Roenneberg, Till

    2016-04-01

    While we do not yet understand all the functions of sleep, its critical role for normal physiology and behaviour is evident. Its amount and temporal pattern depend on species and condition. Humans sleep about a third of the day with the longest, consolidated episode during the night. The change in lifestyle from hunter-gatherers via agricultural communities to densely populated industrialized centres has certainly affected sleep, and a major concern in the medical community is the impact of insufficient sleep on health [1,2]. One of the causal mechanisms leading to insufficient sleep is altered exposure to the natural light-dark cycle. This includes the wide availability of electric light, attenuated exposure to daylight within buildings, and evening use of light-emitting devices, all of which decrease the strength of natural light-dark signals that entrain circadian systems [3].

  9. Medicines for sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzodiazepines; Sedatives; Hypnotics; Sleeping pills; Insomnia - medicines; Sleep disorder - medicines ... are commonly used to treat allergies. While these sleep aids are not addictive, your body becomes used ...

  10. 神经递质在睡眠中的作用%Effect of neurotransmitter in sleep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    初建平; 孟昭义

    2003-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Sleep- wake rhythm is isolated from day- night rhythm of natural world;Sleep depends on the regulation of special structure of central nerve system and correlated neurotransmitters.This paper mainly introduces the research progress of neurotransmitter correlated to sleep.It benefits the comprehension of physiology,pathology and pharmacology of sleep and recognition of sleep.

  11. 体表膈肌肌电对睡眠呼吸暂停事件的鉴别作用%Distinguishing central from obstructive sleep apnea with chest wall surface electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱慧儿; 王玮; 罗远明

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether or not diaphragm electromyography recorded from chest wall surface electrodes (EMGsur) can be used to distinguish central from obstructive sleep apnea.Methods Ten patients ( age (44±10) years,body mass index (25.9±1.8) kg/m2 ) with suspected obstructive sleep apnea referred from Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease were studied between January and September 2009. EMGsur and diaphragm electromyography from esophageal electrode (EMGeso) were recorded during conventional overnight full polysomnography. And chest-abdominal movement was measured with chest and abdominal bands.Results High-quality EMGsur and EMGeso were recorded in all subjects except for one who could not tolerate a multipair esophageal electrode.Excellent correlation was found between EMGsur and EMGeso during sleep including apnea events ( r=0.81±0.06,P<0.05 ).The central sleep apnea events diagnosed by EMGeso were exactly the same as those diagnosed by EMGsur.However,the central sleep apnea events diagnosed by EMGsur were less than those diagnosed by conventional thoracic-abdominal bands ( 7±11 vs 28±31,P<0.05 ).Conclusion EMGsur may be used to distinguish central from obstructive sleep apnea events.%目的 探讨体表电极记录膈肌肌电是否有助于准确区分阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停(OSA)与中枢性睡眠呼吸暂停(CSA)事件.方法 选择2009年1-9月广州呼吸疾病研究所就诊并疑有睡眠呼吸暂停综合征的10例患者,其中男8例,女2例;年龄(44±10)岁,体质指数(25.9±1.8) kg/m2.对患者进行整夜常规多导睡眠监测的同时记录体表膈肌肌电信号、食管膈肌肌电信号,分析体表膈肌肌电与食管膈肌肌电的相关性,并比较胸腹带、体表膈肌肌电和食管膈肌肌电在判断CSA事件方面的差异.结果 除1例患者外,其他9例患者均能耐受多导食管电极检查,并可记录到高质量的食管膈肌肌电信号和体表膈肌肌电信号.食管膈肌肌电和

  12. Sleep Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and mental conditions and stress. Insomnia is the perception that you don't get enough sleep because ... RLS) is a medical condition distinguished by tingling sensations in the legs--and sometimes the arms--while ...

  13. Sleeping during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Sleeping During Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Sleeping During Pregnancy ... have trouble getting enough deep, uninterrupted sleep. Why Sleeping Can Be Difficult The first and most pressing ...

  14. Sleep and Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Sleep and Newborns KidsHealth > For Parents > Sleep and Newborns ... night it is. How Long Will My Newborn Sleep? A newborn may sleep up to 18 hours ...

  15. Sleep Apnea Information Page

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Sleep Apnea Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Sleep Apnea? Sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder ...

  16. Sleep and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Sleep and Aging About Sleep We all look forward to a good night's ... health and quality of life. Two Types of Sleep There are two types of sleep: non-rapid ...

  17. Sleep Apnea (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Obstructive Sleep Apnea KidsHealth > For Parents > Obstructive Sleep Apnea Print ... kids and teens can develop it, too. About Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea happens when a person stops ...

  18. Sleep Talking (Somniloquy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts Causes and Risk Factors Diagnosis and Treatment Sleepwalking Overview & Facts Symptoms & Risk Factors Diagnosis & Treatment Sleep ... area. Search radius: Email Print Parasomnias Confusional Arousals Sleepwalking Sleep Terrors Sleep Eating Disorder REM Sleep Behavior ...

  19. Pediatric sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  20. Sleep aspnea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008057 A multi-center study on the association between sleep apnea and prevalence of hypertension. CHEN Baoyuan(陈宝元), et al. Dept Respir Med, Tianjin Med Univ General Hosp, Tianjin 300052. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis, 2007;30(12):894-897. Objective To investigate the prevalence of hypertension among sleep apnea patients and the associated factors. Methods A total of 2297 patients (male 1310, female 211) from 20 teaching hospita

  1. Refreshing Sleep and Sleep Continuity Determine Perceived Sleep Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichten, Catherine; Creti, Laura; Conrod, Kerry; Tran, Dieu-Ly; Grad, Roland; Jorgensen, Mary; Amsel, Rhonda; Rizzo, Dorrie; Baltzan, Marc; Pavilanis, Alan; Bailes, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Sleep quality is a construct often measured, employed as an outcome criterion for therapeutic success, but never defined. In two studies we examined appraised good and poor sleep quality in three groups: a control group, individuals with obstructive sleep apnea, and those with insomnia disorder. In Study 1 we used qualitative methodology to examine good and poor sleep quality in 121 individuals. In Study 2 we examined sleep quality in 171 individuals who had not participated in Study 1 and evaluated correlates and predictors of sleep quality. Across all six samples and both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, the daytime experience of feeling refreshed (nonrefreshed) in the morning and the nighttime experience of good (impaired) sleep continuity characterized perceived good and poor sleep. Our results clarify sleep quality as a construct and identify refreshing sleep and sleep continuity as potential clinical and research outcome measures. PMID:27413553

  2. Electroencephalographic studies of sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, W. B.; Agnew, H. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Various experimental studies on sleep are described. The following areas are discussed: (1) effect of altered day length on sleep, (2) effect of a partial loss of sleep on subsequent nocturnal sleep; (3) effect of rigid control over sleep-wake-up times; (4) sleep and wakefulness in a time-free environment; (5) distribution of spindles during a full night of sleep; and (6) effect on sleep and performance of swiftly changing shifts of work.

  3. Investigation into the characteristics, triggers and mechanism of apnoea and bradycardia in the anaesthetized platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, J W; Holyoake, C; Fleming, P A; Robertson, I D; Connolly, J H; Warren, K S

    2014-01-01

    Health and conservation research on platypuses (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) may require anaesthesia to reduce stress and the risk of injury to both the animal and the researcher, as well as to facilitate examination and sample collection. Platypus anaesthesia can be difficult to manage, with reports of periods of apnoea and bradycardia described. This study investigated the conditions around sudden-onset apnoea and bradycardia in 163 field-anaesthetized platypuses as part of a health study. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained using isoflurane delivered in oxygen by face mask. Sudden-onset apnoea and bradycardia was observed in 19% of platypuses, occurring either at induction of anaesthesia, during recovery, or both. At induction, occurrence was more often recorded for adults (P = 0.19) and was correlated with low body temperature (P time (P = 0.16). At recovery, sudden-onset apnoea and bradycardia occurred only in platypuses that had been placed in dorsal recumbency as part of their examination, and correlated with poor body condition (P = 0.002), time in dorsal recumbency (P = 0.005), adults (P = 0.06), number of fieldworkers (P = 0.06) and females (P = 0.11). The sudden-onset apnoea and bradycardia we observed is likely to result from the irritant nature of isoflurane (stimulating the trigeminal nerve via nasal chemoreceptors). We propose that this mechanism is analogous to that of submersion of the face/nasal cavity in cold water during a natural dive response, but that the term 'nasopharyngeal response' would more appropriately describe the changes observed under isoflurane anaesthesia. Although we did not record any long-term adverse effects on platypuses that had undergone this response, the nasopharyngeal response could complicate the diagnosis of anaesthetic dose-dependent apnoea and bradycardia. Therefore, we suggest that these responses during anaesthesia of platypuses might be avoided by minimizing the stress around capture

  4. Sleep in Othello

    OpenAIRE

    Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    Some of our best descriptions of sleep disorders come from literature. While Shakespeare is well known for his references to insomnia and sleep walking, his works also demonstrate a keen awareness of many other sleep disorders. This paper examines sleep themes in Shakespeare's play Othello. The play indicates Shakespeare's astute eye for sleep deprivation, sexual parasomnias, and effects of stress and drugs on sleep.

  5. Sleep loss as risk factor for neurologic disorders: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Urrestarazu, Elena; Iriarte, Jorge

    2013-03-01

    Sleep loss refers to sleep of shorter duration than the average baseline need of seven to eight hours per night. Sleep loss and sleep deprivation have severe effects on human health. In this article, we review the main aspects of sleep loss, taking into account its effects on the central nervous system. The neurocognitive and behavioral effects of sleep loss are well known. However, there is an increasing amount of research pointing to sleep deprivation as a risk factor for neurologic diseases, namely stroke, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, headache, epilepsy, pain, and somnambulism. Conversely, sleep loss has been reported to be a potential protective factor against Parkinson's disease. The pathophysiology involved in this relationship is multiple, comprising immune, neuroendocrine, autonomic, and vascular mechanisms. It is extremely important to identify the individuals at risk, since recognition and adequate treatment of their sleep problems may reduce the risk of certain neurologic disorders. PMID:23352029

  6. The effects of sleep deprivation in humans: topographical electroencephalogram changes in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep versus REM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Cristina; Ferrara, Michele; Curcio, Giuseppe; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2010-06-01

    Studies on homeostatic aspects of sleep regulation have been focussed upon non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and direct comparisons with regional changes in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep are sparse. To this end, evaluation of electroencephalogram (EEG) changes in recovery sleep after extended waking is the classical approach for increasing homeostatic need. Here, we studied a large sample of 40 healthy subjects, considering a full-scalp EEG topography during baseline (BSL) and recovery sleep following 40 h of wakefulness (REC). In NREM sleep, the statistical maps of REC versus BSL differences revealed significant fronto-central increases of power from 0.5 to 11 Hz and decreases from 13 to 15 Hz. In REM sleep, REC versus BSL differences pointed to significant fronto-central increases in the 0.5-7 Hz and decreases in the 8-11 Hz bands. Moreover, the 12-15 Hz band showed a fronto-parietal increase and that at 22-24 Hz exhibited a fronto-central decrease. Hence, the 1-7 Hz range showed significant increases in both NREM sleep and REM sleep, with similar topography. The parallel change of NREM sleep and REM sleep EEG power is related, as confirmed by a correlational analysis, indicating that the increase in frequency of 2-7 Hz possibly subtends a state-aspecific homeostatic response. On the contrary, sleep deprivation has opposite effects on alpha and sigma activity in both states. In particular, this analysis points to the presence of state-specific homeostatic mechanisms for NREM sleep, limited to REM sleep and NREM sleep seem to share some homeostatic mechanisms in response to sleep deprivation, as indicated mainly by the similar direction and topography of changes in low-frequency activity.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of sleep related breathing disorders in children: 2007 to 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, A

    2015-03-01

    Sleep related breathing disorders (SRBD) have historically been under-recognised and under-treated. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) affects approximately 3% of children. In line with the increased recognition of SRBD there has been an increase in demand for diagnostic services. We determined the awareness of SRBD amongst Irish paediatricians, examined the provision of sleep services to children throughout the country between 2007 and 2011 and audited diagnostic sleep services in a tertiary centre in 2011. Amongst respondents there was an awareness of SRBD but a poor understanding of diagnostic evaluation with 31\\/46 (67) referring to inappropriate services. There has been a sharp increase in both diagnostic sleep tests (433-1793 [414]) and in the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) (31-186 [627]) for treatment of SRBD between 2007 and 2011. Paediatric sleep services are organized in an ad-hoc manner nationally with significant service variation. The use of domiciliary overnight oximetry reduced the requirement for more formal polysomnography by 70%.

  8. A Contribution for the Automatic Sleep Classification Based on the Itakura-Saito Spectral Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Eduardo; Batista, Arnaldo; Rodrigues, Rui; Ortigueira, Manuel; Bárbara, Cristina; Martinho, Cristina; Rato, Raul

    Sleep staging is a crucial step before the scoring the sleep apnoea, in subjects that are tested for this condition. These patients undergo a whole night polysomnography recording that includes EEG, EOG, ECG, EMG and respiratory signals. Sleep staging refers to the quantification of its depth. Despite the commercial sleep software being able to stage the sleep, there is a general lack of confidence amongst health practitioners of these machine results. Generally the sleep scoring is done over the visual inspection of the overnight patient EEG recording, which takes the attention of an expert medical practitioner over a couple of hours. This contributes to a waiting list of two years for patients of the Portuguese Health Service. In this work we have used a spectral comparison method called Itakura distance to be able to make a distinction between sleepy and awake epochs in a night EEG recording, therefore automatically doing the staging. We have used the data from 20 patients of Hospital Pulido Valente, which had been previously visually expert scored. Our technique results were promising, in a way that Itakura distance can, by itself, distinguish with a good degree of certainty the N2, N3 and awake states. Pre-processing stages for artefact reduction and baseline removal using Wavelets were applied.

  9. Refreshing Sleep and Sleep Continuity Determine Perceived Sleep Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Libman, Eva; Fichten, Catherine; Creti, Laura; Conrod, Kerry; Tran, Dieu-Ly; Grad, Roland; Jorgensen, Mary; Amsel, Rhonda; Rizzo, Dorrie; Baltzan, Marc; Pavilanis, Alan; Bailes, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Sleep quality is a construct often measured, employed as an outcome criterion for therapeutic success, but never defined. In two studies we examined appraised good and poor sleep quality in three groups: a control group, individuals with obstructive sleep apnea, and those with insomnia disorder. In Study 1 we used qualitative methodology to examine good and poor sleep quality in 121 individuals. In Study 2 we examined sleep quality in 171 individuals who had not participated in Study 1 and ev...

  10. Wireless remote monitoring system for sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sechang; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2011-04-01

    Sleep plays the important role of rejuvenating the body, especially the central nervous system. However, more than thirty million people suffer from sleep disorders and sleep deprivation. That can cause serious health consequences by increasing the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart attack and so on. Apart from the physical health risk, sleep disorders can lead to social problems when sleep disorders are not diagnosed and treated. Currently, sleep disorders are diagnosed through sleep study in a sleep laboratory overnight. This involves large expenses in addition to the inconvenience of overnight hospitalization and disruption of daily life activities. Although some systems provide home based diagnosis, most of systems record the sleep data in a memory card, the patient has to face the inconvenience of sending the memory card to a doctor for diagnosis. To solve the problem, we propose a wireless sensor system for sleep apnea, which enables remote monitoring while the patient is at home. The system has 5 channels to measure ECG, Nasal airflow, body position, abdominal/chest efforts and oxygen saturation. A wireless transmitter unit transmits signals with Zigbee and a receiver unit which has two RF modules, Zigbee and Wi-Fi, receives signals from the transmitter unit and retransmits signals to the remote monitoring system with Zigbee and Wi-Fi, respectively. By using both Zigbee and Wi-Fi, the wireless sensor system can achieve a low power consumption and wide range coverage. The system's features are presented, as well as continuous monitoring results of vital signals.

  11. Sleep clinical record: what differences in school and preschool children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pia Villa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The sleep clinical record (SCR may be a valid method for detecting children with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA. This study aimed to evaluate whether there were differences in SCR depending on age and to identify the possible risk factors for OSA development. We enrolled children with sleep disordered breathing between 2013 and 2015, and divided them according to age into preschool- and school-age groups. All patients underwent SCR and polysomnography. OSA was detected in 81.1% and 83.6% of preschool- and school-age groups, respectively. Obesity, malocclusions, nasal septal deviation and inferior turbinate hypertrophy were significantly more prevalent in school-age children (p6.5 had a sensitivity of 74% in predicting OSA in preschool children with positive predictive value of 86% (p=0.0001. Our study confirms the validity of the SCR as a screening tool for patient candidates for a PSG study for suspected OSA, in both school and preschool children.

  12. Redução da prevalência de apneia central em pacientes com insuficiência cardíaca sob uso de betabloqueador Reducción de la prevalencia de apnea central en pacientes con insuficiencia cardiaca bajo uso de betabloqueante Reduction of central sleep apnea in heart failure patients with beta-blockers therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiano Pereira Silva

    2010-02-01

    portadores de IC. MÉTODOS: 65 pacientes portadores de IC fueron sometidos a polisonografía diagnóstica. Los resultados de la polisonografía se evaluaron según el empleo o no de BB. El día del examen, los pacientes contestaron el cuestionario de Minnesota para la calidad de vida con IC. Tras 6 y 12 meses de la fecha de la polisonografía, hubo contacto telefónico con todos los pacientes, para la repetición del cuestionario de Minnesota. RESULTADOS: La prevalencia de apnea del sueño (IAH > 15/h fue de un 46,1% en la población total, además de la apnea central se identificó en solamente un 18,4% de los pacientes. El empleo de BB, en análisis multivariado, fue el único predictor de ocurrencia de menor índice de apnea e hipopnea (IAH central (p=0,002, mayor saturación (p=0,02 y menor desaturación promedio de oxígeno (p=0,03. Además de ello, el empleo de BB fue predictor de mejor calidad de vida tras 6 y 12 meses (p=0,002 y 0,001 respectivamente y de menor número de hospitalizaciones en estos períodos (p=0,001 y p=0,05 respectivamente. CONCLUSIÓN: El empleo de BB reduzco la incidencia de apnea central en la población total, si lo comparamos con los datos de la literatura. Además de esto, los BB mejoran parámetros de la calidad del sueño y de vida de portadores de IC.BACKGROUND: Sleep apneas are frequent in patients with heart failure (HF. Estimate of the pre-beta blocker age (BB point out to 45% of central apneas in these patients. OBJECTIVE: Assess the influence of BB in central apneas and their interference in the quality of sleep and life of patients with heart failure. METHODS: 65 patients with heart failure underwent diagnostic polysomnography. Polysomnography have been assessed according to the use or not of BB. On the day of examination, the patients answered the Minessota questionnaire for quality of life with HF. After 6 and 12 months from the polysomnography date, all patients were contacted by phone, in order to repeat the Minessota

  13. Neuroimmunologic aspects of sleep and sleep loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, N. L.; Szuba, M. P.; Staab, J. P.; Evans, D. L.; Dinges, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    The complex and intimate interactions between the sleep and immune systems have been the focus of study for several years. Immune factors, particularly the interleukins, regulate sleep and in turn are altered by sleep and sleep deprivation. The sleep-wake cycle likewise regulates normal functioning of the immune system. Although a large number of studies have focused on the relationship between the immune system and sleep, relatively few studies have examined the effects of sleep deprivation on immune parameters. Studies of sleep deprivation's effects are important for several reasons. First, in the 21st century, various societal pressures require humans to work longer and sleep less. Sleep deprivation is becoming an occupational hazard in many industries. Second, to garner a greater understanding of the regulatory effects of sleep on the immune system, one must understand the consequences of sleep deprivation on the immune system. Significant detrimental effects on immune functioning can be seen after a few days of total sleep deprivation or even several days of partial sleep deprivation. Interestingly, not all of the changes in immune physiology that occur as a result of sleep deprivation appear to be negative. Numerous medical disorders involving the immune system are associated with changes in the sleep-wake physiology--either being caused by sleep dysfunction or being exacerbated by sleep disruption. These disorders include infectious diseases, fibromyalgia, cancers, and major depressive disorder. In this article, we will describe the relationships between sleep physiology and the immune system, in states of health and disease. Interspersed will be proposals for future research that may illuminate the clinical relevance of the relationships between sleeping, sleep loss and immune function in humans. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  14. Genetics of Sleep and Sleep disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Sehgal, Amita; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Sleep remains one of the least understood phenomena in biology – even its role in synaptic plasticity remains debatable. Since sleep was recognized to be regulated genetically, intense research has launched on two fronts: the development of model organisms for deciphering the molecular mechanisms of sleep and attempts to identify genetic underpinnings of human sleep disorders. In this Review, we describe how unbiased, high-throughput screens in model organisms are uncovering sleep regulatory ...

  15. Sleep Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian sleep has evolved under the influence of the day-night cycle and in response to reproductive needs, food seeking, and predator avoidance, resulting in circadian (predictive) and homeostatic (reactive) regulation. A molecular clock characterized by transcription/translation feedback loops...

  16. What Is Sleep Apnea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... move out of deep sleep and into light sleep. As a result, the quality of your sleep is poor, which makes you tired during the ... of silence followed by gasps. Wanting a better quality of life, Jim sought the advice of his doctor, who recommended a sleep study. As a result of the sleep study, ...

  17. The Neurobiology of Orofacial Pain and Sleep and Their Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, G J; Sessle, B J

    2016-09-01

    This article provides an overview of the neurobiology of orofacial pain as well as the neural processes underlying sleep, with a particular focus on the mechanisms that underlie pain and sleep interactions including sleep disorders. Acute pain is part of a hypervigilance system that alerts the individual to injury or potential injury of tissues. It can also disturb sleep. Disrupted sleep is often associated with chronic pain states, including those that occur in the orofacial region. The article presents many insights that have been gained in the last few decades into the peripheral and central mechanisms involved in orofacial pain and its modulation, as well as the circuits and processes in the central nervous system that underlie sleep. Although it has become clear that sleep is essential to preserve and maintain health, it has also been found that pain, particularly chronic pain, is commonly associated with disturbed sleep. In the presence of chronic pain, a circular relationship may prevail, with mutual deleterious influences causing an increase in pain and a disruption of sleep. This article also reviews findings that indicate that reducing orofacial pain and improving sleep need to be targeted together in the management of acute to chronic orofacial pain states in order to improve an orofacial pain patient's quality of life, to prevent mood alterations or exacerbation of sleep disorder (e.g., insomnia, sleep-disordered breathing) that can negatively affect their pain, and to promote healing and optimize their health. PMID:27154736

  18. Sleep, Rhythms, and the Endocrine Brain: Influence of Sex and Gonadal Hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Mong, Jessica A.; Baker, Fiona C.; Mahoney, Megan M.; Paul, Ketema N.; Schwartz, Michael D.; Semba, Kazue; Silver, Rae

    2011-01-01

    While much is known about the mechanisms that underlie sleep and circadian rhythms, the investigation into sex differences and gonadal steroid modulation of sleep and biological rhythms is in its infancy. There is a growing recognition of sex disparities in sleep and rhythm disorders. Understanding how neuroendocrine mediators and sex differences influence sleep and biological rhythms is central to advancing our understanding of sleep-related disorders. While it is known that ovarian steroids...

  19. REM sleep Behaviour Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Giora, Enrico; Marelli, Sara; Galbiati, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep Behaviour Disorder (RBD) is a REM sleep parasomnia characterized by loss of the muscle atonia that typically occurs during REM sleep, therefore allowing patients to act out their dreams. RBD manifests itself clinically as a violent behaviour occurring during the night, and is detected at the polysomnography by phasic and/or tonic muscle activity on the electromyography channel. In absence of neurological signs or central nervous system lesions, RBD is defined as idiopathic. Nevertheless, in a large number of cases the development of neurodegenerative diseases in RBD patients has been described, with the duration of the follow-up representing a fundamental aspect. A growing number of clinical, neurophysiologic and neuropsychological studies aimed to detect early markers of neurodegenerative dysfunction in RBD patients. Anyway, the evidence of impaired cortical activity, subtle neurocognitive dysfunction, olfactory and autonomic impairment and neuroimaging brain changes in RBD patients is challenging the concept of an idiopathic form of RBD, supporting the idea of RBD as an early manifestation of a more complex neurodegenerative process.

  20. Animal models for information processing during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, A M L; Drinkenburg, W H I M

    2002-12-01

    Information provided by external stimuli does reach the brain during sleep, although the amount of information is reduced during sleep compared to wakefulness. The process controlling this reduction is called 'sensory' gating and evidence exists that the underlying neurophysiological processes take place in the thalamus. Furthermore, it is clear that stimuli given during sleep can alter the functional state of the brain. Two factors have been shown to play a crucial role in causing changes in the sleeping brain: the intensity and the relevance of the stimulus. Intensive stimuli arouse the brain, as well as stimuli having a high informational impact on the sleeping person. The arousal threshold for important stimuli is quite low compared to neutral stimuli. A central question in sleep research is whether associative learning, or in other words the formation of new associations between stimuli, can take place in a sleeping brain. It has been shown that simple forms of learning are still possible during sleep. In sleeping rats, it is proven that habituation, an active, simple form of learning not to respond to irrelevant stimuli, can occur. Moreover, there is evidence for the view that more complex associations can be modulated and newly formed during sleep. This is shown by two experimental approaches: an extinction paradigm and a latent inhibition (pre-exposure) paradigm. The presentation of non-reinforced stimuli during sleep causes slower extinction compared to the same presentation of these stimuli during wakefulness. Consistently, the suppressive capacity of a stimulus in the latent inhibition paradigm is less when previously pre-exposed during sleep, as compared to pre-exposure during wakefulness. Thus, while associative learning is not completely blocked during sleep, aspects of association formation are clearly altered. However, animal studies also clearly indicate that complex forms of learning are not possible during sleep. It is hypothesised that this

  1. Snoring and Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experience sleepless nights and fatigue. Medically – It disturbs sleeping patterns and deprives the snorer of adequate rest. It ... snacks for three hours before retiring. • Establish regular sleeping patterns. • Sleep on your side rather than your back. • ...

  2. Problems sleeping during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000559.htm Problems sleeping during pregnancy To use the sharing features on ... time sleeping well. Why is it hard to sleep during pregnancy? Your baby is growing bigger, which ...

  3. Sleep and your health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000871.htm Sleep and your health To use the sharing features ... in a number of ways. Why You Need Sleep Sleep gives your body and brain time to ...

  4. Sleep Issues and Sundowning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... We will not sell or share your name. Sleep Issues and Sundowning Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | ... Sleep Changes Back to top Coping strategies for sleep issues and sundowning If the person is awake ...

  5. Sleep studies (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    During a sleep study the sleep cycles and stages of sleep are monitored. Electrodes are placed to monitor continuous recordings of brain waves, electrical activity of muscles, eye movement, respiratory ...

  6. Do placebos alter sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, K; Adamson, L; Brezinová, V; Oswald, I

    1976-01-24

    Deliberate suggestion that an inert capsule was a sleeping pill was found not to influence subjective ratings of sleep quality or anxiety or the electrophysiologically recorded features of sleep in 10 volunteers aged 41-62 years. PMID:1247770

  7. Do placebos alter sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, K; Adamson, L; Brezinová, V; Oswald, I

    1976-01-24

    Deliberate suggestion that an inert capsule was a sleeping pill was found not to influence subjective ratings of sleep quality or anxiety or the electrophysiologically recorded features of sleep in 10 volunteers aged 41-62 years.

  8. American Sleep Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Health Professionals Join ASA Press Room American Sleep Association Improving public health by increasing awareness about ... Members Username or Email Password Remember Me Register Sleep Blog Let’s Teach Our Children About Sleep How ...

  9. Sleep Apnea Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Sleep > Sleep Apnea ...

  10. Sleep Troubles, Heart Troubles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161037.html Sleep Troubles, Heart Troubles? American Heart Association says it's ... 19, 2016 MONDAY, Sept. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep disorders -- including too little or too much sleep -- ...

  11. Aging changes in sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a health care provider to find out whether depression or another health condition is affecting your sleep. COMMON PROBLEMS Insomnia is one of the more common sleep problems in the elderly. Other sleep disorders , such as restless legs syndrome, ...

  12. Sleep Medicine Textbook

    OpenAIRE

    Bassetti, Claudio; Dogas, Zoran; Peigneux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The Sleep Medicine Textbook provides comprehensive, all-in-one educational material (550 pages) structured around the Catalogue of knowledge and skills for sleep medicine (Penzel et al. 2014, Journal of Sleep Research). Written by experts in the field and published by the ESRS, it provides an European approach to sleep medicine education, and represents the knowledge-base for the ESRS-endorsed sleep medicine examinations.The book is available at http://www.esrs.eu/esrs/sleep-medicine-textbook...

  13. Energy expenditure during sleep, sleep deprivation and sleep following sleep deprivation in adult humans

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Christopher M.; Melanson, Edward L; Frydendall, Emily J; Perreault, Leigh; Eckel, Robert H.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep has been proposed to be a physiological adaptation to conserve energy, but little research has examined this proposed function of sleep in humans. We quantified effects of sleep, sleep deprivation and recovery sleep on whole-body total daily energy expenditure (EE) and on EE during the habitual day and nighttime. We also determined effects of sleep stage during baseline and recovery sleep on EE. Seven healthy participants aged 22 ± 5 years (mean ± s.d.) maintained ∼8 h per night sleep s...

  14. Sleep Disorders (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Sleep Disorders (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Sleep Disorders Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Getting ...

  15. Sleep and sleep disorders in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Kate

    2011-03-01

    A common but significant change associated with aging is a profound disruption to the daily sleep-wake cycle. It has been estimated that as many as 50% of older adults complain about difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep. Poor sleep results in increased risk of significant morbidity and mortality. Moreover, in younger adults, compromised sleep has been shown to have a consistent effect on cognitive function, which may suggest that sleep problems contribute to the cognitive changes that accompany older age. The multifactorial nature of variables affecting sleep in old age cannot be overstated. Changes in sleep have been thought to reflect normal developmental processes, which can be further compromised by sleep disturbances secondary to medical or psychiatric diseases (e.g., chronic pain, dementia, depression), a primary sleep disorder that can itself be age-related (e.g., Sleep Disordered Breathing and Periodic Limb Movements During Sleep), or some combination of any of these factors. Given that changes in sleep quality and quantity in later life have implications for quality of life and level of functioning, it is imperative to distinguish the normal age-related sleep changes from those originating from pathological processes. PMID:21225347

  16. Beyond mean values: Quantifying intraindividual variability in pre-sleep arousal and sleep in younger and older community-dwelling adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Kristy D; Tighe, Caitlan A; Dautovich, Natalie D; McCrae, Christina S

    2015-01-01

    Intraindividual variability is an often understudied aspect of health outcomes research that may provide additional, complementary information to average values. The current paper aims to further our understanding of intraindividual variability in health research by presenting the results of a daily diary study of sleep and pre-sleep arousal. Pre-sleep arousal is often implicated in poor sleep outcomes, although the arousal-sleep association is not uniform across age groups. The examination of intraindividual variability in different age groups may provide a more complete understanding of these constructs, which, in turn, can inform future research. The overall objectives of the current study are to quantify the amount of intraindividual variability in pre-sleep arousal and sleep and to examine age differences in this variability. A sample of older (n=50) and younger (n=50) adults recruited from North Central Florida and online completed 14-consecutive-day diaries assessing pre-sleep arousal and sleep outcomes. Significant age differences were found for sleep and pre-sleep arousal; older adults displayed poorer, more variable sleep for the majority of sleep outcomes, and higher levels of pre-sleep arousal than younger adults. The high amount of intraindividual variability has implications for the assessment of pre-sleep arousal and sleep across age groups. PMID:26483939

  17. Percentage of REM sleep is associated with overnight change in leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Christy A; Hamilton, Nancy A; Somers, Virend K

    2016-08-01

    Sleep contributes importantly to energy homeostasis, and may impact hormones regulating appetite, such as leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone. There is increasing evidence that sleep duration, and reduced rapid eye movement sleep, are linked to obesity. Leptin has central neural effects beyond modulation of appetite alone. As sleep is not a unifrom process, interactions between leptin and sleep stages including rapid eye movement sleep may play a role in the relationship between sleep and obesity. This study examined the relationship between serum leptin and rapid eye movement sleep in a sample of healthy adults. Participants were 58 healthy adults who underwent polysomnography. Leptin was measured before and after sleep. It was hypothesized that a lower percentage of rapid eye movement sleep would be related to lower leptin levels during sleep. The relationship between percentage of rapid eye movement sleep and leptin was analysed using hierarchical linear regression. An increased percentage of rapid eye movement sleep was related to a greater reduction in leptin during sleep even when controlling for age, gender, percent body fat and total sleep time. A greater percentage of rapid eye movement sleep was accompanied by more marked reductions in leptin. Studies examining the effects of selective rapid eye movement sleep deprivation on leptin levels, and hence on energy homeostasis in humans, are needed. PMID:26919408

  18. Sleep physiology and sleep disorders in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Shakankiry HM

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hanan M El ShakankiryKing Fahd University Hospital, Al Dammam University, Al Khobar, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Sleep has long been considered as a passive phenomenon, but it is now clear that it is a period of intense brain activity involving higher cortical functions. Overall, sleep affects every aspect of a child's development, particularly higher cognitive functions. Sleep concerns are ranked as the fifth leading concern of parents. Close to one third of all children suffer from sleep disorders, the prevalence of which is increased in certain pediatric populations, such as children with special needs, children with psychiatric or medical diagnoses and children with autism or pervasive developmental disorders. The paper reviews sleep physiology and the impact, classification, and management of sleep disorders in the pediatric age group.Keywords: sleep physiology, sleep disorders, childhood, epilepsy

  19. SLEEP DISORDERS, SLEEP APNEA. AND STROKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ANTONIO CULEBRAS, M.D

    2000-01-01

    @@Sleep is the natural suspension of consciousness during which the powers of the body are restored Sleep recurs with remarkable periodicity in alliance with the geocosmic cycle and in compliance with the circadian rhythms of the body.

  20. Sleep for cognitive enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eDiekelmann

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is essential for effective cognitive functioning. Loosing even a few hours of sleep can have detrimental effects on a wide variety of cognitive processes such as attention, language, reasoning, decision making, learning and memory. While sleep is necessary to ensure normal healthy cognitive functioning, it can also enhance performance beyond the boundaries of the normal condition. This article discusses the enhancing potential of sleep, mainly focusing on the domain of learning and memory. Sleep is known to facilitate the consolidation of memories learned before sleep as well as the acquisition of new memories to be learned after sleep. According to a widely held model this beneficial effect of sleep relies on the neuronal reactivation of memories during sleep that is associated with sleep-specific brain oscillations (slow oscillations, spindles, ripples as well as a characteristic neurotransmitter milieu. Recent research indicates that memory processing during sleep can be boosted by (i cueing memory reactivation during sleep, (ii stimulating sleep-specific brain oscillations, and (iii targeting specific neurotransmitter systems pharmacologically. Olfactory and auditory cues can be used, for example, to increase reactivation of associated memories during post-learning sleep. Intensifying neocortical slow oscillations (the hallmark of slow wave sleep by electrical or auditory stimulation and modulating specific neurotransmitters such as noradrenaline and glutamate likewise facilitates memory processing during sleep. With this evidence in mind, this article concludes by discussing different methodological caveats and ethical issues that should be considered when thinking about using sleep for cognitive enhancement in everyday applications.

  1. Transnasal Humidified Rapid-Insufflation Ventilatory Exchange (THRIVE): a physiological method of increasing apnoea time in patients with difficult airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A; Nouraei, S A R

    2015-03-01

    Emergency and difficult tracheal intubations are hazardous undertakings where successive laryngoscopy-hypoxaemia-re-oxygenation cycles can escalate to airway loss and the 'can't intubate, can't ventilate' scenario. Between 2013 and 2014, we extended the apnoea times of 25 patients with difficult airways who were undergoing general anaesthesia for hypopharyngeal or laryngotracheal surgery. This was achieved through continuous delivery of transnasal high-flow humidified oxygen, initially to provide pre-oxygenation, and continuing as post-oxygenation during intravenous induction of anaesthesia and neuromuscular blockade until a definitive airway was secured. Apnoea time commenced at administration of neuromuscular blockade and ended with commencement of jet ventilation, positive-pressure ventilation or recommencement of spontaneous ventilation. During this time, upper airway patency was maintained with jaw-thrust. Transnasal Humidified Rapid-Insufflation Ventilatory Exchange (THRIVE) was used in 15 males and 10 females. Mean (SD [range]) age at treatment was 49 (15 [25-81]) years. The median (IQR [range]) Mallampati grade was 3 (2-3 [2-4]) and direct laryngoscopy grade was 3 (3-3 [2-4]). There were 12 obese patients and nine patients were stridulous. The median (IQR [range]) apnoea time was 14 (9-19 [5-65]) min. No patient experienced arterial desaturation gaseous exchange through flow-dependent deadspace flushing. It has the potential to transform the practice of anaesthesia by changing the nature of securing a definitive airway in emergency and difficult intubations from a pressured stop-start process to a smooth and unhurried undertaking. PMID:25388828

  2. Metabolic consequences of sleep and sleep loss

    OpenAIRE

    Van Cauter, Eve; Spiegel, Karine; Tasali, Esra; Leproult, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Reduced sleep duration and quality appear to be endemic in modern society. Curtailment of the bedtime period to minimum tolerability is thought to be efficient and harmless by many. It has been known for several decades that sleep is a major modulator of hormonal release, glucose regulation and cardiovascular function. In particular, slow wave sleep (SWS), thought to be the most restorative sleep stage, is associated with decreased heart rate, blood pressure, sympathetic nervous activity and ...

  3. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  4. Adolescents' Sleep Behaviors and Perceptions of Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Heather; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph; Telljohann, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sleep duration affects the health of children and adolescents. Shorter sleep durations have been associated with poorer academic performance, unintentional injuries, and obesity in adolescents. This study extends our understanding of how adolescents perceive and deal with their sleep issues. Methods: General education classes were…

  5. Sleep-wake disturbances after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENG Li-ying

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sleep-wake disturbances (SWD after stroke is a sleep-wake disorder resulting from central nervous system lesion caused by stroke. SWD includes hypersomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, fatigue and so on. The prevalence rate of SWD is only less than sleep-related breathing disturbances (SBD. Recent studies suggest that SWD is frequent and negatively affects rehabilitation and quality of life of patients with stroke, and treatment of poststroke SWD may favorably influence stroke outcome. SWD may become a new target of treatment and rehabilitation of stroke. This paper reviewed the progress of this issue.

  6. Characteristics of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Frandsen, Rune Asger Vestergaard; Knudsen, Stine

    2013-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with Parkinsonian disorders, but is also reported in narcolepsy. Most patients...... of hypocretin deficiency. Thus, hypocretin deficiency is linked to the two major disturbances of REM sleep motor regulation in narcolepsy: RBD and cataplexy. Moreover, it is likely that hypocretin deficiency independently predicts periodic limb movements in REM and NREM sleep, probably via involvement...... of the dopaminergic system. This supports the hypothesis that an impaired hypocretin system causes general instability of motor regulation during wakefulness, REM and NREM sleep in human narcolepsy. We propose that hypocretin neurons are centrally involved in motor tone control during wakefulness and sleep in humans...

  7. Cardiovascular Disease and Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powlson, Andrew S; Gurnell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Treatment goals in acromegaly include symptom relief, tumour control and reversal of the excess morbidity and mortality associated with the disorder. Cardiovascular complications include concentric biventricular hypertrophy and cardiomyopathy, hypertension, valvular heart disease and arrhythmias, while metabolic disturbance (insulin resistance/diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia) further increases the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Sleep-disordered breathing (in the form of sleep apnoea) is also common in patients with acromegaly and may exacerbate cardiovascular dysfunction, in addition to contributing to impaired quality of life. Accordingly, and in keeping with evidence that cardiorespiratory complications in acromegaly are not automatically reversed/ameliorated simply through the attainment of 'safe' growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels, recent guidelines have emphasised the need not only to achieve stringent biochemical control, but also to identify and independently treat these comorbidities. It is important, therefore, that patients with acromegaly are systematically screened at diagnosis, and periodically thereafter, for the common cardiovascular and respiratory manifestations and that biochemical targets do not become the only treatment goal. PMID:26227953

  8. Sleep and Infant Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarullo, Amanda R.; Balsam, Peter D.; Fifer, William P.

    2011-01-01

    Human neonates spend the majority of their time sleeping. Despite the limited waking hours available for environmental exploration, the first few months of life are a time of rapid learning about the environment. The organization of neonate sleep differs qualitatively from adult sleep, and the unique characteristics of neonatal sleep may promote…

  9. Essential roles of GABA transporter-1 in controlling rapid eye movement sleep and in increased slow wave activity after sleep deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Hong Xu

    Full Text Available GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of sleep. GABA transporter subtype 1 (GAT1 constructs high affinity reuptake sites for GABA and regulates GABAergic transmission in the brain. However, the role of GAT1 in sleep-wake regulation remains elusive. In the current study, we characterized the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and responses to sleep deprivation in GAT1 knock-out (KO mice. GAT1 KO mice exhibited dominant theta-activity and a remarkable reduction of EEG power in low frequencies across all vigilance stages. Under baseline conditions, spontaneous rapid eye movement (REM sleep of KO mice was elevated both during the light and dark periods, and non-REM (NREM sleep was reduced during the light period only. KO mice also showed more state transitions from NREM to REM sleep and from REM sleep to wakefulness, as well as more number of REM and NREM sleep bouts than WT mice. During the dark period, KO mice exhibited more REM sleep bouts only. Six hours of sleep deprivation induced rebound increases in NREM and REM sleep in both genotypes. However, slow wave activity, the intensity component of NREM sleep was briefly elevated in WT mice but remained completely unchanged in KO mice, compared with their respective baselines. These results indicate that GAT1 plays a critical role in the regulation of REM sleep and homeostasis of NREM sleep.

  10. Essential roles of GABA transporter-1 in controlling rapid eye movement sleep and in increased slow wave activity after sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin-Hong; Qu, Wei-Min; Bian, Min-Juan; Huang, Fang; Fei, Jian; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2013-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of sleep. GABA transporter subtype 1 (GAT1) constructs high affinity reuptake sites for GABA and regulates GABAergic transmission in the brain. However, the role of GAT1 in sleep-wake regulation remains elusive. In the current study, we characterized the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and responses to sleep deprivation in GAT1 knock-out (KO) mice. GAT1 KO mice exhibited dominant theta-activity and a remarkable reduction of EEG power in low frequencies across all vigilance stages. Under baseline conditions, spontaneous rapid eye movement (REM) sleep of KO mice was elevated both during the light and dark periods, and non-REM (NREM) sleep was reduced during the light period only. KO mice also showed more state transitions from NREM to REM sleep and from REM sleep to wakefulness, as well as more number of REM and NREM sleep bouts than WT mice. During the dark period, KO mice exhibited more REM sleep bouts only. Six hours of sleep deprivation induced rebound increases in NREM and REM sleep in both genotypes. However, slow wave activity, the intensity component of NREM sleep was briefly elevated in WT mice but remained completely unchanged in KO mice, compared with their respective baselines. These results indicate that GAT1 plays a critical role in the regulation of REM sleep and homeostasis of NREM sleep.

  11. Sleep loss and circadian disruption in shift work: health burden and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Howard, Mark E; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2013-10-21

    About 1.5 million Australians are shift workers. Shift work is associated with adverse health, safety and performance outcomes. Circadian rhythm misalignment, inadequate and poor-quality sleep, and sleep disorders such as sleep apnoea, insomnia and shift work disorder (excessive sleepiness and/or insomnia temporally associated with the work schedule) contribute to these associations. Falling asleep at work at least once a week occurs in 32%-36% of shift workers. Risk of occupational accidents is at least 60% higher for non-day shift workers. Shift workers also have higher rates of cardiometabolic diseases and mood disturbances. Road and workplace accidents related to excessive sleepiness, to which shift work is a significant contributor, are estimated to cost $71-$93 billion per annum in the United States. There is growing evidence that understanding the interindividual variability in sleep-wake responses to shift work will help detect and manage workers vulnerable to the health consequences of shift work. A range of approaches can be used to enhance alertness in shift workers, including screening and treating sleep disorders, melatonin treatment to promote sleep during the daytime, and avoidance of inappropriate use of sedatives and wakefulness-promoters such as modafinil and caffeine. Short naps, which minimise sleep inertia, are generally effective. Shifting the circadian pacemaker with appropriately timed melatonin and/or bright light may be used to facilitate adjustment to a shift work schedule in some situations, such as a long sequence of night work. It is important to manage the health risk of shift workers by minimising vascular risk factors through dietary and other lifestyle approaches.

  12. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy.

  13. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy. PMID:1621022

  14. Rhythm disturbances in childhood obstructive sleep apnea during apnea-hypopnea episodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) can result in cardiovascular complications. Nocturnal arrhythmias are reported up to 50% of adult OSA patients. Arrhythmias and heart rate variability in children with OSA have not been well studied. We sought to study rhythm disturbances in childhood OSA and also to analyze the relationship of heart rate variability to the severity of OSA in children. In a retrospective cross sectional study, records of children aged < 15 years with history of snoring and suspected OSA, who had undergone polysomnography (PSG) for first time were analyzed. The cardiac rhythm and heart rate variability were studied during PSG. A total of 124 patients diagnosed with OSA were grouped into mild (n = 52), moderate (n = 30), and severe (n = 42) OSA. During PSG, all had sinus arrhythmias and only three patients had premature atrial contractions (PACs). The standard deviation of heart rate (SD-HR) during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in severe OSA (9.1 ± 2.4) was significantly higher than SD-HR in mild OSA (7.5 ± 1.3, P < 0.0001). The maximum heart rate (max-HR) during REM-sleep in severe OSA (132.1 ± 22.1) was significantly higher than the max-HR in mild OSA (121.3 ± 12.6 bpm, P = 0.016). There was no significant arrhythmia in children with OSA during their sleep. Heart rate variability correlated with the severity of OSA

  15. Sleep, sleep disturbance, and fertility in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Jacqueline D; Perlis, Michael L; Zamzow, Jessica A; Culnan, Elizabeth J; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2015-08-01

    Sleep and sleep disturbances are increasingly recognized as determinants of women's health and well-being, particularly in the context of the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and menopause. At present, however, little is known about whether fertility is affected by sleep quantity and quality. That is, to what degree, and by what mechanisms, do sleep and/or its disturbances affect fertility? The purpose of this review is to synthesize what is known about sleep disturbances in relation to reproductive capacity. A model is provided, whereby stress, sleep dysregulation, and circadian misalignment are delineated for their potential relevance to infertility. Ultimately, if it is the case that sleep disturbance is associated with infertility, new avenues for clinical intervention may be possible.

  16. Sleep disorders in children

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Sleep disorders may affect 20-30% of young children, and include excessive daytime sleepiness, problems getting to sleep (dysomnias), or undesirable phenomena during sleep (parasomnias), such as sleep terrors, and sleepwalking. Children with physical or learning disabilities are at increased risk of sleep disorders. Other risk factors include the child being the first born, having a difficult temperament or having had colic, and increased maternal responsiveness.

  17. Childhood epilepsy and sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Biltagi, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and epilepsy are two well recognized conditions that interact with each other in a complex bi-directional way. Some types of epilepsies have increased activity during sleep disturbing it; while sleep deprivation aggravates epilepsy due to decreased seizure threshold. Epilepsy can deteriorate the sleep-related disorders and at the same time; the parasomnias can worsen the epilepsy. The secretion of sleep-related hormones can also be affected by the occurrence of seizures and supplementat...

  18. Ostriches sleep like platypuses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Lesku

    Full Text Available Mammals and birds engage in two distinct states of sleep, slow wave sleep (SWS and rapid eye movement (REM sleep. SWS is characterized by slow, high amplitude brain waves, while REM sleep is characterized by fast, low amplitude waves, known as activation, occurring with rapid eye movements and reduced muscle tone. However, monotremes (platypuses and echidnas, the most basal (or 'ancient' group of living mammals, show only a single sleep state that combines elements of SWS and REM sleep, suggesting that these states became temporally segregated in the common ancestor to marsupial and eutherian mammals. Whether sleep in basal birds resembles that of monotremes or other mammals and birds is unknown. Here, we provide the first description of brain activity during sleep in ostriches (Struthio camelus, a member of the most basal group of living birds. We found that the brain activity of sleeping ostriches is unique. Episodes of REM sleep were delineated by rapid eye movements, reduced muscle tone, and head movements, similar to those observed in other birds and mammals engaged in REM sleep; however, during REM sleep in ostriches, forebrain activity would flip between REM sleep-like activation and SWS-like slow waves, the latter reminiscent of sleep in the platypus. Moreover, the amount of REM sleep in ostriches is greater than in any other bird, just as in platypuses, which have more REM sleep than other mammals. These findings reveal a recurring sequence of steps in the evolution of sleep in which SWS and REM sleep arose from a single heterogeneous state that became temporally segregated into two distinct states. This common trajectory suggests that forebrain activation during REM sleep is an evolutionarily new feature, presumably involved in performing new sleep functions not found in more basal animals.

  19. Synaptic Homeostasis and Restructuring across the Sleep-Wake Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Wilfredo Blanco; Catia M Pereira; Vinicius R Cota; Annie C Souza; César Rennó-Costa; Sharlene Santos; Gabriella Dias; Guerreiro, Ana M. G.; Tort, Adriano B. L.; Adrião D Neto; Sidarta Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is critical for hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. However, the underlying mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are poorly understood. The central controversy is on whether long-term potentiation (LTP) takes a role during sleep and which would be its specific effect on memory. To address this question, we used immunohistochemistry to measure phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKIIα) in the rat hippocampus immediately after specific sleep-wake states...

  20. REM sleep dysregulation in depression: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagini, Laura; Baglioni, Chiara; Ciapparelli, Antonio; Gemignani, Angelo; Riemann, Dieter

    2013-10-01

    Disturbances of sleep are typical for most depressed patients and belong to the core symptoms of the disorder. Since the 1960s polysomnographic sleep research has demonstrated that besides disturbances of sleep continuity, depression is associated with altered sleep architecture, i.e., a decrease in slow wave sleep (SWS) production and disturbed rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. Shortened REM latency (i.e., the interval between sleep onset and the occurrence of the first REM period), increased REM sleep duration and increased REM density (i.e., the frequency of rapid eye movements per REM period) have been considered as biological markers of depression which might predict relapse and recurrence. High risk studies including healthy relatives of patients with depression demonstrate that REM sleep alterations may precede the clinical expression of depression and may thus be useful in identifying subjects at high risk for the illness. Several models have been developed to explain REM sleep abnormalities in depression, like the cholinergic-aminergic imbalance model or chronobiologically inspired theories, which are reviewed in this overview. Moreover, REM sleep alterations have been recently considered not only as biological "scars" but as true endophenotypes of depression. This review discusses the genetic, neurochemical and neurobiological factors that have been implicated to play a role in the complex relationships between REM sleep and depression. We hypothesize on the one hand that REM sleep dysregulation in depression may be linked to a genetic predisposition/vulnerability to develop the illness; on the other hand it is conceivable that REM sleep disinhibition in itself is a part of a maladaptive stress reaction with increased allostatic load. We also discuss whether the REM sleep changes in depression may contribute themselves to the development of central symptoms of depression such as cognitive distortions including negative self-esteem and the

  1. Sleep after critical illness: Study of survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome and systematic review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhooria, Sahajal; Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Agrawal, Anshu Kumar; Agarwal, Ritesh; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Behera, Digambar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: This study aims to evaluate the sleep quality, architecture, sleep-related quality of life, and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) survivors early after discharge. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, observational study, consecutive patients with ARDS discharged from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) underwent evaluation with Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), and overnight polysomnography. Patients having one or more of the following characteristics were classified as having abnormal sleep: ESS>10, PSQI>5, FOSQ 10, seven (35%) had global PSQI>5 and one had FOSQ <17.9. Ten (50%) patients had at least one characteristic that suggested abnormal sleep (4 insomnia, 2 central sleep apnea, 1 obstructive sleep apnea, 1 REM-SDB, and 2 with a high PSQI, but no specific sleep abnormality). Conclusions: Sleep disturbances are common in ARDS survivors early after discharge from the ICU. PMID:27390455

  2. Local aspects of sleep: observations from intracerebral recordings in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Lino; De Gennaro, Luigi; Proserpio, Paola; Moroni, Fabio; Sarasso, Simone; Pigorini, Andrea; De Carli, Fabrizio; Ferrara, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Human sleep is considered a global phenomenon, orchestrated by central specialized neuronal networks modulating the whole-brain activity. However, recent studies point to a local regulation of sleep. Sleep disorders, such as sleepwalking, suggest that electroencephalographic (EEG) features of sleep and wakefulness might be simultaneously present in different cerebral regions. Recently, intracranial EEG recording techniques, mainly applied for the presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epileptic patients, have provided new and interesting information on the activity of different cortical and subcortical structures during sleep in humans. In particular, it has been observed that the thalamus, during the transition between wake and sleep undergoes a deactivation process that precedes the one occurring within the cortex, with extensive cortical territories maintaining an activated pattern for several minutes after the thalamic deactivation. Very recent intracerebral EEG studies have also shown that human NREM sleep can be characterized by the coexistence of wake-like and sleep-like EEG patterns in different cortical areas. Moreover, unit-firing recordings in multiple brain regions of neurosurgical patients evidenced that most sleep slow waves and the underlying active and inactive neuronal states do occur locally. These findings add a new dimension to the concept of local sleep regulation and opens new perspectives in the interpretation of the substrates underlying behavioral states of vigilance. The implications for sleep medicine are also discussed. PMID:22877668

  3. Predictability decomposition detects the impairment of brain-heart dynamical networks during sleep disorders and their recovery with treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faes, Luca; Marinazzo, Daniele; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Jurysta, Fabrice; Porta, Alberto; Giandomenico, Nollo

    2016-05-01

    This work introduces a framework to study the network formed by the autonomic component of heart rate variability (cardiac process η) and the amplitude of the different electroencephalographic waves (brain processes δ, θ, α, σ, β) during sleep. The framework exploits multivariate linear models to decompose the predictability of any given target process into measures of self-, causal and interaction predictability reflecting respectively the information retained in the process and related to its physiological complexity, the information transferred from the other source processes, and the information modified during the transfer according to redundant or synergistic interaction between the sources. The framework is here applied to the η, δ, θ, α, σ, β time series measured from the sleep recordings of eight severe sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (SAHS) patients studied before and after long-term treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, and 14 healthy controls. Results show that the full and self-predictability of η, δ and θ decreased significantly in SAHS compared with controls, and were restored with CPAP for δ and θ but not for η. The causal predictability of η and δ occurred through significantly redundant source interaction during healthy sleep, which was lost in SAHS and recovered after CPAP. These results indicate that predictability analysis is a viable tool to assess the modifications of complexity and causality of the cerebral and cardiac processes induced by sleep disorders, and to monitor the restoration of the neuroautonomic control of these processes during long-term treatment.

  4. Sympatho-vagal responses in patients with sleep and typical vasovagal syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L. Jardine; C.T.P. Krediet; P. Cortelli; C.M. Frampton; W. Wieling

    2009-01-01

    Sleep syncope is a recently described form of vasovagal syncope that interrupts sleep. The pathophysiology of this condition is uncertain but a 'central' non-baroreflex-mediated trigger has been suggested. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that patients with sleep syncope have abnormal

  5. Sleep locally, act globally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattenborg, Niels C; Lima, Steven L; Lesku, John A

    2012-10-01

    In most animals, sleep is considered a global brain and behavioral state. However, recent intracortical recordings have shown that aspects of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and wakefulness can occur simultaneously in different parts of the cortex in mammals, including humans. Paradoxically, however, NREM sleep still manifests as a global behavioral shutdown. In this review, the authors examine this paradox from an evolutionary perspective. On the basis of strategic modeling, they suggest that in animals with brains composed of heavily interconnected and functionally interdependent units, a global regulator of sleep maintains the behavioral shutdown that defines sleep and thereby ensures that local use-dependent functions are performed in a safe and efficient manner. This novel perspective has implications for understanding deficits in human cognitive performance resulting from sleep deprivation, sleep disorders such as sleepwalking, changes in consciousness that occur during sleep, and the function of sleep itself. PMID:22572533

  6. Patterns of sleep behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the electroencephalogram as the critical measurement procedure for sleep research, and survey of major findings that have emerged in the last decade on the presence of sleep within the twenty-four-hour cycle. Specifically, intrasleep processes, frequency of stage changes, sequence of stage events, sleep stage amounts, temporal patterns of sleep, and stability of intrasleep pattern in both man and lower animals are reviewed, along with some circadian aspects of sleep, temporal factors, and number of sleep episodes. It is felt that it is particularly critical to take the presence of sleep into account whenever performance is considered. When it is recognized that responsive performance is extremely limited during sleep, it is easy to visualize the extent to which performance is controlled by sleep itself.

  7. Are You Getting Enough Sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Emails CDC Features Are you getting enough sleep? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Sleep is ... sleep guidelines for different age groups. How much sleep do you need? Newborns 16-18 hours Preschool- ...

  8. All about Sleep (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Naps Sleepwalking Nightmares Night Terrors Sleep and Your 1- to ... Sleep Apnea Sleep Problems in Teens Separation Anxiety Sleepwalking Nightmares What Kids Say About: Sleep Time for ...

  9. Sleep and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Dionne; Tsai, Sheila C

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the effect of sleep and sleep disorders on endocrine function and the influence of endocrine abnormalities on sleep are discussed. Sleep disruption and its associated endocrine consequences in the critically ill patient are also reviewed.

  10. Sleep disorders in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as reading or listening to music. Avoid using sleeping pills to help you sleep, if possible. They can ... taking sleep medications. If you think you need sleeping pills, talk with your doctor about which pills are ...

  11. The Phenomenon of Sleep Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of sleep where vivid dreams occur (known as REM sleep), your arms and legs are temporarily paralyzed so ... alien abductions." Since breathing can be irregular during REM sleep, those experiencing sleep paralysis may feel like they' ...

  12. Sleep Patterns of College Students at a Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forquer, LeAnne M.; Camden, Adrian E.; Gabriau, Krista M.; Johnson, C. Merle

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to determine the sleep patterns of college students to identify problem areas and potential solutions. Participants: A total of 313 students returned completed surveys. Methods: A sleep survey was e-mailed to a random sample of students at a North Central university. Questions included individual…

  13. Sleep spindle alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Nikolic, Miki; Warby, Simon C.;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify changes of sleep spindles (SS) in the EEG of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Five sleep experts manually identified SS at a central scalp location (C3-A2) in 15 PD and 15 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Each SS was given a confidence score...

  14. [Sleep and dreams in pictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, R T

    1995-04-11

    Human life is divided into two thirds wakefulness and one third sleep. A newborn child sleeps to strengthen, the adult for regeneration. At the end of life man sinks down into the sleep of death: Hypnos and Thanatos are twin sons of the Queen of Night. Myths from different cultures are influenced by the experience of sleep and its inner world of pictures, the dreams. Artists, painters and sculptors let their visions float steadily into new pictures, and creatures of sleep formed out of diverse materials. Devine sleep, sleep for new life, sleep of health, creative sleep, prophetic sleep, sleep for revelation and for decisions. PMID:7732243

  15. 慢性心力衰竭患者中枢性睡眠呼吸暂停的诊治进展%Progress in diagnosis and treatment of central sleep apnea in chronic heart failure patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓赟

    2012-01-01

    Chronic systolic heart failure (CHF) is a complex clinical syndrome that is characterized by high morbidity and mortality.Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is highly prevalent in CHF,and seems to have a signifcant adverse effect on prognosis.Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) is a common form of central sleep apnea (CSA),but signifcant controversy still exists about the exact criteria for the diagnosis of the syndrome,as well as which is the most effective therapy for apnea alleviation and whether this is associated with reduced CHF morbidity and mortality.In addition,controversy exists as to whether CSA-CSR is simply an index of CHF severity,or a serious comorbidity with adverse long term prognostic implications.This article review the available data on these controversial issues.%慢性充血性心力衰竭(CHF)是一种复杂的临床综合征,发病率和病死率都极高.心力衰竭患者中睡眠呼吸障碍的发病率极高,对心力衰竭患者的预后产生极为不利的影响.陈-施呼吸(CSR)是最常见的一种中枢性呼吸暂停,但关于该综合征的确切的诊断标准、减少CSR的最有效方法、以及这是否能够降低CHF的致残率和病死率等方面,存在许多不同观点.另外,究竟CSR只是反应CHF严重程度的一个参数,还是一种可导致远期不良预后的严重并发症,亦尚存争议.本文对慢性心力衰竭患者的中枢性睡眠呼吸暂停的诊治进展进行了简要综述.

  16. Pharmacology for sleep disturbance in PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinska, Gosia; Baldwin, David S; Thomas, Kevin G F

    2016-03-01

    Symptoms of sleep disturbance, particularly nightmares and insomnia, are a central feature of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Emerging evidence suggests that specific treatment of PTSD-related sleep disturbance improves other symptoms of the disorder, which in turn suggests that such disturbance may be fundamental to development and maintenance of the disorder. This mini-review focuses on pharmacological treatment of sleep disturbance in adult PTSD (specifically, studies testing the efficacy of antidepressants, adrenergic inhibiting agents, antipsychotics and benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics). We conclude that only prazosin, an adrenergic inhibiting agent, has had its efficacy established by multiple randomised controlled trials. There is also high-level evidence supporting use of eszopiclone, as well as risperidone and olanzapine as adjunct therapy. Antidepressants such as sertraline, venlafaxine and mirtazapine, benzodiazepines such as alprazolam and clonazepam and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics such as zolpidem appear ineffective in treating PTSD-related sleep disturbance. Most studies that report reduced frequency of nightmares and insomnia also report decreases in overall symptom severity. Such findings suggest that (i) sleep disruption is central to PTSD; (ii) treating sleep disruption may be an effective way to address other symptoms of the disorder and (iii) PTSD symptoms tend to cluster together in predictable ways. PMID:26856810

  17. Sleep and sleep disorders in Don Quixote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Alex; Santamaria, Joan; de Riquer, Martín

    2004-01-01

    In Don Quijote de la Mancha, Miguel de Cervantes presents Don Quixote as an amazing character of the 17th century who suffers from delusions and illusions, believing himself to be a medieval knight errant. Besides this neuropsychiatric condition, Cervantes included masterful descriptions of several sleep disorders such as insomnia, sleep deprivation, disruptive loud snoring and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. In addition, he described the occurrence of physiological, vivid dreams and habitual, post-prandial sleepiness--the siesta. Cervantes' concept of sleep as a passive state where all cerebral activities are almost absent is in conflict with his description of abnormal behaviours during sleep and vivid, fantastic dreams. His concept of sleep was shared by his contemporary, Shakespeare, and could have been influenced by the reading of the classical Spanish book of psychiatry Examen de Ingenios (1575).

  18. Sleep patterns and sleep-related complaints of Brazilian interstate bus drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Mello

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep-related complaints have become a highlight for physicians as well as public health administrators. Studies of sleep patterns and sleep-related complaints of shift workers have been useful in minimizing reduction in the quality of life due to the warping of the sleep-wake cycle. The objective of the present study was to assess patterns of sleep, sleep-related complaints as well as physical activity and scoring rates for depression and anxiety in interstate bus drivers. Data were obtained with a sleep questionnaire, with the Beck inventory for depression, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. A total of 400 interstate bus drivers from the northern, southern, central-western and south-eastern regions of Brazil were interviewed. Sixty percent of the subjects interviewed presented at least one sleep-related complaint, 16% admitted to have dozed at the wheel while on duty, and 41% stated that they exercised on a regular basis. Other sleep disturbance complaints reported were: sleep latency 29'17"; physical fatigue, 59.8%; mental fatigue, 45.4%; sleepiness, 25.8%; irritability, 20.6%; insomnia, 37.5%, respiratory disturbances, 19.25% and snoring, 20.75%. Scores for anxiety and depression were not in the pathological range. The present data reinforce the view that bus drivers are generally discontent with shift work and its effects on sleep. Consequently, it is very important to establish an appropriate work schedule for drivers, besides implementing photo-therapy and physical activities in order to minimize sleepiness when driving.

  19. Biochemical Regulation of Sleep and Sleep Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Clinton, James M.; Davis, Christopher J.; Zielinski, Mark R.; Jewett, Kathryn A.; Krueger, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Symptoms commonly associated with sleep loss and chronic inflammation include sleepiness, fatigue, poor cognition, enhanced sensitivity to pain and kindling stimuli, excess sleep and increases in circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) in humans and brain levels of interleukin-1 β (IL1) and TNF in animals. Cytokines including IL1 and TNF partake in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) regulation under physiological and inflammatory conditions. Administration of exogenous IL1 or TN...

  20. Sleep physiology and sleep disorders in childhood

    OpenAIRE

    El Shakankiry HM

    2011-01-01

    Hanan M El ShakankiryKing Fahd University Hospital, Al Dammam University, Al Khobar, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Sleep has long been considered as a passive phenomenon, but it is now clear that it is a period of intense brain activity involving higher cortical functions. Overall, sleep affects every aspect of a child's development, particularly higher cognitive functions. Sleep concerns are ranked as the fifth leading concern of parents. Close to one third of all children suffer ...

  1. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BREAST-FEEDING, CO-SLEEPING, AND SOMATIC COMPLAINTS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Elisabeth Maria; Lusher, Joanne Marie; Banbury, Samantha; Chandler, Chris

    2016-09-01

    The central aim of this study was to expand a limited body of knowledge on the complex relationship between breast-feeding, co-sleeping, and somatic complaints in early childhood. An opportunity sample of 98 parents from the general population with children aged 18 to 60 months consented to participate in the study. Each parent completed a series of questionnaires measuring somatic complaints, sleep problems, co-sleeping, breast-feeding, and demographic factors. Findings indicated that co-sleeping was associated with increased somatic complaints and that breast-feeding associated with decreased somatic complaints. Co-sleeping also was found to be associated with an increase in sleep problems. Boys demonstrated significantly higher levels of sleep problems than did girls. These findings highlight the relationship between co-sleeping during early childhood, which could have implications for prevention, treatment, and intervention regarding somatic complaints and sleep problems in early childhood. PMID:27552361

  2. Prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing in the general population: the HypnoLaus study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzer, R; Vat, S; Marques-Vidal, P; Marti-Soler, H; Andries, D; Tobback, N; Mooser, V; Preisig, M; Malhotra, A; Waeber, G; Vollenweider, P; Tafti, M; Haba-Rubio, J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Sleep-disordered breathing is associated with major morbidity and mortality. However, its prevalence has mainly been selectively studied in populations at risk for sleep-disordered breathing or cardiovascular diseases. Taking into account improvements in recording techniques and new criteria used to define respiratory events, we aimed to assess the prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing and associated clinical features in a large population-based sample. Methods Between Sept 1, 2009, and June 30, 2013, we did a population-based study (HypnoLaus) in Lausanne, Switzerland. We invited a cohort of 3043 consecutive participants of the CoLaus/PsyCoLaus study to take part. Polysomnography data from 2121 people were included in the final analysis. 1024 (48%) participants were men, with a median age of 57 years (IQR 49–68, range 40–85) and mean body-mass index (BMI) of 25·6 kg/m2 (SD 4·1). Participants underwent complete polysomnographic recordings at home and had extensive phenotyping for diabetes, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and depression. The primary outcome was prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing, assessed by the apnoea-hypopnoea index. Findings The median apnoea-hypopnoea index was 6·9 events per h (IQR 2·7–14·1) in women and 14·9 per h (7·2–27·1) in men. The prevalence of moderate-to-severe sleep-disordered breathing (≥15 events per h) was 23·4% (95% CI 20·9–26·0) in women and 49·7% (46·6–52·8) in men. After multivariable adjustment, the upper quartile for the apnoea-hypopnoea index (>20·6 events per h) was associated independently with the presence of hypertension (odds ratio 1·60, 95% CI 1·14–2·26; p=0·0292 for trend across severity quartiles), diabetes (2·00, 1·05–3·99; p=0·0467), metabolic syndrome (2·80, 1·86–4·29; p<0·0001), and depression (1·92, 1·01–3·64; p=0·0292). Interpretation The high prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing recorded in our population-based sample might

  3. Treatment of sleep-disordered breathing with positive airway pressure devices: technology update

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson KG; Johnson DC

    2015-01-01

    Karin Gardner Johnson, Douglas Clark Johnson Department of Medicine, Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA, USA Abstract: Many types of positive airway pressure (PAP) devices are used to treat sleep-disordered breathing including obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, and sleep-related hypoventilation. These include continuous PAP, autoadjusting CPAP, bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, and volume-assured pressure support. Noninvasive PAP has significant leak by design, which t...

  4. Sleeping with the Political Enemy: Woman’s Place in Discourses of Race and Class Struggle in 20th Century Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Bolgár

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I shall argue that the convergence of ideologies operating through the creation of enemies like racism and Bolshevism with discourses regulating gender relations in the Central Europe of the twentieth century had the grave consequence of questioning women’s position in the political community. In short, I shall argue that in the context of racist and Bolshevik discourses, the very fact of being female was in itself a political threat to women. To demonstrate my point, I shall discuss two recent publications. First, I shall analyze the context of the convergence of racist and misogynist discourses in turn-of-the-century Vienna through discussing András Gerő’s book, Neither Woman Nor Jew. Second, I shall explore how the discourse of class struggle affected the political status of Hungarian women in the Stalinist era through discussing Eszter Zsófia Tóth’s book, Kádár’s Daughters.

  5. Sleep Eduction: Treatment & Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts Causes and Risk Factors Diagnosis and Treatment Sleepwalking Overview & Facts Symptoms & Risk Factors Diagnosis & Treatment Sleep Terrors Overview & Facts Symptoms & Risk Factors Diagnosis & Treatment Sleep Eating Disorder Overview & Facts Symptoms & Risk Factors Diagnosis & Treatment REM ...

  6. Teenagers and sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000872.htm Teenagers and sleep To use the sharing features on this page, ... need. What Makes it Hard for Teens to Sleep? Several factors make it hard for teens to ...

  7. Brain Basics: Understanding Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up. Some children experience bedwetting, night terrors, or sleepwalking during deep sleep. When we switch into REM ... stimulate some parts of the brain and can cause insomnia, or an inability to sleep. Many antidepressants ...

  8. Metformin and sleep disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Somsri Wiwanitkit; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2012-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug. Deterioration of sleep is an important unwanted side effect of metformin. Here, the authors review and present the details on metformin and sleep problem.

  9. Sleep and Aging: Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Sleep and Aging Insomnia Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint at ... at greater risk for falling. Health Issues and Insomnia Disorders that cause pain or discomfort during the ...

  10. Sleep and Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kelly C; Spaeth, Andrea; Hopkins, Christina M

    2016-10-01

    Insomnia is related to an increased risk of eating disorders, while eating disorders are related to more disrupted sleep. Insomnia is also linked to poorer treatment outcomes for eating disorders. However, over the last decade, studies examining sleep and eating disorders have relied on surveys, with no objective measures of sleep for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, and only actigraphy data for binge eating disorder. Sleep disturbance is better defined for night eating syndrome, where sleep efficiency is reduced and melatonin release is delayed. Studies that include objectively measured sleep and metabolic parameters combined with psychiatric comorbidity data would help identify under what circumstances eating disorders and sleep disturbance produce an additive effect for symptom severity and for whom poor sleep would increase risk for an eating disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia may be a helpful addition to treatment of those with both eating disorder and insomnia. PMID:27553980

  11. Sleep and Salivary Cortisol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Anne Helene; Karlson, Bernt; Hansen, Åse Marie;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present chapter was to analyze whether measures of cortisol in saliva were associated with measures of sleep and to explore if divergent results were related to underlying differences in theoretic assumptions and methods. Measures of sleep quality included sleep duration, overall...... sleep quality, difficulty falling asleep, disturbed sleep, and sleep deprivation. Twenty-three papers were found to fulfill the inclusion criteria. Cortisol measures were grouped into single time points at different times during the day, deviations at different time periods during the day, reactivity...... duration and single measures of salivary cortisol at awakening, which was observed in 3 studies. In these studies, sleep duration was also associated with low evening cortisol levels, steep diurnal deviation of cortisol and/or high area under the curve. Together these findings suggest that longer sleep...

  12. Sleep Hygiene and Sleep Quality in Italian and American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBOURGEOIS, MONIQUE K.; GIANNOTTI, FLAVIA; CORTESI, FLAVIA; WOLFSON, AMY; HARSH, JOHN

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated cross-cultural differences in adolescent sleep hygiene and sleep quality. Participants were 1348 students (655 males; 693 females) aged 12–17 years from public school systems in Rome, Italy (n = 776) and Southern Mississippi (n = 572). Participants completed the Adolescent Sleep-Wake Scale and the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale. Reported sleep hygiene and sleep quality were significantly better for Italian than American adolescents. A moderate linear relationship was observed between sleep hygiene and sleep quality in both samples (Italians: R = .40; Americans: R = .46). Separate hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that sleep hygiene accounted for significant variance in sleep quality, even after controlling for demographic and health variables (Italians: R2 = .38; Americans: R2 = .44). The results of this study suggest that there are cultural differences in sleep quality and sleep hygiene practices, and that sleep hygiene practices are importantly related to adolescent sleep quality. PMID:15251909

  13. Thalamocortical dynamics of sleep: roles of purinergic neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halassa, Michael M

    2011-04-01

    Thalamocortical dynamics, the millisecond to second changes in activity of thalamocortical circuits, are central to perception, action and cognition. Generated by local circuitry and sculpted by neuromodulatory systems, these dynamics reflect the expression of vigilance states. In sleep, thalamocortical dynamics are thought to mediate "offline" functions including memory consolidation and synaptic scaling. Here, I discuss thalamocortical sleep dynamics and their modulation by the ascending arousal system and locally released neurochemicals. I focus on modulation of these dynamics by electrically silent astrocytes, highlighting the role of purinergic signaling in this glial form of communication. Astrocytes modulate cortical slow oscillations, sleep behavior, and sleep-dependent cognitive function. The discovery that astrocytes can modulate sleep dynamics and sleep-related behaviors suggests a new way of thinking about the brain, in which integrated circuits of neurons and glia control information processing and behavioral output.

  14. Pediatric Sleep Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecille Gail Sulman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Adenotonsillectomy is the most common surgery performed for sleep disordered breathing with good outcomes. Children with obesity, craniofacial disorders, and neurologic impairment are at risk for persistent sleep apnea after adenotonsillectomy. Techniques exist to address obstructive lesions of the palate, tongue base, or craniofacial skeleton in children with persistent sleep apnea. Children with obstructive sleep apnea have a higher rate of peri-operative complications.

  15. Pediatric Sleep Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Cecille Gail Sulman

    2014-01-01

    Adenotonsillectomy is the most common surgery performed for sleep disordered breathing with good outcomes. Children with obesity, craniofacial disorders, and neurologic impairment are at risk for persistent sleep apnea after adenotonsillectomy. Techniques exist to address obstructive lesions of the palate, tongue base, or craniofacial skeleton in children with persistent sleep apnea. Children with obstructive sleep apnea have a higher rate of peri-operative complications.

  16. Sleep disorders and stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Douglas M; Ramos, Alberto R.; Rundek, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight existing literature on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatments of stroke sleep disorders. Stroke sleep disorders are associated with many intermediary vascular risk factors leading to stroke, but they may also influence these risk factors through direct or indirect mechanisms. Sleep disturbances may be further exacerbated by stroke or caused by stroke. Unrecognized and untreated sleep disorders may influence rehabilitation efforts and poor ...

  17. Sleep and Metabolism: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep and its disorders are increasingly becoming important in our sleep deprived society. Sleep is intricately connected to various hormonal and metabolic processes in the body and is important in maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Research shows that sleep deprivation and sleep disorders may have profound metabolic and cardiovascular implications. Sleep deprivation, sleep disordered breathing, and circadian misalignment are believed to cause metabolic dysregulation through myriad pathways involving sympathetic overstimulation, hormonal imbalance, and subclinical inflammation. This paper reviews sleep and metabolism, and how sleep deprivation and sleep disorders may be altering human metabolism.

  18. A link between sleep loss, glucose metabolism and adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.G. Padilha

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review evaluates the role of sleep and its alteration in triggering problems of glucose metabolism and the possible involvement of adipokines in this process. A reduction in the amount of time spent sleeping has become an endemic condition in modern society, and a search of the current literature has found important associations between sleep loss and alterations of nutritional and metabolic contexts. Studies suggest that sleep loss is associated with problems in glucose metabolism and a higher risk for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mechanism involved may be associated with the decreased efficacy of regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis by negative feedback mechanisms in sleep-deprivation conditions. In addition, changes in the circadian pattern of growth hormone (GH secretion might also contribute to the alterations in glucose regulation observed during sleep loss. On the other hand, sleep deprivation stress affects adipokines - increasing tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6 and decreasing leptin and adiponectin -, thus establishing a possible association between sleep-debt, adipokines and glucose metabolism. Thus, a modified release of adipokines resulting from sleep deprivation could lead to a chronic sub-inflammatory state that could play a central role in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further studies are necessary to investigate the role of sleep loss in adipokine release and its relationship with glucose metabolism.

  19. Temperature biofeedback and sleep: limited findings and methodological challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Koninck J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Geneviève Forest,1,2 Cameron van den Heuvel,3 Kurt Lushington,4 Joseph De Koninck21Sleep Laboratory, Département de Psychoéducation et de Psychologie, Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau, Québec, Canada; 2Sleep and Dreams Laboratory, School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 3Research Branch University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 4School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, South Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Given the close link between body temperature and sleep, the perspective of manipulating core and peripheral temperature by self-regulation techniques is very appealing. We report here on a series of attempts conducted independently in two laboratories to use self-regulation (biofeedback of oral (central and hand (peripheral temperature, and measured the impact on sleep-onset latency, sleep architecture, and circadian phase. We found that hand temperature was more successful than oral temperature biofeedback. Moreover, an increase in hand temperature was associated with reduced sleep-onset latency. However, most participants found the procedure difficult to implement. The temperature response to biofeedback was reduced in the aged and weakest at the time of sleep onset, and there was not a systematic relationship between the change in temperature and change in sleep latency. Methodological limitations and individual differences may account for these results. Recommendations for future research are presented.Keywords: biofeedback, core body temperature, sleep, circadian rhythm, sleep onset

  20. Neurobiological bases for the relation between sleep and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrien, Joëlle

    2002-10-01

    The serotoninergic system is involved in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness, its activity being at maximum during the awake state and minimum during sleep. In particular, the production of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep depends on the decrease of serotoninergic tone in brain stem structures. Thus, serotoninergic compounds which increase this tone (such as antidepressants) induce inhibition of REM sleep. Depression is associated with a functional decrease of serotoninergic neurotransmission and with specific alterations of sleep, notably insomnia. Paradoxically, even though they complain of sleep loss, depressed patients exhibit significant mood improvement after one night of sleep deprivation. This antidepressant effect can be accounted for by the same serotoninergic mechanisms as those described for pharmacological treatments. Indeed, the therapeutic action of antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors is thought to depend directly on the enhancement of central serotoninergic neurotransmission. Such enhancement is achieved through desensitization of serotoninergic autoreceptors, which results from chronic treatment with these compounds. Sleep deprivation also induces an activation of serotoninergic neurons due to prolonged wakefulness, and leads to similar serotoninergic adaptive processes. The common neurobiological mechanisms resulting from pharmacological antidepressant treatment and sleep deprivation suggest that sleep loss in some insomniac or in depressed patients might be an endogenous compensatory process which would be therapeutical rather than pathological. This proposal should open the way to new strategies in the treatment of depression. PMID:12531125

  1. The Functions of Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson Z Assefa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is a ubiquitous component of animal life including birds and mammals. The exact function of sleep has been one of the mysteries of biology. A considerable number of theories have been put forward to explain the reason(s for the necessity of sleep. To date, while a great deal is known about what happens when animals sleep, there is no definitive comprehensive explanation as to the reason that sleep is an inevitable part of animal functioning. It is well known that sleep is a homeostatically regulated body process, and that prolonged sleep deprivation is fatal in animals. In this paper, we present some of the theories as to the functions of sleep and provide a review of some hypotheses as to the overall physiologic function of sleep. To better understand the purpose for sleeping, we review the effects of sleep deprivation on physical, neurocognitive and psychic function. A better understanding of the purpose for sleeping will be a great advance in our understanding of the nature of the animal kingdom, including our own.

  2. Sleep and Your Preschooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Sleep and Your Preschooler KidsHealth > For Parents > Sleep and Your Preschooler Print A A A Text ... Preschoolers need about 11 to 12 hours of sleep each day, which can include a nap. There's ...

  3. Is Sleep Essential?

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Cirelli; Giulio Tononi

    2008-01-01

    No current hypothesis can explain why animals need to sleep. Yet, sleep is universal, tightly regulated, and cannot be deprived without deleterious consequences. This suggests that searching for a core function of sleep, particularly at the cellular level, is still a worthwhile exercise.

  4. Effect of Maximal Apnoea Easy-Going and Struggle Phases on Subarachnoid Width and Pial Artery Pulsation in Elite Breath-Hold Divers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel J Winklewski

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess changes in subarachnoid space width (sas-TQ, the marker of intracranial pressure (ICP, pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ and cardiac contribution to blood pressure (BP, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations throughout the maximal breath hold in elite apnoea divers. Non-invasive assessment of sas-TQ and cc-TQ became possible due to recently developed method based on infrared radiation, called near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS.The experimental group consisted of seven breath-hold divers (six men. During testing, each participant performed a single maximal end-inspiratory breath hold. Apnoea consisted of the easy-going and struggle phases (characterised by involuntary breathing movements (IBMs. Heart rate (HR was determined using a standard ECG. BP was assessed using the photoplethysmography method. SaO2 was monitored continuously with pulse oximetry. A pneumatic chest belt was used to register thoracic and abdominal movements. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV was estimated by a 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasonic probe. sas-TQ and cc-TQ were measured using NIR-T/BSS. Wavelet transform analysis was performed to assess cardiac contribution to BP, CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations.Mean BP and CBFV increased compared to baseline at the end of the easy phase and were further augmented by IBMs. cc-TQ increased compared to baseline at the end of the easy phase and remained stable during the IBMs. HR did not change significantly throughout the apnoea, although a trend toward a decrease during the easy phase and recovery during the IBMs was visible. Amplitudes of BP, CBFV and cc-TQ were augmented. sas-TQ and SaO2 decreased at the easy phase of apnoea and further decreased during the IBMs.Apnoea increases intracranial pressure and pial artery pulsation. Pial artery pulsation seems to be stabilised by the IBMs. Cardiac contribution to BP, CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations does not

  5. The neurology of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Todd J

    2005-11-01

    Neurology, by virtue of its study of the brain, is the primary medical science for the elucidation of the anatomy, physiology, pathology and, ultimately, the function of sleep. There has been nothing short of a revolution in the science of sleep over the past 50 years. From the discovery of REM sleep to the identification of Hypocretin/Orexin the basic science and clinical field of sleep medicine has blossomed. This article will explore the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and, to a limited extent, pathophysiology of the sleep/wake centers of the brain. The field of chronobiology will also be touched upon.

  6. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgenthaler TI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bhanu P Kolla,1,2 R Robert Auger,1,2 Timothy I Morgenthaler11Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Misalignment between endogenous circadian rhythms and the light/dark cycle can result in pathological disturbances in the form of erratic sleep timing (irregular sleep–wake rhythm, complete dissociation from the light/dark cycle (circadian rhythm sleep disorder, free-running type, delayed sleep timing (delayed sleep phase disorder, or advanced sleep timing (advanced sleep phase disorder. Whereas these four conditions are thought to involve predominantly intrinsic mechanisms, circadian dysrhythmias can also be induced by exogenous challenges, such as those imposed by extreme work schedules or rapid transmeridian travel, which overwhelm the ability of the master clock to entrain with commensurate rapidity, and in turn impair approximation to a desired sleep schedule, as evidenced by the shift work and jet lag sleep disorders. This review will focus on etiological underpinnings, clinical assessments, and evidence-based treatment options for circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Topics are subcategorized when applicable, and if sufficient data exist. The length of text associated with each disorder reflects the abundance of associated literature, complexity of management, overlap of methods for assessment and treatment, and the expected prevalence of each condition within general medical practice.Keywords: circadian rhythm sleep disorders, assessment, treatment

  7. Autism and sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti A Devnani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available “Autism Spectrum Disorders” (ASDs are neurodevelopment disorders and are characterized by persistent impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication. Sleep problems in ASD, are a prominent feature that have an impact on social interaction, day to day life, academic achievement, and have been correlated with increased maternal stress and parental sleep disruption. Polysomnography studies of ASD children showed most of their abnormalities related to rapid eye movement (REM sleep which included decreased quantity, increased undifferentiated sleep, immature organization of eye movements into discrete bursts, decreased time in bed, total sleep time, REM sleep latency, and increased proportion of stage 1 sleep. Implementation of nonpharmacotherapeutic measures such as bedtime routines and sleep-wise approach is the mainstay of behavioral management. Treatment strategies along with limited regulated pharmacotherapy can help improve the quality of life in ASD children and have a beneficial impact on the family. PubMed search was performed for English language articles from January 1995 to January 2015. Following key words: Autism spectrum disorder, sleep disorders and autism, REM sleep and autism, cognitive behavioral therapy, sleep-wise approach, melatonin and ASD were used. Only articles reporting primary data relevant to the above questions were included.

  8. Sleep apnea and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culebras, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence has established that sleep apnea is a risk factor for stroke. Patients with stroke have a high prevalence of sleep apnea that may have preceded or developed as a result of the stroke. Well-established concurrent stroke risk factors for stroke like hypertension and atrial fibrillation respond favorably to the successful treatment of sleep apnea. The gold standard diagnosis of sleep apnea is obtained in the sleep laboratory, but unattended polysomnography is gaining acceptance. Positive airway pressure (PAP) (continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP] or bilevel positive airway pressure [BiPAP]) applications are the gold-standard treatment of sleep apnea. Suggestive evidence indicates that stroke occurrence or recurrence may be reduced with treatment of sleep apnea. PMID:25407131

  9. Dietary Macronutrients and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindseth, Glenda; Murray, Ashley

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the effects of macronutrient diets on sleep quantity and quality. Using a repeated-measures, randomized crossover study design, 36 young adults served as their own control, and consumed high protein, carbohydrate, fat, and control diets. Treatment orders were counterbalanced across the dietary groups. Following consumption of the study diets, sleep measures were examined for within-subject differences. Fatty acid intakes and serum lipids were further analyzed for differences. Sleep actigraphs indicated wake times and wake minutes (after sleep onset) were significantly different when comparing consumption of macronutrient diets and a control diet. Post hoc testing indicated high carbohydrate intakes were associated with significantly shorter (p Sleep Quality Index© post hoc results indicated high fat intake was associated with significantly better (p sleep in comparison with the other diets. These results highlight the effects that dietary manipulations may have on sleep. PMID:27170039

  10. Sleep and Sleep Problems: From Birth to 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Mond, Courtney; Mindell, Jodi A.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is an important aspect of a child's early development and is essential to family well-being. During their first 3 years, infants and toddlers spend more than 50% of their lives sleeping. However, concerns about sleep and sleep problems are among the most common issues brought to the attention of pediatricians. Although sleep is one of the…

  11. Family Disorganization, Sleep Hygiene, and Adolescent Sleep Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billows, Michael; Gradisar, Michael; Dohnt, Hayley; Johnston, Anna; McCappin, Stephanie; Hudson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The link between sleep hygiene and adolescent sleep is well documented, though evidence suggests contributions from other factors, particularly the family environment. The present study examined whether sleep hygiene mediated the relationship between family disorganization and self-reported sleep onset latency, total sleep time, and daytime…

  12. Sleep arrangements, parent-infant sleep during the first year, and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teti, Douglas M; Shimizu, Mina; Crosby, Brian; Kim, Bo-Ram

    2016-08-01

    The present longitudinal study addressed the ongoing debate regarding the benefits and risks of infant-parent cosleeping by examining associations between sleep arrangement patterns across the first year of life and infant and parent sleep, marital and family functioning, and quality of mothers' behavior with infants at bedtime. Patterns of infant sleep arrangements across the infants' first year were derived from information obtained from 139 families at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of infant age in a central Pennsylvania sample. Linkages between these patterns and parent-infant sleep, marital and coparenting stress, and maternal behavior at bedtime (from video-recordings) were assessed. Compared with families whose infants were solitary sleepers by 6 months, persistent cosleeping was associated with sleep disruption in mothers but not in infants, although mothers in persistent cosleeping arrangements reported that their infants had more frequent night awakenings. Persistent cosleeping was also associated with mother reports of marital and coparenting distress, and lower maternal emotional availability with infants at bedtime (from home observations). Persistent cosleeping appeared to be a marker of, though not necessarily a cause of, heightened family stress, although the present design did not enable strong tests of causal processes, and results may be particular to cultures that are not supportive of cosleeping. Findings are discussed in terms of cultural contexts of infant sleep and the need for further investigations into the role of the health of the family system in influencing how parents structure infant sleep. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27389833

  13. Sleep from an islamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S BaHammam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep medicine is a relatively new scientific specialty. Sleep is an important topic in Islamic literature, and the Quran and Hadith discuss types of sleep, the importance of sleep, and good sleep practices. Islam considers sleep as one of the signs of the greatness of Allβh (God and encourages followers to explore this important sign. The Quran describes different types of sleep, and these correspond with sleep stages identified by modern science. The Quran discusses the beneficial effects of sleep and emphasizes the importance of maintaining a pattern of light and darkness. A mid-day nap is an important practice for Muslims, and the Prophet Muhammad peace be upon him (pbuh promoted naps as beneficial. In accordance with the practice and instructions of Muhammad (pbuh, Muslims have certain sleep habits and these sleep habits correspond to some of the sleep hygiene rules identified by modern science. Details during sleep include sleep position, like encouraging sleep on the right side and discouraging sleep in the prone position. Dream interpretation is an established science in the Islamic literature and Islamic scholars have made significant contributions to theories of dream interpretation. We suggest that sleep scientists examine religious literature in general and Islamic literature in particular, to understand the views, behaviors, and practices of ancient people about the sleep and sleep disorders. Such studies may help to answer some unresolved questions in sleep science or lead to new areas of inquiry.

  14. Sleep from an Islamic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahammam, Ahmed S

    2011-10-01

    Sleep medicine is a relatively new scientific specialty. Sleep is an important topic in Islamic literature, and the Quran and Hadith discuss types of sleep, the importance of sleep, and good sleep practices. Islam considers sleep as one of the signs of the greatness of Allνh (God) and encourages followers to explore this important sign. The Quran describes different types of sleep, and these correspond with sleep stages identified by modern science. The Quran discusses the beneficial effects of sleep and emphasizes the importance of maintaining a pattern of light and darkness. A mid-day nap is an important practice for Muslims, and the Prophet Muhammad peace be upon him (pbuh) promoted naps as beneficial. In accordance with the practice and instructions of Muhammad (pbuh), Muslims have certain sleep habits and these sleep habits correspond to some of the sleep hygiene rules identified by modern science. Details during sleep include sleep position, like encouraging sleep on the right side and discouraging sleep in the prone position. Dream interpretation is an established science in the Islamic literature and Islamic scholars have made significant contributions to theories of dream interpretation. We suggest that sleep scientists examine religious literature in general and Islamic literature in particular, to understand the views, behaviors, and practices of ancient people about the sleep and sleep disorders. Such studies may help to answer some unresolved questions in sleep science or lead to new areas of inquiry. PMID:21977062

  15. Chronic sleep reduction in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the results of this thesis, it can be concluded that sleep problems and chronic sleep reduction have a high impact on adolescents’ daytime functioning. Additionally, this research shows that gradual sleep extension can improve adolescents’ sleep and especially their chronic sleep reduction. This approach has beneficial effects on adolescents’ depressive symptoms and their cognitive performance.

  16. Treatment of obstructive sleep-disordered breathing with positive airway pressure systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pevernagie

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Positive airway pressure systems are widely used to treat patients with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep-disordered breathing. The application of stable continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP via the nose (nasal CPAP has been the mainstay of treatment since the early 1980s. For treatment to be effective, the pressure level must be fine-tuned to restore patency of the individual patient's upper airway. Currently, there is ongoing controversy concerning which outcomes to observe when adapting the pressure level, and which methods to use for pressure adaptation. Adjusting the pressure level to control apnoeas and hypopnoeas is one major objective, but may not be sufficient to restore normal sleep. Evidence is available that elimination of inspiratory flow limitation leads to better results. In recent years, it has become evident that the use of empirically set CPAP or automatic CPAP devices parallel the clinical results obtained with the classical approach of manual CPAP titration. A striking and still unexplained paradox lies in the fact that automatic CPAP devices perform very differently on the bench, but still yield satisfactory results on several clinical outcomes, e.g. control of sleep-related respiratory disturbances, restoration of good sleep quality and daytime alertness. Understanding the functioning of automatic CPAP devices can prove difficult, as the mode of operation is usually not disclosed by the manufacturers. At present, it is impossible to make any scientifically sound statement on the appropriateness of using automatic continuous positive airway pressure devices for the routine treatment of patients with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing. For this purpose, convincing results of phase I–III clinical trials are needed.

  17. Impact of sleep disturbances on kidney function decline in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaussent, Isabelle; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Stengel, Benedicte; Ancelin, Marie-Laure; Dupuy, Anne-Marie; Besset, Alain; Helmer, Catherine; Ritchie, Karen; Berr, Claudine; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2016-03-01

    While sleep disturbances are frequent in renal disease patients, no studies have examined prospectively the associations between sleep disturbances and kidney function decline in community-dwelling elderly subjects.Glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) were estimated at baseline and at 11-year follow-up. A glomerular filtration decline over the follow-up period was defined as a percentage decline greater than or equal to the cut-off value of the highest tertile of kidney function decline (22%) in 1105 subjects. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and insomnia complaints were self-rated at baseline. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and its age at onset were assessed at study end-point. An ambulatory polysomnography recording was performed during the follow-up in 277 subjects. Apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) and total sleep time were analysed.An increased risk of eGFR decline was associated with EDS (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.18-2.34) and RLS (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.18-3.30) independently of potential confounders including cardiovascular risk factors. Among insomnia complaints, a borderline association with eGFR decline was found for early morning awakening only. High AHI (≥30 events·h(-1)) and short total sleep time (<6 h), but not PLMS were linked to eGFR decline in crude associations, but only AHI remained significantly associated after multi-adjustments.EDS, RLS and AHI constitute independent risk factors for kidney glomerular function decline. PMID:26647438

  18. Cardiovascular physiology and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Narayana S; Svatikova, Anna; Somers, Virend K

    2003-05-01

    Sleep is a natural periodic suspension of consciousness during which processes of rest and restoration occur. The cognitive, reparative and regenerative accompaniments of sleep appear to be essential for maintenance of health and homeostasis. This brief overview will examine the cardiovascular responses to normal and disordered sleep, and their physiologic and pathologic implications. In the past, sleep was believed to be a passive state. The tableau of sleep as it unfolds is anything but a passive process. The brain's activity is as complex as wakefulness, never "resting" during sleep. Following the demise of the 'passive theory of sleep' (the reticular activating system is fatigued during the waking day and hence becomes inactive), there arose the 'active theory of sleep' (sleep is due to an active general inhibition of the brain) (1). Hess demonstrated the active nature of sleep in cats, inducing "physiological sleep" with electrical stimulation of the diencephalon (2). Classical experiments of transection of the cat brainstem (3) at midpontine level inhibited sleep completely, implying that centers below this level were involved in the induction of sleep (1, 4). For the first time, measurement of sleep depth without awakening the sleeper using the electroencephalogram (EEG) was demonstrated in animals by Caton and in humans, by Berger (1). This was soon followed by discovery of the rapid eye movement sleep periods (REM) by Aserinski and Kleitman (5), demonstration of periodical sleep cycles and their association with REM sleep (6, 7). Multiple studies and steady discoveries (4) made polysomnography, with its ability to perform simultaneous whole night recordings of EEG, electromyogram (EMG), and electrooculogram (EOC), a major diagnostic tool in study of sleep disorders. This facility has been of further critical importance in allowing evaluation of the interaction between sleep and changes in hemodynamics and autonomic cardiovascular control. Consequently the

  19. Sleep, Cognition and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Verna R; Buxton, William G; Avidan, Alon Y

    2015-12-01

    The older patient population is growing rapidly around the world and in the USA. Almost half of seniors over age 65 who live at home are dissatisfied with their sleep, and nearly two-thirds of those residing in nursing home facilities suffer from sleep disorders. Chronic and pervasive sleep complaints and disturbances are frequently associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and may result in impaired cognition, diminished intellect, poor memory, confusion, and psychomotor retardation all of which may be misinterpreted as dementia. The key sleep disorders impacting patients with dementia include insomnia, hypersomnolence, circadian rhythm misalignment, sleep disordered breathing, motor disturbances of sleep such as periodic leg movement disorder of sleep and restless leg syndrome, and parasomnias, mostly in the form of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is a pre-clinical marker for a class of neurodegenerative diseases, the "synucleinopathies", and requires formal polysomnographic evaluation. Untreated sleep disorders may exacerbate cognitive and behavioral symptoms in patients with dementia and are a source of considerable stress for bed partners and family members. When left untreated, sleep disturbances may also increase the risk of injury at night, compromise health-related quality of life, and precipitate and accelerate social and economic burdens for caregivers. PMID:26478197

  20. Sleep, Cognition and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Verna R; Buxton, William G; Avidan, Alon Y

    2015-12-01

    The older patient population is growing rapidly around the world and in the USA. Almost half of seniors over age 65 who live at home are dissatisfied with their sleep, and nearly two-thirds of those residing in nursing home facilities suffer from sleep disorders. Chronic and pervasive sleep complaints and disturbances are frequently associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and may result in impaired cognition, diminished intellect, poor memory, confusion, and psychomotor retardation all of which may be misinterpreted as dementia. The key sleep disorders impacting patients with dementia include insomnia, hypersomnolence, circadian rhythm misalignment, sleep disordered breathing, motor disturbances of sleep such as periodic leg movement disorder of sleep and restless leg syndrome, and parasomnias, mostly in the form of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is a pre-clinical marker for a class of neurodegenerative diseases, the "synucleinopathies", and requires formal polysomnographic evaluation. Untreated sleep disorders may exacerbate cognitive and behavioral symptoms in patients with dementia and are a source of considerable stress for bed partners and family members. When left untreated, sleep disturbances may also increase the risk of injury at night, compromise health-related quality of life, and precipitate and accelerate social and economic burdens for caregivers.

  1. The effects of sleep extension on sleep and cognitive performance in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction: an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Dewald-Kaufmann; F.J. Oort; A.M. Meijer

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of gradual sleep extension in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction. Outcome variables were objectively measured sleep and cognitive performance. Methods: Participants were randomly assigned to either a sleep extension group (gradual sleep extension by advanc

  2. The role of sleep in pain and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Ernest H S

    2015-09-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common cause of chronic widespread pain, characterized by reduced pressure pain thresholds with hyperalgesia and allodynia. In addition to pain, common symptoms include nonrestorative sleep, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, stiffness and mood disturbances. The latest research indicates that the dominant pathophysiology in fibromyalgia is abnormal pain processing and central sensitization. Neuroimaging studies have shown that patients with fibromyalgia have similar neural activation to healthy age-matched and gender-matched individuals; however, they have a lower pressure-pain threshold. Polysomnography data has demonstrated that these patients have reduced short-wave sleep and abnormal α-rhythms, suggestive of wakefulness during non-REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. Sleep deprivation in healthy individuals can cause symptoms of fibromyalgia, including myalgia, tenderness and fatigue, suggesting that sleep dysfunction might be not only a consequence of pain, but also pathogenic. Epidemiological studies indicate that poor sleep quality is a risk factor for the development of chronic widespread pain among an otherwise healthy population. Mechanistically, sleep deprivation impairs descending pain-inhibition pathways that are important in controlling and coping with pain. Clinical trials of pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies have shown that improving sleep quality can reduce pain and fatigue, further supporting the hypothesis that sleep dysfunction is a pathogenic stimulus of fibromyalgia.

  3. Sleep Hygiene and Sleep Quality in Italian and American Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    LeBourgeois, Monique K.; Giannotti, Flavia; CORTESI, FLAVIA; Wolfson, Amy; Harsh, John

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated cross-cultural differences in adolescent sleep hygiene and sleep quality. Participants were 1348 students (655 males; 693 females) aged 12–17 years from public school systems in Rome, Italy (n = 776) and Southern Mississippi (n = 572). Participants completed the Adolescent Sleep-Wake Scale and the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale. Reported sleep hygiene and sleep quality were significantly better for Italian than American adolescents. A moderate linear relationship was o...

  4. Association Between Sleep Hygiene and Sleep Quality in Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Brick, Cameron A.; Seely, Darbi L.; Palermo, Tonya M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether subjective sleep quality was reduced in medical students, and whether demographics and sleep hygiene behaviors were associated with sleep quality. A Web-based survey was completed by 314 medical students, containing questions about demographics, sleep habits, exercise habits, caffeine, tobacco and alcohol use, and subjective sleep quality (using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). Correlation and regression analyses tested for associations among...

  5. Hippocampal sleep features: relations to human memory function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eFerrara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent spread of intracranial EEG recordings techniques for presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epileptic patients is providing new information on the activity of different brain structures during both wakefulness and sleep. The interest has been mainly focused on the medial temporal lobe, and in particular the hippocampal formation, whose peculiar local sleep features have been recently described, providing support to the idea that sleep is not a spatially global phenomenon. The study of the hippocampal sleep electrophysiology is particularly interesting because of its central role in the declarative memory formation. Recent data indicate that sleep contributes to memory formation. Therefore, it is relevant to understand whether specific pattern of activity taking place during sleep are related to memory consolidation processes. Fascinating similarities between different states of consciousness (wakefulness, REM sleep, NREM sleep in some electrophysiological mechanisms underlying cognitive processes have been reported. For instance, large-scale synchrony in gamma activity is important for waking memory and perception processes, and its changes during sleep may be the neurophysiological substrate of sleep-related deficits of declarative memory. Hippocampal activity seems to specifically support memory consolidation during sleep, through specific coordinated neurophysiological events (slow waves, spindles, ripples that would facilitate the integration of new information into the pre-existing cortical networks. A few studies indeed provided direct evidence that rhinal ripples as well as slow hippocampal oscillations are correlated with memory consolidation in humans. More detailed electrophysiological investigations assessing the specific relations between different types of memory consolidation and hippocampal EEG features are in order. These studies will add an important piece of knowledge to the elucidation of the ultimate sleep

  6. Newberry Volcano—Central Oregon's Sleeping Giant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Stovall, Wendy K.; Ramsey, David W.; Ewert, John W.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Hidden in plain sight, Oregon's massive Newberry Volcano is the largest volcano in the Cascades volcanic arc and covers an area the size of Rhode Island. Unlike familiar cone-shaped Cascades volcanoes, Newberry was built into the shape of a broad shield by repeated eruptions over 400,000 years. About 75,000 years ago a major explosion and collapse event created a large volcanic depression (caldera) at its summit. Newberry last erupted about 1,300 years ago, and present-day hot springs and geologically young lava flows indicate that it could reawaken at any time. Because of its proximity to nearby communities, frequency and size of past eruptions, and geologic youthfulness, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are working to better understand volcanic activity at Newberry and closely monitor the volcano for signs of unrest.

  7. Congestive Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Scott A; Owens, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is among the most common causes of admission to hospitals in the United States, especially in those over age 65. Few data exist regarding the prevalence CHF of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) owing to congestive heart failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). Nevertheless, CSR is expected to be highly prevalent among those with CHF. Treatment should focus on the underlying mechanisms by which CHF increases loop gain and promotes unstable breathing. Few data are available to determine prevalence of CSR in the ICU, or how CSR might affect clinical management and weaning from mechanical ventilation.

  8. Congestive Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Scott A; Owens, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is among the most common causes of admission to hospitals in the United States, especially in those over age 65. Few data exist regarding the prevalence CHF of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) owing to congestive heart failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). Nevertheless, CSR is expected to be highly prevalent among those with CHF. Treatment should focus on the underlying mechanisms by which CHF increases loop gain and promotes unstable breathing. Few data are available to determine prevalence of CSR in the ICU, or how CSR might affect clinical management and weaning from mechanical ventilation. PMID:26972039

  9. Sleep-Route: Routing through Sleeping Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Chayan; Rao, Vijay S.; Prasad, R. Venkatesha

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose an energy-efficient data gathering scheme for wireless sensor network called Sleep-Route, which splits the sensor nodes into two sets - active and dormant (low-power sleep). Only the active set of sensor nodes participate in data collection. The sensing values of the dormant sensor nodes are predicted with the help of an active sensor node. Virtual Sensing Framework (VSF) provides the mechanism to predict the sensing values by exploiting the data correlation among ...

  10. Pathology of sleep, hormones and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steiger, A.; Dresler, M.; Kluge, M.; Schussler, P.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with depression, characteristic changes of sleep electroencephalogram and nocturnal hormone secretion occur including rapid eye movement (REM) sleep disinhibition, reduced non-REM sleep and impaired sleep continuity. Neuropeptides are common regulators of the sleep electroencephalogram (

  11. Irregular sleep-wake syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep-wake syndrome - irregular ... routine during the day. The amount of total sleep time is normal, but the body clock loses ... have a different condition, such as shift work sleep disorder or jet lag syndrome.

  12. American Academy of Sleep Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help you share AASM sleep duration recommendations Senate Finance Committee considers revisions to Stark Law These papers ... announcement: After 38 years of jointly publishing the journal SLEEP with the Sleep Research Society, the AASM ...

  13. Dynamic detection of wake-sleep transition with reaction time-magnitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuang Gao; Bin Chen; Wei Wei

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to observable behaviors, sleep and wakefulness are two fundamentally different behavioral states. Although electroencephalogram (EEG) is traditionally used to define sleep stage, it is difficult to detect or to quantify microarousals or disruptions during sleep. In addition,initial sleep cannot be defined. It is thought that the wake-sleep transition cannot be defined by EEG patterns.OBJECTIVE: To observe the behavioral response magnitude during wake-sleep transition by EEG monitoring and to define the wake-sleep transition.DESIGN, TIME AND SE'n'ING: A behavioral and neural network study was performed at the Key Lab of Human Being Development and Mental Health of Central China Normal University, and Lab of Brain and Cognitive Science of South Central University for Nationalities, China in July 2007.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 30 healthy volunteers, of equal gender and aged (19.7+1.1) years, were recruited from the Central China Normal University, China for this study. None of the subjects had undergone EEG recording prior to this study or received any medication for sleep disturbances.METHODS: A novel adaptive approach was applied to detect wake-sleep transition, which avoided stimulus-induced waking. To test the difference between wake state and wake-sleep transition, the amount of self-information and mutual-information were effective parameters to analyze wake-sleep transition.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The following parameters were measured: morphological changes in reaction time-magnitude, as well as correlation between phase changes and sleep, and wake and wake-sleep transition.RESULTS: There were three typical phases in morphological changes of reaction time-magnitude.With regard to the behavioral definition and criterion for sleep, the phase morphological characteristics displayed good correlation with behavioral states, such as sleep, wakefulness, and sleep onset. Entropy as an indicator of brain cognitive processes was introduced to test

  14. Sleep and metabolic function

    OpenAIRE

    Morselli, Lisa L.; Guyon, Aurore; Spiegel, Karine

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for the role of sleep on metabolic and endocrine function has been reported more than four decades ago. In the past 30 years, the prevalence of obesity and diabetes has greatly increased in industrialized countries, and self-imposed sleep curtailment, now very common, is starting to be recognized as a contributing factor, alongside with increased caloric intake and decreased physical activity. Furthermore, obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic condition characterized by recurrent upper ...

  15. DELIRIUM: IS SLEEP IMPORTANT?

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Paula L.; Ceriana, Piero; Fanfulla, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Delirium and poor sleep quality are common and often co-exist in hospitalized patients. A link between these disorders has been hypothesized but whether this link is a cause and effect relationship or simply an association resulting from shared mechanisms is yet to be determined. Potential shared mechanisms include: abnormalities of neurotransmitters, tissue ischemia, inflammation, and sedative exposure. Sedatives, while decreasing sleep latency, often cause a decrease in slow wave sleep and ...

  16. Classification of Sleep Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Michael J. Thorpy

    2012-01-01

    The classification of sleep disorders is necessary to discriminate between disorders and to facilitate an understanding of symptoms, etiology, and pathophysiology that allows for appropriate treatment. The earliest classification systems, largely organized according to major symptoms (insomnia, excessive sleepiness, and abnormal events that occur during sleep), were unable to be based on pathophysiology because the cause of most sleep disorders was unknown. These 3 symptom-based categories ar...

  17. Sleep enhances exposure therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kleim, Birgit; Wilhelm, F. H.; Temp, L; Margraf, J.; Wiederhold, B. K.; Rasch, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sleep benefits memory consolidation. Here, we tested the beneficial effect of sleep on memory consolidation following exposure psychotherapy of phobic anxiety. Method: A total of 40 individuals afflicted with spider phobia according to DSM-IV underwent a one-session virtual reality exposure treatment and either slept for 90 min or stayed awake afterwards. Results: Sleep following exposure therapy compared with wakefulness led to better reductions in self-reported fear (p = 0...

  18. Adenosine and Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Bjorness, Theresa E.; Greene, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last several decades the idea that adenosine (Ado) plays a role in sleep control was postulated due in large part to pharmacological studies that showed the ability of Ado agonists to induce sleep and Ado antagonists to decrease sleep. A second wave of research involving in vitro cellular analytic approaches and subsequently, the use of neurochemical tools such as microdialysis, identified a population of cells within the brainstem and basal forebrain arousal centers, with activity t...

  19. Pathophysiology of Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Dempsey, Jerome A; Veasey, Sigrid C.; Morgan, Barbara J.; O'Donnell, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep-induced apnea and disordered breathing refers to intermittent, cyclical cessations or reductions of airflow, with or without obstructions of the upper airway (OSA). In the presence of an anatomically compromised, collapsible airway, the sleep-induced loss of compensatory tonic input to the upper airway dilator muscle motor neurons leads to collapse of the pharyngeal airway. In turn, the ability of the sleeping subject to compensate for this airway obstruction will determine the degree o...

  20. Sleep and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Calhoun, David A.; Harding, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Ambulatory BP studies indicate that even small increases in BP, particularly nighttime BP levels, are associated with significant increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Accordingly, sleep-related diseases that induce increases in BP would be anticipated to substantially affect cardiovascular risk. Both sleep deprivation and insomnia have been linked to increases in incidence and prevalence of hypertension. Likewise, sleep disruption attributable to restless legs syndrome increas...

  1. Isolated sleep paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Neena S.; Shubhangi R Parkar; Tambe, Ravindra

    2005-01-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a cardinal symptom of narcolepsy. However, little is available in the literature about isolated sleep paralysis. This report discusses the case of a patient with isolated sleep paralysis who progressed from mild to severe SP over 8 years. He also restarted drinking alcohol to be able to fall asleep and allay his anxiety symptoms. The patient was taught relaxation techniques and he showed complete remission of the symptoms of SP on follow up after 8 months.

  2. The Function of Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel A. Barone; Krieger, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of sleep can be ascertained by noting the effects of its loss, which tends to be chronic and partial, on cognition, mood, alertness, and overall health. Many theories have been put forth to explain the function of sleep in humans, including proposals based on energy conservation, ecological adaptations, neurocognitive function, neural plasticity, nervous system and physical health, and performance. Most account for only a portion of sleep behavior and few are based on strong ex...

  3. Stress, Sleep, and Allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Jernelöv, Susanna

    2010-01-01

    Allergic diseases have recently increased dramatically in the western world, now affecting about 30% of the Swedish population. The reasons for this increase are unclear, but some of the suspects are behavioral factors, such as stress and sleep. Problems with stress are also common today, and stress may change the set-points for the functioning of the body, for instance in the immune system. Sleep, on the other hand, is important for recuperation, and disturbed sleep acts a ...

  4. Burnout and sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Ekstedt, Mirjam

    2005-01-01

    Burnout and Sleep The overall aim of this thesis was to describe the physiological characteristics of sleep in persons with burnout and the relation between sleep and a number of physiological stress markers. The aim was also to evaluate the diurnal pattern of subjective sleepiness and fatigue across workday and weekend, and to describe the experiences of time preceding burnout from a life world perspective. This thesis focuses on burnout in white-collar workers; one gro...

  5. Nonepileptic paroxysmal sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenette, Eric; Guilleminault, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Events occurring during nighttime sleep in children can be easily mislabeled, as witnesses are usually not immediately available. Even when observers are present, description of the events can be sketchy, as these individuals are frequently aroused from their own sleep. Errors of perception are thus common and can lead to diagnosis of epilepsy where other sleep-related conditions are present, sometimes initiating unnecessary therapeutic interventions, especially with antiepileptic drugs. Often not acknowledged, paroxysmal nonepileptic behavioral and motor episodes in sleep are encountered much more frequently than their epileptic counterpart. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD) 2nd edition displays an extensive list of such conditions that can be readily mistaken for epilepsy. The most prevalent ones are reviewed, such as nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias, comprised of sleepwalking, confusional arousals and sleep terrors, periodic leg movements of sleep, repetitive movement disorders, benign neonatal myoclonus, and sleep starts. Apnea of prematurity is also briefly reviewed. Specific issues regarding management of these selected disorders, both for diagnostic consideration and for therapeutic intervention, are addressed. PMID:23622294

  6. [Sleep in depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringuey, D; Darcourt, G

    1990-11-28

    Insomnia is a cardinal symptom of depression, side by side with alterations of mood and slowing down of psychomotor activities. It bears witness to a rupture in the built-in circadian rhythm: architectural changes in sleep betray a biological desynchronization. Insomnia is also a failed attempt at finding a solution to depression. Total deprivation of sleep for one night may damp down the depressive disorders, and so does partial sleep deprivation in the second part of the night during several days. This leads to the conclusion that the waking-sleep system participates in the expression of symptoms of depression or even contributes to the genesis of the disease. PMID:2148377

  7. The Association of Testosterone Levels with Overall Sleep Quality, Sleep Architecture, and Sleep-Disordered Breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Dam, Thuy-Tien; Stone, Katie; Harrison, Stephanie Litwack; Redline, Susan; Orwoll, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Context: Little is known about the association of low endogenous testosterone levels and abnormal sleep patterns in older men, although pharmacological doses of testosterone are associated with increased severity of sleep apnea and other sleep disturbances.

  8. Sleep disordered breathing: OSA, CSA, Pathophysiology and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Vijayan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a prevalent disorder that has beenreported to occur in 2 to 4% of middle-aged adults. A similar prevalence of OSAS hasbeen reported from India as well. However, this condition is frequently unrecognizedand underdiagnosed. Important pathophysiological changes in patients withobstructive sleep apnea (OSA is an alteration in human upper airway leading to areduction in cross-sectional area of the upper airway contributing to the easycollapsibility of upper airway during sleep. Other pathophysiological changes in OSAare oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, sympathetic nerve activation, endothelialdysfunction, procoagulant activity, intrathoracic pressure changes and metabolicdysregulation. The gold standard for diagnosis of OSA is full polysomnography.Key words: Obstructive sleep apnea, Central sleep apnea, Oxidative stress,Metabolic dysregulation, Polysomnography

  9. Unihemispheric sleep and asymmetrical sleep: behavioral, neurophysiological, and functional perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascetti GG

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gian Gastone Mascetti Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy Abstract: Sleep is a behavior characterized by a typical body posture, both eyes' closure, raised sensory threshold, distinctive electrographic signs, and a marked decrease of motor activity. In addition, sleep is a periodically necessary behavior and therefore, in the majority of animals, it involves the whole brain and body. However, certain marine mammals and species of birds show a different sleep behavior, in which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other is awake. In dolphins, eared seals, and manatees, unihemispheric sleep allows them to have the benefits of sleep, breathing, thermoregulation, and vigilance. In birds, antipredation vigilance is the main function of unihemispheric sleep, but in domestic chicks, it is also associated with brain lateralization or dominance in the control of behavior. Compared to bihemispheric sleep, unihemispheric sleep would mean a reduction of the time spent sleeping and of the associated recovery processes. However, the behavior and health of aquatic mammals and birds does not seem at all impaired by the reduction of sleep. The neural mechanisms of unihemispheric sleep are unknown, but assuming that the neural structures involved in sleep in cetaceans, seals, and birds are similar to those of terrestrial mammals, it is suggested that they involve the interaction of structures of the hypothalamus, basal forebrain, and brain stem. The neural mechanisms promoting wakefulness dominate one side of the brain, while those promoting sleep predominates the other side. For cetaceans, unihemispheric sleep is the only way to sleep, while in seals and birds, unihemispheric sleep events are intermingled with bihemispheric and rapid eye movement sleep events. Electroencephalogram hemispheric asymmetries are also reported during bihemispheric sleep, at awakening, and at sleep onset, as well as being associated with a use

  10. Effect of Daytime Exercise on Sleep Eeg and Subjective Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Y.; Kawada, T.; Kiryu, Y.

    1997-08-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of daytime physical exercise on the quality of objective and subjective sleep by examining all-night sleep EEGs. The subjects were five male students, aged 19 to 20 years, who were in the habit of performing regular daytime exercise. The sleep polygraphic parameters in this study were sleep stage time as a percentage of total sleep time (%S1, %S2, %S(3+4), %SREM, %MT), time in bed (TIB), sleep time (ST), total sleep time (TST), sleep onset latency (SOL), waking from sleep, sleep efficiency, number of awakenings, number of stage shifts, number of spindles, and percentages of α and δ waves, all of which were determined by an automatic computer analysis system. The OSA questionnaire was used to investigate subjective sleep. The five scales of the OSA used were sleepiness, sleep maintenance, worry, integrated sleep feeling, and sleep initiation. Each sleep parameter was compared in the exercise and the non-exercise groups. Two-way analysis of variance was applied using subject factor and exercise factor. The main effect of the subject was significant in all parameters and the main effect of exercise in %S(3+4), SOL and sleep efficiency, among the objective sleep parameters. The main effects of the subject, except sleepiness, were significant, as was the main effect of exercise on sleep initiation, among the subjective sleep parameters. These findings suggest that daytime exercise shortened sleep latency and prolonged slow-wave sleep, and that the subjects fell asleep more easily on exercise days. There were also significant individual differences in both the objective and subjective sleep parameters.

  11. Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpy, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    Depression, dementia, and physiologic changes contribute to the high prevalence of sleep disturbances in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Antiparkinsonian drugs also play a role in insomnia by increasing daytime sleepiness and affecting motor symptoms and depression. Common types of sleep disturbances in PD patients include nocturnal sleep disruption and excessive daytime sleepiness, restless legs syndrome, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, sleep apnea, sleep walking and sleep talking, nightmares, sleep terrors, and panic attacks. A thorough assessment should include complete medical and psychiatric histories, sleep history, and a 1- to 2-week sleep diary or Epworth Sleepiness Scale evaluation. Polysomnography or actigraphy may also be indicated. Treatment should address underlying factors such as depression or anxiety. Hypnotic therapy for sleep disturbances in PD patients should be approached with care because of the risks of falling, agitation, drowsiness, and hypotension. Behavioral interventions may also be useful. PMID:15259535

  12. Diagnosing Sleep Disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... REM sleep during their naps. What are Sleep Studies? Sleep studies are tests that measure how well you sleep ... a sleep disorder and how severe it is. Sleep studies are important because untreated sleep disorders can raise ...

  13. The interplay of stress and sleep impacts BDNF level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep plays a pivotal role in normal biological functions. Sleep loss results in higher stress vulnerability and is often found in mental disorders. There is evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF could be a central player in this relationship. Recently, we could demonstrate that subjects suffering from current symptoms of insomnia exhibited significantly decreased serum BDNF levels compared with sleep-healthy controls. In accordance with the paradigm indicating a link between sleep and BDNF, we aimed to investigate if the stress system influences the association between sleep and BDNF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants with current symptoms of insomnia plus a former diagnosis of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS and/or Periodic Limb Movement (PLM and sleep healthy controls were included in the study. They completed questionnaires on sleep (ISI, Insomnia Severity Index and stress (PSS, Perceived Stress Scale and provided a blood sample for determination of serum BDNF. We found a significant interaction between stress and insomnia with an impact on serum BDNF levels. Moreover, insomnia severity groups and score on the PSS each revealed a significant main effect on serum BDNF levels. Insomnia severity was associated with increased stress experience affecting serum BDNF levels. Of note, the association between stress and BDNF was only observed in subjects without insomnia. Using a mediation model, sleep was revealed as a mediator of the association between stress experience and serum BDNF levels. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show that the interplay between stress and sleep impacts BDNF levels, suggesting an important role of this relationship in the pathogenesis of stress-associated mental disorders. Hence, we suggest sleep as a key mediator at the connection between stress and BDNF. Whether sleep is maintained or disturbed might explain why some individuals are able to handle a certain stress load while

  14. BDNF in sleep, insomnia, and sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Karen; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Eckert, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors involved in plasticity of neurons in several brain regions. There are numerous evidence that BDNF expression is decreased by experiencing psychological stress and that, accordingly, a lack of neurotrophic support causes major depression. Furthermore, disruption in sleep homeostatic processes results in higher stress vulnerability and is often associated with stress-related mental disorders. Recently, we reported, for the first time, a relationship between BDNF and insomnia and sleep deprivation (SD). Using a biphasic stress model as explanation approach, we discuss here the hypothesis that chronic stress might induce a deregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system. In the long-term it leads to sleep disturbance and depression as well as decreased BDNF levels, whereas acute stress like SD can be used as therapeutic intervention in some insomniac or depressed patients as compensatory process to normalize BDNF levels. Indeed, partial SD (PSD) induced a fast increase in BDNF serum levels within hours after PSD which is similar to effects seen after ketamine infusion, another fast-acting antidepressant intervention, while traditional antidepressants are characterized by a major delay until treatment response as well as delayed BDNF level increase. Key messages Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in the pathophysiology of stress-related mood disorders. The interplay of stress and sleep impacts on BDNF level. Partial sleep deprivation (PSD) shows a fast action on BDNF level increase. PMID:26758201

  15. Unihemispheric sleep and asymmetrical sleep: behavioral, neurophysiological, and functional perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascetti, Gian Gastone

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a behavior characterized by a typical body posture, both eyes’ closure, raised sensory threshold, distinctive electrographic signs, and a marked decrease of motor activity. In addition, sleep is a periodically necessary behavior and therefore, in the majority of animals, it involves the whole brain and body. However, certain marine mammals and species of birds show a different sleep behavior, in which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other is awake. In dolphins, eared seals, and manatees, unihemispheric sleep allows them to have the benefits of sleep, breathing, thermoregulation, and vigilance. In birds, antipredation vigilance is the main function of unihemispheric sleep, but in domestic chicks, it is also associated with brain lateralization or dominance in the control of behavior. Compared to bihemispheric sleep, unihemispheric sleep would mean a reduction of the time spent sleeping and of the associated recovery processes. However, the behavior and health of aquatic mammals and birds does not seem at all impaired by the reduction of sleep. The neural mechanisms of unihemispheric sleep are unknown, but assuming that the neural structures involved in sleep in cetaceans, seals, and birds are similar to those of terrestrial mammals, it is suggested that they involve the interaction of structures of the hypothalamus, basal forebrain, and brain stem. The neural mechanisms promoting wakefulness dominate one side of the brain, while those promoting sleep predominates the other side. For cetaceans, unihemispheric sleep is the only way to sleep, while in seals and birds, unihemispheric sleep events are intermingled with bihemispheric and rapid eye movement sleep events. Electroencephalogram hemispheric asymmetries are also reported during bihemispheric sleep, at awakening, and at sleep onset, as well as being associated with a use-dependent process (local sleep). PMID:27471418

  16. Unihemispheric sleep and asymmetrical sleep: behavioral, neurophysiological, and functional perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascetti, Gian Gastone

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a behavior characterized by a typical body posture, both eyes' closure, raised sensory threshold, distinctive electrographic signs, and a marked decrease of motor activity. In addition, sleep is a periodically necessary behavior and therefore, in the majority of animals, it involves the whole brain and body. However, certain marine mammals and species of birds show a different sleep behavior, in which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other is awake. In dolphins, eared seals, and manatees, unihemispheric sleep allows them to have the benefits of sleep, breathing, thermoregulation, and vigilance. In birds, antipredation vigilance is the main function of unihemispheric sleep, but in domestic chicks, it is also associated with brain lateralization or dominance in the control of behavior. Compared to bihemispheric sleep, unihemispheric sleep would mean a reduction of the time spent sleeping and of the associated recovery processes. However, the behavior and health of aquatic mammals and birds does not seem at all impaired by the reduction of sleep. The neural mechanisms of unihemispheric sleep are unknown, but assuming that the neural structures involved in sleep in cetaceans, seals, and birds are similar to those of terrestrial mammals, it is suggested that they involve the interaction of structures of the hypothalamus, basal forebrain, and brain stem. The neural mechanisms promoting wakefulness dominate one side of the brain, while those promoting sleep predominates the other side. For cetaceans, unihemispheric sleep is the only way to sleep, while in seals and birds, unihemispheric sleep events are intermingled with bihemispheric and rapid eye movement sleep events. Electroencephalogram hemispheric asymmetries are also reported during bihemispheric sleep, at awakening, and at sleep onset, as well as being associated with a use-dependent process (local sleep). PMID:27471418

  17. [The NHG guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen-van Beek, Z.; Lucassen, P.L.; Gorgels, W.J.M.J.; Smelt, A.F.; Knuistingh Neven, A.; Bouma, M.

    2015-01-01

    - The Dutch College of General Practitioners' (NHG) guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills' provides recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of the most prevalent sleep problems and for the management of chronic users of sleeping pills.- The preferred approach for sleeplessness is not

  18. Shining evolutionary light on human sleep and sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Charles L; Samson, David R; Krystal, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is essential to cognitive function and health in humans, yet the ultimate reasons for sleep-i.e. 'why' sleep evolved-remain mysterious. We integrate findings from human sleep studies, the ethnographic record, and the ecology and evolution of mammalian sleep to better understand sleep along the human lineage and in the modern world. Compared to other primates, sleep in great apes has undergone substantial evolutionary change, with all great apes building a sleeping platform or 'nest'. Further evolutionary change characterizes human sleep, with humans having the shortest sleep duration, yet the highest proportion of rapid eye movement sleep among primates. These changes likely reflect that our ancestors experienced fitness benefits from being active for a greater portion of the 24-h cycle than other primates, potentially related to advantages arising from learning, socializing and defending against predators and hostile conspecifics. Perspectives from evolutionary medicine have implications for understanding sleep disorders; we consider these perspectives in the context of insomnia, narcolepsy, seasonal affective disorder, circadian rhythm disorders and sleep apnea. We also identify how human sleep today differs from sleep through most of human evolution, and the implications of these changes for global health and health disparities. More generally, our review highlights the importance of phylogenetic comparisons in understanding human health, including well-known links between sleep, cognitive performance and health in humans. PMID:27470330

  19. Sex differences in sleep: impact of biological sex and sex steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mong, Jessica A; Cusmano, Danielle M

    2016-02-19

    Men and women sleep differently. While much is known about the mechanisms that drive sleep, the reason for these sex differences in sleep behaviour is unknown and understudied. Historically, women and female animals are underrepresented in studies of sleep and its disorders. Nevertheless, there is a growing recognition of sex disparities in sleep and rhythm disorders. Women typically report poorer quality and more disrupted sleep across various stages of life. Findings from clinical and basic research studies strongly implicate a role for sex steroids in sleep modulation. Understanding how neuroendocrine mediators and sex differences influence sleep is central to advancing our understanding of sleep-related disorders. The investigation into sex differences and sex steroid modulation of sleep is in its infancy. Identifying the mechanisms underlying sex and gender differences in sleep will provide valuable insights leading to tailored therapeutics that benefit each sex. The goal of this review is to discuss our current understanding of how biological sex and sex steroids influence sleep behaviour from both the clinical and pre-clinical perspective. PMID:26833831

  20. Adenosine and sleep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A1 receptors, 3H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for 3H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in 3H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress

  1. Sleep deprivation and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenga, Simon

    1992-01-01

    The association between depression and sleep disturbances is perhaps as old as makind. In view of the longstanding experience with this association it is amazing that only some 20 years ago, a few depressed patients attracted attention to the fact that Total Sleep Deprivation (TSD) had antidepressan

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A.; Stegenga, B.; Wijkstra, P. J.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; Meinesz, A. F.; de Bont, L. G. M.

    2008-01-01

    In clinical practice, oral appliances are used primarily for obstructive sleep apnea patients who do not respond to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We hypothesized that an oral appliance is not inferior to CPAP in treating obstructive sleep apnea effectively. We randomly assigned

  3. What Are Sleep Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Contact Us FAQs Home » Health Information for the Public » Health Topics » Sleep Studies Explore Sleep Studies What Are... Types Who Needs ...

  4. Stress, arousal, and sleep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanford, Larry D.; Suchecki, Deborah; Meerlo, Peter; Meerlo, Peter; Benca, Ruth M.; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Stress is considered to be an important cause of disrupted sleep and insomnia. However, controlled and experimental studies in rodents indicate that effects of stress on sleep-wake regulation are complex and may strongly depend on the nature of the stressor. While most stressors are associated with

  5. Adenosine and sleep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanik, G.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A/sub 1/ receptors, /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress.

  6. 5'-Ectonucleotidase-knockout mice lack non-REM sleep responses to sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Mark R; Taishi, Ping; Clinton, James M; Krueger, James M

    2012-06-01

    Adenosine and extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) have multiple physiological central nervous system actions including regulation of cerebral blood flow, inflammation and sleep. However, their exact sleep regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. Extracellular ATP and adenosine diphosphate are converted to adenosine monophosphate (AMP) by the enzyme ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1, also known as CD39, and extracellular AMP is in turn converted to adenosine by the 5'-ectonuleotidase enzyme CD73. We investigated the role of CD73 in sleep regulation. Duration of spontaneous non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) was greater in CD73-knockout (KO) mice than in C57BL/6 controls whether determined in our laboratory or by others. After sleep deprivation (SD), NREMS was enhanced in controls but not CD73-KO mice. Interleukin-1 beta (IL1β) enhanced NREMS in both strains, indicating that the CD73-KO mice were capable of sleep responses. Electroencephalographic power spectra during NREMS in the 1.0-2.5 Hz frequency range was significantly enhanced after SD in both CD73-KO and WT mice; the increases were significantly greater in the WT mice than in the CD73-KO mice. Rapid eye movement sleep did not differ between strains in any of the experimental conditions. With the exception of CD73 mRNA, the effects of SD on various adenosine-related mRNAs were small and similar in the two strains. These data suggest that sleep is regulated, in part, by extracellular adenosine derived from the actions of CD73.

  7. Shining evolutionary light on human sleep and sleep disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Charles L Nunn; David R. Samson; Krystal, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is essential to cognitive function and health in humans, yet the ultimate reasons for sleep—i.e. ‘why’ sleep evolved—remain mysterious. We integrate findings from human sleep studies, the ethnographic record, and the ecology and evolution of mammalian sleep to better understand sleep along the human lineage and in the modern world. Compared to other primates, sleep in great apes has undergone substantial evolutionary change, with all great apes building a sleeping platform or ‘nest’. Fu...

  8. Total sleep deprivation study in delayed sleep-phase syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Dilshad Manzar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed sleep-phase syndrome (DSPS is characterized by delayed sleep onset against the desired clock time. It often presents with symptoms of sleep-onset insomnia or difficulty in awakening at the desired time. We report the finding of sleep studies after 24 h total sleep deprivation (TSD in a 28-year-old DSPS male patient. He had characteristics of mild chronic DSPS, which may have been precipitated by his frequent night shift assignments. The TSD improved the patients sleep latency and efficiency but all other sleep variables showed marked differences.

  9. The clinical and polysomnographic features in complex sleep apnea syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    İNÖNÜ, Handan; ÇİFTÇİ, Tansu Ulukavak; KÖKTÜRK, Oğuz

    2010-01-01

    Complex sleep apnea syndrome (CompSAS) is characterized by the onset of central apneas or a Cheyne-Stokes breathing pattern in some patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) who were treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The etiology of CompSAS is unclear, but derangement of respiratory control has been proposed. We sought to compare clinical and polysomnography (PSG) features of patients with CompSAS and OSAS. Materials and methods: Records of PSG were evaluat...

  10. The Function of Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Barone

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of sleep can be ascertained by noting the effects of its loss, which tends to be chronic and partial, on cognition, mood, alertness, and overall health. Many theories have been put forth to explain the function of sleep in humans, including proposals based on energy conservation, ecological adaptations, neurocognitive function, neural plasticity, nervous system and physical health, and performance. Most account for only a portion of sleep behavior and few are based on strong experimental support. In this review, we present theories proposing why sleep is necessary and supporting data demonstrating the effects of inadequate sleep, with the intention of gleaning further information as to its necessity, which remains one of the most perplexing mysteries in biology.

  11. Sleep effects on breathing and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary Sumer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand normal sleep pattern and physiological changes during sleep, sleep and breathing interaction, nomenclature and scales used in sleep study, discuss the effect of rapid eye movements and non-rapid eye movements while sleep and to review the effects of obstructive and restrictive lung disease on gas exchange during sleep and sleep architecture.

  12. Sleep effects on breathing and respiratory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhary Sumer; Choudhary Sanjiw

    2009-01-01

    To understand normal sleep pattern and physiological changes during sleep, sleep and breathing interaction, nomenclature and scales used in sleep study, discuss the effect of rapid eye movements and non-rapid eye movements while sleep and to review the effects of obstructive and restrictive lung disease on gas exchange during sleep and sleep architecture.

  13. Clinical Psychology Training in Sleep and Sleep Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Phillips, Cindy; Mindell, Jodi A.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest that clinical psychologists would benefit from more training in sleep and sleep disorders. Sleep disturbances are commonly comorbid with mental health disorders and this relationship is often bidirectional. In addition, psychologists have become integral members of multidisciplinary sleep medicine teams and there are not enough qualified psychologists to meet the clinical demand. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current education on sleep and ...

  14. Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder. Prevalence, sleep, circadian rhythm and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Saxvig, Ingvild West

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is often characterized by delayed and irregular sleep patterns, with potential negative consequences in terms of school performance and daytime functioning. At the most extreme, a stably delayed sleep phase may reflect a circadian rhythm sleep disorder of the delayed sleep phase type (delayed sleep phase disorder, DSPD). DSPD is assumed to be common amongst adolescents and young adults, but little is known about its prevalence and aetiology, and no guidelines exist ...

  15. Models of human sleep regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, Domien G.M.

    1998-01-01

    Non-REM sleep deprivation and REM sleep deprivation both lead to specific rebounds, suggesting that these states fulfil physiological needs. In view of impaired performance after sleep deprivation, a recovery function of sleep seems likely. The timing of this recovery is restricted to a narrow time

  16. Cocaine and Sleep: Early Abstinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T. Morgan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Compulsive cocaine use is associated with a profound dysregulation of sleep. Perhaps the result of chronic use, a significant deterioration in sleep is apparent over the first 3 weeks of abstinence, with no indication of recovery. Interestingly, the diminished sleep is not accompanied by subjective reports of poor or worsening sleep. Rather, subjective reports actually improve over abstinence, while sleep-related cognitive performance declines. A mechanistic understanding of the apparent difference in objective and subjective measures is currently lacking. Here we review the relevant literature on cocaine use and sleep, and discuss the possible relevance of this sleep disturbance in relationship to the underlying disorder and its treatment.

  17. Sleep in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaelen, James; Greiffenstein, Patrick; deBoisblanc, Bennett P

    2015-07-01

    More than one-half million patients are hospitalized annually for traumatic brain injury (TBI). One-quarter demonstrate sleep-disordered breathing, up to 50% experience insomnia, and half have hypersomnia. Sleep disturbances after TBI may result from injury to sleep-regulating brain tissue, nonspecific neurohormonal responses to systemic injury, ICU environmental interference, and medication side effects. A diagnosis of sleep disturbances requires a high index of suspicion and appropriate testing. Treatment starts with a focus on making the ICU environment conducive to normal sleep. Treating sleep-disordered breathing likely has outcome benefits in TBI. The use of sleep promoting sedative-hypnotics and anxiolytics should be judicious. PMID:26118920

  18. Sleep Disturbances in Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumble, Meredith E; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    The article provides an overview of common and differentiating self-reported and objective sleep disturbances seen in mood-disordered populations. The importance of considering sleep disturbances in the context of mood disorders is emphasized, because a large body of evidence supports the notion that sleep disturbances are a risk factor for onset, exacerbation, and relapse of mood disorders. In addition, potential mechanisms for sleep disturbance in depression, other primary sleep disorders that often occur with mood disorders, effects of antidepressant and mood-stabilizing drugs on sleep, and the adjunctive effect of treating sleep in patients with mood disorders are discussed. PMID:26600106

  19. Sleep disorders in hemodialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sabry Alaa; Abo-Zenah Hamdy; Wafa Ehab; Mahmoud Khaled; El-Dahshan Khaled; Hassan Ahmed; Abbas Tarek; Saleh Abd El-Baset; Okasha Kamal

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of sleep disorders is higher in patients with kidney failure than the general population. We studied the prevalence of sleep disorders in 88 (mean age; 41.59 ± 16.3 years) chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients at the Urology and Nephrology Center, Mansoura Uni-versity, Egypt over 4-month period. The investigated sleep disorders included insomnia, restless leg syndrome (RLS), obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), narcolepsy and sleep walk...

  20. Genetic factors in sleep disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Parkes, J. D.; Lock, C B

    1989-01-01

    Several sleep disorders have a genetic basis. These conditions include the narcoleptic syndrome, sleep walking, periodic movements in sleep, circadian delay syndromes and familial insomnia. These disorders illustrate different control mechanisms involved in sleep and wakefulness, including those determining the prevalence and timing of NREM and REM activity, somatomotor inhibition and excitation, autonomic discharge, and the circadian framework of sleep. The genetic defect in narcolepsy has b...

  1. The Neuroprotective Aspects of Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Eugene, Andy R.; Masiak, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is an important component of human life, yet many people do not understand the relationship between the brain and the process of sleeping. Sleep has been proven to improve memory recall, regulate metabolism, and reduce mental fatigue. A minimum of 7 hours of daily sleep seems to be necessary for proper cognitive and behavioral function. The emotional and mental handicaps associated with chronic sleep loss as well as the highly hazardous situations which can be contributed to the lack of...

  2. Sleep spindles provide indirect support to the consolidation of emotional encoding contexts

    OpenAIRE

    Cairney, Scott A.; Durrant, Simon J.; Jackson, Rebecca; Lewis, Penelope A.

    2014-01-01

    Emotional memories tend to be strengthened ahead of neutral memories during sleep-dependent consolidation. In recent work, however, we found that this is not the case when emotion pertains to the contextual features of a memory instead of its central constructs, suggesting that emotional contexts are influenced by distinct properties of sleep. We therefore examined the sleep-specific mechanisms supporting representations of emotional context and asked whether these differ to those already imp...

  3. Insomnia With Objective Short Sleep Duration Is Associated With Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Liao, Duanping; Pejovic, Slobodanka; Calhoun, Susan; KARATARAKI, MARIA; Bixler, Edward O.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We examined the joint effects of insomnia and objective short sleep duration, the combination of which is associated with higher morbidity, on diabetes risk. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 1,741 men and women randomly selected from Central Pennsylvania were studied in the sleep laboratory. Insomnia was defined by a complaint of insomnia with duration of ≥1 year, whereas poor sleep was defined as a complaint of difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, or early final awakeni...

  4. Insomnia and sleep misperception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, C H; Ceklic, T; St-Hilaire, P; Desmarais, F; Pérusse, A D; Lefrançois, J; Pedneault-Drolet, M

    2014-10-01

    Sleep misperception is often observed in insomnia individuals (INS). The extent of misperception varies between different types of INS. The following paper comprised sections which will be aimed at studying the sleep EEG and compares it to subjective reports of sleep in individuals suffering from either psychophysiological insomnia or paradoxical insomnia and good sleeper controls. The EEG can be studied without any intervention (thus using the raw data) via either PSG or fine quantitative EEG analyses (power spectral analysis [PSA]), identifying EEG patterns as in the case of cyclic alternating patterns (CAPs) or by decorticating the EEG while scoring the different transient or phasic events (K-Complexes or sleep spindles). One can also act on the on-going EEG by delivering stimuli so to study their impact on cortical measures as in the case of event-related potential studies (ERPs). From the paucity of studies available using these different techniques, a general conclusion can be reached: sleep misperception is not an easy phenomenon to quantify and its clinical value is not well recognized. Still, while none of the techniques or EEG measures defined in the paper is available and/or recommended to diagnose insomnia, ERPs might be the most indicated technique to study hyperarousal and sleep quality in different types of INS. More research shall also be dedicated to EEG patterns and transient phasic events as these EEG scoring techniques can offer a unique insight of sleep misperception.

  5. Sleep, vigilance, and thermosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeijn, Nico; Raymann, Roy J E M; Møst, Els; Te Lindert, Bart; Van Der Meijden, Wisse P; Fronczek, Rolf; Gomez-Herrero, German; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of sleep and wakefulness is well modeled with two underlying processes: a circadian and a homeostatic one. So far, the parameters and mechanisms of additional sleep-permissive and wake-promoting conditions have been largely overlooked. The present overview focuses on one of these conditions: the effect of skin temperature on the onset and maintenance of sleep, and alertness. Skin temperature is quite well suited to provide the brain with information on sleep-permissive and wake-promoting conditions because it changes with most if not all of them. Skin temperature changes with environmental heat and cold, but also with posture, environmental light, danger, nutritional status, pain, and stress. Its effect on the brain may thus moderate the efficacy by which the clock and homeostat manage to initiate or maintain sleep or wakefulness. The review provides a brief overview of the neuroanatomical pathways and physiological mechanisms by which skin temperature can affect the regulation of sleep and vigilance. In addition, current pitfalls and possibilities of practical applications for sleep enhancement are discussed, including the recent finding of impaired thermal comfort perception in insomniacs.

  6. Management of common sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramar, Kannan; Olson, Eric J

    2013-08-15

    Sleep disorders are common and affect sleep quality and quantity, leading to increased morbidity. Patients with sleep disorders can be categorized as those who cannot sleep, those who will not sleep, those with excessive daytime sleepiness, and those with increased movements during sleep. Insomnia, defined as difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep that results in daytime impairment, is diagnosed using history findings and treated with cognitive behavior therapy, with or without sleep hypnotics. Restless legs syndrome is characterized by an urge to move the legs that worsens with rest, is relieved by movement, and often occurs in the evening or at night. Restless legs syndrome is treated based on the frequency of symptoms. Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. It is diagnosed using a sleep log or actigraphy, followed by overnight polysomnography and a multiple sleep latency test. Narcolepsy is treated with stimulants, such as modafinil; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors; or gamma hydroxybutyric acid (sodium oxybate). Patients with snoring and witnessed apneas may have obstructive sleep apnea, which is diagnosed using overnight polysomnography. Continuous positive airway pressure is the most common and effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is characterized by increased muscle tone during rapid eye movement sleep, resulting in the patient acting out dreams with possible harmful consequences. It is diagnosed based on history and polysomnography findings, and treated with environmental safety measures and melatonin or clonazepam. PMID:23944726

  7. Sleep deprivation in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doongaji D

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Ten patients diagnosed as suffering from depressive illness were treated with 2 consecutive nights of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation was effective in both types of depression viz. endoge-nous and reactive. The improvement was greater and seemed to last longer in endogenous depression as compared to reactive depression at the time of evaluation, 7 days after completion of sleep deprivation. Depressed mood, suicidal tendencies and retard-ation seemed to show the greatest improvement while insight and gastro-intestinal and somatic symptoms, improved the least.

  8. Chimpanzee sleep stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemon, F. R.; Mcnew, J. J.; Adey, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    The electroencephalogram and electro-oculogram of two unrestrained juvenile chimpanzees was monitored for 7 consecutive nights using telemetry methods. Of the sleeping time, 23% was spent in the rapid eye movement of REM type of sleep, whereas 8, 4, 15, and 10% were spent in non-REM stages 1 through 4, respectively. Seven to nine periods of REM sleep occurred per night. The average time from the beginning of one REM period to the beginning of the next was approximately 85 min.

  9. Sleep and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Bopparaju

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea is clinically recognized as a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by recurrent apnea and/or hypopnea. Its prevalence ranges from 4% to 24%. It has been implicated as an independent risk factor for several conditions such as hypertension, stroke, arrhythmia, and myocardial infarction. Recently data has been emerging which suggests an independent association of obstructive sleep apnea with several components of the metabolic syndrome, particularly insulin resistance and abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We hereby review the salient features of the association between sleep and diabetes.

  10. Quantitative differences among EMG activities of muscles innervated by subpopulations of hypoglossal and upper spinal motoneurons during non-REM sleep - REM sleep transitions: a window on neural processes in the sleeping brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukhadze, I; Kamani, H; Kubin, L

    2011-12-01

    In the rat, a species widely used to study the neural mechanisms of sleep and motor control, lingual electromyographic activity (EMG) is minimal during non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and then phasic twitches gradually increase after the onset of REM sleep. To better characterize the central neural processes underlying this pattern, we quantified EMG of muscles innervated by distinct subpopulations of hypoglossal motoneurons and nuchal (N) EMG during transitions from non-REM sleep to REM sleep. In 8 chronically instrumented rats, we recorded cortical EEG, EMG at sites near the base of the tongue where genioglossal and intrinsic muscle fibers predominate (GG-I), EMG of the geniohyoid (GH) muscle, and N EMG. Sleep-wake states were identified and EMGs quantified relative to their mean levels in wakefulness in successive 10 s epochs. During non-REM sleep, the average EMG levels differed among the three muscles, with the order being N>GH>GG-I. During REM sleep, due to different magnitudes of phasic twitches, the order was reversed to GG-I>GH>N. GG-I and GH exhibited a gradual increase of twitching that peaked at 70-120 s after the onset of REM sleep and then declined if the REM sleep episode lasted longer. We propose that a common phasic excitatory generator impinges on motoneuron pools that innervate different muscles, but twitching magnitudes are different due to different levels of tonic motoneuronal hyperpolarization. We also propose that REM sleep episodes of average durations are terminated by intense activity of the central generator of phasic events, whereas long REM sleep episodes end as a result of a gradual waning of the tonic disfacilitatory and inhibitory processes.

  11. Predictability decomposition detects the impairment of brain-heart dynamical networks during sleep disorders and their recovery with treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faes, Luca; Marinazzo, Daniele; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Jurysta, Fabrice; Porta, Alberto; Giandomenico, Nollo

    2016-05-13

    This work introduces a framework to study the network formed by the autonomic component of heart rate variability (cardiac processη) and the amplitude of the different electroencephalographic waves (brain processes δ, θ, α, σ, β) during sleep. The framework exploits multivariate linear models to decompose the predictability of any given target process into measures of self-, causal and interaction predictability reflecting respectively the information retained in the process and related to its physiological complexity, the information transferred from the other source processes, and the information modified during the transfer according to redundant or synergistic interaction between the sources. The framework is here applied to theη,δ,θ,α,σ,βtime series measured from the sleep recordings of eight severe sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (SAHS) patients studied before and after long-term treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, and 14 healthy controls. Results show that the full and self-predictability of η, δ and θ decreased significantly in SAHS compared with controls, and were restored with CPAP forδandθbut not forη The causal predictability of η and δ occurred through significantly redundant source interaction during healthy sleep, which was lost in SAHS and recovered after CPAP. These results indicate that predictability analysis is a viable tool to assess the modifications of complexity and causality of the cerebral and cardiac processes induced by sleep disorders, and to monitor the restoration of the neuroautonomic control of these processes during long-term treatment. PMID:27044993

  12. The two-process model of sleep regulation: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbély, Alexander A; Daan, Serge; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Deboer, Tom

    2016-04-01

    In the last three decades the two-process model of sleep regulation has served as a major conceptual framework in sleep research. It has been applied widely in studies on fatigue and performance and to dissect individual differences in sleep regulation. The model posits that a homeostatic process (Process S) interacts with a process controlled by the circadian pacemaker (Process C), with time-courses derived from physiological and behavioural variables. The model simulates successfully the timing and intensity of sleep in diverse experimental protocols. Electrophysiological recordings from the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) suggest that S and C interact continuously. Oscillators outside the SCN that are linked to energy metabolism are evident in SCN-lesioned arrhythmic animals subjected to restricted feeding or methamphetamine administration, as well as in human subjects during internal desynchronization. In intact animals these peripheral oscillators may dissociate from the central pacemaker rhythm. A sleep/fast and wake/feed phase segregate antagonistic anabolic and catabolic metabolic processes in peripheral tissues. A deficiency of Process S was proposed to account for both depressive sleep disturbances and the antidepressant effect of sleep deprivation. The model supported the development of novel non-pharmacological treatment paradigms in psychiatry, based on manipulating circadian phase, sleep and light exposure. In conclusion, the model remains conceptually useful for promoting the integration of sleep and circadian rhythm research. Sleep appears to have not only a short-term, use-dependent function; it also serves to enforce rest and fasting, thereby supporting the optimization of metabolic processes at the appropriate phase of the 24-h cycle. PMID:26762182

  13. Synaptic Homeostasis and Restructuring across the Sleep-Wake Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Wilfredo; Pereira, Catia M; Cota, Vinicius R; Souza, Annie C; Rennó-Costa, César; Santos, Sharlene; Dias, Gabriella; Guerreiro, Ana M G; Tort, Adriano B L; Neto, Adrião D; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2015-05-01

    Sleep is critical for hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. However, the underlying mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are poorly understood. The central controversy is on whether long-term potentiation (LTP) takes a role during sleep and which would be its specific effect on memory. To address this question, we used immunohistochemistry to measure phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKIIα) in the rat hippocampus immediately after specific sleep-wake states were interrupted. Control animals not exposed to novel objects during waking (WK) showed stable pCaMKIIα levels across the sleep-wake cycle, but animals exposed to novel objects showed a decrease during subsequent slow-wave sleep (SWS) followed by a rebound during rapid-eye-movement sleep (REM). The levels of pCaMKIIα during REM were proportional to cortical spindles near SWS/REM transitions. Based on these results, we modeled sleep-dependent LTP on a network of fully connected excitatory neurons fed with spikes recorded from the rat hippocampus across WK, SWS and REM. Sleep without LTP orderly rescaled synaptic weights to a narrow range of intermediate values. In contrast, LTP triggered near the SWS/REM transition led to marked swaps in synaptic weight ranking. To better understand the interaction between rescaling and restructuring during sleep, we implemented synaptic homeostasis and embossing in a detailed hippocampal-cortical model with both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Synaptic homeostasis was implemented by weakening potentiation and strengthening depression, while synaptic embossing was simulated by evoking LTP on selected synapses. We observed that synaptic homeostasis facilitates controlled synaptic restructuring. The results imply a mechanism for a cognitive synergy between SWS and REM, and suggest that LTP at the SWS/REM transition critically influences the effect of sleep: Its lack determines synaptic homeostasis, its presence causes synaptic

  14. Synaptic Homeostasis and Restructuring across the Sleep-Wake Cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Blanco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is critical for hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. However, the underlying mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are poorly understood. The central controversy is on whether long-term potentiation (LTP takes a role during sleep and which would be its specific effect on memory. To address this question, we used immunohistochemistry to measure phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKIIα in the rat hippocampus immediately after specific sleep-wake states were interrupted. Control animals not exposed to novel objects during waking (WK showed stable pCaMKIIα levels across the sleep-wake cycle, but animals exposed to novel objects showed a decrease during subsequent slow-wave sleep (SWS followed by a rebound during rapid-eye-movement sleep (REM. The levels of pCaMKIIα during REM were proportional to cortical spindles near SWS/REM transitions. Based on these results, we modeled sleep-dependent LTP on a network of fully connected excitatory neurons fed with spikes recorded from the rat hippocampus across WK, SWS and REM. Sleep without LTP orderly rescaled synaptic weights to a narrow range of intermediate values. In contrast, LTP triggered near the SWS/REM transition led to marked swaps in synaptic weight ranking. To better understand the interaction between rescaling and restructuring during sleep, we implemented synaptic homeostasis and embossing in a detailed hippocampal-cortical model with both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Synaptic homeostasis was implemented by weakening potentiation and strengthening depression, while synaptic embossing was simulated by evoking LTP on selected synapses. We observed that synaptic homeostasis facilitates controlled synaptic restructuring. The results imply a mechanism for a cognitive synergy between SWS and REM, and suggest that LTP at the SWS/REM transition critically influences the effect of sleep: Its lack determines synaptic homeostasis, its presence causes

  15. Sleep Loss as a Factor to Induce Cellular and Molecular Inflammatory Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hurtado-Alvarado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A reduction in the amount of time spent sleeping occurs chronically in modern society. Clinical and experimental studies in humans and animal models have shown that immune function is impaired when sleep loss is experienced. Sleep loss exerts a strong regulatory influence on peripheral levels of inflammatory mediators of the immune response. An increasing number of research projects support the existence of reciprocal regulation between sleep and low-intensity inflammatory response. Recent studies show that sleep deficient humans and rodents exhibit a proinflammatory component; therefore, sleep loss is considered as a risk factor for developing cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis. Circulating levels of proinflammatory mediators depend on the intensity and duration of the method employed to induce sleep loss. Recognizing the fact that the concentration of proinflammatory mediators is different between acute and chronic sleep-loss may expand the understanding of the relationship between sleep and the immune response. The aim of this review is to integrate data from recent published reports (2002–2013 on the effects of sleep loss on the immune response. This review may allow readers to have an integrated view of the mechanisms involved in central and peripheral deficits induced by sleep loss.

  16. The spread of sleep loss influences drug use in adolescent social networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara C Mednick

    Full Text Available Troubled sleep is a commonly cited consequence of adolescent drug use, but it has rarely been studied as a cause. Nor have there been any studies of the extent to which sleep behavior can spread in social networks from person to person to person. Here we map the social networks of 8,349 adolescents in order to study how sleep behavior spreads, how drug use behavior spreads, and how a friend's sleep behavior influences one's own drug use. We find clusters of poor sleep behavior and drug use that extend up to four degrees of separation (to one's friends' friends' friends' friends in the social network. Prospective regression models show that being central in the network negatively influences future sleep outcomes, but not vice versa. Moreover, if a friend sleeps sleeps < or =7 hours by 11%. If a friend uses marijuana, it increases the likelihood of marijuana use by 110%. Finally, the likelihood that an individual uses drugs increases by 19% when a friend sleeps < or =7 hours, and a mediation analysis shows that 20% of this effect results from the spread of sleep behavior from one person to another. This is the first study to suggest that the spread of one behavior in social networks influences the spread of another. The results indicate that interventions should focus on healthy sleep to prevent drug use and targeting specific individuals may improve outcomes across the entire social network.

  17. Treatments for Sleep Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caregivers. Daytime napping and other shifts in the sleep-wake cycle. Individuals may feel very drowsy during the ... problems worse include: Depression Restless legs syndrome, a disorder in which unpleasant “crawling” or “tingling” sensations in ...

  18. Sleep Problems and ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of sleep problems and their associations with quality of life (QOL), school attendance, and family impacts in children with ADHD were determined in a study at Royal Children's Hospital, University of Melbourne, Australia.

  19. Employees with Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the legs, described as pins and needles, crawling, and tingling, occur during sleep. As a result ... many more that are not available on the Web site. Contact JAN directly if you have specific ...

  20. Getting Enough Sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Illness & disability Drugs, alcohol & smoking Your feelings Relationships Bullying Safety Your future Environmental health Skip section navigation ( ... have around. Sound good? Now consider some possible effects of not getting enough sleep: Feeling angry or ...

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 100. Kimoff RJ. Obstructive sleep ... Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 88. Qaseem A, Holty JE, ...

  2. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD. PMID:26065126

  3. Sleep Problems and ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of sleep problems and their associations with quality of life (QOL, school attendance, and family impacts in children with ADHD were determined in a study at Royal Children's Hospital, University of Melbourne, Australia.

  4. Psoriasis and Sleep Apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Khalid, Usman; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2016-01-01

    , socioeconomic status, smoking history, alcohol abuse, medication, and comorbidity were estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: There were 53,290, 6,885, 6,348, and 39,908 incident cases of mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and sleep apnea, respectively. IRRs (95% confidence interval......STUDY OBJECTIVES: Psoriasis and sleep apnea are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although both diseases have been linked with systemic inflammation, studies on their potential bidirectional association are lacking. We investigate the potential association between psoriasis......) for sleep apnea were 1.30 (1.17-1.44), 1.65 (1.23-2.22), and 1.75 (1.35-2.26) in subjects with mild and severe psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis, and IRRs for mild and severe psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis in sleep apnea without continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy were 1.62 (1...

  5. Psoriasis and Sleep Apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Khalid, Usman; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2015-01-01

    , socioeconomic status, smoking history, alcohol abuse, medication, and comorbidity were estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: There were 53,290, 6,885, 6,348, and 39,908 incident cases of mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and sleep apnea, respectively. IRRs (95% confidence interval......STUDY OBJECTIVES: Psoriasis and sleep apnea are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although both diseases have been linked with systemic inflammation, studies on their potential bidirectional association are lacking. We investigate the potential association between psoriasis......) for sleep apnea were 1.30 (1.17-1.44), 1.65 (1.23-2.22), and 1.75 (1.35-2.26) in subjects with mild and severe psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis, and IRRs for mild and severe psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis in sleep apnea without continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy were 1.62 (1...

  6. Sleep after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Skarbye, M; Wildschiødtz, G;

    1996-01-01

    .01). SWS was absent in four of the patients after operation, whereas in six patients it was within the normal range (5-20% of the night). The proportion of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was not significantly changed after operation. There were no changes in arterial oxygen saturation on the postoperative...... compared with the preoperative night. Comparison of our results with previous studies on SWS and REM sleep disturbances after open laparotomy, suggests that the magnitude of surgery or administration of opioids, or both, may be important factors in the development of postoperative sleep disturbances.......The sleep pattern and oxygenation of 10 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were studied on the night before operation and the first night after operation. Operations were performed during general anaesthesia and postoperative analgesia was achieved without the administration...

  7. Spontaneous hemodynamic oscillations during human sleep and sleep stage transitions characterized with near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Näsi

    Full Text Available Understanding the interaction between the nervous system and cerebral vasculature is fundamental to forming a complete picture of the neurophysiology of sleep and its role in maintaining physiological homeostasis. However, the intrinsic hemodynamics of slow-wave sleep (SWS are still poorly known. We carried out 30 all-night sleep measurements with combined near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS and polysomnography to investigate spontaneous hemodynamic behavior in SWS compared to light (LS and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REM. In particular, we concentrated on slow oscillations (3-150 mHz in oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations, heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation, and the pulsation amplitude of the photoplethysmographic signal. We also analyzed the behavior of these variables during sleep stage transitions. The results indicate that slow spontaneous cortical and systemic hemodynamic activity is reduced in SWS compared to LS, REM, and wakefulness. This behavior may be explained by neuronal synchronization observed in electrophysiological studies of SWS and a reduction in autonomic nervous system activity. Also, sleep stage transitions are asymmetric, so that the SWS-to-LS and LS-to-REM transitions, which are associated with an increase in the complexity of cortical electrophysiological activity, are characterized by more dramatic hemodynamic changes than the opposite transitions. Thus, it appears that while the onset of SWS and termination of REM occur only as gradual processes over time, the termination of SWS and onset of REM may be triggered more abruptly by a particular physiological event or condition. The results suggest that scalp hemodynamic changes should be considered alongside cortical hemodynamic changes in NIRS sleep studies to assess the interaction between the autonomic and central nervous systems.

  8. Impaired sleep and allostatic load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Alice Jessie; Dich, Nadya; Lange, Theis;

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Understanding the mechanisms linking sleep impairment to morbidity and mortality is important for future prevention, but these mechanisms are far from elucidated. We aimed to determine the relation between impaired sleep, both in terms of duration and disturbed sleep, and allostatic load...... Biobank with comprehensive information on sleep duration, disturbed sleep, objective measures of an extensive range of biological risk markers, and physical conditions. Results: Long sleep (mean difference 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13, 0.32) and disturbed sleep (0.14; 0.06, 0.22) were associated...... with higher AL as well as with high-risk levels of risk markers from the anthropometric, metabolic, and immune system. Sub-analyses suggested that the association between disturbed sleep and AL might be explained by underlying disorders. Whereas there was no association between short sleep and AL...

  9. Artificial organisms that sleep.

    OpenAIRE

    Mirolli, Marco; Parisi, Domenico

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Populations of artificial organisms live in an environment in which light is cyclically present (day) or absent (night). Since being active during night is non-adaptive (activity consumes energy which is not compensated by the food found at night) the organisms evolve a sleep/wake behavioral pattern of being active during daytime and sleeping during nighttime. When the population moves to a different environment that contains "caves", they have to get out of a cave although the dark ...

  10. Reweighted Wake-Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Bornschein, Jörg; Bengio, Yoshua

    2014-01-01

    Training deep directed graphical models with many hidden variables and performing inference remains a major challenge. Helmholtz machines and deep belief networks are such models, and the wake-sleep algorithm has been proposed to train them. The wake-sleep algorithm relies on training not just the directed generative model but also a conditional generative model (the inference network) that runs backward from visible to latent, estimating the posterior distribution of latent given visible. We...

  11. Sleep deprivation and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Elsenga, Simon

    1992-01-01

    The association between depression and sleep disturbances is perhaps as old as makind. In view of the longstanding experience with this association it is amazing that only some 20 years ago, a few depressed patients attracted attention to the fact that Total Sleep Deprivation (TSD) had antidepressant effects. A large number of studies have followed these observations. The purpose of the studies presented in this thesis was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of TSD and related procedures for ...

  12. Sleep in thyrotoxicosis

    OpenAIRE

    G R Sridhar; Venkata Putcha; Lakshmi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Pattern of sleep in hyperthyroid state / thyrotoxicosis has not been systematically studied. It is being characterized as poor without further elaboration. We analyzed the pattern of sleep in a large sample of individuals with thyrotoxicosis who came to our endocrine center in southern India. Materials and Methods: We identified individuals with the diagnosis of ‘thyrotoxicosis’ from our electronic medical record database, and evaluated clinical parameters and pattern of their slee...

  13. Sleep enhances category learning

    OpenAIRE

    Djonlagic, Ina; Rosenfeld, Andrew; Shohamy, Daphna; Myers, Catherine; Gluck, Mark; Stickgold, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The ability to categorize objects and events in the world around us is a fundamental and critical aspect of human learning. We trained healthy adults on a probabilistic category-learning task in two different training modes. The aim of this study was to see whether either form of probabilistic category learning (feedback or observational) undergoes subsequent enhancement during sleep. Our results suggest that after training, a good night of sleep can lead to improved performance the following...

  14. Sleep EEG analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vávrová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with the analysis of EEG during various sleep stages, which is done by calculating the selected parameters from the time and frequency domain. These parameters are calculated from individual segments of EEG signals that correspond with various sleep stages. Based on the analysis it decides which EEG parameters are appropriate for the automatic detection of the phases and which method is more suitable for evaluation of data in hypnogram. The programme MATLAB was used for the ...

  15. Sleep and psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Abad, Vivien C.; Guilleminault, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders constitute 15.4% of the disease burden in established market economies. Many psychiatric disorders are associated with sleep disturbances, and the relationship is often bidirectional. This paper reviews the prevalence of various psychiatric disorders, their clinical presentation, and their association with sleep disorders. Among the psychiatric disorders reviewed are affective disorders, psychosis, anxiety disorders (including post-traumatic stress disorder), substance a...

  16. Sleep and anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Staner, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Sleep disturbances-particularly insomnia - are highly prevalent in anxiety disorders and complaints such as insomnia or nightmares have even been incorporated in some anxiety disorder definitions, such as generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. In the first part of this review, the relationship between sleep and anxiety is discussed in terms of adaptive response to stress. Recent studies suggested that the corticotropin-releasing hormone system and the locus ceruleus-a...

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D. Brass

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because of the individual’s risk factors and symptoms. The vast majority remain undiagnosed and untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences. Individuals with untreated OSA can stop breathing hundreds of times a night during their sleep. These apneic events can lead to fragmented sleep that is of poor quality, as the brain arouses briefly in order for the body to resume breathing. Untreated, sleep apnea can have dire health consequences and can increase the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and heart failure. OSA management has also become important in a number of comorbid neurological conditions, including epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and headache. Diagnosis typically involves use of screening questionnaires, physical exam, and an overnight polysomnography or a portable home study. Treatment options include changes in lifestyle, positive airway pressure, surgery, and dental appliances.

  18. Sleep Paralysis and Hallucinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Stores

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep paralysis is one of the many conditions of which visual hallucinations can be a part but has received relatively little attention. It can be associated with other dramatic symptoms of a psychotic nature likely to cause diagnostic uncertainty. Methods and results: These points are illustrated by the case of a young man with a severe bipolar affective disorder who independently developed terrifying visual, auditory and somatic hallucinatory episodes at sleep onset, associated with a sense of evil influence and presence. The episodes were not obviously related to his psychiatric disorder. Past diagnoses included nightmares and night terrors. Review provided no convincing evidence of various other sleep disorders nor physical conditions in which hallucinatory experiences can occur. A diagnosis of predormital isolated sleep paralysis was made and appropriate treatment recommended. Conclusions: Sleep paralysis, common in the general population, can be associated with dramatic auxiliary symptoms suggestive of a psychotic state. Less common forms are either part of the narcolepsy syndrome or (rarely they are familial in type. Interestingly, sleep paralysis (especially breathing difficulty features prominently in the folklore of various countries.

  19. A sleep state during C. elegans development

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Matthew D.; Raizen, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is the simplest animal shown to sleep. It sleeps during lethargus, a larval transition stage. Behavior during lethargus has the sleep properties of a specific quiescent posture and elevated arousal threshold that are reversible to strong stimulation and of increased sleep drive following sleep deprivation. Genetic similarities between sleep regulation during C. elegans lethargus and sleep regulation in other animals point to a sleep state that was an evolutionarily ance...

  20. Can non-REM sleep be depressogenic?

    OpenAIRE

    Beersma, Domien G. M.; Hoofdakker, Rutger H. van den

    1992-01-01

    Sleep and mood are clearly interrelated in major depression, as shown by the antidepressive effects of various experiments, such as total sleep deprivation, partial sleep deprivation, REM sleep deprivation, and temporal shifts of the sleep period. The prevailing hypotheses explaining these effects concern the antidepressant potency of the suppression of either REM sleep or non-REM sleep. This issue is discussed in the light of present knowledge of the kinetics of non-REM sleep intensity, REM ...

  1. Adenosine, Energy Metabolism, and Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Porkka-Heiskanen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available While the exact function of sleep remains unknown, it is evident that sleep was developed early in phylogenesis and represents an ancient and vital strategy for survival. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the function of sleep is associated with energy metabolism, saving of energy, and replenishment of energy stores. Prolonged wakefulness induces signs of energy depletion in the brain, while experimentally induced, local energy depletion induces increase in sleep, similarly as would a period of prolonged wakefulness. The key molecule in the induction of sleep appears to be adenosine, which induces sleep locally in the basal forebrain.

  2. Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea at Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Konrad E; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    Bloch, Konrad E., Tsogyal D. Latshang, and Silvia Ulrich. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea at altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:110-116, 2015.--Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the general population, in particular in men and women of older age. In OSA patients sleeping near sea level, the apneas/hypopneas associated with intermittent hypoxemia are predominantly due to upper airway collapse. When OSA patients stay at altitudes above 1600 m, corresponding to that of many tourist destinations, hypobaric hypoxia promotes frequent central apneas in addition to obstructive events, resulting in combined intermittent and sustained hypoxia. This induces strong sympathetic activation with elevated heart rate, cardiac arrhythmia, and systemic hypertension. There are concerns that these changes expose susceptible OSA patients, in particular those with advanced age and co-morbidities, to an excessive risk of cardiovascular and other adverse events during a stay at altitude. Based on data from randomized trials, it seems advisable for OSA patients to use continuous positive airway pressure treatment with computer controlled mask pressure adjustment (autoCPAP) in combination with acetazolamide during an altitude sojourn. If CPAP therapy is not feasible, acetazolamide alone is better than no treatment at all, as it improves oxygenation and sleep apnea and prevents excessive blood pressure rises of OSA patients at altitude. PMID:25973669

  3. Do birds sleep in flight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattenborg, Niels C.

    2006-09-01

    The following review examines the evidence for sleep in flying birds. The daily need to sleep in most animals has led to the common belief that birds, such as the common swift ( Apus apus), which spend the night on the wing, sleep in flight. The electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings required to detect sleep in flight have not been performed, however, rendering the evidence for sleep in flight circumstantial. The neurophysiology of sleep and flight suggests that some types of sleep might be compatible with flight. As in mammals, birds exhibit two types of sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep. Whereas, SWS can occur in one or both brain hemispheres at a time, REM sleep only occurs bihemispherically. During unihemispheric SWS, the eye connected to the awake hemisphere remains open, a state that may allow birds to visually navigate during sleep in flight. Bihemispheric SWS may also be possible during flight when constant visual monitoring of the environment is unnecessary. Nevertheless, the reduction in muscle tone that usually accompanies REM sleep makes it unlikely that birds enter this state in flight. Upon landing, birds may need to recover the components of sleep that are incompatible with flight. Periods of undisturbed postflight recovery sleep may be essential for maintaining adaptive brain function during wakefulness. The recent miniaturization of EEG recording devices now makes it possible to measure brain activity in flight. Determining if and how birds sleep in flight will contribute to our understanding of a largely unexplored aspect of avian behavior and may also provide insight into the function of sleep.

  4. Decrease in monocular sleep after sleep deprivation in the domestic chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerema, AS; Riedstra, B; Strijkstra, AM

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the trade-off between sleep need and alertness, by challenging chickens to modify their monocular sleep. We sleep deprived domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus) to increase their sleep need. We found that in response to sleep deprivation the fraction of monocular sleep within sleep d

  5. Sleep disorders in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, Alaa A; Abo-Zenah, Hamdy; Wafa, Ehab; Mahmoud, Khaled; El-Dahshan, Khaled; Hassan, Ahmed; Abbas, Tarek Medhat; Saleh, Abd El-Baset M; Okasha, Kamal

    2010-03-01

    The prevalence of sleep disorders is higher in patients with kidney failure than the general population. We studied the prevalence of sleep disorders in 88 (mean age; 41.59 +/- 16.3 years) chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients at the Urology and Nephrology Center, Mansoura University, Egypt over 4-month period. The investigated sleep disorders included insomnia, restless leg syndrome (RLS), obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), narcolepsy and sleep walking, and we used a questionnaire in accordance with those of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group, the Berlin questionnaire, Italian version of Epworth Sleepiness Scale, International Classification of Sleep Disorders, and the specific questions of Hatoum's sleep questionnaire. The prevalence of sleep disorders was 79.5% in our patients, and the most common sleep abnormality was insomnia (65.9%), followed by RLS (42%), OSAS (31.8%), snoring (27.3%), EDS (27.3%), narcolepsy (15.9%), and sleep walking (3.4%). Insomnia correlated with anemia (r=0.31, P= 0.003), anxiety (r=0.279, P= 0.042), depression (r=0.298, P= 0.24) and RLS (r=0.327, P= 0.002). Also, RLS correlated with hypoalbuminemia (r=0.41, P= Sleep disorders are quite common in the HD patients, especially those who are anemic and hypoalbuminemic. Assessment of sleep quality, preferably with polysomnography, is necessary to confirm our results. Interventional studies for management of sleep disorders in HD patients are warranted. PMID:20228517

  6. Optogenetically induced sleep spindle rhythms alter sleep architectures in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Angela; Latchoumane, Charles; Lee, Soojung; Kim, Guk Bae; Cheong, Eunji; Augustine, George J.; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2012-01-01

    Sleep spindles are rhythmic patterns of neuronal activity generated within the thalamocortical circuit. Although spindles have been hypothesized to protect sleep by reducing the influence of external stimuli, it remains to be confirmed experimentally whether there is a direct relationship between sleep spindles and the stability of sleep. We have addressed this issue by using in vivo photostimulation of the thalamic reticular nucleus of mice to generate spindle oscillations that are structura...

  7. Sleep and Delinquency: Does the Amount of Sleep Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinkinbeard, Samantha S.; Simi, Pete; Evans, Mary K.; Anderson, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep, a key indicator of health, has been linked to a variety of indicators of well-being such that people who get an adequate amount generally experience greater well-being. Further, a lack of sleep has been linked to a wide range of negative developmental outcomes, yet sleep has been largely overlooked among researchers interested in adolescent…

  8. Sleep, its regulation and possible mechanisms of sleep disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porkka-Heiskanen, T; Zitting, K-M; Wigren, H-K

    2013-08-01

    The state of sleep consists of different phases that proceed in successive, tightly regulated order through the night forming a physiological program, which for each individual is different but stabile from one night to another. Failure to accomplish this program results in feeling of unrefreshing sleep and tiredness in the morning. The program core is constructed by genetic factors but regulated by circadian rhythm and duration and intensity of day time brain activity. Many environmental factors modulate sleep, including stress, health status and ingestion of vigilance-affecting nutrients or medicines (e.g. caffeine). Acute sleep loss results in compromised cognitive performance, memory deficits, depressive mood and involuntary sleep episodes during the day. Moreover, prolonged sleep curtailment has many adverse health effects, as evidenced by both epidemiological and experimental studies. These effects include increased risk for depression, type II diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases. In addition to voluntary restriction of sleep, shift work, irregular working hours, jet lag and stress are important factors that induce curtailed or bad quality sleep and/or insomnia. This review covers the current theories on the function of normal sleep and describes current knowledge on the physiologic effects of sleep loss. It provides insights into the basic mechanisms of the regulation of wakefulness and sleep creating a theoretical background for understanding different disturbances of sleep. PMID:23746394

  9. Introduction to modern sleep technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying

    2012-01-01

    This book offers a wide range of up-to-date insight on current research in sleep technology, covering advances in sleep medicine, clinical psychology, engineering, industrial design and technology management, all with the aim of improving people's daily lives.

  10. Functional neuroimaging of sleep disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sleep disorders may affect the health and normal life of human badly. However, the pathophysiology underlying adult sleep disorders is still unclear. Functional neuroimaging can be used to investigate whether sleep disorders are associated with specific changes in brain structure or regional activity. This paper reviews functional brain imaging findings in major intrinsic sleep disorders (i.e., idiopathic insomnia, narcolepsy, and obstructive sleep apnea) and in abnormal motor behavior during sleep (i.e., periodic limb movement disorder and REM sleep behavior disorder). Metabolic/functional investigations (positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging) are mainly reviewed, as well as neuroanatomical assessments (voxel-based morphometry, magnetic resonance spectroscopy). Meanwhile, here are some brief introduction of different kinds of sleep disorders. (authors)

  11. Common Sleep Problems (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Narcolepsy Sleepwalking What Should I Do? en español Problemas comunes del sueño Garrett had a hard time ... them include certain medicines, and consuming drugs or alcohol. Sleep deprivation (getting too little sleep) also can ...

  12. Sleep in High Stress Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn-Evans, Erin

    2014-01-01

    High stress occupations are associated with sleep restriction, circadian misalignment and demanding workload. This presentation will provide an overview of sleep duration, circadian misalignment and fatigue countermeasures and performance outcomes during spaceflight and commercial aviation.

  13. Sleeping dendrites: fiber-optic measurements of dendritic calcium activity in freely moving and sleeping animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Seibt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendrites are the post-synaptic sites of most excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the brain, making them the main location of cortical information processing and synaptic plasticity. Although current hypotheses suggest a central role for sleep in proper cognitive function and brain plasticity, virtually nothing is known about changes in dendritic activity across the sleep-wake cycle and how waking experience modifies this activity. To start addressing these questions, we developed a method that allows long-term recordings of EEGs/EMG combined with in vivo cortical calcium (Ca2+ activity in freely moving and sleeping rats. We measured Ca2+ activity from populations of dendrites of layer (L 5 pyramidal neurons (n = 13 rats that we compared with Ca2+ activity from populations of neurons in L2/3 (n = 11 rats. L5 and L2/3 neurons were labelled using bolus injection of OGB1-AM or GCaMP6 (1. Ca2+ signals were detected using a fiber-optic system (cannula diameter = 400µm, transmitting the changes in fluorescence to a photodiode. Ca2+ fluctuations could then be correlated with ongoing changes in brain oscillatory activity during 5 major brain states: active wake [AW], quiet wake [QW], NREM, REM and NREM-REM transition (or intermediate state, [IS]. Our Ca2+ recordings show large transients in L5 dendrites and L2/3 neurons that oscillate predominantly at frequencies In summary, we show that this technique is successful in monitoring fluctuations in ongoing dendritic Ca2+ activity during natural brain states and allows, in principle, to combine behavioral measurement with imaging from various brain regions (e.g. deep structures in freely behaving animals. Using this method, we show that Ca2+ transients from populations of L2/3 neurons and L5 dendrites are deferentially regulated across the sleep/wake cycle, with dendritic activity being the highest during the IS sleep. Our correlation analysis suggests that specific sleep EEG activity during NREM and IS

  14. Sleep Deprivation and False Memories

    OpenAIRE

    Frenda, SJ; Patihis, L; Loftus, EF; Lewis, HC; Fenn, KM

    2014-01-01

    © The Author(s) 2014. Many studies have investigated factors that affect susceptibility to false memories. However, few have investigated the role of sleep deprivation in the formation of false memories, despite overwhelming evidence that sleep deprivation impairs cognitive function. We examined the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and false memories and the effect of 24 hr of total sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories. We found that under certain conditions,...

  15. Sleep, noise and health: Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mia Zaharna; Christian Guilleminault

    2010-01-01

    Sleep is a physiologic recuperative state that may be negatively affected by factors such as psychosocial and work stress as well as external stimuli like noise. Chronic sleep loss is a common problem in today′s society, and it may have significant health repercussions such as cognitive impairment, and depressed mood, and negative effects on cardiovascular, endocrine, and immune function. This article reviews the definition of disturbed sleep versus sleep deprivation as well as the effects of...

  16. Sleep stages, memory and learning.

    OpenAIRE

    Dotto, L

    1996-01-01

    Learning and memory can be impaired by sleep loss during specific vulnerable "windows" for several days after new tasks have been learned. Different types of tasks are differentially vulnerable to the loss of different stages of sleep. Memory required to perform cognitive procedural tasks is affected by the loss of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep on the first night after learning occurs and again on the third night after learning. REM-sleep deprivation on the second night after learning does n...

  17. Starting a sleep center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Valentine, Paul S

    2010-05-01

    The demand for sleep medicine services has grown tremendously during the last decade and will likely continue. To date, growth in demand has been met by growth in the number of new sleep centers. The need for more new centers will be dependent on market drivers that include increasing regulatory requirements, personnel shortages, integration of home sleep testing, changes in reimbursement, a shift in emphasis from diagnostics to treatment, and an increased consumer focus on sleep. The decision to open a new center should be based on understanding the market dynamics, completing a market analysis, and developing a business plan. The business plan should include an overview of the facility, a personnel and organizational structure, an evaluation of the business environment, a financial plan, a description of services provided, and a strategy for obtaining, managing, and extending a referral base. Implementation of the business plan and successful operation require ongoing planning and monitoring of operational parameters. The need for new sleep centers will likely continue, but the shifting market dynamics indicate a greater need for understanding the marketplace and careful planning. PMID:20442123

  18. [Sleep related eating disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuichi; Komada, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Nighttime eating is categorized as either sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) or night eating syndrome (NES). Critical reviews of the literature on both disorders have suggested that they are situated at opposite poles of a disordered eating spectrum. The feeding behavior in SRED is characterized by recurrent episodes of eating after an arousal from nighttime sleep with amnesia. Conversely, NES could be considered as an abnormality in the circadian rhythm of meal timing with a normal circadian timing of sleep onset. Both conditions clearly concentrate to occur during young adulthood, and are often relentless and chronic. Misunderstanding and low awareness of SRED and NES have limited our ability to determine the exact prevalence of the two disorders. SRED is frequently associated with other sleep disorders, in particular parasomnias such as sleep walking. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is ineffective, but pharmacotherapy is very effective in controlling SRED. Especially, studies have shown that the anti-seizure medication topiramate may be an effective treatment for SRED. PMID:21077298

  19. Sleep in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, M C J; Jennum, P J; Lund, N T;

    2015-01-01

    with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep have been suggested. Sleep in a large, well-characterized population of CH patients was investigated. METHODS: Polysomnography (PSG) was performed on two nights in 40 CH patients during active bout and one night in 25 age, sex and body mass index matched controls...... in hospital. Macrostructure and other features of sleep were analyzed and related to phenotype. Clinical headache characterization was obtained by semi-structured interview. RESULTS: Ninety-nine nights of PSG were analyzed. Findings included a reduced percentage of REM sleep (17.3% vs. 23.0%, P = 0.......0037), longer REM latency (2.0 vs. 1.2 h, P = 0.0012) and fewer arousals (7.34 vs. 14.1, P = 0.003) in CH patients. There was no difference in prevalence of sleep apnea between patients (38%) and matched controls (32%, P = 0.64) although the apnea index in patients was numerically higher (mean apnea...

  20. MRI findings and sleep apnea in children with Chiari I malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatwa, Umakanth; Ramgopal, Sriram; Mylavarapu, Alexander; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Smith, Edward; Proctor, Mark; Scott, Michael; Pai, Vidya; Zarowski, Marcin; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2013-04-01

    Chiari I malformation is characterized by downward herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. Scant data are available on the clinical course, relationship to the extent of herniation on magnetic resonance imaging in Chiari I malformation and the presence of sleep-disordered breathing on polysomnography. Retrospective analysis was performed looking at polysomnographic findings of children diagnosed with Chiari I malformation. Details on how Chiari I malformation was diagnosed, brainstem magnetic resonance imaging findings, and indications for obtaining the polysomnogram in these patients were reviewed. We also reviewed available data on children who had decompression surgery followed by postoperative polysomnography findings. Twenty-two children were identified in our study (11 males, median age 10 years, range 1 to 18). Three had central sleep apnea, five had obstructive sleep apnea, and one had both obstructive and central sleep apnea. Children with sleep-disordered breathing had excessive crowding of the brainstem structures at the foramen magnum and were more likely to have a greater length of herniation compared with those children without sleep-disordered breathing (P = 0.046). Patients with central sleep apneas received surgical decompression, and their conditions were significantly improved on follow-up polysomnography. These data suggest that imaging parameters may correlate with the presence of sleep-disordered breathing in children with Chiari I malformation.