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  1. Petrology of tectonically segmented Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Distribution and mineralogy of various rock types along the 4200-km-long slow-spreading Central Indian Ridge, between Owen fracture zone in the north and Indian Ocean triple junction in the south, is studied in the light of ridge segmentation...

  2. Gravity anomalies over the Central Indian Ridge between 3 S and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-resolution shipboard geophysical investigations along the Indian Ocean ridge system are sparse especially over the Carlsberg and Central Indian ridges. In the present study, the shipboard gravity and multibeam bathymetry data acquired over a 750 km long section of the Central Indian Ridge between 3°S and 11°S ...

  3. Geochemical variability of MORBs along slow to intermediate spreading Carlsberg-Central Indian Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, D.; Misra, S.; Banerjee, R.

    of the Carlsberg Ridge MORBs are similar to the Rodriguez Triple Junction MORBs [e.g., LIL and REE spidergrams and (La/Sm)N ratio etc.]; both closely resemble the average N-MORB. However, the MORBs from the northern- and southern Central Indian Ridge, significantly...

  4. Gravity anomalies over the central Indian ridge between 3 degree S and 11 degree S, Indian Ocean: Segmentation and crustal structure

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Samudrala, K.; KameshRaju, K.A; RamaRao, P.

    High-resolution shipboard geophysical investigations along the Indian Ocean ridge system are sparse especially over the Carlsberg and Central Indian ridges. In the present study, the shipboard gravity and multibeam bathymetry data acquired over a...

  5. Mineral chemistry and alteration characteristics of spinel in serpentinised peridotites from the northern central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Ray, Dwijesh; Ishii, T.

    Serpentinites (frequently cross cut by gabbroic dikelet), collected from Northern Central Indian Ridge (NCIR), Indian Ocean, contain both Cr-rich (Group I) and Cr-poor (Group II) variety of spinel. Based on mineralogy they can be classified as non...

  6. Gondwana subduction-modified mantle domain prevents magmatic seafloor generation in the Central Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, T.; Nakamura, K.; Senda, R.; Suzuki, K.; Kumagai, H.; Sato, H.; Sato, T.; Shibuya, T.; Minoguchi, K.; Okino, K.

    2013-12-01

    The creation of oceanic crust at mid-ocean ridges is essential to understanding the genesis of oceanic plate and the evolution of the Earth. Detailed bathymetric measurements coupled with dense sample recovery at mid-ocean ridge revealed a wide range of variations in the ridge and seafloor morphologies, which cannot be simply explained by a spreading rate, but also by ridge geometry, mantle compositions and thermal structure (Dick et al., 2003 Nature; Cannat et al. 2006 Geology). It is now widely accepted that very limited magmatic activity with tectonic stretching generates oceanic core complex and/or smooth seafloor surface in the slow to ultraslow-spreading ridges, where serpentinized peridotite and gabbros are expected to be exposed associated with detachment faults (Cann et al., 1997 Nature; Cannat et al., 2006), although magmatism might be an essential role for the formation of oceanic core complexes (Buck et al., 2005 Nature; Tucholke et al 2008 JGR). A rising question is why magmatic activity is sometimes prevented during the oceanic plate formation. Ancient melting domain, that are too refractory to melt even in adiabatically upwelling to the shallow upper mantle, might cause the amagmatic spreading ridges (Harvey et al., 2006 EPSL, Liu et al.,2008 Nature). Its origin and effect on seafloor generations are, however, not well understood yet. We report an oceanic hill as an example of an ancient subduction-modified mantle domain, probably formed at continental margin of the Gondwanaland~Pangea supercontinent, existing beneath the Central Indian Ridge. This domain is the most likely to have prevented magmatic seafloor generation, resulting in creation of very deep oceanic valley and serpentine diaper (now the studied oceanic hill) at the present Central Indian ridge.

  7. The Northern Central Indian Ridge: Geology and tectonics of fracture zones-dominated spreading ridge segments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Drolia, R.K.; Iyer, S.D.; Chakraborty, B.; Kodagali, V.N.; Ray, Dwijesh; Misra, S.; Andrade, R.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Rajasekhar, R.P.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    and temporal rates as other enviro n- mental variables, as these are key factors to dec i pher the dynamics of marine ecosystems. Such a study also helps to under stand the role of biology in modifying climate via air ? sea flux of carbon dioxide. Nine chain... xides. ? A deep central plumbing system, fed by distinctive mantle sources, may have supplied magma as uprising diapirs to several small discontinuous buoyant cha m- bers situated at shallow depths along the ridge crest or else the melt surfaced...

  8. Preliminary results from the first InRidge cruise to the central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Murthy, K.S.R.; Iyer, S.D.; Rao, M.M.M.; Banerjee, R.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Ghose, I.; Ganesan, P.; Rao, A.K.; Suribabu, A.; Ganesh, C.; Naik, G.P.

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  9. Hydrothermal alteration studies of gabbros from Northern Central Indian Ridge and their geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Mevel, Catherine; Banerjee, Ranadip

    2009-12-01

    Mylonitic gabbro and altered gabbro were recovered from off-axis high and corner high locations at ridge-transform intersection, adjacent to Vityaz transform fault of the slow spreading (32-35 mm/yr, full spreading) Northern Central Indian Ridge. Both the varieties show signatures of extensive alteration caused due to interaction with sea water. Mylonitic gabbro represents high temperature metamorphism (˜700-800°C) and comprised of hornblende mineral which exhibits well defined foliation/gneissic appearance along with dynamically recrystallised plagioclase grains frequently intercalated with magnetite-ilmenite. Altered gabbro from corner high generally includes low temperature greenschist grade (˜300°C) mineralogical assemblages: chlorite, albite, quartz and locally magnesio hornblende. Crystal plastic deformation resulted in mylonite formation and often porphyroclasts of plagioclase and clinopyroxene grains, while altered gabbro locally exhibits cataclastic texture. Presence of Vityaz transform fault and adjacent megamullion at the weakly magmatic ridge-transform intersection and off-axis high locations prompted the present scenario very much conducive for hydrothermal circulation and further facilitate the exhumation of present suite of gabbro.

  10. Hydrothermal processes in the Edmond deposits, slow- to intermediate-spreading Central Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hong; Sun, Zhilei; Zhai, Shikui; Cao, Zhimin; Jiang, Xuejun; Huang, Wei; Wang, Libo; Zhang, Xilin; He, Yongjun

    2018-04-01

    The Edmond hydrothermal field, located on the Central Indian Ridge (CIR), has a distinct mineralization history owing to its unique magmatic, tectonic, and alteration processes. Here, we report the detailed mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of hydrothermal metal sulfides recovered from this area. Based on the mineralogical investigations, the Edmond hydrothermal deposits comprise of high-temperature Fe-rich massive sulfides, medium-temperature Zn-rich sulfide chimney and low-temperature Ca-rich sulfate mineral assemblages. According to these compositions, three distinctive mineralization stages have been identified: (1) low-temperature consisting largely of anhydrite and pyrite/marcasite; (2) medium-high temperature distinguished by the mineral assemblage of pyrite, sphalerite and chalcopyrite; and (3) low-temperature stage characterized by the mineral assemblage of colloidal pyrite/marcasite, barite, quartz, anglesite. Several lines of evidence suggest that the sulfides were influenced by pervasive low-temperature diffuse flows in this area. The hydrothermal deposits are relatively enriched in Fe (5.99-18.93 wt%), Zn (2.10-10.00 wt%) and Ca (0.02-19.15 wt%), but display low Cu (0.28-0.81 wt%). The mineralogical varieties and low metal content of sulfides in the Edmond hydrothermal field both indicate that extensive water circulation is prevalent below the Edmond hydrothermal field. With regard to trace elements, the contents of Pb, Ba, Sr, As, Au, Ag, and Cd are significantly higher than those in other sediment-starved mid-ocean ridges, which is indicative of contribution from felsic rock sources. Furthermore, the multiphase hydrothermal activity and the pervasive water circulation underneath are speculated to play important roles in element remobilization and enrichment. Our findings deepen our understanding about the complex mineralization process in slow- to intermediate-spreading ridges globally.

  11. A new species of Mirocaris (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea: Alvinocarididae associated with hydrothermal vents on the Central Indian Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Komai

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Mirocaris indica, a new species of the caridean family Alvinocarididae, is described based on 17 specimens from hydrothermal vent fields on the Central Indian Ridge near the Rodriguez Triple Junction. The new species closely resembles the only known representative of Mirocaris, the Atlantic species M. fortunata (Martin and Christiansen. Shared major characters include the dorsoventrally flattened, unarmed rostrum, the presence of epipods on the third maxilliped through to the fourth pereopod with corresponding setobranchs on the first to fifth pereopods, and the lack of appendices internae on the third and fourth pleopods. However, the lack of submarginal rows of short to long stiff setae on the external surfaces of the fingers of the first chela distinguishes M. indica from M. fortunata, and may reflect a difference in feeding habit between the two species. Further, M. indica may attain a larger adult size than M. fortunata does.

  12. 3D Modeling and Inversion of Deep Tow Magnetic Data from Hydrothermal Fields at the Central and Southeast Indian Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreckenberger, B.; Dressel, I.; Heyde, I.; Barckhausen, U.; Freitag, R.; Schumann, K.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal accretion at mid-oceanic ridges and their related hydrothermal systems are in the focus of our investigations that concentrate on detailed near-bottom bathymetric and magnetic ROV measurements. Two deployments of the French ROV Victor, one on the eastern flank of the Central Indian Ridge valley and the other one exactly on the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) axis provided two high quality magnetic data sets. Strong magnetic anomalies measured 50m above the seafloor over zero to 60.000 years old SEIR crust are to a large part related to seafloor topography in this 1.8x3 km wide area. Forward and inverse 3D models are compatible with the magnetic data when systematic variations of the magnetization intensity from 5 to 15 A/m or more for the young crust within the central rift valley are used. Remaining deviations from our basic oceanic magnetization model then indicate areas with depleted magnetization probably related to hydrothermal activity, in one of these areas also manifested by a known active hydrothermal field. The second deep-tow survey over the flank of the Central Indian Ridge represents a tectonically more complicated situation with a more varied basement topography. Magnetic anomalies are dominated by only a few of several ridge-like structures present in the 2x2.5 km wide area. Known active and inactive hydrothermal fields do not have obvious magnetic expressions in the total intensity magnetic field data. Again, wider (but < 1km) areas seem to be depleted in their magnetic mineral content.

  13. Geophysical investigations over a segment of the Central Indian Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    KameshRaju, K.A.; Ramprasad, T.; Subrahmanyam, C.

    depth in the region surveyed varied from 2500 to 3500 m, and accordingly we selected a line spacing of 3 miles to achieve near 100% insoni cation of the sea oor. An area of about 5537 km2 was surveyed along 9 pro les across the ridge segment between... during the present study, are summarized in Fig. 8. Magnetics The magnetic anomaly pro les along with the sea- oor spreading model are presented in Fig. 3. The synthetic magnetic anomalies are generated by applying the Be- rggren et al. (1985) time scale...

  14. Magnetic and bathymetric investigations over the Vema Region of the Central Indian Ridge: Tectonic implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Drolia, R.K.; Ghose, I.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Rao, M.M.M.; Kessarkar, P.M.; Murthy, K.S.R.

    . Geophys. J. Int. 119, 893–930. Dziewonski, A.M., Ekstrom, G., Woodhouse, J.H., Zwart, G., 1990. Centroid-moment tensor solutions for October–December 1989. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 62, 194–207. Engel, C.G., Fisher, R.L., 1975. Granitic to ultramafic rock... Service, Ottawa. Gutenberg, B., Richter, C.F., 1954. Earthquakes and Associated Phenomena, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ. Huang, P.Y., Solomon, S.C., 1987. Centroid depths and mechanism of Mid-Ocean Ridge earthquakes in the Indian Ocean, Gulf...

  15. Deep-sea exploration of the Central Indian Ridge at 19 degrees S

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dyment, J.; Hemond, C.; Asada, M.; Bassoullet, C.; Benoit, M.; Briais, A.; Chaubey, A.K.; Horen, H.; Huot, F.; Kitazawa, M.; Le Gall, B.; Leven, J.H.; Maia, M.; Oldra, J.-P.; Ravilly, M.; Sondroon, V.

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  16. Gravity anomalies over the Central Indian Ridge between 3 S and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S have been analysed to understand the crustal structure and the ridge segmentation pattern. The mantle Bouguer anomalies (MBA) and the residual mantle Bouguer anomalies (RMBA) computed in the study area have shown significant variations along the ridge segments that are separated by transform.

  17. Mantle heterogeneity in the source region of mid-ocean ridge basalts along the northern Central Indian Ridge (8°S-17°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jonguk; Pak, Sang-Joon; Moon, Jai-Woon; Lee, Sang-Mook; Oh, Jihye; Stuart, Finlay M.

    2017-04-01

    The northern Central Indian Ridge (CIR) between 8°S and 17°S is composed of seven segments whose spreading rates increase southward from ˜35 to ˜40 mm/yr. During expeditions of R/V Onnuri to study hydrothermal activity on the northern CIR in 2009-2011, high-resolution multibeam mapping was conducted and ridge axis basalts were dredged. The major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb-He isotopic compositions of basaltic glasses dredged from the spreading axis require three mantle sources: depleted mantle and two distinct enriched mantle sources. The southern segments have Sr, Nd, and Pb that are a mix of depleted mantle and an enriched component as recorded in southern CIR MORB. This enrichment is indistinguishable from Rèunion plume mantle, except for He isotopes. This suggests that the southern segments have incorporated a contribution of the fossil Rèunion plume mantle, as the CIR migrated over hot-spot-modified mantle. The low 3He/4He (7.5-9.2 RA) of this enriched component may result from radiogenic 4He ingrowth in the fossil Rèunion mantle component. Basalts from the northern segments have high 206Pb/204Pb (18.53-19.15) and low 87Sr/86Sr (0.70286-0.70296) that are distinct from the Rèunion plume but consistent with derivation from mantle with FOZO signature, albeit with 3He/4He (9.2-11.8 RA) that are higher than typical. The FOZO-like enriched mantle cannot be attributed to the track of a nearby mantle plume. Instead, this enrichment may have resulted from recycling oceanic crust, possibly accompanied by small plume activity.

  18. Hydrothermal alteration studies of gabbros from northern central Indian ridge and their geodynamic implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Mevel, C.; Banerjee, R.

    . Presence of Vityaz transform fault and adjacent megamullion at the weakly magmatic ridge-transform intersection and off-axis high locations prompted the present scenario very much conducive for hydrothermal circulation and further facilitate the exhumation...

  19. Segmentation and morphology of the Central Indian Ridge between 3°S and 11°S, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    KameshRaju, K.A.; Samudrala, K.; Drolia, R.K.; Amarnath, D.; Ramachandran, R.; Mudholkar, A.V.

    that are separated by well defined transform faults and non-transform discontinuities. Magnetic model studies qualify the ridge as a slow spreading ridge with average full spreading rates varying from 26 to 38 mm/yr. The disposition of the magnetic anomalies suggests...

  20. Structure and isostatic compensation of the Comorin Ridge, north central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sreejith, K.M.; Krishna, K.S.; Bansal, A.R.

    analysis an Airy model or local compensation with an elastic plate thickness (T sub(e)) of about 3 km and crust thickness (t) of 15-20 km are suggested for the southern part of the Comorin Ridge (south of 5 degrees N), whereas for the northern part a...

  1. Origin of magnetic highs at ultramafic hosted hydrothermal systems: Insights from the Yokoniwa site of Central Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Masakazu; Okino, Kyoko; Sato, Taichi; Sato, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution vector magnetic measurements were performed on an inactive ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal vent field, called Yokoniwa Hydrothermal Field (YHF), using a deep-sea manned submersible Shinkai6500 and an autonomous underwater vehicle r2D4. The YHF has developed at a non-transform offset massif of the Central Indian Ridge. Dead chimneys were widely observed around the YHF along with a very weak venting of low-temperature fluids so that hydrothermal activity of the YHF was almost finished. The distribution of crustal magnetization from the magnetic anomaly revealed that the YHF is associated with enhanced magnetization, as seen at the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow and Ashadze-1 hydrothermal sites of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The results of rock magnetic analysis on seafloor rock samples (including basalt, dolerite, gabbro, serpentinized peridotite, and hydrothermal sulfide) showed that only highly serpentinized peridotite carries high magnetic susceptibility and that the natural remanent magnetization intensity can explain the high magnetization of Yokoniwa. These observations reflect abundant and strongly magnetized magnetite grains within the highly serpentinized peridotite. Comparisons with the Rainbow and Ashadze-1 suggest that in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, strongly magnetized magnetite and pyrrhotite form during the progression of hydrothermal alteration of peridotite. After the completion of serpentinization and production of hydrogen, pyrrhotites convert into pyrite or nonmagnetic iron sulfides, which considerably reduces their levels of magnetization. Our results revealed origins of the magnetic high and the development of subsurface chemical processes in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems. Furthermore, the results highlight the use of near-seafloor magnetic field measurements as a powerful tool for detecting and characterizing seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  2. Spiess Ridge: An axial high on the slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Neil C.; Livermore, Roy A.

    1998-07-01

    We report recent mapping of Spiess Ridge with the Hawaii-MR1 sidescan sonar. Spiess Ridge is an unusual elongate 90 by 50 km volcanic feature on the slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge near the Bouvet hotspot. The northwest half of the ridge has a narrow ˜7-km neovolcanic zone in MR1 sonar images and a simple magnetic anomaly sequence including possible anomalies C1n and C2n. In contrast, the southeast half shows extrusive volcanism over >40 km with distributed eruption sites, a broadened central magnetic anomaly with no anomaly C2n, and a volcanic ridge radiating from the summit of Spiess Ridge, oblique to the spreading orthogonal trend. The images show no evidence for large-offset normal faults or an axial rift valley typical of slow spreading ridges. Overall, Spiess Ridge has an appearance very unlike that of either fast or slow spreading ridges and more transitional between a spreading ridge and a seamount. We compare the morphology of Spiess Ridge to other large volcanic structures in oceanic rifts. Spiess Ridge and Bouvet Island represent localized zones of excess melting along the Southwest Indian Ridge and we discuss their origin in the light of current ideas on ridge-hotspot interaction.

  3. Early Paleogene variations in the calcite compensation depth: new constraints using old borehole sediments from across Ninetyeast Ridge, central Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotnick, B. S.; Lauretano, V.; Backman, J.; Dickens, G. R.; Sluijs, A.; Lourens, L.

    2015-03-01

    Major variations in global carbon cycling occurred between 62 and 48 Ma, and these very likely related to changes in the total carbon inventory of the ocean-atmosphere system. Based on carbon cycle theory, variations in the mass of the ocean carbon should be reflected in contemporaneous global ocean carbonate accumulation on the seafloor and, thereby, the depth of the calcite compensation depth (CCD). To better constrain the cause and magnitude of these changes, the community needs early Paleogene carbon isotope and carbonate accumulation records from widely separated deep-sea sediment sections, especially including the Indian Ocean. Several CCD reconstructions for this time interval have been generated using scientific drill sites in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans; however, corresponding information from the Indian Ocean has been extremely limited. To assess the depth of the CCD and the potential for renewed scientific drilling of Paleogene sequences in the Indian Ocean, we examine lithologic, nannofossil, carbon isotope, and carbonate content records for late Paleocene - early Eocene sediments recovered at three sites spanning Ninetyeast Ridge: Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Sites 213 (deep, east), 214 (shallow, central), and 215 (deep, west). The disturbed, discontinuous sediment sections are not ideal, because they were recovered in single holes using rotary coring methods, but remain the best Paleogene sediments available from the central Indian Ocean. The δ13C records at Sites 213 and 215 are similar to those generated at several locations in the Atlantic and Pacific, including the prominent high in δ13C across the Paleocene carbon isotope maximum (PCIM) at Site 215, and the prominent low in δ13C across the early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) at both Site 213 and Site 215. The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and the K/X event are found at Site 213 but not at Site 215, presumably because of coring gaps. Carbonate content at both Sites 213 and

  4. Basinal seamounts and seamount chains of the Central Indian Ocean: Probable near-axis origin from a fast-spreading ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Batiza, R.

    Hydrosweep mapping of crust in the Central Indian Ocean Basin reveals abundant volcanoes occurring both as isolated seamounts and linear seamount chains parallel to flow lines. Their shapes, sizes and overall style of occurrence...

  5. Geo-Morphological Analyses of the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorschel, B.; Schlindwein, V. S. N.; Eagles, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean and the Southwest Indian Ridge in the Southwest Indian Ocean between Africa and Antarctica are ultraslow-spreading (<20 mm yr-1) mid ocean ridges. This type of mid ocean ridge has distinct geo-morphologies that are influenced by the slow rate of plate divergence and by mantle potential temperature, which control the processes (peridotite diapirism and intersticial melt migration) by which material rises to fill the space vacated by plate divergence. These ridges are characterised by non-orthogonal spreading. Transform faults, typical of faster spreading mid ocean ridges, are far less common at ultraslow spreading mid ocean ridges. Thus in return, detailed geo-statistical analyses of the geo-morphology of ultraslow-spreading mid ocean ridges can provide valuable information towards a better understanding of these slowest of spreading ridges. We have generated high resolution bathymetric grids for the Gakkel and Southwest Indian ridges based on high resolution multibeam echosounder data from various expeditions with RV Polarstern. On the basis of these grids, geo-statistical analyses allow for an assessment of the geo-morphological elements of the ridges on various scales. The results of these analyses show that, approximately 200 km long medium-scale sections of the ridges can be characterised by the lengths and orientations of the short-scale (hundreds of meters to tens of kilometres) ridges and troughs. The geomorphologies of short-scale ridges and troughs situated at the junctions between medium scale sections often exhibit a mixture of the geomorphological elements seen in the neighbouring sections. These geo-morphological patterns provide insights into the overall spreading-geometry along the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge.

  6. Petrology of seamounts in the Central Indian Ocean Basin: Evidence for near-axis origin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Batiza, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Previous studies on the distribution and morphology of ancient seamount chains (>50 Ma) in the Central Indian Ocean basin (CIOB) indicated their generation from the fast spreading Southeast Indian Ridge. The petrology of some of these seamounts...

  7. Geophysical studies of aseismic ridges in northern Indian Ocean-crustal structure and isostatic models

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sreejith, K.M.

    The present work consists of a detailed geophysical study of the structure and isostatic compensation mechanisms of three major aseismic ridges; The Comorin Ridge, The 85°E Ridge and Ninety east Ridge of the northeastern Indian Ocean. Various...

  8. Studying the Indian Ocean Ridge System: Agenda for the new century

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Iyer, S.D.; Banerjee, R.; Drolia, R.K.

    the intermediate spreading Central Indian Ridge, and the third one at the Andaman back-arc basin. The National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India and the Geological Survey of India, Calcutta, are the organisations spearheading the work on IORS. The studies made...

  9. Ferromanganese oxides from Mid-Indian ridge, seamounts and abyssal plains from the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.; Pattan, J.N.

    .47%) in the seamount crusts. The ferromanganese oxides from the Mid-Indian Ridge, seamount crusts and abyssal nodules appear to be of hydrothermal, hydrogenous and early-diagenetic in origin respectively...

  10. InRidge program: Preliminary results from the first cruise

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Murthy, K.S.R.; Iyer, S.D.; Rao, M.M.M.; Banerjee, R.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Ghose, I.

    The first cruise under India's own Ridge research initiative, InRidge collected new data on bathymetry, free-air gravity and magnetic anomalies across the ridge axis between the Vema and Zhivago transform faults in the Central Indian Ridge...

  11. Diapycnal Diffusivities over the Southwestern Indian Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.

    2016-02-01

    The southwestern Indian Ocean (SWIO) Ridge stems from the South Atlantic and extends northeastward to Rodrigues Island. The deep trenches and fracture zones between the Crozet Basin and the Madagascar Basin provide the major passages for the deep and the bottom water to enter the Indian Ocean, which is also part of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) in the Indian Ocean. More than 70 CTD profiles have been conducted over the SWIO Ridge from 2010 up to now. Besides, a mooring was deployed about 2900 m below the sea surface for almost one year. Three Seaguard current meters, nine Sea-Bird Electronics Temperature-pressure sensor, and one Sea-Bird Electronics Temperature-Conductivity-Pressure Sensor were mounted on the mooring. The diapycnal diffusivity over the SWIO Ridge is estimated with two methods, i.e., the Internal Wave Spectrum Method (GHP) which relies on the energy cascade due to wave interactions, and the Thorpe scale method. Large diffusivities on the order of 10-2 m2 s-1 are found over the rough ridges. Moreover, the temporal and spatial distributions of diapycnal diffusivities are presented and their physical relations with the fine structure of the bottom topography are analyzed in this study.

  12. Bathymetric influence on dissolved methane in hydrothermal plumes revealed by concentration and stable carbon isotope measurements at newly discovered venting sites on the Central Indian Ridge (11-13°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ok-Rye; Son, Seung Kyu; Baker, Edward T.; Son, Juwon; Kim, Mi Jin; Barcelona, Michael J.; Kim, Moonkoo

    2014-09-01

    Methane is a useful tracer for studying hydrothermal discharge, especially where the source fluids are of low temperature and lack metal precipitates. However, the dual origins of deep-sea methane, both chemical and biological, complicate the interpretation of methane observations. Here, we use both the concentration and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of dissolved methane to trace hydrothermal plumes and identify the source and behavior of methane at two sites of newly discovered hydrothermal activity on the Central Indian Ridge (11-13°S). At both sites, methane and optical anomalies between 2500 and 3500 m at all stations indicate active hydrothermal discharge. We compared methane concentrations and δ13C at three stations, two (CTIR110136 and CTIR110208) with the most prominent anomalies at each site, and a third (CTIR110140) with near-background methane values. At stations CTIR110136 and CTIR110208, the concentration and δ13C of methane in distinct plumes ranged from 3.3 to 42.3 nmol kg-1 and -30.0 to -15.4‰, respectively, compared to deep-water values of 0.5 to 1.2 nmol kg-1 and -35.1 to -28.9‰ at the station with a near-background distal plume (CTIR110140). δ13C was highest in the center of the plumes at CTIR110136 (-15.4‰) and CTIR110208 (-17.8‰). From the plume values we estimate that the δ13C of methane in the hydrothermal fluids at these stations was approximately -19‰ and thus the methane was most likely derived from magmatic outgassing or the chemical synthesis of inorganic matter. We used the relationship between δ13C and methane concentration to examine the behavior of methane at the plume stations. In the CTIR110208 plume, simple physical mixing was likely the major process controlling the methane profile. In the CTIR110136 plume we interpret a more complicated relationship as resulting from microbial oxidation as well as physical mixing. We argue that this difference in methane behavior between the two areas stems from a

  13. Decay of eddies at the South-West Indian Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Coward

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The South-West Indian Ridge in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean is a region recognised for the creation of particularly intense eddy disturbances in the mean flow of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Eddies formed at this ridge have been extensively studied over the past decade using hydrographic, satellite, drifter and float data and it is hypothesised that they could provide a vehicle for localised meridional heat and salt exchange. The effectiveness of this process is dependent on the rate of decay of the eddies. However, in order to investigate eddy decay, logistically difficult hydrographic monitoring is required. This study presents the decay of cold eddies at the South-West Indian Ridge, using outputs from a high-resolution ocean model. The model’s representation of the dynamic nature of this region is fully characteristic of observations. On average, 3–4 intense and well-defined cold eddies are generated per year; these eddies have mean longevities of 5.0±2.2 months with average advection speeds of 5±2 km/day. Most simulated eddies reach their peak intensity within 1.5–2.5 months after genesis and have depths of 2000 m – 3000 m. Thereafter they dissipate within approximately 3 months. The decay of eddies is generally characterised by a decrease in their sea surface height signature, a weakening in their rotation rates and a modification in their temperature–salinity characteristics. Subantarctic top predators are suspected to forage preferentially along the edges of eddies. The process of eddy dissipation may thus influence their feeding behaviour.

  14. Hydrothermal plume anomalies over the southwest Indian ridge: magmatic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, X.; Li, H.; Tao, C.; Ren, J.; Zhou, J.; Chen, J.; Chen, S.; Wang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Here we firstly reported the extensive survey results of the hydrothermal activity along the ultra-slow spreading southwest Indian ridge (SWIR). The study area is located at segment 27, between the Indomed and Gallieni transform faults, SWIR. The seismic crustal thickness reaches 9.5km in this segment (Li et al., 2015), which is much thicker than normal crustal. The anomaly thickened crust could be affected by the Crozet hotspot or highly focused melt delivery from the mantle. The Duanqiao hydrothermal field was reported at the ridge valley of the segment by Tao et al (2009). The Deep-towed Hydrothermal Detection System (DHDS) was used to collect information related with hydrothermal activity, like temperature, turbidity, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and seabed types. There are 15 survey lines at the interval of 2 to 3 km which are occupied about 1300 km2 in segment 27. After processing the raw data, including wiping out random noise points, 5-points moving average processing and subtracting the ambient, we got anomalous Nephelometric Turbidity Units values (ΔNTU). And dE/dt was used to identify the ORP anomalous as the raw data is easily influenced by electrode potentials drifting (Baker et al., 2016). According to the results of water column turbidity and ORP distributions, we confirmed three hydrothermal anomaly fields named A1, A2 and A3. The three fields are all located in the western part of the segment. The A1 field lies on the ridge valley, west side of Duanqiao field. The A2 and A3 field lie on the northern and southern of the ridge valley, respectively. We propose that recent magmatic activity probably focus on the western part of segment 27.And the extensive distribution of hydrothermal plume in the segment is the result of the discrete magma intrusion. References Baker E T, et al. How many vent fields? New estimates of vent field populations on ocean ridges from precise mapping of hydrothermal discharge locations. EPSL, 2016, 449:186-196. Li J

  15. Emplacement and Subsidence of Indian Ocean Plateaus and Submarine Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Millard F.

    Ocean Drilling Program, Deep Sea Drilling Project, and industrial borehole results from Indian Ocean plateaus and submarine ridges help to constrain their subsidence histories. I use a simple Airy isostatic model to calculate basement depths at ODP sites in the absence of sediment, and then backtrack these sites using previously determined age-depth relationships for oceanic lithosphere to determine the original depth or elevation of the sites. Resulting subsidence curves for each site were then checked by examining sedimentologic and biostratigraphic evidence for when each site subsided below shelf depths. The analysis suggests that thermal subsidence has been the dominant tectonic process affecting Indian Ocean plateaus and submarine ridges following emplacement. I conclude that large portions of these features were emplaced and began subsiding well above sea level, similar to large igneous provinces (LIPs) worldwide today. This resulted in significant subaerial erosion and redeposition of volcanic material mixed with biogenic sediment, and a gradual development of facies from terrestrial through terrigenous to shallow water and pelagic, resulting in a sedimentary record with both continental and oceanic characteristics.

  16. Pumices from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.

    sediments are significant not only volumetrically but also as indicators of tectonic environments. A few studies in the past concerning the volcanogenic components in the Indian Ocean are informative but these do not pertain to the Central Indian Ocean Basin...

  17. A study of sex differences in fingerprint ridge density in a North Indian young adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Ngangom, Chitrabala

    2013-05-01

    Fingerprints have considerable value in morphological, biological, anthropological and forensic studies. Fingerprints collected from the crime scene and from the items of evidence of crime have been successfully used to identify suspects, victims or any other person who had touched the surface in question. The thickness of epidermal ridges varies between individuals; females are supposed to have finer ridges than males and therefore a greater ridge density. The present research is an attempt to distinguish sex from fingerprint ridge density in the radial, ulnar and lower areas of a fingerprint in a North Indian population. A total of 194 individuals (97 males and 97 females) aged between 18 and 25 years were included in the study and fingerprints were collected from each finger of the participants. Thus, a total of 1940 fingerprints were obtained and epidermal ridges were counted in the radial, ulnar, and lower areas of each fingerprint. The radial and ulnar areas are the 5 mm × 5 mm areas on the radial and ulnar side of the central core respectively while the lower area is designated as 5 mm × 5 mm area adjoining the flexion crease of the terminal phalanx on a fingerprint. The fingerprint ridge density in radial, ulnar and lower areas and between sexes was compared statistically using t-test. The results indicate that the females tend to have a significantly higher ridge density than males in the three areas analyzed in the study. The fingerprint ridge density in the ulnar and radial areas of the fingerprints is significantly higher than the lower area. The present study suggests that the fingerprint ridge density can be a relevant and useful morphological parameter in distinguishing sex of a latent fingerprint of unknown origin from the scene of crime. The findings can also be useful in identification of mutilated remains when a dismembered hand is brought for medico-legal examination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal

  18. Ferrobasalts from the Spiess Ridge segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roex, A. P.; Dick, H. J. B.; Reid, A. M.; Erlank, A. J.

    1982-10-01

    Highly vesicular, microporphyritic basaltic rocks have been dredged from the slow-spreading Spiess Ridge segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge. All the samples recovered are hyalocrystalline with plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine as phenocryst and microphenocryst phases. Titanomagnetite occurs as euhedral microphenocrysts in some of the more evolved samples. In terms of bulk rock and quench glass chemistry the lavas are characterised by highly evolved compositions(e.g. FeO*=10.3-14.2%;TiO 2=2.0-3.4%;K 2O=0.50-1.1%;MgO=6.0-3.5%;Zr=160-274ppm;Nb=14-32ppm) and can be classified as ferrobasalts. Isotopic and incompatible element ratios of the lavas(e.g. 87Sr/ 86Sr=0.70325-0.70333;Zr/Nb=8.4-11.3;Y/Nb=2.3-1.4) indicate their strongly "enriched" nature (see also Dickey et al. [6]). Quantitative major and trace element modelling indicates that most of the compositional variations observed can be attributed to low-pressure fractional crystallisation of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and minor olivine and titanomagnetite. The range in composition can be accounted for by up to 65% fractional crystallisation. We suggest that the extreme differentiation of the Spiess Ridge lavas is related not to spreading rate, but to rate of magma supply. The basaltic melts appear to have evolved in a newly established zone of magmatic activity, associated with the most recent northward jump of the Bouvet triple junction, where they were effectively isolated from significant admixture of primitive magmas.

  19. Palaeoceanographic interpretation of a seismic profile from the southern Mozambique Ridge, SW Indian Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Watkeys, M. K.; Kretzinger, W.; Frank, M.; Heuer, L.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic reflection data from the southern Mozambique Ridge, SW Indian Ocean, show indications for a modification in the oceanic circulation system. In the absence of an age-depth model based on a drill site information gathered from the study of radiogenic isotopes of ferromanganese nodules and crusts were used. Major reorganisations in the Indian Ocean circulation system led to the onset of current controlled sedimentation in the vicinity of the Mozambique Ridge at 14 Ma. The modific...

  20. A new species of Munidopsis Whiteaves, 1874 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura) from the Northwest Indian Ocean Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dong; Li, Xinzheng; Zhou, Yadong; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-08-23

    A new species, Munidopsis militaris n. sp., from the Carlsberg Ridge, Northwest Indian Ocean Ridge is described herein. The species belongs to a group of species having a pair of epigastric spines, mesial and lateral eye-spines, abdominal tergites unarmed, five or six spines on the lateral margin of the carapace, and a denticulate carina on the distolateral margin of the P1 fixed finger. It can be distinguished from its relatives by the spinous lateral margin of the palm and dorsal carinae on the P2-4 propodus. The Munidopsis fauna of the Indian Ocean Ridge is seldom reported on; this new species is the sixth member of this genus found inhabiting the Indian Ocean Ridge.

  1. Post-ridge-subduction acceleration of the Indian plate induced by slab rollback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-dong Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The driving forces of plate motion, especially that of its sudden change over time, has long been debated. During the closure of an old ocean, the subduction process of the mid-ocean ridge provides valuable clues to quantitative evaluation of the driving forces of plate tectonics. Here we show that the drifting rates of the Indian plate were correlated with a Late Cretaceous adakitic event hosting abundant adakites and adakitic charnockites in the Gangdese belt, southern Tibetan Plateau. While adakites form through slab melting, the ultra-high temperatures and dry nature of charnockites indicate major disturbance of the hot asthenosphere. Temporally, the oldest adakite corresponds to the initiation of the ridge subduction, whereas the youngest adakitic charnockite marks the onset of post-ridge-subduction slab rollback (steepening. Geodynamic modeling suggests that the initiation of the ridge subduction was facilitated by the Morondova mantle plume, corresponding to the lowest drifting rate of the Indian plate. Our analyses further show that the post-ridge-subduction slab rollback pushed the asthenospheric mantle backward, meanwhile it dramatically reduced the ridge-arc interaction force, leading to the first abrupt acceleration of the Indian plate. Slab rollback contributed ∼3.5 cm/yr but lasted for only ∼5 Ma, while slab pull, ridge push together with plume contributed ∼5 cm/yr to the acceleration of the Indian plate. Our study, therefore, provides evidence for a new type of driving forces of Indian plate acceleration during the Late Cretaceous Neotethys ridge subduction.

  2. Indian exploration for polymetallic nodules in the central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ShyamPrasad, M.

    depths between 4000 – 6000 metres, low rates of sedimentation, source supply of metals. Fig. 1. Various ocean basins in the Indian Ocean which show presence of manganese nodules. Of these, the Central Indian Ocean Basin has proved... demand and supply equations. One important parameter that one needs to consider is that there is no known nodule exploitation system developed on a commercial scale at the moment and also that all large nodule deposits are 57 beyond the EEZ...

  3. A new species of Ophryotrocha (Annelida, Eunicida, Dorvilleidae from hydrothermal vents on the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-sheng Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dorvilleids were collected from hydrothermal vents on the Southwest Indian Ridge by manned submersible Jiaolong. These represent a new species of Ophryotrocha that is here described as Ophryotrocha jiaolongi sp. n. This is the first dorvilleid described from vents on the Southwest Indian Ridge. It most closely resembles another vent species, Ophryotrocha akessoni Blake, 1985 from the Galapagos Rift, but can be distinguished by its antennae, palps, jaw structure. The new species has particularly distinctive mandibles, which allow it to be easily identified.

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-resolution shipboard geophysical investigations along the Indian Ocean ridge system are sparse especially over the Carlsberg and Central Indian ridges. In the present study, the shipboard gravity and multibeam bathymetry data acquired over a 750 km long section of the Central Indian Ridge between 3°S and 11°S ...

  5. Cross-Cultural Study of Cognitive Development on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyat, Gilbert; Silk, Stephen

    1970-01-01

    The research summarized in this paper was conducted on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The purpose of the developmental study was to explore the cognitive aspect of development rather than to explore the personality as a whole. The Clinical Exploratory Method of Piaget was employed, which focuses primarily upon an experimental…

  6. Geophysical studies over a segment of the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Desa, M.

    -28 21 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam Letter Section Geophysical studies over a segment of the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean M.V. Ramana, T. Ramprasad, K.A. Kamesh Raju and Maria Desa National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa...

  7. Ablated tektite from the central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Glass, B.P.; Chapman, D.R.; ShyamPrasad, M.

    , if it originated in Southeast Asia, it must have had a very shallow trajectory (only a few degrees) and a velocity on the order of 7 km/s as it re-entered the atmosphere. The central Indian Ocean tektite is compositionally similar to high-magnesium (HMg...

  8. Nodules of the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.; Kodagali, V.N.

    The Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) extends from 0 degree S to 25 degrees S latitudes and 70 degrees E to 90 degrees E longitudes The major portion of CIOB is an abyssal plain and the plains are believed to be developed by the Ganges Fan turbidity...

  9. Hydrothermal plumes over the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, D.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Baker, E.T.; Rao, A.S.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Lupton, J.E.; SuryaPrakash, L.; Gawas, R.B.; VijayaKumar, T.

    year later [Ray et al., 2008] found evidence of a chronic hydrothermal plume. Neither study was able to provide any information about the location of seafloor vent sources. Other than these slim results, no other hydrothermal evidence has been.... The newly discovered submarine plumes have a maximum thickness of ~200 m and maximum rise height of about 400 m from seafloor, resembling a typical chronic hydrothermal plume rather than the apparent event plume discovered on the Carlsberg Ridge by Murton...

  10. Dating of the 85 degrees E Ridge (northeastern Indian Ocean) using marine magnetic anomalies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Michael, L.; Krishna, K.S.

    underneath the eastern Con- rad Rise on the Antarctic plate. Subsequent geophysical RESEARCH ARTICLES CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 100, NO. 9, 10 MAY 2011 1315 studies 5,8 opined that short-lived volcanic activity had ini- tiated the 85°E Ridge in Mahanadi.... Satellite-derived free-air gravity anomaly map of the north- eastern Indian Ocean 24 . Curved strip line indicates continuity of the 85°E Ridge from the Mahanadi Basin to ANS. Few bathymetry con- tours derived from ETOPO5 data are shown in the map. N...

  11. Numerical Simulation of Magma Effects on Hydrothermal Venting at Ultra-Slow Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Hong; Niu, Xiongwei; Ruan, Aiguo; Li, Jiabiao; Meng, Lin

    2017-04-01

    Finite element method is used to numerically simulate oceanic crust thermal dynamics in order to understand the hydrothermal venting mechanism at ultra-slow spreading ridge, whether is the ancient magma chamber still living and supplying hot magma for vents or have surrounding hotspots been affecting on the ridge continually with melting and hot magma. Two models are simulated, one is a horizontal layered oceanic crust model and the other is a model derived from wide angle seismic experiment of OBS at the ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (50°E, Zhao et al., 2013; Li et al., 2015; Niu et al., 2015). For the former two cases are simulated: without magma from upper mantel or with continuous magma supply, and for the latter supposing magma supply occurs only once in short period. The main conclusions are as follows: (1) Without melt magma supply at the oceanic crust bottom, a magma chamber can live only thousands ten thousand years. According to the simulated results in this case, the magma chamber revealed by seismic data at the mid-east shallow section of the Southwest Indian Ridge could only last 0.8Ma, the present hydrothermal venting is impossible to be the caused by the magma activity occurred during 8-11Ma (Sauter et al., 2009). (2) The magma chamber can live long time with continuous hot magma supply beneath the oceanic crust due to the melting effects of surrounding ridge hotspots, and would result hydrothermal venting with some tectonic structures condition such as detachment faults. We suggest that the present hydrothermal activities at the mid-east shallow section of the Southwest Indian Ridge are the results of melting effects or magma supply from surrounding hotspots. This research was granted by the National Basic Research program of China (grant 2012CB417301) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grants 41176046, 91228205). References Zhao, M., Qiu, X., Li, J., et al., 2013. Three-dimensional seismic structure of the Dragon

  12. Hydrothermal venting in magma deserts: The ultraslow-spreading Gakkel and Southwest Indian Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Edward T.; Edmonds, Henrietta N.; Michael, Peter J.; Bach, Wolfgang; Dick, Henry J. B.; Snow, Jonathan E.; Walker, Sharon L.; Banerjee, Neil R.; Langmuir, Charles H.

    2004-08-01

    Detailed hydrothermal surveys over ridges with spreading rates of 50-150 mm/yr have found a linear relation between spreading rate and the spatial frequency of hydrothermal venting, but the validity of this relation at slow and ultraslow ridges is unproved. Here we compare hydrothermal plume surveys along three sections of the Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean) and the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) to determine if hydrothermal activity is similarly distributed among these ultraslow ridge sections and if these distributions follow the hypothesized linear trend derived from surveys along fast ridges. Along the Gakkel Ridge, most apparent vent sites occur on volcanic highs, and the extraordinarily weak vertical density gradient of the deep Arctic permits plumes to rise above the axial bathymetry. Individual plumes can thus be extensively dispersed along axis, to distances >200 km, and ˜75% of the total axial length surveyed is overlain by plumes. Detailed mapping of these plumes points to only 9-10 active sites in 850 km, however, yielding a site frequency Fs, sites/100 km of ridge length, of 1.1-1.2. Plumes detected along the SWIR are considerably less extensive for two reasons: an apparent paucity of active vent fields on volcanic highs and a normal deep-ocean density gradient that prevents extended plume rise. Along a western SWIR section (10°-23°E) we identify 3-8 sites, so Fs = 0.3-0.8; along a previously surveyed 440 km section of the eastern SWIR (58°-66°E), 6 sites yield Fs = 1.3. Plotting spreading rate (us) versus Fs, the ultraslow ridges and eight other ridge sections, spanning the global range of spreading rate, establish a robust linear trend (Fs = 0.98 + 0.015us), implying that the long-term heat supply is the first-order control on the global distribution of hydrothermal activity. Normalizing Fs to the delivery rate of basaltic magma suggests that ultraslow ridges are several times more efficient than faster-spreading ridges in supporting active vent

  13. Ecology and biogeography of megafauna and macrofauna at the first known deep-sea hydrothermal vents on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copley, J T; Marsh, L; Glover, A G; Hühnerbach, V; Nye, V E; Reid, W D K; Sweeting, C J; Wigham, B D; Wiklund, H

    2016-12-14

    The Southwest Indian Ridge is the longest section of very slow to ultraslow-spreading seafloor in the global mid-ocean ridge system, but the biogeography and ecology of its hydrothermal vent fauna are previously unknown. We collected 21 macro- and megafaunal taxa during the first Remotely Operated Vehicle dives to the Longqi vent field at 37° 47'S 49° 39'E, depth 2800 m. Six species are not yet known from other vents, while six other species are known from the Central Indian Ridge, and morphological and molecular analyses show that two further polychaete species are shared with vents beyond the Indian Ocean. Multivariate analysis of vent fauna across three oceans places Longqi in an Indian Ocean province of vent biogeography. Faunal zonation with increasing distance from vents is dominated by the gastropods Chrysomallon squamiferum and Gigantopelta aegis, mussel Bathymodiolus marisindicus, and Neolepas sp. stalked barnacle. Other taxa occur at lower abundance, in some cases contrasting with abundances at other vent fields, and δ 13 C and δ 15 N isotope values of species analysed from Longqi are similar to those of shared or related species elsewhere. This study provides baseline ecological observations prior to mineral exploration activities licensed at Longqi by the United Nations.

  14. Ecology and biogeography of megafauna and macrofauna at the first known deep-sea hydrothermal vents on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copley, J. T.; Marsh, L.; Glover, A. G.; Hühnerbach, V.; Nye, V. E.; Reid, W. D. K.; Sweeting, C. J.; Wigham, B. D.; Wiklund, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Southwest Indian Ridge is the longest section of very slow to ultraslow-spreading seafloor in the global mid-ocean ridge system, but the biogeography and ecology of its hydrothermal vent fauna are previously unknown. We collected 21 macro- and megafaunal taxa during the first Remotely Operated Vehicle dives to the Longqi vent field at 37° 47‧S 49° 39‧E, depth 2800 m. Six species are not yet known from other vents, while six other species are known from the Central Indian Ridge, and morphological and molecular analyses show that two further polychaete species are shared with vents beyond the Indian Ocean. Multivariate analysis of vent fauna across three oceans places Longqi in an Indian Ocean province of vent biogeography. Faunal zonation with increasing distance from vents is dominated by the gastropods Chrysomallon squamiferum and Gigantopelta aegis, mussel Bathymodiolus marisindicus, and Neolepas sp. stalked barnacle. Other taxa occur at lower abundance, in some cases contrasting with abundances at other vent fields, and δ13C and δ15N isotope values of species analysed from Longqi are similar to those of shared or related species elsewhere. This study provides baseline ecological observations prior to mineral exploration activities licensed at Longqi by the United Nations.

  15. Controls on ferromanganese crust composition and reconnaissance resource potential, Ninetyeast Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James; Conrad, Tracey A.; Mizell, Kira; Banakar, Virupaxa K.; Frey, Frederick A.; Sager, William W.

    2016-01-01

    A reconnaissance survey of Fe-Mn crusts from the 5000 km long (~31°S to 10°N) Ninetyeast Ridge (NER) in the Indian Ocean shows their widespread occurrence along the ridge as well as with water depth on the ridge flanks. The crusts are hydrogenetic based in growth rates and discrimination plots. Twenty samples from 12 crusts from 9 locations along the ridge were analyzed for chemical and mineralogical compositions, growth rates, and statistical relationships (Q-mode factor analysis, correlation coefficients) were calculated. The crusts collected are relatively thin (maximum 40 mm), and those analyzed varied from 4 mm to 32 mm. However, crusts as thick as 80 mm can be expected to occur based on the age of rocks that comprise the NER and the growth rates calculated here. Growth rates of the crusts increase to the north along the NER and with water depth. The increase to the north resulted from an increased supply of Mn from the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) to depths below the OMZ combined with an increased supply of Fe at depth from the dissolution of biogenic carbonate and from deep-sourced hydrothermal Fe. These increased supplies of Fe increased growth rates of the deeper-water crusts along the entire NER. Because of the huge terrigenous (rivers, eolian, pyroclastic) and hydrothermal (three spreading centers) inputs to the Indian Ocean, and the history of primary productivity, Fe-Mn crust compositions vary from those analyzed from open-ocean locations in the Pacific.

  16. Spreading rate, spreading obliquity, and melt supply at the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannat, Mathilde; Sauter, Daniel; Bezos, Antoine; Meyzen, Christine; Humler, Eric; Le Rigoleur, Marion

    2008-04-01

    We use bathymetry, gravimetry, and basalt composition to examine the relationship between spreading rate, spreading obliquity, and the melt supply at the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). We find that at regional scales (more than 200 km), melt supply reflects variations in mantle melting that are primarily controlled by large-scale heterogeneities in mantle temperature and/or composition. Focusing on adjacent SWIR regions with contrasted obliquity, we find that the effect of obliquity on melt production is significant (about 1.5 km less melt produced for a decrease of 7 mm/a to 4 mm/a in effective spreading rates, ESR) but not enough to produce near-amagmatic spreading in the most oblique regions of the ridge, unless associated with an anomalously cold and/or depleted mantle source. Our observations lead us to support models in which mantle upwelling beneath slow and ultraslow ridges is somewhat focused and accelerated, thereby reducing the effect of spreading rate and obliquity on upper mantle cooling and melt supply. To explain why very oblique SWIR regions nonetheless have large outcrops of mantle-derived ultramafic rocks and, in many cases, no evidence for axial volcanism (Cannat et al., 2006; Dick et al., 2003), we develop a model which combines melt migration along axis to more volcanically robust areas, melt trapping in the lithospheric mantle, and melt transport in dikes that may only form where enough melt has gathered to build sufficient overpressure. These dikes would open perpendicularly to the direction of the least compressive stress and favor the formation of orthogonal ridge sections. The resulting segmentation pattern, with prominent orthogonal volcanic centers and long intervening avolcanic or nearly avolcanic ridge sections, is not specific to oblique ridge regions. It is also observed along the SWIR and the arctic Gakkel Ridge in orthogonal regions underlain by cold and/or depleted mantle.

  17. Population Growth and Sprawl on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R. L.

    2006-05-01

    The most important impact on global land cover is human use and development. With the recent population growth occurring on the reservations in South Dakota, especially Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, the towns and agricultural areas of the reservation are undergoing a change. Although urban sprawl certainly is not a consideration on the reservations, the population explosion currently underway has seen a subsequent increase in rural sprawl. In this case, rural sprawl is defined as exponential population growth and geographic expansion of remote reservation communities. Using satellite imagery and software to render these images is a cost effective way to investigate this growth. Also, using remotely sensed data and a GIS (geographic information system) package can address different issues that concern people and communities in and around the Pine Ridge area. The objective of my project is to observe land use change on the Pine Ridge Indian reservation using Geographic Information Systems such as; ARCGis 9, ENVI, and Multispec, along with Landsat 4, 5, and 7 imagery over the past 20 years.

  18. Preliminary geology of eastern Umtanum Ridge, South-Central Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The basalt stratigraphy and geologic structures of eastern Umtanum Ridge have been mapped and studied in detail to help assess the feasibility of nuclear waste terminal storage on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Eastern Umtanum Ridge is an asymmetric east-west-trending anticline of Columbia River basalt that plunges 5 degrees eastward into the Pasco Basin. Geologic mapping and determination of natural remanent magnetic polarity and chemical composition reveal that flows of the Pomona and Umatilla Members (Saddle Mountains Basalt), Priest Rapids and Frenchman Springs Members (Wanapum Basalt), and Grande Ronde Basalt were erupted as fairly uniform sheets. The Wahluke and Huntzinger flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) fill a paleovalley cut into Wanapum Basalt. No evidence was found to indicate Quaternary-age movement on any structures in the map area. The basalt strata on the south limb of the Umtanum anticline display relatively little tectonic deformation since Miocene-Pliocene time. Thus, the buried south flank of Umtanum Ridge may provide an excellent location for a nuclear waste repository beneath the Hanford Site.

  19. Preliminary geology of eastern Umtanum Ridge, South-Central Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The basalt stratigraphy and geologic structures of eastern Umtanum Ridge have been mapped and studied in detail to help assess the feasibility of nuclear waste terminal storage on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Eastern Umtanum Ridge is an asymmetric east-west-trending anticline of Columbia River basalt that plunges 5 degrees eastward into the Pasco Basin. Geologic mapping and determination of natural remanent magnetic polarity and chemical composition reveal that flows of the Pomona and Umatilla Members (Saddle Mountains Basalt), Priest Rapids and Frenchman Springs Members (Wanapum Basalt), and Grande Ronde Basalt were erupted as fairly uniform sheets. The Wahluke and Huntzinger flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) fill a paleovalley cut into Wanapum Basalt. No evidence was found to indicate Quaternary-age movement on any structures in the map area. The basalt strata on the south limb of the Umtanum anticline display relatively little tectonic deformation since Miocene-Pliocene time. Thus, the buried south flank of Umtanum Ridge may provide an excellent location for a nuclear waste repository beneath the Hanford Site

  20. Microbial Community Structure of Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vents on the Ultraslow Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ding

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR is a typical oceanic ultraslow spreading ridge with intensive hydrothermal activities. The microbial communities in hydrothermal fields including primary producers to support the entire ecosystem by utilizing geochemical energy generated from rock-seawater interactions. Here we have examined the microbial community structures on four hydrothermal vents from SWIR, representing distinct characteristics in terms of temperature, pH and metal compositions, by using Illumina sequencing of the 16S small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes, to correlate bacterial and archaeal populations with the nature of the vents influenced by ultraslow spreading features. Epsilon-, Gamma-, Alpha-, and Deltaproteobacteria and members of the phylum Bacteroidetes and Planctomycetes, as well as Thaumarchaeota, Woesearchaeota, and Euryarchaeota were dominant in all the samples. Both bacterial and archaeal community structures showed distinguished patterns compared to those in the fast-spreading East Pacific Ridge or the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge as previously reported. Furthermore, within SWIR, the microbial communities are highly correlated with the local temperatures. For example, the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were dominant within bacteria from low-temperature vents, but were not represented as the dominating group recovered from high temperature (over 300°C venting chimneys in SWIR. Meanwhile, Thaumarchaeota, the ammonium oxidizing archaea, only showed high relative abundance of amplicons in the vents with high-temperature in SWIR. These findings provide insights on the microbial community in ultraslow spreading hydrothermal fields, and therefore assist us in the understanding of geochemical cycling therein.

  1. Geodynamic evolution and crustal growth of the central Indian Shield

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    significant in this evolution (Martin 1986, 1993). In this paper we report the geochemical data of gneisses and granitoids from Bastar and Bundelk- hand craton (together called central Indian Shield) and look for evidences to discern the geodynamic evolution and crustal growth of the central Indian. Shield from Archaean to ...

  2. Formation of diapiric structure in the deformation zone, central Indian Ocean: A model from gravity and seismic reflection data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Rao, D.G.; Neprochnov, Y.P.

    . Ship tracks of bathymetry, gravity and seismic reflection pro les in the deformation zone of the central Indian Ocean. Striped and dotted (about the Ninetyeast Ridge) zones are di use lithospheric plate boundaries in which divergent and convergent... the ODP Leg 116 sites and DSDP Site 215 were acquired in the central Indian Ocean dur- ing the 10th cruise (February { March 1995) of A. A. Sidorenko (AS 10). Two long N-S pro les (AS 10-03 and 10-05) along 83:7 E and 87 E run within the convergent di...

  3. Origin of lavas from the Ninetyeast Ridge, Eastern Indian Ocean: An evaluation of fractional crystallization models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludden, J.N.; Thompson, G.; Bryan, W.B.; Frey, F.A.

    1980-08-10

    Ferrobasalts from DSDP sites 214 and 216 on the Ninetyeast Ridge are characterized by high absolute iron (FeO>12.9 wt %), FeO/MgO>1.9, and TiO/sub 2/>2.0 wt %. Their trace element abundances indicate a tholeiitic affinity; however, they are distinct from midocean ridge incompatible element-depleted tholeiites owing to higher contents of Ba, Zr, and Sr and flat to slightly light-REE-enriched, chondrite-normalized REE patterns. Calculations using major and trace element abundances and phase compositions are generally consistent with a model relating most major elements and phase compositions in site 214 and 216 ferrobasalts by fractionation of clinopyroxene and plagio-class. However, some incompatible element abundances for site 216 basalts are not consistent with the fractional crystallization models. Baslats from site 214 can be related to andesitic rocks from the same site by fractionating clinopyroxene, plagioclase and titanomagnetite. Site 254 basalts, at the southern end of the Ninetyeast Ridge, and island tholeiites in the southern Indian Ocean (Amsterdam-St. Paul or Kerguelen-Heard volcanic provinces) possibly represent the most recent activity associated with a hot spot forming the Ninetyeast Ridge. These incompatible-element-enriched tholeiites have major element compositions consistent with those expected for a parental liquid for the site 214 and 216 ferrobasalts. However, differences in the trace element contents of the basalts from the Ninetyeast Ridge sites are not consistent with simple fractional crystallization derivation but require either a complex melting model or a heterogeneous mantle source.

  4. The Atlantis Bank Gabbro Massif, SW Indian Ridge: the Largest Know Exposure of the Lower Crust in the Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, H. J.; Kvassnes, A. J.; Kinoshita, H.; MacLeod, C. J.; Robinson, P. T.

    2017-12-01

    Until the discovery of oceanic core complexes little was known and much inferred about the lower ocean crust at slow-spreading ridges. Their study shows the ocean crust isn't simply a uniform layer-cake of pillow lavas, sheeted dikes and gabbros, but is highly variable in thickness, composition and architecture, and even absent over large regions. The 660 km2 Atlantis Bank Gabbro Massif in the rift-mountains of the SW Indian Ridge flanking the Atlantis II Transform is the magmatic end member for ocean core complexes, and best approximates `average' slow-spread crust. Thus it has been a focus for drilling since its discovery in 1986, leading to the current attempt to drill to Moho there (Project SloMo). There are 3 ODP and IODP drill holes on its crest: 1508-m deep Hole 735B, 158-m deep Hole 1105A, and 809.4-m deep Hole U1473. These provide a 200 Kyr view of lower crustal accretion at a slow-spread ocean ridge. Here we extend this view to 2.7 Myr. Mapping and sampling shows the gabbro massif extends nearly the length of a single 2nd order magmatic ridge segment. With numerous inliers of the dike-gabbro transition at numerous locations, and a crust-mantle boundary, traced for 30-km along the transform wall, it would appear to represent a full section of the lower crust. As Moho is at 5.5 ± 1 km mbsf near Hole 735B, and 4.5 km beneath the transform, it is likely a serpentinization front. The crust-mantle boundary was crossed by dives at 4 locations. In each case gabbros at the base of the crust crystallized from melt that had previously fractionated 50% or more from a likely parent. Thus the gabbro massif must be laterally zoned, and the parental mantle melts had to have been emplaced at the center of the paleo-ridge segment, before intruding laterally to the distal end of the complex. Gabbros on a lithospheric flow line down the center of the massif closely resemble those from the drill holes. This shows that while lateral variations in crustal composition and

  5. Focused Magmatism versus Amagmatic spreading along the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. Evidence from TOBI side scan sonar imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Sauter , Daniel; Mendel , Véronique; Rommevaux-Jestin , Céline; M. Parson , Lindsay; Fujimoto , Hiromi; Mével , Catherine; Cannat , Mathilde; Tamaki , Kensaku

    2004-01-01

    International audience; The analysis of the Towed Ocean Bottom Instrument (TOBI) side scan sonar images along theSouthwest Indian Ridge between 63400E and 65400E reveals strong focusing of magmatic activityand long amagmatic accretionary ridge segments. Fresh-looking volcanic terrains are observed atdistinct locations along the axis separated by highly tectonized and sedimented terrains of an alongaxisextent as much as 82 km. The largest tectonized section corresponds to a dramatically thin c...

  6. Morphotectonic and petrological variations along the southern Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Iyer, S.D; Ray, Dwijesh; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Drolia, R.K.

    ), a large transform discontinuity (LTD), and an overlapping spreading centre (OSC). The major and trace element geochemistry of 44 glass and 47 whole rocks, extent and depth of melting (Na8 and Fe8, respectively), and melt...

  7. Interchromatidal central ridge and transversal symmetry in early metaphasic human chromosome one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello-Miranda, Orlando; Sáenz-Arce, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    The topographic structure of Giemsa-banded (G-banded) early metaphase human chromosomes adsorbed on glass was analyzed by atomic force microscope using amplitude modulation mode (AM-AFM). Longitudinal height measurements for early metaphasic human chromosomes showed a central ridge that was further characterized by transversal height measurements. The heterochromatic regions displayed a high level of transversal symmetry, while the euchromatic ones presented several peaks across the transversal height measurements. We suggest that this central ridge and symmetry patterns point out a transitional arrangement of the early metaphase chromosome and support evidence for interchromatidal interactions prior to disjunction. 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  8. Hydrothermal signature in the axial-sediments from the Carlsberg Ridge in the northwest Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zenghui; Li, Huaiming; Li, Mengxing; Zhai, Shikui

    2018-04-01

    30 sediments grabbed from 24 sites between the equator and 10°N along the Carlsberg Ridge (CR) in the northwest Indian Ocean has been analyzed for bulk chemical compositions. Hydrothermal components in the sediments are identified and characterized. They mainly occur at 6.3°N as sulfide debris and at 3.6°N as both sulfide and high temperature water-rock interaction products. The enrichment of chalcophile elements such as Zn, Cu, Pb and the depletion of alkalis metals such as K and Rb are the typical features of hydrothermal components. High U/Fe, low (Nd/Yb)N and negative Ce anomaly infer the uptake of seawater in the hydrothermal deposits by oxidizing after deposition. However, the general enrichment of Mn in hydrothermal plumed-derived materials is not found in the sediments, which may indicate the limited diffusion of fluids or plumes, at least in the direction along the Carlsberg spreading center. The hydrothermal components show their similarity to the hydrothermal deposits from the Indian Ocean Ridge. At 3.6°N ultramafic rocks or gabbroic intrusions, may be involved in the hydrothermal system.

  9. Magma production rate along the Ninetyeast Ridge and its relationship to Indian plate motion and Kerguelen hot spot activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sreejith, K.M.; Krishna, K.S.

    constraints such as change in the plate velocity, thickness and rheology of the lithosphere, and ridge-plume interactions. Plate reconstruction studies suggest that the Indian plate had significant variations in its speed during the Cretaceous - Paleocene... time (Cande and Stegman 2011, van Hinsbergen et al., 2011, Eagles and Wibisono, 2013, Cande and Patriat, 2015). We observe that onset of rapid movement of the Indian plate under influence of the Reunion Plume at 67 Ma coincides with the decreasing...

  10. Excess aluminum in deep sea sediments of the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Shane, P.

    by biogenic components. q 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: AlrTi; excess aluminum; volcanic glass; scavenging; Central Indian Basin 1. Introduction . Aluminum Al is the third most abundant ele- . ment in the earth’s crust 8.23% by wt... rights reserved. .PII: S0025-3227 99 00042-0 ()J.N. Pattan, P. ShanerMarine Geology 161 1999 247–255248 could be due to the presence of authigenic clay minerals. Variation of AlrTi in the sediment cores from Oman Margin and Owen Ridge in Northwest...

  11. Mud volcanos and mud domes of the central Mediterranean Ridge: near bottom and in situ observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huguen, C.; Mascle, J.; Woodside, J.M.; Zitter, T.A.C.; Foucher, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    The first high-resolution mapping of mud volcanoes and mud domes of the Central Mediterranean Ridge (Eastern Mediterranean) presented here is based on successive in situ observations from the Nautile submersible [MEDINAUT (1998) and NAUTINIL (2003) surveys] and near-bottom side-scan sonar data

  12. Morphotectonics of the Carlsberg Ridge between 62 degrees 20 minutes and 66 degrees 20 minutes E, northwest Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    KameshRaju, K.A.; Chaubey, A.K.; Amarnath, D.; Mudholkar, A.

    The segmentation pattern of 440 km long section of the Carlsberg Ridge between 62 degrees 20 minutes E and 66 degrees 20 minutes E, in the northwest Indian Ocean, has been studied using multibeam bathymetry and magnetic data. A well-defined...

  13. India's manganese nodule mine site in the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.

    This commentary highlights the activities of massive exploration programme for manganese nodule deposits in the Central Indian Basin located 5 km below the ocean surface and India's claim for mine site development and registration with UNCLOS...

  14. Ferromanganese nodules from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jauhari, P.; Pattan, J.N.

    In order to delineate a mine site for ferromanganese nodules, extensive surveys were conducted in Central Indian Ocean Basin. Mapping of the basin by multibeam swath bathymetry (Hydrosweep) has revealed many new bottom relief features...

  15. Buried nodules and associated sediments from the central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R; Iyer, S.D.; Dutta, P.

    Buried nodules from siliceous sediments in the central Indian Basin are morphologically variable and mineralogically consist of d-MnO2 incipient todorokite. Compositionally they are weakly diagenetic. The sediment coarse fractions ( 63 mu m...

  16. New occurrences of Australasian microtektites in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ShyamPrasad, M.

    Thirty-three microtektites have been recovered from four different sites in the Central Indian Basin. Based on their physical properties, geographical occurrence and chemical composition, they are identified as belonging to the Australasian tektite...

  17. Magnetic and bathymetric studies in the vicinity of the 73 degree E fracture zone, Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    KameshRaju, K.A.

    and bounded in the south by the South- tailed studies were carried out in the Central east Indian Ridge, represents a relatively un- Indian Basin in order to delineate the finer disturbed ocean basin with no major top.- scale features (Kamesh Raju... conspicuous bathymetric feature corn- near 35 °S with an approximately N10E prising an approximately 1000 m step-like un- spreading direction. When comparing the ob- 150 OBSERVED PROFILES 25 S 24 N v ,/~ - ;, /'~ J, )~ CIOB-I , <:=:79eE FZ I I ~ ClOB-5...

  18. Mid Ocean Ridge Processes at Very Low Melt Supply : Submersible Exploration of Smooth Ultramafic Seafloor at the Southwest Indian Ridge, 64 degree E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannat, M.; Agrinier, P.; Bickert, M.; Brunelli, D.; Hamelin, C.; Lecoeuvre, A.; Lie Onstad, S.; Maia, M.; Prampolini, M.; Rouméjon, S.; Vitale Brovarone, A.; Besançon, S.; Assaoui, E. M.

    2017-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges are the Earth's most extensive and active volcanic chains. They are also, particularly at slow spreading rates, rift zones, where plate divergence is in part accommodated by faults. Large offset normal faults, also called detachments, are characteristic of slow-spreading ridges, where they account for the widespread emplacement of mantle-derived rocks at the seafloor. In most cases, these detachments occur together with ridge magmatism, with melt injection and faulting interacting to shape the newly formed oceanic lithosphere. Here, we seek to better understand these interactions and their effects on oceanic accretion by studying the end-member case of a ridge where magmatism is locally almost absent. The portion of the Southwest Indian ridge we are studying has an overal low melt supply, focused to discrete axial volcanoes, leaving almost zero melt to intervening sections of the axial valley. One of these nearly amagmatic section of the ridge, located at 64°E, has been the focus of several past cruises (sampling, mapping and seismic experiments). Here we report on the most recent cruise to the area (RV Pourquoi Pas? with ROV Victor; dec-jan 2017), during which we performed high resolution mapping, submersible exploration and sampling of the ultramafic seafloor and of sparse volcanic formations. Our findings are consistent with the flip-flop detachment hypothesis proposed for this area by Sauter et al. (Nature Geosciences, 2013; ultramafic seafloor forming in the footwall of successive detachment faults, each cutting into the footwall of the previous fault, with an opposite polarity). Our observations also document the extent and geometry of deformation in the footwall of a young axial detachment, the role of mass-wasting for the evolution of this detachment, and provide spectacular evidence for serpentinization-related hydrothermal circulation and for spatial links between faults and volcanic eruptions.

  19. The spatial distribution of particulate organic carbon and microorganisms on seamounts of the South West Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurhuus, A.; Read, J. F.; Rogers, A. D.

    2017-02-01

    We used elemental analysis, to measure particulate organic carbon (POC), and flow cytometry, to estimate abundance of microorganisms from above four seamounts (Coral, Melville, Middle of What and Atlantis) along the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) from latitude 32.6°S to 41.3°S, longitude 57.1°E to 42.7°E. Samples were collected from the surface to the bottom using a CTD fitted with optical sensors. POC was predicted from models created from in-situ transmission (optical) data (cp). The high resolution predicted POC in the euphotic zone showed a heterogeneous distribution both above individual and between seamounts. The shallow penetration of two of the seamounts displayed an effect on the POC concentration in the euphotic zone depleting the layer around the summit. The transmission data showed higher concentrations of particles towards the surface, caused by primary production, and near to the seabed, probably resulting from re-suspension of sediments. The POC concentrations and microbial abundance were positively correlated to cp and fluctuated with particle abundance, with microorganisms accounting for 50% of the observed POC. Based on non-metric multidimensional scaling it is clear that the microbial clusters strongly indicate three separate biological regimes associated with northeastern, central and southwestern zones of the section of the SWIR that was sampled. This biological zonation is associated with physical oceanographic boundaries represented by the Subtropical and Subantarctic Fronts, forming three distinct "biogeographical" regions.

  20. Ferrobasalts from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Mukhopadhyay, R.; Popko, D.C.

    and Johnson GL (1973) Magnetic telechemistry of oceanic crust. Nature 245 :373}375 Wilson DS, Clague DA, Sleep NH, and Morton JL (1988) Implica- tions of magma convection for the size and temperature of magma chambers at fast spreading ridges. Journal...

  1. Focused magmatism versus amagmatic spreading along the ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge: Evidence from TOBI side scan sonar imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Daniel; Mendel, VéRonique; Rommevaux-Jestin, CéLine; Parson, Lindsay M.; Fujimoto, Hiromi; MéVel, Catherine; Cannat, Mathilde; Tamaki, Kensaku

    2004-10-01

    The analysis of the Towed Ocean Bottom Instrument (TOBI) side scan sonar images along the Southwest Indian Ridge between 63°40'E and 65°40'E reveals strong focusing of magmatic activity and long amagmatic accretionary ridge segments. Fresh-looking volcanic terrains are observed at distinct locations along the axis separated by highly tectonized and sedimented terrains of an along-axis extent as much as 82 km. The largest tectonized section corresponds to a dramatically thin crust area with moderate magnetization anomalies. We suggest that seafloor spreading is mainly amagmatic in this tectonized section of the Southwest Indian Ridge with upper mantle rocks exposed at the seafloor. Amagmatic accretionary ridge segments of such dimensions are quite distinct from what is observed at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge but are also recognized at the Gakkel Ridge and may thus be characteristic of ultra-slow spreading ridges. The correlation between the distribution of fresh-looking volcanic terrains, the occurrence of shallow areas crowned by axial volcanic ridges, and high magnetization values suggests a shallow segmentation of the ridge mainly related to variation in the thickness and/or the intrinsic magnetization of the basaltic source layer. By contrast, strong along-axis variations of the gravity-derived crustal thickness are shrunken in length relative to this shallow segmentation of the ridge and occur only beneath the elevated segments. Adjacent to these elevated segments, small bathymetric swells with fresh-looking volcanic constructions do not correspond to thicker crust areas. This suggests a highly focused melt supply beneath the elevated segments which may feed volcanic constructions up to 60 km from the center of these segments by shallow lateral melt migration in the crust, probably through large dikes. Neither the ultra-slow spreading rate nor the ridge obliquity explains the variation of the magmatic vigor along the ridge. Mantle source heterogeneities together

  2. Specific features of basalts from the western part of Andrew Bain Fault, Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyve, A. A.; Skolotnev, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    This paper reports original data on the composition of volcanic rocks in the western part of the Andrew Bain Fault of the South-West Indian Ridge obtained in the 23rd voyage of R/V Akademik Nikolai Strakhov. In accordance with high La/Th and low Nb/U ratios, the basalt compositions of stations S2317, S2318, and S2330 could result from melting of the DM-type source with HIMU traces. Meanwhile, the enriched samples of station S2326 correspond to a mantle source with a considerable contribution of recycled sediments (EM). Sample S2326/35, which is composed of a melt almost completely depleted in EM material, corresponds to the volcanic rocks of the Marion and Prince Edward islands. The obtained and available data on the SWIR segment from Bouvet Island to Andrew Bain Fault are indicative of small mantle heterogeneities in this region. Two possible variants of their origin are considered: either preservation of the enriched material fragments in the depleted mantle during the split of Gondwana or "contamination" of the mantle with plume material with the formation of vein irregularities before opening of the ocean in this region. In the latter case, the plume material could cover a huge area not constrained by the young plume magmatism regions on Bouvet, Marion, and Prince Edward islands.

  3. Evidences for a volcanic province in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Sudhakar, M.

    in the Central Indian Basin (CIB). In addition to the rocks studied, the occurrence of many morpho-tectonic features such as seamounts, abyssal hills and major fracture zones at 73 degrees E, 75 degrees 45'E and 79 degrees E, have helped in correlating...

  4. Detailed bathymetric surveys in the central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kodagali, V.N.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Ramprasad, T.; George, P.; Jaisankar, S.

    Over 420,000 line kilometers of echo-sounding data was collected in the Central Indian Basin. This data was digitized, merged with navigation data and a detailed bathymetric map of the Basin was prepared. The Basin can be broadly classified...

  5. Ferromanganese oxides on sharks' teeth from Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.

    The mineralogy, composition and growth rates of ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) oxides over the sharks' teeth from the Central Indian Ocean Basin are presented. The trends of metal enrichment (Mn, Ni, Cu and Zn) and depletion (Fe and Co), the Mn/Fe ratio...

  6. Strain distribution and model for formation of eastern Umtanum Ridge anticline, south-central Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, E.H.

    1979-10-01

    Umtanum Ridge in south-central Washington is the topographic expression of a complex anticline within the Yakima Fold system in the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group. The Yakima Fold system, which is partly contained within the Hanford Site, is an example of a layered basalt sequence folded near the surface of the earth. The Pasco Basin stratigraphic nomenclature is used in this repot. Rockwelll Hanford Operations, under contract to the US Department of Energy, is investigating the feasibility of therminal high-level nuclear waste storage in mined repositories in basalt beneath the Hanford Site. Because thereis essentially no basalt within the Site that has not been involved in some folding, any potential location for a repository will be either on the limbs or near the hinge zone of a Yakima Fold structure. Umtanum Ridge is the best exposed Yakima Fold structure in the vicinity of the Site for studying the nature and three-dimensional style of deformation of a multilayered basalt sequence. The structural geometry, distribution of strain within the Umtanum structure and deformational mechanisms of the Umtanum Ridge are discussed.

  7. Strain distribution and model for formation of eastern Umtanum Ridge anticline, south-central Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, E.H.

    1979-10-01

    Umtanum Ridge in south-central Washington is the topographic expression of a complex anticline within the Yakima Fold system in the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group. The Yakima Fold system, which is partly contained within the Hanford Site, is an example of a layered basalt sequence folded near the surface of the earth. The Pasco Basin stratigraphic nomenclature is used in this repot. Rockwelll Hanford Operations, under contract to the US Department of Energy, is investigating the feasibility of therminal high-level nuclear waste storage in mined repositories in basalt beneath the Hanford Site. Because thereis essentially no basalt within the Site that has not been involved in some folding, any potential location for a repository will be either on the limbs or near the hinge zone of a Yakima Fold structure. Umtanum Ridge is the best exposed Yakima Fold structure in the vicinity of the Site for studying the nature and three-dimensional style of deformation of a multilayered basalt sequence. The structural geometry, distribution of strain within the Umtanum structure and deformational mechanisms of the Umtanum Ridge are discussed

  8. Preservation of beach ridges due to pedogenic calcrete development in the Tongoy palaeobay, North-Central Chile

    OpenAIRE

    M. Pfeiffer; J. P. Le Roux; E. Solleiro-Rebolledo; Helga Kemnitz; S. Sedov; O. Seguel

    2011-01-01

    At the Tongoy palaeobay in north-central Chile, a series of beach ridges developed during seaward progradation that took place after the MIS 11 sea-level highstand (412ka). The microrelief left by this succession of beach ridges has been well preserved from erosion due to the development of a calcrete (petrocalcic horizons), which was resistant to the chemical and physical weathering that characterized the area during humid phases of the late Pleistocene and middle Holocene. Macro- and micro-...

  9. Geo-chemical Characteristics of the Sediments in Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dasong; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yao, Lingling; Du, Yong; Jiang, Binbin

    2015-04-01

    Major elements,trace elements and rare earth elements measurements were carried out on twenty-one sediment samples taken from the Leg II and III in Chinese reasearch cruise DY-30 which explored in Southwest Indian Ridge. The results show that all of the samples can be divided into to two groups: Si-rich group and Ca-rich group. Similar to silicates/aluminosilicates, Si-rich group sediments enrich Si(SiO2:34% to 49.6%), Mg(MgO:4.92% to 27.5%),Fe (Fe2O3:7.78% to 10.65%)and Al(Al2O3:4.87% to 12.15%) , which are very different from Ca-rich group sediments that enrich Ca(CaO:39.7%~53.9%), LOI(29.32% to 42.98%) and Sr(972ppm to 1680ppm) that are similar to biogenetic carbonate. The variation range of ∑REE of Si-rich group sediments is 12.89ppm to 44.90ppm similar to Ca-rich group sediments that is 16.82ppm to 35.11ppm, while the ratio of LREE/HREE of Si-rich group sediments(1.03 to 1.83) is much less than Ca-rich group sediments(2.39 to 5.36). The normalized REEs with North American Shale Composite(NASC) in samples show N-MORB characteristics in Si-group sediments though the ∑REE are a bit lower, and slight negative Ce anomaly in both two groups(δCe: 0.80 to 0.43) while positive Eu anomaly is relatively distinctive in Si-group sediments(δEu: 1.14 to 1.60). Contens of CaO+LOI in Ca-rich group sediments are mostly higher than 80%(even 90%) indicate biodeposition is prominent in contrast to Si-rich group sediments(CaO+LOI: 11.33% to 46.68% ) that are concerned with the mixture of basalt, ultrabasic rocks and calcareous sediments. The good correlation coefficients for major elements (SiO2,Al2O3,MgO,TiO2 and LOI) corrected by CaO(for mitigating the effects of biodeposition) in Si-rich sediments with the comparison of the ∑REE-P2O5 among the Si-rich group sediment, Ca-rich group sediments and basalt in Southwest Indian Ridge also support the basalt is the main material source of Si-rich group sediment. Both of the δCe values and the U/Th-V/(V+Ni)plot show an oxide

  10. Rural Sprawl and the Impact of Human Land Use on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R.; Bennett, T.

    2005-12-01

    The most important impact on global land cover is human use and development. With the recent population growth occurring on the reservations in South Dakota, specifically Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, the towns and communities of the reservation are undergoing change. Although urban sprawl certainly is not a consideration on the reservations, the population explosion currently underway has seen a subsequent increase in rural sprawl. In this case, rural sprawl is defined as exponential population growth and geographic expansion of remote reservation communities. The capacity of satellite imagery to encompass large land tracts make the use of this technology a cost effective way to visualize and investigate population growth in rural communities. Likewise, integrating remotely sensed data into a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be a powerful tool to identify environmental and other land use issues that impact the people and communities in and around the Pine Ridge area. The objective of this research is to (1) observe and calculate land cover change around three communities on the Pine Ridge Indian reservation using remotely sensed data (Landsat MSS, TM and ETM+) and Geographic Information Systems over a 20 year span, and (2) to discuss the potential impacts of rural sprawl on the Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Preliminary results indicate that land cover has changed in relationship to increased population growth within three communities on the reservation. New housing developments, roads and buildings have appeared and these changes were detectable using Landsat imagery. These results will be discussed along with the experiences and education through the NASA Goddard Internship sponsored by the North Dakota Association of Tribal Colleges.

  11. Petrogenesis of ferromanganese nodules from east of the Chagos Archipelago, Central Indian Basin, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Roy, S.; Dasgupta, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Miura, H.

    in the Central Indian Basin to test whether the nodules of our earlier study are really atypical or are representative for this basin. 2. Materials and methods The ferromanganese nodules were collected by freefall grabs at 30 sites from an area bounded...

  12. Morphological analysis of palatal rugae pattern in central Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neha; Nagarajappa, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the morphological study of palatal rugae pattern in a central Indian population and to determine sex differentiation. To investigate the distinctive rugae patterns of the study population and determine the contribution of rugae patterns in gender identification. The present cross-sectional study was conducted among a Central Indian population with a sample size of 500 participants. The study involved 250 males and 250 females who were randomly selected from the outpatient department of Oral Medicine Diagnosis and Radiology, Hitkarini Dental College and Hospital, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh. After collection of impression, casts were made and analyzed to evaluate the palatal rugae pattern in a central Indian population by using Thomas and Kotze classification (1983) for number, shape, direction, and unification of palatal rugae pattern. The statistical analysis was carried out using Mann-Whitney test and Chi-square (χ 2 ) tests for categorical variables. Males showed more number of rugae than females [ P = 0.00 (≤0.001)]. Males had more number of wavy rugae pattern whereas females showed more number of straight rugae patterns [ P = 0.00 (≤0.001)]. Males showed more backwardly directed rugae whereas females showed more forwardly directed rugae [ P = 0.00 (≤0.001)]. The unification did not show any significant difference. This study showed that there was a significant relationship between palatoscopy, human identification, and sex determination. Thus, palatoscopy can be considered as a cost effective, easy, unique, and stable method for human identification.

  13. Water Quality and Evaluation of Pesticides in Lakes in the Ridge Citrus Region of Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquette, Anne F.; Kroening, Sharon E.

    2009-01-01

    Water chemistry, including major inorganic constituents, nutrients, and pesticide compounds, was compared between seven lakes surrounded by citrus agriculture and an undeveloped lake on the Lake Wales Ridge (herein referred to as the Ridge) in central Florida. The region has been recognized for its vulnerability to the leaching of agricultural chemicals into the subsurface due to factors including soils, climate, and land use. About 40 percent of Florida's citrus cultivation occurs in 'ridge citrus' areas characterized by sandy well drained soils, with the remainder in 'flatwoods citrus' characterized by high water tables and poorly drained soils. The lakes on the Ridge are typically flow-through lakes that exchange water with adjacent and underlying aquifer systems. This study is the first to evaluate the occurrence of pesticides in lakes on the Ridge, and also represents one of the first monitoring efforts nationally to focus on regional-scale assessment of current-use pesticides in small- to moderate-sized lakes (5 to 393 acres). The samples were collected between December 2003 and September 2005. The lakes in citrus areas contained elevated concentrations of major inorganic constituents (including alkalinity, total dissolved solids, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate), total nitrogen, pH, and pesticides compared to the undeveloped lake. Nitrate (as N) and total nitrogen concentrations were typically elevated in the citrus lakes, with maximum values of 4.70 and 5.19 mg/L (milligrams per liter), respectively. Elevated concentrations of potassium, nitrate, and other inorganic constituents in the citrus lakes likely reflect inputs from the surficial ground-water system that originated predominantly from agricultural fertilizers, soil amendments, and inorganic pesticides. A total of 20 pesticide compounds were detected in the lakes, of which 12 compounds exceeded the standardized reporting level of 0.06 ug/L (microgram per liter). Those

  14. Pockmarks, Western Ross Sea, Antarctica and Mendeleev Ridge, Central Arctic Ocean: Recent and/or Prevalent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawver, L. A.; Hornbach, M. J.; Davis, M. B.; Brumley, K.; Phillips, R. L.

    2008-12-01

    In 2004, the NBP-0401 cruise to the western Ross Sea, found a large field of pockmarks to the north and west of Franklin Island. The pockmarks ranged in size up to 300 m or more in diameter and are up to 30 m deep. The pockmarks are generally circular and are found in a partially surveyed 3,000 km2 region at water depths ranging from 450 m to 510 m. The pockmarks were most concentrated in an area of approximately 400 km2 where they cover as much as 20% of the seafloor. About 50 km to the west of the heavily pockmarked area, a series of seafloor constructions, up to 5 km in diameter and 120 m high were found in water depths of 490 m to 520 m. Again, ice conditions precluded a complete survey but it is believed the circular features may be carbonate mounds very similar in size and water depth to the ones found by Shannon et al. (2007) in the Porcupine Bight region, offshore Ireland. In 2006, the HLY-0602 cruise undertook a seismic refraction experiment along the Mendeleev Ridge in the Arctic ocean. In the course of the experiment, two to three multibeam lines were run approximately along the crest of the ridge from 76° 40'N to 78° 50'N. On HLY-0503, pockmarks were found in the vicinity of 78° 15'N including one extraordinary cluster of pockmarks at 78° 20'N which were cored on HLY-0602. Three gravity cores taken within pockmarks recovered a significant shell hash in the upper 1 cm but carbon analysis on the shells did not reveal any evidence of chemosynthetic origin for the mollusks. Cores taken along the ridge but away from pockmarks had at most a single shell in the upper 1 cm. Shells were not found below the surface of the cores. Pockmarks along the Mendeleev Ridge are found at depths from 820 m to an extraordinary feature at a depth of ~1420 M. This collapse? feature is 10 km by 5 km with a series of pockmarks in its deepest part. The major feature itself has a central depth of 1480 m but pockmarks withing the feature are as deep as 1520 m at their individual

  15. Changes in geotechnical properties of sediments from the Central Indian Basin induced by disturbance experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khadge, N.H.

    During the Indian Deep-sea Environment Experiment (INDEX) conducted in the Central Indian Basin to simulate nodule mining activity, the sediments were physically disturbed, lifted from the seafloor, and then redeposited to study the effects...

  16. Segmentation and Accretionary Processes Near the Andrew Bain Mega-Transform Fault: The Southwest Indian Ridge 25°-35°E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, C. S.; Sclater, J. G.; Grindlay, N. R.; Madsen, J. A.; Rommevaux-Jestin, C.

    2008-12-01

    The ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) separates the Antarctic and African plates. We present results from two surveys covering the SWIR between 26° and 27°30'E and between 32° and 35°E, lying on either side of the long-offset Andrew Bain transform fault. The objectives of the surveys were to characterize the segmentation of an ultra-slow spreading ridge on either side of a long-offset transform fault and to examine the structure of the individual segments. Four transform faults, the Du Toit, Andrew Bain, Marion, and Prince Edward, and one non-transform discontinuity bound four accretionary segments in the survey areas. Two segments lie northeast of the Andrew Bain (32°-35°E). Large central axial volcanoes, deep, broad mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) lows, and high magnetization intensities centered on the spreading axis result from high magmatic activity. Increased magmatism on the ridge axis is likely caused by high mantle temperatures produced by the close proximity of the Marion Plume, which abuts the northern end of the Andrew Bain. Two segments lie southwest of the Andrew Bain (26°-27°30'E). Discrepancies in the locations of the axial rift valley, central magnetization high, and an irregularly-shaped MBA low suggest complex accretionary processes at the western segment (~26°-27° E). The eastern segment (~27°-27°30'E), which abuts the southwest end of the Andrew Bain, shows a deep axial valley, MBA values which increase to the east, and nearly nonexistent magnetization intensity. These features are probably the result of amagmatic accretion caused by the transform edge effect of the Andrew Bain. A transition in the character of topography at 26°45'E suggests that the current segment configuration may not be temporally stable. High-relief (~1 km) ridge-trough structures south of the spreading axis may be the result of an episodic interplay between accretion, both magmatic and amagmatic, and tectonic extension.

  17. Quaternary deposits and landscape evolution of the central Blue Ridge of Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, L. Scott; Morgan, Benjamin A.; Kochel, R. Craig; Howard, Alan D.

    2003-01-01

    A catastrophic storm that struck the central Virginia Blue Ridge Mountains in June 1995 delivered over 775 mm (30.5 in) of rain in 16 h. The deluge triggered more than 1000 slope failures; and stream channels and debris fans were deeply incised, exposing the stratigraphy of earlier mass movement and fluvial deposits. The synthesis of data obtained from detailed pollen studies and 39 radiometrically dated surficial deposits in the Rapidan basin gives new insights into Quaternary climatic change and landscape evolution of the central Blue Ridge Mountains.The oldest depositional landforms in the study area are fluvial terraces. Their deposits have weathering characteristics similar to both early Pleistocene and late Tertiary terrace surfaces located near the Fall Zone of Virginia. Terraces of similar ages are also present in nearby basins and suggest regional incision of streams in the area since early Pleistocene–late Tertiary time. The oldest debris-flow deposits in the study area are much older than Wisconsinan glaciation as indicated by 2.5YR colors, thick argillic horizons, and fully disintegrated granitic cobbles. Radiocarbon dating indicates that debris flow activity since 25,000 YBP has recurred, on average, at least every 2500 years. The presence of stratified slope deposits, emplaced from 27,410 through 15,800 YBP, indicates hillslope stripping and reduced vegetation cover on upland slopes during the Wisconsinan glacial maximum.Regolith generated from mechanical weathering during the Pleistocene collected in low-order stream channels and was episodically delivered to the valley floor by debris flows. Debris fans prograded onto flood plains during the late Pleistocene but have been incised by Holocene stream entrenchment. The fan incision allows Holocene debris flows to largely bypass many of the higher elevation debris fan surfaces and deposit onto the topographically lower surfaces. These episodic, high-magnitude storm events are responsible for

  18. Geochemical implications of gabbro from the slow-spreading Northern Central Indian Ocean Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Misra, S.; Banerjee, R.; Weis, D.

    crust. Dredged gabbroic samples, therefore, are studied to examine gabbro-basalt relationships (Tiezzi and Scott, 1980; Bloomer et al., 1989), conditions of crystallization (Elthon, 1987), compositions and diversity of parental melts (Bloomer et al...) the present gabbro may be the cumulate phase derived during fractionation of the NCIR parent magma; or (c) these gabbros may have a different magmatic history and are genetically related to the gabbroic rocks occurring along transform faults. Basalts...

  19. Direct evidence of hydration into mantle during shearing below a trasform fault: Prince Edward transform fault, Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michibayashi, K.; Kakihata, Y.; Dick, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) is located to the southwest of Rodriguez Triple Junction, where three Indian ocean ridges meet (Zhou & Dick, 2013, Nature). SWIR is one of the slowest spreading ocean ridges in the world. In this study, we studied microstructural development of 21 peridotite samples obtained from Prince Edward transform fault of SWIR by PROTEA5 cruise in 1983. The peridotites consist dominantly of olivine, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with minor amounts of amphibole and plagioclase as well as secondary minerals such as serpentine and magnetite. The peridotites were classified into four groups based on their microstructures: 3 ultramylonites mostly consisting of extremely fine crystals (3-5µm), 13 heterogeneous tectonites consisting of coarse-grained crystals and fine-grained matrix, 1 cataclasite and 4 intensely serpentinized peridotites. Olivine Mg# is 0.90-0.91 and spinel Cr# is 0.1-0.35. Amphibole crystals have chemical compositions of tremolite and magnesio-hornblende and they were intensely deformed within the ultramylonites and the heterogeneous tectonites, indicating that they have occurred before or during intense shearing in mantle. Moreover, extremely fine grain sizes of olivine and microboudin textures in both pyroxene and spinel crystals suggest that these peridotites have been sheared under high stress conditions. Furthermore, olivine crystal-fabrics within the amphibole bearing peridotites have B and E types that could be developed under hydrous conditions, whereas olivine fabrics within the other peridotites have A and D types that could be developed under anhydrous conditions (Karato et al., 2008, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci.). Consequently, the petrophysical characteristics of peridotites in this study indicate that the uppermost mantle below the Prince Edward transform fault has been locally but intensely hydrated during shearing due to transform movement.

  20. Slow spreading ridges of the Indian Ocean: An overview of marine geophysical investigations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    KameshRaju, K.A.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Samudrala, K.

    than CIR. Magmatic and less magmatic events characterize CR and CIR respectively and well defined oceanic core complex (OCC) are confined only to segments of the CIR. The mantle Bouguer anomaly signatures over the ridges suggest crustal accretion...

  1. Application of artificial neural networks to segmentation and classification of topographic profiles of ridge-flank seafloor

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Lourenco, E.; Kodagali, V.N.; Baracho, J.

    profiles from three directions: central (beam 30), port side (beam 10) and starboard side (beam 50), were acquired from the ridge flank and rift valley areas of the Carlsberg Ridge and plain areas of the Central Indian Basin. Self-Organizing Map (SOM...

  2. Compressional wave velocity and index properties of the gabbroic rocks drilled at hole 1105A of the Atlantis Bank, southwest Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, D.G.; Krishna, K.S.

    Compressional wave velocities (Vp) and index properties of 70 mini- gabbroic rock- core samples of 2.5 cm diameter x 2.1 cm long from 157.1 m below seafloor in Hole 1105Aof the Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge, were measured in the laboratory...

  3. Evidence for multiphase folding of the central Indian Ocean lithosphere

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Bull, J; Scrutton, R

    National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403004, India J.M. Bull School of Ocean and Earth Science, Southampton Oceanography Centre, Southampton University, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK R.A. Scrutton Department of Geology and Geophysics, Edinburgh...: Evidence for the role of fracture zones: Tectonophysics, v. 184, p. 213–228. Bull., J.M., and Scrutton, R.A., 1990, Fault reactivation in the central Indian Ocean and the rheology of oceanic lithosphere: Nature, v. 344, p. 855–858. Bull, J.M., and Scrutton...

  4. Of SWIR and Swarms: Regional View on Earthquake Swarms at Southwest Indian Ridge from Neumayer Observatory in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laederach, C.; Schlindwein, V.; Mueller, C.

    2011-12-01

    Spreading mechanisms of mid-ocean ridges with a full spreading rate of spreading ridges, Gakkel Ridge and Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) are located in areas difficult to access for local studies. At Gakkel Ridge, the perennial ice cover of the Arctic Ocean prohibits the usage of ocean bottom seismometers and at SWIR, difficult weather conditions of the Southern Ocean make it a challenge to perform seismological studies with ocean bottom instrumentation. Thus, the seismological investigation of ultraslow spreading mid-ocean ridges has to fall back on data acquired by land stations which are located at distances such that only high magnitude earthquakes are detected, but the potentially vast majority of lower magnitude earthquakes are missed. Located at the northern foothills of Dronning Maud Land in Antarctica, the VNA2 station with the associated array of 15 short-period sensors of the German Neumayer Station has a distance of ~2400 km to the SWIR and is one of the closest stations and the only existing array within a regional distance of the SWIR. Except for periods during Antarctic winter where energy problems impede data acquisition, the array has been constantly operating during the last decade detecting backazimuth and slowness of arriving waves. This information facilitates the identification of earthquakes occurring in the region of the SWIR. We identified a total amount of 799 earthquakes occurring over a period of eight years in the region of the Orthogonal Segment of the SWIR. For the same time period, the Bulletin of the International Seismological Centre (ISC) reports ~200 earthquakes between 5°E and 29°E along the ridge. We determined body wave magnitudes (mb) for the events detected with the Neumayer array obtaining mb values ranging from 2.9 to 5.6. Thus, the detection threshold for SWIR earthquakes at Neumayer observatory is at least mb 0.5 lower than the ISC detection threshold. Four major earthquake swarms happened on the Orthogonal Segment of

  5. Hair patterns of the lower limb in Central Indian males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, B D

    1977-08-01

    The distribution of hair of the right lower limb has been studied in a random sample of 220 healthy Central Indian males 17 to 45 years of age. The common hair patterns observed are the proximal phalangeal hair in all toes in 55.45%, the middle phalangeal hair in the third toe in 8.18%, the tibial on the dorsum of foot in 69.55%, and the pedo-cruro-femoral in the lower limb in 70.00% subjects. Comparison of these findings with those of the right upper limb shows that hairiness of the two limbs is correlated, that the dorsum of foot is less hairy than the dorsum of hand, and that the third and second toes are comparable with the fourth and third fingers, respectively, as regards their middle phalangeal hair. Comparison with the available literature shows that the Central Indian males resemble the Whites in having greater frequency of middle phalangeal hair than those of the Negroes, that the dorsum of feet of this population is less hairy than the White and more hairy than the Negroes, and that the general hairiness of the lower limb is more or less equal in the three groups of persons.

  6. Nature and distribution of manganese nodules from three sediment domains of the Central Indian Basin, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    Manganese nodules from the Central Indian Basin (5 degrees-10 degrees S) vary in abundance, morphology, mineralogy, and chemistry with water depth and sediment type. Nodules from the southern region, dominatEd. by siliceous sediment, differ markedly...

  7. Pelagic ecology of the South West Indian Ocean Ridge seamounts: Introduction and overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A. D.

    2017-02-01

    The Indian Ocean was described by Behrman (1981) as the "Forlorn Ocean", a region neglected by science up to the late-1950s. For example, the Challenger Expedition from 1872 to 1876 largely avoided the Indian Ocean, sailing from Cape Town into Antarctic waters sampling around the Prince Edward Islands, Kerguelen Island and Crozet Islands before heading to Melbourne. From 1876 to the 1950s there were expeditions on several vessels including the Valdivia, Gauss and Planet (Germany), the Snellius (Netherlands), Discovery II, MahaBiss (United Kingdom), Albatross (Sweden), Dana and Galathea (Denmark; Behrman, 1981). There was no coordination between these efforts and overall the Indian Ocean, especially the deep sea remained perhaps the most poorly explored of the world's oceans. This situation was largely behind the multilateral effort represented by the International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIEO), which was coordinated by the Scientific Committee for Ocean Research (SCOR), and which ran from 1959-1965. Work during this expedition focused on the Arabian Sea, the area to the northwest of Australia and the waters over the continental shelves and slopes of coastal states in the region. Subsequently several large-scale international oceanographic programmes have included significant components in the Indian Ocean, including the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) and the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). These studies were focused on physical oceanographic measurements and biogeochemistry and whilst the Indian Ocean is still less understood than other large oceans it is now integrated into the major ocean observation systems (Talley et al., 2011). This cannot be said for many aspects of the biology of the region, despite the fact that the Indian Ocean is one of the places where exploitation of marine living resources is still growing (FAO, 2016). The biology of the deep Indian Ocean outside of the Arabian Sea is particularly poorly understood given the presence

  8. Fungal diversity in deep-sea sediments of a hydrothermal vent system in the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Gong, Lin-feng; Pang, Ka-Lai; Luo, Zhu-Hua

    2018-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal sediment is known to support remarkably diverse microbial consortia. In deep sea environments, fungal communities remain less studied despite their known taxonomic and functional diversity. High-throughput sequencing methods have augmented our capacity to assess eukaryotic diversity and their functions in microbial ecology. Here we provide the first description of the fungal community diversity found in deep sea sediments collected at the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) using culture-dependent and high-throughput sequencing approaches. A total of 138 fungal isolates were cultured from seven different sediment samples using various nutrient media, and these isolates were identified to 14 fungal taxa, including 11 Ascomycota taxa (7 genera) and 3 Basidiomycota taxa (2 genera) based on internal transcribed spacers (ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8S) of rDNA. Using illumina HiSeq sequencing, a total of 757,467 fungal ITS2 tags were recovered from the samples and clustered into 723 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to 79 taxa (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota contributed to 99% of all samples) based on 97% sequence similarity. Results from both approaches suggest that there is a high fungal diversity in the deep-sea sediments collected in the SWIR and fungal communities were shown to be slightly different by location, although all were collected from adjacent sites at the SWIR. This study provides baseline data of the fungal diversity and biogeography, and a glimpse to the microbial ecology associated with the deep-sea sediments of the hydrothermal vent system of the Southwest Indian Ridge.

  9. Cobalt immobilization by manganese oxidizing bacteria from the Indian ridge system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Antony, R.; Sujith, P.P.; Fernandes, S.O.; Verma, P.; Khedekar, V.D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Co immobilization by two manganese oxidizing isolates from Carlsberg Ridge waters (CR35 and CR48) was compared with that of Mn at same molar concentrations. At a lower concentration of 10 mu M, CR35 and CR48 immobilized 22 and 23 fM Co cell-1...

  10. Local earthquake tomography of central Costa Rica: transition from seamount to ridge subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinc, A. Nilay; Koulakov, Ivan; Thorwart, Martin; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Flueh, Ernst R.; Arroyo, Ivonne; Taylor, Waldo; Alvarado, Guillermo

    2010-10-01

    The structure and seismicity of the subduction zone of central Costa Rica have been investigated with local earthquake tomography down to ca. 50 km depth. Seismic traveltime data sets of three on- and offshore seismic networks were combined for a simultaneous inversion of hypocentre locations, 3-D structure of P-wave velocity and Vp/Vs ratio using about 2000 high-quality events. The seismicity and slab geometry as well as Vp and Vp/Vs show significant lateral variation along the subduction zone corresponding to the changes of the incoming plate which consists of serpentinized oceanic lithosphere in the northwest, a seamount province in the centre and the subducting Cocos Ridge in the southeast of the investigation area. Three prominent features can be identified in the Vp and Vp/Vs tomograms: a high-velocity zone with a perturbation of 4-10 per cent representing the subducting slab, a low-velocity zone (10-20 per cent) in the forearc crust probably caused by deformation, fluid release and hydration and a low-velocity zone below the volcanic arc related to upwelling fluids and magma. Unlike previously suggested, the dip of the subducting slab does not decrease to the south. Instead, an average steepening of the plate interface from 30° to 45° is observed from north to south and a transition from a plane to a step-shaped plate interface. This is connected with a change in the deformation style of the overriding plate where roughly planar, partly conjugated, clusters of seismicity of regionally varying dip are observed. It can be shown that the central Costa Rica Deformation Belt represents a deep crustal transition zone extending from the surface down to 40 km depth. This transition zone indicates the lateral termination of the active part of the volcanic chain and seems to be related to the changing structure of the incoming plate as well.

  11. Seamount influences on mid-water shrimps (Decapoda) and gnathophausiids (Lophogastridea) of the South-West Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letessier, Tom B.; De Grave, Sammy; Boersch-Supan, Philipp H.; Kemp, Kirsty M.; Brierley, Andrew S.; Rogers, Alex D.

    2017-02-01

    Maintenance of often-observed elevated levels of pelagic diversity and biomass on seamounts, of relevance to conservation and fishery management, involves complex interactions between physical and biological variables that remain poorly understood. To untangle these biophysical processes we explore factors influencing the distribution of epi- and meso-pelagic (0-1000 m) micronektonic crustaceans (>15 mm; order Lophogastridea, family Gnathophausiidea; and order Decapoda) on and off seamounts along the South West Indian Ridge (SWIR, 27° to 42°S) and on a seamount off the Madagascar Ridge (31.6°S, 42.8°E). Thirty-one species of micronektic crustaceans were caught using mid-water trawls within the study area but there was no apparent latitude-related patterns in species richness or abundance. Species richness predicted by rarefraction curves and numerical abundance was highest in the vicinity (seamounts (species richness: 15 to 21; abundance: 10±2 to 20±1 ind.10-3 m-1) compared with over the abyssal plains and ridge slopes (species richness: 9.2-9.9; abundance: 24±2 to 79±8 ind.10-3 m-1). Multivariate analysis of assemblage composition revealed significant groupings of individual trawl samples with respect to whether the sample was on or off a seamount and hydrographic region, but not with time of sampling relative to diel cycle (day/night or dawn) or depth of sampling (0-500, 500-800, >800 m). The dominant species assemblage comprised the shrimps Systellaspis debilis (37%) and Sergia prehensilis (34%), and was restricted to seamounts on the subtropical SWIR. Our observations suggest that the 'oasis effect' of seamounts conventionally associated with higher trophic levels is also applicable to pelagic micronektic crustaceans at lower trophic levels. We suggest that the enhanced biomass and species richness attributed is due to 'habitat enrichment', whereby seamounts provide favourable habitats for both pelagic and bentho-pelagic mid-water crustaceans.

  12. Heat Flow on the South West Indian Ridge at 14°E and the Consequences for Microbiological Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, N. E.; Molari, M.; Boetius, A.

    2014-12-01

    During RV POLARSTERN cruise PS81 to the South West Indian Ridge (SWIR) at 52°S, 14°E an integrated study was carried out in more than 4000 m water depth employing seismology, geology, microbiology, deep-sea ecology, heat flow and others. Heat flow is supposed to be an indicator for the varying depth of the magma chamber beneath the ridge axis. Bottom observations from previous work on the SWIR are scarce and visual information about geostructures, habitat landscapes, benthic faunal communities and their distribution in this area have so far been missing. Vigorous fluid flow in the form of black smokers or shimmering water could not be detected but enhanced heat flow due to upward pore water migration occurred. This leads to values of very high heat flow (up to 850 mW/m2) and advection rates up to 25 cm/a Darcy velocity. Enhanced biomass and a greater variation of megafauna along those sites of high heat flow could be inferred from reconnaissance observations with a camera sledge. A closer investigation of microbial activity in the material of gravity corers revealed favorable living conditions for microorganisms. We find the inorganic carbon fixation rates, here applied like a proxy of microbial metabolic activity, were significantly higher (up to 7 times higher) in surficial sediments in proximity of the station PS 81/640 compared to other stations along the ridge. Conversely the extracellular enzymatic activities did not show any significant difference in the potential organic matter degradation between the stations investigated. These results suggest an increase of chemosynthetic activities at St PS 81/649, possibly related to increase of availability of reduced compounds (i.e. sulphide, reduced metals) in presence of pore water flow.

  13. Sup(10)Be variation in surficial sediments of the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; Selvaraj, K.; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.; Chen, C.T.A.

    )) with an average of 3.58 x 10 sup(9) atoms g sup(-1) in the Central Indian Basin, the values in the Andaman Sea are uniform with an average of 1.49 x 10 sup(9) atoms g sup(-1). The sup(10)Be/sup(9)Be values in the Central Indian Basin sediments range between 0...

  14. A double seismic zone in the subducting Juan Fernandez Ridge of the Nazca Plate (32 degrees S), central Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Marot, M.; Monfret, T.; Pardo, M.; Ranalli, G.; Nolet, G.

    2013-01-01

    The region of central Chile offers a unique opportunity to study the links between the subducting Juan Fernandez Ridge, the flat slab, the double seismic zone (DSZ), and the absence of modern volcanism. Here we report the presence and characteristics of the first observed DSZ within the intermediate-depth Nazca slab using two temporary seismic catalogs (Ovalle 1999 and Chile Argentina Seismological Measurement Experiment). The lower plane of seismicity (LP) is located 20-25km below the upper ...

  15. Simulation of the Central Indian Ocean Mode in CESM: Implications for the Indian Summer Monsoon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Murtugudde, Raghu; Neale, Richard B.; Jochum, Markus

    2018-01-01

    The simulation of the Indian summer monsoon and its pronounced intraseasonal component in a modern climate model remains a significant challenge. Recently, using observations and reanalysis products, the central Indian Ocean (CIO) mode was found to be a natural mode in the ocean-atmosphere coupled system and also shown to have a close mechanistic connection with the monsoon intraseasonal oscillation (MISO). In this study, the simulation of the actual CIO mode in historical Community Earth System Model (CESM) outputs is assessed by comparing with observations and reanalysis products. The simulation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, a major component of tropical intraseasonal variabilities (ISVs), is satisfactory. However, the CIO mode is not well captured in any of the CESM simulations considered here. The force and response relationship between the atmosphere and the ocean associated with the CIO mode in CESM is opposite to that in nature. The simulated meridional gradient of large-scale zonal winds is too weak, which precludes the necessary energy conversion from the mean state to the ISVs and cuts off the energy source to MISO in CESM. The inability of CESM to reproduce the CIO mode seen clearly in nature highlights the CIO mode as a new dynamical framework for diagnosing the deficiencies in Indian summer monsoon simulation in climate models. The CIO mode is a coupled metric for evaluating climate models and may be a better indicator of a model's skill to accurately capture the tropical multiscale interactions over subseasonal to interannual timescales.

  16. Processes of interannual mixed layer temperature variability in the thermocline ridge of the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PraveenKumar, B.; Vialard, J.; Lengaigne, M.; Murty, V.S.N.; Foltz, G.R.; McPhaden, M.J.; Pous, S.; Montegut , C.deB.

    , as previously noted for heat content anomalies. Positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events and the remote influence of El Niño induce comparable warming over the TRIO region, though IOD signals peak earlier (November–December) than those associated with El Niño...

  17. Non-native fishes of the central Indian River Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Pamela J.; Loftus, William F.; Reaver, Kristen M.

    2018-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive review of the status of non-native fishes in the central Indian River Lagoon (from Cape Canaveral to Grant-Valkaria, east of I-95) through literature review and field surveys. Historical records exist for 17 taxa (15 species, one hybrid, one species complex). We found historical records for one additional species, and collected one species in our field survey that had never been recorded in the region before (and which we eradicated). Thus, we evaluate 19 total taxa herein. Of these, we documented range expansion of four salt-tolerant cichlid species, extirpation of six species that were previously recorded from the area and eradication of three species. There was no noticeable change in geographic range for one widespread species and the records for one species are doubtful and may be erroneous. Currently, there is not enough information to evaluate geographic ranges for four species although at least one of those is established.

  18. Demography and health of the Xavante Indians of Central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Guimarães de Souza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the demographic and health behavior of the Xavante Indians of Mato Grosso State, Central Brazil. Data covering the period 1999 to 2004 was collected using information from household censuses and vital statistics. In addition to standard demographic analyses, survival analysis was carried out. Results show a young age structure, derived from a combination of high fertility rates (7.7 live births per woman and declining mortality. Mortality rates, especially infant mortality (97 per thousand, remain very high, surpassing regional and national rates. Natural increase is the main contributing factor to population growth. The annual population growth rate is 4.4%. Results suggest that recent declines in mortality and fertility may be related to transformations in the implementation of basic health care services and internal diversity, the latter of which seems to be associated with local history and sociocultural determinants.

  19. Demography and health of the Xavante Indians of Central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Luciene Guimarães de; Santos, Ricardo Ventura; Pagliaro, Heloisa; Carvalho, Marilia Sá; Flowers, Nancy May; Coimbra, Carlos E A

    2011-10-01

    This study investigates the demographic and health behavior of the Xavante Indians of Mato Grosso State, Central Brazil. Data covering the period 1999 to 2004 was collected using information from household censuses and vital statistics. In addition to standard demographic analyses, survival analysis was carried out. Results show a young age structure, derived from a combination of high fertility rates (7.7 live births per woman) and declining mortality. Mortality rates, especially infant mortality (97 per thousand), remain very high, surpassing regional and national rates. Natural increase is the main contributing factor to population growth. The annual population growth rate is 4.4%. Results suggest that recent declines in mortality and fertility may be related to transformations in the implementation of basic health care services and internal diversity, the latter of which seems to be associated with local history and sociocultural determinants.

  20. Framing REDD+ in India: Carbonizing and centralizing Indian forest governance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijge, Marjanneke J.; Gupta, Aarti

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We analyze whether India's REDD+ strategy induces carbonization and centralization. • REDD+ in India is framed as an opportunity for synergistic, decentralized governance. • Yet national safeguards are not as strong as asserted. • Controversial issues have so far been side-lined in India's REDD+ strategy. • Without investments, synergistic and decentralized REDD+ governance remains unlikely. - Abstract: This article analyzes the interaction of newly articulated climate governance goals with long-standing forest policies and practices in India. We focus on India's REDD+ (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation and related forest activities) strategy, with a particular focus on the Green India Mission (GIM). The GIM calls for a doubling of the area for afforestation and reforestation in India in the next decade as a dominant climate mitigation strategy. We analyze how the GIM policy document frames carbon versus non-carbon benefits to be derived from forest-related activities; and how the GIM envisages division of authority (between national, regional and local levels) in its implementation. We are interested in assessing (a) whether the GIM promotes a “carbonization” of Indian forest governance, i.e. an increased focus on forest carbon at the expense of other ecosystem services; and (b) whether it promotes an increased centralization of forest governance in India through retaining or transferring authority and control over forest resources to national and state-level authorities, at the expense of local communities. We argue that the GIM frames the climate-forest interaction as an opportunity to synergistically enhance both carbon and non-carbon benefits to be derived from forests; while simultaneously promoting further decentralization of Indian forest governance. However, based on past experiences and developments to date, we conclude that without significant investments in community-based carbon and biodiversity

  1. Micropalaeontological dating of the basal Cretaceous section of DSDP Site 249, Leg 25, Mozambique Ridge: implications for the timing of the southern Atlantic-Indian Ocean connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunay, Robert E.; Braham, William; Cooper, M. Kevin E.; Lester, Martin; Tremolada, Fabrizio

    2018-02-01

    Tectonic models suggest the absence of a deep water connection on the Mozambique Ridge during early Neocomian time. These models imply the initiation of a deep water connection between the southern Atlantic and Indian oceans formed during Barremian-earliest Aptian times. However, previous biostratigraphic studies of the earliest deep water sediments on the Mozambique Ridge suggest that the basal section is Neocomian in age. Here, we present a new biostratigraphic analysis undertaken to test this tectonic model and determine the earliest age of deep water sedimentation on the Mozambique Ridge. Core samples from the Cretaceous interval 222.05-406.32 m (Cores 19-32) of DSDP Site 249, Leg 25, were sampled for calcareous nannoplankton and palynological analysis. Most of the sampling was concentrated on the Lower Cretaceous interval below 294 m. Our results indicate that the lower sedimentary section is no older than Barremian and therefore provides support for the age proposed by the tectonic models.

  2. Mapping the mantle transition zone beneath the central Mid-Atlantic Ridge using Ps receiver functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, M. R.; Rychert, C.; Harmon, N.; Kendall, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Determining the mechanisms taking place beneath ridges is important in order to understand how tectonic plates form and interact. Of particular interest is establishing the depth at which these processes originate. Anomalies such as higher temperature within the mantle transition zone may be inferred seismically if present. However, most ridges are found in remote locations beneath the oceans restricting seismologists to use far away land-based seismometers, which in turn limits the imaging resolution. In 2016, 39 broadband ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed across the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, along the Romanche and Chain fracture zones as part of the PI-LAB research project (Passive Imaging of the Lithosphere and Asthenosphere Boundary). The one-year long seismic data is now retrieved and analysed to image the mantle transition zone beneath the ridge. We determine P-to-s (Ps) receiver functions to illuminate the 410- and 660-km depth mantle discontinuities using the extended multitaper deconvolution. The data from ocean-bottom seismometers have tilt and compliance noise corrections and is filtered between 0.05-0.2 Hz to enhance the signal. 51 teleseismic earthquakes generated hundreds of good quality waveforms, which are then migrated to depth in 3-D. The topography at the d410 deepens towards the west of the Romanche and Chain fracture zone by 15 km, whereas the topography of d660 shallows beneath the ridge between the two zones. Transition zone thickness thins from 5 to 20 km. Thermal anomalies determined from temperature relationships with transition zone thickness and depth variations of the d410 and d660 suggests hotter temperatures of about 200 K. Overall, the result suggests mid-ocean ridges may have associated thermal signatures as deep as the transition zone.

  3. Eruption age of permanent mandibular first molars and central incisors in the south Indian population

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta Rakhi; Sivapathasundharam B; Einstein A

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The existing eruption schedules for permanent and deciduous dentition are based on studies in the Western population. Since Indians differ from Westerners racially, genetically, and environmentally, these studies fail to provide relevant guidance on the eruption schedule in the Indian population. This study aims at determining the eruption pattern of permanent mandibular molars and central incisors in the south Indian population. Materials and Methods: 10,156 apparently healthy...

  4. Structure, tectonic and petrology of mid-oceanic ridges and the Indian scenario

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Ray, Dwijesh

    and it was updated 13 a decade later under the International Indian Ocean Expe - dition (1959 ? 65; India was an active participant). The developments in remote sensing and da ta imaging techni - ques, helped delineate finer tectonic patterns, preparation... ? MORB are remarkably similar 34 having moderately elevated K 2 O (0.10 ? 0.30% at Mg# > 65), low Zr/Nb and Y/N b (6 ? 16 and 1 ? 4, respectively) and enhanced (La/Sm) N ratios (1 ? 6; N denotes chondrite normalized). Further, the E ? MORB...

  5. Structural setting and tectonic control of mud volcanous from the central Mediterranean Ridge (Eastern Mediterranean)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huguen, C.; Mascle, J.; Chaumillon, E.; Kopf, A.; Woodside, J.M.; Zitter, T.A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Based on a recent marine geophysical data set, including swath bathymetry, acoustic imagery and six-channel seismics, recorded over a large area of the Mediterranean Ridge (MR) in early 1998 during the Prismed 2 survey, this paper presents a study of the various relationships observed between

  6. Observational evidence of mixed rossby gravity waves at the central equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Mohankumar, K.; Sijikumar, S.; Sivakumar, K.U.; Mathew, T.

    Six-hourly soundings (GPS sonde) were carried out at the central equatorial Indian Ocean (80º–83ºE) during 25th September–10th October 2011 under the CINDY2011 (Cooperative Indian Ocean Experiment on Intra-seasonal variability in Year 2011) field...

  7. Cephalopods of the Southwest Indian OceanRidge: A hotspot of biological diversity and absence of endemism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptikhovsky, V.; Boersch-Supan, P.; Bolstad, K.; Kemp, K.; Letessier, T.; Rogers, A. D.

    2017-02-01

    A total of 68 cephalopod species belonging to 26 families (10-11% of the total known cephalopod diversity) were collected onboard R/V Fridtjof Nansen during a research survey on Southwest Indian Ocean Ridge in November-December 2009. This relatively small area extends from the Tropical front to the Subantarctic front with four distinctive cephalopod faunas and represents one of the most outstanding hotspots of cephalopod diversity reported to date. However, most of the species caught there were characterised by circumglobal distribution in the Southern Hemisphere, and no endemic species were unambiguously found, although a number of taxa could not be confidently attributed to known species. Most of the studied area was dominated by squid species reproducing in epipelagic layers (mostly Enoploteuthidae and Pyroteuthidae). Species reproducing in meso-bathypelagial whose juveniles ascend to surface water (Cranchiidae, Histioteuthidae, etc.) became gradually more and more important southward from the Tropical Zone to the Southern Peripheral Ecotone. In the latter region they were joined by near-bottom dwellers of the order Sepiolida. The epipelagic strategy of reproduction disappears completely at the Subpolar Front, where epipelagic waters were inhabited by young members of the Cranchiidae and Gonatidae hatched in deep-seas. This study demonstrated the importance of conservation and management of this high-seas area, with its unique biodiversity and ecological resources, in line with recommendations by the IUCN Seamount project and Global Ocean Biodiversity Initiative.

  8. Ecological adaptations and commensal evolution of the Polynoidae (Polychaeta) in the Southwest Indian Ocean Ridge: A phylogenetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpetti, Natalia; Taylor, M. L.; Brennan, D.; Green, D. H.; Rogers, A. D.; Paterson, G. L. J.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.

    2017-03-01

    The polychaete family polynoid is very large and includes a high diversity of behaviours, including numerous examples of commensal species. The comparison between free-living and commensal behaviours and the evolution of the relationships between commensal species and their hosts are valuable case studies of ecological adaptations. Deep-sea species of Polynoidae were sampled at four seamounts in the Southwest Indian Ridge and twenty specimens from seven species were selected to be analysed. Among them, there were free-living species, living within the three-dimensional framework of cold-water coral reefs, on coral rubble and on mobile sediments, and commensal species, associated with octocorals, hydrocorals (stylasterids), antipatharians and echinoderms (holothurian and ophiuroids). We analysed two mitochondrial (COI, 16S) and two nuclear (18S, 28S) ribosomal genetic markers and their combined sequences were compared with other Genbank sequences to assess the taxonomic relationships within the species under study, and the potential role of hosts in speciation processes. Most basal species of the sub-family Polynoinae are obligate symbionts showing specific morphological adaptations. Obligate and facultative commensal species and free-living species have evolved a number of times, although, according to our results, the obligate coral commensal species appear to be monophyletic.

  9. [In Situ Analysis of Element Geochemistry in Submarine Basalt in Hydrothermal Areas from Ultraslow Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Sun, Xiao-ming; Xu, Li; Liang, Ye-heng; Wu, Zhong-wei; Fu, Yu; Huang, Yi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we analyze element geochemistry of submarine basalt in situ, which is sampled in hydrothermal areas from ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge, including the fresh basalt rocks (B19-9, B15-13) and altered basalt (B5-2). And we can confirm that altered mineral in B5-2 is celadonite by microscope and Raman Spectrum. Furthermore, amygdaloidal celadonites are analyzed by electron microprobe (EPMA) and EDS-line scanning. The results show that K-contents decrease and Na-contents increase from the core to the edge in these altered minerals, indicating the transition from celadonite to saponite. Celadonite is an altered minerals, forming in low temperature (form in low water/rock and more reducing condition. As a result, the transition from celadonite to saponite suggests environment change from oxidizing to reducing condition. Using the result of EPMA as internal standard, we can analyze rare earth elements (REE) in altered mineral in situ. Most of result show positive Eu anomaly (Δ(Eu)), indicating hydrothermal fluid transform from oxidizing to reducing, and reducing fluid rework on the early altered minerals. Comparison with REE in matrix feldspar both in altered and unaltered zoning, we find that reducing fluid can leach REE from the matrix feldspar, leading to lower total REE concentrations and positive Eu anomaly. So leaching process play an important role in hydrothermal system.

  10. Structure and Dynamics of the Southeast Indian Ridge and Off-axis Volcanism, 129°E to 140°E: Preliminary Results of the STORM Cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, M.; Briais, A.; Barrere, F.; Boulart, C.; Ceuleneer, G.; Ferreira, N.; Hanan, B. B.; Hemond, C.; MacLeod, S.; Maillard, A. L.; Merkuryev, S. A.; Park, S. H.; Revillon, S.; Ruellan, E.; Schohn, A.; Watson, S. J.; Yang, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present observations of the South-East Indian Ridge (SEIR) collected during the STORM cruise (South Tasmania Ocean Ridge and Mantle) on the N/O L'Atalante early 2015. The SEIR between Australia and Antarctica displays large variations of axial morphology despite an almost constant intermediate spreading rate. The Australia-Antarctic Discordance (AAD) between 120°E and 128°E is a section of the mid-ocean ridge where the magma budget is abnormally low, and which marks the boundary between Indian and Pacific mantle domains with distinct geochemical isotopic compositions. The STORM project focuses on the area east of the discordance from 128 to 140°E, where gravity highs observed on satellite-derived maps of the flanks of the SEIR reveal numerous volcanic seamounts. A major objective of the STORM cruise was to test the hypothesis of a mantle flow from the Pacific to the Indian domains. We collected multibeam bathymetry and magnetic data between 136 and 138°E to map off-axis volcanic ridges up to 10 Ma-old crust. We mapped the SEIR axis between 129 and 140°E, and the northern part of the George V transform fault. We collected rock samples on seamounts and in the transform fault, basaltic glass samples along the ridge axis, and near-bottom samples and in-situ measurements in the water column. Our observations reveal that the off-axis seamounts form near the SEIR axis, and are not associated to off-axis deformation of the ocean floor. They show a general shallowing of the ridge axis from the AAD to the George V TF and the presence of robust axial segments near the transform fault. They allow us to describe the complex evolution of the transform fault system. They also permit to locate new hydrothermal systems along the ridge axis. STORM cruise scientific party: F. Barrere, C. Boulart, G. Ceuleneer, N. Ferreira, B. Hanan, C. Hémond, S. Macleod, M. Maia, A. Maillard, S. Merkuryev, S.H. Park, S. Révillon, E. Ruellan, A. Schohn, S. Watson, and Y.S. Yang.

  11. Preservation of beach ridges due to pedogenic calcrete development in the Tongoy palaeobay, North-Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Marco; Le Roux, Jacobus P.; Solleiro-Rebolledo, Elizabeth; Kemnitz, Helga; Sedov, Sergey; Seguel, Oscar

    2011-09-01

    At the Tongoy palaeobay in north-central Chile, a series of beach ridges developed during seaward progradation that took place after the MIS 11 sea-level highstand (412 ka). The microrelief left by this succession of beach ridges has been well preserved from erosion due to the development of a calcrete (petrocalcic horizons), which was resistant to the chemical and physical weathering that characterized the area during humid phases of the late Pleistocene and middle Holocene. Macro- and micro-morphological analysis shows that the calcrete is of pedogenic origin and formed during two stages: in the first stage a massive (beta) calcrete developed, followed during the second stage by a laminar (alpha) calcrete. Each event in the development of the calcrete was intimately related to the foregoing process, mainly due to changes in the permeability of the profile horizons. During the first stages of development, organisms played an important role in the precipitation of calcite, which made the calcrete less permeable and favored the accumulation of ponded water during the wet season. As a result of this increased humidity, calcium carbonate with a laminar structure was precipitated. The development of the calcrete was also intimately associated with the evolution of the drainage network, which is characterized by a trellis pattern of tributaries parallel to the beach ridges. This study demonstrates the importance of soil genesis in the geomorphological evolution of landscapes.

  12. Diagenetic remobilization of rare earth elements in a sediment core from the central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Banakar, V.K.

    Rare earth elements (REE) distribution in a 36 cm long sediment box core from the Central Indian Basin is studied. REE concentration is generally higher in the upper oxic zone than in intermediate suboxic zone suggesting REE diffusion upwards...

  13. Rare earth element patterns of the Central Indian Basin sediments related to their lithology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Roelandts, I.; Sudhakar, M.; Pluger, W.L.

    Rare earth element (REE) concentration have been determined in terrigenous, siliceous (nodule barren and nodule bearing), calcareous, and red clay from the Central Indian Basin. The bulk distribution of REE, and in particular the relative cerium...

  14. Geotechnical properties of two siliceous cores from the central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khadge, N.H.

    Physical properties of the siliceous sediments from the Central Indian Basin are measured on two short cores. The properties such as water content, Atterberg limits, porosity specific gravity, wet density show the medium to high plastic sediment...

  15. New ichthyoliths from ferromanganese crusts and nodules from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.

    Ferromanganese encrusted hardgrounds, their intraclasts and the nuclei of manganese nodules collected from the Central Indian Ocean basin have yielded plentiful numbers of ichthyoliths. Forty well-knon ichthyoliths, one new type and 35 new subtypes...

  16. Variation in size, morphology and chemical composition of polymetallic nodules from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Parthiban, G.

    Chemical composition of 613 polymetallic nodules from 150 stations in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) are determined and variations in Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Co, Zn and moisture content are studied with respect to their size and surface texture...

  17. Benthic disturbance and monitoring experiment in the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.; Nath, B.N.

    Environmental impact assessment studies for deep-sea manganese nodule mining have been initiated in the Central indian Ocean Basin since 1995. As a part of the first phase for collecting the benthic baseline data, echosounding, subbottom profiling...

  18. Biological characteristics of Central Indian Basin waters during the southern summer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Matondkar, S.G.P.; Nair, K.K.C; Ansari, Z.A.

    Phytoplankton biomass, taxonomy, primary productivity, and photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) were studied as part of baseline data collection for prospective nodule mining in the Central Indian Basin during the ORV Sagar Kanya cruise SK...

  19. Morphological characteristics and emplacement mechanism of the seamounts in the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Das, P.; Iyer, S.D.; Kodagali, V.N.

    The morphotectonic features of the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) provide information regarding the development of the basin. Multibeam mapping of the CIOB reveals presence of abundant isolated seamounts and seamount chains sub-parallel to each...

  20. Physical properties of a sediment core from the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khadge, N.H.

    A box core of 7.5 m was collected from the Central Indian Basin for the purpose of geotechnical studies and depthwise variation of physical properties and clay mineralogy. Water content, Atterberg limits, specific gravity are measured at regular...

  1. Quantitative radiolarian assemblages in surface sediments from the central Indian Basin and their paleomonsoonal significance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.

    The percentage data of 47 radiolarian coarser taxonomic groups in the surface sediments from the central Indian Basin was subjected to cluster and factor analyses. The R-mode cluster analysis resulted in 3 dominant clusters which represent surface...

  2. Composition and genesis of zeolitic claystones from the central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D; Sudhakar, M.; Das, P.

    More than fifty indurated sediments recovered from the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIoB) are examined during the course of collection for manganese nodules and crusts. The samples occur as slabs either over which ferromanganese oxides are present...

  3. Seabed topography and distribution of manganese nodules in the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Kodagali, V.N.

    The relationship between seabed topography and distribution of nodules, recovery of free fall grab samplers, nodule size and chemical composition of manganese nodules in the Central Indian Ocean have been studied. Nodule abundance was greater (4...

  4. Magmatic evolution of the fresh basalts from the Ridge axis near Egaria Fracture Zone, Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mudholkar, A.V.

    the basalts under study. These gradual changes in the olivines and plagioclase point to a simple evolution of the basaltic magma by differentiating mineral phases from the parental basalt The resorption features observed in high forsteritic olivines (~ 89...

  5. Distribution of deep-sea benthos in the proposed mining area of Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A.

    to assess the impact on the benthic biota from mining activities in the Indian Basin. Several studies have been con-ducted in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans to understand the relationship betwen artificialimpact and biological reaction (the BIE Project.... 1989. Early diagnostic proceses afecting nutrients in theporewater of central Indian Ocean cores. Marine Geology86:57–66.Parulekar,A. H.,S. N. Harkantra,Z. A. Ansari,and S. G. P. Matondkar. 1982. Abyssal ben- thos of the central Indian Ocean. Deep...

  6. Phyto-toxicity and Phyto-remediation Potential of Mercury in Indian Mustard and Two Ferns with Mercury Contaminated Water and Oak Ridge Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Y.; Han, F.X.; Chen, J.; Shiyab, S.; Monts, D.L.; Monts, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    Phyto-remediation is an emerging technology that uses various plants to degrade, extract, contain, or immobilize contaminants from soil and water. Certain fern and Indian mustard species have been suggested as candidates for phyto-remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soil and water because of their high efficiency of accumulating metals in shoots and their high biomass production. Currently, no known hyper-accumulator plants for mercury have been found. Here we report the Hg uptake and phyto-toxicity by two varieties of fern and Indian mustard. Their potential for Hg phyto-remediation application was also investigated. Anatomical, histochemical and biochemical approaches were used to study mercury phyto-toxicity as well as anti-oxidative responses in ferns [Chinese brake fern (P. vittata) and Boston fern (N. exaltata)] and Indian mustard (Florida broadleaf and longstanding) (Brassica juncea L.) grown in a hydroponic system. Phyto-remediation potentials of these plant species were estimated based on their Hg uptake performance with contaminated soils from Oak Ridge (TN, USA). Our results show that mercury exposure led to severe phyto-toxicity accompanied by lipid peroxidation and rapid accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) in P. vittata, but not in N. exaltata. The two cultivars of fern responded differently to mercury exposure in terms of anti-oxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; peroxidase, POD; glutathione reductase, GR). Mercury exposure resulted in the accumulation of ascorbic acid (ASA) and glutathione (GSH) in the shoots of both cultivars of fern. On the other hand, Indian mustard effectively generated an enzymatic antioxidant defense system (especially CAT) to scavenge H 2 O 2 , resulting in lower H 2 O 2 in shoots with higher mercury concentrations. These two cultivars of Indian mustard demonstrated an efficient metabolic defense and adaptation system to mercury-induced oxidative stress. In both varieties of fern and Indian

  7. Newly Discovered Hydrothermal Plumes Along the Furious Fifties, South East Indian Ridge (SEIR; 128°E-140°E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulart, C.; Chavagnac, V.; Briais, A.; Revillon, S.; Donval, J. P.; Guyader, V.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the first evidence for hydrothermal activity along the intermediate-spreading South-East Indian Ridge (SEIR) between Australia and Antarctica (128°E-140°E), discovered during the STORM cruise of R/V L'Atalante. This section of the SEIR is located east of the low-magma Australian-Antarctic Discordance (AAD), where the ridge has the morphology of a slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge despite its intermediate spreading rate of 75 mm/yr. The axial depth decreases eastward, reflecting an eastward increase in magma budget.Using in-situ geochemical tracers based on optical backscatter, temperature, redox potential sensor and in situ mass spectrometer (ISMS) anomalies, we establish the existence of several distinct hydrothermal plumes within the water column along the 500 nautical miles ridge section. At one site, the combination of near-bottom temperature anomalies of 0.1°C together with strong dissolved methane and dissolved carbon dioxide anomalies revealed by the ISMS provides the precise location of an active vent in the Deep Southern Indian Ocean off Tasmania. Hydrothermal venting along the 128°E-140°E section of the SEIR appears to be significant, an observation consistent with the global link between spreading rate and plume occurrence (Baker and German, 2004). Moreover, the plume incidence increases westward and, in the eastern part, hydrothermal venting seems to be less significant, suggesting a possible influence of the high magma budget, as observed in mid-ocean ridge sections affected by hotspots. Future investigation will focus on the direct identification of venting sources and the study of hydrothermal circulation within the specific settings of the AAD. The observation of new venting sites at the frontier between Pacific and Indian Oceans may also provide new insights on the biogeography (diversity and distribution) of hydrothermal fauna. Baker, E. T., and C. R. German (2004), On the global distribution of hydrothermal vent fields, in Mid

  8. Diversity, biogeography and biodegradation potential of actinobacteria in the deep-sea sediments along the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The phylum Actinobacteria has been reported to be common or even abundant in deep marine sediments, however, knowledge about the diversity, distribution, and function of actinobacteria is limited. In this study, actinobacterial diversity in the deep sea along the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR was investigated using both 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and culture-based methods. The samples were collected at depths of 1662–4000 m below water surface. Actinobacterial sequences represented 1.2–9.1% of all microbial 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequences in each sample. A total of 5 actinobacterial classes, 17 orders, 28 families and 52 genera were detected by pyrosequencing, dominated by the classes Acidimicrobiia and Actinobacteria. Differences in actinobacterial community compositions were found among the samples. The community structure showed significant correlations to geochemical factors, notably pH, calcium, total organic carbon, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen, rather than to spatial distance at the scale of the investigation. In addition, 176 strains of the Actinobacteria class, belonging to 9 known orders, 18 families, and 29 genera, were isolated. Among these cultivated taxa, 8 orders, 13 families, and 15 genera were also recovered by pyrosequencing. At a 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the pyrosequencing data encompassed 77.3% of the isolates but the isolates represented only 10.3% of the actinobacterial reads. Phylogenetic analysis of all the representative actinobacterial sequences and isolates indicated that at least four new orders within the phylum Actinobacteria were detected by pyrosequencing. More than half of the isolates spanning 23 genera and all samples demonstrated activity in the degradation of refractory organics, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polysaccharides, suggesting their potential ecological functions and biotechnological applications for carbon recycling.

  9. Geochemistry of pyrite and chalcopyrite from an active black smoker in 49.6°E Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Yang, Yaomin; Yu, Hongjun; Zhao, Yuexia; Ding, Qingfeng; Yang, Jichao; Tang, Xin

    2017-06-01

    Active hydrothermal chimneys, as the product of submarine hydrothermal activity, can be used to determine the fluid evolution and formation process of potential volcanic-hosted massive sulfide deposits. A hard-won specimen from an active hydrothermal chimney was collected in the 49.6°E ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) field through a television-guided grab. A geochemical study of prominent sulfide (e.g., pyrite and chalcopyrite) included in this sample was performed using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The early sulfides produced at low temperature are of disseminated fine-grained anhedral morphology, whereas the late ones with massive, coarse euhedral features precipitated in a high-temperature setting. The systematic variations in the contents of minor and trace elements are apparently related to the crystallization sequence, as well as to texture. Micro-disseminated anhedral sulfides rich in Pb, As, Ni, Ba, Mn, Mo, U, and V were formed during the initial chimney wall growth, whereas those rich in Sn, Se, and Co with massive, coarse euhedral morphology were formed within the late metallogenic stage. The hydrothermal fluid composition has experienced a great change during the chimney growth. Such a conclusion is consistent with that indicated by using principal component analysis, which is a powerful statistical analysis method widely used to project multidimensional datasets (e.g., element contents in different mineral phases) into a few directions. This distribution pattern points to crystallographic controls on minor and trace element uptake during chimney growth, occurring with concomitant variations in the fluid composition evolutionary history. In this pyrite-chalcopyrite-bearing active hydrothermal chimney at the SWIR, the metal concentration and precipitation of sulfides largely occurred at the seafloor as a result of mixing between the upwelling hot hydrothermal fluid and cold seawater. Over the course of

  10. Zircon U-Pb age and Hf-O isotopes of felsic rocks from the Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. Z.; Zhang, W. Q.

    2017-12-01

    Hole U1473A was drilled to 790 meters below seafloor on the Atlantis Bank, an oceanic core complex in the Southwest Indian Ridge, where the upper crust has been removed by detachment faulting. The recovered core consists dominantly of olivine gabbro, with subordinate gabbro, gabbro with varying Fe-Ti oxide concentrations. Felsic veins intermittently occur throughout the whole core section. Zircons separated from twenty-four felsic samples have been conducted for U-Pb dating and O isotope analyses on the Cameca 1280 and Lu-Hf isotopes by laser ablation coupled with a MC-ICPMS. The zircons have highly variable contents of U (12-2078 ppm) and Th (5-801 ppm), yielding Th/U ratios of 0.33-0.81. They are typical oceanic zircons as defined by the trace element discrimination plots of Grimes et al. (2015). The weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of the analyzed zircons vary from 11.29 to 12.57 Ma. Age differences between felsic veins throughout the whole core are not resolved within analytical uncertainty of the SIMS measurements. All felsic samples have similar zircon Hf isotope compositions, with initial 176Hf/177Hf ratios of 0.283126-0.283197 and ɛHf values of 12.76-15.27. Zircons from all felsic samples but one have mantle-like δ18O values of 5.14-5.50‰. Zircons from one sample show partial resorption or total recrystallization; in comparison, they have lower δ18O values of 4.81±0.21‰. Such characteristics provide clear evidence for hydrothermal alteration after magmatic intrusion.

  11. The diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in a deep-sea water column above the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jun; Lai, Qiliang; Sun, Fengqin; Zheng, Tianling; Shao, Zongze

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria involved in organic pollutant degradation in pelagic deep-sea environments are largely unknown. In this report, the diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria was analyzed in deep-sea water on the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). After enrichment with a PAH mixture (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene), nine bacterial consortia were obtained from depths of 3946–4746 m. While the consortia degraded all four PAHs when supplied in a mixture, when PAHs were tested individually, only phenanthrene supported growth. Thus, degradation of the PAH mixture reflected a cometabolism of anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene with phenanthrene. Further, both culture-dependent and independent methods revealed many new bacteria involved in PAH degradation. Specifically, the alpha and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria were confirmed as the major groups within the communities. Additionally, Actinobacteria, the CFB group and Firmicutes were detected. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis showed that bacteria closely affiliated with Alcanivorax, Novosphingobium, and Rhodovulum occurred most frequently in different PAH-degrading consortia. By using general heterotrophic media, 51 bacteria were isolated from the consortia and of these 34 grew with the PAH mixture as a sole carbon source. Of these, isolates most closely related to Alterierythrobacter, Citricella, Erythrobacter, Idiomarina, Lutibacterium, Maricaulis, Marinobacter, Martelella, Pseudidiomarina, Rhodobacter, Roseovarius, Salipiger, Sphingopyxis, and Stappia were found to be PAH degraders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time these bacteria have been identified in this context. In summary, this report revealed significant diversity among the PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea water column. These bacteria may play a role in PAH removal in deep-sea environments. PMID:26379634

  12. The Diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in a deep-sea water column above the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongze eShao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria involved in organic pollutant degradation in pelagic deep-sea environments are largely unknown. In this report, the diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ( PAH-degrading bacteria was analyzed in deep-sea water on the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR. After enrichment with a PAH mixture (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene, 9 nine bacterial consortia were obtained from depths of 3946 m to 4746 m. PAH degradation occurred to all components of the mixture, but when using a single PAH as the sole carbon and energy source, only phenanthrene can be degraded obviously. This indicates the cometabolism of anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene with phenanthreneWhile the consortia degraded all four PAHs when supplied in a mixture, when PAHs were tested individually, only phenanthrene supported growth. Thus, degradation of the PAH mixture reflected a cometabolism of anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene with phenanthrene. Further, both culture-dependent and independent methods revealed many new bacteria involved in PAH degradation. Specifically, the alpha and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria were confirmed as the major groups within the communities. Additionally, Actinobacteria, the CFB group and Firmicutes were detected. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE analysis showed that bacteria closely affiliated with Alcanivorax, Novosphingobium and Rhodovulum occurred most frequently in different PAH-degrading consortia. More than half of the isolates (34 of 51 isolates were confirmed to have the ability to grow with the PAH mixture By using general heterotrophic media, 51 bacteria were isolated from the consortia and of these 34 grew with the PAH mixture as a sole carbon source. Of these, isolates most closely related to Alterierythrobacter, Citricella, Erythrobacter, Idiomarina, Lutibacterium, Maricaulis, Marinobacter, Martelella, Pseudidiomarina, Rhodobacter, Roseovarius, Salipiger, Sphingopyxis and Stappia were found to

  13. A note on incipient spilitisation of central Indian basin basalts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Iyer, S.D.

    of chlorite, epidote and opaques. The oxide variation plots indicate a mid-ocean ridge basalt trend for the samples, which have been spilitised to varying degrees. It is suggested that the basalts formed as a result of a fissure type of eruption along...

  14. Water-column geochemical anomalies associated with the remnants of a mega plume: A case study after CR-2003 hydrothermal event in Carlsberg Ridge, NW Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, D.; Mirza, I.H.; Prakash, L.S.; Kaisary, S.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Rao, B.R.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Drolia, R.K.; KameshRaju, K.A.

    to the shore-based laboratory for analysis. DFe was analysed using APDC- MIBK extraction, followed by Zeeman graphite furnace AAS (Perkin Elmer Analyst 600) measurements as de- scribed by Danielsson et al. 10 . DMn was similarly precon- centrated using SDDC... Oceanography Centre, UK, p. 3. 3. Murton, J. B., Baker, E. T., Sands, C. M. and German, C. R., De- tection of an unusual large hydrothermal event plume above the slow spreading Carlsberg Ridge, NW Indian Ocean. Geophys. Res. Lett., 2006, 33, 1–5. 4...

  15. Prevalence of optic disc hemorrhages in rural central India. The Central Indian Eye and Medical Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jost B Jonas

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the frequency of optic disc hemorrhages in a rural Indian population. METHODS: The population-based Central Indian Eye and Medical Study included 4711 subjects. Mean age was 48.5±12.9 years (range: 30-100 years. Color optic disc photographs were examined. RESULTS: Optic disc photographs were available for 4570 (97.0% subjects. Prevalence of disc hemorrhages was 17/8869 (0.19%; 95%CI:0.10,0.28 per eye and 16/4570 (0.35±0.09%; 95%CI:0.18,0.52 per subject. Prevalence of disc hemorrhages increased from 0.05% (95%CI:0.00,0.13 in the age group of 30-39 years to 0.25% (95CI:0.00,0.49 in the age group of 60-69 years and to 0.91% (95%CI:0.24,1.58 in the age group of 70+ years. After adjusting for older age, higher systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, myopic refractive error, smaller neuroretinal rim area and thinner retinal nerve fiber layer, occurrence of disc hemorrhages was associated only with glaucomatous optic nerve damage (P<0.001; Odds ratio: 87; 95%CI:32,239. Eleven of the 17 (65%; 95%CI:39,90 disc hemorrhages were found in glaucomatous eyes. Out of 193 glaucomatous eyes, 11 eyes (5.7%; 95%CI:2.4,9.0 showed a disc hemorrhage. Out of the 8676 non-glaucomatous eyes, 6 eyes (0.07%; 95%CI:0.01,0.12 had an optic disc hemorrhage. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of disc hemorrhages (0.2% per eye; 0.4% per subject in Indians aged 30+ years was strongly associated with glaucoma after adjustment for age, blood pressure and diabetes mellitus. A disc hemorrhage suggested glaucomatous optic nerve damage with a positive predictive value of 65%. About 6% of glaucomatous eyes showed a disc hemorrhage at the time of clinical examination highlighting the importance of optic disc hemorrhages for the diagnosis of glaucoma.

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The impact of the hybrid system in prediction of extreme rainfall and cyclone track is discussed. pp 1523-1542. Gravity anomalies over the Central Indian Ridge between 3°S and 11°S, Indian Ocean: Segmentation and crustal structure · Kiranmai Samudrala K A Kamesh Raju P Rama Rao · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  17. Two decades of Indian research on Ninetyeast Ridge reveal how seafloor spreading and mantle plume activities have shaped the eastern Indian Ocean.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.

    is widespread and often complex. The style of strike–slip faulting observed over the northern part of the Ninetyeast Ridge is a clear manifes- tation of India–Australia deforma- tion and it differs from the style of extensional faulting in the southern part... of the ridge which was ascribed due to Capricorn–Australia defor- mation. The findings further indicate that structural style of deformations varies on either side of the Ninety- east Ridge, implying that the ridge structure is currently acting as a...

  18. Benthic disturbance and impact experiments in the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.; Nath, B.N.; Valsangkar, A.B.; Parthiban, G.; Sivakholundu, K.M.; Walker, G.A.

    part of the Indian Deep-Sea Environment Experiment (INDEX) to assess the poten-tial environmental impact of nodule mining,it was proposed to simulate a disturbance on the seafloor and to study its effects on the benthic ecosystem. For this purpose a... benthic disturberwas used during cruise 3B of RV Yuzhmorgeologiyaduring August 1997,in a preselected test sitein the Central Indian Ocean. This multidisciplinary study aims to assess the potential effects of such activities. The program is funded...

  19. Seamounts in the Central Indian Ocean Basin: indicators of the Indian plate movement

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Khadge, N.H.

    stream_size 9 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Proc_Indian_Acad_Sci_(EPS)_99_357.pdf.txt stream_source_info Proc_Indian_Acad_Sci_(EPS)_99_357.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  20. Early Pliocene paleoceanography of the Vityaz Fracture Zone (VFZ), Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Banerjee, R.; Mergulhao, L.P.; Banerjee, P.; Parthiban, G.; Tewari, M.

    of land derived which would have transported by fresh water influx. Alternatively, the transport of spores to the bottom of the deep ocean might have accomplished by wind during the intensification of monsoon. An evidence is available for widespread warm... in these microorganisms. This further indicated that at the time of sedimentation of the substrate material, many of the trace metals from the water column were transported to the sea floor by microorganisms. The abrupt increase in the concentration of these trace...

  1. A revisit to vityaz transform fault area, Central Indian Ridge: Isotopic evidence of probable hydrothermal activity.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Banerjee, R.; Xiao, Y.K.

    at the Institute of Salt Lakes, China by +ve thermal ionisation mass spectrometry of Cs2BO4+ and Cs2Cl+ ions respectively, using a VG 354 model TIMS [14]. The measured isotopic ratios were expressed as del values relative to their standard reference materials.... 37.5 38 38.5 39 39.5 40 Del 11B 2000 1600 1200 800 400 0 W at er d ep th (m ) -0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 Del 37Cl 2000 1600 1200 800 400 0 Figure 2: Vertical profiles of δ11B and δ37Cl in water column at Stn.VM3 in the CIR. Stn. No. Latitude Longitude...

  2. Evidences for seawater-rock hydrothermal interaction in the serpentinites from Northern Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    , mineral chemistry and bulk rock analyses, we infer that the present serpentinites might have formed due to the interaction of harzburgites and seawater at a low temperature. Additionally, positive Eu anomaly, higher La/Sm and low Nb/La ratios suggest...

  3. Glass and mineral chemistry of northern central Indian ridge basalts: Compositional diversity and petrogenetic significance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.; Basavalingu, B.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    sub(2)0 with progressive fractionation, the basalts were gradually enriched in Y and Zr and depleted in Ni and Cr. In addition, the Sigma REE of magma also increased with fractionation, without any change in the (La/ Yb) sub(N) value. Glass from the VM...

  4. Macrobenthic abundance in the vicinity of spreading ridge environment in Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.

    In the man tle cavity of the deep - sea mussels Ophryotrocha Around the base of active chimneys Arthropoda: Crustacea Austinograea Around the base of active chimneys Rimicaris Swarms on the surface of active chimneys Chorocaris...

  5. First evidence of tumor-like anomaly infestation in Copepods from the central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhandare, C.; Ingole, B.S.

    at different depths at 5 of 7 stations sampled from elR. The highest (average) frequency was observed at station MPN-03 (390 noll OOm '> The percentage of infected specimens among all the sampled copepods varied from 3.0 6.9(70 and maximum infected population... stillunkl1O\\\\'l1::. high frequency of TLA in d(!Illinant copeplld groups (e.g. OI/COl'll had >21(.:~,TLA among the infected copepods) from thc elR could Ix

  6. Boron and chlorine isotopic signatures of seawater in the Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Xiao, Y.K.; Hai, L

    and then through the Dowex resin to remove all cations and co n vert Cl ? ions to HCl and finally through the Cs - resin bed to convert HCl to CsCl. Nearly 0.5 to 1.0 ml of CsCl sample was co l lected for the isotopic measurements of chlorine by mass spe c... measured by positive thermal ionization mass spe c- trometry of Cs 2 BO 4 + and Cs 2 Cl + ions 17,18 using VG 354 model mass spectrometer. Sample solutions (3 ? 6 ?l) co n- taining 1 ?g of boron per ?l and 5 ?g of chlorine per ?l solution...

  7. Magnetic anomalies across the southern Central Indian Ridge: evidence for a new transform fault

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A.K.; Krishna, K.S.; SubbaRaju, L.V.; Rao, D.G.

    ,~,IRN and F. G. S rt'~tt.I, editors, Plenum Press, New York, pp. 51- 147. ScnouTt:N H. and K. D. Kt.t'rGoao (1982) The memory of the accreting plate boundary and continuity of fracture zone. Earth and Planetary Science Letters', 59,255-266. Sam J. and P...

  8. Preliminary results of a recent cruise to the Northern Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Drolia, R.K.; Iyer, S.D.; Chakraborty, B.; Kodagali, V.N.; Mukhopadhyay, R.; Nanyasi, S.K.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Rajasekhar, R.P.; Misra, S.; Ray, Dwijesh; Andrade, R.; Lasitha, S.; Varghese, J.; Jacob, J.; Sukumaran, N.P.; Pednekar, A.; Furtado, R.; Nair, A.

    , Andrade R 4 . Lasitha S. 4 ,Varghese J. 4 , Jacob J 5 , Sukumaran N. P 1 , Pednekar A 5 , Furtado R 5 , Nair A. 5 1 National Geophysical Research Institute, Uppal Road, Hyderabad-500007 2 Department of Geology and Geophysics, IIT, Kharagpur, India 3...

  9. Eruption age of permanent mandibular first molars and central incisors in the south Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Rakhi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The existing eruption schedules for permanent and deciduous dentition are based on studies in the Western population. Since Indians differ from Westerners racially, genetically, and environmentally, these studies fail to provide relevant guidance on the eruption schedule in the Indian population. This study aims at determining the eruption pattern of permanent mandibular molars and central incisors in the south Indian population. Materials and Methods: 10,156 apparently healthy Indian children in the age-group of 6-9 years were examined with mouth mirror and probe under adequate illumination for the status of the eruption of the permanent mandibular first molar and permanent mandibular central incisor. Pearson′s Chi-square test with Yates′ continuity correction was used to calculate the P -value for comparison of proportion between girls and boys. The values obtained in our study were compared with the standard values. The Z-test with continuity correction was used to calculate the P -value. Results: As per our study, the permanent mandibular first molars and central incisors erupted one to two years later compared to the values reported in Westerners. The earlier eruption of the permanent mandibular first molars compared to the permanent mandibular central incisors, as well as the earlier eruption of both the teeth in girls compared to boys, were in accordance with the existing literature. Conclusion: The eruption age reported by us may form a standard reference for eruption age in Indians.

  10. Eruption age of permanent mandibular first molars and central incisors in the south Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rakhi; Sivapathasundharam, B; Einstein, A

    2007-01-01

    The existing eruption schedules for permanent and deciduous dentition are based on studies in the Western population. Since Indians differ from Westerners racially, genetically, and environmentally, these studies fail to provide relevant guidance on the eruption schedule in the Indian population. This study aims at determining the eruption pattern of permanent mandibular molars and central incisors in the south Indian population. 10,156 apparently healthy Indian children in the age-group of 6-9 years were examined with mouth mirror and probe under adequate illumination for the status of the eruption of the permanent mandibular first molar and permanent mandibular central incisor. Pearson's Chi-square test with Yates' continuity correction was used to calculate the P -value for comparison of proportion between girls and boys. The values obtained in our study were compared with the standard values. The Z-test with continuity correction was used to calculate the P -value. As per our study, the permanent mandibular first molars and central incisors erupted one to two years later compared to the values reported in Westerners. The earlier eruption of the permanent mandibular first molars compared to the permanent mandibular central incisors, as well as the earlier eruption of both the teeth in girls compared to boys, were in accordance with the existing literature. The eruption age reported by us may form a standard reference for eruption age in Indians.

  11. Composition of macrobenthos from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    considered to have a high quality of commercial grade nodules (Prasad 2007). However, of the three oceans, the Indian Ocean is the least studied in terms of deep sea fauna. Benthic organisms play an important role as food for large carnivores and some sediment-dwelling forms influence the mixing of organic and inor-.

  12. Composition of macrobenthos from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The deep sea is well known for its high faunal diversity. But the current interest in its abundant polymetallic nodules, poses a threat to the little known benthic organisms surviving in this unique environment. The present study is the first attempt to document the Indian Ocean abyssal benthic diversity of macroinvertebrates ...

  13. Composition of macrobenthos from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mediterranean. These values were comparable with those of other studies from Indian Ocean (Ingole et al 1992; Pavithran et al 2007). In contrast, work carried out by Sibuet et al (1989) using a sieve size of 0.25mm ..... subjected to a different diet regime characterized by a large predominance of carbohydrates and pos-.

  14. Analog Modeling of the Juan Fernández Ridge, Central Chile, and Implications for Flat-Slab Subduction Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodell, D.; Anderson, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    This study compares the strain experienced by the subducting lithosphere in analog models to the strain recorded by earthquakes in the subduction zone that includes the Juan Fernández Ridge (JFR), near 33 S, 73 W, off the coast of central Chile. The JFR is an aseismic hot spot ridge that has a thickened oceanic crust. The overthickened crust reduces the total density of the slab when compared to the surrounding slab areas, and thus increases the buoyancy of the subducting Nazca plate at this particular location. It is hypothesized that the Nazca plate experiences “flat-slab” subduction at the JFR subduction zone due to this buoyancy. Brudzinski and Chen (2005) argue that, due to the poorly aligned direction of maximum extension (T axes) for earthquakes in the subducting slab in flat-slab subduction zones, the theory of “slab pull” may not be valid for flat-slab subduction zones, and there must be other forces at work. However, Anderson et al. (2007) develop new, more precise slab contours from newly determined earthquake locations and use these contours to qualitatively compare the earthquake data to slab dip directions and thus expected slab-pull directions. They conclude that T axes are parallel to slab dip, and thus slab pull is the only force necessary for explaining the T axis direction. In this study, we quantitatively compare extension produced in analog "flat-slab" models in the laboratory to T axes from the Anderson et al. (2007) study, extending and further testing their idea. Several materials comprise the analog models. Light corn syrup represents the asthenosphere, while silicon putty represents the lithosphere. Recreating the dynamics of the buoyant JFR necessitates two different densities of silly putty: a denser one for the bulk of the slab, and a less dense one for the buoyant ridge. Shallow circular indentations (strain ellipses) on the slab facilitate recording of the strain in the subducting slab. Video and still pictures record each

  15. Indian deep-sea environment experiment (INDEX): Monitoring the restoration of marine enviroment after artificial disturbance to simulate deep-sea mining in central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    Erratum Marine Georesources and Geotechnology vol. 23, no. 4 (September–December 2005) was a special issue, but this was not indicated. The correct special issue information is below. Indian Deep-Sea Environment Experiment (INDEX): Monitoring... the restoration of marine environment after artificial disturbance to simulate deep-sea mining in Central Indian Basin Guest Editor Rahul Sharma Note from guest editor A special issue on Indian Deep-sea Environment Experiment (INDEX) conducted by the scientists...

  16. Pesticides and nitrate in groundwater underlying citrus croplands, Lake Wales Ridge, central Florida, 1999-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquette, Anne F.

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes pesticide and nitrate (as nitrogen) results from quarterly sampling of 31 surficial-aquifer wells in the Lake Wales Ridge Monitoring Network during April 1999 through January 2005. The wells, located adjacent to citrus orchards and used for monitoring only, were generally screened (sampled) within 5 to 40 feet of the water table. Of the 44 citrus pesticides and pesticide degradates analyzed, 17 were detected in groundwater samples. Parent pesticides and degradates detected in quarterly groundwater samples, ordered by frequency of detection, included norflurazon, demethyl norflurazon, simazine, diuron, bromacil, aldicarb sulfone, aldicarb sulfoxide, deisopropylatrazine (DIA), imidacloprid, metalaxyl, thiazopyr monoacid, oxamyl, and aldicarb. Reconnaissance sampling of five Network wells yielded detection of four additional pesticide degradates (hydroxysimazine, didealkylatrazine, deisopropylhydroxyatrazine, and hydroxyatrazine). The highest median concentration values per well, based on samples collected during the 1999–2005 period (n=14 to 24 samples per well), included 3.05 µg/L (micrograms per liter) (simazine), 3.90 µg/L (diuron), 6.30 µg/L (aldicarb sulfone), 6.85 µg/L (aldicarb sulfoxide), 22.0 µg/L (demethyl norflurazon), 25.0 µg/ (norflurazon), 89 µg/ (bromacil), and 25.5 mg/L (milligrams per liter) (nitrate). Nitrate concentrations exceeded the 10 mg/L (as nitrogen) drinking water standard in one or more groundwater samples from 28 of the wells, and the median nitrate concentration among these wells was 14 mg/L. Sampled groundwater pesticide concentrations exceeded Florida’s health-guidance benchmarks for aldicarb sulfoxide and aldicarb sulfone (4 wells), the sum of aldicarb and its degradates (6 wells), simazine (2 wells), the sum of simazine and DIA (3 wells), diuron (2 wells), bromacil (1 well), and the sum of norflurazon and demethyl norflurazon (1 well). The magnitude of fluctuations in groundwater pesticide

  17. Mineralogy of polymetallic nodules and associated sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    in montmorillonite, chlorite and illite, delta MnO sub(2) is the dominant mineral phase in the nodules of the southern Central Indian Ocean Basin. These nodules have a smooth surface texture, are relatively rich in Fe and Co, and are associated with pelagic clay...

  18. Deposition of Mn-Cu-Ni-enriched sediments during glacial period in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Borole, D.V.

    Two siliceous sediment cores collected from the Central Indian Basin have been analysed for organic carbon, biogenic silica, Al, Mn, Ni and Cu content. The concentrations of Mn, Cu and Ni showed one order of magnitude variation (an enrichment by a...

  19. Preliminary geotechnical properties of deepsea sediments from the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khadge, N.H.

    Geotechnical properties of the Plio-Pleistocene sediments from nodule bearing area in the Central Indian Basin have been studied to know shear strength and water content variation with depth. It reveals that surface sediments have low (less than 1 k...

  20. Magnetic lineations, fracture zones and seamounts in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    KameshRaju, K.A

    Magnetic and bathymetric data collected in the Central Indian Basin, between 8 degrees S and 16 degrees S lat., and 71 degrees E and 82 degrees E long. have been studied. The inferred fracture zones at 73 degrees E, 76 degrees 30'E and 79 degrees E...

  1. Early diagenetic processes affecting nutrients in the pore waters of Central Indian Ocean cores

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Mudholkar, A.V.

    Pore-water nutrients, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate, silicate, pH and solid-phase organic carbon were analysed for one core from the Arabian Sea and three cores from the manganese nodule area in the Central Indian Ocean Basin. Possible denitrification...

  2. Morphological variations in the polymetallic nodules from selected stations in the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.

    Polymetallic nodules from the Central Indian Ocean largely range in size from 2 to 6 cm. The smaller nodules (4 cm) are subspheroidal to spheroidal in shape and with the increase in size, nodules become more discoidal and elongated. The size...

  3. Size, surface texture, chemical composition and mineralogy interrelations in ferromanganese nodules of central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.; Pattan, J.N.; Jauhari, P.

    Fiftyseven ferromanganese nodules, classified into 3 size class (4,4-6 and 6-8 cm diam.), from the siliceous sediments of central Indian Ocean were analysed for transition metals and representative sample from each size class for mineralogy. Smaller...

  4. Benthic communities associated with ferromanganese nodules from the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Pavithran, S.; Goltekar, R.

    Micro- meio- and macrobenthic associations with Ferromanganese nodules collected from the Central Indian Ocean were evaluated. The area of nodules ranged from 13.58 to 21 cm super (2). The density of abyssal macrobenthos varies from 22-110 no. m...

  5. Comparison of internal features and microchemistry of ferromanganese crusts from the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D

    SEM/probe analyses of two ferromanganese crusts from the Central Indian Basin, formed on basalt substrate, reveal botryoids and cusps. The botryoids composed of delta-MnOs2, are enriched in Co, and the cusps and laminations with todorokite...

  6. Size analyses and geochemistry of ferromanganese nodules from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.; Khadge, N.H.

    Ferromanganese nodules collected during the 13th cruise of the M.V. Skandi Surveyor in 1987 cover a very large area, 71 424 km super(2) in the Central Indian Ocean. The area consists of 13 nodule types, which are grouped into six size classes...

  7. Correlation of the oldest Toba Tuff to sediments in the central Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    0.77Ma old in two sediment cores which are ~450km apart in the central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB). Morphology and chemical composition of glass shards and associated microtektites have been used to trace their provenance. In ODP site ...

  8. Correlation of the oldest Toba Tuff to sediments in the central Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have identified an ash layer in association with Australasian microtektites of ∼0.77Ma old in two sediment cores which are ∼450 km apart in the central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB). Morphology and chemical composition of glass shards and associated microtektites have been used to trace their provenance. In ODP site ...

  9. Some new observations on the intra-plate deformation in the Central Indian Basin (CIB)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murthy, K.S.R.; Neprochnov, O.V.; Levchenko, O.V.; Rao, T.C.S.; Milanovsky, V.E.; Lakshminarayana, S.

    IN THE CENTRAL INDIAN BASIN 191 , , i ,//" N 1 1~,,,,'-,~- x....~-,..-v--- - - ,..,~/~_. oo I -- ,9 .... 2~. ----" 0 i'" 1 o 8;:50' 8400'E 84-,I0' la I ,__ j; -t ool lOS \\/, .~ -v., .~ ! jF/.~lrt.,/ I I l ~i "°7 ~ o~ o - - ioTaS?-%- -i -h--A~'~-~'~, -/I...

  10. Physical properties of a long sediment core from the central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khadge, N.H.

    In a 7.5 m-long box core, collected at 9 degrees S and 77 degrees E from 5400 m water depth from the Central Indian Basin, geotechnical properties clearly reflect the Plio-Pleistocene boundary. It is marked by a drastic change in the physical...

  11. Macrobenthic standing stock in the nodule areas of Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pavithran, S.; Ingole, B.S.

    Diversity, distribution and standing stock of macrofauna in the nodule areas of Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) were studied during April 2003. The density ranged between 22 to 132 no.m super(-2) (mean: 55 + or - 37 SD, n=25) and biomass ranged...

  12. The heat and moisture budgets of the atmosphere over central equatorial Indian Ocean during summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; RameshBabu, V.; Sastry, J.S.

    The heat and moisture budgets of the atmosphere (surface to 100 mb) over the central equatorial Indian Ocean (2 degrees N to 2 degrees S; 76 degrees E to 80 degrees E) have been investigated utilising the surface and upper air data collected...

  13. Spatial distribution and longitudinal variation of clay minerals in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.

    in the Central Indian Basin (CIB). The average sand content in the basin is 3.8%, which decreases systematically and longitudinally to 0.3% towards south. The average illite and chlorite major clay mineral abundance also decrease southwards along the four...

  14. Geodynamic evolution and crustal growth of the central Indian Shield

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    1984; Mondal et al 2002) cratons reveal that the various events of felsic magmatism within the cen- tral Indian .... 1.21. 1.68. 1.78. 1.33. 0.96. 0.78. Total. 99.82. 98.29. 100.44. 99.31. 98.24. 100.08. 100.54. 99.21. Mg#. 46.22. 45.48. 29.52. 51.52. 53.17. 45.28. 40.91. 18.45. Trace elements in ppm. Cu. 7. 13. 26. 120. 102. 481.

  15. First data on the age of rocks from the central part of the Vitoria-Trindade Ridge (Brazil Basin, South Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolotnev, S. G.; Bylinskaya, M. E.; Golovina, L. A.; Ipat'eva, I. S.

    2011-03-01

    Micropaleontological and isotope-geochronological investigations of calcareous sedimentary rocks and volcanites dredged out from the central portion of the submarine Vitoria-Trindade Ridge during the 24th cruise of R/V Akademik Vavilov have been conducted. It has been established based on micropaleontological analysis, which included determination of the species composition of foraminifera and nannoplankton, that the sequence of sedimentary rocks having a pelagic nature formed on the slopes of the volcanic seamounts in the central portion of the Vitoria-Trindade Ridge from the Early to Mid-Miocene to the Holocene; a good correlation between the degree of lithification of these rocks and their age is observed. It has also been established that the carbonate platforms on the abraded tops of the Davis Seamount and the Dogaressa Bank, which are located in the east-central portion of the Vitoria-Trindade Ridge, started forming in the Early Miocene (19-24 Ma). It has been determined using local U-Pb dating of zircon grains with a SHRIMP-II high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometer that the volcanites forming the upper portion of the volcanic rock sequence of the Jaseur Seamount (29.8 ± 6.6 Ma) located in the west-central portion of the Vitoria-Trindade Ridge date to the Oligocene. The investigations conducted have confirmed the opinion that the Vitoria-Trindade Ridge formed in general because of the activity of the hot spot located under the volcanic Trindade and Martin Vaz Islands. However, separate extended lenticular segments of this ridge existed for a long time as single structures, within which the age of the seamounts was not linearly dependent on the distance from the location of the hot spot. Lenses of hot mantle matter that form at the sublithospheric level as a result of impulses of plume activity and move along with the lithospheric plate play a defining role in the development of individual segments forming the Vitoria-Trindade Ridge.

  16. Fire Regimes of Remnant Pitch Pine Communities in the Ridge and Valley Region of Central Pennsylvania, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Marschall

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many fire-adapted ecosystems in the northeastern U.S. are converting to fire-intolerant vegetation communities due to fire suppression in the 20th century. Prescribed fire and other vegetation management activities that increase resilience and resistance to global changes are increasingly being implemented, particularly on public lands. For many fire-dependent communities, there is little quantitative data describing historical fire regime attributes such as frequency, severity, and seasonality, or how these varied through time. Where available, fire-scarred live and remnant trees, including stumps and snags, offer valuable insights into historical fire regimes through tree-ring and fire-scar analyses. In this study, we dated fire scars from 66 trees at two sites in the Ridge and Valley Province of the Appalachian Mountains in central Pennsylvania, and described fire frequency, severity, and seasonality from the mid-17th century to 2013. Fires were historically frequent, of low to moderate severity, occurred mostly during the dormant season, and were influenced by aspect and topography. The current extended fire-free interval is unprecedented in the previous 250–300 years at both sites.

  17. A double seismic zone in the subducting Juan Fernandez Ridge of the Nazca Plate (32°S), central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marot, M.; Monfret, T.; Pardo, M.; Ranalli, G.; Nolet, G.

    2013-07-01

    The region of central Chile offers a unique opportunity to study the links between the subducting Juan Fernandez Ridge, the flat slab, the double seismic zone (DSZ), and the absence of modern volcanism. Here we report the presence and characteristics of the first observed DSZ within the intermediate-depth Nazca slab using two temporary seismic catalogs (Ovalle 1999 and Chile Argentina Seismological Measurement Experiment). The lower plane of seismicity (LP) is located 20-25 km below the upper plane, begins at 50 km depth, and merges with the lower plane at 120 km depth, where the slab becomes horizontal. Focal mechanism analysis and stress tensor calculations indicate that the slab's state of stress is dominantly controlled by plate convergence and overriding crust thickness: Above 60-70 km depth, the slab is in horizontal compression, and below, it is in horizontal extension, parallel to plate convergence, which can be accounted for by vertical loading of the overriding lithosphere. Focal mechanisms below 60-70 km depth are strongly correlated with offshore outer rise bend faults, suggesting the reactivation of preexisting faults below this depth. The large interplane distances for all Nazca DSZs can be related to the slab's unusually cold thermal structure with respect to its age. Since LPs globally seem to mimic mantle mineral dehydration paths, we suggest that fluid migration and dehydration embrittlement provide the mechanism necessary to weaken the rock and that the stress field determines the direction of rupture.

  18. Recent ORNL experience in site performance prediction: the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Landfill and the Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Central Waste Disposal Facility for disposal of low-level radioactive waste was evaluated using pathways analyses. For these evaluations, a conservative approach was selected; that is, conservatism was built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events had to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics existed. Data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations were used in developing the conceptual and numerical models that served as the basis for the numerical simulations of the long-term transport of contamination to man. However, the analyses relied on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Maximum potential doses to man were calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. Even under this conservative framework, the sites were found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations and conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability were drawn. Our experience through these studies has shown that in reaching conclusions in such studies, some consideration must be given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and to quantitatively determine the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed

  19. Growth of the Afanasy Nikitin seamount and its relationship with the 85 degree E Ridge, northeastern Indian Ocean.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Bull, J.M.; Ishizuka, O.; Scrutton, R.A.; Jaishankar, S.; Banakar, V.K.

    –Antarctica Ridge is invoked at a time between anomalies 31 and 25 in order to isolate the hotspot on the Antarc- tic plate. However, there is no evidence found in the linear magnetic anomaly pattern for such a ridge jump at this time, rather observed a con- tinuous... give no evidence for flex- ure of the oceanic basement towards the seamount that would be associated with substantial con- struction of the ANS in an intraplate setting, although small volcanic additions in an intraplate setting cannot be ruled out...

  20. Neurocysticercosos in South-Central America and the Indian Subcontinent: a comparative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagandeep Singh

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is an important public health problem in South-Central America and South Asia. A review of the differences in epidemiological and clinical attributes of cysticercosis and taeniasis in South Central America and India, respectively, is undertaken in the present communication. Intestinal taeniasis is hyperendemic in several American countries. In comparison, the prevalence of Taenia solium infestation is lower in India. The clinical manifestations in several American neurocysticercosis series comprise epilepsy, intracranial hypertension and meningeal - racemose cysticercosis, in roughly equal proportions. An overwhelming majority of the Indian subjects present with seizures. The commonest pathological substrate of the disorder in Indian patients is the solitary parenchymal degenerating cyst. The reasons for the predominance of solitary forms in India, and of multilesional forms in South Central America are discussed. The magnitude of Taenia solium infestation and the frequency of pork consumption in a given population appear to influence the quantum of cyst load in affected individuals.

  1. Hydrothermal Fe-Si-Mn oxide deposits from the Central and South Valu Fa Ridge, Lau Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhilei; Zhou Huaiyang; Yang Qunhui; Sun Zhixue; Bao Shenxu; Yao Huiqiang

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The Fe-Mn crust in the HHF has seawater contribution, whereas the Fe-Si oxide in the MHF is dominated by hydrothermal fluid → The Nd isotope of diffuse flow Fe-Si-Mn deposits indicates the obvious hydrothermal origin. → The Mn/Fe ratio in hydrothermal deposit may be a good indicator of propagating activities of the Valu Fa Ridge. - Abstract: A series of samples from the Hine Hina hydrothermal field (HHF) and the Mariner hydrothermal field (MHF) in the Central and Southern Valu Fa Ridge (VFR), Lau Basin were examined to explain the source origin and formation of the hydrothermal Fe-Si-Mn oxide deposits. The mineralogy was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). For the Fe-Mn oxide crusts in the HHF, varying amounts of volcanic fragments and some seawater contributions were recognized, along with higher concentrations of Mn, Al, Co, Ni, Zn, Sr, Mo, elevated ΣREE and negative Ce anomalies. In contrast, the Si-rich oxide samples of the MHF were enriched in Cu, Pb and Ba, indicative of proximity to a hydrothermal jet. Moreover, conductive cooling of hydrothermal fluid evoked the Si-rich deposit formation in the MHF. The Sr, Nd and Pb isotope data provided further constraints regarding the source and formation of the Fe-Si-Mn deposits in the VFR by showing that the samples of the HHF are a mixture of three components, namely, hydrothermal fluid, seawater and volcanic materials, whereas the samples of the MHF were dominated by hydrothermal fluids. The seawater had a minor influence on the Nd isotope data, and the Pb isotope data exhibited a close association with the substrate rock and preformed volcaniclastic layers in this area. The occurrence of relatively high Mn/Fe ratios in the hydrothermal deposits of this area may be a good indicator of the propagating activities of the VFR over geological time.

  2. Hydrologic response in karstic-ridge wetlands to rainfall and evapotranspiration, central Florida, 2001-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Leel; Phelps, G.G.; Kinnaman, Sandra L.; German, Edward R.

    2005-01-01

    Two internally drained karstic wetlands in central Florida-Boggy Marsh at the Hilochee Wildlife Management Area and a large unnamed wetland at the Lyonia Preserve-were studied during 2001-03 to gain a better understanding of the net-recharge function that these wetlands provide, the significance of exchanges with ground water with regard to wetland water budgets, and the variability in wetland hydrologic response to a range of climate conditions. These natural, relatively remote and unaltered wetlands were selected to provide a baseline of natural wetland hydrologic variability to which anthropogenic influences on wetland hydrology could be compared. Large departures from normal rainfall during the study were fortuitous, and allowed monitoring of hydrologic processes over a wide range of climate conditions. Wetland responses varied greatly as a result of climate conditions that ranged from moderate drought to extremely moist. Anthropogenic activities influenced water levels at both study sites; however, because these activities were brief relative to the duration of the study, sufficient data were collected during unimpacted periods to allow for the following conclusions to be made. Water budgets developed for Boggy Marsh and the Lyonia large wetland showed strong similarity between the flux terms of rainfall, evaporation, net change in storage, and the net ground-water exchange residual. Runoff was assumed to be negligible. Of the total annual flux at Boggy Marsh, rainfall accounted for 45 percent; evaporation accounted for 25 percent; net change in storage accounted for 25 percent; and the net residual accounted for 5 percent. At the Lyonia large wetland, rainfall accounted for 44 percent; evaporation accounted for 29 percent; net change in storage accounted for 21 percent; and the net residual accounted for 6 percent of the total annual flux. Wetland storage and ground-water exchange were important when compared to the total water budget at both wetlands. Even

  3. Kinematic and tectonic peculiarities of ultra-slow spreading ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokhan, Andrey; Dubinin, Evgeny; Grokholsky, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    This paper is dedicated to ultra-slow spreading ridges. They are distinguished as ridges with spreading velocities less than 2 cm/year. As it was shown by recent studies, these ridges are characterized by significant peculiarities of deep structure, topography and accretion mechanisms different from ridges with higher velocities. They are located in North Atlantic (Reikjanes, Kolbeynsey, Mohns, Knipovich), Arctic (Gakkel ridge, Lena trough), and southern part of the Indian Ocean (South-Western Indian ridge (SWIR)). Ridges located near hotspots (Reikjanes, Kolbeynsey ridge, central part of SWIR) show structure changing with increase of proximity of hotspots. Far from hotspots axial volcanic ridges (AVRs) are short, high and offset by large non-transform offsets (NTOs) located in axial valley. Near hotspots the ridges are characterized by axial rise with long AVRs offset by small NTOs located on axial rise. These features are explained by influence of mantle flow from hotspots initiating the increase of mantle temperature. It results in decrease of lithospheric brittle layer with approaching to hotspot and subsequent change in accretion mechanisms, faulting patterns and lithosphere rheology. Several segments of ridges (16-25° E SWIR, 8° W-3° E) are characterized by structure similar with slow spreading Mid-Atlantic ridge (MAR). The rift valley is occupied by regularly spaced AVRs offset by small NTOs. Basalts prevail in dredges. Flanks of the ridges have the similar structure with MAR. The most significant portion of ultra-slow spreading ridges is characterized by unique segmentation (eastern and central part of Gakkel ridge, Knipovich, Mohns ridges, Lena trough segments in the eastern and western parts of SWIR) comprised of magmatic and amagmatic segments. The first ones are short centers of focused magmatic activity structurally resembling central parts of segments of MAR. The second ones are 35-150 km long portions with reduced or almost absent volcanic

  4. Deep sea litter: A comparison of seamounts, banks and a ridge in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans reveals both environmental and anthropogenic factors impact accumulation and composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Cheryl Woodall

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine litter is a global challenge that has recently received policymakers’ attention, with new environmental targets in addition to changes to old legislation. There are no global estimates of benthic litter because of the scarcity of data and only patchy survey coverage. However, estimates of baseline abundance and composition of litter are vital in order to implement litter reduction policies and adequate monitoring schemes. Two large-scale surveys of submarine geomorphological features in the Indian and Atlantic Oceans reveal that litter was found at all locations, despite their remoteness. Litter abundance was patchy, but both surveyed oceans had sites of high litter density. There was a significant difference in the type of litter found in the two oceans, with the Indian Ocean sites being dominated by fishing gear, whereas the Atlantic Ocean sites displayed a greater mix of general refuse. This study suggests that seabed litter is ubiquitous on raised benthic features, such as seamounts. It also concludes that the pattern of accumulation and composition of the litter is determined by a complex range of factors both environmental and anthropogenic. We suggest that the tracing of fishing effort and gear type would be an important step to elucidate hotspots of litter abundance on seamounts, ridges and banks.

  5. Laboratory development of methods for centralized treatment of liquid low-level waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.D.; Bostick, D.T.; Burgess, M.W.; Taylor, P.A.; Perona, J.J.; Kent, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    Improved centralized treatment methods are needed in the management of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). LLLW, which usually contains radioactive contaminants at concentrations up to millicurie-per-liter levels, has accumulated in underground storage tanks for over 10 years and has reached a volume of over 350,000 gal. These wastes have been collected since 1984 and are a complex mixture of wastes from past nuclear energy research activities. The waste is a highly alkaline 4-5 M NaNO 3 solution with smaller amounts of other salts. This type of waste will continue to be generated as a consequence of future ORNL research programs. Future LLLW (referred to as newly generated LLLW or NGLLLW) is expected to a highly alkaline solution of sodium carbonate and sodium hydroxide with a smaller concentration of sodium nitrate. New treatment facilities are needed to improve the manner in which these wastes are managed. These facilities must be capable of separating and reducing the volume of radioactive contaminants to small stable waste forms. Treated liquids must meet criteria for either discharge to the environment or solidification for onsite disposal. Laboratory testing was performed using simulated waste solutions prepared using the available characterization information as a basis. Testing was conducted to evaluate various methods for selective removal of the major contaminants. The major contaminants requiring removal from Melton Valley Storage Tank liquids are 90 Sr and 137 Cs. Principal contaminants in NGLLLW are 9O Sr, 137 Cs, and 106 Ru. Strontium removal testing began with literature studies and scoping tests with several ion-exchange materials and sorbents

  6. Influence of regional and local topography on the distribution of polymetallic nodules in Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kodagali, V.N.

    Detailed bathymetric surveys from part of the Central Indian Ocean revealed several bathymetric features such as hills, slopes, valleys, and plains. Areas with a local relief of a few to hundreds of meters generally have a high abundance...

  7. Radiolarian zonation and volcanic ash layers in two Quaternary sediment cores from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.

    Radiolarian abundance in two Quaternary sediment cores, collected from the Central Indian Basin, was studied and Nigrini's (1971) and Goll's (1980) zones are recognised. New radiolarian zones Collosphaera orthoconus, Lamprocyrtis nigriniae...

  8. Effect of benthic disturbance on geotechnical characteristics of sediments from nodule mining area in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khadge, N.H.

    Benthic disturbance is carried out in the Central Indian Basin for environmental impact assessment studies. Geotechnical measurements were made on sediments collected before and after disturbing the top 10-15 cm of the seafloor. Results indicate...

  9. Radiolarian abundance and geochemistry of the surface-sediments from the Central Indian Basin: Inferences to Antarctic bottom water current

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.; Jauhari, P.

    The distribution trend of numbers of radiolarian shells/gram dry sediment, biogenic silica, organic carbon, and the carbon/nitrogen ratios in the surface sediments of the Central Indian Basin is similar. Ratios of two suborders of radiolaria, i...

  10. Assessing the distribution and abundance of seabed minerals from seafloor photographic data in the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.; Khadge, N.H.; JaiSankar, S.

    estimation of a deposit from photographic data in conjunction with sounding and sampling data in the Central Indian Ocean Basin. Data from more than 20,000 photos were analysed and correlated with geological features such as bathymetry, sediment thickness...

  11. Deep-sea nematode assemblages from a commercially important polymetallic nodule area in the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, R.; Miljutin, D.M.; Miljutina, M.; Martinez, P.A.; Ingole, B.S.

    The Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) is an important area for prospective mining for polymetallic nodules. However, little is known about the biodiversity or community structure of abyssal benthic assemblages in the area. The aim of this study...

  12. Variability of Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu and Co in manganese nodules from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jauhari, P.

    The trace element variations in manganese nodules from the Central Indian Basin have been related to the underlying sediment type. Percentages of Mn, Cu and Ni are high in nodules occurring in siliceous sediments compared with nodules from the red...

  13. Seasonal cycle of cross-equatorial flow in the central Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; McPhaden, Michael J.

    2017-05-01

    This study investigates the seasonal cycle of meridional currents in the upper layers of central equatorial Indian Ocean using acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and other data over the period 2004-2013. The ADCP data set collected along 80.5°E is the most comprehensive collection of direct velocity measurements in the central Indian Ocean to date, providing new insights into the meridional circulation in this region. We find that mean volume transport is southward across the equator in the central Indian Ocean in approximate Sverdrup balance with the wind stress curl. In addition, mean westerly wind stress near the equator drives convergent Ekman flow in the surface layer and subsurface divergent geostrophic flow in the thermocline at 50-150 m depths. In response to a mean northward component of the surface wind stress, the maximum surface layer convergence is shifted off the equator to between 0.5° and 1°N. Evidence is also presented for the existence of a shallow equatorial roll consisting of a northward wind-driven surface drift overlaying the southward directed subsurface Sverdrup transport. Seasonal variations are characterized by cross-equatorial transports flowing from the summer to the winter hemisphere in quasi-steady Sverdrup balance with the wind stress curl. In addition, semiannually varying westerly monsoon transition winds lead to semiannual enhancements of surface layer Ekman convergence and geostrophic divergence in the thermocline. These results quantify expectations from ocean circulation theories for equatorial Indian Ocean meridional circulation patterns with a high degree of confidence given the length of the data records.

  14. Geochemical and visual indicators of hydrothermal fluid flow through a sediment-hosted volcanic ridge in the Central Bransfield Basin (Antarctica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Aquilina

    Full Text Available In the austral summer of 2011 we undertook an investigation of three volcanic highs in the Central Bransfield Basin, Antarctica, in search of hydrothermal activity and associated fauna to assess changes since previous surveys and to evaluate the extent of hydrothermalism in this basin. At Hook Ridge, a submarine volcanic edifice at the eastern end of the basin, anomalies in water column redox potential (E(h were detected close to the seafloor, unaccompanied by temperature or turbidity anomalies, indicating low-temperature hydrothermal discharge. Seepage was manifested as shimmering water emanating from the sediment and from mineralised structures on the seafloor; recognisable vent endemic fauna were not observed. Pore fluids extracted from Hook Ridge sediment were depleted in chloride, sulfate and magnesium by up to 8% relative to seawater, enriched in lithium, boron and calcium, and had a distinct strontium isotope composition ((87Sr/(86Sr = 0.708776 at core base compared with modern seawater ((87Sr/(86Sr ≈ 0.70918, indicating advection of hydrothermal fluid through sediment at this site. Biogeochemical zonation of redox active species implies significant moderation of the hydrothermal fluid with in situ diagenetic processes. At Middle Sister, the central ridge of the Three Sisters complex located about 100 km southwest of Hook Ridge, small water column E(h anomalies were detected but visual observations of the seafloor and pore fluid profiles provided no evidence of active hydrothermal circulation. At The Axe, located about 50 km southwest of Three Sisters, no water column anomalies in E(h, temperature or turbidity were detected. These observations demonstrate that the temperature anomalies observed in previous surveys are episodic features, and suggest that hydrothermal circulation in the Bransfield Strait is ephemeral in nature and therefore may not support vent biota.

  15. Lake-level fluctuations since the Last Glaciation in Selin Co (lake), Central Tibet, investigated using optically stimulated luminescence dating of beach ridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dewen; Li Yingkui; Ma Baoqi; Zhao, Junxiang; Dong Guocheng; Wang Liqiang

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on lake-level fluctuations since the Last Glaciation in Selin Co (lake), Central Tibet, by dating four groups of beach ridges using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The highest/oldest beach ridge group (>100 m higher than the current lake level) is dated back to 67.9 ± 2.4 ka BP, corresponding to the early stage of the Last Glaciation (marine isotope stage (MIS) 4). This date further supports that no plateau-scale ice sheet covered the Tibetan Plateau during the Last Glaciation. The other three groups produce OSL ages of 30.4 ± 2.9 to 18.6 ± 1.7, 12.5 ± 1.6 to 9.2 ± 0.5, and 6.9 ± 0.2 ka BP respectively, most likely corresponding to cold or wet climate periods of the late stage of the Last Glaciation (MIS 2), deglaciation, and Holocene Hypsithermal. On the plateau scale, these four beach ridge groups are almost synchronous with advances or standstills of Himalayan glaciers, indicating similar climate controls across the central and southern Tibetan Plateau, and being consistent with the conclusion, obtained from nearby ice core records, that this area is affected by the South Asia monsoon. Furthermore, beach ridges are also synchronous with fluvial terraces in the northern Tibetan Plateau, implying common driving forces during their formation. Therefore, some terraces may be formed as a result of climate events rather than being of tectonic origin.

  16. Ultraslow Ridges through Binoculars: Teleseismic Earthquake Characteristics Illuminate Accretion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlindwein, V.; Laederach, C.; Korger, E.

    2011-12-01

    Ultraslow spreading ridges with full spreading rates global mid-ocean ridge system, yet 85% of these ridges are still unexplored. Understanding the structure and dynamics of crustal production and the associated hydrothermal systems including their biota has become a major challenge of modern mid-ocean ridge research. The complex interplay between tectonic, magmatic and hydrothermal processes that governs lithospheric accretion at ultraslow-spreading ridges is so poorly investigated because their main representatives, the Arctic ridge system and the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), are situated in remote areas with difficult working conditions. While local seismicity studies with ocean bottom seismometers on slow and fast spreading ridges have greatly contributed to our understanding of active accretion processes, comparable studies are lacking for ultraslow spreading ridges forcing to fall back on studies of larger earthquakes recorded on land. Using teleseismic data from the Bulletin of the International Seismological Centre between the years 1976 and 2010, we performed a systematic analysis of the ridge related seismicity (M > 4) of the ultraslow spreading Arctic ridge system and the SWIR. These ridges were divided in 11 sections of uniform seismological, topographic and geological characteristics, totalling a length of 7200 km with the rift axis defined as a multisegment line along the topographic low of the rift valley. Only events within 30 km of the rift axis were included in our study. We found that magmatic and amagmatic accretion sections cannot be distinguished neither by event rate, moment release rate, maximum earthquake magnitude, nor by the b-value. Yet using single link cluster analysis for identification of swarms of 8 or more earthquakes, small clusters of 2-7 earthquakes and single events, we found that sections with amagmatic accretion lack swarms and show consistently a high percentage of single events, while teleseismic swarms occur only in

  17. Seasonal Cycle of Cross Equatorial Flow in the Central Equatorial Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael; Wang, Yi

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the seasonal cycle of meridional currents in the upper layers of central equatorial Indian Ocean using acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data and other data sets along 80.5°E for the period 2004-13. The ADCP data set is the most comprehensive collection of direct velocity measurements in the central Indian Ocean to date, providing new insights into cross equatorial flow in this region. Mean meridional currents are characterized by subsurface divergence between 50-100 m depths with relatively weak convergence above, driven by the annual mean westward pressure gradient force and the surface westerly wind stress respectively. However, in response to a mean northward component of the surface wind stress, the maximum mean surface layer convergence is shifted off the equator to 0.75°N. Evidence is also presented for the existence of a shallow equatorial roll, consisting of a northward wind-driven surface drift overlaying a southward subsurface flow. Cross equatorial transports during boreal summer and winter indicate that a quasi-steady Sverdrup transport balance dominates the seasonal cycle of upper-layer meridional currents. In addition, semi-annually varying westerly monsoon transition winds force Ekman convergence in the surface layer and set up transient zonal pressure gradients that drive seasonally enhanced meridional geostrophic divergence in the thermocline. These results quantify expectations from ocean circulation theories for equatorial Indian Ocean meridional circulation patterns with a high degree of confidence given the length of the data records.

  18. Phenotypic differentiation of Barilius bendelisis (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) in four rivers from Central Indian Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Javaid Iqbal; Saxena, Neha; Patiyal, Rabindar Singh; Sahoo, Prabhati Kumari

    2015-03-01

    Barilius bendelisis, commonly known as Indian Hill Trout is an upland water fish of South East Asia. It belongs to the family Cyprinidae and dwells in shallow, clear and cold water. In this study, the intraspecific variation of Barilius bendelisis, on the basis of morphometric characters, was investigated. Altogether, 402 specimens were collected from four rivers in the Central Indian Himalaya. A truss network was constructed by interconnecting 12 landmarks to yield 30 distance variables that were extracted from digital images of specimens using tpsDig2 and PAST software. Allometric transformed truss measurements were subjected to univariate analysis of variance, factor analysis and discriminant analysis. All variables exhibited significant differences between the populations. Altogether 88% of the specimens were classified into their original populations (81.98% under a 'leave-one-out' procedure). With factor analysis measurements of the head region, the middle portion and the caudal region had high loadings on the first and second axis. The results indicated that B. bendelisis has significant phenotypic heterogeneity between the geographically isolated regions of Central Indian Himalaya. We hypothesize that the marked interspecific variation in B. bendelisis is the result of local ecological conditions.

  19. The Impact of Fe-Ti Oxide Concentration on the Structural Rigidity of the Lower Oceanic Crust, Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, J. R.; Winkler, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Fe-Ti oxides are important components of oceanic core complexes (OCC) formed at slow-spreading ridges, since Fe-Ti oxide phases form throughout the crustal column and are weaker than silicate phases. This study investigated the predicted relationship between the presence and concentration of Fe-Ti oxides and the presence/intensity of crystal-plastic deformation in samples from Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). Atlantis Bank is an OCC that formed through the exhumation of lower oceanic crust along a detachment shear zone/fault. OCCs form along slow-spreading ridges and are characterized by the complex interactions between magmatism and crustal extension, thus, making them more susceptible to crystal-plastic deformation at higher temperatures and for weaker phases like Fe-Ti oxides to preferentially partition strain. Atlantis Bank has been the focus of many scientific expeditions to various sites including; Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Holes 735B and 1105A, and the International Oceanic Discovery Program (IODP) Hole U1473A. A total of 589 thin sections from all three holes were analyzed using the software package Fiji to calculate the Fe-Ti oxide concentration within the thin sections. The Fe-Ti oxide percentage was correlated with the crystal-plastic fabric (CPF) intensity, from 0-5 (no foliation - ultramylonite), for each thin section using the statistical software R. All three holes show a positive correlation between the abundance of Fe-Ti oxides and the CPF intensity. Specifically, 76.3% of samples with a concentration of 5% or more Fe-Ti oxides have a corresponding CPF intensity value of 2 or more (porphyroclastic foliation - ultramylonitic). The positive correlation may be explained by the Fe-Ti oxides preferentially partitioning strain, especially at temperatures below where dry plagioclase can recrystallize. This allows for a mechanism of continued slip along the shear zone or form new shear zones at amphibolite grade conditions while the lower

  20. Magnetic rock properties of the gabbros from the ODP Drill Hole 1105A of the Atlantis Bank, southwest Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, D.G.; Krishna, K.S.

    . Comparison of modal proportions of the oxides, grain sizes and magnetization parameters of the rocks has con rmed that most coarse-grained oxide mineral bearing rocks record low Koenigsberger ratio (2 to 5) and median destructive elds (5 to 7 mT). Average...- swered is to what extent lower crustal rocks con- tribute to linear marine magnetic anomalies. The Atlantis Bank (32 43:130S; 57 16:650E), east of the Atlantis II Fracture Zone is a window in the Indian Ocean where lower crustal rocks, gabbros...

  1. Biogenic influence on the growth of ferromanganese micronodules in the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R; Iyer, S.D.

    in manganese nodules and micronodules from northwest Atlantic. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 43:1105 1115. Banerjee, R., lyer, S.D. and Dutta, P., 1990. Effect of diagenesis on the buried nodules and associated sediments in the siliceous ooze domain... of the Central Indian Basin. Geo- Mar. Lett., in press. Baturin, G.N. and Dubinchuk, U.T., 1983. Biomorphic ultra- microscopic structures in pelagic iron manganese concre- tions. Oceanology, 23:747 749. Bernat, M., Bieri, R.H., Koide, M., Griffin, J.J...

  2. Monitoring the impact of simulated deep-sea mining in Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.; Nath, B.N.; Jaisankar, S.

    Ocean (Foell et al. 1990; Trueblood 1993; Fukushima 1995; Tkatchenko et al. 1996). Sediment transport during deep-sea disturbances, natural or artificial, not only has immediate effects, but also long term impacts, and the restoration is a very com- plex... for designing and undertaking a deep-sea mining operation. This study gives an overview on the immediate effects and long-term (44 months later) restoration of the deep-sea floor environment at the INDEX site in the Central Indian Basin. Work Done Under...

  3. Carbon budget in the eastern and central Arabian Sea: An Indian JGOFS synthesis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Swathi, P.S.; DileepKumar, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Bhattathiri, P.M.A.; Madhupratap, M.; Ramaswamy, V.; Sarin, M.M.; Gauns, M.; Ramaiah, N.; Sardessai, S.; DeSousa, S.N.

    : Upper ocean processes: Kf"TIYORD.',': carbon, Arabian Sea, budgct. biogeochemistry, grazing, lGOFS Citation: Sarma, V. V. S. S.. el al .. Carhon budget in the eastern and central Arabian Sea: An Indian lGOFS synthesis, Global Biog(!ochem. (l'cles, J7... locations in the Arabian Sea. Shaded area represents depth <200 m. because of the upward pumping of nutrients by convection [Madhuprutap el al., 1996; Barber et 01., 2001], which results in deep mixed layers of 120 m in the northern Arabian Sca. de Sousa ct...

  4. Final report for the Central Mercury Treatment System in Building 9623 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This document discusses the construction of the Central Mercury Treatment System (CMTS) in Building 9623 at the Y-12 Plant, the remediation activities involved, waste generated from the project, and the monitoring schedule of the CMTS. As part of the Reduction of Mercury in Plant Effluent Program, the project treats groundwater contaminated with mercury from Buildings 9201-4, 9201-5, and 9204-4 at the Y-12 Plant to meet National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit limits for discharge to East Fork Poplar Creek. The CMTS, located in Building 9623, will treat water from the sumps of buildings in which mercury was used in operations and which have been shown to be significant contributors to the overall levels of mercury in plant effluents. This project was anticipated when the NPDES Permit was issued, and the contamination limits and frequency of monitoring for the system discharge are detailed in the permit as Outfall 551. This project was performed as an Incentive Task Order and included the advance procurement of the carbon columns, removal of existing equipment in Building 9623, and system installation and checkout. Construction activities for installing the system started in January 1996 after the area in Building 9623 had been cleared of existing, obsolete equipment. The CMTS became operational on November 26, 1996, well ahead of the permit start date of January 1, 1998. The early completion date allows Hg concentrations in EFPC to be evaluated to determine whether further actions are required to meet NPDES permit limits for reduced Hg loading to the creek

  5. A record of the last 460 thousand years of upper ocean stratification from the central Walvis Ridge, South Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scussolini, P.; Peeters, F.J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The upper branch of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation predominantly enters the Atlantic Ocean through the southeast, where the subtropical gyre is exposed to the influence of the Agulhas leakage (AL). To understand how the transfer of Indian Ocean waters via the AL affected the upper

  6. Paleomagnetic Constraints on the Evolution of Atlantis Bank: Results from IODP Expedition 360 "SW Indian Ridge Lower Crust and Moho"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A.; Bowles, J. A.; Tivey, M.; Expedition 360 Scientists, I.

    2016-12-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 360 was the first step in a multiphase drilling program designed to better understand the nature of lower oceanic crust and the Moho at slower spreading ridges. Hole U1473A was drilled to 790 meters below seafloor on the summit of Atlantis Bank, an oceanic core complex, where the lower crust has been exposed by detachment faulting. Paleomagnetic data on the gabbroic cores allow us to constrain tectonic rotations, investigate magmatic and sub-solidus deformation of the rocks, and better understand the nature of lower crustal contributions to marine magnetic anomalies. The average paleomagnetic inclination at U1473A is consistent with results found at other ODP Atlantis Bank Holes 735B and 1105A and suggests a minimum platform-wide rotation of 20° subsequent to cooling through magnetic blocking temperature(s). However, in detail, inclination data from U1473A reveal down-core variations consistent with relative tectonic rotation of up to 12° across at least one major fault zones. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility results show magnetic fabrics that on average are slightly more foliated than lineated, with a foliation that dips at 40°, with considerable down-hole variation and with a reasonable correlation with observed macroscopic crystal-plastic fabric dips. While the majority of Hole U1473A carries a reversed polarity magnetization, consistent with formation in geomagnetic polarity chron C5r.3r, some narrow zones of altered gabbro carry an apparent normal polarity. These zones were likely remagnetized during a subsequent normal polarity period, and although the timing of the alteration cannot be uniquely determined, this suggests that the boundary between reverse chron C5r.3r and normal chron C5r.2n may occur near the current bottom of the hole.

  7. The central monitoring station of Indian Environmental Radiation Monitoring Network (IERMON): the architecture and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Saurabh; Ratheesh, M.P.; Mukundan, T.; Patel, M.D.; Nair, C.K.G.; Puranik, V.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Indian Environmental Radiation Monitoring Network (IERMON) is being established across the country by the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The network consists of stations with automated systems for environmental radiation monitoring with online data communication facility. Currently about 100 stations are operational and additional 500 stations are expected to be installed by March, 2012. The network is established with different objectives, the main objective being the detection and reporting of any nuclear emergency anywhere in the country. The central monitoring station of the network is established in Mumbai. This paper describes the architecture and functions of IERMON Central Station. The Central Station consists of server room for online data collection from remote stations and maintenance of databases for various applications; central monitoring room for user interaction with database and IERMON website maintenance and development room for the development of new applications. The functions of IERMON Central Station include detection and reporting of nuclear emergency, maintenance of remote stations, enhancement of public awareness on environmental radiation through public display systems and website, etc. The details on system layout and data protocols can be found in the paper. (author)

  8. Geochemical and Isotopic Variations Along the Southeast Indian Ridge (126°-140°E) Related to Mantle Flow Originating from Beneath Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanan, B. B.; Graham, D. W.; Hemond, C.; Dufour, F.; Briais, A.; Ceuleneer, G.; Maia, M.; Park, S. H.; Revillon, S.; Yang, Y. S.

    2017-12-01

    We present data for glassy basalts from 37 localities along the spreading axis of the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) between 126°-140°E, eastward of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance (AAD). Each of the five ridge segments (A1 to A5, west to east) show well-defined major element trends. An isotopic and negative axial depth anomaly is present, centered on the overlapping tips of segments A3 and A4 at 135°E. Segment A4 basalts have distinct radiogenic Pb and He isotopes plus enriched MORB-like ɛHf, relative to segments to the west and east. Crystal fractionation is more extensive at the A3 and A5 overlapping segment tips adjacent to A4, and decreases both to the west and east. The along axis pattern suggests a mantle heterogeneity located beneath the A3-A4 segments. Pb-Pb isotopic co-variations for the 5 segments define two linear arrays, with a western trend (A1-A3) and an eastern trend (A4-A5) that intersects it at the composition of the anomalous A4 segment, at a 206Pb/204Pb 19. The western trend has higher 208Pb/204Pb for a given 206Pb/204Pb, revealing a gradient in the asthenosphere, with Δ208Pb/204Pb decreasing to the east away from the AAD. Overall, 206,207,208Pb/204Pb and 4He/3He of the A4 anomaly define trends that vector toward the fields for Cenozoic lavas from west Antarctica (Marie Byrd Land and Balleny Islands). West Antarctica has a history of mantle plume underplating and lithosphere modification by subduction [1,2], and there is a broad seismic anomaly below 250 km underlying the West Antarctic Rift system [3]. Our data supports a model in which flow of underplated material plus lithosphere may be guided by the underside topography of the lithosphere beneath the Transantarctic mountains. This flow emerges from beneath east Antarctica, where it leads to volcanism in the Balleny Islands [4]. The material apparently continues to flow northward to the SEIR at 135°E. The geochemical anomaly beneath Zone A is potentially explained by the presence of

  9. Late-Middle Quaternary lithostratigraphy and sedimentation patterns on the Alpha Ridge, central Arctic Ocean: Implications for Arctic climate variability on orbital time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rujian; Polyak, Leonid; Xiao, Wenshen; Wu, Li; Zhang, Taoliang; Sun, Yechen; Xu, Xiaomei

    2018-02-01

    We use sediment cores collected by the Chinese National Arctic Research Expeditions from the Alpha Ridge to advance Quaternary stratigraphy and paleoceanographic reconstructions for the Arctic Ocean. Our cores show a good litho/biostratigraphic correlation to sedimentary records developed earlier for the central Arctic Ocean, suggesting a recovered stratigraphic range of ca. 0.6 Ma, suitable for paleoclimatic studies on orbital time scales. This stratigraphy was tested by correlating the stacked Alpha Ridge record of bulk XRF manganese, calcium and zirconium (Mn, Ca, Zr), to global stable-isotope (LR04-δ18O) and sea-level stacks and tuning to orbital parameters. Correlation results corroborate the applicability of presumed climate/sea-level controlled Mn variations in the Arctic Ocean for orbital tuning. This approach enables better understanding of the global and orbital controls on the Arctic climate. Orbital tuning experiments for our records indicate strong eccentricity (100-kyr) and precession (∼20-kyr) controls on the Arctic Ocean, probably implemented via glaciations and sea ice. Provenance proxies like Ca and Zr are shown to be unsuitable as orbital tuning tools, but useful as indicators of glacial/deglacial processes and circulation patterns in the Arctic Ocean. Their variations suggest an overall long-term persistence of the Beaufort Gyre circulation in the Alpha Ridge region. Some glacial intervals, e.g., MIS 6 and 4/3, are predominated by material presumably transported by the Transpolar Drift. These circulation shifts likely indicate major changes in the Arctic climatic regime, which yet need to be investigated. Overall, our results demonstrate applicability of XRF data to paleoclimatic studies of the Arctic Ocean.

  10. Mineral chemistry, bulk composition and source of the ferromanganese nodules nuclei from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Miura, H.

    Nuclei of ferromanganses nodules from the Central Indian Ocean Basin show the presence of abundant plagioclase feldspars (1-3 mm diameter). They are indentified as calcic plagioclase (peak at 3.20 A). Plagioclase chemical composition (CaO 6...

  11. Coarse fraction components in a red-clay sedimemt core, Central Indian Ocean Basin: Their occurrence and significance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Fernandes, G.Q.; Mahender, K.

    Coarse Fractions Components of a sediment core (268 cm from a water depth of 5120 m) collected at 18 degrees S and 80 degrees E from the red clay domain in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB), comprises mineral grains, basaltic fragments...

  12. Multielemental analysis of ferromanganese nodules from Central Indian Ocean Basin by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, R. K.; Vijayan, V.; Ghosh, S.; Chakravortty, V.

    1997-01-01

    Ferromanganese nodules found on the Ocean bed are complex heterogeneous mixtures of several components. Two nodules from Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) were analysed by proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique using 3UD Tandem pelletron. The precision and the accuracy of this technique for chemical analyses has been confirmed by analysing USGS Geological Standards. Thick sample targets were bombarded by 3 MeV protons for the multielemental analysis. GUPIX-96 software was used for spectral data analysis. Quantitative estimate of K, Ca, Tl, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Ba, Ce, Tl and Pb has been ascertained. The occurrence of Ga, Ge, Rb and Zr in nodules from this region is reported for the first time. The role of manganese and iron oxide phases in determining the uptake of various trace elements from ocean water and bottom sediment pore water has been discussed. (author)

  13. 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopic characterisation of a ferromanganese nodule from the Central Indian Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, R.K.; Chakravortty, V.

    1997-01-01

    The iron bearing phases present in a ferromanganese nodule from the Central Indian Ocean have been determined using 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The Moessbauer results have been corroborated by XRD, IR and TG-DTA studies. The Moessbauer spectrum of a ferromanganese nodule shows a broad line width which indicates the presence of more than one iron bearing paramagnetic oxide or oxyhydroxide phases where iron is present as Fe 3+ . γ-FeOOH has been distinctly characterised as one of the iron bearing phases in the nodule. Other oxyhydroxide and oxide phases of iron in the nodule have been ruled out. A typical paramagnetic doublet persists even at very high temperature which has been proposed to be due to iron(III)phosphate. Formation of solid solution of Mn 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 has been observed in the heat treated nodule at 1073 K, which has been characterised by the Moessbauer technique. (author)

  14. Development of the negative gravity anomaly of the 85 degrees E Ridge, northeastern Indian Ocean – A process oriented modelling approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sreejith, K.M.; Radhakrishna, M.; Krishna, K.S.; Majumdar, T.J

    The 85 degrees E Ridge is associated with two contrasting gravity anomalies: negative anomaly over the north part (up to 5 degrees N latitude), where the ridge structure is buried under thick Bengal Fan sediments and positive anomaly over the south...

  15. Sodium‑chromium covariation in residual clinopyroxenes from abyssal peridotites sampled in the 43°-46°E region of the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyler, Monique; Brunelli, Daniele

    2018-03-01

    Mantle-derived peridotites sampled at three dredge sites between the Discovery and Indomed fracture zones on the Southwest Indian Ridge axis are analyzed for petrography and major and trace element mineral compositions. While textures and microstructures are those typical of normal residual peridotites these rocks display a large compositional variation encompassing the whole spectrum of abyssal peridotites even at the scale of a single dredge site (≤ 1 km). Particularly, clinopyroxenes in peridotites dredged at 44.03°E show a huge variation in sodium contents positively correlated with chromium concentrations. Observed Nasbnd Cr enrichments exceed the commonly reported contents of the spinel abyssal peridotites. Similar values are also found in very few peridotite samples collected at ultra-slow spreading ridges. Major substitutions governing the compositions of these clinopyroxenes suggest that Nasbnd Cr covariation is caused by a more rapid decrease in Al-Tschermak's molecule with respect to the sodic components jadeite ± kosmochlor, as Cr/Al increases and modal clinopyroxene decreases. We conclude that sodium and chromium enrichments must have occurred contemporaneously with aluminum depletion, i.e., during partial melting. Our modelling suggests that partial, non-modal, melting of a depleted peridotite in association with addition of sodium, by percolation of a Na-rich melt in the upwelling mantle, or Na diffusion from a nearby alkaline melt, may explain this enigmatic and counterintuitive trend. A) SWF-26-2-5: Lherzolite; B) SWF-26-2-7: Harzburgite; C) SWF-26-2-11: Lherzolite; D) SWF-26-2-9: Lherzolite with large pyroxene clusters; E) SWF-27-1-12: Harzburgite. Scale bar = 5 cm. Data show that the compositions of these peridotites do not follow fractional melting trends but plot toward Sm and Ce enrichments relative to Yb at decreasing Yb contents. In the same sampling site, clinopyroxenes highly enriched both in Na2O (> 1 wt.%) and Cr2O3 (> 1.5 wt.%) have

  16. Amphibole and felsic veins from the gabbroic oceanic core complex of Atlantis Bank (Southwest Indian Ridge, IODP Hole U1473A): when the fluids meets the melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, A.; Tribuzio, R.; Antonicelli, M.; Zanetti, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present a petrological/geochemical investigation of brown amphibole and felsic veins drilled during IODP 360 expedition at Atlantis Bank, a gabbroic oceanic core complex from Southwest Indian Ridge. The main purpose of this study is to unravel the role of seawater and magmatic components in the origin of these veins. Brown amphibole veins were collected at 90-170 mbsf. These veins typically include minor modal amounts of plagioclase and are associated with alteration halos made up of brown amphibole and whitish milky plagioclase in host gabbros. Two sets of late magmatic felsic veins, which mostly consist of plagioclase and minor brown amphibole, were selected. Amphibole-plagioclase geothermometry (Holland and Blundy, 1994) documents that crystallization of brown amphibole and felsic veins occurred in the 850-700 °C interval. In the brown amphibole veins, amphibole and plagioclase have relatively low concentrations of incompatible trace elements and significant Cl (0.2-0.3 wt%). The development of these veins at near surface levels is therefore attributed to seawater-derived fluids migrating downward through cracks developing in the exhuming gabbro. To explain the high temperature estimates for the development of these shallow veins, however, the seawater-derived fluids must have interacted not only with the gabbros, but also with a high temperature magmatic component. This petrogenetic hypothesis is consistent with oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of amphiboles from shallow veins in adjacent Hole 735B gabbros (Alt and Bach, 2006). Trace element compositions of amphibole and plagioclase from the felsic veins show formation by silicate melts rich in incompatible elements. In addition, Cl concentrations in amphibole from the felsic veins are low, thereby indicating that the melts feeding these veins had low or no seawater component. We cautiously propose that: (i) the felsic veins were generated by SiO2-rich melts residual after crystallization of Fe

  17. Exploration for nodules in the Central Indian Ocean Basin: Past present and the future

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ShyamPrasad, M.

    in the Indian Ocean is – 10-18 mil. Sq.km Total Estimated reserves in the Indian Ocean—0.15 trillion tones. Successful exploitation depends on : Technological Development, Geological and Environmental Factors, Metallurgical factors, Legal and political...

  18. Disseminated sulphides in basalts from the northern central Indian ridge: Implications on late-stage hydrothermal activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Ray, D.

    chalcopyrite (Cpy), magnetite (Mgt) and ilmenite (Ilm) are also seen as associated phases Geo-Mar Lett (2015) 35:91–103 93 California, USA, with an ICP-MS finish (Baedecker 1987). For the Ni-sulphide assays, the sample powder (~1 g) was mixed with soda ash...

  19. A petrogenetic model of basalts from the Northern Central Indian Ridge: 3-11°S

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Iyer, S.D.; Banerjee, R.; Misra, S.; Widdowson, M.

    became gradually enriched in V, Co, Y, Zr and to some extent in Sr, and depleted in Ni and Cr. In addition, the SREE of magma also increased with fractionation, without any change in (La/Yb)N value....

  20. A new report of serpentinites from Northern Central Indian Ridge (at 6 degrees S) - An implication for hydrothermal activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    . Abundant 'mesh rim' and 'bastite' texture and variegated matrix reveal that the present serpentinites might have formed due to the interaction of harzburgite and seawater. Positive Eu anomaly (EuJEu* up to +3.38), higher LaISm (up to 4.40) and NbLa (up...() o Intensity a b c d e f Chtl (V3) Chtl (V1) Chtl (V2) Meandering vein Orthogonal vein Opx Chtl+Liz Hourglass texture Liz Chtl 1mm 20 m a b a Fe-rich vein b Sp 0.001 0.01 0.1 1 10 100 Cs Rb Ba K Th U Nb La Pb Ce Pr Sr Nd Zr Hf Eu Ti Gd Tb Dy Y Er Yb...

  1. Assessment of digital literacy and use of smart phones among Central Indian dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Payal; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Mehrotra, Divya; Kamthan, Shivam; Sabir, Husain; Katiyar, Pratibha; Sai Prasad, S V

    2018-01-01

    Education has largely been digitalized. More so, for professional education, keeping updated in this fast paced world has become a necessary requisite and dentistry has not been left untouched. This cross sectional questionnaire based study aimed to assess the digital literacy and smartphone usage amongst the 260 Central Indian dental students including their perspicacity about smartphone/internet usage for learning purposes. The students' attitude for implementation of digital technology in study programs/education system was also evaluated. The questionnaire was distributed among total 260 dental students from different dental institutes of Central India. The data was collected and analyzed using SPSS software. Out of 260 students, 250 were internet users, out of which 56% had internet access all time. 94.23% students owned a smartphone. 46.53% (114/245) students had some app related to the dentistry in their smartphone device. The commonest site for surfing related to knowledge seeking was google scholar (72%) followed by Pubmed and others. Nearly 80% dental students believed that social media helps them in their professional course studies. Post graduate students showed statistitically significant difference from undergraduates and interns in terms of knowledge of keywords, dental apps and reading research journals. 89.23% students were keen for implementation of e-learning in their curriculum. This study reflects willingness of dental students to adopt digital revolution in dental education which in turn may present an opportunity for educators and policy makers to modify educational methods and thereby advance student's current learning approaches.

  2. Genetic Isolation among the Northwestern, Southwestern and Central-Eastern Indian Ocean Populations of the Pronghorn Spiny Lobster Panulirus penicillatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Fadry Abdullah

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The pronghorn spiny lobster Panulirus penicillatus is a highly valuable species which is widely distributed in Indo-West Pacific and Eastern Pacific regions. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences (566–571 bp were determined to investigate the population genetic structure of this species in the Indian Ocean. In total, 236 adult individuals of Panulirus penicillatus were collected from five locations in the Indian Ocean region. Almost all individuals had a unique haplotype. Intrapopulation haplotype (h and nucleotide (π diversities were high for each locality, ranging from h = 0.9986–1.0000 and π = 0.031593–0.043441. We observed distinct genetic isolation of population located at the northwestern and southwestern edge of the species range. Gene flow was found within localities in the central and eastern region of the Indian Ocean, probably resulting from an extended planktonic larval stage and prevailing ocean currents.

  3. Relationship between size and geochemistry of polymetallic nodules from the Central Indian Ocean Basin: Significance in selection of high grade nodules

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.; Ambre, N.V.

    Morphological, mineralogical and geochemical studies on nodules of different sizes collected from the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) show two suits of nodule formation by oxic diagenetic and hydrogenous process resulting into distinct properties...

  4. Multibeam bathymetric, gravity and magnetic studies over 79 degrees E fracture zone, central Indian basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    KameshRaju, K.A.; Ramprasad, T.; Kodagali, V.N.; Nair, R.R.

    -resolution capabilities of the Hydrosweep multibeam swath bathymetric survey system. The bathymetric map clearly reveals the 79 degrees E FZ, depicting a ridge and trough topography with an elevation difference of over 300 m. Prominent E-W bathymetric lineations...

  5. Composition and origin of buried ferromanganese nodules from central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Parthiban, G.

    sediment core from Central Indian Ocean Basin Element Mn (%) Fe (9b) Ti (%) P (%) Sc (ppm) V Cr Co Ni Cu Zn Ga Rb Sr Y Zr Nb Mo Cs La Ce Pr Nd Sm Eu Gd Tb Dy Ho Er Tm Yb Lu Hf Ta Pb Th U 167- 169 cm 26.05 1.73 0.10 0.051 ? 1297 24.46 270 5110 13560 450 19....05 24.13 4.55 1.75 4 57 0 98 4.94 1.07 1.99 0.44 2.96 0.45 12.17 0.50 800 4.24 3.04 226- 228 cm 27.28 2.12 0.12 0.050 481 692 31.27 580 6500 14410 660 29 52 159 556 15.11 487 11.58 733 0.81 6.53 154 2.52 16.93 4.46 1.61 4.22 0.90 4.95 1.14 216 0.46 3...

  6. Application of pathways analyses for site performance prediction for the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Oblow, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility for shallow-land burial of low-level radioactive waste is evaluated using pathways analyses. The analyses rely on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Conceptual and numerical models are developed using data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations and are used to simulate the long-term transport of contamination to man. Conservatism is built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events have to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics exist. Maximum potential doses to man are calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. The sites are found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations. Conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability are drawn. In reaching these conclusions, some consideration is given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed. 18 refs., 9 figs

  7. New ridge parameters for ridge regression

    OpenAIRE

    Dorugade, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Hoerl and Kennard (1970a) introduced the ridge regression estimator as an alternative to the ordinary least squares (OLS) estimator in the presence of multicollinearity. In ridge regression, ridge parameter plays an important role in parameter estimation. In this article, a new method for estimating ridge parameters in both situations of ordinary ridge regression (ORR) and generalized ridge regression (GRR) is proposed. The simulation study evaluates the performance of the proposed estimator ...

  8. The Influence of Ridge Geometry at the Ultraslow-Spreading Southwest Indiean Ridge (9 deg - 25 deg E): Basalt Composition Sensitivity to Variations in Source and Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Gakkel Ridge [Jokat et al., 2003] both support theoretical studies suggesting diminished melt production on ridges spreading at rates < 20 mm/yr [Bown...be measured disequilibria from Gakkel Ridge basalts plot, as the half spreading rate along this ridge is also ultraslow. 6. Conclusions Our...chemistry at ultraslow- spreading rates (Southwest Indian Ridge from 9°-25°E): A tectonomagmatic model for origin of non-hotspot E-MORB, (submitted

  9. Early Jurassic clay authigenesis in the Central Appalachian Valley and Ridge province; infiltration of surface-derived fluids during Pangean rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, E. A.; van der Pluijm, B.; Vennemann, T. W.

    2017-12-01

    The eastern margin of North America has a protracted and intricate tectonic history. The terminal collision of Gondwana and Laurentia in the late Paleozoic formed the Appalachian mountain belt, a trans-continental orogen that persisted for almost 100 million years until Mesozoic break-up of the supercontinent Pangea. A host of studies have targeted the evolution and migration of fluids through Appalachian crust in an effort to understand how fluid promotes mass and heat redistribution, and mediates crustal deformation, particularly during the assembly of Pangea. Folded clay units from the Central Appalachian Valley and Ridge province were sampled for stable and radiogenic isotope analysis. Separation of samples into different grain-size fractions characterizes detrital (host) and authigenic (neomineralized) clays. Stable H-isotope compositions reveal a systematic pattern with varying proportions of illite polytypes—the finer, younger fraction is D-depleted compared to the coarser, primarily detrital fraction. For each individual location, the H-isotopic composition of the fluid from which the authigenic population was grown is calculated. δDVSMOW of these fluids has a range from -77 to -52 ± 2 ‰, consistent with a surface-derived fluid source. The notably negative values for several samples indicates a meteoric composition of moderate to high elevation origin, suggesting that they are not connate waters, but instead preserve infiltration of fluids due to fracture-induced permeability. Key to this interpretation is 40Ar/39Ar-dating of a subset of these samples that reveals a post-orogenic age for authigenic clay mineralization in the Early Jurassic ( 180 Ma). These ages are evidence that surface fluid infiltration was unrelated to the Appalachian orogeny, but coeval with (upper) crustal extension from the initial break-up of Pangea and the emplacement of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province.

  10. Tectonics and magmatism of ultraslow spreading ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, E. P.; Kokhan, A. V.; Sushchevskaya, N. M.

    2013-05-01

    The tectonics, structure-forming processes, and magmatism in rift zones of ultraslow spreading ridges are exemplified in the Reykjanes, Kolbeinsey, Mohns, Knipovich, Gakkel, and Southwest Indian ridges. The thermal state of the mantle, the thickness of the brittle lithospheric layer, and spreading obliquety are the most important factors that control the structural pattern of rift zones. For the Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey ridges, the following are crucial factors: variations in the crust thickness; relationships between the thicknesses of its brittle and ductile layers; width of the rift zone; increase in intensity of magma supply approaching the Iceland thermal anomaly; and spreading obliquety. For the Knipovich Ridge, these are its localization in the transitional zone between the Gakkel and Mohns ridges under conditions of shear and tensile stresses and multiple rearrangements of spreading; nonorthogonal spreading; and structural and compositional barrier of thick continental lithosphere at the Barents Sea shelf and Spitsbergen. The Mohns Ridge is characterized by oblique spreading under conditions of a thick cold lithosphere and narrow stable rift zone. The Gakkel and the Southwest Indian ridges are distinguished by the lowest spreading rate under the settings of the along-strike variations in heating of the mantle and of a variable spreading geometry. The intensity of endogenic structure-forming varies along the strike of the ridges. In addition to the prevalence of tectonic factors in the formation of the topography, magmatism and metamorphism locally play an important role.

  11. Reconciling plate kinematic and seismic estimates of lithospheric convergence in the central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bull, J.M.; DeMets, C.; Krishna, K.S.; Sanderson, D.J.; Merkouriev, S.

    The far-field signature of the India-Asia collision and history of uplift in Tibet are recorded by sediment input into the Indian Ocean and the strain accumulation history across the diffuse plate boundary between the Indian and Capricorn plates. We...

  12. A combined basalt and peridotite perspective on 14 million years of melt generation at the Atlantis Bank segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge: Evidence for temporal changes in mantle dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, L.A.; Thompson, G.M.; MacLeod, C.J.; Dick, H.J.B.; Edwards, S.J.; Hosford, Scheirer A.; Barry, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about temporal variations in melt generation and extraction at midocean ridges largely due to the paucity of sampling along flow lines. Here we present new whole-rock major and trace element data, and mineral and glass major element data, for 71 basaltic samples (lavas and dykes) and 23 peridotites from the same ridge segment (the Atlantis Bank segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge). These samples span an age range of almost 14 My and, in combination with the large amount of published data from this area, allow temporal variations in melting processes to be investigated. Basalts show systematic changes in incompatible trace element ratios with the older samples (from ???8-14 Ma) having more depleted incompatible trace element ratios than the younger ones. There is, however, no corresponding change in peridotite compositions. Peridotites come from the top of the melting column, where the extent of melting is highest, suggesting that the maximum degree of melting did not change over this interval of time. New and published Nd isotopic ratios of basalts, dykes and gabbros from this segment suggest that the average source composition has been approximately constant over this time interval. These data are most readily explained by a model in which the average source composition and temperature have not changed over the last 14 My, but the dynamics of mantle flow (active-to-passive) or melt extraction (less-to-more efficient extraction from the 'wings' of the melting column) has changed significantly. This hypothesised change in mantle dynamics occurs at roughly the same time as a change from a period of detachment faulting to 'normal' crustal accretion. We speculate that active mantle flow may impart sufficient shear stress on the base of the lithosphere to rotate the regional stress field and promote the formation of low angle normal faults. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy on Central Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome in Indian Adults- A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Pulkit; Thillai, Manoj; Nain, Prabhdeep Singh; Ahuja, Ashish; Vayoth, Sudheer Othiyil; Khurana, Preetika

    2017-01-01

    Increasing incidence of obesity in Indian population has led to an exponential rise in the number of bariatric operations performed annually. Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) has been proposed to cause rapid remission of Type 2 Diabetes Melitus (T2DM) and metabolic syndrome in a weight loss independent manner. To evaluate the effects of LSG on metabolic syndrome and central obesity in morbidly and severely obese Indian adults. Material and Methods: Study was conducted on 91 morbidly obese [Body Mass Index (BMI)>40 kg/m 2 ] and severely obese (BMI>35 kg/m 2 ) individuals who were suffering from diabetes, hypertension or dyslipidemia. The patients were followed up for six months and the trends of glycaemic control, mean blood pressure, lipid profile, weight loss parameters and changes in parameters of central obesity were studied. Weight loss was significant at three months postsurgery and was sustained through six months. There was significant improvement in glycaemic control leading to reduction in need for oral hypoglycaemic agents or insulin in majority of them and even discontinuation of these medications in few patients. Hypertension and dyslipidemia also showed an improving trend through six months postsurgery. There was a significant impact on reduction of central obesity in these patients as marked by significant reduction in waist to hip ratio. LSG produces sustainable weight loss with significant improvement in glycaemic status and control of metabolic syndrome in severe to morbidly obese patients. LSG is also efficacious in reducing central obesity in Indian population which is a major depressive ailment amongst obese individuals.

  14. Impact of service quality management (SQM) practices on Indian railways : study of South Central Railways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    The main objective of this study is to present a framework developed for assisting Railways to monitor and : control the quality of services provided to passengers. The study evaluated the passenger Rail Service quality of : Indian Railways by develo...

  15. Internal constitution of manganese nodules from the Central Indian Ocean basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    Morphological, chemical, physical and acoustic properties of Mn-nodules in the the Indian Ocean are inter-linked and depend much on local and regional oceanic environments. These nodules are anisotropic and sound propagation is faster parallel...

  16. Correlation of the oldest Toba Tuff to sediments in the central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; ShyamPrasad, M.; Babu, E.V.S.S.K.

    and associated microtektites have been used to trace their provenance. In ODP site 758 from Ninetyeast Ridge, ash layer-D (13 cm thick, 0.73-0.75 Ma) and layer-E (5 cm thick, 0.77-0.78 Ma) were previously correlated to the oldest Toba Tuff (OTT) eruptions...

  17. Association of television viewing time with central obesity status in rural Asian Indian women: Santiniketan women study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arnab; Bhagat, Minakshi

    2014-01-01

    The present community based cross-sectional study aimed to investigate anthropometric and body composition measures, and blood pressure characteristics by TV viewing times in rural women of Asian Indian Origin. A total of 343 apparently healthy rural Asian Indian women living in and around Santiniketan, West Bengal, India and aged between 25 and 65 years took part in the study. Anthropometric measures namely body mass index (BMI), percentages of body fat (PBF), basal metabolic rate (BMR), and intra-abdominal visceral fat (IVF) were measured using an Omron body fat analyzer. Fat mass (FM), fat free mass (FFM), arm muscle area (AMA), arm fat area (AFA), and arm muscle circumference (AMC) were calculated using standard techniques. Each individual was also asked how many minutes/day they spend watching TV. Comparison of central obesity status (CNO = waist circumference TV viewing times (categories) revealed a significant difference [χ(3)2 14.29] for central obesity status across the groups. Increased leisure-time activity was associated with central obesity status and warrant early intervention to prevent increasing incidences of cardiovascular disease in this population. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. GREYBULL SANDSTONE PETROLEUM POTENTIAL ON THE CROW INDIAN RESERVATION, SOUTH-CENTRAL MONTANA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Lopez

    2000-12-14

    Evaluation of the Lower Cretaceous Greybull Sandstone on the Crow Indian Reservation for potential stratigraphic traps in the valley-fill sandstone was the focus of this project. The Crow Reservation area, located in south-central Montana, is part of the Rocky Mountain Foreland structural province, which is characterized by Laramide uplifts and intervening structural basins. The Pryor and Bighorn mountains, like other foreland uplifts, are characterized by asymmetrical folds associated with basement-involved reverse faults. The reservation area east of the mountains is on the northwestern flank of the Powder River Basin. Therefore, regional dips are eastward and southeastward; however, several prominent structural features interrupt these regional dips. The nearly 4,000 mi{sup 2} reservation is under explored but has strong potential for increased oil and gas development. Oil and gas production is well established in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming to the south as well as in the areas north and west of the reservation. However, only limited petroleum production has been established within the reservation. Geologic relations and trends indicate strong potential for oil and gas accumulations, but drilling has been insufficient for their discovery. The Greybull Sandstone, which is part of the transgressive systems tract that includes the overlying Fall River Sandstone, was deposited on a major regional unconformity. The erosional surface at the base of the Greybull Sandstone is the +100 Ma, late Aptian-Early Albian regional unconformity of Weimer (1984). This lowstand erosional surface was controlled by a basin-wide drop in sea level. In areas where incised Greybull channels are absent, the lowstand erosional unconformity is at the base of the Fall River Sandstone and equivalent formations. During the pre-Greybull lowstand, sediment bypassed this region. In the subsequent marine transgression, streams began to aggrade and deposit sand of the lower Greybull Sandstone

  19. First results from light scattering enhancement factor over central Indian Himalayas during GVAX campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumka, U C; Kaskaoutis, D G; Sagar, Ram; Chen, Jianmin; Singh, Narendra; Tiwari, Suresh

    2017-12-15

    The present work examines the influence of relative humidity (RH), physical and optical aerosol properties on the light-scattering enhancement factor [f(RH=85%)] over central Indian Himalayas during the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). The aerosol hygroscopic properties were measured by means of DoE/ARM (US Department of Energy, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) mobile facility focusing on periods with the regular instrumental operation (November-December 2011). The measured optical properties include aerosol light-scattering (σ sp ) and absorption (σ ap ) coefficients and the intensive parameters i.e., single scattering albedo (SSA), scattering Ångström exponent (SAE), absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) and light scattering enhancement factor (f(RH)=σ sp (RH, λ)/σ sp (RH dry , λ)). The measurements were separated for sub-micron (RH) and enhancement rate (γ). The particle size affects the aerosol hygroscopicity since mean f(RH=85%) of 1.27±0.12 and 1.32±0.14 are found for D 10μm and D 1μm , respectively. These f(RH) values are relatively low suggesting the enhanced presence of soot and carbonaceous particles from biomass burning activities, which is verified via backward air-mass trajectories. Similarly, the light-scattering enhancement rates are ~0.20 and 0.17 for the D 1μm and D 10μm particles, respectively. However, a general tendency for increasing f(RH) and γ is shown for higher σ sp and σ ap values indicating the presence of rather aged smoke plumes, coated with industrial aerosols over northern India, with mean SSA, SAE and AAE values of 0.92, 1.00 and 1.15 respectively. On the other hand, a moderate-to-small dependence of f(RH) and γ on SAE, AAE, and SSA was observed for both particle sizes. Furthermore, f(RH) exhibits an increasing tendency with the number of cloud condensation nuclei (N CCN ) indicating larger particle hygroscopicity but without significant dependence on the activation ratio. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  20. Design/Installation and Structural Integrity Assessment of Bethel Valley Low-Level Waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (central off-gas scrubber facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in response to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lined concrete vault, replacing an existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. Ne scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation. A formal design certification statement is included herein on Page 53, a certification covering the installation shall be executed prior to placing the modified facility into service

  1. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment of Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in responsible to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lines concrete vault, replacing and existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. New scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation

  2. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment of Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in responsible to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lines concrete vault, replacing and existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. New scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  3. The Knipovich Ridge segmentation and the comparison with other ultraslow spreading ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, K.; Curewitz, D.; Asada, M.; Tamaki, K.

    2003-04-01

    The ultraslow-spreading Knipovich Ridge is an ~550 km long, transform-free ridge segment linking the Molloy transform fault and the Mohns Ridge in the Arctic Ocean. Discrete volcanic centers marked by large volcanic constructions and accompanying short wavelength mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) lows generally resemble those of the Gakkel Ridge and the easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge. These magmatically robust segment centers are regularly spaced about 85-100 km apart along the ridge, and are characterized by accumulated hummocky terrain, high relief, off-axis seamount chains and significant MBA lows. We suggest that these eruptive centers correspond to areas of enhanced magma flux, and that their spacing reflects the geometry of underlying mantle upwelling cells. The large-scale thermal structure of the mantle primarily controls discrete and focused magmatism, and the relatively wide spacing of these segments may reflect cool mantle beneath the ridge. Segment centers along the southern Knipovich Ridge are characterized by lower relief and smaller MBA anomalies than along the northern section of the ridge. This suggests that ridge obliquity is a secondary control on ridge construction on the Knipovich Ridge, as the obliquity changes from 35 to 49 deg. from north to south, respectively, while spreading rate and axial depth remain approximately constant. A comparison of along-axis depths, MBA anomalies and other fundamental parameters of ultraslow spreading ridges based on previous studies shows that the scale of volcanic edifices tends to decrease as obliquity increases. High relief and large MBA characterize the non-oblique segment of the SWIR, while low relief and small MBA characterize the southern Knipovich Ridge (obliquity 49deg.) and the oblique segment of the SWIR (obliquity 45deg.). The increased obliquity may contribute to decreased effective spreading rates, lower upwelling magma velocity and melt formation, and limited horizontal dike propagation near the

  4. Lepini Mountains Carbonatic Ridge: try of springs recharge areas verification and water exchange quantification with Pontina Plain by use of a numerical model (Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Teoli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study area of this work is represented by the Lepini Mountains carbonatic ridge and by the Pontina Plain foothills area, on which in the past, within quantitative hydrogeological characterizations, models were developed for calculating the groundwater flow, but only referred to the ridge. The most recent studies (Teoli, 2012 have done their best, instead, to represent the underground water exchanges between the ridge and the Pontina Plain foothill area. The new model (developed using computer code MODFLOW 2005 has been implemented to simulate steady-state underground flow using equivalent porous media approach even for the ridge; attention has been particularly directed to the proper tectonic ridge schematic, which the authors had previously defined, together with others (Alimonti et al., 2010, on detailed structural-geological survey basis, integrated by hydrogeological analysis. So, it’s been possible to determine partitioning effects on groundwater flowpaths and on springs recharge areas extent, whose total average discharge is about 10m3/s. Model calibration main goal has been the recharge areas permeability definition, posing the correspondence of calculated flows with measured springs’ flows; as a consequence, it’s been possible to improve the model reliability (uncertainty reduction quantifying the flow residuals’ standard deviation offset.

  5. Hydrovolcanic activity in the Central Indian Ocean Basin. Does nature mimic laboratory experiments?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; ShyamPrasad, M.; Gupta, S.M.; Charan, S.N.; Mukherjee, A.D.

    . NIO Contribution # 2542. Del Monte, M., Nanni, T., Tagliazucca, M., 1975. Ferromagnetic volcanic particulate matter and black magnetic sphetules: a comparative study. J. Geophys. Res. 80, 1880- 1884. El Goresy, A., Fechtig, H., 1967. Fusion crust..., ferro- manganese crusts at 45”N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR; Aumento and Mitchell, 19751, in limestones and carbonates (Freeman, 1986; Suk et al., 1990), lunar soils (Heiken et al., 19741, extraterrestrial ma- terials (El Goresy and Fechtig, 1967...

  6. Cell structure of developing barbs and barbules in downfeathers of the chick: Central role of barb ridge morphogenesis for the evolution of feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, L

    2005-04-01

    The present ultrastructural study shows how cells organize to form the complex structure of downfeathers in chick embryos. The embryonic epidermis of the apical part of feather filaments folds inward forming barb ridges which extend toward the base of the feather. The stratification of epidermal cells in barb ridges is maintained but the basal layer loses most of the germinal activity. New cells for the growth of feather filaments are mainly produced in its basal part. In barb ridges only the original four epidermal layers of the embryonic epidermis remain to form feathers: 1) the external periderm, 2) three-five layers of the feather sheath and barb vane ridge cells, 3) subperiderm cells, and 4) basal or cylindrical cells. Periderm, sheath, barb vane ridge and cylindrical cells synthesize only alpha-keratin. Instead, cells of the subperiderm layer synthesize a small type of beta-keratin: feather beta-keratin. At hatching, the subperiderm layer is lost in most areas of the skin of the chick (apteric and scaled), and is replaced by cells containing alpha-keratin (interfollicular-apteric epidermis), scale beta-keratin (scales), beak beta-keratin (beak), and claw beta-keratin (claws). Only in feathers, cells of the original subperiderm layer remain and give origin to barb and barbule cells. The formation of separated chains of barb and barbule cells is allowed by the presence of barb vane ridge cells that function as spacers between merging cells of barb and barbule cells. Subperiderm cells elongate and merge into a syncitium to form barbules and barbs. While barbule and barb cells accumulate feather-keratin, barb vane and cylindrical cells accumulate lipids, vesicles and little alpha-keratin. These cells eventually degenerate by necrosis leaving empty spaces and lipids between barbules and barbs. No apoptosis is necessary to explain the process of carving out of barb and barbules in feathers after dissolution of the external sheath. In fact, the retraction of blood

  7. Magnetic Anomaly Amplitudes on the Gakkel Ridge: Indicators of Ridge Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, V. A.; Lawver, L. A.; Brozena, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    For most of its length, the Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean's Eurasia Basin is characterized by a discontinuous magnetic signature with regions of missing or low-amplitude central anomalies punctuated by short, high-amplitude segments. The ridge segment in between the Morris Jesup Rise and the Yermak Plateau has an unusually large amplitude central magnetic anomaly that is more than four times the amplitude of the flanking anomalies. This ridge segment is straight, without large offsets, for about 150 km. The difference in character between the central anomaly in this segment and the rest of Gakkel Ridge is striking. The western half of the Gakkel Ridge and the Eurasia Basin were surveyed in 1998-99 by a Naval Research Laboratory aerogeophysical campaign that measured magnetics, gravity, and sea-surface topography. The new magnetic data densify the historical US Navy aeromagnetic data and improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly field in this region. This new field highlights the variability of the Gakkel Ridge over time, showing regions of strong anomalies that are continuous along strike and anomalies that fade away or become discontinuous. In particular, anomalies 15y to 21o show regions of high amplitudes on both sides of the ridge for varying distances along strike. We suggest that these high-amplitude segments were formed at times when the Gakkel Ridge at this location had a high-amplitude central magnetic anomaly like the present day high-amplitude segment or the shorter ones distributed along the ridge. The higher central anomaly amplitudes may be associated with variations in geochemistry and/or melt delivery along the ridge. Recent dredging of zero-aged crust along the Gakkel Ridge showed a good but not perfect correlation of high-amplitude central anomalies and basalt recovery (P. Michael, personal communication). This magnetic data set in conjunction with future dredging provides an opportunity to constrain past ridge variability.

  8. A pair of seamount chains in the Central Indian Basin, identified from multibeam mapping

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kodagali, V.N.

    Indian Basin. The average depth in this basin is around 5,100 m. Height of these features range from 200 to 1700 m, with varying morphologies ranging from pointed cones to flat tops and cratered tops. Two distinct chains of seamounts and abyssal hills...

  9. Nature, distribution and origin of clay minerals in grain size fractions of sediments from manganese nodule field, Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Nath, B.N.

    DT, IR and X-ray diffraction analyses have been carried out on 3 grain size fractions (1, 1-2 and 2-4 mu m) of sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin. Results indicate that there are 2 smectite minerals (montmorillonite and Fe...

  10. Sup(210)Pb, sup(230)Th, and sup(10)Be in Central Indian Basin seamount sediments: Signatures of degassing and hydrothermal alteration of recent origin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Borole, D.V.; Aldahan, A.; Patil, S.K.; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.; Possnert, G.; Ericsson, T.; Ramaswamy, V.; Gupta, S.M.

    the flank of a seamount in the Central Indian Basin located at the edge of the 75 degrees 30 minutes E fracture zone. Alteration effects are also reflected in 1) the depleted sedimentary organic carbon, 2) dissolution features of radiolarian skeletons, 3...

  11. Characteristics of shallow water waves off the central west coast of India before, during and after the onset of the Indian summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amrutha, M.M.; SanilKumar, V.; Sharma, S.; Singh, J.; Gowthaman, R.; Kankara, R.S.

    We studied the wave characteristics before, during and after the onset of the Indian summer monsoon based on data measured using the buoy moored at 3 locations off the central west coast of India. The study reveals the dramatic changes that occur...

  12. Record of carbonate preservation and the Mid-Brunhes climatic shift from a seamount top with low sedimentation rates in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Sijinkumar, A.V.; Borole, D.V.; Gupta, S.M.; Mergulhao, L.P.; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.; Ramaswamy, V.; Guptha, M.V.S.; Possnert, G.; Aldahan, A.; Khadge, N.H.; Sharma, R.

    In the present investigation, an age model of carbonate-rich cores from a seamount top in the Central Indian Basin (CIB) was constructed using both isotopic (sup(230)Th sub(excess), AMS sup(14)C, oxygen isotopes) and biostratigraphic methods...

  13. A New Class of Plate Boundary and Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, H.; Lin, J.; Schouten, H.; Michael, P.; Snow, J.; Jokat, W.

    2003-04-01

    While it has long been considered that there are only three types of boundary that enclose the earth's tectonic plates, a new class of plate boundary, amagmatic accretionary ridge segments, has recently been recognized as well as a new class of ocean ridge: ultra-slow spreading. This is the direct consequence of the successful investigations of the very-slow spreading Southwest Indian and Arctic Ridge systems promoted by InterRidge. Amagmatic accretionary ridge segments are a new class of accretionary plate boundary distinct from magmatic accretionary ridge segments. Amagmatic accretionary segments are marked by deep troughs often floored by mantle peridotite, with only thin or scattered basalt flows. They represent plate failure originating near the base of the plate following the zone of lithospheric necking unlike magmatic accretionary segments, where the plate fails from the top. Unlike stable transforms and magmatic accretionary segments, amagmatic accretionary segments may assume any angle to the spreading direction and replace both orthogonal segments and transform faults over large sections of ocean ridge. Magmatic and amagmatic accretionary segments can stably coexist, one connected to the other for many millions of years, or may displace one another as mantle thermal structure, composition, ridge geometry or spreading rate change. Ultra-slow spreading ridges are a new class of ridge that form where the effective spreading rate for mantle upwelling falls below ~12 mm/yr. The ESR is the orthogonal component of the spreading rate measured perpendicular to the ridge trend. Magmas erupted along ultra-slow spreading ridges may be alkaline and/or isotopically and incompatible trace element enriched compared to typical MORB. Ultra-slow spreading ridges consist of linked magmatic and amagmatic accretionary segments and are as mechanically, morphologically and petrologically distinct from slow-spreading ridges, as slow-spreading ridges are from fast. The Southwest

  14. Volcanic ash and its enigma: A case study from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.

    is mainly responsible for the elevated Al/Ti ratio in the bulk sediment. In the present study, the behaviour of element concentration in a sediment core where ash layer was present is relooked into and its possible implications are discussed... silica (wt%), (d) Al excess (wt%). (e) Fe (wt%), (f) AI/Al+Fe+Mn. (g) K (wt%). (1,) Mg (wt%), (i) Ti(wt%). (j) Mn (wt%), (k) Cu (ppm) and (I) Ni (ppm) in a sediment core (NR-54) from Centra Indian Ocean basin. Ash layer is present at 30-35 cm...

  15. Influence of seabed topography on the distribution of manganese nodules and associated features in the Central Indian Basin: A study based on photographic observations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.; Kodagali, V.N.

    value of R, whereas the slopes and plains have a variable R, and the valleys have very low R-values. The studies on nodules in box cores by Sorem et al. (1979b), suggest that the burial varies depend- ing upon the physical features of the underlying... Ocean Explor., 8: 20. lyer, S.D. and Karisiddaiah, S.M., 1990. Petrology of ocean- floor rocks from the Central Indian Ocean Basin. Indian J. Mar. Sci., 19: 13-16. lyer, S.D. and Sharma, R., 1990. Correlation between occur- rence of manganese...

  16. Rise of the dormant: Simulated disturbance improves culturable abundance, diversity, and functions of deep-sea bacteria of Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.

    and quantitative parameters of the bacterial community. This is a part of the Environmental Impact Assessment studies for polymetallic nodule mining under the Indian Deep-sea environment Experiment (INDEX). In order to assess the effects of sediment resuspension... and resettlement, a benthic disturbance experiment was car- ried out during July–August 1997, in a strip of 3000C2200m by a hydraulic device in the test area. The effects of the simulated disturbance carried out in the Central Indian Ocean were monitored...

  17. Intestinal parasitism in the Xavánte Indians, Central Brazil Parasitas intestinais entre índios Xavánte, Brasil Central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo V. Santos

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the findings of a survey for intestinal parasites among the Xavánte Indians from Central Brazil. A. lumbricoides (25.0% and hookworms (33.6% were the two most common helminths; E. histolytica complex (7.8% and G. lamblia (8.6% the most common protozoans. The majority (58.5% of positive individuals hosted only one species of helminth. Egg counts for helminths, and for A. lumbricoides in particular, were found to be not dispersed at random, with a few individuals, all of whom young children, showing very high counts. The prevalence rates of intestinal parasites for the Xavánte are below those reported for other Amerindian populations from Brazil.Este trabalho reporta os resultados de um inquérito transversal qualitativo e quantitativo sobre parasitas intestinais entre os Xavánte do Brasil Central. A. lumbricoides (25% e ancilostomídeos (33,6% foram os helmintos mais freqüentes; complexo E. histolytica (7,8% e G. lamblia (8,6% os protozoários mais comuns. A maioria dos indivíduos positivos albergava somente uma espécie de helminto (58,5%. Os resultados dos exames quantitativos indicaram que alguns poucos indivíduos, todos eles crianças, apresentavam concentrações particularmente elevadas de ovos de helmintos, particularmente no caso de A. lumbricoides. As prevalências de positividade dos Xavánte são inferiores àquelas reportadas para outros grupos indígenas do Brasil.

  18. Population dynamics and reproductive biology of Barilius bendelisis (Cyprinidae: Cypriniformes) from river Gaula of Central Indian Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Neha; Patiyal, Rabindar Singh; Dube, Kiran; Tiwari, Virendra K

    2016-09-01

    The Indian hill trout cyprinid, Barilius bendelisis is a member of family Cyprinidae that dwells in shallow, cold, and clear water. In this study, growth parameters and reproductive biology of Indian hill trout, Barilius bendelisis from river Gaula, Central Himalaya region, India, were studied. The length-frequency data were grouped sex wise and were analyzed to determine the growth and mortality parameters using the computer software programme, FAO-ICLARM Stock Assessment Tool (FISAT II). Altogether, 501 individuals were collected from river Gaula (November 2013-October 2014) and were preserved in formalin for further analysis. The results showed that the female outnumbered the male population. The minimum GSI of females was observed in the month of October (4.93 ± 0.26) and for males in the month of June and July (0.093 ± 0.12), whereas, the maximum value was in the month of April for both females (13.47 ± 0.52) and males (1.21 ± 0.12). Fluctuation in GSI values had a bimodal pattern showing two peaks during March-May and August-September in both the sexes, indicating the common spawning period of fish. The slope of regression showed the negative allometric growth for both males and females (b= 2.65 for male and b= 2.5 for female). A significant relationship between length and weight was observed in the present study (p < 0.05). The ELEFAN-I estimated L∞ and K of the von Bertalanffy growth factor for males (17.33 cm and 0.310 per year), females (17.33 cm and 0.3 per year) and pooled sexes (17.33 cm and 0.240 per year). The results indicated that Barilius bendelisis is a small sized fish having negative allometric growth that spawns twice a year. Thus, the present study on biological traits represents the baseline information for effective production, conservation and restoration planning.

  19. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome. PMID:26262646

  20. Ridge Regression: A Panacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Joseph M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Ridge regression is an approach to the problem of large standard errors of regression estimates of intercorrelated regressors. The effect of ridge regression on the estimated squared multiple correlation coefficient is discussed and illustrated. (JKS)

  1. Interference of lithospheric folding in western Central Asia by simultaneous Indian and Arabian plate indentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J.W.H.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069161836; Burov, E.; Tesauro, M.; Sokoutis, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298809214; Kaban, M.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale intraplate deformation of the crust and the lithosphere in Central Asia as a result of the indentation of India has been extensively documented. In contrast, the impact of continental collision between Arabia and Eurasia on lithosphere tectonics in front of the main suture zone, has

  2. Interference of lithospheric folding in Central Asia by simultaneous Indian and Arabian plate indentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J.H.W.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.; Burov, E.; Tesauro, M.; Sokoutis, D.; Kaban, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale intraplate deformation of the crust and the lithosphere in Central Asia as a result of the indentation of India has been extensively documented. In contrast, the impact of continental collision between Arabia and Eurasia on lithosphere tectonics in front of the main suture zone, has

  3. Fresh pumice from the Central Indian Basin: A Krakatau 1883 signature

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mudholkar, A.V.; Fujii, T.

    ., Istidjab, M., Badruddin. M., Parlin, M., Sadjiman, Djuwandi, A., Sudradjat, A. and Suhanda, T., 1982. Geochemical study of lava flows, ejecta and pyroclastic flow from the Krakatau Group, Indonesia. Rep. Fat. Sci. Kagoshima Univ. (Earth Sci., Biol.), 15... study of volcanic products, in particular to pumice flow, of the Krakatau Group, Indonesia. Rep. Fat. Sci. Kagoshima Univ. (Earth Sci., Biol.), 16: 21-41. Rao, V.P., 1987. Mineralogy of polymetallic nodules and associated sediments from the Central...

  4. Multiple ash layers in late Quaternary sediments from the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.; Nath, B.N.; Iyer, S.D.; Borole, D.V.; Parthiban, G.; Jijin, R.; Khedekar, V.D.

    of the parent material (Taylor and McLennan, 1985, McLennan, 2001). We have used Cr/Sc as a tool to detect cryptotephra (Lim et al., 2008) and as a means to identify the probable stratigraphic positions of distal/proximal cryptotephra in the CIB pelagic... for tephrochronology? Quat. Sci. Rev., 23, 581–589. Davis, A.S., Clague, D.A., 2003. Hyaloclastite from Miocene seamounts offshore central California: compositions, eruption styles, and depositional processes. In: White, J.D.L., Smellie, J.L., Clague, D.A. (Eds...

  5. [Neurobiology of endocannabinoids and central effects of tetrahydrocannabinol contained in indian hemp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Jean

    2014-03-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychotropic component of Cannabis indica, is an addictive drug with multiple effects including both peripheral and central damages. All these effects are due to interference with endocannabinoidergic transmission. This endocannabinoid system subtly regulates many physiologicalfunctions. This regulation involves various ligands derived from arachidonic acid (anandamide, di-arachidonoylglycerol, virodhamin, noladin ether, N arachidonoyl dopamine, etc.) which stimulate two main types of receptor CB1 in the central nervous system and CB2 in the periphery. CB1 receptors are very numerous and ubiquitous in the brain. They influence various important functions (awakening, attention, delirium, hallucinations, memory, cognition, anxiety, humor stability, motor coordination, brain maturation, etc.). Far from mimicking endocannabinoids, THC caricatures their effects. It affects all brain structures, simultaneously, intensely and durably, inducing down-regulation of CB1 receptors and thereby reducing the effects of their physiological ligands. On account of its exceptional lipophilia, THC accumulates for days and even weeks in the brain. It is not a soft drug but rather a slow drug: its abuse induces long-lasting modifications and deterioration of brain function, potentially leading to various mental and psychiatric disorders.

  6. Kinematics of Mid-Ocean Ridge Relative Motions in the Indo-Atlantic Frame of Reference: Passive and Active Spreading Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, C. J.; Rowley, D. B.; Forte, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    A kinematic analysis of the motions of mid-ocean ridges is presented in the Indo-Atlantic hotspot frame of reference. Relative motions of all major divergent plate boundaries are computed, including an assessment of uncertainties in their motions, back to 83 Ma (C34ny). As is expected from the general assumption that ridges are passive components of the plate boundary and mantle convective system, most ridges migrate across the underlying mantle along simple paths, largely perpendicular to the trend of the ridge. In the Indo-Atlantic reference frame, the Nansen-Gakkel ridge has migrated away from Europe by ~800 km along a NE trajectory. The Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR) just north of the Azores triple junction (TJ) has moved away from Europe by ~1800km towards the WNW. South of the Azores TJ the MAR has moved away from Africa by ~1600 km towards the W. The slow to ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge has migrated slightly away from Antarctica, with a considerable fraction of the motion approximately parallel to the ridge trend. The Carlsberg Ridge has moved ~3400 km away from Africa towards the NNE in the past 65 Ma, while the Mid-Indian Ridge has migrated to the NNE away from Africa by ~3950 km over 83 Ma. The Southeast Indian Ridge, west of the 90°E ridge (Capricorn-Australia-East Antarctica TJ), has migrated ~3950 km to the NE away from Antarctica. Farther east, divergence between Australia and Antarctica has resulted in ~1800 km of northward motion of the ridge away from Antarctica. The Southwest Pacific Ridge, between the Pacific and West Antarctic plates has migrated ~1500 km to the NW away from west Antarctica. These motions are entirely consistent with intuition, given that Africa and Antarctica are largely surrounded by spreading systems. In contrast to the rest of the global ridge system, despite its high spreading rate the East Pacific Ridge has undergone essentially no (ridge perpendicular (E-W) migration in the past 80 Ma, and neglible ridge parallel

  7. Primary central nervous system lymphomas: Indian experience, and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Tr; Challa, S; Tandon, A; Panigrahi, Mk; Purohit, Ak

    2008-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs) are a rare form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma which arise within and remain confined primarily to the central nervous system (CNS). They generally account for 1-2% of all primary brain tumors and are reported to be on the rise due to the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. To study the clinicopathological and immunophenotypic characteristics of PCNSLs and look for any differences in PCNSLs reported in India from those in other countries. All cases of PCNSLs between January 1998 and December 2006 were reviewed. Presence of lymphadenopathy, organomegaly and bone marrow study was done to exclude the possibility of secondary involvement by lymphoma. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology with Hematoxylin and Eosin and reticulin stains. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) with leucocyte common antigen (LCA), CD 20 and CD 3 was performed on available blocks. The immune status was evaluated by clinical examination and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serology (since 1996). In a 19-year study period, there were 56 patients of PCNSLs, accounting for 1.07% of all intracranial neoplasms. The patients ranged from 10-75 years of age with a median age of 42 years. Barring one patient who was HIV positive, all the others were immunocompetent. All cases were diffuse large cell lymphomas on histopathology. IHC with LCA and CD 20 revealed positivity in 100% and 86.4% cases respectively. There was a single case of CD 3 positive T-cell lymphoma. In the present study, PCNSLs occurred in young immunocompetent patients and majority were diffuse large B cell lymphomas.

  8. The Central Nervous System and Alcohol Use. Science of Alcohol Curriculum for American Indians. Training Unit [and] Participant Booklet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Cecelia; And Others

    The Science of Alcohol Curriculum for American Indians uses the Medicine Circle and the "new science paradigm" to study the science of alcohol through a culturally relevant holistic approach. Intended for teachers and other educational personnel involved with American Indians, this curriculum aims to present a framework for alcohol…

  9. Identification and origin of a subsurface ridge on the continental margin of western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Murty, G.P.S.; Rao, D.G.

    of magnetic polarity reversals is marked along 15~'10'N. Further it is conjectured that these ridges probably originated because of the movement of the Indian Plate over the Reunion hotspot, during the Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary...

  10. A ~400 ka supra-Milankovitch cycle in the Na, Mg, Pb, Ni, and Co records of a ferromanganese crust from the Vityaz fracture zone, central Indian ridge.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Gupta, S.M.; Miura, H.; Borole, D.V.

    at the geological ages, we used both sup(230)Th sub(execcs) and Co-chronometric datings. The correlation coefficient between the sup(230)Th sub(execcs) based dates and Co-chronometric dates for the top 0-8mm is very high (r=0.9734, at 99.9 percent significance...

  11. On the nature of the calcareous substrate of a ferromanganese crust from the Vityaz Fracture Zone, Central Indian Ridge: Inferences on palaeoceanography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Banerjee, R.; Mergulhao, L.

    Pliocene age has been assigned to the calcareous substrate. Among the nannoplankton, discoasters outnumber coccoliths and show signs of dissolution. The presence of certain species of benthic Foraminifera such as Uvigerina, Lenticulina, Bulimina...

  12. The Influence of Ridge Geometry at Ultraslow Spreading Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, H. J.; Standish, J.

    2004-12-01

    Ridges spreading at ultraslow rate less than 20 mm/yr have been identified as a unique class of ocean ridge as different from slow spreading as slow spreading are from fast 1. Ridge characteristics, such as the presence or absence of amagmatic accretionary segments, transform faults, axial valleys or axial rises, however, are not a simple function of spreading rate, and it is therefore difficult to define precisely ridge classes simply on this criterion. Ridge morphology, tectonics, and geochemistry are also largely a function of mantle thermal structure, upwelling rate, fertility, and ridge geometry. However, examination of ridge crustal structure with spreading rate clearly shows a sharp break, with seismic measurements of crustal thickness indicating highly variable, generally thin crust associated with spreading rates below 20 mm/yr. In contrast, crust formed at spreading rates greater than 20 mm/yr is generally thicker and less variable thickness, averaging between 6 and 7 km, without a clear relationship to spreading rate. The generally accepted explanation is the influence of conductive heat loss and the formation of a thick axial lithosphere due to slow mantle upwelling rates, thereby limiting melt production at ultraslow spreading rates 2. Comparatively, the influence of conductive heat loss at spreading rates greater than 20 mm/yr is likely negligible except near major large offset transforms. The latter effect is predicted by modeling to increase sharply with decreasing spreading rate below 20 mm/yr. Thus perturbations in ridge geometry that would otherwise have a negligible effect, can dramatically influence melt production and ridge tectonics at ultraslow spreading rates. Investigation of the SW Indian Ridge and along the Gakkel Ridge, for example, shows that where the effective spreading rate for mantle upwelling, which ridge obliquity, falls below ~12 mm/yr, long amagmatic accretionary ridge segments form and replace both magmatic accretionary ridge

  13. Ridge regression revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M.C. de Boer (Paul); C.M. Hafner (Christian)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe argue in this paper that general ridge (GR) regression implies no major complication compared with simple ridge regression. We introduce a generalization of an explicit GR estimator derived by Hemmerle and by Teekens and de Boer and show that this estimator, which is more

  14. Thermohaline circulation in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIB) during austral summer and winter periods of 1997

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Suryanarayana, A.; Murty, V.S.N.

    -79 degrees E; 9 degrees-14 degrees S) during austral summer (January 1997) from the Indian research vessel ORV Sagar Kanya, while during the austral winter season (June-July 1997), hydrographical stations were occupied by Russian research vessel RV...

  15. Primary productivity, phytoplankton standing crop and physico-chemical characteristics of the Antarctic and adjacent central Indian Ocean waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JiyalalRam, M.

    Primary productivity, phytoplankton pigments and physico-chemical properties were studied in Antarctic waters and adjoining Indian Ocean between 11 degrees and 67 degrees E longitudes from polynya region (60 degrees S) to equator during the austral...

  16. Sampling history and 2009--2010 results for pesticides and inorganic constituents monitored by the Lake Wales Ridge Groundwater Network, central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquette, Anne F.; Freiwald, R. Scott; Kraft, Carol L.

    2012-01-01

    The Lake Wales Ridge Monitoring (LWRM) Network was established to provide a long-term record of water quality of the surficial aquifer in one of the principal citrus-production areas of Florida. This region is underlain by sandy soils that contain minimal organic matter and are highly vulnerable to leaching of chemicals into the subsurface. This report documents the 1989 through May 2010 sampling history of the LWRM Network and summarizes monitoring results for 38 Network wells that were sampled during the period January 2009 through May 2010. During 1989 through May 2010, the Network’s citrus land-use wells were sampled intermittently to 1999, quarterly from April 1999 to October 2009, and thereafter quarterly to semiannually. The water-quality summaries in this report focus on the period January 2009 through May 2010, during which the Network’s citrus land-use wells were sampled six times and the non-citrus land-use wells were sampled two times. Within the citrus land-use wells sampled, a total of 13 pesticide compounds (8 parent pesticides and 5 degradates) were detected of the 37 pesticide compounds analyzed during this period. The most frequently detected compounds included demethyl norflurazon (83 percent of wells), norflurazon (79 percent), aldicarb sulfoxide (41 percent), aldicarb sulfone (38 percent), imidacloprid (38 percent), and diuron (28 percent). Agrichemical concentrations in samples from the citrus land-use wells during the 2009 through May 2010 period exceeded Federal drinking-water standards (maximum contaminant levels, MCLs) in 1.5 to 24 percent of samples for aldicarb and its degradates (sulfone and sulfoxide), and in 68 percent of the samples for nitrate. Florida statutes restrict the distance of aldicarb applications to drinking-water wells; however, these statutes do not apply to monitoring wells. Health-screening benchmark levels that identify unregulated chemicals of potential concern were exceeded for norflurazon and diuron in 29 and

  17. Metallogenesis along the Indian Ocean Ridge System

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Ray, Dwijesh

    Segment of 11 of SWIR, signature of extinct hydrothermal activity along SWIR on the Mt Jourdanne. Water depth 2941 m (ref. 21) 16. 27?51 minuteS/63?56 minuteE Relict hydrotherma l field, east of Melville fracture zone. Water depth 2940 m...S, 70?02 minuteE in the off - axis area of the CIR, just north of the RTJ. A l though seven dives failed in loca ting the active venting site, strong anomalies of light tran s mission (up to 0.5%) were found at 2200 ? 2450 m depth during...

  18. Nature, source and composition of volcanic ash in sediments from a fracture zone trace of Rodriguez Triple Junction in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.; Nath, B.N.; Borole, D.V.; Gupta, S.M.

    during the late Pleistocene. Introduction Tephra layers in marine sediments provide a high-resolution and temporally precise record of volcanic activity (Paterne et al., 1988; Arculus and Bloomfield, 1992; Bednarz and Schmincke, 1994). Submarine... of terrgenous influence in deep-sea sediments upto 8 oS in the Central Indian basin. Mar. Geol. 87, 301-313. Paterne, M., Guichard, F., Labeyrie, J., 1988. Explosive activity of the south Italian volcanoes during the past 80,000 years as determined by marine...

  19. Ridge Regression Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of the Global Positioning System (GPS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) necessitates the development of Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) techniques. In order to guarantee a certain level of integrity, a thorough understanding of modern estimation techniques applied to navigational problems is required. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) is derived and analyzed under poor geometry conditions. It was found that the performance of the EKF is difficult to predict, since the EKF is designed for a Gaussian environment. A novel approach is implemented which incorporates ridge regression to explain the behavior of an EKF in the presence of dynamics under poor geometry conditions. The basic principles of ridge regression theory are presented, followed by the derivation of a linearized recursive ridge estimator. Computer simulations are performed to confirm the underlying theory and to provide a comparative analysis of the EKF and the recursive ridge estimator.

  20. Understanding the conviction of Binayak Sen: Neocolonialism, political violence and the political economy of health in the central Indian tribal belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jonathan J; King, Lawrence P

    2011-05-01

    The health of adivasis' (Scheduled Tribes or indigenous peoples) is far worse than the general Indian population. Binayak Sen, a renowned Indian public health practitioner, has worked with adivasis in central India for over thirty years. On Christmas Eve 2010 Sen was convicted of involvement with Maoist insurgents and sentenced to life in prison. Sen's conviction has been condemned by Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, and medical journals such as The Lancet and the British Medical Journal are campaigning for his release. This short report addresses the apparently vexing question of how such a miscarriage of justice could happen to a well-reputed physician in a country that is widely referred to as 'the world's largest democracy'. Both Sen's conviction and the health crisis among adivasis in central India are symptoms of what Paul Farmer (2005) refers to as 'deeper pathologies of power'; specifically, the neocolonial political economy in which the state is very active in dispossessing adivasis but inactive in providing benevolent functions. Thus, the case demonstrates the manner in which public health is intimately related to social, economic and political processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Microbial biomass and organic nutrients in the deep-sea sediments of the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Sheelu, G.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Mohandass, C.

    (TC)pergramdrysediment.Thebacterialsizewasmeasuredusinganocularmicrometer.ColonyFormingUnits.Colonyformingunitsofbacteriaandfungiisolatedfromplateswereidenti® eduptogenericlevelusingvariousbiochemical parameters(Oliver,1982)andmorphologicalcharacteristics(Carmichaeletal.,1980)respectively....InAreportonbaseline benthicconditionsinIndianPioneerarea.TechnicalreportofN.I.O.,Goa,India.Oliver,J.D.1982.Taxonomicschemefortheidenti® cationofmarinebacteria.Deep-SeaResearch29:795± 798.Parsons,T.R.,Y.Maita,andC.H.Lalli.1984.AManualofchemicalandbiologicalmethods forseawateranalysis...

  2. Preliminary Analysis of the Knipovich Ridge Segmentation - Influence of Focused Magmatism and Ridge Obliquity on an Ultraslow Spreading System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, K.; Curewitz, D.; Asada, M.; Tamaki, K.

    2002-12-01

    Bathymetry, gravity and deep-tow sonar image data are used to define the segmentation of a 400 km long portion of the ultraslow-spreading Knipovich Ridge in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, Northeast Atlantic Ocean. Discrete volcanic centers marked by large volcanic constructions and accompanying short wavelength mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) lows generally resemble those of the Gakkel Ridge and the easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). These magmatically robust segment centers are regularly spaced about 85-100 km apart along the ridge, and are characterized by accumulated hummocky terrain, high relief, off-axis seamount chains and significant MBA lows. We suggest that these eruptive centers correspond to areas of enhanced magma flux, and that their spacing reflects the geometry of underlying mantle upwelling cells. The large-scale thermal structure of the mantle primarily controls discrete and focused magmatism, and the relatively wide spacing of these segments may reflect cool mantle beneath the ridge. Segment centers along the southern Knipovich Ridge are characterized by lower relief and smaller MBA anomalies than along the northern section of the ridge. This suggests that ridge obliquity is a secondary control on ridge construction on the Knipovich Ridge, as the obliquity changes from 35° to 49° from north to south, respectively, while spreading rate and axial depth remain approximately constant. The increased obliquity may contribute to decreased effective spreading rates, lower upwelling magma velocity and melt formation, and limited horizontal dike propagation near the surface. We also identify small, magmatically weaker segments with low relief, little or no MBA anomaly, and no off axis expression. We suggest that these segments are either fed by lateral melt migration from adjacent magmatically stronger segments or represent smaller, discrete mantle upwelling centers with short-lived melt supply.

  3. Preliminary analysis of the Knipovich Ridge segmentation: influence of focused magmatism and ridge obliquity on an ultraslow spreading system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, Kyoko; Curewitz, Daniel; Asada, Miho; Tamaki, Kensaku; Vogt, Peter; Crane, Kathleen

    2002-09-01

    Bathymetry, gravity and deep-tow sonar image data are used to define the segmentation of a 400 km long portion of the ultraslow-spreading Knipovich Ridge in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, Northeast Atlantic Ocean. Discrete volcanic centers marked by large volcanic constructions and accompanying short wavelength mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) lows generally resemble those of the Gakkel Ridge and the easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge. These magmatically robust segment centers are regularly spaced about 85-100 km apart along the ridge, and are characterized by accumulated hummocky terrain, high relief, off-axis seamount chains and significant MBA lows. We suggest that these eruptive centers correspond to areas of enhanced magma flux, and that their spacing reflects the geometry of underlying mantle upwelling cells. The large-scale thermal structure of the mantle primarily controls discrete and focused magmatism, and the relatively wide spacing of these segments may reflect cool mantle beneath the ridge. Segment centers along the southern Knipovich Ridge are characterized by lower relief and smaller MBA anomalies than along the northern section of the ridge. This suggests that ridge obliquity is a secondary control on ridge construction on the Knipovich Ridge, as the obliquity changes from 35° to 49° from north to south, respectively, while spreading rate and axial depth remain approximately constant. The increased obliquity may contribute to decreased effective spreading rates, lower upwelling magma velocity and melt formation, and limited horizontal dike propagation near the surface. We also identify small, magmatically weaker segments with low relief, little or no MBA anomaly, and no off-axis expression. We suggest that these segments are either fed by lateral melt migration from adjacent magmatically stronger segments or represent smaller, discrete mantle upwelling centers with short-lived melt supply.

  4. Volcanogenic-hydrothermal iron-rich materials from the southern part of the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Gupta, S.M.; Charan, S.N.; Mills, O.P.

    . Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 40, 12–24. Del Monte, M., Nanni, T., Tagliazucca, M., 1975. Ferromagnetic volcanic particulate matter and black magnetic spherules: a comparative study. J. Geophys. Res. 80, 1880–1884. El Goresy, A., 1968. Electron microprobe... in the CIOB.  1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: magnetite spherules; hydrovolcanism; Indian Ocean 1. Introduction Magnetic and metallic spherules have been noted to occur in deep-sea sediments (El Goresy and Fechtig, 1967...

  5. Characterization of Seafloor Volcanism Along the Extremely Slow-Spreading Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge, in the Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean, is the slowest spreading portion of the global mid-ocean ridge system. Full spreading rates vary from 12.7 mm/a at the western end to 6.0 mm/a near the Laptev shelf. Mantle melting models based on decompression melting predict that melt production and crustal thickness decrease dramatically as the spreading rate drops below 15 mm/a. The very low spreading rate is expected to affect not only the crustal thickness, but also the form and distribution of volcanic activity. We have used a seamount-locating algorithm to locate and characterize volcanic features along the Gakkel Ridge axis in order to determine the nature of volcanic processes along the ridge and the manner in which these processes vary along the axis. The technique searches gridded bathymetry data for concentric closed contours shallower than the surrounding seafloor. Volcanic and tectonic features are distinguished primarily by their aspect ratio. The Gakkel Ridge has been divided into three regions on the basis of relative abundance of rock types by Michael et al [2003], a western volcanic zone (WVZ), a central "sparsely magnetic zone" (SMZ) and eastern volcanic zone (EVZ). The WVZ (west of 3°E) is characterized by a relatively shallow rift valley (4200 m), abundant recovery of basalt and clearly volcanic landforms, and visually appears similar to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). This analogy is supported by our analysis that shows numerous volcanoes scattered across the rift valley floor and perched on terraces of the rift valley walls. The density of volcanoes (number/sq. km) is similar to regions of the MAR where we have carried out similar analyses. Volcanoes on this portion of the Gakkel Ridge tend however to be smaller than on the MAR. The magmatic vigor of this area, which varies greatly from what is observed both on the rest of the Gakkel Ridge and on most of the faster-spreading Southeast Indian Ridge, requires unusual thermal and

  6. Ridge and Furrow Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per Grau

    2016-01-01

    Ridge and furrow is a specific way of ploughing which makes fields of systematic ridges and furrows like a rubbing washboard. They are part of an overall openfield system, but the focus in this paper is on the functionality of the fields. There are many indications that agro-technological reasons...... systems and the establishment of basic structures like villages (with churches) and townships and states (in northern Europe). The fields can be considered as a resilient structure lasting for 800 years, along with the same basic physical structures in society....

  7. Interpretation of free-air gravity anomaly data for determining the crustal structure across the continental margins and aseismic ridges: Some examples from Indian continental margins and deep-sea basins

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.

    diagnostic anomaly pattern, and is independent of the location of the boundary with respect to the shelf edge. Robinowitz and Labrecque (1977) computed isostatic gravity anomalies across Argentine and southern African continental margins. The profiles... anomalies over the shelf edge were explained in several ways. For example, Worzel and Shurbet (1955) suggested that that basement ridge and crustal thinning account for gravity high near the shelf edge. High density belts in the basement have been...

  8. Ridge: a computer program for calculating ridge regression estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald E. Hilt; Donald W. Seegrist

    1977-01-01

    Least-squares coefficients for multiple-regression models may be unstable when the independent variables are highly correlated. Ridge regression is a biased estimation procedure that produces stable estimates of the coefficients. Ridge regression is discussed, and a computer program for calculating the ridge coefficients is presented.

  9. Becoming an Indian

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramachandra Guha

    2017-11-25

    Nov 25, 2017 ... ern education, and other accoutrements of civilization. In the competing version, associated with the ruled, the white man's Raj was always illegitimate, marked by coercion and backed by force, its central aim the economic exploitation of Indian labour and Indian raw materials. Thus, British bookshops and ...

  10. Calculating a Stepwise Ridge Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, John D.

    1986-01-01

    Although methods for using ordinary least squares regression computer programs to calculate a ridge regression are available, the calculation of a stepwise ridge regression requires a special purpose algorithm and computer program. The correct stepwise ridge regression procedure is given, and a parallel FORTRAN computer program is described.…

  11. The Composition of the Complete Crust at Ultraslow Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvassnes, A. J.; Devey, C.; Dick, H. J.

    2006-12-01

    Strongly focused magmatic activity at discrete points along the ridge axis is typical for the ultraslow ridges, resulting in the formation of axis-perpendicular basement ridges (Dick et al., Nature 426, 405-412, 2003; Jokat et al., Nature 423: 962-965, 2003). Middle and lower crustal rocks are exposed along steeply dipping normal faults at the basement ridges in places where seismic studies have demonstrated the crust to be ~2-km thick (Jokat et al., op. cit., Michael, et al., Nature Vol 423: 956-961, 2003). High Na8 values and low Fe8 values in many of the basaltic glasses probably result from very low rate of fractional melting of the mantle and caused the very thin crust to be formed. We present a model of the major and trace element composition of the complete crust at these ultraslow ridges based on an extensive study of whole rocks and minerals from upper, middle and lower crustal rocks from the Gakkel and Southwest Indian ridges. The Gakkel Ridge rocks fall clearly into two geochemical types based on geographic region the Western Volcanic Zone and the Sparsely Magmatic Zone. Magmas from the Western Volcanic Zone shows geochemical signatures indicating very large degrees of melting, or derivation from a very depleted source, or both, and as such are atypical of magmas from ultraslow ridges, and may or may not be a red herring. Therefore, in order to calculate a magmatic budget for the complete crust at the typical ultraslow ridges, we have used the data from the Sparsely Magmatic Zone together with the ultraslow part of the Southwest Indian Ridge. We have derived models for the major element compositions of coexisting mineral phases using the modeling program "Melts" (Ghiorso and Sack, Cont Min Pet, 119: 197- 212, 1995), and compared them to our data, in order to determine how much each of the rocks were crystallized relative to the major elements of a parental magma. The major and trace elements for the different rock types are then added together in

  12. Emerging diversity of hydrothermal systems on slow spreading ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, Peter A.

    The development of seafloor hydrothermal research has followed a classic scientific progression in which discoveries were initially interpreted as special cases until further exploration revealed their more general significance. The first high-temperature seafloor hydrothermal system was found at the Atlantis II Deep of the slow spreading Red Sea in 1963. At that time, the hydrothermal activity was largely discounted as an anomaly associated with continental rifting rather than as part of an early stage of opening of an ocean basin that could continue with the development of ocean ridges as in the Atlantic. When high-temperature black smoker hydrothermal venting was found on the East Pacific Rise in 1979, the scientific consensus then held that the relatively high rate of magma supply at intermediate to fast spreading rates was required for such activity. Accordingly, high-temperature hydrothermal activity could not occur on the slow spreading half of the global ocean ridge system. High-temperature black smokers like those on the East Pacific Rise were first discovered on a slow spreading ocean ridge at the TAG hydrothermal field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in 1985. The scientific consensus then ruled out the possibility for such activity on the ultraslow portion of the ocean ridge system. Plumes indicative of active high-temperature black smokers were found on the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic in 2001, and active black smokers were found on the Southwest Indian Ridge in 2006. A diversity of high-temperature hydrothermal systems remains to be found on ocean ridges, particularly at slow spreading rates.

  13. Petrology of Gakkel Ridge Basalts: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmuir, C. H.; Lehnert, K.; Goldstein, S. L.; Michael, P.; Graham, D.; Schramm, B.

    2001-12-01

    source. There is no evidence for an enriched "veined mantle" component at these very low extents of melting These samples appear to reflect the dying out of the melting regime and a depleted mantle in this region. Proceeding further east, there is an amagmatic region where purely tectonic spreading appears to take place, and where no basalts were recovered. Magmatism then revives at about 10° E, first with highly enriched basalts with 150ppm Ba and 4% Na2O,and then with progressively less enriched compositions further east. In the far eastern, slowest spreading portions of the ridge, the magmatism is fresh and abundant, but is focussed at large, slightly elongate volcanic complexes, separated by short sections of tectonized ridge. The mean compositions of Gakkel Ridge basalts correspond with the global depth-chemistry systematics. The deepest and highest Na8 region is the central Gakkel Ridge. Spreading rate alone is clearly not the dominant variable in controlling the changes along the strike of the ridge, even at ultra-slow spreading rates. Mantle composition and possibly mantle temperature clearly play an important role even at ultra-slow spreading rates. The edges of the amagmatic zone provide evidence of the variable compositions of the lowest degree melts that occur in the sub-oceanic mantle.

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ODP Leg 179) of the Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge have revealed magnetic properties of the gabbros, olivine gabbros, oxide gabbros and olivine oxide gabbros down the core. Comparison of modal proportions of the oxides, grain sizes ...

  15. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1, (OU1) which consists of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP). The CRSP are located {approximately}800 ft southeast of the central portion of the Y-12 Plant atop Chestnut Ridge, which is bounded to the northwest by Bear Creek Valley and to the southeast by Bethel Valley. Operated from 1973 to 1988, the CRSP consisted of a series of trenches used for the disposal of classified hazardous and nonhazardous waste materials. Disposal of hazardous waste materials was discontinued in December 1984, while nonhazardous waste disposal ended on November 8, 1988. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern (COC), support an ecological risk assessment (ERA) and a human health risk assessment (HHRA), support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this Work Plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU1. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the overall risk posed to human health and the environment by OU1.

  16. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1, (OU1) which consists of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP). The CRSP are located ∼800 ft southeast of the central portion of the Y-12 Plant atop Chestnut Ridge, which is bounded to the northwest by Bear Creek Valley and to the southeast by Bethel Valley. Operated from 1973 to 1988, the CRSP consisted of a series of trenches used for the disposal of classified hazardous and nonhazardous waste materials. Disposal of hazardous waste materials was discontinued in December 1984, while nonhazardous waste disposal ended on November 8, 1988. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern (COC), support an ecological risk assessment (ERA) and a human health risk assessment (HHRA), support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this Work Plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU1. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the overall risk posed to human health and the environment by OU1

  17. 3D Gravimetric Modeling of the Spreading System North and Southeast of the Rodriguez Triple Junction (Indian Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyde, I.; Girolami, C.; Barckhausen, U.; Freitag, R.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrothermal vent fields along mid-ocean ridges can be metal-rich and thus of great importance for the industries in the future. By order of the German Federal Ministry of Economics and in coordination with the International Seabed Authority (ISA), BGR explores potential areas of the active spreading system in the Indian Ocean. A main goal is the identification of inactive seafloor massive sulfides (SMS) with the aid of modern exploration techniques. Important contributions could be expected from bathymetric, magnetic, and gravity datasets, which can be acquired simultaneously time from the sea surface within relatively short ship time. The area of interest is located between 21°S and 28°S and includes the southern Central Indian Ridge (CIR) and the northern Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR). In this study we analyzed the marine gravity and bathymetric data acquired during six research cruises. The profiles running perpendicular to the ridge axis have a mean length of 60 km. Magnetic studies reveal that the parts of the ridges covered are geologically very young with the oldest crust dating back to about 1 Ma. To extend the area outside the ridges, the shipboard data were complemented with data derived from satellite radar altimeter measurements. We analyzed the gravity anomalies along sections which cross particular geologic features (uplifted areas, accommodation zones, hydrothermal fields, and areas with hints for extensional processes e.g. oceanic core complexes) to establish a correlation between the gravity anomalies and the surface geology. Subsequently, for both ridge segments 3D density models were developed. We started with simple horizontally layered models, which, however, do not explain the measured anomalies satisfyingly. The density values of the crust and the upper mantle in the ridge areas had to be reduced. Finally, the models show the lateral heterogeneity and the variations in the thickness of the oceanic crust. There are areas characterized by

  18. Ridge regression processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    Current navigation requirements depend on a geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) criterion. As long as the GDOP stays below a specific value, navigation requirements are met. The GDOP will exceed the specified value when the measurement geometry becomes too collinear. A new signal processing technique, called Ridge Regression Processing, can reduce the effects of nearly collinear measurement geometry; thereby reducing the inflation of the measurement errors. It is shown that the Ridge signal processor gives a consistently better mean squared error (MSE) in position than the Ordinary Least Mean Squares (OLS) estimator. The applicability of this technique is currently being investigated to improve the following areas: receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM), coverage requirements, availability requirements, and precision approaches.

  19. The Gakkel Ridge: Crustal Accretion at Extremely Slow Spreading Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. R.; Kurras, G. J.; Edwards, M. H.; Coakley, B. J.

    2002-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge, in the Arctic Ocean, is the slowest spreading portion of the global mid-ocean ridge system. Total spreading rates range from 12.7 mm/a near Greenland to 6.0 mm/a where the ridge disappears beneath the Laptev Shelf. Swath-bathymetry and gravity data for an 850-km-long section of the Gakkel Ridge from 5° E to 97° E were obtained from the U.S. Navy submarine USS Hawkbill during the SCICEX program. The ridge axis is very deep, generally 4700-5300 m, within a well-developed rift valley. The topography is primarily tectonic in origin, characterized by linear rift-parallel ridges and fault-bounded troughs with up to 2 km of relief. Evidence of extrusive volcanic activity is limited and confined to specific locations. East of 32° E, isolated discrete volcanoes are observed at 25-95 km intervals along the axis. Abundant small-scale volcanism characteristic of the MAR is absent; it appears that the amount of melt generated is insufficient to maintain a continuous magmatic spreading axis. Instead, melt is erupted on the seafloor at a set of distinct locations where multiple eruptions have built up central volcanoes and covered adjacent areas with low relief lava flows. Between 5° E and 32° E, almost no volcanic activity is observed except near 19° E. The ridge axis shoals rapidly by 1500 m over a 30 km wide area at 19° E that coincides with a high-standing axis-perpendicular bathymetric high. Bathymetry and sidescan data show the presence of numerous small volcanic features and flow fronts in the axial valley on the upper portions of the 19° E along-axis high. Gravity data imply up to 3 km of crustal thickening under the 19° E axis-perpendicular ridge. The 19° E magmatic center may result from interaction of the ridge with a passively imbedded mantle inhomogeneity. Away from 19° E, the crust appears thin and patchy and may consist of basalt directly over peridotite. The ridge axis is continuous with no transform offset. However, sections of the

  20. Epidemiology of viral pathogens of free-ranging dogs and Indian foxes in a human-dominated landscape in central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsare, A V; Vanak, A T; Gompper, M E

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing concern that free-ranging domestic dog (Canis familiaris) populations may serve as reservoirs of pathogens which may be transmitted to wildlife. We documented the prevalence of antibodies to three viral pathogens, canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine adenovirus (CAV), in free-ranging dog and sympatric Indian fox (Vulpes bengalensis) populations in and around the Great Indian Bustard Wildlife Sanctuary, in Maharashtra, central India. A total of 219 dogs and 33 foxes were sampled during the study period. Ninety-three percentage of dogs and 87% of foxes were exposed to one or more of the three pathogens. Exposure rates in dogs were high: >88% for CPV, >72% for CDV and 71% for CAV. A large proportion of adult dogs had antibodies against these pathogens due to seroconversion following earlier natural infection. The high prevalence of exposure to these pathogens across the sampling sessions, significantly higher exposure rates of adults compared with juveniles, and seroconversion in some unvaccinated dogs documented during the study period suggests that these pathogens are enzootic. The prevalence of exposure to CPV, CDV and CAV in foxes was 48%, 18% and 52%, respectively. Further, a high rate of mortality was documented in foxes with serologic evidence of ongoing CDV infection. Dogs could be playing a role in the maintenance and transmission of these pathogens in the fox population, but our findings show that most dogs in the population are immune to these pathogens by virtue of earlier natural infection, and therefore, these individuals make little current or future contribution to viral maintenance. Vaccination of this cohort will neither greatly improve their collective immune status nor contribute to herd immunity. Our findings have potentially important implications for dog disease control programmes that propose using canine vaccination as a tool for conservation management of wild carnivore populations. © 2014

  1. The Mozambique Ridge: a document of massive multistage magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Maximilian D.; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Jacques, Guillaume; Werner, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    The Mozambique Ridge, a prominent basement high in the southwestern Indian Ocean, consists of four major geomorphological segments associated with numerous phases of volcanic activity in the Lower Cretaceous. The nature and origin of the Mozambique Ridge have been intensely debated with one hypothesis suggesting a Large Igneous Province origin. High-resolution seismic reflection data reveal a large number of extrusion centres with a random distribution throughout the southern Mozambique Ridge and the nearby Transkei Rise. Intrabasement reflections emerge from the extrusion centres and are interpreted to represent massive lava flow sequences. Such lava flow sequences are characteristic of eruptions leading to the formation of continental and oceanic flood basalt provinces, hence supporting a Large Igneous Province origin of the Mozambique Ridge. We observe evidence for widespread post-sedimentary magmatic activity that we correlate with a southward propagation of the East African Rift System. Based on our volumetric analysis of the southern Mozambique Ridge we infer a rapid sequential emplacement between ˜131 and ˜125 Ma, which is similar to the short formation periods of other Large Igneous Provinces like the Agulhas Plateau.

  2. Preservation of Fertile Mantle Components at Mid-Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesi, L. G.; Behn, M. D.; Standish, J. J.; Dick, H. J.

    2007-12-01

    Recycled lithosphere is suspected to contribute to the geochemical enrichment not only of Ocean Island Basalts (OIB) but also exceptional Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts collected at ultraslow ridges. In particular, the chemistry of basalts at volcanic centers along the Southwest Indian Ridge oblique supersegment of 9-16°E is best explained by an exceptionally strong contribution from an enriched mafic component mixed in the upwelling mantle. Why this component is so strong at these volcanic centers can be understood in at least two ways. 1) The mantle underneath each volcanic center is anomalous. Such an explanation is equivalent to appealing to small plume-like features underneath each volcanic center. 2) The fertile component is present everywhere but melt migration gathers the resulting magma toward the volcanic centers. In this contribution, we test the second hypothesis using a numerical melt migration model in which magma rises vertically until it encounter the base of the thermal lithosphere. In the SWIR 9-16°E area, variations in ridge axis azimuth produce a strong relief to the base of the lithosphere, which focuses magma towards the location of the observed volcanic centers. Magma produced off-axis, which is dominated by the fertile component, is focused even more strongly than near-axis magma, explaining the relative enrichment of the surface lava. We compare the expected enrichment pattern with the geochemistry of collected lava and show that, were the ridge straighter or spreading faster, this signal would be more difficult to observe.

  3. Lecture notes on ridge regression

    OpenAIRE

    van Wieringen, Wessel N.

    2015-01-01

    The linear regression model cannot be fitted to high-dimensional data, as the high-dimensionality brings about empirical non-identifiability. Penalized regression overcomes this non-identifiability by augmentation of the loss function by a penalty (i.e. a function of regression coefficients). The ridge penalty is the sum of squared regression coefficients, giving rise to ridge regression. Here many aspect of ridge regression are reviewed e.g. moments, mean squared error, its equivalence to co...

  4. Seafloor age dependence of Rayleigh wave phase velocities in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Karen E.; Dalton, Colleen A.; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2017-05-01

    Variations in the phase velocity of fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves across the Indian Ocean are determined using two inversion approaches. First, variations in phase velocity as a function of seafloor age are estimated using a pure-path age-dependent inversion method. Second, a two-dimensional parameterization is used to solve for phase velocity within 1.25° × 1.25° grid cells. Rayleigh wave travel time delays have been measured between periods of 38 and 200 s. The number of measurements in the study area ranges between 4139 paths at a period of 200 s and 22,272 paths at a period of 40 s. At periods Rodriguez Triple Junction and the Australian-Antarctic Discordance and anomalously low velocities immediately to the west of the Central Indian Ridge.

  5. Cocos Ridge Collision as a Driver for Plate Boundary Deformation in the Western Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Femina, P. C.; Govers, R. M.; Geirsson, H.; Kobayashi, D.

    2011-12-01

    The subduction and collision of bathymetric highs can result in geodynamic changes along convergent plate boundaries, including intense upper plate deformation, increases in mechanical coupling and seismicity, migration and or cessation of volcanism and formation of forearc terranes. But how extensive can the deformation associated with these features be and what are the implications for the long-term formation and evolution of plate boundary zones? Plate boundary evolution and upper plate deformation in southern Central America associated with Cocos Ridge collision is well studied and indicates, 1) migration of the volcanic arc toward the backarc northwest of and cessation of volcanism directly inboard the ridge, 2) uplift of the Cordillera de Talamanca inboard the ridge, 3) shortening across the forearc Fila Costena fold and thrust belt, and 4) outer forearc uplift above and flanking the ridge. Recent geodynamical modeling of Cocos Ridge collision, combined with the results of kinematic block models for the Central American margin, suggests the ridge drives northwest-directed forearc motion from central Costa Rica northwest to the Cocos - Caribbean (Central American forearc block) - North America triple junction, greatly increasing the spatial scale of deformation. Upperplate deformation of the Central American margin to the southeast of the Cocos Ridge in Panama was not investigated in these models. We investigate the dynamics of Cocos Ridge collision along the entire Central American margin and the implications on plate boundary evolution with a new geodynamic model of ridge collision. Our model results are compared to a new GPS derived horizontal velocity field for Central America and preliminary results indicate that the Cocos Ridge drives the Panamanian isthmus into northern South America (i.e., the North Andes block).

  6. Spreading rate dependent seafloor deformation in response to India-Eurasia collision: results of a hydrosweep survey in the Central Indian Ocean basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; George, P.; Ranade, G.

    ), and fault scarps (their ridge-parallel orientation, variable length, and non-uniform spacing) implies a pronounced effect of regional tectonic disturbance. We attribute these variations to variation in the rates of spreading at th eridge crest. In particular...

  7. Measuring mandibular ridge reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, W.H.A.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis investigates the mandibular reduction in height of complete denture wearers and overdenture wearers. To follow this reduction in the anterior region as well as in the lateral sections of the mandible, an accurate and reproducible measuring method is a prerequisite. A radiologic technique offers the best chance. A survey is given of the literature concerning the resorption process after the extraction of teeth. An oblique cephalometric radiographic technique is introduced as a promising method to measure mandibular ridge reduction. The reproducibility and the accuracy of the technique are determined. The reproducibility in the positioning of the mandible is improved by the introduction of a mandibular support which permits a precise repositioning of the edentulous jaw, even after long periods of investigation. (Auth.)

  8. Deciphering detailed plate kinematics of the Indian Ocean and developing a unified model for East Gondwanaland reconstruction: An Indian-Australian-French initiative

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Yatheesh, V.; Dyment, J.; Bhattacharya, G.C.; Muller, R.D.

    in the northwestern and central Indian Ocean by combining the available magnetic data from conjugate regions and provided a detailed understanding of plate tectonic evolution of Indian-Antarctic and Indian-African plate boundaries. Those projects were complemented...

  9. Petrology of gabbros from Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Snow, J. E.; Hellebrand, E.; von der Handt, A.; Dick, H.; Hoefs, J.

    2003-04-01

    Major element geochemistry of constituent minerals in the gabbros from Gakkel Ridge has been investigated by electron microprobe. In contrast to the abundant recovery of basalt and peridotite along the ridge, gabbros were only recovered from a few locations. This is consistent with geophysical evidence that the gabbro layer is very thin or even absent beneath the Gakkel Ridge. The recovered gabbros are mainly olivine bearing and olivine gabbro, together with some troctolite and microgabbro. Compared with the relatively fresh nature of the Hole735B (SWIR) gabbro, most Gakkel gabbros are characterized by greenschist facies alteration. At the same time, most gabbros have well-developed brittle fractures, which are filled with low temperature alteration products (abundant smectite and carbonate). Electron probe measurements were performed on the freshest central part of the minerals. Except for one drop-stone, in general Gakkel gabbros are more primitive than those recovered from EPR (Hess Deep), and even are more primitive than Hole 735B gabbros. All gabbros have a very narrow crystallization temperature from 1100-1150°C, based on the olivine-pyroxene Mg-Fe-exchange geothermometer. This indicates that measured mineral compositions represent their original magmatic signature, although most minerals had been affected by a series of alterations. The more primitive nature of Gakkel gabbro suggests that the melt from which they were crystallized was only fractionated to a very low degree. This may reflect a different mechanism of aggregation, which is related to the ultra-slow spreading rate of the Gakkel Ridge. Such as the melting degree is too low to maintain a magma chamber for extensive fractionation.

  10. Heat Flow Data Cruise MD72 RV Marion Dufresne over the Mascarene Ridge

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data were gathered by the R/V Marion Dufresne in May and June of 1992 over the Mascarene Ridge in the Indian Ocean on cruise MD72/MASCAFLUX. Heat flow measurements...

  11. Development of the negative gravity anomaly of the 85 E Ridge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    4Space Applications Centre, Indian Space Research Organization, Ahmedabad 380 015, India. ∗ e-mail: sreejith81@gmail.com. The 85 ... N latitude), where the ridge structure is buried under thick Bengal Fan sediments and positive anomaly over the south part, where the structure is intermittently exposed above the ...

  12. U-Series Disequilibria across the New Southern Ocean Mantle Province, Australian-Antarctic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, S. R.; Sims, K. W. W.; Park, S. H.; Langmuir, C. H.; Lin, J.; Kim, S. S.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Michael, P. J.; Choi, H.; Yang, Y. S.

    2017-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) provide a unique window into the temporal and spatial scales of mantle evolution. Long-lived radiogenic isotopes in MORB have demonstrated that the mantle contains many different chemical components or "flavors". U-series disequilibria in MORB have further shown that different chemical components/lithologies in the mantle contribute differently to mantle melting processes beneath mid-ocean ridges. Recent Sr, Nd, Hf, and Pb isotopic analyses from newly collected basalts along the Australian-Antarctic Ridge (AAR) have revealed that a large distinct mantle province exists between the Australian-Antarctic Discordance and the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge, extending from West Antarctica and Marie Byrd Land to New Zealand and Eastern Australia (Park et al., submitted). This southern mantle province is located between the Indian-type mantle and the Pacific-type mantle domains. U-series measurements in the Southeast Indian Ridge and East Pacific Rise provinces show distinct signatures suggestive of differences in melting processes and source lithology. To examine whether the AAR mantle province also exhibits different U-series systematics we have measured U-Th-Ra disequilibria data on 38 basalts from the AAR sampled along 500 km of ridge axis from two segments that cross the newly discovered Southern Ocean Mantle province. We compare the data to those from nearby ridge segments show that the AAR possesses unique U-series disequilibria, and are thus undergoing distinct mantle melting dynamics relative to the adjacent Pacific and Indian ridges. (230Th)/(238U) excesses in zero-age basalts (i.e., those with (226Ra)/(230Th) > 1.0) range from 1.3 to 1.7, while (226Ra)/(230Th) ranges from 1.0 to 2.3. (226Ra)/(230Th) and (230Th)/(238U) are negatively correlated, consistent with the model of mixing between deep and shallow melts. The AAR data show higher values of disequilibria compared to the Indian and Pacific Ridges, which can be explained by either

  13. Europan double ridge morphometry as a test of formation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dameron, Ashley C.; Burr, Devon M.

    2018-05-01

    Double ridges on the Jovian satellite Europa consist of two parallel ridges with a central trough. Although these features are nearly ubiquitous on Europa, their formation mechanism(s) is (are) not yet well-understood. Previous hypotheses for their formation can be divided into two groups based on 1) the expected interior slope angles and 2) the magnitude of interior/exterior slope symmetry. The published hypotheses in the first ("fracture") group entail brittle deformation of the crust, either by diapirism, shear heating, or buckling due to compression. Because these mechanisms imply uplift of near-vertical fractures, their predicted interior slopes are steeper than the angle of repose (AOR) with shallower exterior slopes. The second ("flow") group includes cryosedimentary and cryovolcanic processes - explosive or effusive cryovolcanism and tidal squeezing -, which are predicted to form ridge slopes at or below the AOR. Explosive cryovolcanism would form self-symmetric ridges, whereas effusive cryolavas and cryo-sediments deposited during tidal squeezing would likely not exhibit slope symmetry. To distinguish between these two groups of hypothesized formation mechanisms, we derived measurements of interior slope angle and interior/exterior slope symmetry at multiple locations on Europa through analysis of data from the Galileo Solid State Imaging (SSI) camera. Two types of data were used: i) elevation data from five stereo-pair digital elevation models (DEMs) covering four ridges (580 individual measurements), and ii) ridge shadow length measurements taken on individual images over 40 ridges (200 individual measurements). Our results shows that slopes measured on our DEMs, located in the Cilix and Banded Plains regions, typically fall below the AOR, and slope symmetry is dominant. Two different shadow measurement techniques implemented to calculate interior slopes yielded slope angles that also fall below the AOR. The shallow interior slopes derived from both

  14. The opening of the Indian Ocean: what is the consequence on the formation of the East African, Madagascar and Antarctic margins, and what are the origins of the aseismic ridges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph; Moulin, Maryine; Aslanian, Daniel; Guillocheau, François; de Clarens, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Palinspatic reconstructions of the Indian Ocean presents lots of challenges and problems, occasioned mostly as a result of a number of unanswered scientific questions in the ocean due to inadequate data, and in some cases lack of consensus on the interpretation of available data; resulting in kinematic reconstruction model proposals which are inconsistent and incoherent with current data interpretations and independently modeled motions of neighboring plates. Such models are largely characterized by gaps and overlaps in the full-fit reconstruction. Although, there is published significant scientific knowledge and data that confirms Gondwana and the Wilson cycle, a crucial scientific question that still remain unanswered is: what was the true geometry of Gondwana and how has its plates evolved through time? This is a very crucial question which is very critical in deciphering how we position the plates relative to each other. Although there has been a number of attempts to answer this question over several decades, answers so far provided differ widely, and currently there is no consensus on the true answer. We present here a new initial fit of East Gondwana within the framework of the Passive Margin Exploration Laboratories (PAMELA) project, through the adoption of a multifaceted approach by analysis and interpretation of onshore and offshore geophysical (Seismic, gravity, magnetic, and bathymetry) and geological (Stratigraphic, geochemical and geochronogical data from the plate basement and the Karoo volcanics and sediments) data, to have a better understanding of the history of all the events and processes, and to present a global picture by comparing with events in neighboring oceans. The PhD thesis of Joseph Offei Thompson is co-funded by TOTAL and IFREMER as part of the PAMELA (Passive Margin Exploration Laboratories) scientific project

  15. High H2O/Ce of K-rich MORB from Lena Trough and Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, J. E.; Feig, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    Lena Trough in the Arctic ocean is the oblique spreading continuation of Gakkel Ridge through the Fram Strait (eg Snow et al. 2011). Extreme trace element and isotopic compositions seen in Lena Trough basalt appear to be the enriched end member dominating the geochemistry of the Western Volcanic Zone of the Western Gakkel Ridge as traced by Pb isotopes, K2O/TiO2, Ba/Nb and other isotopic, major and trace element indicators of mixing (Nauret et al., 2011). This is in contrast to neighboring Gakkel Ridge which has been spreading for 50-60 million years. Basalts from Lena Trough also show a pure MORB noble gas signature (Nauret et al., 2010) and peridotites show no evidence of ancient components in their Os isotopes (Lassiter, et al., in press). The major and trace element compositions of the basalts, however are very distinct from MORB, being far more potassic than all but a single locality on the SW Indian Ridge. We determined H2O and trace element composiitions of a suite of 17 basalt glasses from the Central Lena Trough (CLT) and the Gakkel Western Volcanic Zone, including many of those previously analyzed by Nauret et al. (2012). The Western Gakkel glasses have high H2O/Ce for MORB (>300) suggesting a water rich source consistent with the idea that the northernmost Atlantic mantle is enriched in water (Michael et al., 1995). They are within the range of Eastern Gakkel host glasses determined by Wanless et al, 2013. The Lena Trough (CLT) glasses are very rich in water for MORB (>1% H2O) and are among the highest H2O/Ce (>400) ever measured in MORB aside from melt inclusions in olivine. Mantle melting dynamics and melt evolution cannot account for the H2O/Ce variations in MORB, as these elements have similar behavior during melting and crustal evolution. Interestingly, the H2O/K2O ratios in the basalts are only around 1. This is because the K2O levels in the CLT glasses are very high as well relative to REE. The absolutely linear relationship between H2O and K2O

  16. Ridges on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This is the highest resolution picture ever taken of the Jupiter moon, Europa. The area shown is about 5.9 by 9.9 miles (9.6 by 16 kilometers) and the smallest visible feature is about the size of a football field. In this view, the ice-rich surface has been broken into a complex pattern by cross-cutting ridges and grooves resulting from tectonic processes. Sinuous rille-like features and knobby terrain could result from surface modifications of unknown origins. Small craters of possible impact origin range in size from less than 330 feet (100 meters) to about 1300 feet (400 meters) across are visible.This image was taken by the solid state imaging television camera aboard the Galileo during its fourth orbit around Jupiter, at a distance of 2060 miles (3340 kilometers). The picture is centered at 325 degrees West, 5.83 degrees North. North is toward the top of this image, with the sun shining from the right.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  17. Growth of a tectonic ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, R.W.; Messerich, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Johnson, A.M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    1997-12-31

    The 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake of M 7.6 created an impressive record of surface rupture and ground deformation. Fractures extend over a length of more than 80 km including zones of right-lateral shift, steps in the fault zones, fault intersections and vertical changes. Among the vertical changes was the growth of a tectonic ridge described here. In this paper the authors describe the Emerson fault zone and the Tortoise Hill ridge including the relations between the fault zone and the ridge. They present data on the horizontal deformation at several scales associated with activity within the ridge and belt of shear zones and show the differential vertical uplifts. And, they conclude with a discussion of potential models for the observed deformation.

  18. Ultra-slow-spreading - A New Class of Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, H. J.; Lin, J.; Michael, P. J.; Schouten, H.; Snow, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    Surveys of the the SW Indian and Gakkel Ridges show that ultra-slow spreading ridges are as different from slow spreading ridges as fast spreading ridges are from slow ? perhaps more so. At an effective spreading rate for mantle upwelling rate spreading component measured orthogonal to the ridge trend) there are dramatic changes. Magmatism becomes discontinuous, with mantle peridotite emplaced directly to the sea floor over large regions. Local magmatic centers are either ephemeral point source or occur at long-lived cross-axis volcanic highs. The latter are principally localized at bends in the ridge trend or at ridge transform intersections. Mantle peridotites emplaced to the sea floor range from harzburgite to lherzolite, despite low levels of melt production, suggesting that much of this variability predates the ridge melting event. While high-pressure vein assemblages are not present, evidence for late stage low-pressure melt impregnation is common, suggesting that the peridotites underwent partial fusion. This likely eliminated pre-existing vein assemblages. Ridge basalts differ from those at faster spreading ridges as they are generally enriched - possible evidence of a pre-existing vein assemblage. In magmatically active areas, rift axes are sub-orthogonal to the spreading direction with high-angle normal faults dominating the formation of axial and rift valley relief. In the absence of active magmatism, rift valley walls are more subdued, and follow the ridge trend. The walls of amagmatic spreading segments are often lower than those at magmatic segments and are either highly irregular or dominated by low-angle normal faults. The latter dip ~14°-18° and slope down from the crest of the rift valley wall to the floor of the axial trough on essentially a single fault surface. Despite this an orthogonal fabric defined by 50 to 200-m high-angle normal fault scarps, reflecting brittle plate extension, is ubiquitous. This is most easily seen where the ridge

  19. 210Pb, 230Th, and 10Be in Central Indian Basin seamount sediments: Signatures of degassing and hydrothermal alteration of recent origin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Borole, D.V.; Aldahan, A.; Patil, S.K.; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.; Possnert, G.; Ericsson, T.; Ramaswamy, V.; Gupta, S.M.

    influence of neutral chloride type hydrothermal fluids. This is the first report of recently occurring sediment alteration by shallow circulating sub-surface fluids along the Indian Ocean intra-plate seamount environment. Citation: Nath, B. N., D. V. Borole...

  20. Ridge regression and its degrees of freedom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Theo K.

    2014-01-01

    For ridge regression the degrees of freedom are commonly calculated by the trace of the matrix that transforms the vector of observations on the dependent variable into the ridge regression estimate of its expected value. For a fixed ridge parameter this is unobjectionable. When the ridge parameter

  1. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. NEENA ISAAC1 2 T I ELDHO1. Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076, India; Central Water and Power Research Station, Khadakwasla, Pune 411024, India ...

  2. Indian refining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, I.J.

    2002-01-01

    The author discusses the history of the Indian refining industry and ongoing developments under the headings: the present state; refinery configuration; Indian capabilities for refinery projects; and reforms in the refining industry. Tables lists India's petroleum refineries giving location and capacity; new refinery projects together with location and capacity; and expansion projects of Indian petroleum refineries. The Indian refinery industry has undergone substantial expansion as well as technological changes over the past years. There has been progressive technology upgrading, energy efficiency, better environmental control and improved capacity utilisation. Major reform processes have been set in motion by the government of India: converting the refining industry from a centrally controlled public sector dominated industry to a delicensed regime in a competitive market economy with the introduction of a liberal exploration policy; dismantling the administered price mechanism; and a 25 year hydrocarbon vision. (UK)

  3. Records of near-isothermal decompression and clockwise P-T history from the Paleoproterozoic Mahakoshal Belt, Central Indian Tectonic Zone: Constraints from pseudosection modelling and monazite geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Tanzil; Naraga, Prabhakar; Bhattacharya, Abhijit; Kaliappan, Madhavan

    2017-04-01

    The Mahakoshal Belt (MB) is regarded as the oldest subunit along the northern collar of the Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ) arguably representing the zone of accretion between the North India Block and the South India Block. The following study focuses on deciphering the structural and metamorphic P-T-t history of the schists/phyllites from the eastern part of the belt, and provides insights into the Paleoproterozoic tectonic development in the CITZ. The schists comprise phengite, quartz, andalusite, biotite, muscovite and margarite, and are associated with veins of rare andalusite + corundum + quartz assemblage. The field relations combined with deformation microtextures in the MB schists suggests three episodes of metamorphism, M1, M2 and M3, corresponding with D1, D2 and D3 deformation events respectively. Inclusion trails (S1) of phengite + biotite + quartz ± chlorite in syn/post-S2 andalusite porphyroblasts constrain the M1 metamorphic event in pelitic schists. The application of pseudosection modelling estimated peak metamorphic conditions at ˜8 kbar and 520 ˚ C. Near isothermal decompression (populations at 1.8-1.9 Ga, and rim populations at 1.7-1.8 Ga and 1.5-1.6 Ga. Thus, the peak metamorphism in MB schists was Paleoproterozoic in age, 1.8-1.9 Ga, and the clockwise P-T path was recorded at 1.7-1.8 Ga, which overlaps with the emplacement of blastoporphyritic granitoids along southern margin of the MB. The results obtained in this study combined with the existing structural-metamorphic-chronological information demonstrate the CITZ to be a composite of desperately-evolved crustal domains. With some major omissions, the tectono-thermal events identified in the CITZ partly overlap with those observed in the Capricorn Orogen (Western Australia) and the Trans North China Orogen. Therefore, these global correlations possibly corroborate new configurations on the assembly and fragmentation of Columbia Supercontinent, but await further studies and robust age

  4. Melt distribution along the axis of ultraslow spreading mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlindwein, V. S. N.; Schmid, F.; Meier, M.

    2017-12-01

    Ultraslow spreading mid-ocean ridges (spreading rate) differ from faster spreading ridges by their uneven melt distribution. Crustal thickness varies along axis from zero to more than 8 km at volcanic centers. These volcanic centers receive more melt than the regional average and may be sustained for millions of years. The segmentation pattern and active volcanism at ultraslow spreading ridges greatly differs from faster spreading ridges. Using networks of ocean bottom seismometers at three differing ridge segments, we could show that the maximum depth of brittle faulting, equivalent approximately to temperatures of 600-700°C, varies drastically along axis. Ridge sections that lack an igneous crust exhibit a thick lithosphere as evidenced by the deepest mid-ocean ridge earthquakes observed so far at more than 30 km depth. Beneath areas of basalt exposure, in particular beneath pronounced volcanic centers, the axial lithosphere may be more than 15 km thinner allowing for melt flow at the base of the lithosphere towards the volcanoes, a process that has been postulated to explain the uneven along-axis melt distribution. Spreading events at ultraslow spreading ridges are unusual as we found from two spreading episodes at 85°E Gakkel Ridge and Segment 8 volcano on the Southwest Indian Ridge. These eruptions were preceded or accompanied by large (M>5) and long-lasting earthquake swarms and active magmatism lasted over 3-16 years. A massive hydrothermal event plume and sounds from deep submarine explosive volcanism were observed at Gakkel Ridge. At the Segment 8 volcano, we imaged a melt reservoir extending to about 8 km depth below the volcano that potentially fed a sill intrusion recorded by an ocean bottom seismometers about 30 km away at a neighboring subordinate volcanic center. To better understand the segmentation and melt transport at ultraslow spreading rigdes, we recently conducted a segment-scale seismicity survey of Knipovich Ridge in the Norwegian

  5. Seismic structure at the Kairei Hydrothermal vent field near the Rodriguez Triple Junction in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, H.; Sato, T.; Imai, Y.; Mori, T.; Noguchi, Y.; Kono, A.; Yamada, T.; Shinohara, M.

    2014-12-01

    Central Indian Ridge is located at the north of the Rodriguez Triple Junction and shows slow-intermediate spreading rate. The Kairei hydrothermal Field (KHF) was discovered in the first segment of Central Indian Ridge near the Rodriguez Triple Junction. The vent fluid which is extruding at the KHF has higher H2 content compared with other hydrothermal vent fluid in the world. Although The KHF itself exists above a basaltic rock massif, gabbro and mafic rocks were discovered on the seafloor around the KHF. These deep-seated rocks may contribute to the high H2concentration of the Kairei vent fluid .To understand how gabbro and mafic rocks are uplifted and exhumed on the seafloor, we conducted a seismic refraction/reflection survey using ocean bottom seismograms (OBSs). We conducted the seismic refraction/reflection survey from January 27 to March 19 in 2013 using S/V Yokosuka of Jamstec. In the experiment, we used 21 OBSs, an air gun (G.I.gun) and a single channel steamer cable. We obtained 5 survey lines NNW-SSE direction parallel to the ridge axis, 5 lines E-W direction and 5 lines NNE-SSW direction. In addition to these lines, we acquired other 5 lines passing through the point above the KHF or Yokoniwa Rise, which is the north of the KHF. In analysis of refraction data, firstly, we estimated 2D velocity model under survey lines, which are parallel to the ridge axis, using the progressive model development method developed by Sato and Kennett (2000). Then, we constructed a 3D initial model and run the 3D tomographic method developed by Zelt and Barton (1998). The 1D velocity profile of the KHF seems to be similar to that of mid ocean ridges such as Mid Atlantic Ridge, East Pacific Rise. Seismic velocities under the KHF and Yokoniwa Rise reach about 6km/s at depth of 1~2 km below seafloor, probably indicating uplift of deep-seated rocks. In this presentation we will show 3D seismic structure of this area.

  6. Processing, Analysing and Visualisation of Multibeam Data from Different Systems Gathered during the AMORE-Expedition to Gakkel Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Gauger, S.; Hartmann, T.; Hatzky, Jörn; Schenke, Hans-Werner

    2002-01-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean was the object of an international expedition in the boreal summer 2001. This part of the mid-ocean ridge system is of particular geoscientific interest because of its extremely slow spreading rates and the variety of morphologic forms and features that are produced in this tectonic environment. Therefore, the multibeam bathymetric measurements were of special importance to the scientific goals of the exploration of this deep-sea ridge. The data wa...

  7. The Effects of Aseismic Ridge Collision on Upper Plate Deformation: Cocos Ridge Collision and Deformation of the Western Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Femina, P. C.; Govers, R. M. A.; Ruiz, G.; Geirsson, H.; Camacho, E.; Mora-Paez, H.

    2015-12-01

    The collision of the Panamanian isthmus with northwestern South America is thought to have initiated as early as Oligocene - Miocene time (23-25 Ma) based on geologic and geophysical data and paleogeographic reconstructions. This collision was driven by eastward-directed subduction beneath northwestern South America. Cocos - Caribbean convergence along the Middle America Trench, and Nazca - Caribbean oblique convergence along the South Panama Deformed Belt have resulted in complex deformation of the southwestern Caribbean since Miocene - Pliocene time. Subduction and collision of the aseismic Cocos Ridge is thought to have initiated migration of the volcanic arc toward the back-arc in Costa Rica; 3) Quaternary to present deformation within the Central Costa Rica Deformed Belt; 4) Quaternary to present shortening across the fore-arc Fila Costeña fold and thrust belt and back-arc North Panama Deformed Belt (NPDB); 5) Quaternary to present outer fore-arc uplift of Nicoya Peninsula above the seamount domain, and the Osa and Burica peninsulas above the ridge; and 6) Pleistocene to present northwestward motion of the Central American Fore Arc (CAFA) and northeastward motion of the Panama Region. We investigate the geodynamic effects of Cocos Ridge collision on motion of the Panama Region with a new geodynamic model. The model is compared to a new 1993-2015 GPS-derived three-dimensional velocity field for the western Caribbean and northwestern South America. Specifically, we test the hypotheses that the Cocos Ridge is the main driver for upper plate deformation in the western Caribbean. Our models indicate that Cocos Ridge collision drives northwest-directed motion of the CAFA and the northeast-directed motion of the Panama Region. The Panama Region is driven into the Caribbean across the NPDB and into northwestern South America, which is also converging with the Panama Region, pushing it toward the west-northwest. Therefore, recent (South America is driven by Cocos

  8. Constraints on ocean ridge basalt generation from Gakkel Ridge basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmuir, C. H.; Michael, P.; Standish, J.; Goldstein, S.

    2006-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge that traverses the Arctic Ocean from Greenland to Siberia provides five "natural experiments" with respect to our understanding of melt generation and delivery at ocean ridges. (1) It is the deepest of the ocean ridges, and tests the global correlations of basalt chemistry with axial depth and the origin of such correlations. (2) It is the slowest spreading ridge, and tests the influence of ultra-slow spreading on magma generation without the complexity of oblique spreading or multiple transform offsets. (3) The samples are both on- and off-axis, allowing tests of the similarity of on- and off-axis volcanism. (4) It provides a test of the veined mantle disequilibrium melting hypothesis for MORB, since both ultra-slow spreading rate and great depth suggest minimum extents of melting, with the extent of melting decreasing progressively towards the east. (5) It tests segmentation models, because there are no transform offsets along the ridge, and the slow spreading rates should lead to maximum melt focusing along strike. The comprehensive major element, trace element and isotopic data set for the rocks obtained on the AMORE cruise allows investigation of all of these issues. (1) The Gakkel fits global depth-chemistry correlations, and major and trace element data as well as crustal thickness suggest small extents of melting in this region, decreasing towards the east. (2)Ultra-slow spreading leads to a thicker lithospheric lid and more garnet influence towards the east. The effects of thick lithosphere and mantle temperature on melting can be clearly distinguished in this region, and contrast with global systematics. This suggests that lithosphere variations are of minor importance in controlling the global array. (3) Off-axis samples are more diverse than on-axis samples, confirming the importance of off-axis volcanism at ultra-slow ridges. (4) Trace element data do not show an increase in a "veined component" towards the east as spreading rate

  9. Tubular Initial Conditions and Ridge Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Borysova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2D azimuth and rapidity structure of the two-particle correlations in relativistic A+A collisions is altered significantly by the presence of sharp inhomogeneities in superdense matter formed in such processes. The causality constraints enforce one to associate the long-range longitudinal correlations observed in a narrow angular interval, the so-called (soft ridge, with peculiarities of the initial conditions of collision process. This study's objective is to analyze whether multiform initial tubular structures, undergoing the subsequent hydrodynamic evolution and gradual decoupling, can form the soft ridges. Motivated by the flux-tube scenarios, the initial energy density distribution contains the different numbers of high density tube-like boost-invariant inclusions that form a bumpy structure in the transverse plane. The influence of various structures of such initial conditions in the most central A+A events on the collective evolution of matter, resulting spectra, angular particle correlations and vn-coefficients is studied in the framework of the hydrokinetic model (HKM.

  10. The Distribution of Hydrothermal Venting on Ultraslow Spreading Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, E. T.; Edmonds, H. N.; German, C. R.; Bach, W.; Banerjee, N. R.; Walker, S. L.

    2002-12-01

    Modeling efforts and field observations over the last decade have concluded that the thermal structure of midocean ridges (MORs) represents a balance between the supply of magmatic heat and the efficiency of cooling by hydrothermal circulation. A simple hypothesis states that the spatial density of hydrothermal circulation increases with the magma budget, but complicating factors include the role of permeability, heat sources other than magma, time-scale differences between venting and magma delivery/cooling, the uncertainty of vent-field exploration, and others. One of the most intriguing areas of hydrothermal research is ultraslow (spreading centers. These ridges compose ~25% of the global MOR system and are believed to have a much lower magma supply rate than would be predicted by a simple spreading-rate extrapolation. Is convective hydrothermal cooling proportionally lower as well? Recent plume-mapping surveys along more than 950 km of the Gakkel Ridge (GR) and 1300 km in two areas of the South West Indian Ridge (SWIR: 10° - 24° E and 58° - 66° E) have provided a first look at hydrothermal activity along ultraslow-spreading MORs. Hydrothermal plumes in all three of these regions have been detected almost exclusively using optical/temperature sensors, though corroborating chemical data exist for several sites on the GR. Plumes were rare on the SWIR, suggesting 8-15 active sites. In sharp contrast, >80% of 138 vertical profiles on the GR detected a plume, though these likely emanate from a minimum of 8-12 individual sites. Apparently the unusual hydrography of the deep Arctic Ocean combined with the simple geometry and deep rift valley of the GR promotes along-axis plume dispersal on a scale unseen elsewhere. Viewed on the global scale, and based on this limited data set, active venting per kilometer of axis length is substantially sparser on the SWIR and GR than on faster spreading ridges. Proportional to the magma delivery rate, however, venting appears to

  11. The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge Expedition - AMORE 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, P.; Thiede, J.; Langmuir, C.; Jokat, W.; Dick, H.; Snow, J.; Goldstein, S.; Graham, D.; Edmonds, H.

    2003-04-01

    The first high resolution mapping and sampling study of the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge was accomplished during an international icebreaker expedition to the high Arctic in summer 2001 involving research icebreakers PFS POLARSTERN and USCGC HEALY. Gakkel Ridge extends 1800 km from north of Greenland to Laptev Sea, all of it beneath Arctic sea ice. High-resolution maps of the seafloor were made with multibeam sonars, even while breaking ice. The western part of the ridge was mapped for the first time. We sampled and analyzed igneous rocks from over 200 sites along 1000 km of the ridge. Seismic refraction and reflection profiles were run across the basins flanking Gakkel Ridge and show that crustal thickness varies with time. Along-axis seismic refraction profiles show anomalously fast velocities present at shallow levels in the crust. Abundant hydrothermal activity was found using MAPRs deployed while rock sampling, and by dredging sulfides. For this slowest spreading mid-ocean ridge (MOR), predictions were that magmatism and crustal thickness should progressively diminish as the spreading rate decreases progressively eastward along the ridge and that hydrothermal activity should be rare. Instead, magmatic variations are irregular and hydrothermal activity is abundant. A 300-kilometer long central amagmatic zone where mantle peridotites are emplaced directly in the axis lies between abundant, continuous volcanism in the west and large, widely spaced volcanic centers in the east. Distinctive geochemical trends in basalts show that the extent of mantle melting is low and varies along axis but not systematically with spreading rate. They also show systematic variations in source composition. Most peridotites are less refractory and less altered than typical abyssal peridotites, but enigmatic harzburgites are also present. These observations show that the extent of mantle melting is not a simple function of spreading rate: mantle temperatures at depth and/or mantle

  12. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2004 with the mission of standing up a supercomputer 100 times...

  13. General circulation and tracers: studies in the Western Indian Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamous, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    The main question addressed in this thesis is how to best use the information obtained from hydro-biogeochemical tracer data, to study the oceanic general circulation in the Western Indian Ocean. First, a principal component analysis is performed on a historical data set. The tracers considered are temperature, salinity, density, oxygen, phosphate and silica. The method reduces the amount of data to be considered by a factor of 5. It reproduces correctly and efficiently the large-scale distributions of these oceanic properties. The analysed data are then used in a finite-difference nonlinear inverse model. The grid has a resolution of 4 deg. by 4 deg.. Dynamical as well as tracer conservation constraints are used. These constraints are well satisfied by the obtained solutions but the associated errors remain large. Additional constraints would be required in order to discuss the different solutions in more detail. Finally, a qualitative study is done on the deep distribution of helium-3. The data show several important features linked to hydrothermal input in the Gulf of Aden and on the Central Indian Ridge, and to the origin of water masses and deep circulation characteristics. However additional data are required in order to clarify the distribution of this tracer in other key areas. (author) [fr

  14. Oak Ridge Geochemical Reconnaissance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, J.W.

    1977-03-01

    The Oak Ridge reconnaissance program is responsible for the geochemical survey in a 12-state area covering Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. The program concept is outlined and the planning and organization of the program is discussed

  15. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are…

  16. Halogen and trace element geochemistry in Mid-Ocean Ridge basalts from the Australian-Antarctic Ridge (AAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. S.; Seo, J. H.; Park, S. H.; Kim, T.

    2015-12-01

    Australian-Antarctic Ridge (AAR) is an extension of easternmost SE Indian Mid-Ocean Ridge (MOR).We collected volcanic glasses from the "in-axis" of the KR1 and KR2 MOR, and the overlapping zones of the KR1 MOR and the nearby seamounts ("KR1 mixing"). We determined trace and halogen elements in the glasses. Halogen concentrations and its ratios in the glasses are important to understand the mantle metasomatism and volatile recycling. 52 of the collected glasses are "primitive" (higher than 6 wt% MgO), while 3 of them have rather "evolved" composition (MgO wt% of 1.72, 2.95 and 4.15). K2O concentrations and Th/Sc ratios in the glasses show a negative correlation with its MgO concentration. Incompatible element ratios such as La/Sm are rather immobile during a magma differentiation so the ratios are important to understand mantle composition (Hofmann et al. 2003). La/Sm ratios in the glasses are 0.95 ~ 3.28 suggesting that the AAR basalts can be classified into T-MORB and E-MORB (Schilling et al., 1983). La/Sm ratios are well-correlated with incompatible elements such as U, Ba, Nb, and negatively correlated with compatible elements such as Sc, Eu2+, Mg. The AAR glasses contain detectable halogen elements. The "KR1 mixing" glasses in halogen elements are more abundant than "in-axis" the glasses. Cl is the least variable element compared to the other halogens such as Br and I in the AAR. The "KR1 mixing" glasses have the largest variations of Br/Cl ratios compared to the "in-axis" glasses. The Cl/Br and Th/Sc ratios in the "in-axis" glasses and in the "KR1 mixing" glasses show positive and negative correlations, respectively. The Br-rich glasses in the "KR1 mixing" zone might be explained by a recycled Br-rich oceanic slab of paleo-subduction or by a hydrothermal alteration in the AAR. I composition in the glasses does not show a correlation other trace elements. The K/Cl and K/Ti ratios in the AAR glasses are similar to the basalts from the Galapagos Spreading Center

  17. Crustal structure along Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Aursch, M. C.; Jokat, W.

    2003-04-01

    Relationships between melt generation, crustal thicknesses and spreading rates are well-known for fast- and intermediate- to slow-spreading midoceanic ridges. But for very-slow-spreading ridges with full spreading rates smaller than 20 mm/yr only few data have been available yet. Therefore, the 1800 km long ultra-slow-spreading Gakkel Ridge with full spreading rates between 13 mm/yr near Greenland and 6 mm/yr in the Laptev Sea was investigated by the joint AMORE expedition in summer 2001. The two research icebreakers RV Polarstern and USCGC Healy conducted several petrological and geophysical programs. Seismic refraction experiments with receivers deployed on ice floes and a 24 l airgun array towed behind one ship were performed along the rift valley during the cruise. Gravity measurements onboard revealed additional information on the crustal structure. A helicopter-based magnetic survery gave evidence for long term focused magmatism along the ridge. Forward modelling of the wide-angle seismic data with raytracing yields an exceptional thin crust with thicknesses well below 3 km. Crustal seismic velocities not higher than 6.4 km/s indicate a missing or not resolvable oceanic layer 3. Refracted mantle waves with seismic velocities up to 7.8 km/s give constraints on the crustal thickness. First results of a 3D forward gravity modelling based on the 5-minute-grid of the Arctic Gravity Project and shipboard data will also be shown. They extend the knowledge of crustal thickness and upper mantle structure to areas off-axis Gakkel Ridge and the parts along the rift valley not covered by deep seismic data.

  18. Geophysical characteristics of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokat, Wilfried; Schmidt-Aursch, Mechita C.

    2007-03-01

    The northernmost spreading centre of the world, the Gakkel Ridge, is also an end-member in terms of global spreading velocities. Models show that full spreading rates vary between 1.3 and 0.63 mm yr-1 along the almost 1800 km long ridge system in the Central Arctic Ocean. The western part of the ridge was investigated in great detail by a two-ship expedition in summer 2001. The complete data sets and the modelling of the seismic refraction and aeromagnetic experiments gathered during this expedition are shown in this study. The magnetic signals along the dense (2 km spacing) aeromagnetic flight lines acquired at the same time show a good correlation between high amplitudes and a shallowing of the rift valley and the presence of large volcanic constructions at the rift shoulders. The magnetic anomalies rapidly fade out east and west of these centres of focused magmatism. This might indicate that the basaltic layer producing the magnetic anomaly thins away from the volcanic centres. A continuous magnetic anomaly is observed along the rift valley west of 3°30'E, consistent with increasing and more robust magmatism. The crustal thickness along the Gakkel Ridge varies greatly. Beneath some of the centres of focused magmatism, the oceanic crust thickens up to 3.5 km. In the amagmatic segments in between the crust thins to 1.4-2.9 km. This observation is also valid for the Western Volcanic Zone west of 3°30'E, where despite the stronger magnetic anomaly the crust does not significantly thicken. The strength of the magnetic anomaly along the rift valley is thus not a reliable indicator of crustal thickness beneath the Gakkel Ridge. The data show that the crustal thickness does not change dramatically across 3°30'E. Only the occurrence of a large elongate volcanic ridge significantly influences this parameter. More frequent volcanic eruptions along such ridges are most likely responsible for the basalts found in the westernmost part of the Gakkel Ridge. In the non

  19. Manganese oxidation by bacterial isolates from the Indian Ridge System

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Krishnan, K.P.; Khedekar, V.D; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    ) observations of both isolates revealed free-living cells in clustered matrices apprrox. 2 Mu diameter. Energy dispersive spectrum of the cell matrix of CR35 cultured in 1 mM Mn detected 30%Mn, while the cell aggregates of CR48 harbored 7 -10% Mn. The relatively...

  20. Prosthodontic management of ridge deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malament, Kenneth A; Neeser, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    The treatment goals in prosthodontics and dental laboratory technology are to provide patients with long-term predictable and esthetic outcomes. The periodontal tissues define the framework that will maintain ridge height, thickness, color, texture, and gingival-tooth frame. The loss of teeth, residual ridge resorption and the loss of gingival tissues continue to affect long-term and esthetic treatment outcomes. Prosthodontic treatment requires consideration of the potential negative tissue effect that time and normal biologic change might have on the completed prosthetic design. This article describes alternative restorative solutions for clinical conditions that have traditionally been managed by surgery, removable prosthodontics, or esthetically compromised fixed restorations. Different clinical conditions for tooth-retained and implant-retained fixed partial dentures as well as the laboratory technology describing construction of these different restorations will be discussed.

  1. Microseismicity of the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlindwein, Vera; Müller, Christian; Jokat, Wilfried

    2007-04-01

    The active mid-ocean ridge of the Arctic Ocean, named Gakkel ridge, is the slowest spreading ridge of the global system of mid-oceanic ridges with full spreading rates declining from about 12.5 to 6 mm yr-1 from west to east. Geological models of seafloor spreading predict a decreasing intensity of magmatic processes with decreasing spreading rate. In summer 2001, the multidisciplinary Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge Expedition (AMORE2001) discovered robust magmatism at western Gakkel ridge, an amagmatic section further east and pronounced volcanic centres at eastern Gakkel ridge. During AMORE2001, an attempt was made at recording the microearthquake activity of the ridge which allows important insights into the character and dynamics of active crustal accretion at the ridge axis. Due to the permanent ice cover of the Arctic Ocean, the use of ocean-bottom seismometers bears the risk of instrument and data loss. In this pilot study, we used for the first time drifting ice floes as platforms for small seismological arrays. The arrays consisted of four three-component seismometers equipped with GPS devices and arranged as a triangle with a central seismometer and a side length of about 1 km. Three such arrays were deployed in different rift segments and recorded the seismic activity continuously for 5-11 days at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. The array technique allowed to distinguish clearly between icequakes and earthquakes and to localize the earthquake source to within few kilometres or less depending on epicentral distance. We intensively discuss the detection capabilities and the location accuracy of this single array on a drifting ice floe. Earthquake magnitudes could not be calculated in our pilot study but are estimated to be significantly smaller than magnitude 2 by comparison with a regional earthquake of known magnitude. Furthermore, we analyse the characteristics of the recorded seismic events ranging from long waveforms of regional events to short local events with

  2. Similarities in Chemistry of North Gorda Ridge basalts with Ultra-slow Spreading Ridge Lavas Due to Decreasing Magma Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. S.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.

    2006-12-01

    Chemical variability of MORB has been reported from ultra-fast to ultra-slow spreading ridges. Despite the large number of studies, high density of precisely located samples is still rare for most ridge segments. Using MBARI's ROV Tiburon and a rock corer, we collected 71 basalt glasses along the axial valley of the 65 km- long, northern Gorda Ridge segment. To explore the temporal variability at the central part of the segment, we collected an additional twenty samples over a distance of 4 km up the eastern valley wall, corresponding to a maximum age of about 150, 000 years. Lava compositions along the ridge axis show considerable major-and minor element diversity (MgO 8.4-4.4%, K2O 0.07-0.36%) for lavas erupted in close proximity. Although they form a near-continuum, the compositions can be separated into two groups, one is typical N-MORB (K2O/TiO2 0.09). The chondrite-normalized REE patterns also reflect this grouping with Ce/YbN 20 for N- MORB and Ce/YbN >1 and Zr/Nb ridge segment, nearly as much diversity exists at the deepest part (>3,800 m) near the non-transform offset at the southern end. Except for two more enriched compositions, off-axis samples are LREE-depleted N-MORB with a narrow compositional range (MgO 7.7±0.3%, Zr/Nb=38-50). In comparison, basalts from the southern Cleft segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, which has a comparable spreading rate but different ridge morphology, all plot on the N-MORB trend with high Zr/Nb (30-40) and slight LREE depletion (Smith et al. 1994). In contrast, ultra-slow spreading ridges like Knipovich, Gakkel, and Mohns, with ridge morphologies similar to North Gorda although reaching even greater depth (>4000m), have erupted predominantly E-MORB. Their least enriched compositions overlap with the most LREE-enriched North Gorda lava although most have Zr/Nb1.0 and up to 3.2 (e.g. Haase et al., 1996; Muhe et al., 1997, Hellevang and Pedersen, 2005). On a Zr/Nb versus K2O /TiO2 plot, the basalts from the ultra-slow ridges

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

  4. Bose enhancement and the ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Altinoluk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We point out that Bose enhancement in a hadronic wave function generically leads to correlations between produced particles. We show explicitly, by calculating the projectile density matrix in the Color Glass Condensate approach to high-energy hadronic collisions, that the Bose enhancement of gluons in the projectile leads to azimuthal collimation of long range rapidity correlations of the produced particles, the so-called ridge correlations.

  5. Oak Ridge strategy accelerates cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, S.B. II; Boston, H.L.

    1996-01-01

    The strategy of the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program is to accelerate the transition from characterization to remediation by making decisions at the watershed scale based on recommended land uses and historical data. Since the primary means of contaminant transport is via shallow groundwater to surface water, grouping contaminated sites by watersheds for characterization, decision-making, and remediation allows consistency and appropriateness in remedy selection. It also results in cost and schedule savings

  6. Bose enhancement and the ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altinoluk, Tolga [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Armesto, Néstor, E-mail: nestor.armesto@usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Beuf, Guillaume [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Kovner, Alex [Physics Department, University of Connecticut, 2152 Hillside Road, Storrs, CT 06269-3046 (United States); Lublinsky, Michael [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2015-12-17

    We point out that Bose enhancement in a hadronic wave function generically leads to correlations between produced particles. We show explicitly, by calculating the projectile density matrix in the Color Glass Condensate approach to high-energy hadronic collisions, that the Bose enhancement of gluons in the projectile leads to azimuthal collimation of long range rapidity correlations of the produced particles, the so-called ridge correlations.

  7. The Gakkel Ridge: Bathymetry, gravity anomalies, and crustal accretion at extremely slow spreading rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, James R.; Kurras, Gregory J.; Edwards, Margo H.; Coakley, Bernard J.

    2003-02-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean is the slowest spreading portion of the global mid-ocean ridge system. Total spreading rates range from 12.7 mm/yr near Greenland to 6.0 mm/yr where the ridge disappears beneath the Laptev Shelf. Swath bathymetry and gravity data for an 850 km long section of the Gakkel Ridge from 5°E to 97°E were obtained from the U.S. Navy submarine USS Hawkbill. The ridge axis is very deep, generally 4700-5300 m, within a well-developed rift valley. The topography is primarily tectonic in origin, characterized by linear rift-parallel ridges and fault-bounded troughs with up to 2 km of relief. Evidence of extrusive volcanic activity is limited and confined to specific locations. East of 32°E, isolated discrete volcanoes are observed at 25-95 km intervals along the axis. Abundant small-scale volcanism characteristic of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) is absent. It appears that the amount of melt generated is insufficient to maintain a continuous magmatic spreading axis. Instead, melt is erupted on the seafloor at a set of distinct locations where multiple eruptions have built up central volcanoes and covered adjacent areas with low relief lava flows. Between 5°E and 32°E, almost no volcanic activity is observed except near 19°E. The ridge axis shoals rapidly by 1500 m over a 30 km wide area at 19°E, which coincides with a highstanding axis-perpendicular bathymetric high. Bathymetry and side scan data show the presence of numerous small volcanic features and flow fronts in the axial valley on the upper portions of the 19°E along-axis high. Gravity data imply up to 3 km of crustal thickening under the 19°E axis-perpendicular ridge. The 19°E magmatic center may result from interaction of the ridge with a passively imbedded mantle inhomogeneity. Away from 19°E, the crust appears thin and patchy and may consist of basalt directly over peridotite. The ridge axis is continuous with no transform offsets. However, sections of the ridge have

  8. Variational Ridging in Sea Ice Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, A.; Hunke, E. C.; Lipscomb, W. H.; Maslowski, W.; Kamal, S.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents the results of a new development to make basin-scale sea ice models aware of the shape, porosity and extent of individual ridges within the pack. We have derived an analytic solution for the Euler-Lagrange equation of individual ridges that accounts for non-conservative forces, and therefore the compressive strength of individual ridges. Because a region of the pack is simply a collection of paths of individual ridges, we are able to solve the Euler-Lagrange equation for a large-scale sea ice field also, and therefore the compressive strength of a region of the pack that explicitly accounts for the macro-porosity of ridged debris. We make a number of assumptions that have simplified the problem, such as treating sea ice as a granular material in ridges, and assuming that bending moments associated with ridging are perturbations around an isostatic state. Regardless of these simplifications, the ridge model is remarkably predictive of macro-porosity and ridge shape, and, because our equations are analytic, they do not require costly computations to solve the Euler-Lagrange equation of ridges on the large scale. The new ridge model is therefore applicable to large-scale sea ice models. We present results from this theoretical development, as well as plans to apply it to the Regional Arctic System Model and a community sea ice code. Most importantly, the new ridging model is particularly useful for pinpointing gaps in our observational record of sea ice ridges, and points to the need for improved measurements of the evolution of porosity of deformed ice in the Arctic and Antarctic. Such knowledge is not only useful for improving models, but also for improving estimates of sea ice volume derived from altimetric measurements of sea ice freeboard.

  9. European temperature responses to blocking and ridge regional patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Pedro M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Barriopedro, David; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Santos, João A.

    2018-01-01

    Blocking occurrence and its impacts on European temperature have been studied in the last decade. However, most previous studies on blocking impacts have focused on winter only, disregarding its fingerprint in summer and differences with other synoptic patterns that also trigger temperature extremes. In this work, we provide a clear distinction between high-latitude blocking and sub-tropical ridges occurring in three sectors of the Euro-Atlantic region, describing their climatology and consequent impacts on European temperature during both winter and summer. Winter blocks (ridges) are generally associated to colder (warmer) than average conditions over large regions of Europe, in some areas with anomalies larger than 5 °C, particularly for the patterns occurring in the Atlantic and Central European sectors. During summer, there is a more regional response characterized by above average temperature for both blocking and ridge patterns, especially those occurring in continental areas, although negative temperature anomalies persist in southernmost areas during blocking. An objective analysis of the different forcing mechanisms associated to each considered weather regime has been performed, quantifying the importance of the following processes in causing the temperature anomalies: horizontal advection, vertical advection and diabatic heating. While during winter advection processes tend to be more relevant to explain temperature responses, in summer radiative heating under enhanced insolation plays a crucial role for both blocking and ridges. Finally, the changes in the distributions of seasonal temperature and in the frequencies of extreme temperature indices were also examined for specific areas of Europe. Winter blocking and ridge patterns are key drivers in the occurrence of regional cold and warm extreme temperatures, respectively. In summer, they are associated with substantial changes in the frequency of extremely warm days, but with different signatures in

  10. Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Phyllis C. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The

  11. Magma plumbing system and seismicity of an active mid-ocean ridge volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera; Koulakov, Ivan; Plötz, Aline; Scholz, John-Robert

    2017-02-20

    At mid-ocean ridges volcanism generally decreases with spreading rate but surprisingly massive volcanic centres occur at the slowest spreading ridges. These volcanoes can host unexpectedly strong earthquakes and vigorous, explosive submarine eruptions. Our understanding of the geodynamic processes forming these volcanic centres is still incomplete due to a lack of geophysical data and the difficulty to capture their rare phases of magmatic activity. We present a local earthquake tomographic image of the magma plumbing system beneath the Segment 8 volcano at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. The tomography shows a confined domain of partial melt under the volcano. We infer that from there melt is horizontally transported to a neighbouring ridge segment at 35 km distance where microearthquake swarms and intrusion tremor occur that suggest ongoing magmatic activity. Teleseismic earthquakes around the Segment 8 volcano, prior to our study, indicate that the current magmatic spreading episode may already have lasted over a decade and hence its temporal extent greatly exceeds the frequent short-lived spreading episodes at faster opening mid-ocean ridges.

  12. Dynamics of the Seychelles-Chagos Thermocline Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, S.

    2016-02-01

    The southwest tropical Indian Ocean (SWTIO) features a unique, seasonal upwelling of the thermocline also known as the Seychelles-Chagos Thermocline Ridge (SCTR). More recently, this ridge or "dome"-like feature in the thermocline depth at (55°E-65°E, 5°S-12°S) in the SWTIO has been linked to interannual variability in the semi-annual Indian Ocean monsoon seasons as well as the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The SCTR is a region where the MJO is associated with strong SST variability. Normally more cyclones are found generated in this SCTR region when the thermocline is deeper, which has a positive relation to the arrival of a downwelling Rossby wave from the southeast tropical Indian Ocean. Previous studies have focused their efforts solely on sea surface temperature (SST) because they determined salinity variability to be low, but with the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), and Aquarius salinity missions new insight can be shed on the effects that the seasonal upwelling of the thermocline has on Sea Surface Salinity (SSS). Seasonal SSS anomalies these missions will reveal the magnitude of seasonal SSS variability, while Argo depth profiles will show the link between changes in subsurface salinity and temperature structure. A seasonal increase in SST and a decrease in SSS associated with the downwelling of the thermocline have also been shown to occasionally generate MJO events, an extremely important part of climate variability in the Indian ocean. Satellite derives salinity and Argo data can help link changes in surface and subsurface salinity structure to the generation of the important MJO events. This study uses satellite derived salinity from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), and Aquarius to see if these satellites can yield new information on seasonal and interannual surface variability. In this study barrier layer thickness (BLT) estimates will be derived from satellite measurements using a

  13. Residual ridge dimensions at edentulous maxillary first molar sites and periodontal bone loss among two ethnic cohorts seeking tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Aneesha; Hao, Jia; Mattheos, Nikos; Chau, Anson; Shirke, Prashant; Lang, Niklaus P

    2014-12-01

    To study residual ridge dimensions at edentulous first molar sites in relation to periodontal bone loss among cohorts of partially edentulous Asian Indian and Hong Kong Chinese subjects seeking tooth replacement. A total of 628 edentulous maxillary first molar sites were analyzed on Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans of 225 Asian Indian (I) and 232 Hong Kong Chinese (C) partially edentulous adults seeking tooth replacement. Age, ethnicity, gender, total tooth loss, the presence or absence of adjacent teeth, categories of periodontal status defined according to radiographic alveolar bone loss (P0: periodontal health, P1: incipient to moderate disease, P2: severe periodontal disease) and sinus membrane abnormalities were noted. Alveolar ridge height (RH), widths at 1 and 3 mm from crest (RW1; RW3), and relative position of the bone crest (RR) were measured. Prevalence of P2 status was most frequent in both cohorts(C: 50.4% I: 49.2%). P2 had lowest ridge heights; 13.1% C P2 and 14%I P2 had RH Periodontal status and sinus membrane abnormality increased the odds of RH periodontal disease was common among Asian Indian and Hong Kong Chinese subjects seeking tooth replacement and associated with lower available bone heights. Ethnicity, gender, sinus membrane thickening affected available bone height in the subsinus region, while the presence of adjacent teeth- and age-affected residual ridge width. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. R A Scrutton. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 123 Issue 1 February 2014 pp 33-47. Growth of the Afanasy Nikitin seamount and its relationship with the 85°E Ridge, northeastern Indian Ocean · K S Krishna J M Bull O Ishizuka R A Scrutton S ...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 121; Issue 5. Geochemistry of abyssal peridotites from the super slow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge near 65°E: Implications for magma source and seawater alteration. Zhigang Zeng Qiaoyun Wang Xiaomei Wang Shuai Chen Xuebo Yin Zhaoxue Li. Volume ...

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. M Radhakrishna. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 4 August 2011 pp 605-615. Development of the negative gravity anomaly of the 85°E Ridge, northeastern Indian Ocean – A process oriented modelling approach · K M Sreejith M ...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 120; Issue 4. Development of the negative gravity anomaly of the 85°E Ridge, northeastern Indian Ocean – A process oriented modelling approach. K M Sreejith M Radhakrishna K S Krishna T J Majumdar. Volume 120 Issue 4 August 2011 pp 605-615 ...

  18. Caldera collapse at near-ridge seamounts: an experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumans, Jason P.; Stix, John

    2016-10-01

    Collapse calderas are sub-circular volcanic depressions caused by subsidence of the magma reservoir roof during an eruption. Scaled physical models of caldera collapse using flat topography have been instrumental in investigating the spatial and temporal development of calderas, in particular, two distinctive sets of concentric ring faults, one reverse and one normal. More recent analog studies have investigated the effect of non-flat topography which alters the principle stress trajectories and resulting collapse structure. This work provides the basis for investigating how naturally scaled topographic loads may affect caldera collapse in relation to shallow magma reservoirs. The objective of this study is to understand how a near-ridge seamount affects caldera collapse from both a central and offset position as the seamount migrates above the magma reservoir as a result of plate motion. We utilize scaled analog models of caldera collapse in conjunction with three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) to investigate caldera collapse dynamics at near-ridge seamounts. Experiments using a seamount cone positioned centrally above the magma reservoir result in (1) increased subsidence along the interior outward-dipping faults and (2) a preference to more symmetric collapse patterns as indicated by the subsidence profile and structure of the caldera relative to experiments with an offset cone. When the cone is offset, the collapse is asymmetric and trapdoor in nature, with the center of greatest subsidence displaced away from the region of largest topographic load. For these latter experiments, subsidence is focused where the roof is thinnest along an initial reverse fault, followed by a transition to an antithetic graben structure. The asymmetric collapse in the experiments results in a caldera with a tilted profile. Offset calderas at near-ridge seamounts are tilted towards the ridge axis, suggesting that they may have collapsed

  19. Pendeteksian Outlier dengan Metode Regresi Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Harini

    2009-01-01

    Dalam analisis regresi linier berganda adanya satu atau lebih pengamatan pencilan (outlier) akan menimbulkan dilema bagi para peneliti. Keputusan untuk menghilangkan pencilan tersebut harus dilandasi alasan yang kuat, karena kadang-kadang pencilan dapat memberikan informasi penting yang diperlukan. Masalah outlier ini dapat diatasi dengan berbagai metode, diantaranya metode regresi ridge (ridge regression). Untuk mengetahui kekekaran regresi ridge perlu melihat nilai-nilai R2, PRESS, serta le...

  20. Inverse regression for ridge recovery I: Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Glaws, Andrew T.; Constantine, Paul G.; Cook, R. Dennis

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the application of sufficient dimension reduction (SDR) to a deterministic function of several variables. In this context, SDR provides a framework for ridge recovery. A ridge function is a function of a few linear combinations of the variables---i.e., a composition of a nonlinear function with a low-dimensional linear transformation. We connect the key feature of SDR---the dimension reduction subspace---to ridge structure in functions, which provides a subspace-based perspecti...

  1. Mid-oceanic ridge system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    , leading to the creation of new ocean floor. As two tectonic plates slowly separate, molten material rises up from within the mantle to fill the opening. Thus the rugged volcanic landscape of a mid-ocean ridge is created along the plate boundary... In order to understand how magnetic stripe anomalies support plate tectonics we need to understand (1) the basics of plate tectonic theory, especially the part about sea-floor spreading; (2) how the Earth’s magnetic field behaves, and (3) how magnetic...

  2. Ridge filter design for carbon radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gata-Danil, G.; Parajpan, M.; Timoshenko, G.

    2008-01-01

    The design of a ridge filter intended for forming the uniform spread-out Bragg peak within a tumor at carbon radiotherapy is described. The computation of the ridge filter shape was carried out by an analytical algorithm and tested by MC simulation (GEANT4 code). Two kinds of the ridge filter were considered: stationary and movable. The influence on a ridge filter shape of the carbon beam energy and type of relative biological effectiveness dependence on the carbon ion linear energy transfer in tissue were examined

  3. Pendeteksian Outlier dengan Metode Regresi Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Harini

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Dalam analisis regresi linier berganda adanya satu atau lebih pengamatan pencilan (outlier akan menimbulkan dilema bagi para peneliti. Keputusan untuk menghilangkan pencilan tersebut harus dilandasi alasan yang kuat, karena kadang-kadang pencilan dapat memberikan informasi penting yang diperlukan. Masalah outlier ini dapat diatasi dengan berbagai metode, diantaranya metode regresi ridge (ridge regression. Untuk mengetahui kekekaran regresi ridge perlu melihat nilai-nilai R2, PRESS, serta leverage (hii, untuk metode regresi ridge dengan berbagai nilai tetapan bias k yang dipilih.

  4. Ridge split and implant placement in deficient alveolar ridge: Case report and an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reenesh Mechery

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Hilt Tatum 1970s introduced a method of ridge splitting or bone spreading, which over a period have been used in implant dentistry for esthetic rehabilitation and implant site preparation in cases of deficient alveolar ridges to satisfy the basic ideal need of hard tissue augmentation for functional and esthetic outcome of implant. In this case report, we describe a case of horizontal ridge augmentation using ridge split and simultaneous implant placement in esthetic maxillary premolar zone.

  5. Indian Legends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting American Indian legends, this material provides insight into the cultural background of the Dakota, Ojibwa, and Winnebago people. Written in a straightforward manner, each of the eight legends is associated with an Indian group. The legends included here are titled as follows: Minnesota is Minabozho's Land (Ojibwa); How We Got the…

  6. Emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skipper, M.N.

    1990-03-01

    Emergency preparedness for industry was commonly believed to be an essential responsibility on the part of management. Therefore, this study was conducted to research and accumulate information and data on emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to conduct a thorough evaluation of emergency preparedness knowledge among employees to determine if they were properly informed or if they needed more training. Also, this study was conducted to provide insight to management as to what their responsibility was concerning this training. To assess employee emergency preparedness knowledge, a questionnaire was developed and administered to 100 employees at ORNL. The data was analyzed using frequencies and percentages of response and was displayed through the use of graphs within the report. 22 refs., 22 figs

  7. Emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skipper, M.N.

    1990-03-01

    Emergency preparedness for industry was commonly believed to be an essential responsibility on the part of management. Therefore, this study was conducted to research and accumulate information and data on emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to conduct a thorough evaluation of emergency preparedness knowledge among employees to determine if they were properly informed or if they needed more training. Also, this study was conducted to provide insight to management as to what their responsibility was concerning this training. To assess employee emergency preparedness knowledge, a questionnaire was developed and administered to 100 employees at ORNL. The data was analyzed using frequencies and percentages of response and was displayed through the use of graphs within the report. 22 refs., 22 figs.

  8. The origin and destruction of beach ridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeglas, D.J.

    1955-01-01

    During the Fall of 1945 the author measured daily the micro-topography of a beach profile at Zandvoort, the Netherlands. The daily changes and the movements of the beach ridges have been determined. Several beach ridges came into being and were destroyed during storms. The structure of the deposits

  9. Sex Determination from Fingerprint Ridge Density | Gungadin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted with an aim to establish a relationship between sex and fingerprint ridge density. The fingerprints were taken from 500 subjects (250 males and 250 females) in the age group of 18-60 years. After taking fingerprints, the ridges were counted in the upper portion of the radial border of each print for all ...

  10. An Interactive Approach to Ridge Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquette, J. F.; Dufala, M. M.

    1978-01-01

    Ridge regression is an approach to ameliorating the problem of large standard errors of regression estimates when predictor variables are highly intercorrelated. An interactive computer program is presented which allows for investigation of the effects of using various ridge regression adjustment values. (JKS)

  11. An Identity for Kernel Ridge Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Zhdanov, Fedor; Kalnishkan, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    This paper derives an identity connecting the square loss of ridge regression in on-line mode with the loss of the retrospectively best regressor. Some corollaries about the properties of the cumulative loss of on-line ridge regression are also obtained.

  12. Ridges and tidal stress on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, G.D.; Turtle, E.P.; Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Greenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sets of ridges of uncertain origin are seen in twenty-nine high-resolution Galileo images, which sample seven locales on Io. These ridges are on the order of a few kilometers in length with a spacing of about a kilometer. Within each locale, the ridges have a consistent orientation, but the orientations vary from place to place. We investigate whether these ridges could be a result of tidal flexing of Io by comparing their orientations with the peak tidal stress orientations at the same locations. We find that ridges grouped near the equator are aligned either north-south or east-west, as are the predicted principal stress orientations there. It is not clear why particular groups run north-south and others east-west. The one set of ridges observed far from the equator (52?? S) has an oblique azimuth, as do the tidal stresses at those latitudes. Therefore, all observed ridges have similar orientations to the tidal stress in their region. This correlation is consistent with the hypothesis that tidal flexing of Io plays an important role in ridge formation. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucke, P.C.

    1992-10-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1991 is the 21st in a series that began in 1971. The report documents the annual results of a comprehensive program to estimate the impact of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge operations upon human health and the environment. The report is organized into ten sections that address various aspects of effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, dose assessment, waste management, and quality assurance. A compliance summary gives a synopsis of the status of each facility relative to applicable state and federal regulations. Data are included for the following: Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and Oak Ridge K-25 Site. Effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs are intended to serve as effective indicators of contaminant releases and ambient contaminant concentrations that have the potential to result in adverse impacts to human health and the environment

  14. Alveolar ridge preservation immediately after tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Bouckaert, M; Lemmer, J

    2013-10-01

    Ridge preservation procedures immediately after tooth extraction, are commonly used with a view to minimising remodelling and shrinkage of the alveolar ridge, associated with socket healing. These procedures may sometimes be effective, but they cannot completely prevent reduction in dimension of the ridge. Certain biomater als used may actually hamper normal deposition of bone within the healing socket, reducing bone trabeculae that can integrate with the implant surface. However, in extraction sockets in alveolar ridges of low bone density, particles of implanted bone substitute incorporated in the healing bone, may enhance the mechanical support for the implant, provided by normal healed bone of low trabecular density alone. This paper reviews biological rationales and procedures for ridge preservation immediately after extraction and comments on their clinical use.

  15. Validation of Indian diabetic risk score in diagnosing type 2 diabetes mellitus against high fasting blood sugar levels among adult population of central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Kasar, Pradeep Kumar; Toppo, Neelam Anupama

    2015-01-01

    Globally the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is major public health concern. The Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) was developed by Madras Diabetes Research Foundation (MDRF) as a simple tool to help detect undiagnosed type 2 DM (T2DM) in the community. We conducted a study among 911 adults of Jabalpur District to validate the IDRS score against increased fasting blood sugar levels in diagnosing T2DM. T2DM was confirmed either by history of previously known disease or fasting plasma glucose ≥126 mg/dl on two occasions. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, Youden index (sensitivity + specificity -1), likelihood ratio for positive test, and likelihood ratio for negative test were calculated for IDRS cut-offs of ≥20, ≥40, ≥60, and ≥80 against the presence of T2DM (either known diabetic or fasting plasma glucose >126 mg/dl on two occasions). The overall prevalence of T2DM was 9.99% (95% confidence interval, 8.04-11.94%). In the Receiver operating characteristic analysis, IDRS had an area under the curve of 0.736 (P diabetes in the community and IDRS is also a much stronger risk indicator than examining individual risk factors like age, family history, obesity, or physical activity.

  16. Dermocystidium sp. infection in Blue Ridge Sculpin captured in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Vicki; Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Snyder, Craig D.; Snook, Erin; Adams, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Raised pale cysts were observed on Blue Ridge Sculpin Cottus caeruleomentum during stream fish community surveys in Catoctin Mountain Park, Maryland. When examined histologically, preserved sculpin exhibited multiple cysts containing spherical endospores with a refractile central body characteristic of Dermocystidiumspp. Cysts were not observed on the gills or internally. The portion of the watershed in which affected sculpin were observed contained lower than expected numbers of sculpin, raising concerns about the population effects of this infection. A nearby stream lacked sculpin even though they are common in this region, further suggesting the possibility of regional effects. This is the first report of a Dermocystidium infecting any fish species in the eastern United States.

  17. Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series; Volume 1; Issue 1. How good are network centrality measures? Longitudinal analysis of traffic in a railway network in the United States. SATYAM MUKHERJEE. Proceedings of the Conference on Perspectives in Nonlinear Dynamics - 2016 Volume 1 Issue 1 ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp 567-576. Evolution and outburst risk analysis of moraine-dammed lakes in the central Chinese Himalaya ... Probabilistic seismic hazard assessment of NW and central Himalayas and the adjoining region ... Morphotectonic analysis, structural evolution/pattern of a contractional ridge: Giouchtas Mt., Central Crete, Greece.

  19. Magmatic and amagmatic seafloor generation at the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, P. J.; Langmuir, C. H.; Dick, H. J. B.; Snow, J. E.; Goldstein, S. L.; Graham, D. W.; Lehnert, K.; Kurras, G.; Jokat, W.; Mühe, R.; Edmonds, H. N.

    2003-06-01

    A high-resolution mapping and sampling study of the Gakkel ridge was accomplished during an international ice-breaker expedition to the high Arctic and North Pole in summer 2001. For this slowest-spreading endmember of the global mid-ocean-ridge system, predictions were that magmatism should progressively diminish as the spreading rate decreases along the ridge, and that hydrothermal activity should be rare. Instead, it was found that magmatic variations are irregular, and that hydrothermal activity is abundant. A 300-kilometre-long central amagmatic zone, where mantle peridotites are emplaced directly in the ridge axis, lies between abundant, continuous volcanism in the west, and large, widely spaced volcanic centres in the east. These observations demonstrate that the extent of mantle melting is not a simple function of spreading rate: mantle temperatures at depth or mantle chemistry (or both) must vary significantly along-axis. Highly punctuated volcanism in the absence of ridge offsets suggests that first-order ridge segmentation is controlled by mantle processes of melting and melt segregation. The strong focusing of magmatic activity coupled with faulting may account for the unexpectedly high levels of hydrothermal activity observed.

  20. Total body fat, proinflammatory cytokines and insulin resistance in Indian subjects. Highlights and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajnik, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Urban and migrant Indians are experiencing a rapidly escalating epidemic of diabetes and CHD. This may be related to high body fat percentage in Indians and its central distribution which have been shown to be detrimental for metabolism

  1. Cretaceous magmatism in the High Canadian Arctic: Implications for the nature and age of Alpha Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Richard; Tarduno, John; Singer, Brad

    2013-04-01

    Cretaceous magmatism in the High Arctic, best expressed on Axel Heiberg and Ellesmere Island, can provide clues to the nature and age of the adjacent Alpha Ridge, which is in turn a key to understanding the tectonic evolution of the Arctic Ocean. Although the incorporation of some continental crust cannot be excluded, the prevailing view is that Alpha Ridge is dominantly thickened oceanic crust, analogous to oceanic plateaus of the Pacific and Indian Ocean. Together with the on-land volcanic exposures, Alpha Ridge composes the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (LIP), but the physical processes responsible for the magmatism remain unclear. Here we focus on two volcanic formations found on the Canadian Arctic margin. The Strand Fiord Formation is composed of a series of classic continental flood basalt flows, and represents the most voluminous expression of volcanism that has survived erosion. These basalts yield a 40Ar/39Ar age of ~95 Ma (Tarduno et al., Science, 1998) but this comes from the distant edge of the flood basalt exposures. The Hansen Point Volcanics consist of felsic and mafic rocks; previous age assignments range from the Maastrichtian (on the basis of palynomorphs, Falcon-Lang et al., Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 2004) to 80 Ma (Rb/Sr isochron, Estrada and Henjes-Kunst, Z. dt. Geol. Ges, 2004). Here we report new 40Ar/39Ar radioisotopic and paleomagnetic data from the Hansen Point Volcanics. In contrast to the latest Cretaceous/Paleogene dates, we find ages of ~95 Ma and 88-90 Ma. Because of the proximity of the landward extension of Alpha Ridge to Hansen Point, these new ages suggest that volcanism that contributed to the construction of Alpha Ridge may have extended over at least a 7 million interval (although it could have occurred in pulses). We will discuss the implications of these new data for candidate mantle processes that could have been responsible for the emplacement of Alpha Ridge and the High Arctic LIP.

  2. Variations in land use and nonpoint-source contamination on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, west-central North Dakota, 1990-93

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek-Rowland, Kathleen; Lent, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of land-use activities on the water quality of five streams on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation were evaluated. The five basinsevaluated were East Fork Shell Creek, Deepwater Creek, Bear Den Creek, Moccasin Creek, and Squaw Creek. East Fork Shell Creek and DeepwaterCreek Basins are located east of Lake Sakakawea and Bear Den Creek, Moccasin Creek, and Squaw Creek Basins are located west of the lake. Land-use data for the five selected basins on and adjacent to the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation were obtained for 1990-92. Discharge measurements were made and water-quality samples were collected at stations and sites on each of the five streams during October 1991 through September 1993. Analysis of land-use data indicated that prairie was the largest land-use category in the study area. More prairie acreage was found in the basins located west of Lake Sakakawea than in the basins located east of the lake. Wheat was the predominant crop in the study area. More wheat acreage was found in the basins located east of Lake Sakakawea than in the basins located west of the lake. Discharge data for the five selected streams indicated that all of thestreams were ephemeral and had many days of no flow during the study period. High flows were usually the result of spring runoff or intense storms over the basins. East Fork Shell Creek and Deepwater Creek with larger basins and flatter stream slopes had high flows characterized by rapidly rising flows and gradually receding flows. In contrast, Bear DenCreek, Moccasin Creek, and Squaw Creek with smaller basins and steeper stream slopes had high flows characterized by rapidly rising flows and receding flows of shorter duration. Analysis of water-quality samples indicated concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and total organic carbon varied throughout the study area. Nitrogen concentrations were larger in the streams located east of LakeSakakawea than in the streams located west of the lake. The largest nitrogen

  3. Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of a Hematite-bearing Ridge on Mauna Kea, Hawaii: A Potential Mineralogical Process Analog for the Mount Sharp Hematite Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Hamilton, J. C.; Adams, M.; Fraeman, A. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Catalano, J. G.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity landed in Gale Crater in August 2012 and is currently roving towards the layered central mound known as Mount Sharp [1]. Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) hyperspectral data indicate Mount Sharp contains an 5 km stratigraphic sequence including Fe-Mg smectites, hematite, and hydrated sulfates in the lower layers separated by an unconformity from the overlying anhydrous strata [1,2,3]. Hematite was initially detected in CRISM data to occur in the lower sulfate layers on the north side of the mound [2]. [3] further mapped a distinct hematite detection occurring as part of a 200 m wide ridge that extends 6.5 km NE-SW, approximately parallel with the base of Mount Sharp. It is likely a target for in-situ analyses by Curiosity. We document here the occurrence of a stratum of hematite-bearing breccia that is exposed on the Puu Poliahu cinder cone near the summit of Mauna Kea volcano (Hawaii) (Fig.1). The stratum is more resistant to weathering than surrounding material, giving it the appearance of a ridge. The Mauna Kea hematite ridge is thus arguably a potential terrestrial mineralogical and process analog for the Gale Crater hematite ridge. We are acquiring a variety of chemical and mineralogical data on the Mauna Kea samples, with a focus on the chemical and mineralogical information already available or planned for the Gale hematite ridge.

  4. A survey of Echuya Central Forest Reserve, Uganda, for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    swamp warblers Bradypterus graueri within Echuya Central Forest Reserve. Thirty-one breeding territories ... aligned ridges, with its eastern and western borders lying essentially on the ridge tops and falling down ... an important population of the globally-threatened Grauer's Swamp Warbler. Bradypterus graueri which ...

  5. Depth profiles of 230Th excess, transition metals and mineralogy of ferromanganese crusts of the Central Indian Ocean basin and implications for palaeoceanographic influence on crust genesis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.; Borole, D.V.

    /Fe ratios ( 1-l .6), &MnO, as the main Mn mineral phase and a smooth exponential decay pattern of 23”Th clcw and “@Th cxen./232Th activities with depth indicate that these crusts have not recorded any palaeoceano- graphic events of the past u 0.4 Ma...; Banakar, 1988). The Central In- dian basin crusts occur at greater water depths, well below the present-day carbonate compen- sation depth (CCD ), in sharp contrast to the 0 168-9622/9 l/$03.50 0 1991 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V. All rights...

  6. Hemipelagic deposits on the Mendeleev and northwestern Alpha submarine Ridges in the Arctic Ocean: acoustic stratigraphy, depositional environment and an inter-ridge correlation calibrated by the ACEX results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruvoll, Vibeke; Kristoffersen, Yngve; Coakley, Bernard J.; Hopper, John R.

    2010-09-01

    The first high resolution multichannel seismic data from the Mendeleev and Alpha Ridges in the Arctic Ocean have been used to investigate the depositional history, and compare acoustic stratigraphies of the three main sub-marine ridges (Mendeleev, Alpha and Lomonosov) in the polar ocean. Acoustic basement on the Mendeleev Ridge is covered by a ~0.6-0.8 s thick sediment drape over highs and up to 1.8 s within grabens. A pronounced angular discordance at 0.18-0.23 s below the seafloor along the middle to upper slopes divides the succession into an upper, undisturbed, uniformly thick, hemipelagic drape (Unit M1) and a partially truncated lower unit (Unit M2) characterized by strong reflection bands. Unit M2 is thicker in intra-ridge grabens and includes three sub-units with abundant debris flows in the uppermost subunit (M2a). The discordance between Units M1 and M2 most likely relates to instability along the middle to upper slopes and mass wasting, triggered by tectonic activity. The scars were further smoothed by bottom current erosion. We observe comparable acoustic stratigraphy and discordant relationships on the investigated northwestern part of Alpha Ridge. Similarly, on the central Lomonosov Ridge, Paleocene and younger sediments sampled by scientific drilling include an uppermost ~0.2 s thick drape overlying, highly reflective deposits with an angular unconformity confined to the upper slope on both sides of the ridge. Sediment instability on the three main ridges was most likely generated by a brief phase of tectonic activity (~14.5-22 Ma), coinciding with enhanced bottom circulation. These events are coeval with the initial opening of the Fram Strait. The age of the oldest sediments above acoustic basement on the Mendeleev- and west-central Alpha Ridges is estimated to be 70-75 Ma.

  7. Peculiarities in the Fabric of Oceanic Crust Generated at the Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, E.; Jokat, W.

    2001-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge, northern boundary of the American and Eurasian plates, presents the lowest spreading rate (< 20 mm/yr) of the global ridge system. Therefore it provides an excellent opportunity to study any dependence of crustal fabric on spreading rate. Subject of this contribution are the crustal thickness and the roughness of basement surface in the Eurasian Basin. Reflection seismics and gravity records aquired during the ARCTIC'91 expedition across the Gakkel Ridge and the adjacent Nansen and Amundsen Basin are used. The data are combined with results of former refraction seismic experiments to constrain starting-points for gravity modeling. The topography of the basements surface, buried under more than 3000m thick sediments in the central parts of the basins, appears to be very rough. It varies from several hundred meters up to 1000 m. The RMS-roughness ranges from 450 m in the central Amundsen Basin to 584 m in the southern Eurasian Basin. These values agree reasonably well with RMS-roughness values derived by an empirical model from spreading rates. The gravity models reveal a 5-6 km thick oceanic crust (density of 2900 kg/cm) in the central part of the Amundsen Basin, increasing to 9 km towards the Gakkel Ridge. At the southwestern end of the Eurasian Basin, oceanic crust is only 2-5 km thick and thickens towards the Gakkel Ridge. In our model the ridge is composed of a 2 km thick upper layer with a density of 2600 kg/cm, underlain by an 8 km thick zone with a density of 2900 kg/cm. This is a surprising result, contradicting most theoretical models from which crustal thickness is supposed to decrease with decreasing spreading rate.

  8. Optimization of ridge parameters in multivariate generalized ridge regression by plug-in methods

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Isamu; Yanagihara, Hirokazu; Satoh, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Generalized ridge (GR) regression for an univariate linear model was proposed simultaneously with ridge regression by Hoerl and Kennard (1970). In this paper, we deal with a GR regression for a multivariate linear model, referred to as a multivariate GR (MGR) regression. From the viewpoint of reducing the mean squared error (MSE) of a predicted value, many authors have proposed several GR estimators consisting of ridge parameters optimized by non-iterative methods. By expanding...

  9. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were...

  10. The beach ridges of India: A review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.; Wagle, B.G.

    are distinguished into 4 genetic classes. Finally the utilization of beach ridges in the reconstruction of sea level curve, palaeo-climate and sediment budget histories has been highlighted and scope for future study is discussed...

  11. KINERJA JACKKNIFE RIDGE REGRESSION DALAM MENGATASI MULTIKOLINEARITAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HANY DEVITA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ordinary least square is a parameter estimations for minimizing residual sum of squares. If the multicollinearity was found in the data, unbias estimator with minimum variance could not be reached. Multicollinearity is a linear correlation between independent variabels in model. Jackknife Ridge Regression(JRR as an extension of Generalized Ridge Regression (GRR for solving multicollinearity.  Generalized Ridge Regression is used to overcome the bias of estimators caused of presents multicollinearity by adding different bias parameter for each independent variabel in least square equation after transforming the data into an orthoghonal form. Beside that, JRR can  reduce the bias of the ridge estimator. The result showed that JRR model out performs GRR model.

  12. Inverse regression for ridge recovery II: Numerics

    OpenAIRE

    Glaws, Andrew; Constantine, Paul G.; Cook, R. Dennis

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the application of sufficient dimension reduction (SDR) to a noiseless data set derived from a deterministic function of several variables. In this context, SDR provides a framework for ridge recovery. In this second part, we explore the numerical subtleties associated with using two inverse regression methods---sliced inverse regression (SIR) and sliced average variance estimation (SAVE)---for ridge recovery. This includes a detailed numerical analysis of the eigenvalues of th...

  13. Indian Summer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, E. [Sho-Ban High School, Fort Hall, ID (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  14. The Cartan matrix of a centralizer algebra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 122, No. 1, February 2012, pp. 67–73. c Indian Academy of Sciences. The Cartan matrix of a centralizer algebra ... isomorphism classes of principal indecomposable Л-modules (throughout this article, the .... An inductive argument then shows that when i ≥ j, then every product.

  15. New data of the Gakkel Ridge seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonovskaya, Galina; Basakina, Irina; Kremenetskaya, Elena

    2016-04-01

    250 earthquakes were recorded in the Gakkel Ridge during the period 2012-2014 by Arkhangelsk seismic network. The magnitude Ml of these earthquakes is 1.5 - 5.7, 70% of them have Ml up to 3.0. Seismic events are arranged along to a narrow center line of the Mid-Arctic Ridge, most of the earthquakes are confined to the southern board of the Ridge. Presumably it's connected with the reflection of spreading processes. The high seismic activity zones, which we associate with the volcano-tectonic processes, have been identified. Have been recorded 13 events per day in the Western Volcanic Zone. The largest number of events (75%) is confined to the Sparsely Magmatic Zone. About 30% of all recorded earthquakes with magnitudes above 2.9 have a T-phase. We divided the Gakkel Ridge's earthquakes into two groups by using spectral-time analysis. The first group: maximum energy of the earthquake is observed from 1.5 to 10 Hz, values of magnitudes Ml 2.50-5.29. Earthquakes are distributed along the Gakkel Ridge. The second group: maximum energy of the earthquake is observed from 1.5 to 20 Hz, clearly expressed a high-frequency component, values of magnitudes Ml 2.3-3.4. Earthquakes 2 groups focused only in the Sparsely Magmatic Zone. The new seismic data shows an unique information about geodynamic processes of the Gakkel Ridge.

  16. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R.

    1990-10-01

    This two-volume report, the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1989, is the nineteenth in an annual series that began in 1971. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at the three major US Department of Energy (DOE) production and research installations in Oak Ridge on the immediate areas' and surrounding region's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation and wildlife, and through these multiple and varied pathways, the resident human population. Information is presented for the environmental monitoring Quality Assurance (QA) Program, audits and reviews, waste management activities, land special environmental studies. Data are included for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Volume 1 presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions based on environmental monitoring at the three DOE installations and in the surrounding environs during calendar year (CY) 1989. Volume 1 is intended to be a ''stand-alone'' report about the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the reader who does not want an in-depth review of 1989 data. Volume 2 presents the detailed data from which these conclusions have been drawn and should be used in conjunction with Volume 1

  17. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R. (eds.)

    1990-10-01

    This two-volume report, the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1989, is the nineteenth in an annual series that began in 1971. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at the three major US Department of Energy (DOE) production and research installations in Oak Ridge on the immediate areas' and surrounding region's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation and wildlife, and through these multiple and varied pathways, the resident human population. Information is presented for the environmental monitoring Quality Assurance (QA) Program, audits and reviews, waste management activities, land special environmental studies. Data are included for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Volume 1 presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions based on environmental monitoring at the three DOE installations and in the surrounding environs during calendar year (CY) 1989. Volume 1 is intended to be a stand-alone'' report about the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the reader who does not want an in-depth review of 1989 data. Volume 2 presents the detailed data from which these conclusions have been drawn and should be used in conjunction with Volume 1.

  18. Nanolithography using nanoscale ridge apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang

    There is a continuous effort to develop techniques for nanoscale feature definition below the diffraction limit. Nanolithography has been a key technique because of its precision and cost effective. A sub-wavelength hole in an opaque screen can be used to provide a small light source with the optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit in the near field. However, a nanometer-sized hole in circular or square shapes is plagued by low transmission and poor contrast. This drawback limits the nanoscale apertures from being employed in nanolithography applications. Ridge apertures in C, H and bowtie shapes, on the other hand, have been numerically and experimentally demonstrated to show the ability of achieving both enhanced light transmission and sub-wavelength optical resolution down to nanometer domain benefiting from the existence of waveguide propagation mode confined in the gap between the ridges. In this report, the detailed field distributions in contact nanolithography are analyzed using finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. It was found that the high imaging contrast, which is necessary for successful lithography, is achieved close to the mask exit plane and decays quickly with the increase of the distance from the mask exit plane. Simulations are also performed for comparable regular shaped apertures and different shape bowtie apertures. Design rules are proposed to optimize the bowtie aperture for producing a sub-wavelength, high transmission field with high imaging contrast. High resolution contact nanolithography was carried on a home constructed lithography setup. It has been experimentally demonstrated that nanoscale bowtie and C apertures can be used for contact lithography to achieve nanometer scale resolution due to its intrinsic advantages of achieving enhanced optical transmission and concentrating light far beyond the diffraction limit. It also has shown the advantages of bowtie and C apertures over conventional apertures in both

  19. Helium Isotope Variations in Basalts Along Gakkel Ridge and Heterogeneity of the Arctic Upper Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D. W.; Lupton, J. E.; Goldstein, S. L.; Langmuir, C. H.; Michael, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    We report helium isotope compositions, determined by crushing in vacuum to release the gas trapped in vesicles, for 57 basalt glasses from the ultra-slow spreading Gakkel Ridge. Other geochemical data, especially radiogenic isotopes (Pb, Nd, Sr) reveal the presence of an isotopic boundary in the mid-section of this ridge that separates basalts in the west (west of 14°E longitude) having “Indian Ocean” (Dupal) isotopic signatures, from basalts in the east which resemble the North Atlantic/Pacific domain (Goldstein et al. 2008). This boundary reflects heterogeneity in the underlying mantle related to the tectonic history of continental land masses surrounding the Arctic Ocean. In the west there is a narrow range of 3He/4He with lower values (7.0-7.9 RA), while in the east there is a wider range of 3He/4He with higher values (7.9-9.3 RA) and effectively no overlap with the western group. Off-axis lavas do not fit this simple picture however, revealing some systematic temporal variability, perhaps associated with mantle flow beneath the ridge. All Gakkel Ridge basalts are deeply erupted and most have high helium contents, in some cases at the upper end of the MORB range (>50 μccSTP/g). The few exceptions, having He contents below 0.1 μccSTP/g, have the highest 3He/4He (>8.8 RA). This effect appears to reflect earlier (recent) melting of isotopically heterogeneous mantle, during which the initial melt fractions were slightly enriched in 4He, perhaps due to a larger modal contribution of clinopyroxene and/or garnet to those melts. The temporal variability and the melting effects, while significant, do not account for the large 3He/4He signal observed along the ridge axis. Overall, 3He/4He shows systematic covariation with other isotopic indicators of mantle heterogeneity (Pb, Nd, Sr and Hf), indicating that the helium isotope variations are a long-lived feature of the Arctic upper mantle. The 3He/4He ratio is as effective a discriminant of eastern and western

  20. Variation in the position of the jugal medial ridge among lizards (reptilia: squamata): its functional and taxonomic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerňanský, Andrej; Smith, Krister T; Klembara, Jozef

    2014-12-01

    The course of the medial ridge in the lizard jugal shows considerable morphological variation. There are four basic configurations: (1) the medial ridge is located ventral to mid-height on the suborbital process and anterior to mid-length on the postorbital process; (2) the medial ridge is located ventrally on the suborbital process (as above), but posteriorly on the postorbital process; (3) the medial ridge is located dorsally on the suborbital process and anteriorly on the postorbital process; and (4) the medial ridge is centrally located along the entire length of the jugal. Ancestral character state reconstruction shows that type 1 is plesiomorphic for Squamata regardless of the broad-scale phylogenetic topology. Type 3 is present in chamaeleonids and convergently in Anolis barbatus. Type 3 is a synapomorphy of the chamaeleonids. Type 2 is considered plesiomorphic for Anguidae, Heloderma and Xenosaurus, although it is independently modified in some extant members. These taxa form a clade in molecular phylogenies of Squamata, and the course of the medial ridge of the jugal therefore provides some measure of morphological support for this arrangement. The course of the medial ridge may be best explained by the position of the eye and by the angle of the jugal; its relations with other bony orbital structures (supraocular osteoderms, palpebral, supraorbital flanges) and the posterior extent of the maxilla are also discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Deep Cenezoic Sediments in Front of the Barbados Ridge Complex, Odp Site 672: Hemipelagites, Turbidites, and Possible Contourites in Western Central Atlantic Ocean Sédiments cénozoïques au front du complexe de la Barbade, site ODP 672 : hémipélagites, turbidites, et possibles contourites dans l'Atlantique central occidental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascle A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The cenozoic sediments cover of western central Atlantic oceanic floor was cored at about 5 000 m depth, close to the deformation front of the Barbados Accretionary Prism. Good preservation of sedimentary structures and high recovery rate allowed the recognition and study of hemipelagic calcareous or siliceous clays and muds, with or without interbedded airfall volcanic ash beds, and with or without interbedded coarser deposits coming from lateral inputs. The latters are either calcareous fine-grained turbidites coming from local shallower oceanic areas, or terrigenous and calcareous (more hypothetical contourites (reworking turbidites related to bottom currents running along the South-America margin. Fluid-escape veinstructures, related to dewatering process - upward, vertical to almost horizontal advection - were identified, especially in relation with the beginning of offscraping stress in early Miocene incipient décollementhorizon. Twenty-four color print photos of splitted cores are presented; the macroscopic features they show are commented and discussed. La couverture sédimentaire cénozoïque du plancher océanique de l'Atlantique Central occidental a été carottée à environ 5000 m de profondeur, à proximité du front de déformation du prisme d'accrétion de la Barbade. Une bonne préservation des structures sédimentaires et un taux de récupération élevé ont permis la reconnaissance et l'étude d'argilites et shales hémipélagiques, calcaires ou siliceuses, localement intercalées de lits de cendres volcaniques, et auxquelles s'ajoutent des niveaux plus grossiers attribués à des apports latéraux. Ces derniers consistent, soit en turbidites calcareuses à grain fin provenant de hauts-fonds océaniques proches, soit en (plus hypothétiques contourites calcareuses et terrigènes (remaniant des turbidites attribuées à l'activité de courants profonds longeant la marge sud-américaine. Des veinesd'échappement de fluides

  2. Anthropometry of south Indian industrial workmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, J E; Uppugonduri, K G

    1992-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an anthropometric survey conducted on South Indian male workers in the electronic industry. The data were collected as part of a project to modify work stations that utilized equipment from other countries. A set of 27 body dimensions were taken from a sample of 128 workmen (aged 18-35 years). The anthropometric measurements are compared with those of Indian men from Central, Western, and Northern parts of India and with those of the American, German, and Japanese men. The results indicate that in general the South Indian man is smaller than Central, Western, and Northern Indian men, as well as smaller than men in America, Germany, Japan, and Africa. This difference needs to be allowed for when considering buying and subsequently using imported equipment for the electronics industry in South India.

  3. Psychometric assessment of anxiety with the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale among central Indian adults seeking oral health care to a dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deogade, Suryakant C; Suresan, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety toward dental treatment can cause people to delay or avoid seeking oral health care despite being in need of treatment. Therefore, recognizing such anxious patients and their appropriate management plays important aspects in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of dental anxiety (DA), factors affecting it, and anxiety toward dental extraction among adults seeking dental care to a dental school in Central India. The study sample consisted of 1360 consecutive patients aged 18-70 years. Participants completed a questionnaire while in the waiting room, which included the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) to assess the level of DA. An additional item was included which asked participants to rate the anxiety felt on having a tooth extracted. Among the study group, 65.1% were men and 34.9% were women. Based on the MDAS score, 41.8% of the participants were identified to be less anxious, 53.2% were moderately or extremely anxious, and 5% were suffering from dental phobia. Female participants and younger patients were more anxious ( P = 0.0008). Patients who were anxious had postponed their dental visit ( P = 0.0008). Participants who had negative dental experience were more anxious ( P = 0.03). Nearly, 83% reported anxiety toward extraction procedure. A significant association was observed between anxiety toward dental extraction and the patients' gender ( P = 0.03), age ( P = 0.0007), education level ( P = 0.03), employment status ( P = 0.0006), income ( P = 0.0007), self-perceived oral health status ( P = 0.03), and their history of visit to dentist ( P = 0.02). Majority of patients in this population revealed high levels of DA. Factors such as age, gender, education level, occupation, financial stability, and previous bad dental experience influence DA to various levels. Extraction followed by injection of local anesthetics and drilling of tooth provoked more anxiety.

  4. Psychometric assessment of anxiety with the Modified Dental Anxiety scale among central Indian adults seeking oral health care to a dental school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakant C Deogade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anxiety toward dental treatment can cause people to delay or avoid seeking oral health care despite being in need of treatment. Therefore, recognizing such anxious patients and their appropriate management plays important aspects in clinical practice. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the level of dental anxiety (DA, factors affecting it, and anxiety toward dental extraction among adults seeking dental care to a dental school in Central India. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 1360 consecutive patients aged 18–70 years. Participants completed a questionnaire while in the waiting room, which included the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS to assess the level of DA. An additional item was included which asked participants to rate the anxiety felt on having a tooth extracted. Results: Among the study group, 65.1% were men and 34.9% were women. Based on the MDAS score, 41.8% of the participants were identified to be less anxious, 53.2% were moderately or extremely anxious, and 5% were suffering from dental phobia. Female participants and younger patients were more anxious (P = 0.0008. Patients who were anxious had postponed their dental visit (P = 0.0008. Participants who had negative dental experience were more anxious (P = 0.03. Nearly, 83% reported anxiety toward extraction procedure. A significant association was observed between anxiety toward dental extraction and the patients' gender (P = 0.03, age (P = 0.0007, education level (P = 0.03, employment status (P = 0.0006, income (P = 0.0007, self-perceived oral health status (P = 0.03, and their history of visit to dentist (P = 0.02. Conclusion: Majority of patients in this population revealed high levels of DA. Factors such as age, gender, education level, occupation, financial stability, and previous bad dental experience influence DA to various levels. Extraction followed by injection of local anesthetics and drilling of tooth provoked more anxiety.

  5. The Pine Ridge-Mayo National Aeronautics and Space Administration telemedicine project: program activities and participant reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottke, T E; Little Finger, L; Trapp, M A; Panser, L A; Novotny, P J

    1996-04-01

    To determine the response of participants to the Pine Ridge-Mayo National Aeronautics and Space Administration telemedicine project. We describe a 3-month demonstration project of medical education and clinical consultations conducted by means of satellite transmission. Postparticipation questionnaires and a postproject survey were used to assess the success of the activity. Patients and employees at the Pine Ridge Indian Health Service Hospital in southwestern South Dakota and employees at Mayo Clinic Rochester participated in a telemedicine project, after which they completed exit surveys and a postproject questionnaire to ascertain the acceptability of this mode of health care. Almost all Pine Ridge and Mayo Clinic participants viewed the project as beneficial. The educational sessions received favorable evaluations, and almost two-thirds of the patients who completed evaluations thought the consultation had contributed to their medical care. More than 90% of the respondents from Pine Ridge and more than 85% of the respondents from Mayo Clinic Rochester said that they would recommend participation in this project to others. More than 90% of respondents from Pine Ridge and 80% of Mayo respondents agreed with the statement that the project should continue. These data suggest that a program of clinical consultation services, professional education, and patient education available by telemedicine might be viewed as beneficial.

  6. The Cocos Ridge drives collision of Panama with northwestern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFemina, Peter; Govers, Rob; Mora-Paez, Hector; Geirsson, Halldor; Cmacho, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The collision of the Panamanian isthmus with northwestern South America is thought to have initiated as early as Oligocene - Miocene time (23-25 Ma) based on geologic and geophysical data and paleogeographic reconstructions. This collision was driven by eastward-directed subduction beneath northwestern South America. Cocos - Caribbean convergence along the Middle America Trench, and Nazca - Caribbean oblique convergence along the South Panama Deformed Belt have resulted in complex deformation of the southwestern Caribbean since Miocene - Pliocene time. Subduction and collision of the aseismic Cocos Ridge is thought to have initiated migration of the volcanic arc toward the back-arc; 3) Quaternary to present deformation within the Central Costa Rica Deformed Belt; 4) Quaternary to present shortening across the fore-arc Fila Costeña fold and thrust belt and back-arc North Panama Deformed Belt (NPDB); 5) Quaternary to present outer fore-arc uplift of Nicoya Peninsula above the seamount domain, and the Osa and Burica peninsulas above the ridge; and 6) Pleistocene to present northwestward motion of the Central American Fore Arc (CAFA) and northeastward motion of the Panama Region. We investigate the geodynamic effects of Cocos Ridge collision on motion of the Panama Region with a new geodynamic model. The model is compared to a new 1993-2015 GPS-derived three-dimensional velocity field for the western Caribbean and northwestern South America. Specifically, we test the hypotheses that the Cocos Ridge is the main driver for upper plate deformation in the western Caribbean. Our models indicate that Cocos Ridge collision drives northwest-directed motion of the CAFA and the northeast-directed motion of the Panama Region. The Panama Region is driven into the Caribbean across the NPDB and into northwestern South America, which is also converging with the Panama Region, pushing it toward the west-northwest. Therefore, modern collision of Panama with northwestern South America

  7. Modeling the Crust and Upper Mantle in Northern Beata Ridge (CARIBE NORTE Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Diana; Córdoba, Diego; Cotilla, Mario Octavio; Pazos, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The complex tectonic region of NE Caribbean, where Hispaniola and Puerto Rico are located, is bordered by subduction zone with oblique convergence in the north and by incipient subduction zone associated to Muertos Trough in the south. Central Caribbean basin is characterized by the presence of a prominent topographic structure known as Beata Ridge, whose oceanic crustal thickness is unusual. The northern part of Beata Ridge is colliding with the central part of Hispaniola along a transverse NE alignment, which constitutes a morphostructural limit, thus producing the interruption of the Cibao Valley and the divergence of the rivers and basins in opposite directions. The direction of this alignment coincides with the discontinuity that could explain the extreme difference between west and east seismicity of the island. Different studies have provided information about Beata Ridge, mainly about the shallow structure from MCS data. In this work, CARIBE NORTE (2009) wide-angle seismic data are analyzed along a WNW-ESE trending line in the northern flank of Beata Ridge, providing a complete tectonic view about shallow, middle and deep structures. The results show clear tectonic differences between west and east separated by Beata Island. In the Haiti Basin area, sedimentary cover is strongly influenced by the bathymetry and its thickness decreases toward to the island. In this area, the Upper Mantle reaches 20 km deep increasing up to 24 km below the island where the sedimentary cover disappears. To the east, the three seamounts of Beata Ridge provoke the appearance of a structure completely different where sedimentary cover reaches thicknesses of 4 km between seamounts and Moho rises up to 13 km deep. This study has allowed to determine the Moho topography and to characterize seismically the first upper mantle layers along the northern Beata Ridge, which had not been possible with previous MCS data.

  8. Ridge regression in prediction problems: automatic choice of the ridge parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cule, Erika; De Iorio, Maria

    2013-11-01

    To date, numerous genetic variants have been identified as associated with diverse phenotypic traits. However, identified associations generally explain only a small proportion of trait heritability and the predictive power of models incorporating only known-associated variants has been small. Multiple regression is a popular framework in which to consider the joint effect of many genetic variants simultaneously. Ordinary multiple regression is seldom appropriate in the context of genetic data, due to the high dimensionality of the data and the correlation structure among the predictors. There has been a resurgence of interest in the use of penalised regression techniques to circumvent these difficulties. In this paper, we focus on ridge regression, a penalised regression approach that has been shown to offer good performance in multivariate prediction problems. One challenge in the application of ridge regression is the choice of the ridge parameter that controls the amount of shrinkage of the regression coefficients. We present a method to determine the ridge parameter based on the data, with the aim of good performance in high-dimensional prediction problems. We establish a theoretical justification for our approach, and demonstrate its performance on simulated genetic data and on a real data example. Fitting a ridge regression model to hundreds of thousands to millions of genetic variants simultaneously presents computational challenges. We have developed an R package, ridge, which addresses these issues. Ridge implements the automatic choice of ridge parameter presented in this paper, and is freely available from CRAN. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  9. Ridge trace as a boost to ridge regression estimate in the presence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multicollinearity often causes a huge interpretative problem in linear regression analysis. The ridge estimator is not generally accepted as a vital alternative to the ordinary least squares (OLS) estimator because it depends on unknown parameters. In any specific application of ridges regression, there is no guarantee that ...

  10. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This document outlines the activities necessary to conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI) of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The CRSP, also designated Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 1, is one of four OUs along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The purpose of the RI is to collect data to (1) evaluate the nature and extent of known and suspected contaminants, (2) support an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) and a Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA), (3) support the feasibility study in the development and analysis of remedial alternatives, and (4) ultimately, develop a Record of Decision (ROD) for the site. This chapter summarizes the regulatory background of environmental investigation on the ORR and the approach currently being followed and provides an overview of the RI to be conducted at the CRSP. Subsequent chapters provide details on site history, sampling activities, procedures and methods, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, and waste management related to the RI.

  11. Arctic Ocean: hydrothermal activity on Gakkel Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Fourré, Elise

    2004-03-04

    In the hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges, sea water penetrates the fractured crust, becomes heated by its proximity to the hot magma, and returns to the sea floor as hot fluids enriched in various chemical elements. In contradiction to earlier results that predict diminishing hydrothermal activity with decreasing spreading rate, a survey of the ultra-slowly spreading Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean) by Edmonds et al. and Michael et al. suggests that, instead of being rare, the hydrothermal activity is abundant--exceeding by at least a factor of two to three what would be expected by extrapolation from observation on faster spreading ridges. Here we use helium-3 (3He), a hydrothermal tracer, to show that this abundance of venting sites does not translate, as would be expected, into an anomalous hydrothermal 3He output from the ridge. Because of the wide implications of the submarine hydrothermal processes for mantle heat and mass fluxes to the ocean, these conflicting results call for clarification of the link between hydrothermal activity and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges.

  12. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This document outlines the activities necessary to conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI) of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The CRSP, also designated Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 1, is one of four OUs along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The purpose of the RI is to collect data to (1) evaluate the nature and extent of known and suspected contaminants, (2) support an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) and a Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA), (3) support the feasibility study in the development and analysis of remedial alternatives, and (4) ultimately, develop a Record of Decision (ROD) for the site. This chapter summarizes the regulatory background of environmental investigation on the ORR and the approach currently being followed and provides an overview of the RI to be conducted at the CRSP. Subsequent chapters provide details on site history, sampling activities, procedures and methods, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, and waste management related to the RI

  13. Ridge regression for longitudinal biomarker data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliot, Melissa; Ferguson, Jane; Reilly, Muredach P; Foulkes, Andrea S

    2011-01-01

    Technological advances facilitating the acquisition of large arrays of biomarker data have led to new opportunities to understand and characterize disease progression over time. This creates an analytical challenge, however, due to the large numbers of potentially informative markers, the high degrees of correlation among them, and the time-dependent trajectories of association. We propose a mixed ridge estimator, which integrates ridge regression into the mixed effects modeling framework in order to account for both the correlation induced by repeatedly measuring an outcome on each individual over time, as well as the potentially high degree of correlation among possible predictor variables. An expectation-maximization algorithm is described to account for unknown variance and covariance parameters. Model performance is demonstrated through a simulation study and an application of the mixed ridge approach to data arising from a study of cardiometabolic biomarker responses to evoked inflammation induced by experimental low-dose endotoxemia.

  14. Evidence of recent, off-axis volcanism on Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, M.; Cochran, J. R.; Dick, H. J.

    2010-12-01

    In 1998 and 1999 the Science and Ice Exercise (SCICEX) programs used interferometric sonars installed on a U.S. Navy nuclear-powered submarine to map the morphology, texture and crustal structure of Gakkel Ridge from 6° E to 96° E with coverage out to ~50 km from the ridge axis (Edwards et al., 2001; Cochran et al., 2003). This effort represented the most comprehensive, systematic survey of this important end-member ridge on the spreading rate spectrum (Cochran et al., 2003). The SCICEX programs were followed by the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge Expedition (AMORE) in 2001 which used both the USCGC Healy and PFS Polarstern to map the axial valley floor and walls along Gakkel Ridge at high resolution (Michael et al., 2003; Jokat et al., 2003) from the Lena Trough to an inferred active volcanic construrct at 85°E (Müller and Jokat, 2000; Edwards et al., 2001). We have used the GPS-navigated AMORE data to refine the navigation of the SCICEX data, extending the coverage of both the SCICEX and AMORE datasets and improving the resolution and positional accuracy of the SCICEX data. The integrated dataset allows identification of several reflective, and thus relatively recent, off-axis lava flows. These flows are analogous to off-axis eruptions that have been reported on the Southwest Indian Ridge [Standish and Sims, 2010]. Several of the flows on Gakkel Ridge originate along fissures located at or near the top of the axial valley walls and spill down onto the axial valley floors. Other flows are associated with small (a few hundred meter or less in diameter) constructs contained entirely within the axial valley. We present a comparison of the integrated topographic and textural data with the results of dredge samples recovered during the AMORE expedition to document the petrology and relative age of these flow features. We further use the morphology of the reflective flow features, in combination with tectonic interpretations of the local terrain, to demonstrate the eruptive

  15. Mantle Partial Melting Beneath Gakkel Ridge Reflected in the Petrography of Spinel Lherzolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, J. E.; Dick, H.; Buechl, A.; Michael, P.; Hellebrand, E.; Ship Sc Parties HEALY 102-POLARSTERN 59,; Ship Sc Parties HEALY 102-POLARSTERN 59,; Ship Sc Parties HEALY 102-POLARSTERN 59,

    2001-12-01

    One of the main aims of the AMORE expedition to Gakkel Ridge was to investigate the nature of mantle residues of low-degree partial melting. Previous results from a single sample of highly serpentinized Gakkel peridotite were unable to conclusively resolve many of the issues of mantle melting and mantle veining involved (1). We have made a preliminary examination of 46 thin sections and hundreds of hand samples of mantle peridotites made on board PFS POLARSTERN and HEALY in the course of the expedition. Most of these peridotites are altered 60-90%, like most abyssal peridotites. Some however are stunningly fresh, containing no detectable serpentine in thin section. The distribution of mantle rock types is similar to that from other mid-ocean ridges. Dunites are present but rare, in contrast to the SW Indian Ridge oblique spreading center at 12° E, as are plagioclase peridotites, in contrast to their abundance at Molloy Ridge further south on the arctic ridge system. There are two differences between this sample set and those commonly observed on mid-ocean ridges that are of particular note. First is the relative abundance of clinopyroxene. The mean clinopyroxene content and size observed in thin section are both qualitatively greater than is commonly observed in abyssal peridotites. Second, the spinels are more nearly euhedral, more abundant and commonly very pale in color. The pale color is well known to be a sign of low Cr content (and thus high activity of Al) in the residual system. All of these observations suggest a low degree of partial melting in the Gakkel Ridge mantle, in accordance with theoretical predictions. What has not been observed to date in even the largest and freshest samples is any evidence of significant mantle veining. It may be that mantle veins have sufficiently low solidi that they melt out completely without a trace even at the lowest degrees of partial melting. The petrographic evidence however suggests that there never was significant

  16. Ridge Splitting Technique for Horizontal Augmentation and Immediate Implant Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papathanasiou Ioannis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient width of the alveolar ridge often prevents ideal implant placement. Guided bone regeneration, bone grafting, alveolar ridge splitting and combinations of these techniques are used for the lateral augmentation of the alveolar ridge. Ridge splitting is a minimally invasive technique indicated for alveolar ridges with adequate height, which enables immediate implant placement and eliminates morbidity and overall treatment time. The classical approach of the technique involves splitting the alveolar ridge into 2 parts with use of ostetomes and chisels. Modifications of this technique include the use of rotating instrument, screw spreaders, horizontal spreaders and ultrasonic device.

  17. Influence of elevation and forest type on community assemblage and species distribution of shrews in the central and southern Appalachian mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Mark Ford; Timothy S. McCay; Michael A. Menzel; W. David Webster; Cathryn H. Greenberg; John F. Pagels; Joseph F. Merritt; Joseph F. Merritt

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed shrew community data from 398,832 pitfall trapnights at 303 sites across the upper Piedmont, Blue Ridge, northern Ridge and Valley, southern Ridge and Valley, Cumberland Plateau and Allegheny Mountains and Plateau sections of the central and southern Appalachian Mountains from Alabama to Pennsylvania. The objectives of our research were to describe regional...

  18. Chemical and physical gradients along the OMC-1 ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerechts, H.; Bergin, E. A.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.; Snell, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    We present a survey of the distribution of 20 chemical and isotopic molecular species along the central ridge of the Orion molecular cloud from 6' north to 6' south of BN-KL observed with the QUARRY focal plane array on the FCRAO 14 m telescope, which provides an angular resolution of approximately 50" in the 3 mm wavelength region. We use standard tools of multivariate analysis for a systematic investigation of the similarities and differences among the maps of integrated intensities of the 32 lines observed. The maps fall in three broad classes: first, those strongly peaked toward BN-KL; second, those having rather flat distributions along the ridge; and third, those with a clear north-south gradient or contrast. We identify six positions or regions where we calculate relative abundances. Line velocities and line widths indicate that the optically thin lines generally trace the same volume of dense gas, except in the molecular bar, where C18O, C34S, H13CO+, CN, C2H, SO, and C3H2 have velocities characteristic of the bar itself, whereas the emission from other detected species is dominated by the background cloud. The strongest abundance variations in our data are the well-known enhancements seen in HCN, CH3OH, HC3N, and SO toward BN-KL and, less strongly, toward the Orion-South outflow 1'.3S. The principal result of this study is that along the extended quiescent ridge the chemical abundances, within factors of 3-4, exhibit an impressive degree of uniformity. The northern part of the ridge has a chemistry closest to that found in quiescent dense clouds. While temperature and density are similar around the northern radical-ion peak near 3'.5N and in the southern core near 4'.2S, some abundances, in particular, those of the ions HCO+ and N2H+, are significantly lower toward 4'.2S. The areas near 4.'2S and the molecular bar itself around (1'.7E, 2'.4S) stand out with peculiar and similar properties probably caused by stronger UV fields penetrating deeper into the

  19. ORLANDO - Oak Ridge Large Neutrino Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Efremenko, Yu.; Fazely, A.; Gabriel, T.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Plasil, F.; Svoboda, R.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss a proposal for construction of an Oak Ridge LArge Neutrino DetectOr (ORLANDO) to search for neutrino oscillations at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A 4 MW SNS is proposed to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the first stage to be operative around 2006. It will have two target stations, which makes it possible with a single detector to perform a neutrino oscillation search at two different distances. Initial plans for the placement of the detector and the discovery potential of such a detector are discussed

  20. Alveolar Ridge Carcinoma. Two Cases Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupo Triguero, Raul J; Vivar Bauza, Miriam; Alvarez Infante, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    Two cases with alveolar ridge carcinoma due to prosthetist traumatism are discussed in this paper, after 9 and 10 years of using dental prosthesis. Both patients began with disturbance in the alveolar ridge. The clinical examination and biopsy showed a well differenced carcinoma. The treatment was radical surgery and radiotherapy in the first patient, and conservative surgery with radiotherapy in the second case .The patients had xerostomia after radiotherapy and the woman had difficulties with mastication. The advantages and disadvantages of the treatment were discussed, focused on the prevention and treatment for oral

  1. Hafnium isotope results from mid-ocean ridges and Kerguelen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchett, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    176Hf/177Hf ratios are presented for oceanic volcanic rocks representing both extremes of the range of mantle Hf-Nd-Sr isotopic variation. Hf from critical mid-ocean ridge basalts shows that 176Hf/177Hf does indeed have a greater variability than 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr in the depleted mantle. This extra variation is essentially of a random nature, and can perhaps be understood in terms of known Rb/Sr-Sm/Nd-Lu/Hf fractionation relationships. At the other extreme of mantle isotopic compositions, 176Hf/177Hf ratios for igneous rocks from the Indian Ocean island of Kerguelen show a closely similar variation to published 143Nd/144Nd ratios for the same samples. Comparison of Hf-Nd-Sr isotopic relatonships for Tristan da Cunha, Kerguelen and Samoa reveals divergences in the mantle array for ocean-island magma sources, and perhaps suggests that these irregularities are largely the result of an extra component of 87Sr/86Sr variation.-G.R.

  2. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Centre for Rural and Cryogenic Technologies, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032, India; Department of Central Scientific Services, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032, India; Department of Electronics and Electrical Communication Engineering, Indian Institute of ...

  3. Interannual variability of the tropical Indian Ocean mixed layer depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Keerthi, M.G.; Lengaigne, M.; Vialard, J.; Montegut, C.deB.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    and south-eastern Indian Ocean and a deepening in the south-central Indian Ocean. The El Niño signature is rather weak, with moderate MLD shoaling in autumn in the eastern Arabian Sea. Stronger than usual monsoon jets are only associated with a very modest...

  4. Normalization Ridge Regression in Practice I: Comparisons Between Ordinary Least Squares, Ridge Regression and Normalization Ridge Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcock, J. W.

    The problem of model estimation when the data are collinear was examined. Though the ridge regression (RR) outperforms ordinary least squares (OLS) regression in the presence of acute multicollinearity, it is not a problem free technique for reducing the variance of the estimates. It is a stochastic procedure when it should be nonstochastic and it…

  5. Ridge regression estimator: combining unbiased and ordinary ridge regression methods of estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Damodar Gore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Statistical literature has several methods for coping with multicollinearity. This paper introduces a new shrinkage estimator, called modified unbiased ridge (MUR. This estimator is obtained from unbiased ridge regression (URR in the same way that ordinary ridge regression (ORR is obtained from ordinary least squares (OLS. Properties of MUR are derived. Results on its matrix mean squared error (MMSE are obtained. MUR is compared with ORR and URR in terms of MMSE. These results are illustrated with an example based on data generated by Hoerl and Kennard (1975.

  6. Wrinkle Ridges and Young Fresh Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 May 2002) The Science Wrinkle ridges are a very common landform on Mars, Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. These ridges are linear to arcuate asymmetric topographic highs commonly found on smooth plains. The origin of wrinkle ridges is not certain and two leading hypotheses have been put forth by scientists over the past 40 years. The volcanic model calls for the extrusion of high viscosity lavas along linear conduits. This thick lava accumulated over these conduits and formed the ridges. The other model is tectonic and advocates that the ridges are formed by compressional faulting and folding. Today's THEMIS image is of the ridged plains of Lunae Planum located between Kasei Valles and Valles Marineris in the northern hemisphere of the planet. Wrinkle ridges are found mostly along the eastern side of the image. The broadest wrinkle ridges in this image are up to 2 km wide. A 3 km diameter young fresh crater is located near the bottom of the image. The crater's ejecta blanket is also clearly seen surrounding the sharp well-defined crater rim. These features are indicative of a very young crater that has not been subjected to erosional processes. The Story The great thing about the solar system is that planets are both alike and different. They're all foreign enough to be mysterious and intriguing, and yet familiar enough to be seen as planetary 'cousins.' By comparing them, we can learn a lot about how planets form and then evolve geologically over time. Crinkled over smooth plains, the long, wavy raised landforms seen here are called 'wrinkle ridges,' and they've been found on Mars, Mercury, Venus, and the Moon - that is, on rocky bodies that are a part of our inner solar system. We know from this observation that planets (and large-enough moons) follow similar processes. What we don't know for sure is HOW these processes work. Scientists have been trying to understand how wrinkle ridges form for 40 years, and they still haven't reached a conclusion. That

  7. On some rare Oplophoridae (Caridea, Decapoda from the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cardoso

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR divides the Atlantic Ocean longitudinally into two halves, each with a series of major basins delimited by secondary, more or less transverse ridges. Recent biological investigations in this area were carried out within the framework of the international project Mar-Eco (Patterns and Processes of the Ecosystems of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In 2009 (from October, 25 to November, 29 12 benthic sampling events were conducted on the R/V Akademik Ioffe, during the first oceanographic cruise of South Atlantic Mar-Eco. As a result we report some rare Oplophoridae species collected during the cruise. This family includes 73 species occurring strictly on the meso- and bathypelagic zones of the oceans. Five Oplophoridae species were sampled: Acanthephyra acanthitelsonis Bate, 1888; A. quadrispinosa Kemp, 1939; Heterogenys monnioti Crosnier, 1987; Hymenodora glacialis (Buchholz, 1874 and Kemphyra corallina (A. Milne-Edwards, 1883. Among these, H. monnioti and K. corallina are considered extremely rare, both with very few records. Of the sampled species, only A. quadrispinosa and H. glacialis were previously recorded to southwestern Atlantic, so the Oplophoridae fauna of the South MAR seems more related with the fauna from the eastern Atlantic and Indian oceans.

  8. Early Cenozoic rapid flight enigma of the Indian subcontinent resolved: Roles of topographic top loading and subcrustal erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuvairavasamy Ramkumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic magmatic processes are considered as critical operators of plate movements. Here we demonstrate the role of extrinsic processes consequent to intrinsic processes as a catalyst for anomalous rapid plate movement. The rapid and accelerated flight of the Indian subcontinent since Deccan volcanism until its collision with Eurasia remains as one of the geological conundrums. Data on seismic tomography, peninsular geomorphology and inferences on continuum of subcrustal structures are utilized to address this enigma. We propose geomorphic isostasy as the mechanism that has driven this fastest drift ever recorded in geological history. It was initiated by sudden instability after the Deccan volcanism and resultant extensive accumulation of lava pile over continental lithosphere of northern India, northern-eastern tilt due to crustal thickness heterogeneity and subcrustal thermal stratification. The drift was sustained by Carlsberg and Central Indian ridge-push until collision and sediment top loading at northeast thenceforth. These inferences and geomorphic isostasy as a catalytic mechanism necessitate variability of drift rates as integral inputs for any continental scale modeling.

  9. A Huge Event-Plume Discovered Over the Carlsberg Ridge: The First Outside the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, B. J.; Sands, C. M.; Baker, E. T.

    2005-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges (MOR) are the loci of the majority of Earth's volcanism, that in turn plays a pivotal role in the global transfer of mass and heat from the Earth's lithosphere to the hydrosphere. Yet only a few volcanic events have been detected to date, often days to weeks after finishing, by indirect observations of transient thermal and chemical anomalies in the water column (termed event-plumes). As a result, we are left with a gap in our understanding of the magnitude and duration of submarine volcanic events and their substantial potential to affect water column structure, mixing and overturn. Here, we report the discovery of a huge event-plume (denoted CR2003) located over the slow-spreading (1.2cm/yr) Carlsberg Ridge in the NW Indian Ocean. Compared to other event-plumes, CR2003 is one of the most energetic and voluminous: dissipating a minimum of 7.4 x 10/16J at a rate of at least 56GW, rising 1400m above the seafloor, being 1000m thick and overlying 70km of ridge axis. On average, event-plumes are related to the eruption of 0.02km cubed of lava, which equates annually to one eruption for every 450km of MOR axis. While hydrodynamic forces break-up event-plumes in to ~20km-diameter eddies, they can remain as distinct features over their source-ridges for up to 3 months. This raises the probability of encountering an event-plume to about 1:4 for every 450km of MOR surveyed. For slow and ultra-slow spreading MOR (e.g. the Southwest Indian and Gakkel ridges) where the volume of individual eruptions is thought to be relatively low and their frequency correspondingly high, event-plumes like CR2003 can make a significant contribution to the anomalously high plume incidence rates recently reported while accounting for the paradoxically low 3He/4He flux from the Arctic Ocean.

  10. Oak Ridge Low Level Waste Management Task Force summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    New facilities are required in the next five years to manage low level radioactive wastes (LLW) produced on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The Central Waste Disposal Facility (CWDF) was planned to provide the needed additional facilities beginning in late 1985. The CWDF was planned as a shallow land burial facility to dispose of non-stabilized LLW. However, comments on the CWDF Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) received from the State of Tennessee, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission identified major issues related to the treatment of alternatives as required by the National Environmental Policy Act, and the potential for unacceptable groundwater contamination resulting from shallow land burial of non-stabilized waste. A series of initial and detailed evaluations are being conducted to develop the basic environmental performance and cost information needed to compare several LLW management approaches and arrive at a proposed system for development. The evaluations are targeted for completion by October

  11. The Guadalquivir Diapiric Ridge: Deep Tectonics and Related Gas Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Puga, M. C.; Somoza, L.; Pinheiro, L. M.; Magalhães, V.; Vázquez, J. T.; Díaz-del-Río, V.; Ivanov, M.

    Cooperation between the Spanish TASYO project during the cruises Tasyo/2000, Anastasya/99, Anastasya/00 and Anastasya/01 and the UNESCO-IOC Trainning Trough Research Programme during the TTR9, TTR10 and TTR-11 cruises have per- mitted to identify numerous structures related to hydrocarbon seepages in the Gulf of Cadiz, located between the Africa and Eurasia plate. The interpretation of multibeam bathymetry and a large database of reflection seismic profiles shows two important morphotectonics structures: the Cadiz Diapiric Ridge (CDR) and the Guadalquivir Di- apiric Ridge (GDR). The CDR is a diapiric elongate structure located between 400 and 700m water depth, with a N-S direction. The GDR is an elongated ridge, situated west- ward of this structure and located along the shelf and slope between 300-1100m depth. This highly deformed ridge, formed by several diapirs oriented in NE-SW direction, has been mapped using industrial multifold seismic, core logs, gravity cores, dredge samples and photographs, obtained during the ANASTASYA 01/09 cruise. This data has shown that it is composed of early-middle Miocene blue marls (Maldonado et al, 1999), mud breccias and calcarenites. In fact, this diapiric structure is associated with a complex tectono-sedimentary history related to along slope gravity gliding and tec- tonic compression westward the fronts of the deformed wedges of the SOlistostromic & cedil;allochtonous unitsT (Somoza et al., 1999). According to the observed and sampled structures along the GDR, this ridge can be divided in three areas: (a) The NE area is characterized by the existence of a series of wide single sub-circular mud volcanoes (Anastasya, Tarsis and Pipoca), surrounded by a ring shaped seafloor depression. Mud breccia has been collected from these mud volcanoes (ANAS00-TG5,TG6,TG7,TG8 and ANAS01-TG2); (b) a central sector with long rounded-like crater structures, of unknown origin, from which calcarenites were collected (ANAS01-DA13); and (c) a SW

  12. Month-to-month variability of Indian summer monsoon rainfall in 2016: role of the Indo-Pacific climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdary, Jasti S.; Srinivas, G.; Du, Yan; Gopinath, K.; Gnanaseelan, C.; Parekh, Anant; Singh, Prem

    2018-03-01

    Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall during 2016 exhibited a prominent month-to-month fluctuations over India, with below normal rainfall in June and August and above normal rainfall in July. The factors determining the month-to-month fluctuations in ISM rainfall during 2016 are investigated with main focus on the Indo-Pacific climatic anomalies. Warm sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies associated with super El Niño 2015 disappeared by early summer 2016 over the central and eastern Pacific. On the other hand, negative Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) like SST anomaly pattern over the equatorial Indian Ocean and anomalous anticyclonic circulation over the western North Pacific (WNP) are reported in summer 2016 concurrently with decaying El Niño/developing La Niña phase. Observations revealed that the low rainfall over central north India in June is due to moisture divergence caused by the westward extension of ridge corresponding to WNP anticyclone and subsidence induced by local Hadley cell partly related to negative IOD. Low level convergence of southeasterly wind from Bay of Bengal associated with weak WNP anticyclone and northwesterly wind corresponding to anticyclonic circulation over the northwest India remarkably contributed to positive rainfall in July over most of the Indian subcontinent. While reduced rainfall over the Indian subcontinent in August 2016 is associated with the anomalous moisture transport from ISM region to WNP region, in contrast to July, due to local cyclogenesis corroborated by number of tropical cyclones in the WNP. In addition to this, subsidence related to strong convection supported by cyclonic circulation over the WNP also resulted in low rainfall over the ISM region. Coupled General Circulation model sensitivity experiments confirmed that strong convective activities associated with cyclonic circulation over the WNP is primarily responsible for the observed negative ISM rainfall anomalies in August 2016. It is noted that the Indo

  13. Ridge Regression: A Regression Procedure for Analyzing correlated Independent Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Ernest A.

    1978-01-01

    Ridge regression is a technique used to ameliorate the problem of highly correlated independent variables in multiple regression analysis. This paper explains the fundamentals of ridge regression and illustrates its use. (JKS)

  14. Internal doses in Oak Ridge. The Internet beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passchier, W.F.

    1997-01-01

    A brief overview is given of the information, presented by the Radiation Internal Dose Information Center (RIDIC) of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities in Oak Ridge, TN, USA, via Internet (www.orau.gov/ehsd/ridic.htm)

  15. Autocorrelated logistic ridge regression for prediction based on proteomics spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeman, Jelle J

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents autocorrelated logistic ridge regression, an extension of logistic ridge regression for ordered covariates that is based on the assumption that adjacent covariates have similar regression coefficients. The method is applied to the analysis of proteomics mass spectra.

  16. Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.W. [ed.

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the waste management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation facilities. The primary purpose is to convey what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year.

  17. Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the waste management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation facilities. The primary purpose is to convey what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year

  18. Petrography of basalts from the Carlsberg ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Petrographic characteristics of basalts collected from a segment of the Carlsberg Ridge (lat. 3 degrees 35'N to 3 degrees 41'N; long. 64 degrees 05'E to 64 degrees 09'E) show typical pillow lava zonations with variable concentrations of plagioclase...

  19. Anelastic Semigeostrophic Flow Over a Mountain Ridge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bannon, Peter R; Chu, Pe-Cheng

    1987-01-01

    ...) characterize the disturbance generated by the steady flow of a uniform wind (U0, V0) incident on a mountain ridge of width alpha in an isothermal, uniformly rotating, uniformly stratified, vertically semi-infinite atmosphere. Here mu = h(0)/H(R...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A RIDGE PROFILE WEEDER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    1980-03-01

    driven rotating horizontal short shaft which is connected by universal joints to two gangs of rotary hoe weeders. With the short shaft nearly at the bottom of a furrow between two ridges, the gangs of weeders lie on the sides of ...

  1. Elastic Modes of an Anisotropic Ridge Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameya Galinde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A semi-analytical method for finding the elastic modes propagating along the edge of an anisotropic semi-infinite plate is presented. Solutions are constructed as linear combinations of a finite number of the corresponding infinite plate modes with the constraint that they decay in the direction perpendicular to the edge and collectively satisfy the free boundary condition over the edge surface. Such modes that are confined to the edge can be used to approximate solutions of acoustic ridge waveguides whose supporting structures are sufficiently far away from the free edge. The semi-infinite plate or ridge is allowed to be oriented arbitrarily in the anisotropic crystal. Modifications to the theory to find symmetric and antisymmetric solutions for special crystal orientations are also presented. Accuracy of the solutions can be improved by including more plate modes in the series. Numerical techniques to find modal dispersion relations and orientation dependent modal behavior, are discussed. Results for ridges etched in single crystal Silicon are found to be in good agreement with Finite Element simulations. It is found that variations in modal phase velocity with respect to crystal orientation are not significant, suggesting that anisotropy may not be a critical issue while designing ridge waveguides in Silicon.

  2. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were perf...

  3. Predictive efficiency of ridge regression estimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiwari Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have considered the problem of prediction within and outside the sample for actual and average values of the study variables in case of ordinary least squares and ridge regression estimators. Finally, the performance properties of the estimators are analyzed.

  4. Modelling Issues in Kernel Ridge Regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Exterkate (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractKernel ridge regression is gaining popularity as a data-rich nonlinear forecasting tool, which is applicable in many different contexts. This paper investigates the influence of the choice of kernel and the setting of tuning parameters on forecast accuracy. We review several popular

  5. Oak Ridge reservation land-use plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibb, W. R.; Hardin, T. H.; Hawkins, C. C.; Johnson, W. A.; Peitzsch, F. C.; Scott, T. H.; Theisen, M. R.; Tuck, S. C.

    1980-03-01

    This study establishes a basis for long-range land-use planning to accommodate both present and projected DOE program requirements in Oak Ridge. In addition to technological requirements, this land-use plan incorporates in-depth ecological concepts that recognize multiple uses of land as a viable option. Neither environmental research nor technological operations need to be mutually exclusive in all instances. Unique biological areas, as well as rare and endangered species, need to be protected, and human and environmental health and safety must be maintained. The plan is based on the concept that the primary use of DOE land resources must be to implement the overall DOE mission in Oak Ridge. This document, along with the base map and overlay maps, provides a reasonably detailed description of the DOE Oak Ridge land resources and of the current and potential uses of the land. A description of the land characteristics, including geomorphology, agricultural productivity and soils, water courses, vegetation, and terrestrial and aquatic animal habitats, is presented to serve as a resource document. Essentially all DOE land in the Oak Ridge area is being fully used for ongoing DOE programs or has been set aside as protected areas.

  6. A preliminary study of tidal current ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenxia; Xia, Dongxing

    1985-06-01

    Tidal current ridges, widely distributed geomorphological phenomena over the continental shelf of the world, are studied. They are formed by tidal current and the trend of their sand bodies runs parallel to the direction of tidal current. There are two types of the plane shapes: the parallel and the fingered. Conditions of forming tidal current ridges are the velocities of tidal current ranging from 1 to 3.5 knots and the supply of abundant sediments. Tidal current ridges often develop in following morphological locations: the bays, estuaries, the mouths of channels, as well as the offshore area with strong tidal current. Tidal current ridges occur generally at a water depth of less than 35 metres. The sediments of tidal current ridges are mainly composed of sand. The grain size of the sediments is uniform and well sorted. The characteristics of grain size of the sand imply that their formation mechanism is similar to that of river sand, that is, both of them are the result of flow movements in a trongth channel controlled by boundary. There is however difference between them that the river sand is formed by one-way flow movement while the tidal current sand by two-way movement. There are two saltation populations in the log-probability curves of tidal current sand, the sorting of first saltation population is better than the second one, and having positive skewness, which differs from beach sand. In the C-M grain size pattern tidal current sand is most found in graded suspension segment. The continental shelves of the Yellow Sea, the East China Sea and the South China Sea have favourable conditions for developing tidal current ridges in massive scale and special shape, such as the tidal current ridges in the offshore of Jiangsu, the Gulf of Korea, the shoal of Liaodong, the east and west mouths of the channel of Qiongzhou, Jiaozhou Bay, the shoal of Taiwan, Lingdingyang, the north branch of Changjiang estuary. The studies of them are of vital significance in

  7. Comprehensive work plan for the Well Driller's Steam Cleaning Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this Comprehensive Work Plan is to address the history of the site as well as the scope, roles and responsibilities, documentation, training, environmental compliance requirements, and field actions needed to close the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Well Driller's Steam Cleaning Facility, hereinafter referred to as the Facility. The Facility was constructed in 1989 to provide a central area suitable to conduct steam cleaning operations associated with cleaning drilling equipment, containment boxes, and related accessories. Three basins were constructed of crushed stone (with multiple plastic and fabric liners) over a soil foundation to collect drill cuttings and wastewater generated by the cleaning activities. The scope of this task will be to demolish the Facility by using a bulldozer and backhoe to recontour and dismantle the area

  8. Indian Ledger Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcoat, George W.

    1990-01-01

    Offers an innovative way to teach mid-nineteenth century North American Indian history by having students create their own Indian Ledger art. Purposes of the project are: to understand the role played by American Indians, to reveal American Indian stereotypes, and to identify relationships between cultures and environments. Background and…

  9. Jim Crow, Indian Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svingen, Orlan J.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews history of voting rights for Indians and discusses a 1986 decision calling for election reform in Big Horn County, Montana, to eliminate violations of the voting rights of the county's Indian citizens. Notes that positive effects--such as election of the county's first Indian commissioner--co-exist with enduring anti-Indian sentiment. (JHZ)

  10. Volcanics of the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer

    stream_size 2 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name J_Geol_Soc_India_70_883.pdf.txt stream_source_info J_Geol_Soc_India_70_883.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  11. Surface Currents. South Central Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    8217 lOe 01 0a 0t sil O’ s O i it OS 1 60 03 0 0 t t 3 toita 85 E 9 DISTRIBUTION LIST NAVY PRIVATE & UNIVERSITIES CINCPACFLT (02M) FLORIDA ST. UNIV...e cu r r e t Is d e p ic ted by vector resultants as follows.-* xslts primarily Ollected by the s upplemented qt y Japanese.-1960’ s thr’ough • Ider...o J oootoI %I ,I ., II -, -.a 1 11. ,1 I isI I so Y 3sOa Os44am s I I I ’a 0 1 o a t o0 o.o ’ I, I I, I o , 1’ .114 oa o 111 G a 1 ,Ia I 0oa I 0 1 o

  12. Abyssal benthos of the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.; Harkantra, S.N.; Ansari, Z.A.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    and the type of substratum. Contribution of macro and meiofauna to the total standing crop was in the ratio of 31 to 1. High benthic biomass and rich fauna are consequences of high organic production in the euphotic zone. The correlation between biomass...

  13. Design assessment for the Bethel Valley FFA Upgrades at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the proposed upgrades to Building 3025 and the Evaporator Area at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Design assessments, specifications and drawings are provided. Building 3025 is a general purpose research facility utilized by the Materials and Ceramics Division to conduct research on irradiated materials. The Evaporator Area, building 2531, serves as the collection point for all low-level liquid wastes generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  14. Photoclinometric analysis of wrinkle ridges on Lunae Planum, Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plescia, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Wrinkle ridges are common morphologic features on Mars. Both volcanic and tectonic mechanisms were suggested to explain their origin; recent work has focused on a compressional origin. Analysis of terrestrial analogs has greatly influenced and aided the understanding of wrinkle ridge formation. An important aspect necessary to intrepret structure is topography. Topographic profiles across ridges can provide important constraints for models of internal structure and analyzing deformation associated with ridges. Topographic maps of Mars are too coarse to resolve the topography of individual ridges; therefore, monoscopic photoclinometry was used to derive topographic profiles for the ridges. Profiles spaced a few kilometers apart were obtained for each ridge, the number depended on ridge length, morphology, and albedo variation. Photoclinometry relies on pixel brightness variations which results from topography, albedo, or both. Because of the albedo variations, photoclimometric profiles can not be extended across large distances, such as between adjacent ridges (about 20 to 80 km). However, the technique is applicable to shorter distances, such as the distance across typical ridges. Profiles were measured across the ridge and extended a few kilometers on either side, including all visible components of the ridge. The results of these measurements and the use of internal structure and topographic profile models for estimating the shortening due to folding and faulting are discussed

  15. Does the lateral intercondylar ridge disappear in ACL deficient patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, Carola F.; Morse, Kenneth R.; Lesniak, Bryson P.; Kropf, Eric J.; Tranovich, Michael J.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in the presence of the lateral intercondylar ridge and the lateral bifurcate ridge between patients with sub-acute and chronic ACL injuries. We hypothesized that the ridges would be present less often with chronic ACL deficiency.

  16. Records of upper mantle oxygen fugacity gleaned from high-density sampling of basalts and peridotites at ultraslow ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birner, S.; Cottrell, E.; Warren, J. M.; Kelley, K. A.; Davis, F. A.

    2016-12-01

    Mantle oxygen fugacity (fO2) controls volatile speciation, phase stability, and the depth of the peridotite solidus, and is thus critical to our understanding of melt production at mid-ocean ridges. Both basalts [1] and peridotites [2] have been used as proxies for calculating upper mantle fO2 beneath ridges. Though the global peridotite dataset for fO2 is limited and does not overlap geographically with samples from the more comprehensive global basalt dataset, the average fO2 recorded by peridotites is lower than that recorded by basalts. Ultraslow spreading ridges such as the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) and Gakkel Ridge have limited magma production due to thick conductive cooling lids at the ridge axis, and thus offer a unique opportunity to compare geographically overlapping suites of basalt and peridotite. In this study, we determined the oxygen fugacity of 41 peridotite samples from the Oblique Segment of SWIR and 10 peridotite samples from Gakkel - more than doubling the number of fO2 estimates for ridge peridotites globally. Our results for SWIR show that peridotite fO2 is highly variable on the dredge to sub-segment scale, ranging from 1.7 log units below the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer (QFM) to 1 log unit above QFM, with an average of QFM+0.2 (±0.6). We also calculated fO2 for 25 basalt glasses from the Oblique Segment, which have an average fO2 of QFM+0.3 (±0.1). Importantly, on average, we find no offset between mantle fO2 as recorded by basalts versus peridotites. However, fO2 recorded by basalts is significantly more homogenous than by peridotites, consistent with the idea of aggregate melts recording homogenization of a heterogeneous mantle. The most reduced peridotites at both ridges are generally highly refractory samples at high spinel Cr# (Cr# = Cr/(Cr+Al)) and low modal cpx. This suggests that the process of melt extraction may leave behind a reduced residue. Alternatively, if these highly refractory lithologies are residues from

  17. Radiogenic isotopes in enriched mid-ocean ridge basalts from Explorer Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousens, Brian; Weis, Dominique; Constantin, Marc; Scott, Steve

    2017-09-01

    Extreme gradients in topography related to variations in magma supply are observed on the Southern Explorer Ridge (SER), part of the northern Juan de Fuca ridge system. We report radiogenic isotope (Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf) and geochemical data for twenty-four basalt whole-rock and glass samples collected from the length of the SER and from Explorer Deep, a rift to the north of the SER. Lavas from the SER form a north-south geochemical gradient, dominated by E-MORB at the northern axial high, and range from T-MORB to N-MORB towards the southern deepest part of the ridge. Linear relationships between incompatible element ratios and isotopic ratios in MORB along the ridge are consistent with mixing of magmas beneath the ridge to generate the geographic gradient from E- to N-MORB. The E-MORB have high Sr and Pb, and low Nd and Hf isotopic ratios, typical of enriched mantle that includes a FOZO or HIMU isotopic component. The West Valley and Endeavour segments of the northern Juan de Fuca ridge also include this isotopic component, but the proportion of the FOZO or HIMU component is more extreme in the SER basalts. The FOZO or HIMU component may be garnet-bearing peridotite, or a garnet pyroxenite embedded in peridotite. Recycled garnet pyroxenite better explains the very shallow SER axial high, high Nb/La and La/Sm, and the ;enriched; isotopic compositions.

  18. Masirah – the other Oman ophiolite: A better analogue for mid-ocean ridge processes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh Rollinson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Oman has two ophiolites – the better known late Cretaceous northern Oman (or Semail ophiolite and the lesser known and smaller, Jurassic Masirah ophiolite located on the eastern coast of the country adjacent to the Indian Ocean. A number of geological, geochronological and geochemical lines of evidence strongly suggest that the northern Oman ophiolite did not form at a mid-ocean ridge but rather in a supra-subduction zone setting by fast spreading during subduction initiation. In contrast the Masirah ophiolite is structurally part of a series of ophiolite nappes which are rooted in the Indian Ocean floor. There are significant geochemical differences between the Masirah and northern Oman ophiolites and none of the supra-subduction features typical of the northern Oman ophiolite are found at Masirah. Geochemically Masirah is MORB, although in detail it contains both enriched and depleted MORB reflecting a complex source for the lavas and dykes. The enrichment of this source predates the formation of the ophiolite. The condensed crustal section on Masirah (ca. 2 km contains a very thin gabbro sequence and is thought to reflect its genesis from a cool mantle source associated with the early stages of sea-floor spreading during the early separation of eastern and western Gondwana. These data suggest that the Masirah ophiolite is a suitable analogue for an ophiolite created at a mid-ocean ridge, whereas the northern Oman ophiolite is not. The stratigraphic history of the Masirah ophiolite shows that it remained a part of the oceanic crust for ca. 80 Ma. The chemical variability and enrichment of the Masirah lavas is similar to that found elsewhere in Indian Ocean basalts and may simply reflect a similar provenance rather than a feature fundamental to the formation of the ophiolite.

  19. Morphostructure at the junction between the Beata ridge and the Greater Antilles island arc (offshore Hispaniola southern slope)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja Bruña, J. L.; Carbó-Gorosabel, A.; Llanes Estrada, P.; Muñoz-Martín, A.; ten Brink, U. S.; Gómez Ballesteros, M.; Druet, M.; Pazos, A.

    2014-03-01

    Oblique convergence between the Caribbean plate's interior and the inactive Greater Antilles island arc has resulted in the collision and impingement of the thickened crust of the Beata ridge into southern Hispaniola Island. Deformation resulting from this convergence changes from a low-angle southward-verging thrust south of eastern Hispaniola, to collision and uplift in south-central Hispaniola, and to left-lateral transpression along the Southern peninsula of Haiti in western Hispaniola. Using new swath bathymetry and a dense seismic reflection grid, we mapped the morphological, structural and sedimentological elements of offshore southern Hispaniola. We have identified four morphotectonic provinces: the Dominican sub-basin, the Muertos margin, the Beata ridge and the Haiti sub-basin. The lower slope of the Muertos margin is occupied by the active Muertos thrust belt, which includes several active out-of-sequence thrust faults that, were they to rupture along their entire length, could generate large-magnitude earthquakes. The interaction of the thrust belt with the Beata ridge yields a huge recess and the imbricate system disappears. The upper slope of the Muertos margin shows thick slope deposits where the extensional tectonics and slumping processes predominate. The northern Beata ridge consists of an asymmetrically uplifted and faulted block of oceanic crust. Our results suggest that the shallower structure and morphology of the northern Beata ridge can be mainly explained by a mechanism of extensional unloading from the Upper Cretaceous onward that is still active residually along the summit of the ridge. The tectonic models for the northern Beata ridge involving active reverse strike-slip faults and transpression caused by the oblique convergence between the Beata ridge and the island arc are not supported by the structural interpretation. The eastern Bahoruco slope an old normal fault that acts as a passive tear fault accommodating the sharp along

  20. A Study of Plagioclase-bearing Pyroxenites from the Ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, R.; Gale, A.; Von Der Handt, A.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle pyroxenites play an important role in models on melt petrogenesis at mid-ocean ridges and ocean islands. Thus their study can give extremely valuable insights on mantle heterogeneity and deep melting and melt transport processes but only a limited number of studies exist. A recent study on pyroxenites sampled at the Lena Trough showed that measuring the elemental composition of minerals within pyroxenites can give important information on their formation processes and associated pressures and temperatures. Here we build on this recent study by working on fresh plagioclase-bearing pyroxenites from the nearby Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean. Very little has been published on abyssal pyroxenites and plagioclase-bearing pyroxenites in particular, and the ability to contrast our results - including estimates of formation pressures and temperatures - with pyroxenites from a nearby ridge is particularly useful. In this study we determined the chemical and modal composition of three samples of plagioclase-bearing pyroxenites dredged within the Sparsely Magmatic Zone. These samples are particularly fresh, allowing a detailed study of mineral compositional variation and their textural context. Different generations of pyroxene can be identified and plagioclase occurs as rims around spinel, pl-opx symplectites and lamellae in and around clinopyroxene and crosscutting olivines. Mineral compositions are variable within a given thin section and distinctly different from pyroxenites from Lena Trough. We established temperature and pressure conditions under which the samples likely formed using mineral equilibria and single mineral thermometers; we then compared and contrasted the studied samples with published data from other plagioclase pyroxenites and peridotites. Pressure estimates show that plagioclase formation occurred shallower relative to Lena Trough but comparable to pyroxenites from the Southwest Indian Ridge.

  1. Indian transplant registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Shroff

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An ′Indian transplant registry′ has been established over the past two years due to the efforts of the Indian Society of Organ Transplantation. This society is about 20 years old with over 450 members who are doctors and basic scientist. The registry is currently in the first phase of its development and can be partly viewed at www.transplantindia.com. The endeavor has been undertaken with the objective of having a centralized repository of information of the various transplants that are being undertaken in India. In its first phase of the registry ′Fast Fact′ retrospective short datasets are being captured that include the essential details of the transplant programme. The fast fact data includes the number of transplant done yearly, the sex ratio and type of transplant. So far thirteen major institutional data has been entered in the registry. In the second phase of the registry, over twenty fields are likely to be captured and all member institutions would be encouraged to enter the data prospectively. In the third phase data would be derived with ongoing audit features.. The society and its members have supported the formation of the registry and are enthusiastic about its potential.

  2. Characteristic Microearthquakes of the Active Submarine Volcanic Complex at 85°E, Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlindwein, V.; Linder, J.

    2007-12-01

    New oceanic crust is formed at mid-ocean ridges by magmatic intrusion, volcanic eruptions, tectonic extension and hydrothermal cooling. These active processes give rise to earthquakes, which are usually too small to be recorded on land, but can be recorded locally with ocean bottom seismometers (OBS). OBS studies on slow and fast spreading ridges have greatly contributed to our understanding of active seafloor spreading. However, at ultraslow spreading rates, predictions of amagmatic spreading proved incorrect and the processes of crustal generation are still poorly understood, partly because of the remote location of the main ultraslow ridges like the Arctic ridge system. No comprehensive microearthquake studies of ultraslow-spreading ridges have yet been undertaken. During the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge Expedition(AMORE2001), we made a first attempt at observing microearthquakes at Gakkel Ridge in the ice-covered Arctic Ocean using ice floes as platforms for small seismological arrays consisting of four conventional short-period seismometers. We successfully recorded microearthquakes including a swarm of 200 explosive sounds at the volcanic complex near 85°E which was active in 1999. We interpreted these sounds as signs of an ongoing eruption. The presence of a hydrothermal event plume in the water column supported this interpretation. Following this pilot study, we now started a comprehensive and comparative study of the seismicity of ultraslow- spreading ridges. As part of this project, we conducted a microseismicity survey during the Arctic Gakkel Vents Expedition (AGAVE2007). We deployed a network of three seismological arrays in the rift valley at the 85°E volcanic complex greatly improving the detection threshold and location capabilities compared to AMORE2001. The arrays had triangular shape with a central station. Each array measured about 1 km in size and was located on one ice floe. The inter-array distance was 15 km. The arrays recorded continuously at a

  3. In-situ study of the eastern ridge-transform intersection of the Vema Fracture Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaloukas-Frangoulis, Vassilios; Auzende, Jean-Marie; Bideau, Daniel; Bonatti, Enrico; Cannat, Mathilde; Honnorez, José; Lagabrielle, Yves; Malavieille, Jacques; Mével, Catherine; David Needham, H.

    1991-04-01

    Fourteen dives of the submersible Nautile have been carried out at the eastern intersection of the Vema Fracture Zone with the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Direct observations allow us to locate precisely the surficial expression of the transform fault motion in the southern trough of the fracture zone valley. The present-day displacement zone, corresponding to an extremely narrow (less than 300 m) transform fault zone, is confined to a belt of disturbed terrain situated at the foot of the southern wall and characterized by transform-parallel 30-100 m high ridges of basaltic fragments and pelagic sediments. Active splays of the transform fault zone lie generally between these ridges, creating steep V-shaped furrows. Despite a rather sinuous trend one of the fault strands appears to be laterally continuous and other minor active splays branch out from it or run parallel to it. The surface manifestations of the tectonic activity along the present-day displacement zone include (R) Riedel shears, low-angle shears, P shears, "en échelon" structures, open fissures, small pull-apart structures and funnel alignments in the sedimentary cover. The transform fault motion reactivates large normal faults on the adjacent flanks of the southern wall and the median ridge. The transform-parallel topography defines a 10 km wide zone with dip-slip motion. The ridge-transform intersection area is entirely floored by fresh basalts contrasting with other intersections of major fracture zones such as the Kane and Oceanographer Fracture Zones. Recent volcanic activity is not restricted to the central volcanic ridge but is widespread across the whole nodal basin area. The present-day displacement zone cross-cuts the neovolcanic zone, and the disconnected northernmost extension of the volcanic ridge is attached to the median ridge and so belongs to the African Plate. The extensive volcanism is suggestive of a magmatic production phase in the intersection area. Extremely fresh pillowed lava forms

  4. Genomic selection using regularized linear regression models: ridge regression, lasso, elastic net and their extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogutu, Joseph O; Schulz-Streeck, Torben; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2012-05-21

    Genomic selection (GS) is emerging as an efficient and cost-effective method for estimating breeding values using molecular markers distributed over the entire genome. In essence, it involves estimating the simultaneous effects of all genes or chromosomal segments and combining the estimates to predict the total genomic breeding value (GEBV). Accurate prediction of GEBVs is a central and recurring challenge in plant and animal breeding. The existence of a bewildering array of approaches for predicting breeding values using markers underscores the importance of identifying approaches able to efficiently and accurately predict breeding values. Here, we comparatively evaluate the predictive performance of six regularized linear regression methods-- ridge regression, ridge regression BLUP, lasso, adaptive lasso, elastic net and adaptive elastic net-- for predicting GEBV using dense SNP markers. We predicted GEBVs for a quantitative trait using a dataset on 3000 progenies of 20 sires and 200 dams and an accompanying genome consisting of five chromosomes with 9990 biallelic SNP-marker loci simulated for the QTL-MAS 2011 workshop. We applied all the six methods that use penalty-based (regularization) shrinkage to handle datasets with far more predictors than observations. The lasso, elastic net and their adaptive extensions further possess the desirable property that they simultaneously select relevant predictive markers and optimally estimate their effects. The regression models were trained with a subset of 2000 phenotyped and genotyped individuals and used to predict GEBVs for the remaining 1000 progenies without phenotypes. Predictive accuracy was assessed using the root mean squared error, the Pearson correlation between predicted GEBVs and (1) the true genomic value (TGV), (2) the true breeding value (TBV) and (3) the simulated phenotypic values based on fivefold cross-validation (CV). The elastic net, lasso, adaptive lasso and the adaptive elastic net all had

  5. Tectonic Evolution of Mozambique Ridge in East African continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong

    2017-04-01

    Tectonic Evolution of Mozambique Ridge in East African continental margin Yong Tang He Li ES.Mahanjane Second Institute of Oceanography,SOA,Hangzhou The East Africa passive continental margin is a depression area, with widely distributed sedimentary wedges from southern Mozambique to northern Somali (>6500km in length, and about 6km in thickness). It was resulted from the separation of East Gondwana, and was developed by three stages: (1) rifting in Early-Middle Jurassic; (2) spreading from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous; (3) drifting since the Cretaceous period. Tectonic evolution of the Mozambique continental margin is distinguished by two main settings separated by a fossil transform, the Davie Fracture Zone; (i) rifting and transform setting in the northern margin related to opening of the Somali and Rovuma basins, and (ii) rifting and volcanism setting during the opening of the Mozambique basin in the southern margin. 2D reflection seismic investigation of the crustal structure in the Zambezi Delta Depression, provided key piece of evidence for two rifting phases between Africa and Antarctica. The magma-rich Rift I phase evolved from rift-rift-rift style with remarkable emplacement of dyke swarms (between 182 and 170 Ma). Related onshore outcrops are extensively studied, the Karoo volcanics in Mozambique, Zimbabwe and South Africa, all part of the Karoo "triple-junction". These igneous bodies flow and thicken eastwards and are now covered by up to 5 km of Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments and recorded by seismic and oil exploration wells. Geophysical and geological data recorded during oceanographic cruises provide very controversial results regarding the nature of the Mozambique Ridge. Two conflicting opinions remains open, since the early expeditions to the Indian Ocean, postulating that its character is either magmatic (oceanic) or continental origin. We have carried out an China-Mozambique Joint Cruise(CMJC) on southern Mozambique Basin on 1st June to

  6. Geochemistry of axial seamount lavas: Magmatic relationship between the Cobb Hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J. M.; Morgan, C.; Liias, R. A.

    1990-08-01

    Axial Seamount, located along the central portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and at the eastern end of the Cobb-Eickelberg Seamount Chain, is the current center of the Cobb Hotspot. The Axial Seamount lavas are transitional between N-type and E-type mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), characteristics that they share with lavas along the rest of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. There are, however, subtle, but distinct, differences between the seamount lavas and those of the adjoining ridge segments. These include higher Na2O, CaO, and Sr at a given MgO content and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas as compared with the ridge lavas. Lava chemistry and bathymetry indicate that Axial Seamount is a discrete volcanic unit, with a more productive shallow magmatic plumbing system separate from the adjacent ridge segments. These high magma supply rates have sustained a continuously replenished, steady state magma reservoir that has erupted remarkably homogeneous lavas over a long time period. Despite this classic association of spreading center and hotspot volcanic activity, there is no evidence in the lavas for geochemical or isotopic enrichment typical of hotspot or mantle plume activity. The differences in composition between the Axial Seamount lavas and the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas are attributed to melting processes rather than to any fundamental differences in their mantle source compositions. The higher magma production rates, higher Sr, and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas relative to the ridge lavas are thought to be a consequence of melt initiation at greater depths. The melting column producing the seamount lavas is thought to be initiated in the stability field of spinel peridotite, whereas the ridge lavas are produced from a melting column initiated at shallower levels, possibly within or close to the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. Implicit in this interpretation is the conclusion that the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas, and by analogy most

  7. Immediate effects of tooth extraction on ridge integrity and dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblebicioglu, Binnaz; Hegde, Rachana; Yildiz, Vedat O; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to assess possible immediate post-extraction changes in ridge integrity and width. Tooth extractions (53 teeth in 30 adults) were performed following atraumatic techniques. Root trunk and ridge width were measured at the crest level in buccolingual direction. Similarly, socket width and buccal plate thickness were also determined. Pre- and post-extraction buccal plate dehiscence, fenestration, or fracture was recorded. Diameter and length of extracted tooth root were also measured. Multinomial logistic regression was used to reveal relationships between ridge outcome (expanded, stable, or collapsed groups) and assessed tooth/site parameters. Post-extraction, buccal plate fracture developed in 5 (9%), dehiscence in 15 (28%), and complete buccal plate loss in 2 sites (4%). Following extraction, ridge width was expanded in 30 (57%), collapsed in 12 (23%), and remained unchanged in 11 (21%) sites. In most sites (72%), post-extraction socket size was wider than pre-extraction root trunk width (p ridge outcome (expansion or collapse compared to stable) (p ridge integrity is uncommon, while ridge width expansion is a common finding immediately following tooth extraction. The significance of such expansion compared to integrity of socket walls remains to be established. Tooth extraction approaches that preserve ridge integrity are accompanied by mainly ridge expansion in ridge width. The significance of such immediate changes for the long-term ridge outcomes (i.e., effect on bone remodeling especially in relation to buccal bone integrity) needs further investigation.

  8. Effect of Micro Ridges on Orientation of Cultured Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Hino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of micro ridges on orientation of cultured cells has been studied in vitro. Several patterns of micro ridges have been fabricated on a transparent polydimethylsiloxane disk with the photo lithography technique. The ridges consist of several lines of rectangular column: the width of 0.003 mm, the interval of 0.007 mm. Variation has been made on the height of the ridge between 0.0003 mm and 0.0035 mm. C2C12 (mouse myoblast cell line originated with cross-striated muscle of C3H mouse was cultured on the disk with the micro ridges for one week and was observed with an inverted phase contrast microscope. The experimental results show that cells adhere on the top of the ridge and align to the longitudinal direction of the micro ridges with the height between 0.0015 mm and 0.0025 mm.

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented

  10. ORNL [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] 89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.D.; Appleton, B.R.; Jefferson, J.W.; Merriman, J.R.; Mynatt, F.R.; Richmond, C.R.; Rosenthal, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    This is the inaugural issues of an annual publication about the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here you will find a brief overview of ORNL, a sampling of our recent research achievements, and a glimpse of the directions we want to take over the next 15 years. A major purpose of ornl 89 is to provide the staff with a sketch of the character and dynamics of the Laboratory

  11. Marker-assisted selection using ridge regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, J C; Thompson, R; Denham, M C

    2000-04-01

    In cross between inbred lines, linear regression can be used to estimate the correlation of markers with a trait of interest; these marker effects then allow marker assisted selection (MAS) for quantitative traits. Usually a subset of markers to include in the model must be selected: no completely satisfactory method of doing this exists. We show that replacing this selection of markers by ridge regression can improve the mean response to selection and reduce the variability of selection response.

  12. ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) 89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.D.; Appleton, B.R.; Jefferson, J.W.; Merriman, J.R.; Mynatt, F.R.; Richmond, C.R.; Rosenthal, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    This is the inaugural issues of an annual publication about the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here you will find a brief overview of ORNL, a sampling of our recent research achievements, and a glimpse of the directions we want to take over the next 15 years. A major purpose of ornl 89 is to provide the staff with a sketch of the character and dynamics of the Laboratory.

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

  14. Processing of Oak Ridge Mixed Waste Labpacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, C. H.; Franco, P.; Bisaria, A.

    2002-02-26

    The Oak Ridge Site Treatment Plan (STP) issued under a Tennessee Commissioner's Order includes a compliance milestone related to treatment of mixed waste labpacks on the Oak Ridge sites. The treatment plan was written and approved in Fiscal Year 1997. The plan involved approximately 1,100 labpacks and 7,400 on-the-shelf labpackable items stored at three Department of Energy (DOE) sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The labpacks and labpack items consist of liquids and solids with various chemical constituents and radiological concerns. The waste must be processed for shipment to a commercial hazardous waste treatment facility or treatment utilizing a Broad Spectrum mixed waste treatment contract. This paper will describe the labpack treatment plan that was developed as required by the Site Treatment Plan and the operations implemented to process the labpack waste. The paper will discuss the labpack inventory in the treatment plan, treatment and disposal options, processing strategies, project risk assessment, and current project status.

  15. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh is home to a large number of tribal populations of diverse linguistic and ethnic backgrounds. With a view to examining how well genomic affinities among tribal populations of this state correspond with their ethnic and linguistic affinities, we analysed DNA samples of individuals ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Venkatakrishna R Jala1 V Prakash2 N Appaji Rao1 H S Savithri1. Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India; Department of Protein Chemistry and Technology, Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore 570 013, India ...

  17. Arctic Ocean Paleoenvironmental Change in the last 50 kyr Reconstructed from an Alpha Ridge to Gakkel Ridge Transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielhagen, R. F.; Glogowski, S.; Noergaard-Pedersen, N.; Schmidt, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean has undergone profound changes in the last ca. 50 kyr, reaching from a dense sea ice cover with large numbers of icebergs during the mid-Weichselian glaciation (MWG, >45 ka) to a perennial sea ice cover with seasonally open leads in the Holocene. During the main glacial phases (MWG and last glacial maximum (ca. 20 ka)), large parts of the surrounding continents were covered by ice sheets which discharged icebergs to the ocean, leaving traces in the form of ice-rafted debris (IRD) in the bottom sediments. Different lithologies in the source areas of the icebergs allow to reconstruct the pathways of the ice and thus the large-scale drift pattern of the oceanic ice cover. Microfossils and geochemical proxies give evidence of other parameters of the surface-near water masses and their spatial and temporal variability. In our presentation we will use a multiproxy data set from sediment cores obtained between the Alpha (130-160°W) and Gakkel (30-60°E) ridges to reconstruct the paleoenvironment in the central Arctic with emphasis on the intervals with extensive continental glaciations. Sedimentation rates were generally low (1 cm/kyr or less) with the exception of the MWG with several cm/kyr. Coarse fraction content (IRD and microfossils) in sediments from both glaciation intervals is increasing towards the Alpha Ridge, revealing a stronger influence (iceberg discharge) of the North American Arctic ice sheet if compared to the northern Eurasian ice sheet. Planktic foraminifer occurrences in Alpha Ridge sediments from the MWG indicate that seasonally open waters were present occasionally and may have allowed higher melt rates than in the Eurasian subbasin. The paleoenvironmantal picture for the LGM is more ambiguous because of extremely low sedimentation rates or even an interval of non-sedimentation. However, it seems likely that the eastern part of the Eurasian Basin was largely free of icebergs for a few thousand years during the LGM. The different

  18. Real-time earthquake monitoring at the Indian Tsunami Early Warning System for tsunami advisories in the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Uma Devi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Indian Tsunami Early Warning System situated at Indian National Center for Ocean Information Services, Hyderabad, India, monitors real-time earthquake activity throughout the Indian Ocean to evaluate potential tsunamigenic earthquakes. The functions of the Indian Tsunami Early Warning System earthquake monitoring system include detection, location and determination of the magnitude of potentially tsunamigenic earthquakes occurring in the Indian Ocean. The real-time seismic monitoring network comprises 17 broadband Indian seismic stations transmitting real-time earthquake data through VSAT communication to the central receiving stations located at the Indian Meteorological Department, New Delhi, and the Indian National Center for Ocean Information Services, Hyderabad, simultaneously for processing and interpretation. In addition to this, earthquake data from around 300 global seismic stations are also received at the Indian National Center for Ocean Information Services in near-real-time. Most of these data are provided by IRIS Global Seismographic Network and GEOFON Extended Virtual Network through Internet. The Indian National Center for Ocean Information Services uses SeisComP3 software for auto-location of earthquake parameters (location, magnitude, focal depth and origin time. All earthquakes of Mw >5.0 are auto-located within 5–10 minutes of the occurrence of the earthquake. Since its inception in October 2007 to date, the warning centre has monitored and reported 55 tsunamigenic earthquakes (under-sea and near coast earthquakes of magnitude ⩾6.5 in the Indian Ocean region. Comparison of the earthquake parameters (elapsed time, magnitude, focal depth and location estimated by the Indian Tsunami Early Warning System with the US Geological Survey suggests that the Indian Tsunami Early Warning System is performing well and has achieved the target set up by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

  19. Volcanism and hydrothermalism on a hotspot-influenced ridge: Comparing Reykjanes Peninsula and Reykjanes Ridge, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałgan, Dominik; Devey, Colin W.; Yeo, Isobel A.

    2017-12-01

    Current estimates indicate that the number of high-temperature vents (one of the primary pathways for the heat extraction from the Earth's mantle) - at least 1 per 100 km of axial length - scales with spreading rate and should scale with crustal thickness. But up to present, shallow ridge axes underlain by thick crust show anomalously low incidences of high-temperature activity. Here we compare the Reykjanes Ridge, an abnormally shallow ridge with thick crust and only one high-temperature vent known over 900 km axial length, to the adjacent subaerial Reykjanes Peninsula (RP), which is characterized by high-temperature geothermal sites confined to four volcanic systems transected by fissure swarms with young (Holocene) volcanic activity, multiple faults, cracks and fissures, and continuous seismic activity. New high-resolution bathymetry (gridded at 60 m) of the Reykjanes Ridge between 62°30‧N and 63°30‧N shows seven Axial Volcanic Ridges (AVR) that, based on their morphology, geometry and tectonic regime, are analogues for the volcanic systems and fissure swarms on land. We investigate in detail the volcano-tectonic features of all mapped AVRs and show that they do not fit with the previously suggested 4-stage evolution model for AVR construction. Instead, we suggest that AVR morphology reflects the robust or weak melt supply to the system and two (or more) eruption mechanisms may co-exist on one AVR (in contrast to 4-stage evolution model). Our interpretations indicate that, unlike on the Reykjanes Peninsula, faults on and around AVRs do not cluster in orientation domains but all are subparallel to the overall strike of AVRs (orthogonal to spreading direction). High abundance of seamounts shows that the region centered at 62°47‧N and 25°04‧W (between AVR-5 and -6) is volcanically robust while the highest fault density implies that AVR-1 and southern part of AVR-6 rather undergo period of melt starvation. Based on our observations and interpretations we

  20. A moment-based ridge detection approach for agricultural robot using stereovision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fangming; Ying, Yibin

    2004-10-01

    It is necessary to perceive and avoid collision with obstacles, such as ridges, for an agricultural robot. In this paper we regarded weeds as the prominent feature of the ridge and used stereovision to infer their depth. The mixed moments and mixed central moments were used to characterize the weeds in two disparity images, and the Bayes" rule was applied to segment the weeds from background. The weeds were matched based on their approximate contours. Then the disparity was the difference between the two centers of the contours, which were extracted using the method of Cartesian moments. Since the contour of weed was random, it showed that stereovision could be applied for agricultural robot to detect complex obstacles.