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Sample records for centaur radiation measurements

  1. Measurement of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) employing the ADVIA Centaur platform. Validation, reference interval and comparison to UniQ RIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Cindy Soendersoe; Heickendorff, Lene; Nexo, Ebba

    2014-01-01

    ). In this article, we show that the Centaur PIIINP may be used in place of the much more labor-intensive RIA method, and we present an age stratified reference interval. Methods: We analyzed four control samples 20 times over a period of 5 days. Centaur PIIINP assay measurements were compared with the widely used......Background: Recently, measurement of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) was introduced as a part of the hepatic cirrhotic marker enhanced liver fibrosis™ test on the automated ADVIA Centaur® immunoassay platform (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA...... PIIINP assay is suitable for routine use with our newly defined reference interval. The results obtained by Centaur correlates well with those obtained by the previously employed RIA, though the absolute values are higher....

  2. Centaur size distribution with DECam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Cesar; Trilling, David E.; Schlichting, Hilke

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of the 2014 centaur search campaign on the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) in Tololo, Chile. This is the largest debiased Centaur survey to date, measuring for the first time the size distribution of small Centaurs (1-10km) and the first time the sizes of planetesimals from which the entire Solar System formed are directly detected.The theoretical model for the coagulation and collisional evolution of the outer solar system proposed in Schlichting et al. 2013 predicts a steep rise in the size distribution of TNOs smaller than 10km. These objects are below the detection limit of current TNO surveys but feasible for the Centaur population. By constraining the number of Centaurs and this feature in their size distribution we can confirm the collisional evolution of the Solar System and estimate the rate at which material is being transferred from the outer to the inner Solar System. If the shallow power law behavior from the TNO size distribution at ~40km can be extrapolated to 1km, the size of the Jupiter Family of Comets (JFC), there would not be enough small TNOs to supply the JFC population (Volk & Malhotra, 2008), debunking the link between TNOs and JFCs.We also obtain the colors of small Centaurs and TNOs, providing a signature of collisional evolution by measuring if there is in fact a relationship between color and size. If objects smaller than the break in the TNO size distribution are being ground down by collisions then their surfaces should be fresh, and then appear bluer in the optical than larger TNOs that are not experiencing collisions.

  3. Influence of Vitamin D Binding Protein on Accuracy of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Measurement Using the ADVIA Centaur Vitamin D Total Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Freeman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D status in different populations relies on accurate measurement of total serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] concentrations [i.e., 25(OHD3 and 25(OHD2]. This study evaluated agreement between the ADVIA Centaur Vitamin D Total assay for 25(OHD testing (traceable to the NIST-Ghent reference method procedure and a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS method for various populations with different levels of vitamin D binding protein (DBP. Total serum 25(OHD concentrations were measured for 36 pregnant women, 40 hemodialysis patients, and 30 samples (DBP-spiked or not from healthy subjects. ELISA measured DBP levels. The mean serum DBP concentrations were higher for pregnancy (415 μg/mL and lower for hemodialysis subjects (198 μg/mL than for healthy subjects and were highest for spiked serum (545 μg/mL. The average bias between the ADVIA Centaur assay and the LC-MS/MS method was −1.4% (healthy, −6.1% (pregnancy, and 4.4% (hemodialysis. The slightly greater bias for samples from some pregnancy and hemodialysis subjects with serum DBP levels outside of the normal healthy range fell within a clinically acceptable range—reflected by analysis of their low-range (≤136 μg/mL, medium-range (137–559 μg/mL, and high-range (≥560 μg/mL DBP groups. Thus, the ADVIA Centaur Vitamin D Total assay demonstrates acceptable performance compared with an LC-MS/MS method for populations containing different amounts of DBP.

  4. Two Color Populations of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegler, Stephen C.; Romanishin, William; Consolmagno, Guy

    2016-10-01

    We present new optical colors for 64 Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) and Centaur objects measured with the 1.8-meter Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) and the 4.3-meter Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT). By combining these new colors with our previously published colors, we increase the sample size of our survey to 154 objects. Our survey is unique in that the uncertainties in our color measurements are less than half the uncertainties in the color measurements reported by other researchers in the literature. Small uncertainties are essential for discerning between a unimodal and a bimodal distribution of colors for these objects as well as detecting correlations between colors and orbital elements. From our survey, it appears red Centaurs have a broader color distribution than grey Centaurs. We find red Centaurs have a smaller orbital inclination angle distribution than grey Centaurs at the 99.3% confidence level. Furthermore, we find that our entire sample of KBOs and Centaurs exhibits bimodal colors at the 99.4% confidence level. KBOs and Centaurs with HV > 7.0 have bimodal colors at the 99.96% confidence level and KBOs with HV < 6.0 have bimodal colors at the 96.3% confidence level.We are grateful to the NASA Solar System Observations Program for support, NAU for joining the Discovery Channel Telescope Partnership, and the Vatican Observatory for the consistent allocation of telescope time over the last 12 years of this project.

  5. Nucleus of the active Centaur C/2011 P2 (PANSTARRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Perna, D.; Dotto, E.; Palumbo, P.; Dall'Ora, M.; Micheli, M.; Ieva, S.; Perozzi, E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: In this paper we present observations of the active Centaur C/2011 P2 (PANSTARRS), showing a compact comet-like coma at the heliocentric distance of rh = 9 au. The observations were obtained in the framework of a wider program on Centaurs aimed at searching for comet-like activity in several targets outside Jupiter's aphelion. Methods: We analysed visible images of the Centaur taken at the TNG telescope in the R filter to investigate the level of coma contributing to the target brightness and to derive information on its nucleus size. Results: Centaur C/2011 P2 (PANSTARRS) shows a faint but still detectable comet-like activity, which accounts for more than 50% to the observed brightness. The coma contribution has been subtracted in order to derive an estimate for the Centaur's diameter of D 16 km, assuming an albedo of A = 0.07 (average of albedo measured within the Centaur group). The results for Centaur C/2011 P2 (PANSTARRS) fit in the general picture of the group: Centaurs with smaller perihelion distance q and semi-major axis a are smaller than those remaining farther from the Sun during their orbital path, thus reinforcing the idea that active Centaurs are "comets in fieri". Based on observations collected at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), operated on the island of La Palma by the Centro Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  6. [Comparative study of parathormone and vitamin D measurements by three automats: ADVIA Centaur XP® (Siemens), ISYS® (IDS) and Liaison® (Diasorin)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardien, Pauline; Moineau, Marie-Pierre; Kerspern, Hélène; Bordron, Anne; Carre, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D (Vit.D) and parathormone (PTH) measurements are usually prescribed for phosphocalcic metabolism assessment and, especially for Vit.D, more and more frequently for other pathologies. In order to step up to automated techniques for these analysis in our laboratory, we tested 3 devices: ADVIA Centaur XP(®) (Siemens), ISYS(®) (IDS) and Liaison(®) (Diasorin), which allow to simultaneously quantify Vit.D and PTH. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fidelity of these methods as well as study the correlation between them and the radioimmunological techniques previously used in our laboratory : « ELSA PTH » (Iba Cisbio International) and « 25-OH D » (IDS). The comparison of PTH analysis was performed on a population of chronic renal failure patients undergoing haemodialysis. According to our study, the 3 devices show acceptable analytical performances; anyway the measurements realized on the ISYS analyzer are the ones showing the best results in terms of fidelity, and the closest results to those obtained with the RIA reference techniques.

  7. Centaur Rocket Installation in PSL #1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    Centaur Rocket Installation in PSL - Propulsion Systems Laboratory #1. The RL-10 Rocket was developed by Pratt and Whitney in the late 1950's and tested at the Lewis Research Center (now known as the John H. Glenn Research Lewis Field). This power plant was the propulsion system for NASA's upper stage Centaur rocket and was significant for being the first to use liquid hydrogen and oxygen as fuel. The Centaur suffered a number of early failures, but later proved to be a very successful upper stage for numerous commercial, NASA and military payloads.

  8. Measurement and detection of radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tsoulfanidis, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    This fourth edition reflects recent major developments that have occurred in radiation detector materials, systems, and applications. It continues to provide the most practical and up-to-date introduction to radiation detector technology, proper measurement techniques, and analysis of results for engineers and scientists using radiation sources. New chapters emphasize the expanded use of radiation detection systems in nuclear non-proliferation, homeland security, and nuclear medicine. The book also discusses the correct ways to perform measurements following current health physics procedures.

  9. New Scattered Disk Object and Centaur Colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Melissa; Wilcox, P.; Stansberry, J.

    2013-10-01

    We report B, V, and R magnitudes for scattered disk objects and centaurs from observations taken in December 2011 and August 2013 using the Lowell Observatory Perkins Telescope with PRISM and observations taken in March 2012 at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona. Targeted scattered disk objects include 2002 CY224, 2003 UY117, 2006 QJ181, 2008 CT190, 2009 YG19, 2010 FD49, 2010 VZ98. Targeted centaurs include 2002 QX47, 2005 UJ438, 2006 UX184, and 2007 RH283. We will determine if the resultant centaur colors follow the bimodal distribution (B-R either red or gray) previously detected. We will also compare the resultant scattered disk object colors to those published for other scattered disk objects. This work is based on observations with the Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory, and with the VATT: The Alice P. Lennon Telescope and the Thomas J. Bannan Astrophysics Facility.

  10. Solar and infrared radiation measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Vignola, Frank; Michalsky, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The rather specialized field of solar and infrared radiation measurement has become more and more important in the face of growing demands by the renewable energy and climate change research communities for data that are more accurate and have increased temporal and spatial resolution. Updating decades of acquired knowledge in the field, Solar and Infrared Radiation Measurements details the strengths and weaknesses of instruments used to conduct such solar and infrared radiation measurements. Topics covered include: Radiometer design and performance Equipment calibration, installation, operati

  11. Measurement and detection of radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tsoulfanidis, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    This is an update of the standard textbook for the field of radiation measurement. It includes illustrative examples and new problems. The research and applications of nuclear instrumentation have grown substantially since publication of the previous editions. With the miniaturization of equipment, increased speed of electronic components, and more sophisticated software, radiation detection systems are now more productively used in many disciplines, including nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, and nuclear medicine. Continuing in the tradition of its bestselling predecessors, "Measurement and Detection of Radiation, Third Edition" illustrates the fundamentals of nuclear interactions and radiation detection with a multitude of examples and problems. It offers a clearly written, accessible introduction to nuclear instrumentation concepts. The following are new to the third edition: a new chapter on the latest applications of radiation detection, covering nuclear medicine, dosimetry, health physics, no...

  12. A Centaur in Salaryman's Clothing: Parody and Play in est em's Centaur Manga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Japanese manga artist est em (esu to emu is notable for blurring genre boundaries and subverting established conventions in various publications since her debut in 2006. Two of her works, Hatarake, kentaurosu! (‘Work, Centaur!’ and equus, focus exclusively on male centaurs in homosocial settings. Classified as shōjo (girls’ manga and BL (‘boys’ love’ manga respectively, these two works allow female readers to enjoy the pleasures of homoerotic subtexts and intertextual parody. This paper examines how conventions of sexuality and gender, particularly hegemonic masculinity and heterosexuality, are constructed/deconstructed in est em’s centaur manga using the framework of intertextuality, with particular emphasis on parody, pleasure and play. By placing centaurs in realistic, everyday settings, these works present a critique of Japan’s contemporary salaryman culture, while also highlighting issues of alienation and otherness that both female readers and gay men face in their daily lives.

  13. Acoustic and thermal testing of the Titan/Centaur upper stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehringer, Mark; Gibson, Chris; Janes, Ron

    1992-01-01

    A new version of the Centaur high-energy upper stage is being produced by General Dynamics for the USAF/Martin Marietta Titan launch vehicle. The Titan/Centaur upper stage is subject to consecutive acoustic and thermal testing in General Dynamics' Acoustic and Thermal Test Facility (ATTF). All data is acquired and processed digitally using the high-speed data acquisition system located in the ATTF. Processed data from over 250 sensors measuring acceleration, temperature, and sound pressure level is made available to the test team in minutes for use in making real-time test decisions. These tests represent the first consecutive large-scale environmental tests conducted on a complete, pressure stabilized, cryogenically tanked space launch vehicle. Some of the unique challenges involved in testing the Titan/Centaur and how these challenges were met using the ATTF are described.

  14. Acoustic and thermal testing of the Titan/Centaur upper stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehringer, Mark; Gibson, Chris; Janes, Ron

    1992-11-01

    A new version of the Centaur high-energy upper stage is being produced by General Dynamics for the USAF/Martin Marietta Titan launch vehicle. The Titan/Centaur upper stage is subject to consecutive acoustic and thermal testing in General Dynamics' Acoustic and Thermal Test Facility (ATTF). All data is acquired and processed digitally using the high-speed data acquisition system located in the ATTF. Processed data from over 250 sensors measuring acceleration, temperature, and sound pressure level is made available to the test team in minutes for use in making real-time test decisions. These tests represent the first consecutive large-scale environmental tests conducted on a complete, pressure stabilized, cryogenically tanked space launch vehicle. Some of the unique challenges involved in testing the Titan/Centaur and how these challenges were met using the ATTF are described.

  15. Measurement of radiative neutralino production

    CERN Document Server

    Bartels, Christoph; Langenfeld, Ulrich; List, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    We perform the first experimental study with full detector simulation for the radiative production of neutralinos at the linear collider, at sqrt{s} = 500 GeV and realistic beam polarizations. We consider all relevant backgrounds, like the Standard Model background from radiative neutrino production. The longitudinal polarized beams enhance the signal and simultaneously reduce the background, such that statistical errors are significantly reduced. We find that the photon spectrum from the signal process can be well isolated. The neutralino mass and the cross section can be measured at a few per-cent level, with the largest systematic uncertainties from the measurement of the beam polarization and the beam energy spectrum.

  16. Thermal properties of Trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs from combined Herschel and Spitzer observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos-Sanz, P.; Lellouch, E.; Mommert, M.; Fornasier, S.; Stansberry, J.; Mueller, Th.; Kiss, C.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, M.; Harris, A. W.; Delsanti, A.; Groussin, O.

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the thermal properties of about 70 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs observed with Herschel Space Observatory [8] (either PACS or PACS and SPIRE) and Spitzer Space Telescope [12] (MIPS). We apply radiometric modeling techniques (NEATM [2]) to the measured fluxes to de

  17. Taming Liquid Hydrogen: The Centaur Upper Stage Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The Centaur is one of the most powerful rockets in the world. As an upper-stage rocket for the Atlas and Titan boosters it has been a reliable workhorse for NASA for over forty years and has played an essential role in many of NASA's adventures into space. In this CD-ROM you will be able to explore the Centaur's history in various rooms to this virtual museum. Visit the "Movie Theater" to enjoy several video documentaries on the Centaur. Enter the "Interview Booth" to hear and read interviews with scientists and engineers closely responsible for building and operating the rocket. Go to the "Photo Gallery" to look at numerous photos of the rocket throughout its history. Wander into the "Centaur Library" to read various primary documents of the Centaur program. Finally, stop by the "Observation Deck" to watch a virtual Centaur in flight.

  18. On the dynamical evolution and end states of binary centaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunini, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we perform a numerical integration of 666 fictitious binary Centaurs coming from the trans Neptunian space. Our population is restricted to tight binaries whose components have sizes between 30 and 100 km. We included the dynamical perturbations from the giant planets, Kozai Cycles induced by the Sun and tidal friction on the orbits of the binaries. We found that most binaries are disrupted during one of the close planetary encounters, making the mean lifetime of binary Centaurs much shorter than the one of single Centaurs. Nearly 10 per cent of the binaries reach a very tight circular orbit, arguing in favour of the existence of a non-negligible population of contact Centaurs. Another 10 per cent survive as a binary during their lifetime as Centaur. Our simulations favour the existence of a small population of very tight binary Centaurs.

  19. Radiation Measurements aboard Spacelab 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. V.; Almasi, J.; Cassou, R.; Frank, A.; Henke, R. P.; Rowe, V.; Parnell, T. A.; Schopper, E.

    1984-07-01

    The radiation environment inside Spacelab 1 was measured by a set of passive radiation detectors distributed throughout the volume inside the module, in the access tunnel, and outside on the pallet. Measurements of the low-LET (linear energy transfer) component obtained from the thermoluminescence detectors ranged from 102 to 190 millirads, yielding an average low-LET dose rate of 11.2 millirads per day inside the module, about twice the low-LET dose rate measured on previous flights of the space shuttle. Because of the higher inclination of the orbit (57 degrees versus 28.5 degrees for previous shuttle flights), substantial fluxes of highly ionizing HZE particles (high charge and energy galactic cosmic rays) were observed, yielding an overall average mission dose-equivalent of about 150 millirems, more than three times higher that measured on previous shuttle missions.

  20. Centaur's ring system formation by close encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santana, Thamiris; Winter, Othon

    2016-10-01

    Rupture of small bodies due to close approach to a massive body is a frequent event in the Solar System. Some of these small bodies can just disintegrate completely or suffer a material loss.In this work we study the gravitational interaction between a giant planet and a small body in close encounters in order to simulate the formation of a planetary ring system around a centaur by the partial rupture of the small body.Considering the current Chariklo's body and a disk of particles around it, we simulated the system under close encounters with one of giant planets.Another motivation for the study is also the centaur Chiron, that is a candidate to have a ring system like Chariklo. The characteristics of the encounters are defined by the impact parameter and the velocity at infinity.The results are presented in terms of conditions that could lead to a rupture that could generate a ring like system.

  1. A Herschel-PACS view of 16 Centaurs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffard, Rene; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Vilenius, E.; Ortiz, J.; Mueller, T.; Fornasier, S.; Lellouch, E.; Mommert, M.; Pal, A.; Kiss, C.; Mueller, M.; Stansberry, J.; Delsanti, A.; Peixinho, N.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize a set of Centaurs in terms of their size, albedo, and thermal properties. The Herschel open time key program "TNOs are Cool!'' observed 130 Centaurs and TNOs in 2009-2012. In this particular work we use Herschel/PACS three-band photometry to obtain monochroma

  2. Intercomparison of Environmental Nuclear Radiation Measuring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Fei; NI; Ning; HOU; Jin-bing; SONG; Ming-zhe

    2015-01-01

    In 2015,Radiation Metrology Division of China Institute of Atomic Energy organized an environmental monitoring of nuclear radiation measuring intercomparison,and 9laboratories attended.The intercomparison included environmental level dosemeters and protection level

  3. Spectrophotometry of Kuiper Belt Objects and Centaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Vilas, F.

    2002-09-01

    We present an ongoing study of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) and Centaurs. We acquired broadband (UBVRI) and medium band photometry with the 4m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak and the 1.8m Perkins telescope at Lowell Observatory. We present broadband colors of these objects and discuss the results of our search for absorption bands in the visible spectral region. Vilas (Icarus, 111) demonstrated that the existence of the 0.7um absorption feature in asteroids with solar-like colors was strongly correlated with the presence of the 3.0um water of hydration feature. The broad 0.7um absorption band is attributed to a charge-transfer in Fe-bearing hydrated silicates (phyllosilicates), which are a product of aqueous alteration. For aqueous alteration to take place, one must have water ice present in an object, and an energy source to heat the water ice to a liquid water phase. Water ice has already been discovered in some Centaurs (Luu et al. ApJ, 531; Brown AJ, 119), and Durda and Stern (Icarus, 145) estimate that KBOs experience collisional processing regularly throughout their lifetimes. The estimated impact energies are high enough to induce aqueous alteration. We undertook this study to search for evidence of the 0.7um feature in KBOs and Centaurs. We employed medium band Windhorst filters, located at 0.527, 0.666, 0.705, 0.755 and 0.848 um in conjunction with the Mosaic CCD to search for this absorption band, which extends from 0.57-0.83um. Initial analysis suggests that an absorption feature exists near 0.7um in the greyer objects but not the redder objects, following the correlations observed in asteroids. These data are consistent with the absorption band detected near 0.7um by de Bergh et al. (ACM 2002, Berlin) in visible spectra of 2000 EB173 and 2000 GN171. However, further analysis is required to confirm whether the absorption we see is due to phyllosilicates or another source. We will present the results from this analysis. This research was supported through the

  4. CCD photometry of active Centaur 166P/2001 T4 (NEAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J. C.; Ma, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    To study the secular evolution of the activity of Centaur 166P/2001 T4 (Near Earth Asteroid Tracking, NEAT) and its physical properties, we present the results of optical observations of the Centaur taken on 2009 March 29 with the Keck 10-m telescope located atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. It was still active at rh = 11.9 au post-perihelion. An upper limit of the nucleus radius of aN < 14.32 km is derived. The colour index is B - R = 1.59 ± 0.05. The Afρ value is measured to be 288 ± 19 cm and the corresponding dust production rate is 252 kg s-1. Finally, a possible mechanism of activity is discussed.

  5. On output measurements via radiation pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeman, S.; Healey, A.J.; Forsberg, F.;

    1990-01-01

    It is shown, by simple physical argument, that measurements of intensity with a radiation pressure balance should not agree with those based on calorimetric techniques. The conclusion is ultimately a consequence of the circumstance that radiation pressure measurements relate to wave momentum, whi...

  6. Diffuse solar radiation: measurement reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butera, F.M.; Farruggia, S.; Festa, R.; Ratto, C.

    Numerous empirical relationships, found in literature, allow - where only the average monthly or daily value of global radiation on a horizontal surface is known - the determination of the components of both diffuse and direct radiations. These relationships result from the elaboration of data recorded mostly at weather stations located in North America. With the use of hourly data of global and diffuse solar radiation, recorded in Genova, Italy, during a period of six years, it is shown that the above mentioned relationships give values which systematically differ from experimental ones, even if some offer better results than others. Furthermore, the extent of the difference and the similar results obtained from other researchers indicate the possibility of specific weather conditions in the Mediterranean area.

  7. Measurement of advanced electromagnetic radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Bajlo, Darko

    2017-01-01

    For the purpose of detecting advanced electromagnetic radiation predicted by Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory for the case of incomplete absorption of retarded electromagnetic radiation, pulses in duration of 6 ns to 24 ns, wavelength from 91 cm to 200 cm where supplied to three different transmitting antennas. Detection was done with a λ/20 monopole antenna in the advanced time window at a time 2r/c before the arrival of the center of the retarded pulse. At distances ranging from 430 cm to 18...

  8. Optical alignment of Centaur's inertial guidance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordan, Andrew L.

    1987-01-01

    During Centaur launch operations the launch azimuth of the inertial platform's U-accelerometer input axis must be accurately established and maintained. This is accomplished by using an optically closed loop system with a long-range autotheodolite whose line of sight was established by a first-order survey. A collimated light beam from the autotheodolite intercepts a reflecting Porro prism mounted on the platform azimuth gimbal. Thus, any deviation of the Porro prism from its predetermined heading is optically detected by the autotheodolite. The error signal produced is used to torque the azimuth gimbal back to its required launch azimuth. The heading of the U-accelerometer input axis is therefore maintained automatically. Previously, the autotheodolite system could not distinguish between vehicle sway and rotational motion of the inertial platform unless at least three prisms were used. One prism was mounted on the inertial platform to maintain azimuth alignment, and two prisms were mounted externally on the vehicle to track sway. For example, the automatic azimuth-laying theodolite (AALT-SV-M2) on the Saturn vehilce used three prisms. The results of testing and modifying the AALT-SV-M2 autotheodolite to simultaneously monitor and maintain alignment of the inertial platform and track the sway of the vehicle from a single Porro prism.

  9. Phantoms for Radiation Measurements of Mobile Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of radiation efficiency for a handheld phone equipped with a patch and a helical antenna operated near the human user have been performed. Both measurements include a simple head plus hand phantom and live persons are considered. The position of the hand on the phone is found...... to be the main reason for the large variation in radiation efficiency among persons. The tilt angle of the phone and the distance between the head and phone only play a minor role...

  10. Evaluation of arctic broadband surface radiation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Matsui

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  11. A Chemical and Dynamical Link Between Red Centaur Objects and the Cold Classical Kuiper Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegler, Stephen C.; Romanishin, William; Consolmagno, Guy

    2015-11-01

    We present new B-V, V-R, and B-R colors for 32 Centaurs objects using the 4.3-meter Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) near Happy Jack, AZ and the 1.8-meter Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope on Mt. Graham, AZ. Combining these new colors with our previously reported colors, we now have optical broad-band colors for 58 Centaur objects.Application of the non-parametric Dip Test to our previous sample of only 26 objects showed Centaurs split into gray and red groups at the 99.5% confidence level, and application of the Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test to the same sample showed that red Centaurs have a higher median albedo than gray Centaurs at the 99% confidence level (Tegler et al., 2008, Solar System Beyond Neptune, U Arizona Press, pp. 105-114).Here we report application of the Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test to our sample of 58 Centaurs. We confirm red Centaurs have a higher median albedo than gray Centaurs at the 99.7% level. In addition, we find that red Centaurs have a lower median inclination angle than gray Centaurs at the 99.5% confidence level. Because of their red colors and lower inclination angles, we suggest red Centaurs originate in the cold classical Kuiper belt. We thank the NASA Solar System Observations Program for its support.

  12. Mass Densities of KBOs and Centaurs from Spitzer Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Spencer, J.; Stansberry, J.; Grundy, W.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamical and physical properties of the Small Solar System Bodies in the outer Solar system, Centaurs and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs), contain important clues on the formation and evolution of the early Solar System. The only practical way to study their internal properties, such as chemical com

  13. Implementation of an interpreter for a parallel language in CENTAUR

    OpenAIRE

    Bertot, Yves

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of an interpreter for the parallel language ESTEREL in the CENTAUR system. The dynamic semantics of the language is described and completed with several modules providing a graphical input-output interface, a graphical execution observation tool, and a simple execution controller.

  14. Measurement of $\\psip$ Radiative Decays

    OpenAIRE

    Ablikim, M.; J.Z. Bai; Ban, Y.; Collaboration, BES

    2006-01-01

    Using 14 million psi(2S) events accumulated at the BESII detector, we report first measurements of branching fractions or upper limits for psi(2S) decays into gamma ppbar, gamma 2(pi^+pi^-), gamma K_s K^-pi^++c.c., gamma K^+ K^- pi^+pi^-, gamma K^{*0} K^- pi^+ +c.c., gamma K^{*0}\\bar K^{*0}, gamma pi^+pi^- p pbar, gamma 2(K^+K^-), gamma 3(pi^+pi^-), and gamma 2(pi^+pi^-)K^+K^- with the invariant mass of hadrons below 2.9GeV/c^2. We also report branching fractions of psi(2S) decays into 2(pi^+...

  15. Development of radiation protection and measurement technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Si Young; Lee, T. Y.; Kim, J. L.; Kim, B. H.; Lee, B. J.; Chung, K. K.; Lee, K. C.; Chung, R. I.; Han, Y. D.; Kim, J. S.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, C. K.; Yoon, K. S.; Jeong, D. Y.; Yoon, S. C.; Yoon, Y. C.; Lee, S. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, K. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. K.; Lee, J. K. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Reference X-, gamma, beta and neutron radiation fields complying with the ISO and ANSI standards have been established and evaluated to provide a basic technical support in national radiation protection dosimetry program and to provide calibration measurement devices. Personal dose evaluation algorithm has been developed with these reference radiation fields, which comply well with both domestic and the new ANSI N13.11, to evaluate accurate personal dose equivalents. A personal internal dosimetry algorithm which can estimate the intakes of radionuclides from the results of in vivo bioassay and the resulting internal doses has been developed and verified its performance. It was also evaluated to be equality excellent compared with those being used in foreign countries and used to make a computer code for internal dose evaluation which can be run with PC under the Windows environment. A BOMAB phantom for precise calibration of in vivo system has been also designed, fabricated and test-evaluated. Based on the ALARA concept of the optimization principle of radiation protection, a method for estimating the cost for radiation protection has been studied and an objective monetary cost of detriment due to radiation exposure, called {alpha} value ($/man-Sv) has been derived and proposed based on the Korean socio-economic situation and human risk factors to provide basic data for the radiation protection optimization study in Korea. (author). 100 refs., 104 tabs., 69 figs.

  16. Measurement of Radiated Power Loss on EAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段艳敏; 王亮; 胡立群; 毛松涛; 许平; 陈开云; 林士耀; 钟国强; 张继宗; 张凌

    2011-01-01

    A type of silicon detector known as AXUV (absolute extreme ultraviolet) photodiodes is successfully used to measure the radiated power in EAST. The detector is characterized by compact structure, fast temporal response (〈0.5 s) and flat spectral sensitivity in the range from ultra-violet to X-ray. Two 16-channel AXUV arrays are installed in EAST to view the whole poloidal cross-section of plasma. Based on the diagnostic system, typical radiation distributions for both limiter and divertor plasma are obtained and compared. As divertor detachment occurs, the radiation distribution in X-point region is observed to vary distinctly. The total radiation power losses in discharges with different plasma parameters are briefly analyzed.

  17. Remote Task-level Commanding of Centaur over Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreckenghost, Debra; Ngo, Tam; Burridge, Robert; Wang, Lui; Izygon, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Remote operation of robots on the lunar surface by ground controllers poses unique human-robot interaction challenges due to time delay and constrained bandwidth. One strategy for addressing these challenges is to provide task-level commanding of robots by a ground controller. Decision-support tools are being developed at JSC for remote task-level commanding over time-delay. The approach is to provide ground procedures that guide a controller when executing task-level command sequences and aid awareness of the state of command execution in the robot. This approach is being evaluated using the Centaur robot at JSC. The Centaur Central Commander provides a task-level command interface that executes on the robot side of the delay. Decision support tools have been developed for a human Supervisor in the JSC Cockpit to use when interacting with the Centaur Central Commander. Commands to the Central Commander are defined as instructions in a procedure. Sequences of these instructions are grouped into procedures for the Cockpit Supervisor. When a Supervisor is ready to perform a task, a procedure is loaded into the decision support tool. From this tool, the Supervisor can view command sequences and dispatch individual commands to Centaur. Commands are queued for execution on the robot side of the delay. Reliable command sequences can be dispatched automatically upon approval by the Supervisor. The decision support tool provides the Supervisor with feedback about which commands are waiting for execution and which commands have finished. It also informs the Supervisor when a command fails to have its intended effect. Cockpit procedures are defined using the Procedure Representation Language (PRL) developed at JSC for mission operations. The decision support tool is based on a Procedure Sequencer and multi-agent software developed for human-robot interaction. In this paper the approach for remote task-level commanding of robots is described and the results of the evaluation

  18. Evaluation of Arctic broadband surface radiation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Matsui

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ surface radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure incoming and outgoing shortwave (SW and thermal infrared, or longwave (LW, radiation. Enhancements may include various sensors for measuring irradiance in narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers that keep sensors and shading devices trained on the sun along its diurnal path. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating stations in a pristine undisturbed setting free of artificial blockage (such as from buildings and towers and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data in the Arctic include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the protective glass domes of the radiometers and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, comparisons are made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse SW measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of arctic radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both SW and LW measurements. Solutions to these operational problems that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols are proposed.

  19. Web based Measurement System for Solar Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shachi Awasthi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present in this paper, the principles of the measurement system for solar radiation, and our implementation using Web based data logging concept. The photocurrent produced by Silicon PN junction is used as a solar radiation transducer, to make it more viable we have used commercially available solar panels as our transducers. Using a silicon solar cell as sensor, a low cost solar radiometer can be constructed. The photocurrent produced by solar cell is electronically tailored to be measured and stored by our web based data acquisition and monitoring system. Measurement using real solar cell array gives a good measure of actual producible energy by solar arrays. Our portable instrument can be used in remote sites and substitutes the solar monitor and integrator, Current data of solar radiation can be monitored using Ethernet interface available in all PC, Laptops. We store the data into a secure digital card which can be retrieved to plot and analyse the data. We have developed system hardware and software based on ATmega32 AVR Microcontrollers and ENC28J60 Ethernet PHY and MAC network interface chip by Microchip. So the global irradiance data are obtained after correction using the instantaneous measurement of ambient temperature which allows us to calculate the junction temperature and consequently improve the precision of measurement of our data acquisition system.

  20. "TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region. IX. Thermal properties of Kuiper belt objects and Centaurs from combined Herschel and Spitzer observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lellouch, E.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Lacerda, P.; Mommert, M.; Duffard, R.; Ortiz, J. L.; Müller, T. G.; Fornasier, S.; Stansberry, J.; Kiss, Cs.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, M.; Peixinho, N.; Moreno, R.; Groussin, O.; Delsanti, A.; Harris, A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The goal of this work is to characterize the ensemble thermal properties of the Centaurs / trans-Neptunian population. Methods: Thermal flux measurements obtained with Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/MIPS provide size, albedo, and beaming factors for 85 objects (13 of which are presented here for th

  1. "TNOs are Cool" : A survey of the trans-Neptunian region IX. Thermal properties of Kuiper belt objects and Centaurs from combined Herschel and Spitzer observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lellouch, E.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Lacerda, P.; Mommert, M.; Duffard, R.; Ortiz, J. L.; Mueller, T. G.; Fornasier, S.; Stansberry, J.; Kiss, Cs.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, M.; Peixinho, N.; Moreno, R.; Groussin, O.; Delsanti, A.; Harris, A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. The goal of this work is to characterize the ensemble thermal properties of the Centaurs/trans-Neptunian population. Methods. Thermal flux measurements obtained with Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/MIPS provide size, albedo, and beaming factors for 85 objects (13 of which are presented here for the

  2. Web based Measurement System for Solar Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shachi Awasthi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present in this paper, the principles of themeasurement system for solar radiation, and ourimplementation using Web based data loggingconcept.The photocurrent produced by Silicon PNjunction is used as a solar radiation transducer, tomake it more viable we have used commerciallyavailable solar panels as our transducers. Using asilicon solar cell as sensor, a low cost solarradiometer can be constructed. The photocurrentproduced by solar cell is electronically tailored to bemeasured and stored by our web based dataacquisition and monitoring system. Measurementusing real solar cell array gives a good measure ofactual producible energy by solar arrays. Ourportable instrument can be used in remote sites andsubstitutes the solar monitor and integrator,Current data of solar radiation can be monitoredusing Ethernet interface available in all PC,Laptops. We store the data into a secure digital cardwhich can be retrieved to plot and analyse the data.We have developed system hardware andsoftware based on ATmega32 AVR Microcontrollersand ENC28J60 Ethernet PHY and MAC networkinterface chip by Microchip.So the global irradiance data are obtained aftercorrection using the instantaneous measurement ofambient temperature which allows us to calculatethe junction temperature and consequently improvethe precision of measurement of our dataacquisition system

  3. Measuring ionizing radiation with a mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsburg, Matthias; Fehrenbach, Thomas; Puente León, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    In cases of nuclear disasters it is desirable to know one's personal exposure to radioactivity and the related health risk. Usually, Geiger-Mueller tubes are used to assess the situation. Equipping everyone with such a device in a short period of time is very expensive. We propose a method to detect ionizing radiation using the integrated camera of a mobile consumer device, e.g., a cell phone. In emergency cases, millions of existing mobile devices could then be used to monitor the exposure of its owners. In combination with internet access and GPS, measured data can be collected by a central server to get an overview of the situation. During a measurement, the CMOS sensor of a mobile device is shielded from surrounding light by an attachment in front of the lens or an internal shutter. The high-energy radiation produces free electrons on the sensor chip resulting in an image signal. By image analysis by means of the mobile device, signal components due to incident ionizing radiation are separated from the sensor noise. With radioactive sources present significant increases in detected pixels can be seen. Furthermore, the cell phone application can make a preliminary estimate on the collected dose of an individual and the associated health risks.

  4. Photocatalytic Active Radiation Measurements and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Underwood, Lauren W.

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalytic materials are being used to purify air, to kill microbes, and to keep surfaces clean. A wide variety of materials are being developed, many of which have different abilities to absorb various wavelengths of light. Material variability, combined with both spectral illumination intensity and spectral distribution variability, will produce a wide range of performance results. The proposed technology estimates photocatalytic active radiation (PcAR), a unit of radiation that normalizes the amount of light based on its spectral distribution and on the ability of the material to absorb that radiation. Photocatalytic reactions depend upon the number of electron-hole pairs generated at the photocatalytic surface. The number of electron-hole pairs produced depends on the number of photons per unit area per second striking the surface that can be absorbed and whose energy exceeds the bandgap of the photocatalytic material. A convenient parameter to describe the number of useful photons is the number of moles of photons striking the surface per unit area per second. The unit of micro-einsteins (or micromoles) of photons per m2 per sec is commonly used for photochemical and photoelectric-like phenomena. This type of parameter is used in photochemistry, such as in the conversion of light energy for photosynthesis. Photosynthetic response correlates with the number of photons rather than by energy because, in this photochemical process, each molecule is activated by the absorption of one photon. In photosynthesis, the number of photons absorbed in the 400 700 nm spectral range is estimated and is referred to as photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). PAR is defined in terms of the photosynthetic photon flux density measured in micro-einsteins of photons per m2 per sec. PcAR is an equivalent, similarly modeled parameter that has been defined for the photocatalytic processes. Two methods to measure the PcAR level are being proposed. In the first method, a calibrated

  5. Radiative lifetime measurements of rubidium Rydberg states

    CERN Document Server

    Branden, Drew B; Mahlokozera, Tatenda; Vesa, Cristian; Wilson, Roy O; Zheng, Mao; Kortyna, Andrew; Tate, Duncan A

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the radiative lifetimes of ns, np and nd Rydberg states of rubidium in the range 28 < n < 45. To enable long-lived states to be measured, our experiment uses slow-moving Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Two experimental techniques have been adopted to reduce random and systematic errors. First, a narrow-bandwidth pulsed laser is used to excite the target Rydberg state, resulting in minimal shot-to-shot variation in the initial state population. Second, we monitor the target state population as a function of time delay from the laser pulse using a short-duration, millimetre-wave pulse that is resonant with a one- or two-photon transition. We then selectively field ionize the monitor state, and detect the resulting electrons with a micro-channel plate. This signal is an accurate mirror of the target state population, and is uncontaminated by contributions from other states which are populated by black body radiation. Our results are generally consistent with other recent experime...

  6. Uncertainty of dose measurement in radiation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1996-01-01

    The major standard organizations of the world have addressed the issue of reporting uncertainties in measurement reports and certificates. There is, however, still some ambiguity in the minds of many people who try to implement the recommendations in real life. This paper is a contribution...... to the running debate and presents the author's view, which is based upon experience in radiation processing dosimetry. The origin of all uncertainty components must be identified and can be classified according to Type A and Type B, but it is equally important to separate the uncertainty components into those...... that contribute to the observable uncertainty of repeated measurements and those that do not. Examples of the use of these principles are presented in the paper....

  7. A photometric search for activity among asteroids and Centaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa Oyarzabal, A.; Mammana, L.; Fernández, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    We present the first results of a long-term observational campaign focused on the detection of activity in selected asteroids and centaurs. Our observational targets are near-Earth asteroids in cometary orbits (cf. [2]), the so called ''main-belt comets'' or ''active asteroids'' (well-known objects as well as potential candidates), and bright centaurs with good orbits, all close to their perihelion passages. In those objects with a former detection of activity, our aim is to contribute to a better physical knowledge of them, and determine, for instance, if the observed activity is transient or permanent. To achieve our goals, we analyzed CCD-filtered images of each observable target acquired with the 2.15-m telescope ''Jorge Sahade'' at CASLEO (San Juan, Argentina), during two runs of three consecutive nights each (during August 2013 and January 2014, respectively). Our study will be completed by future runs with the same instrumentation already assigned to our campaign. As preliminary results, we observed activity in the main-belt comets P/2013 P5 (PANSTARRS) and 133P/(7968) Elst-Pizarro. We also observed the main-belt comet (596) Scheila, which showed an unequivocally stellar appearance. We observed the main-belt comet candidate (3646) Aduatiques (cf. [1]), and noticed in this object a curious feature whose connection to some kind of activity is not well determined yet. We also observed the near-Earth asteroid in cometary orbit 2006 XL_5 (cf. [3]), and the centaurs (281371) 2008 FC_{76}, (332685) 2009 HH_{36}), (382004) 2010 RM_{64}, 2010 XZ_{78}, and 2011 UR_{402}. We have not detected activity in these objects, but an improved analysis is still in progress. %Corresponding author: Andrea Sosa (asosa@fisica.edu.uy)

  8. Carbon monoxide in the distantly active centaur 174P/Echeclus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzchos, Kacper; Womack, Maria

    2016-10-01

    60558 Echeclus is very unusual. It has a dual asteroid-comet designation, and is classified as a centaur. A dust-rich outburst was observed when it was at a heliocentric distance, r, of 13.1 AU pre-perihelion (Choi & Weissman 2006). Interestingly, the coma's center of brightness was not at the nucleus location, but was offset by up to 7 arcseconds (Weissman et al. 2006, Tegler et al. 2006). This was hypothesized to be a due to a fragment that split off the nucleus and began outgassing on its own (Fernandez 2009). A smaller coma was observed when Echeclus was at r = 8.5 AU, but overall, the object appears dormant with little or no extended coma observed at optical wavelengths for years at a time (Choi et al. 2015, Rousselot et al. 2015). Echeclus is too far from the Sun for any of the activity to be caused by water-ice sublimation, the dominant cause for most comets. Instead, the coma must have been generated by another mechanism, such as impact or supervolatile outgassing. If a substantial amount of the supervolatile CO were relatively near the surface and outgassing, then its emission could be detected, or significant limits could be set, through radio observations when Echeclus was near perihelion, which occurred at 2015 Apr at r = 5.8 AU. In order to better explore the volatile nature of this centaur, we searched for CO emission from the J=2-1 rotational line at 230 GHz with the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 10-m Sub-millimeter Telescope (SMT) during May and June 2016 when the comet was at r = 6.1 AU, post-perihelion. We find that the CO production rate from Echeclus is substantially lower than what is typically observed for 29P/Schwassmann Wachmann 1, another distantly active comet often classified as a centaur. We report on the measurements and implications.The SMT is operated by the ARO, the Steward Observatory, and the University of Arizona, with support through the NSF University Radio Observatories program (AST-1140030).

  9. Method and apparatus for measuring electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, J. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described in which the capacitance of a semiconductor junction subjected to an electromagnetic radiation field is utilized to indicate the intensity or strength of the radiation.

  10. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, M. C. E.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.; Poland, A. I.

    1988-01-01

    The SUMER (solar ultraviolet measurements of emitted radiation) experiment is described. It will study flows, turbulent motions, waves, temperatures and densities of the plasma in the upper atmosphere of the Sun. Structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity will be observed on various spatial and temporal scales. This will contribute to the understanding of coronal heating processes and the solar wind expansion. The instrument will take images of the Sun in EUV (extreme ultra violet) light with high resolution in space, wavelength and time. The spatial resolution and spectral resolving power of the instrument are described. Spectral shifts can be determined with subpixel accuracy. The wavelength range extends from 500 to 1600 angstroms. The integration time can be as short as one second. Line profiles, shifts and broadenings are studied. Ratios of temperature and density sensitive EUV emission lines are established.

  11. Gamma radiation measurements in Brazilian commercial granites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, R.M.; Veiga, R.; Mosquera, B.; Carvalho, C.; Macario, K. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Gamma radiation from radionuclides which are characterized by half lives comparable to the age of the earth, such as 40 K and the radionuclides from the 238 U and 232 Th series, and their decay products, represent the main terrestrial source of irradiation to the human body. Their concentrations vary for different types of rocks, where high radiation levels are associated with igneous rocks such as granite. Thorium, uranium and potassium concentrations of granitic rocks are intimately related to their mineral compositions and general petrologic features. Then, these features associated with effects of weathering and metamorphism produce expressive alterations in the relationship between the natural radionuclides (Th, U, K, Th/U and Th/K). Consequently, the measurements of thorium, uranium, and potassium concentrations of different granite samples result on individual differentiation sequences. From the 232 Th, 238 U and 40 K activity concentrations obtained for each sample, it is possible to evaluate their respective dose rates in air, when these stones are used as tiling rocks. These results are of great interest in the environmental radiological protection study, since granites are widely used as building and ornamental materials, including as indoor covering. In this way, the Laboratory of Radioecology (L.A.R.A.) of the Physics Institute of the Universidade Federal Fluminense (I.F. -U.F.F.) has been performing analyzes on more than one hundred differ ent types of the main Brazilian commercial granites in last two years [1]. Using NaI and HP Ge gamma-ray spectrometers to determine the concentration of natural radionuclides in these samples, the annual effective dose rates and the gamma activity concentration index have been evaluated and compared to the limits proposed by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) and European Commission (E.C.). In addition, the correlations between thorium

  12. Radiation detection and measurement concepts, methods and devices

    CERN Document Server

    McGregor, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    This text on radiation detection and measurement is a response to numerous requests expressed by students at various universities, in which the most popularly used books do not provide adequate background material, nor explain matters in understandable terms. This work provides a modern overview of radiation detection devices and radiation measurement methods. The topics selected in the book have been selected on the basis of the author’s many years of experience designing radiation detectors and teaching radiation detection and measurement in a classroom environment.

  13. Space life sciences: radiation risk assessment and radiation measurements in low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The volume contains papers presented at COSPAR symposia in October 2002 about radiation risk assessment and radiation measurements in low Earth orbit. The risk assessment symposium brought together multidisciplinary expertise including physicists, biologists, and theoretical modelers. Topics included current knowledge about known and predicted radiation environments, radiation shielding, physics cross section models, improved ion beam transport codes, biological demonstrations of specific shielding materials and applications to a manned mission to Mars, advancements in biological measurement of radiation-induced protein expression profiles, and integration of physical and biological parameters to assess key elements of radiation risk. Papers from the radiation measurements in low Earth orbit symposium included data about dose, linear energy transfer spectra, and charge spectra from recent measurements on the International Space Station (ISS), comparison between calculations and measurements of dose distribution inside a human phantom and the neutron component inside the ISS; and reviews of trapped antiprotons and positrons inside the Earth's magnetosphere.

  14. Effects of non-gravitational forces on orbital evolution of active Centaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churyumov, Klim; Kovalenko, Nataliya

    2016-07-01

    Currently there are 26 active Centaurs known among 121 discovered .In the present study we have investigated the influence of cometary activity on their orbital evolution by using orbital evolution integrators. Since there is no information on exact values of non-gravitational forces for these cometary Centaurs, because of their large heliocentric distances, we assumed their non-gravitational forces as the one for comet Halley with coefficient of 1/r^{2}, where r is perihelion distance. As a result we got the differences in perihelion passage dates for active Centaurs and differences in their perihelion distances during one period around the Sun and longer time-span.

  15. Radiation detection and measurement student solutions manual

    CERN Document Server

    Wehe, David K

    2012-01-01

    This is the resource that engineers turn to in the study of radiation detection. The fourth edition takes into account the technical developments that continue to enhance the instruments and techniques available for the detection and spectroscopy of ionizing radiation. New coverage is presented on ROC curves, micropattern gas detectors, new sensors for scintillation light, and the excess noise factor. Revised discussions are also included on TLDs and cryogenic spectrometers, radiation backgrounds, and the VME standard. Engineers will gain a strong understanding of the field with this updated book.

  16. About Solar Radiation Intensity Measurements and Data Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICH-VANCEA Claudiu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the intensity of solar radiation is one of the directions of investigation necessary for the implementation of photovoltaic systems in a particular geographical area. This can be done by using specific measuring equipment (pyranometer sensors based onthermal or photovoltaic principle. In this paper it is presented a method for measuring solar radiation (which has two main components - direct radiation and diffuse radiation with sensors based on photovoltaic principle. Such data are processed for positioning solarpanels, in order their efficiency to be maximized.

  17. Influence of the Centaurs and TNOs on the main belt and its families

    OpenAIRE

    Galiazzo, Mattia Alvise; Wiegert, Paul; Aljbaae, Safwan

    2016-01-01

    Centaurs are objects whose orbits are found between those of the giant planets. They are supposed to originate mainly from the TransNeptunian objects, and they are among the sources of NearEarth Objects.TransNeptunian Objects (TNOs) cross Neptune's orbit and produce the Centaurs. We investigate their interactions with main belt asteroids to determine if chaotic scattering caused by close encounters and impacts by these bodies may have played a role in the dynamical evolution of the main belt....

  18. Particle fluence measurements by activation technique for radiation damage studies

    CERN Document Server

    León-Florián, E; Furetta, C; Leroy, Claude

    1995-01-01

    High-level radiation environment can produce radiation damage in detectors and their associate electronic components. The establishment of a correlation between damage, irradiation level and absorbed dose requires a precise measurement of the fluence of particles causing the damage. The activation technique is frequently used for performing particle fluence measurements. A review of this technique is presented.

  19. Design, Construction and Calibration of a Solar Radiation Measuring Meter

    OpenAIRE

    Asiegbu, A. Daniel; Echeweozo, E. Odinakachi

    2014-01-01

    A digital solar radiation measuring instrument has been designed, constructed and calibrated. It incorporates a small rectangular silicon photocell as the sensor. On exposure to solar radiation, electromotive force which is proportional to radiation intensity is developed within the circuit. The device correlates voltage developed with available solar intensity. A standard solarimeter was therefore used to calibrate the device to translate the unit of its reading from Volt to Watt per square ...

  20. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, L. E.; Badawy, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care.

  1. Radiation Measurements in Simulated Ablation Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    effect in the presence of radiation, at speeds of 8 km/sec and over. The „ nitridation ‟ reaction is also important (Park 2006), where nitrogen atoms...conditions. Due to the long test time of this facility, and the cleanliness of the flow which avoids the surface damage caused in the expansion tubes...particulate components of the surface is very important, and full protection of exposed surfaces from oxidation has not yet been achieved. The nitridation

  2. Measurement and Modeling of Particle Radiation in Coal Flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäckström, Daniel; Johansson, Robert; Andersson, Klas Jerker;

    2014-01-01

    properties. The in-flame particle radiation was measured with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer connected to a water-cooled probe via fiber optics. In the cross-section of the flame investigated, the particles were found to be the dominating source of radiation. Apart from giving information...

  3. Traceability of radiation measurements: musings of a user

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1980-04-01

    Although users of radiation desire measurement traceability for a number of reasons, including legal, regulatory, contractual, and quality assurance requirements, there exists no real definition of the term in the technical literature. Definitions are proposed for both traceability and traceability to the National Bureau of Standards. The hierarchy of radiation standards is discussed and allowable uncertainties are given for each level. Areas of need with respect to radiation standards are identified, and a system of secondary radiation calibration laboratories is proposed as a means of providing quality calibrations and traceability on a routine basis.

  4. Measurement of absorbed dose and proposed radiation exposure level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masayuki; Furukawa, Tomo [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). Hospital

    2003-03-01

    Absorbed dose was measured in clinical X-ray examinations using thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD). Moreover, we distributed the levels of radiation exposure into 3 classes. The presumed dose of the internal organs, e.g., uterus dose, was computed to depth doses with a surface dose. This information provides a prediction of the influence of radiation, and the examination can be performed with the informed consent of the patient. Moreover, we examined the distribution of the level of absorbed dose. We proposed two kinds of radiation exposure level, one to the fetus in a pregnant woman and a general level of radiation exposure that is not applied to pregnant women. The levels were as follows: 0.5 mGy and 100 mGy were considered the boundaries for fetal radiation exposure in a pregnant woman, and 200 mGy and 3 Gy were considered the boundaries for the general level of radiation exposure (excluding pregnant women). (author)

  5. A ring system detected around the Centaur (10199) Chariklo

    CERN Document Server

    Braga-Ribas, F; Ortiz, J L; Snodgrass, C; Roques, F; Vieira-Martins, R; Camargo, J I B; Assafin, M; Duffard, R; Jehin, E; Pollock, J; Leiva, R; Emilio, M; Machado, D I; Colazo, C; Lellouch, E; Skottfelt, J; Gillon, M; Ligier, N; Maquet, L; Benedetti-Rossi, G; Gomes, A Ramos; Kervella, P; Monteiro, H; Sfair, R; Moutamid, M El; Tancredi, G; Spagnotto, J; Maury, A; Morales, N; Gil-Hutton, R; Roland, S; Ceretta, A; Gu, S -h; Wang, X -b; Harpsøe, K; Rabus, M; Manfroid, J; Opitom, C; Vanzi, L; Mehret, L; Lorenzini, L; Schneiter, E M; Melia, R; Lecacheux, J; Colas, F; Vachier, F; Widemann, T; Almenares, L; Sandness, R G; Char, F; Perez, V; Lemos, P; Martinez, N; Jørgensen, U G; Dominik, M; Roig, F; Reichart, D E; LaCluyze, A P; Haislip, J B; Ivarsen, K M; Moore, J P; Frank, N R; Lambas, D G

    2014-01-01

    Until now, rings have been detected in the Solar System exclusively around the four giant planets. Here we report the discovery of the first minor-body ring system around the Centaur object (10199) Chariklo, a body with equivalent radius 124$\\pm$9 km. A multi-chord stellar occultation revealed the presence of two dense rings around Chariklo, with widths of about 7 km and 3 km, optical depths 0.4 and 0.06, and orbital radii 391 and 405 km, respectively. The present orientation of the ring is consistent with an edge-on geometry in 2008, thus providing a simple explanation for the dimming of Chariklo's system between 1997 and 2008, and for the gradual disappearance of ice and other absorption features in its spectrum over the same period. This implies that the rings are partially composed of water ice. These rings may be the remnants of a debris disk, which were possibly confined by embedded kilometre-sized satellites.

  6. When Lulu met the Centaur: Photographic traces of creaturely love

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Pettman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The brief triangular love between Nietzche, Salomé, and Rée – as crystallised in the famous photograph of kitsch (literal horse-play, where the woman is depicted as treating the two men as beasts of burden – allows us to consider the role of ‘creaturely love’ in our more general understanding of the lover’s discourse. That is to say, through such images we can explore the role and figure of the animal within ‘the anthropological machine’, itself designed to produce a sense of the human from the inhuman (especially through mediated forms of intimacy. Further, in the different intermedial relationships between photography, poetry, and philosophy, the Centaur – in the letters and texts circulated by this group (later including Rilke – provides a charged specific totem for a libidinal ecology of souls, striving to understand themselves as simultaneously creaturely and spiritual. Such a figure allowed both a recognition and a disavowal of the nonhuman basis (and telos of human affections.

  7. Physical properties of the extreme centaur and super-comet candidate 2013 AZ60

    CERN Document Server

    Pál, A; Horner, J; Szakáts, R; Vilenius, E; Müller, Th G; Acosta-Pulido, J; Licandro, J; Cabrera-Lavers, A; Sárneczky, K; Szabó, Gy M; Thirouin, A; Sipőcz, B; Dózsa, Á; Duffard, R

    2015-01-01

    We present estimates of the basic physical properties -- including size and albedo -- of the extreme Centaur 2013 AZ60. These properties have been derived from optical and thermal infrared measurements. Our optical measurements revealed a likely full period of ~9.4 h with a shallow amplitude of 4.5%. By combining optical brightness information and thermal emission data, we are able to derive a diameter of 62.3 +/- 5.3 km and a geometric albedo of 2.9% -- corresponding to an extremely dark surface. Additionally, our finding of ~> 50 Jm^{-2}K^{-1}s^{-1/2} for the thermal inertia is also noticeably for objects in such a distance. The results of dynamical simulations yield an unstable orbit, with a 50% probability that the target will be ejected from the Solar System within 700,000 years. The current orbit of this object as well as its instability could imply a pristine cometary surface. This possibility is in agreement with the observed low geometric albedo and red photometric colour indices for the object, whic...

  8. Development of radiation detection and measurement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, B. S.; Ham, C. S.; Chung, C. E. and others

    2000-03-01

    This report contains descriptions on the following six items. The first item is the result of a study on CsI(TI) crystals with their light emitting characteristics and the result of a study on plastic scintillators. The second item is the result of a study on advanced radiation detectors and includes experiments for the effect of using a Compton suppressor with an HPGe detector. For the third item, we describe the results of a design work done using EGS4 for a thickness gauge, a density gauge, and a level gauge. The fourth item contains descriptions on the prototype circuit systems developed for a level gauge, a thickness gauge, and for a survey meter. The fifth part contains the computed tomography algorithm and a prototype scanning system developed for a CT system. As the sixth and the last item, we describe the prototype high precision heat source and the prototype heat-voltage converter which we have designed and fabricated.

  9. Influence of the Centaurs and TNOs on the main belt and its families

    CERN Document Server

    Galiazzo, Mattia Alvise; Aljbaae, Safwan

    2016-01-01

    Centaurs are objects whose orbits are found between those of the giant planets. They are supposed to originate mainly from the TransNeptunian objects, and they are among the sources of NearEarth Objects.TransNeptunian Objects (TNOs) cross Neptune's orbit and produce the Centaurs. We investigate their interactions with main belt asteroids to determine if chaotic scattering caused by close encounters and impacts by these bodies may have played a role in the dynamical evolution of the main belt. We find that Centaurs and TNOs that reach the inner Solar System can modify the orbits of main belt asteroids, though only if their mass is of the order of 1 billion less the mass of the sun for single encounters or, one order less in the case of multiple close encounters. Centaurs and TNOs are unlikely to have significantly dispersed young asteroid families in the main belt, but they can have perturbed some old asteroid families. Current main belt asteroids that originated as Centaurs or Trans-Neptunian Objects may lie ...

  10. Influence of the Centaurs and TNOs on the main belt and its families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiazzo, Mattia A.; Wiegert, Paul; Aljbaae, Safwan

    2016-12-01

    Centaurs are objects whose orbits are found between those of the giant planets. They are supposed to originate mainly from the Trans-Neptunian objects, and they are among the sources of Near-Earth Objects. Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) cross Neptune's orbit and produce the Centaurs. We investigate their interactions with main belt asteroids to determine if chaotic scattering caused by close encounters and impacts by these bodies may have played a role in the dynamical evolution of the main belt. We find that Centaurs and TNOs that reach the inner Solar System can modify the orbits of main belt asteroids, though only if their mass is of the order of 10^{-9} m_{⊙} for single encounters or, one order less in case of multiple close encounters. Centaurs and TNOs are unlikely to have significantly dispersed young asteroid families in the main belt, but they could have perturbed some old asteroid families. Current main belt asteroids that originated as Centaurs or Trans-Neptunian Objects may lie in the outer belt with short lifetime ≤ 4 My, most likely between 2.8 and 3.2 au at larger eccentricities than typical of main belt asteroids.

  11. Radiation risk estimation based on measurement error models

    CERN Document Server

    Masiuk, Sergii; Shklyar, Sergiy; Chepurny, Mykola; Likhtarov, Illya

    2017-01-01

    This monograph discusses statistics and risk estimates applied to radiation damage under the presence of measurement errors. The first part covers nonlinear measurement error models, with a particular emphasis on efficiency of regression parameter estimators. In the second part, risk estimation in models with measurement errors is considered. Efficiency of the methods presented is verified using data from radio-epidemiological studies.

  12. Radiation dose measurement of paediatric patients in Estonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepler, K. [Training Centre of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tartu (Estonia); Lintrop, M. [Department of Radiology, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu (Estonia); Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Eek, V.; Filippova, I. [Estonian Radiation Protection Centre, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2003-06-01

    According to the Medical Exposure Directive (97/43/Euratom) the radiation doses to patients should be measured in every hospital and doses should be compared to the reference doses established by the competent authorities. Special attention should be paid to the paediatric x-ray examinations, because the paediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adult patients. The requirement of measurements of radiation dose to patients is not yet included in the Estonian radiation act, but the purpose to join the European Communities makes the quality control in radiology very actual in Estonia. The necessity exists to introduce suitable measurement methods in the Xray departments of Estonian hospitals for establishing feedback system for radiologists, radiographers and medical physicists in optimising the radiation burden of patients and image quality. (orig.)

  13. Optical fibers and their applications for radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    When optical fibers are used in a strong radiation field, it is necessary to increase the radiation-resistant capacity. Aiming at the improvement of such property, the characteristics of recent optical fibers made from quartz-glass were reviewed and the newly developed techniques for radiation measurement using those fibers were summarized in this report. Since optical fibers became able to use in the levels near the core conditions, their applications have started in various fields of technologies related to radiation. By combining the optical fibers and a small sensor, it became possible to act as `Key Component` for measuring wide range radioactivity from a trace activity to a strong radiation field in the reactor core. Presently, the fibers are utilized for investigation of the optical mechanisms related in radiation, evaluation of their validities so on. Further, the optical fibers are expected to utilize in a multi-parametric measuring system which allows to concomitantly determine the radiation, temperature, pressure, flow amount etc. as an incore monitor. (M.N.)

  14. Measurement of background gamma radiation in the northern Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordner, Autumn S; Crosswell, Danielle A; Katz, Ainsley O; Shah, Jill T; Zhang, Catherine R; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Hughes, Emlyn W; Ruderman, Malvin A

    2016-06-21

    We report measurements of background gamma radiation levels on six islands in the northern Marshall Islands (Enewetak, Medren, and Runit onEnewetak Atoll; Bikini and Nam on Bikini Atoll; and Rongelap on Rongelap Atoll). Measurable excess radiation could be expected from the decay of (137)Cs produced by the US nuclear testing program there from 1946 to 1958. These recordings are of relevance to safety of human habitation and resettlement. We find low levels of gamma radiation for the settled island of Enewetak [mean = 7.6 millirem/year (mrem/y) = 0.076 millisievert/year (mSv/y)], larger levels of gamma radiation for the island of Rongelap (mean = 19.8 mrem/y = 0.198 mSv/y), and relatively high gamma radiation on the island of Bikini (mean = 184 mrem/y = 1.84 mSv/y). Distributions of gamma radiation levels are provided, and hot spots are discussed. We provide interpolated maps for four islands (Enewetak, Medren, Bikini, and Rongelap), and make comparisons to control measurements performed on the island of Majuro in the southern Marshall Islands, measurements made in Central Park in New York City, and the standard agreed upon by the United States and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) governments (100 mrem/y = 1 mSv/y). External gamma radiation levels on Bikini Island significantly exceed this standard (P = <0.01), and external gamma radiation levels on the other islands are below the standard. To determine conclusively whether these islands are safe for habitation, radiation exposure through additional pathways such as food ingestion must be considered.

  15. "TNOs are Cool": A Survey of the Transneptunian Region XI: A Herschel-PACS view of 16 Centaurs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffard, R.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Vilenius, E.; Ortiz, J. L.; Mueller, Th; Fornasier, S.; Lellouch, E.; Mommert, M.; Pal, A.; Kiss, C.; Mueller, M.; Stansberry, J.; Delsanti, A.; Peixinho, N.; Trilling, D.

    2014-01-01

    Centaurs are the transitional population between trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and Jupiter-family comets. For this reason it is possible to access the smaller ones, which is more difficult to do with the TNO population. The goal of this work is to characterize a set of 16 Centaurs in terms of their

  16. Measurement of radiative widths at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Krämer, Markus

    2014-01-01

    COMPASS is a multipurpose fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS, which addresses a wide variety of physic topics, in particular the structure and spectroscopy of hadrons. Diffractive dissociation of pions on nuclear targets allows for clean access to the light meson spectrum. In addition meson production can be studied in pion-photon reactions via the Primakoff effect, where high-energetic pions react with the quasi-real photon field surrounding the target nuclei. At low pion-photon center-of-mass energies, these reactions are governed by chiral dynamics and contain information relevant for chiral perturbation theory. At higher energies, resonances are produced and their radiative coupling is investigated. During a short run using a 190GeV $\\pi^-$ beam and a lead target in the year 2004, 3 million exclusive $\\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ events in the region of small squared four-momentum transfer, i.e. t' < 0:01GeV$^2$=c$^2$, have been recorded. At very low t' < 0:001GeV$^2$=c$^2$, the contribution from electroma...

  17. The definition analyses of radiation temperature measurement area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Tairan; Cheng Xiaofang; Zhong Maohua

    2008-01-01

    In the research of primary spectrum pyrometry, this paper discussed the definition problem of radiation tem-perature measurement area based on the measurement coordinates. For the linear spectrum emissivity model and im-proved monotonic spectrum emissivity model, the characteristics of radiation temperature measurement area restricted by the measurement coordinates were theoretically analyzed, through the investigations of the temperature and emissivity co-ordinate axes. Choosing the specific primary spectrum pyrometer as an example in applications, the theoretical area of radiation temperature measurement of this pyrometer was given and it was verified through blackbody experiments. The discussions of this paper will provide the necessary foundation for the theory research development of primary spectrum pyrometry and the realization of technical applications.

  18. Self-regulating heater application to Shuttle/Centaur hydrazine fuel line thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkrich, David B.

    1987-01-01

    The Shuttle/Centaur high energy upper stage vehicle thermal environments were more severe than previous Centaur vehicle thermal environments, creating need for a new hydrazine fuel line thermal control technique. Constant power heaters did not satisfy power dissipation requirements, because the power required to maintain fuel line thermal control during cold conditions exceeded the maximum power allowable during hot conditions. Therefore, a Raychem Thermolimit self-regulating heater was selected for this application, and was attached to the hydrazine fuel line with Kapton and aluminum foil tapes. Fuel line/heater thermal modeling and subsequent thermal vacuum chamber testing simulated heater thermal performance during all worst-case Shuttle/Centaur thermal environmental conditions. Fuel line temperatures were maintained between the 4C to 71C limits during all analytical and test cases. Finally, the thermal model predictions were correlated with the test data, thereby ensuring that the model would provide satisfactory predictions for future missions and/or vehicles.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  20. Evaluation of the automated ADVIA centaur® XP syphilis assay for serological testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Sharon; Zhao, Huiqin; Tan, Phyllis; Saw, Betty; Sethi, Sunil

    2017-02-20

    We evaluated the performance of the ADVIA Centaur XP Syphilis assay (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY, USA) using samples previously tested on the ARCHITECT i4000SR system (Abbott Diagnostics, Lake Forest, IL, USA) and confirmed by the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA) (SERODIA-TPPA, Fujirebio Diagnostics Inc., Malvern, PA, USA). Clinical patient information was included to aid resolution of discordant samples where available. Precision, interference, and cross-reactivity were also assessed. Relative to patient clinical status, the sensitivity of both the ADVIA Centaur XP and the ARCHITECT assays was 100% (95% CI, 93.9-100), and the specificity of the ADVIA Centaur XP assay was 95.5% (95% CI, 90.4-98.3), which was slightly higher than that of the ARCHITECT assay at 93.9% (95% CI, 88.4-97.3). Overall agreement relative to patient clinical status was 96.9% (95% CI, 93.3-98.8) for the ADVIA Centaur XP assay and 95.8% (95% CI, 91.9-98.2) for the ARCHITECT assay. Overall agreement between the two automated assays was 96.9% (95% CI, 93.3-98.8). ADVIA Centaur XP assay precision was <5% at all index values tested. No significant interference was observed for lipemia or hemolysis; a small effect was seen with some samples for bilirubin. The assay exhibited no significant cross-reactivity with a number of potential interfering factors. The ADVIA Centaur XP Syphilis assay can be considered a sensitive and accurate assay for identification of treponemal antibodies in screening populations as well as patients presenting with suspicion of syphilitic infection.

  1. Coordinated weather balloon solar radiation measurements during a solar eclipse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R G; Marlton, G J; Williams, P D; Nicoll, K A

    2016-09-28

    Solar eclipses provide a rapidly changing solar radiation environment. These changes can be studied using simple photodiode sensors, if the radiation reaching the sensors is unaffected by cloud. Transporting the sensors aloft using standard meteorological instrument packages modified to carry extra sensors, provides one promising but hitherto unexploited possibility for making solar eclipse radiation measurements. For the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse, a coordinated campaign of balloon-carried solar radiation measurements was undertaken from Reading (51.44°N, 0.94°W), Lerwick (60.15°N, 1.13°W) and Reykjavik (64.13°N, 21.90°W), straddling the path of the eclipse. The balloons reached sufficient altitude at the eclipse time for eclipse-induced variations in solar radiation and solar limb darkening to be measured above cloud. Because the sensor platforms were free to swing, techniques have been evaluated to correct the measurements for their changing orientation. In the swing-averaged technique, the mean value across a set of swings was used to approximate the radiation falling on a horizontal surface; in the swing-maximum technique, the direct beam was estimated by assuming that the maximum solar radiation during a swing occurs when the photodiode sensing surface becomes normal to the direction of the solar beam. Both approaches, essentially independent, give values that agree with theoretical expectations for the eclipse-induced radiation changes.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  2. Coordinated weather balloon solar radiation measurements during a solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Solar eclipses provide a rapidly changing solar radiation environment. These changes can be studied using simple photodiode sensors, if the radiation reaching the sensors is unaffected by cloud. Transporting the sensors aloft using standard meteorological instrument packages modified to carry extra sensors, provides one promising but hitherto unexploited possibility for making solar eclipse radiation measurements. For the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse, a coordinated campaign of balloon-carried solar radiation measurements was undertaken from Reading (51.44°N, 0.94°W), Lerwick (60.15°N, 1.13°W) and Reykjavik (64.13°N, 21.90°W), straddling the path of the eclipse. The balloons reached sufficient altitude at the eclipse time for eclipse-induced variations in solar radiation and solar limb darkening to be measured above cloud. Because the sensor platforms were free to swing, techniques have been evaluated to correct the measurements for their changing orientation. In the swing-averaged technique, the mean value across a set of swings was used to approximate the radiation falling on a horizontal surface; in the swing-maximum technique, the direct beam was estimated by assuming that the maximum solar radiation during a swing occurs when the photodiode sensing surface becomes normal to the direction of the solar beam. Both approaches, essentially independent, give values that agree with theoretical expectations for the eclipse-induced radiation changes. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse’. PMID:27550757

  3. Satellite data sets for the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, L.; Bernstein, R.L. [SeaSpace Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This abstract describes the type of data obtained from satellite measurements in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The data sets have been widely used by the ARM team to derive cloud-top altitude, cloud cover, snow and ice cover, surface temperature, water vapor, and wind, vertical profiles of temperature, and continuoous observations of weather needed to track and predict severe weather.

  4. Using Radiation Pattern Measurements for Mobile Handset Performance Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2005-01-01

    The mean effective gain (MEG) is an attractive performance measure of mobile handsets, since it incorporates both directional and polarization properties of the handset and environment. In this work the MEG is computed from measured spherical radiation patterns of five different mobile handsets...

  5. Mobile Handset Performance Evaluation Using Radiation Pattern Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2006-01-01

    The mean effective gain is an attractive performance measure of mobile handsets, since it incorporates both directional and polarization properties of the handset and environment. In this work the mean effective gain is computed from measured spherical radiation patterns of five different mobile ...

  6. Measurements of terahertz radiation generated using a metallic, corrugated pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, Karl; Stupakov, Gennady; Antipov, Sergey; Fedurin, Mikhail; Kusche, Karl; Swinson, Christina; Xiang, Dao

    2017-02-01

    A method for producing narrow-band THz radiation proposes passing an ultra-relativistic beam through a metallic pipe with small periodic corrugations. We present results of a measurement of such an arrangement at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). Our pipe was copper and was 5 cm long; the aperture was cylindrically symmetric, with a 1 mm (radius) bore and a corrugation depth (peak-to-peak) of 60 μm. In the experiment we measured both the effect on the beam of the structure wakefield and the spectral properties of the radiation excited by the beam. We began by injecting a relatively long beam compared to the wavelength of the radiation, but with short rise time, to excite the structure, and then used a downstream spectrometer to infer the radiation wavelength. This was followed by injecting a shorter bunch, and then using an interferometer (also downstream of the corrugated pipe) to measure the spectrum of the induced THz radiation. For the THz pulse we obtain and compare with calculations: the central frequency, the bandwidth, and the spectral power-compared to a diffraction radiation background signal.

  7. Measurement of microwave radiation from electron beam in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, I.S.; Akimune, H. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Fukushima, M.; Ikeda, D. [Institute of Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Inome, Y. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Matthews, J.N. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 4112-0830 (United States); Ogio, S. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Sagawa, H. [Institute of Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Sako, T. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Shibata, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Yamamoto, T., E-mail: tokonatu@konan-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan)

    2016-02-21

    We report the use of an electron light source (ELS) located at the Telescope Array Observatory in Utah, USA, to measure the isotropic microwave radiation from air showers. To simulate extensive air showers, the ELS emits an electron beam into the atmosphere and a parabola antenna system for the satellite communication is used to measure the microwave radiation from the electron beam. Based on this measurement, an upper limit on the intensity of a 12.5 GHz microwave radiation at 0.5 m from a 10{sup 18} eV air shower was estimated to be 3.96×10{sup −16} W m{sup −2} Hz{sup −1} with a 95% confidence level.

  8. Online Radiation Dose Measurement System for ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Particle detectors and readout electronics in the high energy physics experiment ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN operate in radiation field containing photons, charged particles and neutrons. The particles in the radiation field originate from proton-proton interactions as well as from interactions of these particles with material in the experimental apparatus. In the innermost parts of ATLAS detector components will be exposed to ionizing doses exceeding 100 kGy. Energetic hadrons will also cause displacement damage in silicon equivalent to fluences of several times 10e14 1 MeV-neutrons per cm2. Such radiation doses can have severe influence on the performance of detectors. It is therefore very important to continuously monitor the accumulated doses to understand the detector performance and to correctly predict the lifetime of radiation sensitive components. Measurements of doses are important also to verify the simulations and represent a crucial input into the models used for predicting future ...

  9. Measurement Of Double-radiative Pion Capture On Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, S

    2003-01-01

    The first measurement of double radiative pion capture on hydrogen is presented. The experiment was conducted at the TRIUMF cyclotron using the RMC spectrometer, and detected γ-ray coincidences following π − stops in liquid hydrogen. The branching ratio for the double radiative capture reaction was found to be (3.05 ± 0.27 (stat.) ± 0.31 (syst.)) × 10−5. The measured branching ratio and angle-energy distributions support the theoretical prediction of a dominant contribution from the π−π + → γγ annihilation mechanism.

  10. Measurements of Terahertz Radiation Generated using a Metallic, Corrugated Pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Bane, Karl; Antipov, Sergey; Fedurin, Mikhail; Kusche, Karl; Swinson, Christina; Xiang, Dao

    2016-01-01

    A method for producing narrow-band THz radiation proposes passing an ultra-relativistic beam through a metallic pipe with small periodic corrugations. We present results of a measurement of such an arrangement at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). Our pipe was copper and was 5 cm long; the aperture was cylindrically symmetric, with a 1 mm (radius) bore and a corrugation depth (peak-to-peak) of 60 um. In the experiment we measured both the effect on the beam of the structure wakefield and the spectral properties of the radiation excited by the beam. We began by injecting a relatively long beam compared to the wavelength of the radiation, but with short rise time, to excite the structure, and then used a downstream spectrometer to infer the radiation wavelength. This was followed by injecting a shorter bunch, and then using an interferometer (also downstream of the corrugated pipe) to measure the spectrum of the induced THz radiation. For the THz pulse we obtain and compare with calculations: the cen...

  11. A New Quantum Sensor for Measuring Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.; Thomas, T.; Heinicke, D.; Peterson, R.; Morgan, P.; McDermitt, D. K.; Burba, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    A quantum sensor measures photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, in μmol of photons m-2 s-1) in the 400 nm to 700 nm waveband. Plants utilize this radiation to drive photosynthesis, though individual plant responses to incident radiation may vary within this range. The new quantum sensor (model LI-190R, LI-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NE), with an optical filter and silicon photodiode detector housed in a cosine-corrected head, is designed to provide a better response to incident radiation across the 400-700 nm range. The new design is expected to significantly improve spectral response due to uniformity across the PAR waveband, but particularly in the wavebands from 520 nm to 600 nm and 665 nm to 680 nm, and sharp cutoffs in the regions below and above the PAR waveband. Special care was taken to make sure that PAR sensor would not substantially respond to incident radiation above the 700 nm threshold because this can lead to errors when performing measurements in environments with a large proportion of near-infrared radiation, such as canopy understory. The physical housing of the sensor is designed to be weather-resistant, to effectively shed precipitation, provide protection at high temperature and high humidity conditions, and has a cosine-corrected response to 82° zenith angle. The latter is particularly important when measuring incident radiation at low elevation angles, diffuse light, or low light conditions. This presentation describes the principles of the new design, and shows the performance results from field experiments and laboratory tests.

  12. Diffraction and polarization effects in Earth radiation budget measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, J R; Barki, A R; Priestley, K J

    2016-12-01

    Thermal radiation emitted and reflected from the Earth and viewed from near-Earth orbit may be characterized by its spectral distribution, its degree of coherence, and its state of polarization. The current generation of broadband Earth radiation budget instruments has been designed to minimize the effect of diffraction and polarization on science products. We used Monte Carlo ray-trace (MCRT) models that treat individual rays as quasi-monochromatic, polarized entities to explore the possibility of improving the performance of such instruments by including measures of diffraction and polarization during calibration and operation. We have demonstrated that diffraction and polarization sensitivity associated with typical Earth radiation budget instrument design features has a negligible effect on measurements.

  13. Thermal Properties Of Trans-neptunian Objects And Centaurs From Combined Herschel And Spitzer Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lellouch, Emmanuel; Santos-Sanz, P.; Mommert, M.; Fornasier, S.; Stansberry, J.; Müller, T.; Duffard, R.; Ortiz, J.; Kiss, C.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, M.; Lacerda, P.; Harris, A.; TNOs are Cool Team, [No Value

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the thermal properties of about 70 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs observed with Herschel Space Observatory (either PACS or PACS/SPIRE) and Spitzer (MIPS). The combined wavelength range is 24-160 μm and additionally up to 500 μm for a few targets. We apply radiometr

  14. TNOs are Cool: A Survey of the Transneptunian Region: A Herschel-PACSview of 16 Centaurs

    CERN Document Server

    Duffard, R; Santos-Sanz, P; Vilenius, E; Ortiz, J L; Mueller, Th; Fornasier, S; Lellouch, E; Mommert, M; Pal, A; Kiss, C; Mueller, M; Stansberry, J; Delsanti, A; Peixinho, N; Trilling, D

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize a set of 16 Centaurs in terms of their size, albedo, and thermal properties. We study the correlations for a more extended sample, obtained from the literature, of diameter, albedo, orbital parameters and spectral slopes. We have done three-band photometric observations using Herschel/PACS and we use a consistent method for data reduction and aperture photometry of this sample to obtain monochromatic flux densities at 70, 100 and 160 $\\mu$m. Additionally, we use Spitzer/MIPS flux densities at 24 and 70 $\\mu$m when available. We also include the Centaurs sample observed only with Spitzer/MIPS and Scattered Disk Objects, a dynamical family of TNOs, presented in a previous work of the team. We have determined new radiometric sizes and albedos of 16 Centaurs. The first conclusion is that the albedo of the Centaurs is not determined by their orbit. Similarly we do not find any correlation between diameter and orbital parameters. We also find that most of the objects in our ...

  15. Listing of solar radiation measuring equipment and glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, E. A.; Greenbaum, S. A.; Patel, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt is made to list and provide all available information about solar radiation measuring equipment which are being manufactured and are available on the market. The list is in tabular form and includes sensor type, response time, cost data and comments for each model. A cost code is included which shows ranges only.

  16. Detection and spectral measurements of coherent synchrotron radiation at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2010-02-15

    The operation of high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) underlies tremendous demands on high quality electron beams with high peak currents. At the Free-Electron-Laser in Hamburg (FLASH), two magnetic bunch compressors are used to compress the electron bunches longitudinally. In the bunch compressor magnets, these short electron bunches generate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). This CSR contains information on the longitudinal bunch profile, which is relevant for driving an FEL. In order to investigate coherent synchrotron radiation at the second bunch compressor BC3 at FLASH, a new setup behind the last dipole was installed. For the detection of coherent synchrotron radiation, which is emitted in the infrared regime, pyroelectric detectors were used. These pyroelectric detectors have been calibrated at the free-electron laser FELIX in the wavelength range from 5 {mu}m to 110 {mu}m. For characterisation of the emitted radiation, a transverse scanning device was used to measure the transverse intensity distribution. Various transmission filters were used to obtain additional information about the spectral content. In order to get spectral information with high resolution over a wide wavelength range, a rotating mirror spectrometer using reflective blazed gratings was installed. Using this spectrometer, the first spectral measurements of coherent synchrotron radiation at FLASH in a wavelength range from 10 {mu}m to 160 {mu}m were done. (orig.)

  17. Radiation profiles measured through clouds using a return glider radiosonde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf; Kivi, Rigel

    2016-04-01

    With new and improved radiation sensors in a small glider aircraft vertical flights through clouds have been conducted. This new Return Glider Radiosonde (RG-R) is lifted up with double balloon technique to keep the radiation instruments as horizontal as possible during ascent. The RG-R is equipped with a routine radiosonde to transmit the data to a ground station and an autopilot to fly the glider radiosonde back to the launch site, where it lands autonomous with a parachute. The RG-R was successfully tested and deployed for tropospheric and stratospheric radiation measurements up to 30 hPa (24 km altitude) at the GRUAN sites Payerne (Switzerland) and Sodankylä (Finland). Radiation profiles and the radiation budget through the atmosphere during different daytimes and under cloud-free and cloudy situations will be shown in relation to temperature and humidity at the surface and in the atmosphere. The RG-R flight characteristics and new measurement possibilities will also be discussed.

  18. Research on UV radiation measurements and correction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Dai, Cai-hong; Yu, Jai-lin; Wu, Zhi-feng; Ouyang, Hui-quan

    2011-06-01

    The widely use of UV radiation led to the demand for improved understanding of the properties of instrumentation used to measure this radiation. The UV radiometers are mainly influenced by the factors as operating conditions, environmental conditions and the UV sources to be calibrated and measured. In addition, large errors can occur due to out-of-band, non-linear, and non-ideal cosine or spatial response of the UV meters. Through a new designed measurement system for cosine response property, we do some measuring experiments to 21 kinds of UV radiometers and calculate the relative deviation of each UV meters. The cosine errors are existed universally. It is recommended that keeping the UV source closing to a point source and perpendicular to UV detector when it is measured is very important. We also design and fulfill an experimental system to reflect the measuring errors of UV radiometers when measuring sources and calibrated sources are mismatched. The results show that if the measurement is of a broadband source, it is wise to unify the measuring and calibrated source or the two sources have similar spectral distribution. If that is not possible, we can calculate the spectral mismatch correction factor and spectral matching characteristic factor to correct the measuring data. All the works above are to let the users in appropriate usage of UV Radiometers in a standardized and comparable way and make the measurement quantities more accurate.

  19. Calibration for Radiation Protection Equipment for the Measuring Airborne Tritium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xi-lin; SHEN; En-wei; WEI; Ke-xin; WANG; Kong-zhao; LI; Hou-wen; GE; Jian-an; LV; Xiao-xia

    2012-01-01

    <正>Monitoring airborne tritium is an important routine work in heavy water reactor nuclear power stations and the units related with tritium. Nowadays direct measuring instruments like hand carrying tritium monitors are more often used in routine workshop environment check. Need for calibrating such monitors was suggested. A trial work about the calibration for radiation protection equipment for measuring airborne tritium was carried out with a domestic standard EJ/T 1077-1998 equivalent that of IEC 710.

  20. Measuring electron-positron annihilation radiation from laser plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui; Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Seely, J.; Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Pereira, N. [Artep Inc., Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Gregori, G.; Falk, K.; Mithen, J.; Murphy, C. D. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    We investigated various diagnostic techniques to measure the 511 keV annihilation radiations. These include step-wedge filters, transmission crystal spectroscopy, single-hit CCD detectors, and streaked scintillating detection. While none of the diagnostics recorded conclusive results, the step-wedge filter that is sensitive to the energy range between 100 keV and 700 keV shows a signal around 500 keV that is clearly departing from a pure Bremsstrahlung spectrum and that we ascribe to annihilation radiation.

  1. Measurement of parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodke, A D; Husain, Riyasat; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Surendra; Puntambekar, T A

    2012-10-01

    The paper presents the measurement of optics parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source, which include betatron tune, beta function, dispersion function, natural chromaticity, corrected chromaticity, central RF frequency, momentum compaction factor, and linear betatron coupling. Two methods were used for beta function measurement; a conventional quadrupole scan method and a method using the fitting of the orbit response matrix. A robust Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used for nonlinear least square fitting of the orbit response matrix. In this paper, detailed methods for the parameter measurements are described. The measured results are discussed and compared with the theoretical values obtained using accelerator simulation code Accelerator Toolbox in MATLAB.

  2. Measuring the radiation field and radiation hard detectors at JET: Recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Edlington, T.; Angelone, M.; Bertalot, L.; Bolshakova, I.; Bonheure, G.; Brzozowski, J.; Coccorese, V.; Holyaka, R.; Kiptily, V.; Lengar, I.; Morgan, P.; Pillon, M.; Popovichev, S.; Prior, P.; Prokopowicz, R.; Quercia, A.; Rubel, M.; Santala, M.; Shevelev, A.; Syme, B.; Vagliasindi, G.; Villari, R.; Zoita, V. L.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2008-08-01

    Since in ITER the radiation field will be much more demanding than that of present day devices, research programmes at JET are aimed at developing radiation hard diagnostics and related components. Initially, significant efforts are devoted to determining the radiation field of both the plasma and in the immediate environment with better accuracy. New developments in MCNP calculations and dedicated measurements provide useful information about the radiation field in the Torus Hall, even during non-operational periods. The effect of using Beryllium in the near future for JET first wall, is being assessed. New materials for activation samples are under consideration and will be tested to improve the calibration accuracy of JET neutron diagnostics. The long-term goal of this work is to obtain spectrometric information from an appropriate combination of different materials. Several studies are under way to modify the radiation field at the detectors by using LiH or pure water as neutron filters, to alleviate the problem of the background in γ-ray measurements. A suite of radiation hard detectors for neutrons, magnetic field and charged particles are being developed. Super-heated fluid neutron detectors, used for yield and imaging, are being upgraded, in order to provide a broad-band spectrometric capability. Chemical vapour deposited diamond diodes are being qualified as counters and as spectrometers. Prototypes of Hall probes made of InSb have been installed on the machine and have provided some preliminary results. Si-on-insulator detectors are under development for use in neutral particle analysers and are currently being bench-tested. Some attention is being devoted to optical components, fibres and mirrors, and to investigating radiation hard electronics using reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Arrays.

  3. Probing Radiation Damage in Plutonium Alloys with Multiple Measurement Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W

    2010-04-21

    A material subjected to radiation damage will usually experience changes in its physical properties. Measuring these changes in the physical properties provides a basis to study radiation damage in a material which is important for a variety of real world applications from reactor materials to semiconducting devices. When investigating radiation damage, the relative sensitivity of any given property can vary considerably based on the concentration and type of damage present as well as external parameters such as the temperature and starting material composition. By measuring multiple physical properties, these differing sensitivities can be leveraged to provide greater insight into the different aspects of radiation damage accumulation, thereby providing a broader understanding of the mechanisms involved. In this report, self-damage from {alpha}-particle decay in Pu is investigated by measuring two different properties: magnetic susceptibility and resistivity. The results suggest that while the first annealing stage obeys second order chemical kinetics, the primary mechanism is not the recombination of vacancy-interstitial close pairs.

  4. A Comparison of EAST Shock-Tube Radiation Measurements with a New Air Radiation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher O.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between the recent EAST shock tube radiation measurements (Grinstead et al., AIAA 2008-1244) and the HARA radiation model. The equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation measurements are studied for conditions relevant to lunar-return shock-layers; specifically shock velocities ranging from 9 to 11 kilometers per second at initial pressures of 0.1 and 0.3 Torr. The simulated shock-tube flow is assumed one-dimensional and is calculated using the LAURA code, while a detailed nonequilibrium radiation prediction is obtained in an uncoupled manner from the HARA code. The measured and predicted intensities are separated into several spectral ranges to isolate significant spectral features, mainly strong atomic line multiplets. The equations and physical data required for the prediction of these strong atomic lines are reviewed and their uncertainties identified. The 700-1020 nm wavelength range, which accounts for roughly 30% of the radiative flux to a peak-heating lunar return shock-layer, is studied in detail and the measurements and predictions are shown to agree within 15% in equilibrium. The plus or minus 1.5% uncertainty on the measured shock velocity is shown to cause up to a plus or minus 30% difference in the predicted radiation. This band of predictions contains the measured values in almost all cases. For the highly nonequilibrium 0.1 Torr cases, the nonequilibrium radiation peaks are under-predicted by about half. This under-prediction is considered acceptable when compared to the order-of-magnitude over-prediction obtained using a Boltzmann population of electronic states. The reasonable comparison in the nonequilibrium regions provides validation for both the non-Boltzmann modeling in HARA and the thermochemical nonequilibrium modeling in LAURA. The N2 (+)(1-) and N2(2+) molecular band systems are studied in the 290 480 nm wavelength range for both equilibrium and nonequilibrium regimes. The non-Boltzmann rate models for these

  5. Recent measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.

    2001-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for hadron therapy overlap the low end of the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation applications, Z=1-26 and approximately 100-1000 MeV/nucleon. It has been known for some time that the nuclear interactions of the incident ions must be taken into account both in treatment planning and in understanding and addressing the effects of galactic cosmic ray ions on humans in space. Until relatively recently, most of the studies of nuclear fragmentation and transport in matter were driven by the interests of the nuclear physics and later, the hadron therapy communities. However, the experimental and theoretical methods and the accelerator facilities developed for use in heavy ion nuclear physics are directly applicable to radiotherapy and space radiation studies. I will briefly review relevant data taken recently at various accelerators, and discuss the implications of the measurements for radiotherapy, radiobiology and space radiation research.

  6. Recent measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: nuclear physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J

    2001-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for hadron therapy overlap the low end of the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation applications, Z=1-26 and approximately 100-1000 MeV/nucleon. It has been known for some time that the nuclear interactions of the incident ions must be taken into account both in treatment planning and in understanding and addressing the effects of galactic cosmic ray ions on humans in space. Until relatively recently, most of the studies of nuclear fragmentation and transport in matter were driven by the interests of the nuclear physics and later, the hadron therapy communities. However, the experimental and theoretical methods and the accelerator facilities developed for use in heavy ion nuclear physics are directly applicable to radiotherapy and space radiation studies. I will briefly review relevant data taken recently at various accelerators, and discuss the implications of the measurements for radiotherapy, radiobiology and space radiation research.

  7. Measurement of Radiation Belt Partcles by MDS-1 Onboard SEDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H.; Koshiishi, H.; Goka, T.

    The Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment (SEDA) is on board the Mission Demonstration Test Satellite-1 (MDS-1) to measure the radiation environment, which was launched into geo-stationary transfer orbit (GTO) on February 4, 2002 with an apogee of about 35,700km, a perigee of about 500 km and an inclination of about 28.5 degrees. SEDA consists of the four instruments. Standard Dose Monitor monitors the electron and proton flux. Dosimeter measures the integrated radiation dose at fifty-six points of the satellite. Heavy Ion Telescope monitors the flux of heavy ions from He to Fe. Magnetometer measures the magnetic field in the magnetosphere. In this paper are described first results and comparison with the ISO standard model for the space environment

  8. Assessment and comparison of methods for solar ultraviolet radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leszczynski, K.

    1995-06-01

    In the study, the different methods to measure the solar ultraviolet radiation are compared. The methods included are spectroradiometric, erythemally weighted broadband and multi-channel measurements. The comparison of the different methods is based on a literature review and assessments of optical characteristics of the spectroradiometer Optronic 742 of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and of the erythemally weighted Robertson-Berger type broadband radiometers Solar Light models 500 and 501 of the Finnish Meteorological Institute and STUK. An introduction to the sources of error in solar UV measurements, to methods for radiometric characterization of UV radiometers together with methods for error reduction are presented. Reviews on experiences from world-wide UV monitoring efforts and instrumentation as well as on the results from international UV radiometer intercomparisons are also presented. (62 refs.).

  9. Half-brightness measurements of candidate radiation sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen Alexander

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge for human and robotic space missions. Practical luminescent sensors will depend heavily upon research investigating the resistance of these materials to ionizing radiation and the ability to anneal or self-heal the damage caused by such radiation. In 1951, Birks and Black experimentally showed that the luminescent efficiency of anthracene bombarded by alpha particles varies with total fluence. From 1990 to the present, we found that the Birks and Black relation describes the reduction in light emission yield for every tested luminescent material except lead phosphate glass due to proton irradiation. These results indicate that radiation produced quenching centers compete with emission for absorbed energy. The purpose of this thesis is to present new results from related luminescent materials by exposing them to a 1-3 MeV proton beam. Particular emphasis will be placed on recent measurements made with bright luminescent materials, such as zinc sulfide doped with manganese (ZnS:Mn), europium tetrakis dibenzoylmethide triethylammonium (EuD4TEA), an magnesium tetrakis dibenzoylmethide triethylammonium (MgD4TEA). This research can be used to help determine if luminescent materials can be used as a real-time sensor to detect ionizing radiation.

  10. Measurement of LINAC 90 degrees head leakage radiation TVL values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Mutic, Sasa; Low, Daniel

    2006-09-01

    One of the key components in modern LINAC room shielding design is the amount of 90 degrees head leakage radiation levels. With the general clinical acceptance of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique, accurate knowledge of this quantity has become even more important. Measurement of 90 degrees head leakage radiation of medical linear accelerators can be technically challenging due to the low dose rate causing poor signal-to-noise ratios in most detectors. 90 degrees leakage tenth-value layer (TVL) values in concrete have not been reported for the Elekta linear accelerators. This report describes our measurements of 90 degrees leakage TVL values for 6, 10, and 18 MV x-ray beams for an Elekta Precise Treatment System. A large-volume (1000 cm3) unpressurized ionization chamber and a high sensitivity electrometer, together with a separate chamber bias power supply, were used in these measurements in order to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. A lead enclosure, of minimum thickness 10 cm, was constructed inside the treatment room to house the ion chamber to reduce the influence of room-scattered radiation. A square aperture of 10 X 10 cm2 area was left in the shield and aimed towards the accelerator head. Measurements were performed with the chamber placed at approximately 2 m from the accelerator isocenter. Concrete slabs with individual dimensions of approximately 40 X 40 cm2 cross-sectional area and 5 cm thickness were placed between the accelerator head and the ion chamber for these measurements. The measurements were performed with total concrete thickness of up to 80 cm, so that values up to the third TVL were measured. These measurements showed thatthe first concrete TVL values are 22, 23, and 28 cm (8.6, 9.1, and 10.5 in.) for 6, 10, and 18 MV beams, while the average of the first 3 TVL's were 25, 26, and 29 cm (9.9, 10.2, and 11.5 in.). Measured values agreed to within 10% of previously reported values for Varian linear accelerators for

  11. Direct measurements of radiative capture reactions with DRAGON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Gregory

    2015-10-01

    Direct measurements of radiative proton and alpha capture reactions are crucial for understanding nucleosynthesis in a variety of astrophysical environments, including classical novae, supernovae, X-Ray bursts, and quiescent stellar burning. Often the most important reactions have very low cross sections or involve unstable targets, making laboratory measurements extremely challenging. The detector of recoils and gammas of nuclear reactions (DRAGON) at TRIUMF is a recoil mass separator designed to measure radiative capture reactions in inverse kinematics, with beam suppression factors as high as 1016. When combined with the intense radioactive beams available at the ISAC-I facility, DRAGON's capabilities are unique and world-leading. In this talk, I will give a brief technical overview of DRAGON before presenting results from recent experiments. Some highlights include the first-ever direct measurement of 38K(p , γ) 39Ca, a crucial reaction for determining the endpoint of nova nucleosynthesis, and measurements of 76Se(α , γ) 80Kr. The latter measurements determine the rate of the reverse reaction, 80Kr(γ , α) 76Se, an important waiting point in the synthesis of the p-nuclei. I will also discuss future (and ongoing) developments at DRAGON, including the commissioning of a new chamber for high-precision elastic scattering measurements and plans to determine the 330 keV resonance strength in 18F(p , γ) 19Ne via measurements of 15O(α , γ) 19Ne and 15O + α elastic scattering.

  12. Measurements of diversity gain and radiation efficiency of the eleven antenna by using different measurement techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jian; Pivnenko, Sergey; Laitinen, Tommi

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents measurement results of diversity gain and radiation efficiency by using three different measurement techniques: reverberation chamber, spherical near-field anechoic chamber, and multi-probe anechoic chamber. The results are measured over a large 2–8 GHz bandwidth which...

  13. Measurements of radiated elastic wave energy from dynamic tensile cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boler, Frances M.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fracture-velocity, microstructure, and fracture-energy barriers in elastic wave radiation during a dynamic fracture was investigated in experiments in which dynamic tensile cracks of two fracture cofigurations of double cantilever beam geometry were propagating in glass samples. The first, referred to as primary fracture, consisted of fractures of intact glass specimens; the second configuration, referred to as secondary fracture, consisted of a refracture of primary fracture specimens which were rebonded with an intermittent pattern of adhesive to produce variations in fracture surface energy along the crack path. For primary fracture cases, measurable elastic waves were generated in 31 percent of the 16 fracture events observed; the condition for radiation of measurable waves appears to be a local abrupt change in the fracture path direction, such as occurs when the fracture intersects a surface flaw. For secondary fractures, 100 percent of events showed measurable elastic waves; in these fractures, the ratio of radiated elastic wave energy in the measured component to fracture surface energy was 10 times greater than for primary fracture.

  14. Optical radiation measurements for photovoltaic applications: instrumentation uncertainty and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Daryl R.; Reda, Ibrahim; Wilcox, Stephen; Andreas, Afshin

    2004-11-01

    Evaluating the performance of photovoltaic (PV) devices in the laboratory and in the field requires accurate knowledge of the optical radiation stimulating the devices. We briefly describe the radiometric instrumentation used for characterizing broadband and spectral irradiance for PV applications. Spectral radiometric measurement systems are used to characterize solar simulators (continuous and pulsed, or flash sources) and natural sunlight. Broadband radiometers (pyranometers and pyrheliometers) are used to assess solar resources for renewable applications and develop and validate broadband solar radiation models for estimating system performance. We describe the sources and magnitudes of uncertainty associated with calibrations and measuremens using these instruments. The basic calibration and measurement uncertainty associated with this instrumentaion are based on the guidlines described in the International Standards Organization (ISO) and Bureau INternationale des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) Guide to Uncertainty in Measurement. The additional contributions to uncertainty arising from the uncertainty in characterization functions and correction schemes are discussed and ilustrated. Finally, empirical comparisons of several solar radiometer instrumentation sets illustrate that the best measurement accuracy for broadband radiation is on the order of 3%, and spectrally dependent uncertainty for spectroradiometer systems range from 4% in the visible to 8% to 10% in the ultraviolet and infrared.

  15. Coherent radiation spectrum measurements at KEK LUCX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevelev, M., E-mail: mishe@post.kek.jp [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Aryshev, A., E-mail: alar@post.kek.jp [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Araki, S.; Fukuda, M. [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Karataev, P. [John Adams Institute at Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J. [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2015-01-21

    This paper demonstrates the detailed design concept, alignment, and initial testing of a Michelson interferometer for the THz spectral range. We present the first results on the measurement of a coherent transition radiation spectrum and describe the performance of a pair of ultra-fast broadband room temperature Schottky barrier diode detectors. We discuss the main criteria of interferometer beam splitter optimization, the alignment technique, the high-precision calibration and linearity check of the motion system.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Facilities Newsletter - September 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdridge, D. J., ed

    1999-09-27

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program September 1999 Facilities Newsletter discusses the several Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) that the ARM SGP CART site will host in the near future. Two projects of note are the International Pyrgeometer Intercomparison and the Fall Single Column Model (SCM)/Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL) IOP. Both projects will bring many US and international scientists to the SGP CART site to participate in atmospheric research.

  17. Comparative Measurements of Cosmic Radiation Monitors for Aircrew Exposure Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getley, I. L.; Bennett, L. G. I.; Boudreau, M. L.; Lewis, B. J.; Green, A. R.; Butler, A.; Takada, M.; Nakamura, T.

    Various commercially available electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) have recently been flown on numerous scheduled airline flights in order to determine their viability as small, convenient monitors to measure cosmic radiation at altitude. Often, frequent flyers or airline crew will acquire such dosimeters and report the readings from their flights, without due regard for the mixed radiation field at altitude, which is different from the intended fields on land. A sampling of EPDs has been compared to two types of spectrometers, which measure the total radiation spectrum. The "HAWK" tissue equivalent proportional counter is considered a reference instrument and measures the total dose equivalent H*(10). The Liulin-4N and 4SN linear energy transfer spectrometers each have a silicon semiconductor-based PIN diode detector which provides an absorbed dose, D, but have been further developed to provide H*(10). A Thermo Electron FH41B and B-10, and EPD-N2, and several personal dosimeters (Fuji NRY-21 and NRF-20, and RADOS DIS-100) were also flown.

  18. Characterization of a radiation detector for aircraft measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda M, L. de; Federico, C. A.; Caldas, L. V. E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Air crews, as pilots and flight attendants, are subjected to cosmic ray doses which can be higher than the average doses on workers from the nuclear industry. The diversity of particles of high energies present in the radiation field on board of air crafts turns the determination of the incident dose difficult, and requires special care regarding dosimetric systems to be used in this kind of radiation field. The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA) in conjunction with the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN-SP) are working on this subject since 2008. A prototype of a radiation detector for aircraft measurements was previously built and tested in flight and laboratory conditions. The detector is able of measuring a quantity known as absorbed dose (using passive dosimeters), which will subsequently be correlated to the ambient dose equivalent and the effective dose received by air crews. In this context, a theoretical approach through Monte Carlo simulations with the computational codes MCNP5 and MCNPX was used to model and characterize the detector response at such experimental conditions. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between the absorbed doses measured and simulated, and its relationship with the ambient dose equivalent and the effective dose for this detector. (author)

  19. Investigation of Radiation Protection Methodologies for Radiation Therapy Shielding Using Monte Carlo Simulation and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanny, Sean

    The advent of high-energy linear accelerators for dedicated medical use in the 1950's by Henry Kaplan and the Stanford University physics department began a revolution in radiation oncology. Today, linear accelerators are the standard of care for modern radiation therapy and can generate high-energy beams that can produce tens of Gy per minute at isocenter. This creates a need for a large amount of shielding material to properly protect members of the public and hospital staff. Standardized vault designs and guidance on shielding properties of various materials are provided by the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) Report 151. However, physicists are seeking ways to minimize the footprint and volume of shielding material needed which leads to the use of non-standard vault configurations and less-studied materials, such as high-density concrete. The University of Toledo Dana Cancer Center has utilized both of these methods to minimize the cost and spatial footprint of the requisite radiation shielding. To ensure a safe work environment, computer simulations were performed to verify the attenuation properties and shielding workloads produced by a variety of situations where standard recommendations and guidance documents were insufficient. This project studies two areas of concern that are not addressed by NCRP 151, the radiation shielding workload for the vault door with a non-standard design, and the attenuation properties of high-density concrete for both photon and neutron radiation. Simulations have been performed using a Monte-Carlo code produced by the Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), Monte Carlo Neutrons, Photons 5 (MCNP5). Measurements have been performed using a shielding test port designed into the maze of the Varian Edge treatment vault.

  20. Global real-time dose measurements using the Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Bouwer, D.; Smart, D.; Shea, M.; Bailey, J.; Didkovsky, L.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C.; Xu, X.; Wiltberger, M.; Wiley, S.; Teets, E.; Jones, B.; Hong, S.; Yoon, K.

    2016-11-01

    The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) program has successfully deployed a fleet of six instruments measuring the ambient radiation environment at commercial aircraft altitudes. ARMAS transmits real-time data to the ground and provides quality, tissue-relevant ambient dose equivalent rates with 5 min latency for dose rates on 213 flights up to 17.3 km (56,700 ft). We show five cases from different aircraft; the source particles are dominated by galactic cosmic rays but include particle fluxes for minor radiation periods and geomagnetically disturbed conditions. The measurements from 2013 to 2016 do not cover a period of time to quantify galactic cosmic rays' dependence on solar cycle variation and their effect on aviation radiation. However, we report on small radiation "clouds" in specific magnetic latitude regions and note that active geomagnetic, variable space weather conditions may sufficiently modify the magnetospheric magnetic field that can enhance the radiation environment, particularly at high altitudes and middle to high latitudes. When there is no significant space weather, high-latitude flights produce a dose rate analogous to a chest X-ray every 12.5 h, every 25 h for midlatitudes, and every 100 h for equatorial latitudes at typical commercial flight altitudes of 37,000 ft ( 11 km). The dose rate doubles every 2 km altitude increase, suggesting a radiation event management strategy for pilots or air traffic control; i.e., where event-driven radiation regions can be identified, they can be treated like volcanic ash clouds to achieve radiation safety goals with slightly lower flight altitudes or more equatorial flight paths.

  1. [Analyses of spectral emissivity in radiation temperature measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tai-Ran; Cheng, Xiao-Fang; Zhong, Mao-Hua; Yang, Zang-Jian

    2008-01-01

    The complexity of the spectral emissivity of actual surfaces is the key point in the research and applications of radiation temperature measurement, resulting in the difficulty in the achievement of the temperature measurement. In the present paper, based on the discussions of the Taylor expansion, the non-dimension wavelength and the exponent, the authors describe the mathematical expression of the spectral emissivity of actual surfaces, and establish the general spectral emissivity function. Through the fitting of experimental data of the spectral emissivities of different metals at different temperatures, the applicability of the spectral emissivity function is verified which especially becomes the fundamental in the research of primary spectrum pyrometry.

  2. Absorption Measurement of Radiatively-Heated Low-z Mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jia-Min; DING Yao-Nan; ZHANG Bao-Han; YANG Guo-Hong; ZHENG Zhi-Jian; ZHANG Wen-Hai; WANG Yao-Mei; YAN Jun; LI Jia-Ming

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution transmission spectra of radiatively-heated low-z C10H16O6 plasma have been measured on 'Xing-guang Ⅱ' laser facility by using a flat field grating spectrometer. Absorption lines of oxygen and carbon ions in the region of 1.6-5.0nm have been observed clearly and identified. Using the unresolved transition array model,we also calculated the transmission spectra of C10H16O6 plasma. The measured transmission spectrum has beencompared with the calculated one.

  3. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity in Teflon (PTFE).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, E. [ITT Exelis Mission Systems, Colorado Springs, CO

    2013-05-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.

  4. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, Eric F. (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO); Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO)

    2010-10-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

  5. Measurement of radiation dose at the north interaction point of BEPCⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Xiao-Hu; ZHANG Jian-Yong; ZHANG Tian-Bao; ZHANG Qing-Jiang; Achasov Mikhail; FU Cheng-Dong; Muchnoi Nikolay; QIN Qing; QU Hua-Min; WANG Yi-Fang; WU Jing-Min; XU Jin-Qiang; YU Bo-Xiang

    2009-01-01

    The technique details for measuring radiation dose are expounded.The results of gamma and neutron radiation levels are presented and the corresponding radiation shielding is discussed based on the simplified estimation.In addition, the photon radiation level move as background for future experiments is measured by a NaI(T1) detector.

  6. Changes in Handset Performance Measures due to Spherical Radiation Pattern Measurement Uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    An important characteristic of a mobile handset is its ability to receive and transmit power. One way to characterize the performance of a handset in this respect is to use measurements of the spherical radiation pattern from which the total radiated power (TRP), total isotropic sensitivity (TIS......), and mean effective gain (MEG) can be computed. Often this kind of measurements are made with a phantom head next to the handsets in order to simulate the influence of a real user. The measured radiation patterns are only expected to be repeatable if the same setup is used, i.e., the same phantom...... and the same mounting of the handset on the phantom. In this work the influence of mounting errors on the TRP, TIS, and MEG is investigated. Knowledge about the error due to incorrect mounting is necessary in determining requirements for both the mounting accuracy as well as for other parts of the measurement...

  7. Orbit determination of Transneptunian objects and Centaurs for the prediction of stellar occultations

    CERN Document Server

    Desmars, J; Braga-Ribas, F; Vieira-Martins, R; Assafin, M; Vachier, F; Colas, F; Ortiz, J L; Duffard, R; Morales, N; Sicardy, B; Gomes-Júnior, A R; Benedetti-Rossi, G

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of stellar occultations by Transneptunian objects and Centaurs is a difficult challenge that requires accuracy both in the occulted star position as for the object ephemeris. Until now, the most used method of prediction involving tens of TNOs/Centaurs was to consider a constant offset for the right ascension and for the declination with respect to a reference ephemeris. This offset is determined as the difference between the most recent observations of the TNO and the reference ephemeris. This method can be successfully applied when the offset remains constant with time. This paper presents an alternative method of prediction based on a new accurate orbit determination procedure, which uses all the available positions of the TNO from the Minor Planet Center database plus sets of new astrometric positions from unpublished observations. The orbit determination is performed through a numerical integration procedure (NIMA), in which we develop a specific weighting scheme. The NIMA method was appli...

  8. Solar Panel Integration as an Alternate Power Source on Centaur 2 (SPIAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebara, Christine A.; Schuetze, Nich A.; Knochel, Aviana M.; Magruder, Darby F.

    2011-01-01

    The dream of exploration has inspired thousands throughout time. Space exploration, in particular, has taken the past century by storm and caused a great advance in technology. In this project, a retractable solar panel array will be developed for use on the Centaur 2 Rover. Energy generated by the solar panels will go to power the Centaur 2 Robot (C2) or Regolith & Environment Science & Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload, an in-situ resource utilization project. Such payload is designed to drill into lunar and Martian terrain as well as be able to conduct other geological testing; RESOLVE is slated for testing in 2012. Ultimately, this project will fit into NASA s larger goal of deep space exploration as well as long term presence outside Earth s orbit.

  9. Measurement of radiative Bhabha and quasi-real Compton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Easo, S; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palit, S; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Sakar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F; Zilizi, G

    1998-01-01

    We report on a study of radiative Bhabha and quasi-real Compton scattering at centre-of-mass energies between 50~{\\GeV} and 170~{\\GeV} and 20~{\\GeV} and 140~{\\GeV}, respectively, using the L3 detector at LEP. The analysis is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $232.2 \\,\\pb$. A total of 2856 radiative Bhabha and 4641 Compton scattering events are collected. Total and differential cross sections for both reactions are presented and found to be in good agreement with QED expectations. Our measurement of Compton scattering at the highest energies obtained so far is used to derive exclusion limits on the coupling $\\lambda$ for the on-shell production of an excited electron $\\e^{\\star}$ decaying into a $\\gamma\\e$ pair in the mass range $20 \\gev < m_{\\e^{\\star}} < 170 \\gev$.

  10. Electromagnetic Radiation Measurements and Safety Issues of some Cellular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mousa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As the mobile telecommunication systems are tremendously growing allover the world then the numbers of handheld andbase stations are also rapidly growing and it became very popular to see these base stations distributed everywhere in theneighborhood and on roof tops which has caused a considerable amount of panic to the public in Palestine concerning witherthe radiated electromagnetic field from these base stations may cause any health effect or hazard. This paper focuses on theradiated electromagnetic energy from some typical mobile base stations around the city of Nablus. The exposure levels dueto these stations were measured and compared to some international standard guidelines like ICNIRP and FCC to see if itmeets these standards, this is in order to answer some of the public fear and concern. The results are presented and somecomments are made on the other sources of electromagnetic radiation in the 200 kHz to 3 GHz range.

  11. Comparisons of Air Radiation Model with Shock Tube Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Deepak; McCorkle, Evan; Bogdanoff, David W.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the predictive capability of shock layer radiation model appropriate for NASA s Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle lunar return entry. A detailed set of spectrally resolved radiation intensity comparisons are made with recently conducted tests in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The spectral range spanned from vacuum ultraviolet wavelength of 115 nm to infrared wavelength of 1400 nm. The analysis is done for 9.5-10.5 km/s shock passing through room temperature synthetic air at 0.2, 0.3 and 0.7 Torr. The comparisons between model and measurements show discrepancies in the level of background continuum radiation and intensities of atomic lines. Impurities in the EAST facility in the form of carbon bearing species are also modeled to estimate the level of contaminants and their impact on the comparisons. The discrepancies, although large is some cases, exhibit order and consistency. A set of tests and analyses improvements are proposed as forward work plan in order to confirm or reject various proposed reasons for the observed discrepancies.

  12. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashenfelter, J. [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Balantekin, B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Baldenegro, C.X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Band, H.R. [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Barclay, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bass, C.D. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Le Moyne College, Syracuse, NY 13214 (United States); Berish, D. [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Bowden, N.S., E-mail: nbowden@llnl.gov [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bryan, C.D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Cherwinka, J.J. [Physical Sciences Laboratory, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Chu, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Classen, T. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Davee, D. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Dean, D.; Deichert, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Dolinski, M.J. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dolph, J. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Dwyer, D.A. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fan, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); and others

    2016-01-11

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  13. Nuclear fragmentation measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Battistoni, G.; Blancato, A. A.; Bondı, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Giacoppo, F.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Pandola, L.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Romano, F.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V.; Sfienti, C.; Tropea, S.

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection, to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections has been measured and in particular, to our knowledge, no double differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in literature. We have measured the double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the 12C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been also used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before.

  14. Characterisation of spectrophotometers used for spectral solar ultraviolet radiation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröbner, J

    2001-01-01

    Spectrophotometers used for spectral measurements of the solar ultraviolet radiation need to be well characterised to provide accurate and reliable data. Since the characterisation and calibration are usually performed in the laboratory under conditions very different from those encountered during solar measurements, it is essential to address all issues concerned with the representativity of the laboratory characterisation with respect to the solar measurements. These include among others the instrument stability, the instrument linearity, the instrument responsivity, the wavelength accuracy, the spectral resolution, stray light rejection and the instrument dependence on ambient temperature fluctuations. These instrument parameters need to be determined often enough so that the instrument changes only marginally in the period between successive characterisations and therefore provides reliable data for the intervening period.

  15. Characterisation of spectrophotometers used for spectral solar ultraviolet radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groebner, J

    2001-07-01

    Spectrophotometers used for spectral measurements of the solar ultraviolet radiation need to be well characterised to provide accurate and reliable data. Since the characterisation and calibration are usually performed in the laboratory under conditions very different from those encountered during solar measurements, it is essential to address all issues concerned with the representativity of the laboratory characterisation with respect to the solar measurements. These include amongst other the instrument stability, the instrument linearity, the instrument responsivity, the wavelength accuracy, the spectral resolution, stray light rejection and the instrument dependence on ambient temperature fluctuations. These instrument parameters need to be determined often enough so that the instrument changes only marginally in the period between successive characterisations and therefore provides reliable data for the intervening period. (author)

  16. Nuclear fragmentation measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Napoli, M. [INFN - Sezione di Catania (Italy); Agodi, C.; Blancato, A. A.; Cavallaro, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy); Battistoni, G. [INFN - Sezione di Milano (Italy); Bondi, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Nicolosi, D.; Raciti, G.; Tropea, S. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Giacoppo, F. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo (Norway); Morone, M. C. [Dipartimento di Biopatologia e Diagnostica per Immagini, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Pandola, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Rapisarda, E. [Nuclear and Radiation Physics Section, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Celestijnenlaan Heverlee (Belgium); Romano, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy) and Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche E. Fermi Roma (Italy); and others

    2013-04-19

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection, to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections has been measured and in particular, to our knowledge, no double differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in literature. We have measured the double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the {sup 12}C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been also used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before.

  17. Background Radiation Measurements at High Power Research Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ashenfelter, J; Baldenegro, C X; Band, H R; Barclay, G; Bass, C D; Berish, D; Bowden, N S; Bryan, C D; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, R; Classen, T; Davee, D; Dean, D; Deichert, G; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Dwyer, D A; Fan, S; Gaison, J K; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilje, K; Glenn, A; Green, M; Han, K; Hans, S; Heeger, K M; Heffron, B; Jaffe, D E; Kettell, S; Langford, T J; Littlejohn, B R; Martinez, D; McKeown, R D; Morrell, S; Mueller, P E; Mumm, H P; Napolitano, J; Norcini, D; Pushin, D; Romero, E; Rosero, R; Saldana, L; Seilhan, B S; Sharma, R; Stemen, N T; Surukuchi, P T; Thompson, S J; Varner, R L; Wang, W; Watson, S M; White, B; White, C; Wilhelmi, J; Williams, C; Wise, T; Yao, H; Yeh, M; Yen, Y -R; Zhang, C; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including $\\gamma$-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  18. 3-D Measurement of Recycling and Radiation in MST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norval, Ryan; Goetz, John; Schmitz, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    The MST reversed-field pinch (RFP) can undergo spontaneous transition to a helical core state, associated with the growth of the innermost resonant magnetic mode. Currently multiple 2-D imaging cameras are in place allowing for nearly full vessel viewing and measurement of recycling and impurities fluxes. The transition from the standard to helical RFP causes an observable change in edge plasma. While in the helical state the plasma wall interaction (PWI) on MSTs poloidal limiter strongly correlates with the helicity of the core mode. PWI on the toroidal limiter overall is reduced, with the remaining PWI sites corresponding the helicity of the core mode, or the locations of diagnostic limiters and the error fields they create. EIRENE, a neutral particle code use for modeling edge plasmas, is used to compute the neutral profiles based on measured recycling fluxes. EIRENE computes the radiative and charge exchange power losses. Comparison is made between the standard and helical RFP plasmas. Bolometer measurements of total radiation are currently in progress to supplement the modeling. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. Influence of Spherical Radiation Pattern Measurement Uncertainty on Handset Performance Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2005-01-01

    An important characteristic of a mobile handset is its ability to receive and transmit power. One way to characterize the performance of a handset in this respect is to use measurements of the spherical radiation pattern from which the total radiated power (TRP), total isotropic sensitivity (TIS...... in the performance measures are investigated for both the GSM-900 and the GSM-1800 band. Despite the deliberately large deviations from the reference position, the changes in TRP and TIS are generally within ±0.5 dB with a maximum of about 1.4 dB. For the MEG values the results depend on the orientation...

  20. Preliminary measurements of gamma radiation in Chilean Antarctic Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuardo B, E. (Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago. Dept. de Aplicaciones Nucleares)

    1983-11-01

    Natural and artificial gamma radiation, 1 m above the soil, is being investigated in 4 Chilean Antartic Stations. The measurements are performed with different types of TLD detectors. Preliminary results in the Tte. Marsh Station are reported and discussed. An average exposition of 3,5 ..mu..R/h was found during a 108 days period. This exposition corresponds to an annual dose of about 40 mrad, 8% of the annual dose limit for individual of the public. The presence of low energy artificial radioisotopes was not found.

  1. 3D measurement of absolute radiation dose in grid therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trapp, J V [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Department of Applied Physics, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Warrington, A P [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Partridge, M [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Philps, A [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Leach, M O [Cancer Research UK Clinical MR Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Webb, S [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    Spatially fractionated radiotherapy through a grid is a concept which has a long history and was routinely used in orthovoltage radiation therapy in the middle of last century to minimize damage to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. With the advent of megavoltage radiotherapy and its skin sparing effects the use of grids in radiotherapy declined in the 1970s. However there has recently been a revival of the technique for use in palliative treatments with a single fraction of 10 to 20 Gy. In this work the absolute 3D dose distribution in a grid irradiation is measured for photons using a combination of film and gel dosimetry.

  2. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  3. Development of radiation detection and measurement system - Development of scintillation radiation sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hee Dong; Kim, Wan [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea); Kim, Do Sung [Taegu University, Taegu (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    We have been fabricated CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals and plastic scintillators for radiation-based measuring equipment. CsI (Tl) single crystals doped with thallium as an activator were grown using the Czochralski method. The crystal structure of grown CsI(Tl) was bcc, and it was confirmed that its lattice constant was 4,568 A. The spectral range of luminescence of CsI(Tl) was 350 {approx} 700 nm independent of thallium concentration, and the fast component of the luminescence was decreased with increasing thallium concentration. The energy resolution of CsI(Tl) scintillator doped with 0.1 mole% thallium was about 9% for 137 Cs {gamma}-rays. The relation formula of {gamma}-ray energy versus energy resolution was ln(FWHM%)=-0.705ln({epsilon})+6.75. The radiation damage of CsI(Tl) increased in proportion to thallium concentration and radiation damage of CsI(Tl) increased in proportion to thallium concentration and radiation dosage, and the irradiated crystals were colored reddish. The radiation induced absorption bands appeared around 355, 425, 520 and 555 nm, and their energy level were about 3.50, 2.88, 2.39 and 2.21 eV. Plastic scintillators were fabricated thermal polymerization method. Those were polymerizing at 120 deg. C, during 72 hours, and annealing at 75 deg. C, during 24 hours. When the concentration of 1st solute was 1.5 wt% and concentration of 2nd solute was 0.01 wt%, the characteristics of scintillation were very excellent. Also 3.0 wt% tetraphenyl lead were loaded to improve the detection efficiency of {gamma}-ray. The range of emission spectrum was 400 {approx} 450nm, and the central peak was 415 nm. The radiation damage was not appear under 1*10{sup 3}Gy, but the color of plastic scintillator was changed to brown, over 1*10{sup 4}Gy exposured. 84 refs., 39 figs. (Author)

  4. BOREAS HYD-3 Subcanopy Incoming Solar Radiation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Janet P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Davis, Robert E.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Hydrology (HYD)-3 team collected several data sets related to the hydrology of forested areas. This data set contains solar radiation measurements from several pyranometers (solar radiometers) placed on the snow surface in jack pine (1994) and black spruce and aspen forests (1996) in the BOREAS southern study area (SSA). An array of radiometers was used to collect data for three to four consecutive days in each forest type to study the hypothesis that energy transfer and snow water equivalent would vary spatially as a function of canopy closure. The quality of the data is good, because the days were generally clear and the radiometers were checked daily to remove anything that landed on the radiometers. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The subcanopy incoming solar radiation measurement data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  5. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of alumina and sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, E. Frederick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zarick, Thomas Andrew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sheridan, Timothy J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Preston, Eric F. [ITT Coporation, Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

    2011-04-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Alumina and Sapphire at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Five mil thick samples were irradiated with pulses of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E7 to 1E9 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 1 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 1E10 and 1E9 mho/m/(rad/s), depending on the dose rate and the pulse width for Alumina and 1E7 to 6E7 mho/m/(rad/s) for Sapphire.

  6. Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Jr.; Charles L.; Buckner, Mark A.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Bryan, William L.

    2011-04-26

    Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes in situ polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LR Roeder

    2007-12-01

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  8. Radiation pressure efficiency measurements of nanoparticle coated microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Y. [National Research Council, Research Associateship Programs, 500 Fifth Street NW (Keck 568), Washington, D.C. 20001 (United States); Taylor, Joseph D.; Ladouceur, Harold D.; Hart, Sean J.; Terray, Alex, E-mail: terray@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Chemistry Division, Bioanalytical Chemistry, Code 6112, 4555 Overlook Avenue S.W., Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)

    2013-12-02

    Experimental measurements of the radiation pressure efficiency (Q{sub pr}) for several microparticles have been compared to theoretical calculations extrapolated from the Bohren-Huffman code for Mie scattering of coated particles. An increased shift of the Q{sub pr} parameter was observed for 2 μm SiO{sub 2} core particles coated with nanoparticles of higher refractive indices. Coatings of 14 nm melamine particles were found to increase the Q{sub pr} parameter 135 times over similar coatings using SiO{sub 2} particles of the same size. While a coating of 100 nm polystyrene particles also showed a significant increase, they did not agree well with theoretical values. It is hypothesized that other factors such as increased scatter, drag, and finite coating coverage are no longer negligible for coatings using nanoparticles in this size regime.

  9. Radiation pressure efficiency measurements of nanoparticle coated microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Y.; Taylor, Joseph D.; Ladouceur, Harold D.; Hart, Sean J.; Terray, Alex

    2013-12-01

    Experimental measurements of the radiation pressure efficiency (Qpr) for several microparticles have been compared to theoretical calculations extrapolated from the Bohren-Huffman code for Mie scattering of coated particles. An increased shift of the Qpr parameter was observed for 2 μm SiO2 core particles coated with nanoparticles of higher refractive indices. Coatings of 14 nm melamine particles were found to increase the Qpr parameter 135 times over similar coatings using SiO2 particles of the same size. While a coating of 100 nm polystyrene particles also showed a significant increase, they did not agree well with theoretical values. It is hypothesized that other factors such as increased scatter, drag, and finite coating coverage are no longer negligible for coatings using nanoparticles in this size regime.

  10. Diffuse scattering measurements with synchrotron radiation: Instrumentation and techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, E.; Georgopoulos, P.

    1985-12-01

    The analysis of diffuse scattering from single crystalline specimens in the reflection mode has generally been acknowledged as a very powerful means of obtaining structural information on local atomic arrangements in disordered alloys, intermetallics and ceramics. However, owing to the low intensities encountered and the large number of measurements required for such an analysis, experiments have been extremely time consuming and few have been attempted. Synchrotron radiation makes it possible to conduct such experiments in a matter of hours and much higher quality data can be obtained than in the laboratory. This paper describes the experimental procedures and methods applied to a study of Al-Cu age hardening alloys conducted at the Cornell Synchrotron Source (CHESS). (orig.).

  11. Measurement and analysis of coherent synchrotron radiation effects at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beutner, B.

    2007-12-15

    The vacuum-ultra-violet Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is a linac driven SASE-FEL. High peak currents are produced using magnetic bunch compression chicanes. In these magnetic chicanes, the energy distribution along an electron bunch is changed by eff ects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR). Energy changes in dispersive bunch compressor chicanes lead to transverse displacements along the bunch. These CSR induced displacements are studied using a transverse deflecting RF-structure. Experiments and simulations concerning the charge dependence of such transverse displacements are presented and analysed. In these experiments an over-compression scheme is used which reduces the peak current downstream the bunch compressor chicanes. Therefore other self interactions like space charge forces which might complicate the measurements are suppressed. Numerical simulations are used to analyse the beam dynamics under the influence of CSR forces. The results of these numerical simulations are compared with the data obtained in the over-compression experiments at FLASH. (orig.)

  12. Carbonization in Titan Tholins: implication for low albedo on surfaces of Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Chaitanya; McKay, Christopher P.; Goesmann, Fred; Schäfer, Nadine; Li, Xiang; Steininger, Harald; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Gautier, Thomas; Reitner, Joachim; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.

    2016-07-01

    Astronomical observations of Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) yield two characteristic features - near-infrared (NIR) reflectance and low geometric albedo. The first feature apparently originates due to complex organic material on their surfaces, but the origin of the material contributing to low albedo is not well understood. Titan tholins synthesized to simulate aerosols in the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan have also been used for simulating the NIR reflectances of several Centaurs and TNOs. Here, we report novel detections of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nanoscopic soot aggregates and cauliflower-like graphite within Titan tholins. We put forth a proof of concept stating the surfaces of Centaurs and TNOs may perhaps comprise of highly `carbonized' complex organic material, analogous to the tholins we investigated. Such material would apparently be capable of contributing to the NIR reflectances and to the low geometric albedos simultaneously.

  13. Design and implementation of automatic shading device for diffuse radiation measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LYU; Wenhua; BIAN; Zeqiang; CHONG; Wei

    2015-01-01

    Considering the problem of too large area the shading disc covered,complex shadow band coefficients and too big diffuse radiation measurement bias,an automatic shading device for diffuse radiometer is designed and realized. Set a shading ball on the automatic sun tracker,drive linkage parallelogram structure with the declination axis arm,the shading ball can rotate synchronously with the motion of the sun and shade beam radiation measured with pyranometer,thus shading beam radiation and measuring diffuse radiation can be realized automatically. The comparison test results show that the automatic shading device can realize diffuse radiation measurement automatically,the accuracy of diffuse radiation readings can get a 18. 7% improvement compared with traditional measure system,greatly improves the reliability and accuracy of the diffuse radiation measurement.

  14. Experimentally Measured Radiative Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths in Neutral Vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C. E.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Belmonte, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new study of the V i atom using a combination of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform spectroscopy that contains newly measured radiative lifetimes for 25 levels between 24,648 cm-1 and 37,518 cm-1 and oscillator strengths for 208 lines between 3040 and 20000 Å from 39 upper energy levels. Thirteen of these oscillator strengths have not been reported previously. This work was conducted independently of the recent studies of neutral vanadium lifetimes and oscillator strengths carried out by Den Hartog et al. and Lawler et al., and thus serves as a means to verify those measurements. Where our data overlap with their data, we generally find extremely good agreement in both level lifetimes and oscillator strengths. However, we also find evidence that Lawler et al. have systematically underestimated oscillator strengths for lines in the region of 9000 ± 100 Å. We suggest a correction of 0.18 ± 0.03 dex for these values to bring them into agreement with our results and those of Whaling et al. We also report new measurements of hyperfine structure splitting factors for three odd levels of V i lying between 24,700 and 28,400 cm-1.

  15. Human exposition to non ionizing electromagnetic radiations. Legislation and base stations measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Alonso Alonso

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This work deals about measurement procedures of non-ionizing radiations and their recorded levels in practice. The analyzed radiation sources cover the most common broadcasting media such as AM and FM transmissions and the GSM mobile telephony base stations. These sources currently radiate locations with high density of population. Spanish radiation level regulations are briefly described and some possible improvements are pointed out. The measurement results are discussed.

  16. Modular Architecture for the Measurement of Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaune, Paul; Turner, Kathryn; Holland, S. Douglas; Carson, William R.; Riman, Fadi

    2007-01-01

    A modular architecture has been conceived for the design of radiation-monitoring instruments used aboard spacecraft and in planetary-exploration settings. This architecture reflects lessons learned from experience with prior radiation-monitoring instruments. A prototype instrument that embodies the architecture has been developed as part of the Mars Advanced Radiation Acquisition (MARA) project. The architecture is also applicable on Earth for radiation-monitoring instruments in research of energetic electrically charged particles and instruments monitoring radiation for purposes of safety, military defense, and detection of hidden nuclear devices and materials.

  17. Monte Carlo analysis of radiative transport in oceanographic lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E.; Ferro, G. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, N. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ingegneria Energetica, Nucleare e del Controllo Ambientale

    2001-07-01

    The analysis of oceanographic lidar systems measurements is often carried out with semi-empirical methods, since there is only a rough understanding of the effects of many environmental variables. The development of techniques for interpreting the accuracy of lidar measurements is needed to evaluate the effects of various environmental situations, as well as of different experimental geometric configurations and boundary conditions. A Monte Carlo simulation model represents a tool that is particularly well suited for answering these important questions. The PREMAR-2F Monte Carlo code has been developed taking into account the main molecular and non-molecular components of the marine environment. The laser radiation interaction processes of diffusion, re-emission, refraction and absorption are treated. In particular are considered: the Rayleigh elastic scattering, produced by atoms and molecules with small dimensions with respect to the laser emission wavelength (i.e. water molecules), the Mie elastic scattering, arising from atoms or molecules with dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength (hydrosols), the Raman inelastic scattering, typical of water, the absorption of water, inorganic (sediments) and organic (phytoplankton and CDOM) hydrosols, the fluorescence re-emission of chlorophyll and yellow substances. PREMAR-2F is an extension of a code for the simulation of the radiative transport in atmospheric environments (PREMAR-2). The approach followed in PREMAR-2 was to combine conventional Monte Carlo techniques with analytical estimates of the probability of the receiver to have a contribution from photons coming back after an interaction in the field of view of the lidar fluorosensor collecting apparatus. This offers an effective mean for modelling a lidar system with realistic geometric constraints. The retrieved semianalytic Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been developed in the frame of the Italian Research Program for Antarctica (PNRA) and it is

  18. Technology Development for Radiation Dose Measurement and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Hwan; Chang, S. Y.; Lee, T. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The correction factors essential for the operation of In-Vivo counting system were produced and implemented into a field operation for the improvement of accuracy in measurement of the radioactivity inside a human body. The BiDAS2007 code which calculate an internal dose was developed by upgrading the former code prepared in the previous stage of this project. The method of using the multibioassy data, the maximum likelihood function and the Bayesian statistics were established to an internal dose based on the measurement data of radioactivity, intakes and retention of radioactivity in a human body and it can improve the accuracy in estimation of the intakes of radioactivity and the committed effective dose equivalent. In order to solve the problem of low detection efficiency of the conventional Bonner Sphere (BS) to a high energy neutron, the extended BS's were manufactured and the technique for neutron field spectrometry was established. The fast neutron and gamma spectrometry system with a BC501A scintillation detector was also prepared. Several neutron fluence spectra at several nuclear facilities were measured and collected by using the extended BS. The spectrum weighted responses of some neutron monitoring instruments were also derived by using these spectra and the detector response functions. A high efficient TL material for the neutron personal dosimeter was developed. It solved the main problem of low thermal stability and high residual dose of the commercial TLDs and has the sensitivity to neutron and to gamma radiation with 40 and 10 times higher respectively than them.

  19. Status of radiation damage measurements in room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, L.A.; James, R.B.

    1998-04-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) is reviewed for the purpose of determining their applicability to space applications. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10{sup 10} p/cm{sup 2} and significant bulk leakage after 10{sup 12} p/cm{sup 2}. CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5 {times} 10{sup 9} p/cm{sup 2} in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from moderated fission spectrum neutrons after fluences up to 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}, although activation was evident. CT detectors show resolution losses after fluences of 3 {times} 10{sup 9} p/cm{sup 2} at 33 MeV for chlorine-doped detectors. Indium doped material may be more resistant. Neutron exposures (8 MeV) caused resolution losses after fluences of 2 {times} 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}. Mercuric iodide has been studied with intermediate energy protons (10 to 33 MeV) at fluences up to 10{sup 12} p/cm{sup 2} and with 1.5 GeV protons at fluences up to 1.2 {times} 10{sup 8} p/cm{sup 2}. Neutron exposures at 8 MeV have been reported at fluences up to 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}. No radiation damage was found under these irradiation conditions.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis on Radiation Error of Surface Air Temperature Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Liu, Qing-Quan; Ding, Ren-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Due to solar radiation effect, current air temperature sensors inside a naturally ventilated radiation shield may produce a measurement error that is 0.8 K or higher. To improve air temperature observation accuracy and correct historical temperature of weather stations, a radiation error correction method is proposed. The correction method is based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method and a genetic algorithm (GA) method. The CFD method is implemented to obtain the radiation error of the naturally ventilated radiation shield under various environmental conditions. Then, a radiation error correction equation is obtained by fitting the CFD results using the GA method. To verify the performance of the correction equation, the naturally ventilated radiation shield and an aspirated temperature measurement platform are characterized in the same environment to conduct the intercomparison. The aspirated temperature measurement platform serves as an air temperature reference. The mean radiation error given by the intercomparison experiments is 0.23 K, and the mean radiation error given by the correction equation is 0.2 K. This radiation error correction method allows the radiation error to be reduced by approximately 87 %. The mean absolute error and the root mean square error between the radiation errors given by the correction equation and the radiation errors given by the experiments are 0.036 K and 0.045 K, respectively.

  1. Derivation of the radiation budget at ground level from satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, E.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the Earth radiaton budget and progress in measurement of the budget components and in the treatment of imaging data from satellites are described. Methods for calculating the radiation budget in a general circulation model, radiative transfer characteristics of clouds, computation of solar radiation at ground level using meteorological data and development of a 10-channel radiometer are discussed.

  2. Pan-STARRS 1 observations of the unusual active Centaur P/2011 S1(Gibbs)

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, H W; Lacerda, P; Ip, W H; Holman, M; Protopapas, P; Chen, W P; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Flewelling, H; Huber, M E; Jedicke, R; Kaiser, N; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Price, P A

    2014-01-01

    P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is an outer solar system comet or active Centaur with a similar orbit to that of the famous 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has been observed by the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) sky survey from 2010 to 2012. The resulting data allow us to perform multi-color studies of the nucleus and coma of the comet. Analysis of PS1 images reveals that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has a small nucleus $< 4$ km radius, with colors $g_{P1}-r_{P1} = 0.5 \\pm 0.02$, $r_{P1}-i_{P1} = 0.12 \\pm 0.02$ and $i_{P1}-z_{P1} = 0.46 \\pm 0.03$. The comet remained active from 2010 to 2012, with a model-dependent mass-loss rate of $\\sim100$ kg s$^{-1}$. The mass-loss rate per unit surface area of P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is as high as that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, making it one of the most active Centaurs. The mass-loss rate also varies with time from $\\sim 40$ kg s$^{-1}$ to 150 kg s$^{-1}$. Due to its rather circular orbit, we propose that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1-like outbursts that control the outgass...

  3. Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture on radiation protection and measurements: what makes particle radiation so effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Eleanor A

    2012-11-01

    The scientific basis for the physical and biological effectiveness of particle radiations has emerged from many decades of meticulous basic research. A diverse array of biologically relevant consequences at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organism level have been reported, but what are the key processes and mechanisms that make particle radiation so effective, and what competing processes define dose dependences? Recent studies have shown that individual genotypes control radiation-regulated genes and pathways in response to radiations of varying ionization density. The fact that densely ionizing radiations can affect different gene families than sparsely ionizing radiations, and that the effects are dose- and time-dependent, has opened up new areas of future research. The complex microenvironment of the stroma and the significant contributions of the immune response have added to our understanding of tissue-specific differences across the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum. The importance of targeted versus nontargeted effects remains a thorny but elusive and important contributor to chronic low dose radiation effects of variable LET that still needs further research. The induction of cancer is also LET-dependent, suggesting different mechanisms of action across the gradient of ionization density. The focus of this 35th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture is to chronicle the step-by-step acquisition of experimental clues that have refined our understanding of what makes particle radiation so effective, with emphasis on the example of radiation effects on the crystalline lens of the human eye.

  4. Calibrated, multiband radiometric measurements of the optical radiation from lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Mason G.

    Calibrated, multiband radiometric measurements of the optical radiation emitted by rocket-triggered lightning (RTL) have been made in the ultraviolet (UV, 200-360 nm), the visible and near infrared (VNIR, 400-1000 nm), and the long wave infrared (LWIR, 8-12 microm) spectral bands. Measurements were recorded from a distance of 198 m at the University of Florida International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) during the summers of 2011 and 2012. The ICLRT provided time-correlated measurements of the current at the base of the RTL channels. Following the onset of a return stroke, the dominant mechanism for the initial rise of the UV and VNIR waveforms was the geometrical growth of the channel in the field-of-view of the sensors. The UV emissions peaked about 0.7 micros after the current peak, with a peak spectral power emitted by the source per unit length of channel of 10 +/- 7 kW/(nm-m) in the UV. The VNIR emissions peaked 0.9 micros after the current peak, with a spectral power of at 7 +/- 4 kW/(nm-m). The LWIR emissions peaked 30-50 micros after the current peak, and the mean peak spectral power was 940 +/- 380 mW/(nm-m), a value that is about 4 orders of magnitude lower than the other spectral band emissions. In some returns strokes the LWIR peak coincides with a secondary maximum in the VNIR band that occurs during a steady decrease in channel current. Examples of the optical waveforms in each spectral band are shown as a function of time and are discussed in the context of the current measured at the channel base. Source power estimates in the VNIR band have a mean and standard deviation of 2.5 +/- 2.2 MW/m and are in excellent agreement with similar estimates of the emission from natural subsequent strokes that remain in a pre-existing channel which have a mean and standard deviation of 2.3 +/- 3.4 MW/m. The peak optical power emitted by RTL in the UV and VNIR bands are observed to be proportional to the square of the peak current at the

  5. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program May 2003 Intensive Operations Period Examining Aerosol Properties and Radiative Influences: Preface to Special Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrare, Richard; Feingold, Graham; Ghan, Steven; Ogren, John; Schmid, Beat; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Sheridan, Pat

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence climate by scattering and absorbing radiation in clear air (direct effects) and by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, modifying the microphysical properties of clouds, influencing radiation and precipitation development (indirect effects). Much of present uncertainty in forcing of climate change is due to uncertainty in the relations between aerosol microphysical and optical properties and their radiative influences (direct effects) and between microphysical properties and their ability to serve as cloud condensation nuclei at given supersaturations (indirect effects). This paper introduces a special section that reports on a field campaign conducted at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in North Central Oklahoma in May, 2003, examining these relations using in situ airborne measurements and surface-, airborne-, and space-based remote sensing.

  6. Quantitative measurement of radiation pressure on a microcantilever in ambient environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Dakang; Munday, Jeremy N., E-mail: jnmunday@umd.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Garrett, Joseph L. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-03-02

    Light reflected off a material or absorbed within it exerts radiation pressure through the transfer of momentum. Micro/nano-mechanical transducers have become sensitive enough that radiation pressure can influence these systems. However, photothermal effects often accompany and overwhelm the radiation pressure, complicating its measurement. In this letter, we investigate the radiation force on an uncoated silicon nitride microcantilever in ambient conditions. We identify and separate the radiation pressure and photothermal forces through an analysis of the cantilever's frequency response. Further, by working in a regime where radiation pressure is dominant, we are able to accurately measure the radiation pressure. Experimental results are compared to theory and found to agree within the measured and calculated uncertainties.

  7. Radiation exposure in nuclear medicine: real-time measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Sylvain

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available French regulations have introduced the use of electronic dosimeters for personal monitoring of workers. In order to evaluate the exposure from diagnostic procedures to nuclear medicine staff, individual whole-body doses were measured daily with electronic (digital personal dosimeters during 20 consecutive weeks and correlated with the work load of each day. Personal doses remained always below 20 µSv/d under normal working conditions. Radiation exposure levels were highest to tech staff, nurses and stretcher-bearers. The extrapolated annual cumulative doses for all staff remained less than 10 % of the maximum legal limit for exposed workers (2 mSv/yr. Electronic dosimeters are not technically justified for routine survey of staff. The high sensitivity and immediate reading of electronic semiconductor dosimeters may become very useful for exposure control under risky working conditions. It may become an important help for optimising radiation protection.A legislação francesa introduziu o uso de dosímetros eletrônicos para monitoração da exposição do trabalhador. Afim de avaliar a exposição do trabalhador proveniente de exames diagnósticos em medicina nuclear, doses individuais do corpo inteiro foram medidas diariamente com dosímetros eletrônicos (digitais durante 20 semanas consecutivas e correlatas com as atividades de trabalho de cada dia. As doses foram sempre inferiores à 20 µSv por dia em condições normais de trabalho. Os níveis de exposição de radiação mais elevados foram para os enfermeiros, manipuladores e maqueiros. A extrapolação da dose anual para todos os trabalhadores foi menos que 10 % do limite máximo legal para os trabalhadores expostos (2 mSv/ano. Dosímetros eletrônicos não são tecnicamente justificados para a o controle de rotina da exposição dos trabalhadores, mas a alta sensibilidade e a leitura imediata desses dosímetros podem vir a serem muito úteis para o controle da exposição em condi

  8. The assessment of four different correction models applied to the diffuse radiation measured with a shadow ring using global and normal beam radiation measurements for Beer Sheva, Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudish, Avraham I.; Evseev, Efim G. [Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, E D Bergmann Campus, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2008-02-15

    The measurement of the diffuse radiation incident on a horizontal surface, a priori a straightforward task, is fraught with difficulties. It is possible to measure the diffuse radiation by three different techniques: two of which measure it directly and the third indirectly. The most accurate is the indirect one, which is based upon the concurrent measurements of the horizontal global and the normal incidence beam radiation. The disadvantage of this being the relatively expensive tracking system required for measuring the latter. The diffuse radiation can be measured directly with a pyranometer outfitted with either an occulting disk or shadow ring, which prevent the beam radiation from impinging on the pyranometer sensor. The occulting disk can provide accurate measurements of the diffuse radiation but it requires a relatively expensive sun tracking system in the east-west axis. The shadow ring is a stationary device with regard to the east-west axis and blocks the beam radiation component by creating a permanent shadow on the pyranometer sensor. The major disadvantage of the shadow ring is that it also blocks that portion of the diffuse radiation obscured by the shadow ring. This introduces a measurement error that must be corrected to account for that portion of the sky obscured by the shadow band. In addition to this geometric correction factor there is a need to correct for anisotropic sky conditions. Four correction models have been applied to the data for Beer Sheva, Israel and the results have been evaluated both graphically and statistically. An attempt has been made to score the relative performance of the models under different sky conditions. (author)

  9. Radiation Protection in Educational Institutions. Recommendations of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The problems involved when radiation-producing devices of our contemporary technology are used in the teaching of science at the high school and undergraduate college level are discussed. Information is provided on the hazards involved in the use of radiation-producing equipment or radioactive materials in science demonstrations and experiments…

  10. Automated Radiation Measurements for Aviation Safety (ARMAS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Commercial aircrew members and frequent flyers face radiation hazards from the effects of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles. During significant solar events,...

  11. New measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    The dual goals of optimizing clinical efficacy of hadrontherapy and determining radiation risk estimates for space research have intersected to a common focus for investigation of the biological effects of charged particles. This paper briefly highlights recent international progress at accelerator facilities engaged in both biological and clinical studies of the effects of particle beams, primarily protons, carbon and iron ions. Basic mechanisms of molecular, cellular and tissue responses continue under investigation for radiations with a range of ionization densities. Late normal tissue effects, including the risk of cancer in particular, are of importance for both research fields. International cooperation has enhanced the rate of progress as evidenced by recent publications. Specific areas of biomedical research related to the biological radiotoxicity of critical organs (especially the central nervous system), individual radiosensitivities to radiation carcinogenesis, and the analysis of effects in mixed radiation fields still require more research. Recommendations for addressing these issues are made.

  12. Measurement quantities in radiation protection; Messgroessen im Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosi, Peter [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Fachbereich ' Strahlenschutzdosimetrie' ; Hupe, Oliver [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Photonendosimetrie' ; Kramer, H.M.

    2013-06-15

    After an introduction of the dose equivalent different types of dose equivalents are presented. In this connection stochastic and deterministic radiation effects are considered. Then stationary dose and personnel dose are discussed. Finally the different weighting factors are considered. (HSI)

  13. Automated Radiation Measurements for Aviation Safety (ARMAS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The existing state-of-the-art for physics-based, data-driven, climatological specification of the global radiation environment is the capability embodied by Nowcast...

  14. Measurement of the Radiation Dose Rates of Patients Receiving Treatment with I-131 Using Telescopic Radiation Survey Meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehia Lahfi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In order to discharge the patients receiving treatment with large radiation doses of 131I for thyroid cancer, it is necessary to measure and evaluate the external dose rates of these patients. The aim of the study was to assess a new method of external dose rate measurement, and to analyze the obtained results as a function of time. Materials and Methods In this study, a telescopic radiation survey meter was utilized to measure the external dose rates of a sample population of 192 patients receiving treatment with high-dose 131I at one, 24, and 48 hours after dose administration. Results The proposed technique could reduce the occupational radiation exposure of the physicist by a factor of 1/16. Moreover, the external dose rates of both genders rapidly decreased with time according to bi-exponential equations, which could be attributed to the additional factors associated with iodine excretion, as well as the physiology of the body in terms of 131I uptake. Conclusion According to the results of this study, telescopic radiation survey meter could be used to measure the external dose rates of patients receiving treatment with 131I. Furthermore, the average difference in the radiation exposure between female and male patients was calculated to be less than 17%.

  15. Lessons learned from the Radiation measurements of the Mars Science Lab Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL-RAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Guenther; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) was designed to characterize the radiation environment on the Mars surface and to contribute to an improved assessment of radiation risk for a future human mission to Mars. The flight was chosen to cover a period of solar maximum activity to allow besides the measurement of the galactic cosmic rays an intense study of exposures by solar particle events. The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft (MSL), containing the Curiosity rover, in which RAD was integrated, was launched to Mars on November 26, 2011. Although not part of the mission planning, RAD was operated already during the 253 day and 560 million km cruise to Mars and made the first time detailed measurements of a radiation environment comparable to that inside a future spacecraft carrying humans to Mars and in other deep space missions. Exactly 100 years after the discovery of cosmic rays on August 7, 1912 RAD makes the first observation of the radiation environment on the surface of another planet and is still gathering data until today. Meanwhile the maximum activity of the current solar cycle has been passed and the solar activity is decreasing. Unfortunately the present solar cycle was an unexpected weak cycle. As a matter of fact only very small solar particle events could be observed during the still ongoing RAD measurements. The paper highlights the achievements of RAD by presenting selected data measured during the cruise and on the Mars surface and describes its impact on predictive models for health risks of astronauts during space missions.

  16. The direct measurement using an imaging plate for coincidence of radiation centre and laser position in external radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Tsunashima, Yoshikazu

    2003-02-21

    A new method of quality assurance has been studied to measure coincidence of the radiation centre and a patient-setup laser position on a transverse plane to the beam at the isocentre. This measurement is achieved by using an imaging plate (IP). When radiation is applied to an IP, the energy is stored as trapped electrons. The number of electrons is decreased by local laser exposure. As a result, the radiation field produced by external beam irradiation is recorded as 'positive' information and the position of the patient-setup laser is recorded as 'negative' on an IP. The advantages of this method are the direct measurement, short time and high resolution. These are required for daily and monthly quality checks. We confirmed the advantage of this method by an experiment using a proton beam.

  17. A method to measure internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qijie; Chang, Songtao; Li, Zhou; He, Fengyun; Qiao, Yanfeng

    2017-03-01

    The suppression level of internal stray radiation is a key criterion for infrared imaging systems, especially for high-precision cryogenic infrared imaging systems. To achieve accurate measurement for internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures, a measurement method, which is based on radiometric calibration, is presented in this paper. First of all, the calibration formula is deduced considering the integration time, and the effect of ambient temperature on internal stray radiation is further analyzed in detail. Then, an approach is proposed to measure the internal stray radiation of cryogenic infrared imaging systems under various ambient temperatures. By calibrating the system under two ambient temperatures, the quantitative relation between the internal stray radiation and the ambient temperature can be acquired, and then the internal stray radiation of the cryogenic infrared imaging system under various ambient temperatures can be calculated. Finally, several experiments are performed in a chamber with controllable inside temperatures to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can be used to measure internal stray radiation with high accuracy at various ambient temperatures and integration times. The proposed method has some advantages, such as simple implementation and the capability of high-precision measurement. The measurement results can be used to guide the stray radiation suppression and to test whether the internal stray radiation suppression performance meets the requirement or not.

  18. Pan-STARRS 1 observations of the unusual active Centaur P/2011 S1(Gibbs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H. W.; Ip, W. H.; Chen, W. P. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y. T. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lacerda, P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Holman, M.; Protopapas, P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Jedicke, R.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Price, P. A., E-mail: edlin@gm.astro.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is an outer solar system comet or active Centaur with a similar orbit to that of the famous 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has been observed by the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) sky survey from 2010 to 2012. The resulting data allow us to perform multi-color studies of the nucleus and coma of the comet. Analysis of PS1 images reveals that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has a small nucleus <4 km radius, with colors g {sub P1} – r {sub P1} = 0.5 ± 0.02, r {sub P1} – i {sub P1} = 0.12 ± 0.02, and i {sub P1} – z {sub P1} = 0.46 ± 0.03. The comet remained active from 2010 to 2012, with a model-dependent mass-loss rate of ∼100 kg s{sup –1}. The mass-loss rate per unit surface area of P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is as high as that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, making it one of the most active Centaurs. The mass-loss rate also varies with time from ∼40 kg s{sup –1} to 150 kg s{sup –1}. Due to its rather circular orbit, we propose that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1-like outbursts that control the outgassing rate. The results indicate that it may have a similar surface composition to that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. Our numerical simulations show that the future orbital evolution of P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is more similar to that of the main population of Centaurs than to that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. The results also demonstrate that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is dynamically unstable and can only remain near its current orbit for roughly a thousand years.

  19. Three Orbital Burns to Molniya Orbit via Shuttle Centaur G Upper Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.

    2014-01-01

    An unclassified analytical trajectory design, performance, and mission study was done for the 1982-86 joint NASA-USAF Shuttle/Centaur G upper stage development program to send performance-demanding payloads to high orbits such as Molniya using an unconventional orbit transfer. This optimized three orbital burn transfer to Molniya orbit was compared to the then-baselined two burn transfer. The results of the three dimensional trajectory optimization performed include powered phase steering data and coast phase orbital element data. Time derivatives of the orbital elements as functions of thrust components were evaluated and used to explain the optimization's solution. Vehicle performance as a function of parking orbit inclination was given. Performance and orbital element data was provided for launch windows as functions of launch time. Ground track data was given for all burns and coasts including variation within the launch window. It was found that a Centaur with fully loaded propellant tanks could be flown from a 37deg inclination low Earth parking orbit and achieve Molniya orbit with comparable performance to the baselined transfer which started from a 57deg inclined orbit: 9,545 lb vs. 9,552 lb of separated spacecraft weight respectively. There was a significant reduction in the need for propellant launch time reserve for a one hour window: only 78 lb for the three burn transfer vs. 320 lb for the two burn transfer. Conversely, this also meant that longer launch windows over more orbital revolutions could be done for the same amount of propellant reserve. There was no practical difference in ground tracking station or airborne assets needed to secure telemetric data, even though the geometric locations of the burns varied considerably. There was a significant adverse increase in total mission elapsed time for the three vs. two burn transfer (12 vs. 11/4 hrs), but could be accommodated by modest modifications to Centaur systems. Future applications were

  20. Three Orbital Burns to Molniya Orbit Via Shuttle_Centaur G Upper Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.

    2015-01-01

    An unclassified analytical trajectory design, performance, and mission study was done for the 1982 to 1986 joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-United States Air Force (USAF) Shuttle/Centaur G upper stage development program to send performance-demanding payloads to high orbits such as Molniya using an unconventional orbit transfer. This optimized three orbital burn transfer to Molniya orbit was compared to the then-baselined two burn transfer. The results of the three dimensional trajectory optimization performed include powered phase steering data and coast phase orbital element data. Time derivatives of the orbital elements as functions of thrust components were evaluated and used to explain the optimization's solution. Vehicle performance as a function of parking orbit inclination was given. Performance and orbital element data was provided for launch windows as functions of launch time. Ground track data was given for all burns and coasts including variation within the launch window. It was found that a Centaur with fully loaded propellant tanks could be flown from a 37 deg inclination low Earth parking orbit and achieve Molniya orbit with comparable performance to the baselined transfer which started from a 57 deg inclined orbit: 9,545 versus 9,552 lb of separated spacecraft weight, respectively. There was a significant reduction in the need for propellant launch time reserve for a 1 hr window: only 78 lb for the three burn transfer versus 320 lb for the two burn transfer. Conversely, this also meant that longer launch windows over more orbital revolutions could be done for the same amount of propellant reserve. There was no practical difference in ground tracking station or airborne assets needed to secure telemetric data, even though the geometric locations of the burns varied considerably. There was a significant adverse increase in total mission elapsed time for the three versus two burn transfer (12 vs. 1-1/4 hr), but could be

  1. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars science laboratory's curiosity rover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassler, D.M.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.; Ehresmann, B.; Rafkin, S.; Eigenbrode, J.L.; Brinza, D.E.; Weigle, G.; Böttcher, S.; Böhm, E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Köhler, J.; Martin, C.; Reitz, G.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Kim, M.-H.; Grinspoon, D.; Bullock, M.A.; Posner, A.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Vasavada, A.; Grotzinger, J.P.; MSL Science Team, the

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory’s Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equival

  2. Radiation dose measurements during kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography imaging in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sathish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Radiation dose to the eye, breast, and the surface of the pelvis have been arrived at during CBCT. The doses measured on patients agreed closely with those measured on humanoid phantom and with published values.

  3. A study on the real-time radiation dosimetry measurement system based on optically stimulated luminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-Ping; CHEN Zhao-Yang; BA Wei-Zhen; FAN Yan-Wei; DU Yan-Zhao; PAN Shi-Lie; GUO Qi

    2008-01-01

    The optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) radiation dosimeter technically surveys a wide dynamic measurement range and a high sensitivity.Optical fiber dosimeters provide capability for remote monitoring of the radiation in the locations which are difficult-to-acoess and hazardous.In addition.optical fiber dosimeters are immune to electrical and radio-frequency interference.In this paper,a novel remote optical fiber radiation dosimeter is described.The optical fiber dosimeter takes advantage of the charge trapping materials CaS:Ce, Sm that exhibit OSL.The measuring range of the dosimeter is from 0.1 to 100 Gy.The equipment is relatively simple and small in size,and has low power consumption.This device is suitable for measuring the space radiation dose and also can be used in high radiation dose condition and other dangerous radiation occasions.

  4. Measurements of energetic particle radiation in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, C; Hassler, D M; Cucinotta, F A; Ehresmann, B; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Brinza, D E; Kang, S; Weigle, G; Böttcher, S; Böhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Köhler, J; Martin, C; Posner, A; Rafkin, S; Reitz, G

    2013-05-31

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011, and for most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector made detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment inside the spacecraft. These data provide insights into the radiation hazards that would be associated with a human mission to Mars. We report measurements of the radiation dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer spectra. The dose equivalent for even the shortest round-trip with current propulsion systems and comparable shielding is found to be 0.66 ± 0.12 sievert.

  5. An information theory approach for evaluating earth radiation budget (ERB) measurements - Nonuniform sampling of reflected shortwave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Direskeneli, Haldun; Halyo, Nesim

    1992-01-01

    An information theory approach to examine the temporal nonuniform sampling characteristics of shortwave (SW) flux for earth radiation budget (ERB) measurements is suggested. The information gain is computed by computing the information content before and after the measurements. A stochastic diurnal model for the SW flux is developed, and measurements for different orbital parameters are examined. The methodology is applied to specific NASA Polar platform and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) orbital parameters. The information theory approach, coupled with the developed SW diurnal model, is found to be promising for measurements involving nonuniform orbital sampling characteristics.

  6. Size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles in intense radiation fields using wire screens and imaging plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yuichi; Tanaka, Toru; Takamiya, Koichi; Ishi, Yoshihiro; UesugI, Tomonori; Kuriyama, Yasutoshi; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Nitta, Shinnosuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osada, Naoyuki [Advanced Science Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Very fine radiation-induced aerosol particles are produced in intense radiation fields, such as high-intensity accelerator rooms and containment vessels such as those in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP). Size measurement of the aerosol particles is very important for understanding the behavior of radioactive aerosols released in the FDNPP accident and radiation safety in high-energy accelerators. A combined technique using wire screens and imaging plates was developed for size measurement of fine radioactive aerosol particles smaller than 100 nm in diameter. This technique was applied to the radiation field of a proton accelerator room, in which radioactive atoms produced in air during machine operation are incorporated into radiation-induced aerosol particles. The size of 11C-bearing aerosol particles was analyzed using the wire screen technique in distinction from other positron emitters in combination with a radioactive decay analysis. The size distribution for 11C-bearing aerosol particles was found to be ca. 70 μm in geometric mean diameter. The size was similar to that for 7Be-bearing particles obtained by a Ge detector measurement, and was slightly larger than the number-based size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer. The particle size measuring method using wire screens and imaging plates was successfully applied to the fine aerosol particles produced in an intense radiation field of a proton accelerator. This technique is applicable to size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles produced in the intense radiation fields of radiation facilities.

  7. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 11: Radiation Detection and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  8. The radiation measurement applied to beam lifetime study on the synchrotron radiation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuxiong; Li, Juexin; Liu, Zuping; Cui, Yonggang; Gong, Guanghua; Shao, Beibei

    2003-06-01

    To collect beam loss information from an accelerator radiation field is helpful to machine study and operation. For a synchrotron radiation storage ring, shower electrons give a distinct clue to loss location and a BLM-XS model detector is suitable to detect them. Recently, we set up a new beam loss monitoring system by this method for National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) storage ring. It does not interfere with the vacuum chamber and machine operation. Different from other systems, the detectors are used in pairs, fixed on opposite sides of the chamber separately. Some interesting phenomena about beam lifetime were observed. We located exactly where an excessive beam loss took place during ramping process and solved the problem. It was proved that gas accumulated at the front ends of photo-beam lines strongly impacted the electron beam and led to beam lifetime decreases. The cause of beam lifetime decrease because of superconducting wiggler is discussed.

  9. Airborne spectral radiation measurements to derive solar radiative forcing of Saharan dust mixed with biomass burning smoke particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, S.; Bierwirth, E.; Wendisch, M. (Leipzig Inst. for Meteorology (LIM), Univ. of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)), e-mail: s.bauer@uni-leipzig.de; Esselborn, M.; Petzold, A.; Trautmann, T. (Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany)); Macke, A. (Leibniz Inst. for Tropospheric Research (IfT) (Germany))

    2011-09-15

    Airborne measurements of upward solar spectral irradiances were performed during the second Saharan Mineral dUst experiMent (SAMUM-2) campaign based on the Cape Verde Islands. Additionally, airborne high resolution lidar measurements of vertical profiles of particle extinction coefficients were collected in parallel to the radiation data. Aerosol layers of Saharan dust, partly mixed with biomass-burning smoke, were probed. With corresponding radiative transfer simulations the single scattering albedo and the asymmetry parameter of the aerosol particles were derived although with high uncertainty. The broad-band aerosol solar radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere was calculated and examined as a function of the aerosol types. However, due to uncertainties in both the measurements and the calculations the chemical composition cannot be identified. In addition, a mostly measurement-based method to derive the broad-band aerosol solar radiative forcing was used. This approach revealed clear differences of broad-band net irradiances as a function of the aerosol optical depth. The data were used to identify different aerosol types from different origins. Higher portions of biomass-burning smoke lead to larger broad-band net irradiances

  10. A modified Wheeler cap method for radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiaying; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of radiation efficiency for ultra small antennas represents a great challenge due to influence of the feeding cable. The Wheeler cap method is often used to measure the radiation efficiency of small antennas. However, it is well applicable for antennas on a ground plane......, but not for balanced antennas like loops or dipoles. In this paper, a modified Wheeler cap method is proposed for the radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas and a three-port network model of the Wheeler cap measurement is introduced. The advantage of the modified method...... is that it is wideband, thus does not require any balun, and both the antenna input impedance and radiation efficiency can be obtained. An electrically small loop antenna and a wideband dipole were simulated and measured according to the proposed method and the results of measurements and simulations are presented...

  11. Ozonesonde measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Billings, Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Ozonesonde instruments were prepared and released at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site located near Billings, Oklahoma. Ozone sensors, associated radiosondes, balloons, and other parts and pieces required for the ozone observations were provided by WFF on a reimbursable arrangement with ANL. Observations were scheduled daily at 1,700 UTC beginning on September 22, 1995. Attempts to maintain this schedule were frustrated by a few simultaneous operations involving different electronic devices in use resulting in considerable rf noise. Since radiosondes are necessarily low-cost instruments their reception is particularly susceptible to noisy rf fields. Overall, however, 36 ozonesonde flights were made with the last observation occurring on November 1, 1995. Ozone data were processed on-site through the ground-station software and preliminary data delivered to Mike Splitt at the ARM site.

  12. A novel dosimeter for measuring the amount of radiation exposure of surgeons during percutaneous nephrolithotomy: Instadose™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuruk, Emrah; Gureser, Gokhan; Tuken, Murat; Ertas, Kasim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of Instadose™, a novel dosimeter designed for radiation workers to provide a measurement of the radiation dose at any time from any computer; to determine the amount of radiation exposure during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL); and to evaluate the factors that affect the amount of radiation exposed. Material and methods Two experienced surgeons wore Instadose™ on the outer part of their lead aprons during the PNL procedures performed between December 2013 and July 2014. Patient demographics and stone characteristics were noted. Factors affecting radiation dose were determined. Fluoroscopic screening time was compared with the amount of radiation in order to validate the measurements of Instadose™. Results Overall, 51 patients with a mean age of 43.41 ±18.58 (range 1–75) years were enrolled. Male to female ratio was 35/16. The amount of radiation was greater than 0.01mSv in only 19 (37.25%) cases. Stone location complexity (p = 0.380), dilation type (p = 0.584), stone size (p = 0.565), dilation size (p = 0.891) and access number (p = 0.268) were not associated with increased radiation exposure. Instadose™ measurements were correlated with fluoroscopic screening time (r = 0.519, p = 0.001). Conclusions Instadose™ is a useful tool for the measurement of radiation exposure during PNL. The advantage of measuring the amount of radiation exposure after each PNL operation is that it may aid urologists in taking appropriate precautions to minimize the risk of radiation related complications. PMID:27551558

  13. UV radiation in global climate change. Measurements, modeling and effects on ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Wei; Slusser, James R. (eds.) [Colorado State Univ., CO (United States). Natural Resource Ecology Lab.; Schmoldt, Daniel L. [Waterfront Centre, Washington, DC (United States). Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service

    2010-07-01

    Numerous studies report that ultraviolet (UV) radiation is harmful to living organisms and detrimental to human health. Growing concerns regarding the increased levels of UV-B radiation that reach the earth's surface have led to the development of ground- and space-based measurement programs. Further study is needed on the measurement, modeling, and effects of UV radiation. The chapters of this book describe the research conducted across the globe over the past three decades in the areas of: (1) current and predicted levels of UV radiation and its associated impact on ecosystems and human health, as well as economic and social implications; (2) new developments in UV instrumentation, advances in calibration (ground- and satellite-based), measurement methods, modeling efforts, and their applications; and (3) the effects of global climate change on UV radiation. (orig.)

  14. Detector Response and Beam Line Transmission Measurements with Far-Infrared Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Grimm, O; Fröhlich, L

    2005-01-01

    Various activities at the TTF linear accelerator at DESY, Hamburg, that drives the VUV-FEL are geared towards measuring the longitudinal charge distribution of electron bunches with coherent far-infrared radiation. Examples are beam lines transporting synchrotron or transition radiation to interferometers mounted inside or outside the tunnel, and studies of single-shot grating spectrometers. All such approaches require a good understanding of the radiation generation and transport mechanism and of the detector characteristics to extract useful information on the charge distribution. Simulations and measurements of the expected transverse intensity distribution and polarization of synchrotron radiation emitted at the first bunch compressor of TTF have been performed. The transverse intensity scanning provided for the first time at DESY a visual image of the footprint of terahertz radiation. Detector response measurements have been performed at the FELIX facility, Netherlands, for wavelengths between 100-160 mi...

  15. Coherent transition radiation diagnostic for electron bunch shape measurement at FELIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Meisong; Weits, H. H.; Oepts, D.

    1997-02-01

    An optical autocorrelation system using coherent transition radiation has been set up to determine the electron bunch shape at FELIX. A polarisation interferometer and a 10 × 10 mm 2 pyroelectric detector are used to allow operation over a wide range of wavelength (from 30 μm to 10 mm) without strong variation in efficiency. An evacuated 15 m long overmoded waveguide is used to transport the transition radiation to the experimental area. The intensity of the transition radiation was measured and compared with our calculation. The phase-retrieval technique applied to the measured spectrum provides details of the electron bunch. The bunch shapes have been studied at different buncher phase settings. Measurements of coherent transition radiation and coherent undulator radiation are compared.

  16. Dose equivalent measurements in mixed and time varying radiation fields around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields behind the shielding of high-energy accelerators are a challenging task. Several radiation components (photons, neutrons, charged particles, muons, etc.), spanning a wide range of energies, contribute to the total dose equivalent. The radiation fields are produced by beam losses interacting with structural material during the acceleration or at the ejection to experimental areas or other accelerators. The particle beam is usually not continuous but separated in "bunches" or pulses, which further complicates dose measurements at high-energy accelerators. An ideal dosimeter for operational radiation protection should measure dose equivalent for any composition of radiation components in the entire energy range even when the field is strongly pulsed. The objective of this work was to find out if an ionisation chamber operated as a "recombination chamber" and a TEPC instrument using the variance-covariance method ("Sievert Instrument") are capable ...

  17. Influence of Participating Media on the Radiation Thermometry for Surface Temperature Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuying LIU; Xinxin ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    A temperature measurement model of radiation thermometry for the surface covered by participating media was developed. The model was based on the radiation heat transfer of participating media and principles of radiation pyrometers, and solved by integral formulation of discrete ordinate method on spectral waveband. The influence of water mist on the indicated temperature of Raytek MR1SB one/two color pyrometer was discussed. Mie theory was used to calculate the radiative properties of water mist. In order to verify the model, a laboratory temperature measurement experiment was executed. The result shows that temperature of radiation thermometry is sensitive to the spectral response wavelength of pyrometer, and the simulated temperature of pyrometer agrees well with the experimental measurements on a suitable wavelength. The simulated temperature was lower than the real temperature of surface for one-color pyrometer, and it could be higher or lower than the real one for two-color pyrometer with the influence of participating media.

  18. Evaluation of Diversity Antenna Designs Using Ray Tracing, Measured Radiation Patterns, and MIMO Channel Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Pal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of the MIMO performance of three candidate antenna array designs, each embedded within a PDA footprint, using indoor wideband channel measurements at 5.2 GHz alongside channel simulations. A channel model which employs the plane-wave approximation was used to combine the embedded antenna radiation patterns of the candidate devices obtained from far-field pattern measurements and multipath component parameters from an indoor ray-tracer. The 4-element candidate arrays were each constructed using a different type of antenna element, and despite the diverse element directivities, pattern characteristics, and polarization purities, all three devices were constructed to fully exploit diversity in polarization, space, and angle. Thus, low correlation and high information theoretic capacity was observed in each case. A good match between the model and the measurements is also demonstrated, especially for 2×2 MIMO subsets of identically or orthogonally polarized linear slot antennas. The interdependencies between the channel XPD, directional spread and pathloss, and the respective impact on channel capacity are also discussed in this paper.

  19. Evaluation of Diversity Antenna Designs Using Ray Tracing, Measured Radiation Patterns, and MIMO Channel Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Arindam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of the MIMO performance of three candidate antenna array designs, each embedded within a PDA footprint, using indoor wideband channel measurements at 5.2 GHz alongside channel simulations. A channel model which employs the plane-wave approximation was used to combine the embedded antenna radiation patterns of the candidate devices obtained from far-field pattern measurements and multipath component parameters from an indoor ray-tracer. The 4-element candidate arrays were each constructed using a different type of antenna element, and despite the diverse element directivities, pattern characteristics, and polarization purities, all three devices were constructed to fully exploit diversity in polarization, space, and angle. Thus, low correlation and high information theoretic capacity was observed in each case. A good match between the model and the measurements is also demonstrated, especially for MIMO subsets of identically or orthogonally polarized linear slot antennas. The interdependencies between the channel XPD, directional spread and pathloss, and the respective impact on channel capacity are also discussed in this paper.

  20. Macro-Bending Influence on Radiation Induced Attenuation Measurement in Optical Fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Guillermain, E; Ricci, D; Weinand, U

    2014-01-01

    Influence of the bending radius on the measurement of radiation induced attenuation in glass optical fibres is discussed in this paper. Radiation induced attenuation measured in two single-mode fibre types shows discrepancies when coiled around a low bending radius spool: the observed attenuation is lower than expected. A series of dedicated tests reveals that this invalid measurement is related to the displacement of the mode field towards the cladding when the fibre is bent with a low radius, and to the different radiation resistances of the core and cladding glasses. For irradiation tests of optical fibres, the spool radius should therefore be carefully chosen.

  1. Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoffel, T; Riordan, C; Bigger, J

    1992-11-01

    Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

  2. Solar radiation measurements from coordinated radiosonde flights during the 20th March 2015 solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. Giles; Marlton, Graeme; Williams, Paul; Nicoll, Keri

    2016-04-01

    Solar radiation sensors can be carried on standard weather balloon packages and provide additional information about the atmosphere's vertical structure beyond the traditional thermodynamic measurements [1]. An interesting set of circumstances for such sensors occurs during a solar eclipse, which provides a rapidly changing solar radiation environment within the duration of a typical free balloon flight. Coordinating several launches of solar radiation measuring radiosondes brings a good likelihood of at least one being above any cloud during the maximum eclipse, allowing solar eclipse radiation measurements for comparison with theory. For the 20th March 2015 solar eclipse, a coordinated campaign of balloon-carried solar radiation measurements was undertaken from Reading (51.44N, 0.94W), Lerwick (60.15N, 1.13W) and Reykjavik (64.13N, 21.90W), straddling the path of the eclipse. All three balloons reached sufficient altitude at the eclipse time for eclipse-induced variations in solar radiation and solar limb darkening to be measured above cloud. Because the sensor platforms were free to swing, techniques have been evaluated to correct the measurements for their changing orientation. These approaches, which are essentially independent, give values that agree with theoretical expectations for the eclipse-induced radiation changes. [1] K.A. Nicoll and R.G. Harrison, Balloon-borne disposable radiometer Rev Sci Instrum 83, 025111 (2012) doi: 10.1063/1.3685252

  3. Impact of the radiation trapping on lifetime measurement of Er{sup 3+} doped glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoita, A.; Vautey, T.; Jacquier, B. [Universite de Lyon, Lyon F-69000 (France); Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS, UMR5620, Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Guy, S., E-mail: guy@pcml.univ-lyon1.f [Universite de Lyon, Lyon F-69000 (France); Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS, UMR5620, Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2010-07-15

    We report on the interplay between experimental arrangement, resonant radiation trapping and decay measurements of infra-red emission of erbium doped glasses. The impact of the relative position between the exciting and detecting positions of the bulk samples is investigated. We show that the radiation trapping leads to long rise time dynamics evenly distributed outside the pulsed pumped region.

  4. BOBMEX-98 Pilot: Measurement and analysis of incoming shortwave radiation data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Gopala Reddy; P Sree Ram

    2000-06-01

    Empirical formulae for estimation of hourly incoming shortwave radiation over the Indian Ocean under different cloud amounts have been developed by using the pyranometer measurements of the incoming solar radiation and the cloud observations during BOBMEX Pilot (October - November 1998) cruise.

  5. Radioactivity measurement of radioactive contaminated soil by using a fiber-optic radiation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hanyoung; Kim, Rinah; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    A fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) was developed to measure the gamma radiation from radioactive contaminated soil. The FORS was fabricated using an inorganic scintillator (Lu,Y)2SiO5:Ce (LYSO:Ce), a mixture of epoxy resin and hardener, aluminum foil, and a plastic optical fiber. Before its real application, the FORS was tested to determine if it performed adequately. The test result showed that the measurements by the FORS adequately followed the theoretically estimated values. Then, the FORS was applied to measure the gamma radiation from radioactive contaminated soil. For comparison, a commercial radiation detector was also applied to measure the same soil samples. The measurement data were analyzed by using a statistical parameter, the critical level to determine if net radioactivity statistically different from background was present in the soil sample. The analysis showed that the soil sample had radioactivity distinguishable from background.

  6. Testing of environmental radiation monitors using the Risø low-level radiation measurement stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    2000-01-01

    a simulation of a radioactive plume passing over the monitors during a certain time was made using a specially designed source set up in the field that was able to vary the air kerma rate from low activity Cs-137 sources additional to the natural air kerma rate. It is demonstrated that a typical environmental...... radiation detector can distinguish an increase of the ambient air kerma rate of less than 3%....

  7. Radiochromic Plastic Films for Accurate Measurement of Radiation Absorbed Dose and Dose Distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, Arne; Fidan, S.

    1977-01-01

    of many polymeric systems in industrial radiation processing. The result is that errors due to energy dependence of response of the radiation sensor are effectively reduced, since the spectral sensitivity of the dose meter matches that of the polymer of interest, over a wide range of photon and electron...... in polymeric solutions can be cast into flexible free-standing thin films of uniform thickness and reproducible response to ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. The increase in optical density versus energy deposited by radiation is linear over a wide range of doses and is for practical purposes independent......Thin radiochromic dye films are useful for measuring large radiation absorbed doses (105–108 rads) and for high-resolution imaging of dose patterns produced by penetrating radiation beams passing through non-homogeneous media. Certain types of amino-substituted triarylmethane cyanides dissolved...

  8. Measurements of the spectrum and energy dependence of X-ray transition radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of experiments designed to test the theory of X-ray transition radiation and to verify the predicted dependence of the characteristic features of the radiation on the radiator dimensions are presented. The X-ray frequency spectrum produced by 5- to 9-GeV electrons over the range 4 to 30 keV was measured with a calibrated single-crystal Bragg spectrometer, and at frequencies up to 100 keV with an NaI scintillator. The interference pattern in the spectrum and the hardening of the radiation with increasing foil thickness are clearly observed. The energy dependence of the total transition-radiation intensity was studied using a radiator with large dimensions designed to yield energy-dependent signals at very high particle energies, up to E/mc-squared approximately equal to 100,000. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  9. Cosmic radiation dose measurements from the RaD-X flight campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Gronoff, Guillaume P.; Norman, Ryan B.; Hayes, Bryan M.; Lusby, Terry C.; Straume, Tore; Tobiska, W. Kent; Hands, Alex; Ryden, Keith; Benton, Eric; Wiley, Scott; Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard; Xu, Xiaojing

    2016-10-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) stratospheric balloon flight mission obtained measurements for improving the understanding of cosmic radiation transport in the atmosphere and human exposure to this ionizing radiation field in the aircraft environment. The value of dosimetric measurements from the balloon platform is that they can be used to characterize cosmic ray primaries, the ultimate source of aviation radiation exposure. In addition, radiation detectors were flown to assess their potential application to long-term, continuous monitoring of the aircraft radiation environment. The RaD-X balloon was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico (34.5°N, 104.2°W) on 25 September 2015. Over 18 h of flight data were obtained from each of the four different science instruments at altitudes above 20 km. The RaD-X balloon flight was supplemented by contemporaneous aircraft measurements. Flight-averaged dosimetric quantities are reported at seven altitudes to provide benchmark measurements for improving aviation radiation models. The altitude range of the flight data extends from commercial aircraft altitudes to above the Pfotzer maximum where the dosimetric quantities are influenced by cosmic ray primaries. The RaD-X balloon flight observed an absence of the Pfotzer maximum in the measurements of dose equivalent rate.

  10. Spectral Signature of Column Solar Radiation Absorption During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE). Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hirok, William; Gautier, Catherine; Ricchiazzi, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Spectral and broadband shortwave radiative flux data obtained from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) are compared with 3-D radiative transfer computations for the cloud field of October 30, 1995. Because the absorption of broadband solar radiation in the cloudy atmosphere deduced from observations and modeled differ by 135 Wm{sup -2}, we performed a consistency analysis using spectral observations and the model to integrate for wavelengths between the spectral observations. To match spectral measurements, aerosols need a reduction in both single scattering albedo (from 0.938 to 0.82) and asymmetry factor (from 0.67 to 0.61), and cloud droplets require a three-fold increase in co-albedo. Even after modifying the model inputs and microphysics the difference in total broadband absorption is still of the order of 75Wm{sup -2}. Finally, an unexplained absorber centered around 1.06 {micro}m appears in the comparison that is much too large to be explained by dimers.

  11. Developments in radiation, stimulation and observation facilities in luminescence measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Andersen, C.E.; Duller, G.A.T.;

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarises recent developments in the Riscircle divide TL/OSL reader. These new developments include an elevated temperature irradiation facility that has been expanded to measure variable temperature radioluminescence (RL) during beta irradiation. This RL facility allows the measurement...... facilities, and illustrates their applications with representative measurements. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. [Evaluation of uncertainty in measurement of radiated disturbance and analysis of the result].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiming; Jiang, Sui

    2012-03-01

    This paper evaluates the uncertainty in the measurement of radiated disturbance by analyzing and calculating the components that influence the uncertainty. And the effectiveness of the uncertainty testing has been confirmed through the ability validation.

  13. 47 CFR 2.1053 - Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization...) Measurements shall be made to detect spurious emissions that may be radiated directly from the cabinet, control... spurious emission. For this test, single sideband, independent sideband, and controlled...

  14. Visible spectroscopy of the new ESO Large Program on trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs: final results

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasier, S; de Bergh, C; Alvarez-Candal, A; DeMeo, F; Merlin, F; Perna, D; Guilbert, A; Delsanti, A; Dotto, E; Doressoundiram, A

    2009-01-01

    A second large programme (LP) for the physical studies of TNOs and Centaurs, started at ESO Cerro Paranal on October 2006 to obtain high-quality data, has recently been concluded. In this paper we present the spectra of these pristine bodies obtained in the visible range during the last two semesters of the LP. We investigate the spectral behaviour of the TNOs and Centaurs observed, and we analyse the spectral slopes distribution of the full data set coming from this LP and from the literature. We computed the spectral slope for each observed object, and searched for possible weak absorption features. A statistical analysis was performed on a total sample of 73 TNOs and Centaurs to look for possible correlations between dynamical classes, orbital parameters, and spectral gradient. We obtained new spectra for 28 bodies, 15 of which were observed for the first time. All the new presented spectra are featureless, including 2003 AZ84, for which a faint and broad absorption band possibly attributed to hydrated sil...

  15. Development of Precision Information Measuring System for Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSHCHUPKIN, O.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Results of studying the neural network method are presented to reduce the amount of calibration points for the multisensor (MS, in particular for the photodiode. This allows transmitting to the MS individual conversion function and provides the high accuracy of measurement. The structure of synthesized information-measuring system and its measuring channel has created for implementing of the proposed approach. A structural scheme is proposed as well for values transmitting the etalon measures to measuring systems. Its used to determine the errors of photodiodes, as those which are produced for customers. This assures the interchangeability of sensors when using the individual conversion function.

  16. Scientific system for high-resolution measurement of the circumsolar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrott, Simeon, E-mail: thomas.schmidt@ise.fraunhofer.de; Schmidt, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.schmidt@ise.fraunhofer.de; Hornung, Thorsten, E-mail: thomas.schmidt@ise.fraunhofer.de; Nitz, Peter, E-mail: thomas.schmidt@ise.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-09-26

    We developed a camera based system for measurements of the circumsolar radiation with a high angular resolution of 0.1 mrad. Subsequent measurements may be taken at intervals as short as 15 s. In this publication we describe the optical system in detail and discuss some aspects of the measurement method. First results from two days of measurement at Freiburg i. Br., Germany, are presented and compared to data from literature. The good results encourage us to perform longer measurement campaigns in future to better understand the influence of circumsolar radiation on the power yield of concentrating photovoltaic systems.

  17. Nuclear Targets for a Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Radiative Width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, Philippe; Clinton, Eric; McWilliams, R.; Lawrence, Dave; Miskimen, Rory; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Asaturyan, Arshak; Baker, O.; Benton, LaRay; Bernstein, Aron; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Dale, Daniel; Danagoulian, Samuel; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, Raphael; Deur, Alexandre; DOLGOLENKO, A.; Dzyubenko, Georgiy; Evdokimov, Anatoly; Feng, JIng; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gan, Liping; Gasparian, Ashot; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hardy, K.; Ito, Mark; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kingsberry, Paul; Kolarkar, Ameya; Konchatnyi, Mykhailo; Korchin, O.; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kowalski, Stanley; Kubantsev, Mikhail; Kubarovsky, Valery; LARIN, Ilya; MATVEEV, V.; McNulty, Dustin; Milbrath, Brian; Minehart, Ralph; Mochalov, Vasiliy; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Nakagawa, Itaru; Overby, Steven; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Payen, Marvin; Pedroni, Ronald; Prok, Yelena; Ritchie, Barry; Salgado, Carlos; Sitnikov, Anatoly; Sober, Daniel; Stephens, W.; Teymurazyan, Aram; Underwood, Jarreas; VASILIEV, A.; VEREBRYUSOV, V.; Vishnyakov, Vladimir; Wood, Michael

    2009-12-01

    A technique is presented for precision measurements of the area densities, density * T, of approximately 5% radiation length carbon and 208Pb targets used in an experiment at Jefferson Laboratory to measure the neutral pion radiative width. The precision obtained in the area density for the carbon target is +/- 0.050%, and that obtained for the lead target through an x-ray attenuation technique is +/- 0.43%.

  18. Instrument for thermal radiation flux measurement in high temperature gas flow (Cuernavaca instrument)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afgan, N.H. [Universidade Tecnica, Lisbon (Portugal); Leontiev, A.I. [Moscow State Technical University (Russian Federation)

    1995-05-01

    A new instrument for hemispherical radiation heat flux measurement is proposed. It is based on the theory of blow of the boundary layer, taking into account that at the critical mass flow rate through the porous surface the thermal boundary layer is blown off and only radiation flux from high temperature gases reaches the porous surface. With the measurement of blow of gas flow and the temperature of the porous material, the respective heat flux is obtained. (author)

  19. An analysis of the Wheeler method for measuring the radiating efficiency of antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    A model problem is formulated to evaluate the limitations imposed by the assumptions in the Wheeler or cap method for measuring the radiating efficiency of antennas. The antenna in the model is a circular loop and the radiation shield is a spherical metal shell. Calculated values of the actual efficiency of the antenna and the efficiency that would be measured using the Wheeler method are compared to determine the accuracy of the method and set guidelines for its application.

  20. A unified approach to deconvolution radiation spectra measured by radiochromic films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stančić Velimir A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the evaluation of energy distribution of a radiation source on the basis of measured space distribution of deposited energy is proposed. The measured data were obtained by using radiochromic films. Mathematical modeling is defined as a Fredholm integral equation inversion problem. Negative solutions were treated as an additional condition expressed through undefined energy group boundaries, caused by virtue of the physical phenomenon of statistical uncertainty. Examples are given of the electron source and neutron radiation field.

  1. Survey of radiofrequency radiation levels around GSM base stations and evaluation of measurement uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulević Branislav D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a summary of broadband measurement values of radiofrequency radiation around GSM base stations in the vicinity of residential areas in Belgrade and 12 other cities in Serbia. It will be useful for determining non-ionizing radiation exposure levels of the general public in the future. The purpose of this paper is also an appropriate representation of basic information on the evaluation of measurement uncertainty.

  2. Measurement of the Pulse Radiation of an IRA in Time Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadtler, Thiemo; Ter Haseborg, Jan Luiken; Sabath, Frank

    For radiation of UWB pulses special Impulse Radiating Antennas (IRA) have been designed and are continuously improved. The measurement of its near field can help optimizing this antenna type. This paper presents a time domain scanner which is able to determine the transient near field. The so called double probe near field scanner can be employed to measure the two dimensional field distribution in time domain.

  3. An Algorithm to Calculate Phase-Center Offset of Aperture Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An Algorithm to Calculate Phase-Center Offset of Aperture Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns by Patrick Debroux...Offset of Aperture Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns Patrick Debroux and Berenice Verdin Survivability/Lethality Analysis... Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  4. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki [Department of Intelligent Mechanical Engineering, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, 3-30-1 Wajirohigashi, Higashiku, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO{sub 2} gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  5. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO2 gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  6. Radiation Measurements Performed with Active Detectors Relevant for Human Space Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, Livio; Berger, Thomas; Matthiä, Daniel; Reitz, Günther

    2015-01-01

    A reliable radiation risk assessment in space is a mandatory step for the development of countermeasures and long-duration mission planning in human spaceflight. Research in radiobiology provides information about possible risks linked to radiation. In addition, for a meaningful risk evaluation, the radiation exposure has to be assessed to a sufficient level of accuracy. Consequently, both the radiation models predicting the risks and the measurements used to validate such models must have an equivalent precision. Corresponding measurements can be performed both with passive and active devices. The former is easier to handle, cheaper, lighter, and smaller but they measure neither the time dependence of the radiation environment nor some of the details useful for a comprehensive radiation risk assessment. Active detectors provide most of these details and have been extensively used in the International Space Station. To easily access such an amount of data, a single point access is becoming essential. This review presents an ongoing work on the development of a tool that allows obtaining information about all relevant measurements performed with active detectors providing reliable inputs for radiation model validation.

  7. Radiation measurements performed with active detectors relevant for human space exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livio eNarici

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A reliable radiation risk assessment in space is a mandatory step for the development of countermeasures and long duration mission planning in human spaceflight.Research in radiobiology provides information about possible risks linked to radiation. In addition, for a meaningful risk evaluation, the radiation exposure has to be assessed to a sufficient level of accuracy. Consequently, both the radiation models predicting the risks and the measurements used to validate such models must have an equivalent precision. Corresponding measurements can be performed both with passive and active devices. The former are easier to handle, cheaper, lighter and smaller but they measure neither the time dependence of the radiation environment nor some of the details useful for a comprehensive radiation risk assessment. Active detectors provide most of these details and have been extensively used in the International Space Station (ISS.To easily access such an amount of data, a single point access is becoming essential. This review presents an ongoing work on the development of a tool which allows obtaining information about all relevant measurements performed with active detectors providing reliable inputs for radiation model validation.

  8. Measuring instruments and challenges in radiation-protection measuring techniques; Messgeraete und Herausforderungen in der Strahlenschutzmesstechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupe, Oliver [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Photonendosimetrie'

    2013-06-15

    After a description of the different types of radiation detectors the application of these detectors for dosimetry are discussed, whereby personnel dosemeters and stationary dosemeters are considered. (HSI)

  9. Measurements of radiation effects on a 4 Mb PSRAM memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalez, Odair Lelis; Pereira Junior, Evaldo Carlos Fonseca; Vaz, Rafael Galhardo; Pereira, Marlon Antonio; Wirth, Gilson Inácio; Both, Thiago Hanna

    2014-11-01

    The results of a static test of total ionizing dose (TID) effects on an ISSI 4Mb PSRAM memory are reported in this work. The irradiation was performed at the IEAv's Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation with 1.17 and 1.32 MeV gamma-rays from a 60Co source at a dose rate of 2.5 krad/h up to an accumulated dose of 215.7 krad. The TID threshold for bit flip found in this experiment was 52.5 krad. From a sampling of 4096 memory addresses it was estimated a bit flip rate of approximately 50% at an accumulated dose of 215.7 krad.

  10. Short-term variability of a sample of 29 trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirouin, A.; Ortiz, J. L.; Duffard, R.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Aceituno, F. J.; Morales, N.

    2010-11-01

    Aims: We attempt to increase the number of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) whose short-term variability has been studied and compile a high quality database with the least possible biases, which may be used to perform statistical analyses. Methods: We performed broadband CCD photometric observations using several telescopes (the 1.5 m telescope at Sierra Nevada Observatory, the 2.2 m Calar Alto telescope and the 2.5 m INT on La Palma). Results: We present the results of 6 years of observations, reduced and analyzed with the same tools in a systematic way. We report completely new data on 15 objects, for 5 objects we present a new analysis of previously published results plus additional data and for 9 objects we present a new analysis of data already published. Lightcurves, possible rotation periods, and photometric amplitudes are reported for all of them. The photometric variability is smaller than previously thought: the mean amplitude of our sample is 0.1 mag and only around 15% of our sample has a larger variability than 0.15 mag. The smaller variability seems to be caused by a bias of previous observations. We find a very weak trend of faster spinning objects towards smaller sizes, which appears to be consistent with the smaller objects being more collisionally evolved, but may also be a specific feature of the Centaurs, the smallest objects in our sample. We also find that the smaller the objects, the larger their amplitude, which is also consistent with the idea that small objects are more collisionally evolved and thus more deformed. Average rotation rates from our work are 7.5 h for the whole sample, 7.6 h for the TNOs alone and 7.3 h for the Centaurs. Maxwellian fits to the period distribution yield similar results. Table 1 and Appendix are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTable 3 is available in electronic form in the Center of astronomical Data of Strasbourg cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb

  11. KERMA-based radiation dose management system for real-time patient dose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Oh, Kyung-Min; Nam, Sang-Hee; Kang, Sang-Sik; Park, Ji-Koon; Song, Yong-Keun; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2016-07-01

    Because systems that reduce radiation exposure during diagnostic procedures must be developed, significant time and financial resources have been invested in constructing radiation dose management systems. In the present study, the characteristics of an existing ionization-based system were compared to those of a system based on the kinetic energy released per unit mass (KERMA). Furthermore, the feasibility of using the KERMA-based system for patient radiation dose management was verified. The ionization-based system corrected the effects resulting from radiation parameter perturbations in general radiography whereas the KERMA-based system did not. Because of this difference, the KERMA-based radiation dose management system might overestimate the patient's radiation dose due to changes in the radiation conditions. Therefore, if a correction factor describing the correlation between the systems is applied to resolve this issue, then a radiation dose management system can be developed that will enable real-time measurement of the patient's radiation exposure and acquisition of diagnostic images.

  12. Radiation force on absorbing targets and power measurements of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the analytic expressions for the radiated field of a circular concave piston given by Hasegawa et al.,an integral for calculation of the radiation force on a plane absorbing target in a spherically focused field is derived.A general relation between acoustic power P and normal radiation force Fn is obtained under the condition of kr 1.Numerical computation is carried out by using the symbolic computation program for practically focused sources and absorbing circular targets.The results show that,for a given source,there is a range of target positions where the radiation force is independent of the target’s position under the assumption that the contribution of the acoustic field behind the target to the radiation force can be neglected.The experiments are carried out and confirm that there is a range of target positions where the measured radiation force is basically independent of the target’s position even at high acoustic power (up to 700 W).It is believed that when the radiation force method is used to measure the acoustic power radiated from a focused source,the size of the target must be selected in such a way that no observable sound can be found in the region behind the target.

  13. Solar Radiation Measurement Using Raspberry Pi and Its Modelling Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Selvanathan Shanmuga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of solar energy as the best alternative to traditional energy sources has led to an extensive study on the measurement and prediction of solar radiation. Devices such as pyranometer, pyrrheliometer, global UV radiometer are used for the measurement of solar radiation. The solar radiation measuring instruments available at Innovation Center, MIT Manipal were integrated with a Raspberry Pi to allow remote access to the data through the university Local Area Network. The connections of the data loggers and the Raspberry Pi were enclosed in a plastic box to prevent damage from the rainfall and humidity in Manipal. The solar radiation data was used to validate an Artificial Neural Network model which was developed using various meterological data from 2011-2015.

  14. Evaluation of long-term global radiation measurements in Denmark and Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skalík, Lukáš; Lulkovičová, Otília; Furbo, Simon

    different Swedish climate stations of Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. The global horizontal radiation has been measured for a high number of years at all of these stations. The values show a tendency of increased annual global radiation, most likely due to decreased pollution...... of the atmosphere, increased duration of periods without clouds and/or combination of both these effects. Twenty years of measurements from a climate station in Lyngby, Denmark show that the global radiation increase is almost 3.5 kWh/m2 per year, corresponding to a growth of 7 % for the last 20 years. The global....../systems are located. This study is based on yearly and monthly values of global radiation based on measurements from a climate station placed on the roof of building 119 at Technical University of Denmark in Kgs. Lyngby, from different Danish climate stations runned by Danish Meteorological Institute and from...

  15. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Brinza, David E; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P

    2014-01-24

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  16. Workshop on measurement quality assurance for ionizing radiation: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, J.A.; Swinth, K.L. [comps.

    1993-12-31

    This workshop was held to review the status of secondary level calibration accreditation programs, review related measurement accreditation programs, document lessons learned, and to present changes in programs due to new national priorities involving radioactivity measurements. Contents include: fundamentals of measurement quality assurance (MQA), standards for MQA programs; perspectives and policies; complete MQA programs; future MQA programs; QA/QC programs--radioactivity; QA/QC programs--dosimetry; laboratory procedures for QA/QC; in-house control of reference dosimetry laboratories; in-house controls of radioactivity laboratories; and poster session. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. Cloud recognition from ground-based solar radiation measurements: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbo, Josep; Gonzalez, Josep-Abel

    1998-12-01

    Despite cloud recognition techniques that can routinely identify cloud classes form satellite images, observation of clouds from the ground is still needed to acquire a complete description of cloud climatology. Solar radiation in a given site is one of the meteorological magnitudes that are most affected by cloud cover. Presently, the number of stations where both global and diffuse total solar radiation is measured is growing, due basically to energetic applications of solar radiation. Global and diffuse hourly irradiation, along with some measure of the temporal variability of solar radiation, are used in this paper to describe the sky condition, and to classify it into several cloud types. A classical maximum likelihood method is applied for clustering data. One year of solar radiation data and cloud observations at a site in Catalonia, Spain is used to illustrate the ability of solar radiation measurements to describe cloud types. Preliminary results of the above methodology show that three clusters appear using global and diffuse hourly irradiation only. Fog, stratus, and stratocumulus from the first group. A second group includes altocumulus alone or mixed with other clouds, as well as scattered cumulus congestus. In a third group, we find clear skies, cirrus and scattered cumulus. Especially in this third group, variability of solar radiation within an hour helps to separate different situations.

  18. Proceedings of the 109th basic science seminar on research for quantum radiation measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    In the field of radiation measurement in next century, one of the main themes for researchers will be to develop new radiation detection techniques based on quantum effects. Thus three research projects for development of new neutron detection method using He-Ne laser cells, radiation-resistant optical fibers, and superconducting tunnel junction radiation detectors have been started five years before in our research group for quantum radiation measurement of the advanced science research center (ASRC) of JAERI. The joint workshop `Research for Quantum Radiation Measurement` was held as one of basic science seminars in ASRC on 19-20th of January 1998 on the occasion of the ending of the projects. There were many presentations concerning the above three themes and the participants had a good opportunity to exchange relating research information. This proceedings includes 13 papers of the presentations. It is not only useful to know the present status of advanced study but also very suggestive to see the direction and evolution of `radiation detection techniques based on quantum effects` in the future. (J.P.N.)

  19. Spectral emissivity measurements of land-surface materials and related radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Z.; Ng, D.; Dozier, J.

    1994-01-01

    Spectral radiance measurements have been made in the laboratory and in the field for deriving spectral emissivities of some land cover samples with a spectroradiometer and an auxiliary radiation source in the wavelength range 2.5-14.5 micrometers. A easy and quick four-step method (four steps to measure the sample and a diffuse reflecting plate surface under sunshine and shadowing conditions, respectively) has been used for simultaneous determination of surface temperature and emissivity. We emphasized in-situ measurements in combination with radiative transfer simulations, and an error analysis for basic assumptions in deriving spectral emissivity of land-surface samples from thermal infrared measurements.

  20. Measuring the Cosmic Particle Radiation from electrons to actinides - CALET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John; Calet Collaboration; Hnx/Tigeriss Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    CALET (Calorimetric Electron Telescope) was installed on the Exposed Facility of the Japanese Experiment Module (Kibo) on for 24 August 2015. CALET measures the high-energy spectra of electrons, nuclei, and gamma-rays. CALET will extend direct measurements of the total electron spectrum into the trans-TeV energy range for the first time. In this paper, we well present the science and current status of CALET and initial observations from its first 1.5 years in orbit.

  1. Accredited dose measurements for validation of radiation sterilized products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1993-01-01

    The activities and services of the accredited Risø High Dose Reference Laboratory are described. The laboratory operates according to the European standard EN 45001 regarding Operation of Testing Laboratories, and it fulfills the requirements of being able to deliver traceable dose measurements f...... of the dosimetric parameters of an irradiation facility. 5. 5. Measurement of absorbed dose distribution in irradiated products. The paper describes these services and the procedures necessary for their execution....

  2. Measurement of XUV-absorption spectra of ZnS radiatively heated foils

    CERN Document Server

    Kontogiannopoulmos, Nikolaos; Thais, Frédéric; Chenais-Popovics, Claude; Sauvan, Pascal; Schott, R; Fölsner, Wolfgang; Arnault, Philippe; Poirier, Michel; Blenski, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Time-resolved absorption of zinc sulfide (ZnS) and aluminum in the XUV-range has been measured. Thin foils in conditions close to local thermodynamic equilibrium were heated by radiation from laser-irradiated gold spherical cavities. Analysis of the aluminum foil radiative hydrodynamic expansion, based on the detailed atomic calculations of its absorption spectra, showed that the cavity emitted flux that heated the absorption foils corresponds to a radiation temperature in the range 55 60 eV. Comparison of the ZnS absorption spectra with calculations based on a superconfiguration approach identified the presence of species Zn6+ - Zn8+ and S5+ - S6+. Based on the validation of the radiative source simulations, experimental spectra were then compared to calculations performed by post-processing the radiative hydrodynamic simulations of ZnS. Satisfying agreement is found when temperature gradients are accounted for.

  3. The 250AH/90A active lithium-thionyl chloride cell for Centaur-G application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolla, A. E.; Tura, D. D.

    1987-09-01

    A high rate active Li/SOCl2 cell was designed for use in a 28 volt, 250 amp-hour space battery system. The lithium battery is being considered as a replacement of its heavier silver-zinc counterpart on board the Centaur-G booster rocket which is used to launch payloads from the Space Shuttle cargo bay into deep-space. Basically a feasibility study, this development effort is demonstrating the ability of the lithium cell to deliver up to 90 amps safely at power densities of approximately 25 watts per pound. Test data on 4 prototype units is showing an energy density of 85 watt-hours per pound and 9.0 watt-hours/cu in. The cells tested typically delivered 280 to 300 amp-hours under ambient temperature test conditions using alternating continuous loads of 90, 55, and 20 amperes throughout life. Data from four cells tested are presented to demonstrate the capability of Li/SOCl2 technology for a C/3 discharge rate in active and hermetic cell units.

  4. Supervised Autonomy for Exploration and Mobile Manipulation in Rough Terrain with a Centaur-like Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Schwarz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Planetary exploration scenarios illustrate the need for autonomous robots that are capable to operate in unknown environments without direct human interaction. At the DARPA Robotics Challenge, we demonstrated that our Centaur-like mobile manipulation robot Momaro can solve complex tasks when teleoperated. Motivated by the DLR SpaceBot Cup 2015, where robots should explore a Mars-like environment, find and transport objects, take a soil sample, and perform assembly tasks, we developed autonomous capabilities for Momaro. Our robot perceives and maps previously unknown, uneven terrain using a 3D laser scanner. Based on the generated height map, we assess drivability, plan navigation paths, and execute them using the omnidirectional drive. Using its four legs, the robot adapts to the slope of the terrain. Momaro perceives objects with cameras, estimates their pose, and manipulates them with its two arms autonomously. For specifying missions, monitoring mission progress, on-the-fly reconfiguration, and teleoperation, we developed a ground station with suitable operator interfaces. To handle network communication interruptions and latencies between robot and ground station, we implemented a robust network layer for the ROS middleware. With the developed system, our team NimbRo Explorer solved all tasks of the DLR SpaceBot Camp 2015. We also discuss the lessons learned from this demonstration.

  5. An integrated autonomous rendezvous and docking system architecture using Centaur modern avionics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kurt

    1991-01-01

    The avionics system for the Centaur upper stage is in the process of being modernized with the current state-of-the-art in strapdown inertial guidance equipment. This equipment includes an integrated flight control processor with a ring laser gyro based inertial guidance system. This inertial navigation unit (INU) uses two MIL-STD-1750A processors and communicates over the MIL-STD-1553B data bus. Commands are translated into load activation through a Remote Control Unit (RCU) which incorporates the use of solid state relays. Also, a programmable data acquisition system replaces separate multiplexer and signal conditioning units. This modern avionics suite is currently being enhanced through independent research and development programs to provide autonomous rendezvous and docking capability using advanced cruise missile image processing technology and integrated GPS navigational aids. A system concept was developed to combine these technologies in order to achieve a fully autonomous rendezvous, docking, and autoland capability. The current system architecture and the evolution of this architecture using advanced modular avionics concepts being pursued for the National Launch System are discussed.

  6. Measurements of the Radiation Induced Conductivity of Insulating Polymeric Materials for the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbridge, J.; Dennison, J. R.; Hodges, J.; Hoffmann, R. C.; Abbott, J.; Hunt, A.; Spaulding, R.

    2006-10-01

    We report on initial measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity (RIC) for twelve thin film polymer materials that are used in the cabling of the James Webb Space Telescope. Results will be used to model possible detrimental arching due to space craft charging effects. RIC occurs when incident ionizing radiation deposits energy in a material and excites electrons into the conduction band of insulators. RIC is determined using a constant voltage test method as the difference in the equilibrium sample conductivity under no incident radiation and sample conductivity under an incident flux. An accelerator beam at the Idaho Accelerator Center provides the 2-5 MeV incident flux over a range of 10^2 to 10^+1 rad/sec. Measurements are made for a range of applied voltages and radiation dose rates.

  7. Ground-based measurements of aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbin Chen; Xiangao Xia; Pucai Wang; Wenxing Zhang

    2007-01-01

    In order to gain an insight into the aerosol properties and their climatic effect over the continental source regions of China, it is of significance to carry out long-term ground-based measurements of aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing. A couple of temporary and permanent Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and three comprehensive radiative sites were established in China as a result of international cooperation in recent years. Heavy aerosol loading and significant temporal and spatial variation over North China are revealed by the AERONET data.Aerosol-induced reductions in surface radiation budget are examined on the basis of collocated observations by sun photometers and pyranometers.

  8. Measurements and TCAD Simulations of Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects

    CERN Document Server

    F. Moscatelli; G. M. Bilei; A. Morozzi; G.-F. Dalla Betta; R. Mendicino; M. Boscardin; N. Zorzi; L. Servoli; P. Maccagnani

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose the application of a radiation damage model based on the introduction of deep level traps/recombination centers suitable for device level numerical simulation of radiation detectors at very high fluences (e.g. 1÷2×1016 1-MeV equivalent neutrons per square centimeter) combined with a surface damage model developed by using experimental parameters extracted from measurements from gamma irradiated p-type dedicated test structures.

  9. Measurements and TCAD Simulations of Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects in Silicon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; Passeri, D; Bilei, G M; Servoli, L; Morozzi, A; Betta, G -F Dalla; Mendicino, R; Boscardin, M; Zorzi, N

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose the application of a radiation damage model based on the introduction of deep level traps/recombination centers suitable for device level numerical simulation of radiation detectors at very high fluences (e.g. 1{\\div}2 10^16 1-MeV equivalent neutrons per square centimeter) combined with a surface damage model developed by using experimental parameters extracted from measurements from gamma irradiated p-type dedicated test structures.

  10. Anticlastic curvature measurements on unribbed crystal optics for synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintana, J.P.; Dolin, Y.; Georgopoulos, P. (DND-CAT Synchrotron Research Center, APS/ANL Sector 5, Building 400, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)); Kushnir, V.I. (APS/XFD, Bldg. 362, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States))

    1995-02-01

    Various methods have been proposed for measuring the distortion in perfect crystals using double-crystal methods. The majority of these methods rely on making comparisons between double-crystal rocking curve measurements under the spatial extent of an extended x-ray beam. Unless the beam is large and parallel (such as at a synchrotron bending magnet), these methods are not easily scalable to large crystals (e.g., crystal focusing elements for synchrotron beamlines) due to the mechanical inaccuracies inherent in moving the various optical components. We present a method based on a scanning source which simplifies the problems in scaling double-crystal methods to large optics. In addition, results using this method are presented on a ribless sagittal focusing Si(111) crystal demonstrating that the anticlastic deviation can be made to be less than [plus minus]1 s of arc over a 1-cm-long section parallel to the sagittal axis.

  11. Measurement of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1983-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed in which a suitably tuned CO2 laser, frequency doubled by a Tl3AsSe37 crystal, was brought into resonance with a P-line or two R-lines in the fundamental vibration spectrum of CO. Cooling or heating produced by absorption in CO was measured in a gas-thermometer arrangement. P-line cooling and R-line heating could be demonstrated, measured, and compared. The experiments were continued with CO mixed with N2 added in partial pressures from 9 to 200 Torr. It was found that an efficient collisional resonance energy transfer from CO to N2 existed which increased the cooling effects by one to two orders of magnitude over those in pure CO. Temperature reductions in the order of tens of degrees Kelvin were obtained by a single pulse in the core of the irradiated volume. These measurements followed predicted values rather closely, and it is expected that increase of pulse energies and durations will enhance the heat pump effects. The experiments confirm the feasibility of quasi-isentropic engines which convert laser power into work without the need for heat rejection. Of more immediate potential interest is the possibility of remotely powered heat pumps for cryogenic use, such applications are discussed to the extent possible at the present stage.

  12. Measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 6. 3 cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandolesi, N.; Calzolari, P.; Cortiglioni, S.; Morigi, G.

    1984-06-15

    We present results of a measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at a wavelength of 6.3 cm. We obtained the value T/sub CBR/ = 2.71 +- 0.20 K. This is in good agreement with, and has a smaller error than, any previous measurement at equal or longer wavelengths.

  13. Measurements of longitudinal gamma ray distribution using a multichannel fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, S. H.; Jeon, D.; Kim, J. S.; Jang, J. S.; Jang, K. W.; Yoo, W. J.; Moon, J. H.; Park, B. G.; Kim, S.; Lee, B.

    2014-11-01

    Cerenkov radiation occurs when charged particles are moving faster than the speed of light in a transparent dielectric medium. In optical fibers, Cerenkov radiation can also be generated due to the fiber’s dielectric components. Accordingly, the radiation-induced light signals can be obtained using the optical fibers without any scintillating material. In this study, we fabricated a multichannel, fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) system using silica optical fibers (SOFs), plastic optical fibers (POFs), an optical spectrometer, multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MA-PMTs) and a scanning system to measure the light intensities of Cerenkov radiation induced by gamma rays. To evaluate the fading effects in optical fibers, the spectra of Cerenkov radiation generated in the SOFs and POFs were measured based on the irradiation time by using an optical spectrometer. In addition, we measured the longitudinal distribution of gamma rays emitted from the cylindrical type Co-60 source by using MA-PMTs. The result was also compared with the distribution of the electron flux calculated by using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNPX).

  14. An overview of global solar radiation measurements in Ghardaia area, south Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gairaa, Kacem; Bakelli, Yahia [Applied Research Unit for Renewables Energies, Ouargla Road, Ghardaia (Algeria)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of actual solar radiation data measurements in Ghardaia site (32.360 N, 3.810 W, 450 m above MSL). Global solar radiation and surface temperatures were measured and analyzed for one complete year from 1 January-31December 2005. The data thus recorded are compared with corresponding data of the 22-year average of NASA's surface meteorology and solar energy-model. Hourly, daily and monthly solar radiation was made from five-minute recorded by EKO Pyranometer. The highest measured daily and monthly mean solar radiation was found to be 369 and 326 (W/m2), and the highest five minute averaged solar radiation values up to 1268 (W/m2) were observed in the summer season from May to September, and the yearly average daily energy input was 21.83 (MJ/m2/day). Besides the global solar radiation, the daily and monthly average temperature variations are discussed. The collected data indicate that Ghardaia has a strong potential for solar energy applications.

  15. An overview of global solar radiation measurements in Ghardaia area, south Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacem Gairaa, Yahia Bakelli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of actual solar radiation data measurements in Ghardaia site (32.360 N, 3.810 W, 450 m above MSL. Global solar radiation and surface temperatures were measured and analyzed for one complete year from 1 January-31December 2005. The data thus recorded are compared with corresponding data of the 22-year average of NASA's surface meteorology and solar energy-model. Hourly, daily and monthly solar radiation was made from five-minute recorded by EKO Pyranometer. The highest measured daily and monthly mean solar radiation was found to be 369 and 326 (W/m2, and the highest five minute averaged solar radiation values up to 1268 (W/m2 were observed in the summer season from May to September, and the yearly average daily energy input was 21.83 (MJ/m2/day. Besides the global solar radiation, the daily and monthly average temperature variations are discussed. The collected data indicate that Ghardaia has a strong potential for solar energy applications.

  16. Radiative flux measurements during the Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX) Guam Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment was a field program utilizing the NASA Global Hawk aircraft, to make extensive measurements of tropical tropopause layer (TTL) over the Pacific Ocean. In February and March of 2014, the NASA Global Hawk was deployed to Guam and flew six long duration science flights. The aircraft was outfitted with a suite of instruments to study the composition of the TTL. Measurements included: water vapor amount, cloud particle size and shape, various gaseous species (e.g. CO, CH4, CO2, O3), and radiation measurements. The radiation measurements were comprised of the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) that made spectrally resolved measurements of upwelling and downwelling solar irradiance from 350 to 2200 nm and thermal broadband (4μm to 42 μm) upwelling and downwelling irradiance. Once airborne, the Global Hawk made numerous vertical profiles (14 - 18 km) through the TTL. In this work we present results of combined solar spectral irradiance and broadband thermal irradiance measurements. Solar spectral measurements are correlated, wavelength-by-wavelength, with broadband thermal measurements. The radiative impact in the TTL of water vapor and cirrus clouds are examined both in the solar and thermal wavelengths from both upwelling and downwelling irradiances. The spectral measurements are used in an attempt to attribute physical mechanisms to the thermal (spectrally integrated) measurements. Measurements of heating rates are also presented, highlighting the difficultly in obtaining reliable results from aircraft measurements.

  17. Distribution measurement of radiation intensity with optical fiber at narrow space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Chizuo [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Engineering

    1998-07-01

    Recently, in the field or radiation measurement, optical fiber and scintillation fiber are also begun to use. In order to investigate a new application method of the optical fiber to radiation measurement, a lithium compound for neutron converter and a ZnS(Ag) scintillator are kneaded with epoxy type adhesives, and much few weight of them is coated at an end of optical fiber with 1 to 2 mm in diameter, which is further overcoated with black paint or an aluminum cap for its shielding light to produce a thermal neutron detector. The thermal neutron detector is found to be measurable to neutron flux distribution very rapidly and in high position resolution by moving with computer automatically. This method can be measured selctively aimed radiation such as thermal neutron, rapid neutron, {gamma}-ray, and so forth by means of changing the neutron converter. And, the developed fiber method could be widely used for measurement of neutron and {gamma}-ray intensity distribution at fine interval in the nuclear radiation facilities such as neighbors of accelerator facilities, medical radiation facilities. (G.K.)

  18. Plasma scattering of electromagnetic radiation theory and measurement techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Froula, Dustin H; Luhmann, Neville C Jr; Sheffield, John

    2011-01-01

    This work presents one of the most powerful methods of plasma diagnosis in exquisite detail to guide researchers in the theory and measurement techniques of light scattering in plasmas. Light scattering in plasmas is essential in the research and development of fusion energy, environmental solutions, and electronics.Referred to as the "Bible" by researchers the work encompasses fusion and industrial applications essential in plasma research. It is the only comprehensive resource specific to the plasma scattering technique. It provides a wide-range of experimental examples and discussion of the

  19. Imaging Thomson scattering measurements of radiatively heated Xe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, B; Meinecke, J; Kuschel, S; Ross, J S; Divol, L; Glenzer, S H; Tynan, G R

    2012-05-01

    Uniform density and temperature Xe plasmas have been produced over >4 mm scale-lengths using x-rays generated in a cylindrical Pb cavity. The cavity is 750 {micro}m in depth and diameter, and is heated by a 300 J, 2 ns square, 1054 nm laser pulse focused to a spot size of 200 {micro}m at the cavity entrance. The plasma is characterized by simultaneous imaging Thomson scattering measurements from both the electron and ion scattering features. The electron feature measurement determines the spatial electron density and temperature profile, and using these parameters as constraints in the ion feature analysis allows an accurate determination of the charge state of the Xe ions. The Thomson scattering probe beam is 40 J, 200 ps, and 527 nm, and is focused to a 100 {micro}m spot size at the entrance of the Pb cavity. Each system has a spatial resolution of 25 {micro}m, a temporal resolution of 200 ps (as determined by the probe duration), and a spectral resolution of 2 nm for the electron feature system and 0.025 nm for the ion feature system. The experiment is performed in a Xe filled target chamber at a neutral pressure of 3-10 Torr, and the x-rays produced in the Pb ionize and heat the Xe to a charge state of 20 {+-} 4 at up to 200 eV electron temperatures.

  20. Measurement of environmental radiation using medical scintillation detector in well counter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Kwang Yeul; Park, Yeon Joon; Kim, Min Jeong; Ham, Eun Hye; Yoon, Ji Yeol; Kim, Hyun in; Min, Jung Hwan; Park, Hoon Hee [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    After the Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011, concerns about radiation by people are increasing rapidly. If people could know how much they will be exposed by radiation, it may help them avoiding it and understand what exactly radiation is. By doing this, we were helping to reduce the anxiety of radiation contamination. In this study, we have researched figures of radioactivity with ‘Captus-3000 thyroid uptake measurement systems’ in well counter detector system. The materials were measured with Briquette, Shiitake, Pollock, Button type battery, Alkaline battery, Topsoil, Asphalt, Gasoline, Milk powder, Pine, Basalt stone, Pencil lead, Wasabi, Coarse salt, Tuna(can) Cigar, Beer, and then we categorized those samples into Land resources, Water resources, Foodstuff and Etc (Beer classified as a water resources has been categorized into Foodstuff). Also, we selected the standard radiation source linear 137Cs to measure the sensitivity of well counter detector. After that, we took cpm(counter per minute) for the well counter detector of thyroid uptake system’s sensitivity. Then we compared the results of each material’s cpm and converted those results to Bq/kg unit. There were a little limitation with the measurement equipment because it has less sensitivity than other professional equipment like ‘High purity germanium radiation detector’. Moreover, We didn’t have many choices to decide the materials. As a result, there are macroscopic differences among the rates of material’s spectrum. Therefore, it had meaningful results that showed how much each material had emitted radiation. To compare the material’s cpm with BKG, we’ve compounded their spectrums. By doing that, we were able to detect some differences among the spectrums at specific peak section. Lastly, Button type battery, Alkaline Battery, Briquette, Asphalt and Topsoil showed high value. There were classified emitting high radiation Group A and emitted lower radiation Group B. The Group A

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LR Roeder

    2005-11-30

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

  2. Real-time evolvable pulse shaper for radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanchares, Juan, E-mail: julandan@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garnica, Oscar, E-mail: ogarnica@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Risco-Martín, José L., E-mail: jlrisco@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ignacio Hidalgo, J., E-mail: hidalgo@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Regadío, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.regadio@insa.es [Área de Tecnologías Electrónicas, Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), 28850 Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-01

    In the last two decades, recursive algorithms for real-time digital pulse shaping in pulse height measurements have been developed and published in number of articles and textbooks. All these algorithms try to synthesize in real time optimum or near optimum shapes in the presence of noise. Even though some of these shapers can be considered effective designs, some side effects like aging cannot be ignored. We may observe that after sensors degradation, the signal obtained is not valid. In this regard, we present in this paper a novel technique that, based on evolvable hardware concepts, is able to evolve the degenerated shaper into a new design with better performance than the original one under the new sensor features.

  3. Measurement of gamma and neutron radiations inside spent fuel assemblies with passive detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L., E-mail: vie@ujv.cz [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, 250 68 Husinec-Rez 130 (Czech Republic); Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Lahodova, Z.; Voljanskij, A.; Klupak, V.; Koleska, M. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, 250 68 Husinec-Rez 130 (Czech Republic); Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Cabalka, M. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, 250 68 Husinec-Rez 130 (Czech Republic); Turek, K. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-01

    During operation of a fission nuclear reactor, many radionuclides are generated in fuel by fission and activation of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and other nuclides present in the assembly. After removal of a fuel assembly from the core, these radionuclides are sources of different types of radiation. Gamma and neutron radiation emitted from an assembly can be non-destructively detected with different types of detectors. In this paper, a new method of measurement of radiation from a spent fuel assembly is presented. It is based on usage of passive detectors, such as alanine dosimeters for gamma radiation and track detectors for neutron radiation. Measurements are made on the IRT-2M spent fuel assemblies used in the LVR-15 research reactor. During irradiation of detectors, the fuel assembly is located in a water storage pool at a depth of 6 m. Detectors are inserted into central hole of the assembly, irradiated for a defined time interval, and after the detectors removed from the assembly, gamma dose or neutron fluence are evaluated. Measured profiles of gamma dose rate and neutron fluence rate inside of the spent fuel assembly are presented. This measurement can be used to evaluate relative fuel burn-up.

  4. Measurement of gamma and neutron radiations inside spent fuel assemblies with passive detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Voljanskij, A.; Klupák, V.; Koleška, M.; Cabalka, M.; Turek, K.

    2011-10-01

    During operation of a fission nuclear reactor, many radionuclides are generated in fuel by fission and activation of 235U, 238U and other nuclides present in the assembly. After removal of a fuel assembly from the core, these radionuclides are sources of different types of radiation. Gamma and neutron radiation emitted from an assembly can be non-destructively detected with different types of detectors. In this paper, a new method of measurement of radiation from a spent fuel assembly is presented. It is based on usage of passive detectors, such as alanine dosimeters for gamma radiation and track detectors for neutron radiation. Measurements are made on the IRT-2M spent fuel assemblies used in the LVR-15 research reactor. During irradiation of detectors, the fuel assembly is located in a water storage pool at a depth of 6 m. Detectors are inserted into central hole of the assembly, irradiated for a defined time interval, and after the detectors removed from the assembly, gamma dose or neutron fluence are evaluated. Measured profiles of gamma dose rate and neutron fluence rate inside of the spent fuel assembly are presented. This measurement can be used to evaluate relative fuel burn-up.

  5. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chuyu [Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    2012-12-31

    Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as "organs of sense" or "eyes of the accelerator." Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measure photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators increases the

  6. Capillary acquisition devices for high-performance vehicles: Executive summary. [evaluation of cryogenic propellant management techniques using the centaur launch vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, M. H.; Bradshaw, R. D.; Risberg, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Technology areas critical to the development of cryogenic capillary devices were studied. Passive cooling of capillary devices was investigated with an analytical and experimental study of wicking flow. Capillary device refilling with settled fluid was studied using an analytical and experimental program that resulted in successful correlation of a versatile computer program with test data. The program was used to predict Centaur D-1S LO2 and LH2 start basket refilling. Comparisons were made between the baseline Centaur D-1S propellant feed system and feed system alternatives including systems using capillary devices. The preferred concepts from the Centaur D-1S study were examined for APOTV and POTV vehicles for delivery and round trip transfer of payloads between LEO and GEO. Mission profiles were determined to provide propellant usage timelines and the payload partials were defined.

  7. Alignment Jig for the Precise Measurement of THz Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Hamid H.

    2009-01-01

    A miniaturized instrumentation package comprising a (1) Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, (2) an inertial measurement unit (IMU) consisting largely of surface-micromachined sensors of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, and (3) a microprocessor, all residing on a single circuit board, is part of the navigation system of a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft [e.g., the International Space Station (ISS)] for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. Variants of the package may also be useful in terrestrial collision-detection and -avoidance applications. The navigation solution obtained by integrating the IMU outputs is fed back to a correlator in the GPS receiver to aid in tracking GPS signals. The raw GPS and IMU data are blended in a Kalman filter to obtain an optimal navigation solution, which can be supplemented by range and velocity data obtained by use of (l) a stereoscopic pair of electronic cameras aboard the robotic spacecraft and/or (2) a laser dynamic range imager aboard the ISS. The novelty of the package lies mostly in those aspects of the design of the MEMS IMU that pertain to controlling mechanical resonances and stabilizing scale factors and biases.

  8. Development of infrared spectral radiation measurement system of a non-luminous flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Jin; Maohua Yang; Guibin Yuan; Jingmin Dai

    2005-01-01

    @@ The spectral radiation characteristic of a non-luminous flame is analyzed. The apparatus and the calibration procedure based on infrared emission spectrometry for measurements of the flame are introduced.The influence of background radiation and stray light on the measurement results could be reduced and suppressed by the design of thermolator and digital lock-in technique. A blackbody cavity was used as reference emission source to calibrate the system that completed absolute measurement. The spectral measurement range is 1-20 μm. The least measuring distance and the lowest power detected at the entrance pupil are 550 mm and 10-9 W/cm2, respectively. The experimental results show that the measure error is less than 10%.

  9. Automated System of Area Radiation Measurement (ASARM); Sistema Automatizado de Medicion de Radiacion de Area (SAMRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez G, J., E-mail: jaime.hernandez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The realized activities in nuclear facilities involve the determination of the presence of ionizing radiation fields in the workspaces. The instruments designed to detect and to measure these radiation fields provide useful information (specific type of radiation, intensity, etc.) to take the appropriate radiological protection measures, with the purpose of reducing to the minimum the workers exposition and the people in general. The radiological protection program of Reactor TRIGA Mark III contains the instructions and procedures to implement a periodic radiological monitoring, surveillance, rising of contamination levels, type and number of the instruments required for the radiological monitoring of areas and personal. The ana logical monitoring system model Rms II used to detect and measuring exposition speed and neutron radiation fields in several areas of the installation, provides the information in a logarithmic scale measurer of 4 or 5 decades located in a shelf where the previously mentioned measurement channels are centralized. Also inside the reactor monitoring system are two monitors of radioactive material concentration in the air: The particles continuous monitor and the gaseous effluents monitor which present the referred information of the diverse detectors through ana logical readers. These monitors when operating with an ana logical indication does not present the possibility to generate historical files electronically of each monitor previously mentioned neither to generate visual and audible indications of the alarms. This work presents the Automated System of Area Radiation Measurement which potentiated the functionality of the area monitors for gamma and neutron radiation, as well as of the particles continuous monitor and the gaseous effluents of reactor TRIGA Mark III, when being developed a computer system that captures in real time the information of all the monitors, generating this way an electronic binnacle, a visual and audible alarm

  10. Measurement of the track structure of ionizing radiation; Messung der Spurstruktur ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgers, Gerhard [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Nanodosimetrie'

    2013-06-15

    After a description of the nanodosimetric measurement quantities of tracks induced by ionizing radiation the nanodosemeter operated in the PTB is described. Finally the scaling behaviour of nanodosimetry is considered. In order to test the validity of the corresponding equation ionization-cluster size distributions were measured with monoenergetic proton and alpha beams in the energy range from 0.1 to 20 MeV with propane and nitrogen as measuring gases. (HSI)

  11. Radiation-induced cholecystitis after hepatic radioembolization: do we need to take precautionary measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Jip F; van den Hoven, Andor F; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Elschot, Mattijs; de Jong, Hugo W A M; Lam, Marnix G E H

    2014-11-01

    Controversy exists over the need to take precautionary measures during hepatic radioembolization to minimize the risk of radiation-induced cholecystitis. Strategies for a variety of clinical scenarios are discussed on the basis of a literature review. Precautionary measures are unnecessary in the majority of patients and should be taken only when single photon-emission computed tomography (CT; SPECT)/CT shows a significant concentration of technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin in the gallbladder wall. In this case report with quantitative SPECT analysis, it is illustrated how an adjustment of the catheter position can effectively reduce the absorbed dose of radiation delivered to the gallbladder wall by more than 90%.

  12. Measurement of accelerator neutron radiation field spectrum by Extended Range Neutron Multisphere Spectrometers and unfolding program

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Guanjia; Ma, Zhongjian; Guo, Siming; Yan, Mingyang; Shi, Haoyu; Xu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    This paper described a measurement of accelerator neutron radiation field at a transport beam line of Beijing-TBF. The experiment place was be selected around a Faraday Cup with a graphite target impacted by electron beam at 2.5GeV. First of all, we simulated the neutron radiation experiment by FLUKA. Secondly, we chose six appropriate ERNMS according to their neutron fluence response function to measure the neutron count rate. Then the U_M_G package program was be utilized to unfolding experiment data. Finally, we drew a comparison between the unfolding with the simulation spectrum and made an analysis about the result.

  13. Cosmic radiation measurements on the Foton-M4 satellite by passive detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strádi, Andrea; Pálfalvi, József K.; Szabó, Julianna; Pázmándi, Tamás; Ivanova, Olga A.; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A.

    2017-02-01

    The Russian Foton spacecraft was designed to deliver scientific experiments to low Earth orbit and return them safely to the ground for further analysis. During the 44-d Foton-M4 satellite mission in 2014 several passive cosmic ray detectors were exposed outside (in a single holder) and inside (in 4 locations) the recoverable capsule to study the radiation field. The applied thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) are more sensitive to the particles with LET under 10 keV μm-1, while the solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) measure the particles having LET over this value. According to our measurements the average internal absorbed dose rate varied between 374-562 μGy/day for low LET radiation and 40-52 μGy/day for high LET radiation. Outside the capsule the dose rate was much higher, 1078 μGy/day for low LET radiation and 75 μGy/day for high LET radiation. Within the paper the obtained absorbed dose rates has been compared to those measured on the previous Foton-M flights, during the Bion-M1 mission and in the Columbus module of the International Space Station.

  14. Comparison of dependent measures used to quantify radiation-induced taste aversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spector, A.C.; Smith, J.C.; Hollander, G.R. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (USA). Dept. of Psychology)

    1981-11-01

    Several commonly used measures of conditioned taste aversion were compared under a variety of experimental conditions. In the first experiment an aversion to a saccharin solution (0.1%) was conditioned by pairing this taste substance with a single 100 R exposure to Cobalt-60. Comparisons were performed between the following measures: a short-term single-bottle test, a 22-hour two-bottle preference test, a measure quantifying recovery from the aversion along with other measures derived from these tests. Appropriate control groups received saccharin and sham exposure, water and sham exposure, and water and radiation exposure in order to measure both neophobia and enhanced neophobia. In Experiment 2 the total whole body radiation exposure used to condition the taste aversion was varied in different groups from 50 to 300 R exposures and the effect on conditioning was measured using the dependent variables described in Experiment 1. In Experiment 3 radiation-induced taste aversion was studied in rats which had prior exposures to the saccharin solution. In all three studies it was shown that different interpretations result from measuring the conditioned aversion with the different dependent variables commonly used, and several measures are needed to give a fair and accurate description of learned taste aversion.

  15. Radiation dosimetry.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists.

  16. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Taiee [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  17. RADIATION DOSE MEASUREMENTS FOR HIGH-INTENSITY LASER INTERACTIONS WITH SOLID TARGETS AT SLAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Bauer, J; Cimeno, M; Ferrari, A; Galtier, E; Granados, E; Lee, H J; Liu, J; Nagler, B; Prinz, A; Rokni, S; Tran, H; Woods, M

    2016-12-01

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. These laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source's (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 10(18) and 7.1 × 10(19) W cm(-2) are presented.

  18. Measurement of Near Earth Radiation Environment in Japan—Overview and Plan—

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goka, Tateo; Matsumoto, Haruhisa

    2009-06-01

    The current status of measuring radiation using JAXA satellites is reviewed. Starting with Engineering Test Satellite-V (ETS-V; KIKU-5 in Japanese) in 1987, efforts to conduct radiation measurements in space have continued using almost all Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA formerly NASDA) satellites (ETS-VI, ADEOS, ADEOS-II, MDS-1, DRTS (ongoing), and ALOS (ongoing)), in geostationary orbit (GEO), geostationary -transfer orbit (GTO), and low-Earth orbit (LEO). Electrons, protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions have been the main objects of study. Future plans for radiation monitoring in JAXA, including GOSAT, Jason-2 (in ollaboration with CNES), SmartSat (in collaboration with NICT), and ISS/JEM/Exposure Facility/SEDA-AP, are presented.

  19. Optimization of Thermal Neutron Converter in SiC Sensors for Spectral Radiation Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krolikowski, Igor; Cetnar, Jerzy [Department of Nuclear Energy, Faculty of Energy and Fuels at AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Issa, Fatima; Ferrone, Raffaello; Ottaviani, Laurent [IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Aix-Marseille University, Case 231, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Szalkai, Dora; Klix, Axel [KIT- Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe 76344 (Germany); Vermeeren, Ludo [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Lyoussi, Abdalla [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Saenger, Richard [Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, Clamart (France)

    2015-07-01

    Optimization of the neutron converter in SiC sensors is presented. The sensors are used for spectral radiation measurements of thermal and fast neutrons and optionally gamma ray at elevated temperature in harsh radiation environment. The neutron converter, which is based on 10B, allows to detect thermal neutrons by means of neutron capture reaction. Two construction of the sensors were used to measure radiation in experiments. Sensor responses collected in experiments have been reproduced by the computer tool created by authors, it allows to validate the tool. The tool creates the response matrix function describing the characteristic of the sensors and it was used for detailed analyses of the sensor responses. Obtained results help to optimize the neutron converter in order to increase thermal neutron detection. Several enhanced construction of the sensors, which includes the neutron converter based on {sup 10}B or {sup 6}Li, were proposed. (authors)

  20. [Measuring intraoperative radiation exposure of the trauma surgeon. Measuring eye, thyroid gland and hand with highly sensitive thermoluminescent detectors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, M; Modler, H; Schmid, A; Dumont, C; Stürmer, K M

    1999-05-01

    A prospective study of 24 operative procedures involving minimal invasive techniques and fluoroscopic guidance was undertaken in order to measure the radiation exposure to the primary surgeon. Radiation was monitored with the use of high sensitive thermoluminescent dosimeters. At the spots of dosimetry (eyes, thyroid gland, hand and genitals under lead apron) the dose was uniformly low and ranged from 0.6 muSv at the eyes to 259.3 muSv at the hand. The dose is determined by the duration of fluoroscopy and the amount of scattered rays, which in turn depends on the volume being x-rayed. On the basis of our results there is no likelihood of exceeding the limits of safety regulations even in a very busy operative environment, although a statistically increased incidence of thyroid cancer or a radiation-induced glaucoma is present. In vitro measurements with irradiation of a phantom resulted in the following recommendations: 1) fluoroscopy should be performed using the magnification-mechanism of the x-ray apparatus, 2) during lateral fluoroscopy the primary surgeon should be positioned close to the image intensifier. At least the surgeon should be familiar with the technique of closed reduction and instrumentation to reduce the duration of fluoroscopy which proved to be the most important factor for the amount of the radiation exposure.

  1. Stored-fluorography mode reduces radiation dose during cardiac catheterization measured with OSLD dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Tang, Kuo-Ting; Liu, Wei-Chung; Lin, Chun-Chih; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2015-12-01

    Coronary angiogram is an imperative tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases, in which cine-angiography is a commonly used method. Although the angiography proceeds under radiation, the potential risk of radiation exposure for both the patients and the operators was seldom noticed. In this study, the absorbed radiation dose in stored-fluorography mode was compared with that in cine-angiography mode by using optically simulated luminescent dosimeters to realize their effects on radiation dose. Patients received coronary angiogram via radial artery approach were randomized into the stored-fluorography group (N=30) or the cine-angiography group (N=30). The excluded criteria were: 1. women at pregnancy or on breast feeding, 2. chronic kidney diseases with glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min. During the coronary angiogram, absorbed dose of the patients and the operator radiation exposure was measured with optically simulated luminescent dosimeter (OSLD). The absorbed dose of the patients in the stored-fluorography group (3.13±0.25 mGy) was apparently lower than that in the cine-angiography group (65.57±5.37 mGy; Pcine-angiography (0.6519μGy). Compared with traditional cine-angiography mode, the stored-fluorography mode can apparently reduce radiation exposure of the patients and the operator in coronary angiogram.

  2. Study of Phase Reconstruction Techniques applied to Smith-Purcell Radiation Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Delerue, Nicolas; Bezshyyko, Oleg; Khodnevych, Vitalii

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of coherent radiation at accelerators typically give the absolute value of the beam profile Fourier transform but not its phase. Phase reconstruction techniques such as Hilbert transform or Kramers Kronig reconstruction are used to recover such phase. We report a study of the performances of these methods and how to optimize the reconstructed profiles.

  3. Study of Phase Reconstruction Techniques applied to Smith-Purcell Radiation Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Delerue, Nicolas; Vieille-Grosjean, Mélissa; Bezshyyko, Oleg; Khodnevych, Vitalii

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of coherent radiation at accelerators typically give the absolute value of the beam profile Fourier transform but not its phase. Phase reconstruction techniques such as Hilbert transform or Kramers Kronig reconstruction are used to recover such phase. We report a study of the performances of these methods and how to optimize the reconstructed profiles.

  4. Proceedings of the third Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) science team meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1993 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held in Morman, Oklahoma. To put these papers in context, it is useful to consider the history and status of the ARM Program at the time of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  5. On-site radiated emissions measurements in Semi-reverberant environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt-Ardatjew, Robert; Lundgren, Urban; Fernandez-Romero, Sergio; Leferink, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Radiated emission tests are generally performed in either free space, reflection-free environments, such as an open area test site or semi- or full-anechoic chambers, or in reverberation chambers. This paper describes measurements in semireflecting environments such as an office, a workshop of a lar

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2008-01-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  7. An inverse method for flue gas shielded metal surface temperature measurement based on infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B.; Xu, C. L.; Wang, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    The infrared temperature measurement technique has been applied in various fields, such as thermal efficiency analysis, environmental monitoring, industrial facility inspections, and remote temperature sensing. In the problem of infrared measurement of the metal surface temperature of superheater surfaces, the outer wall of the metal pipe is covered by radiative participating flue gas. This means that the traditional infrared measurement technique will lead to intolerable measurement errors due to the absorption and scattering of the flue gas. In this paper, an infrared measurement method for a metal surface in flue gas is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The spectral emissivity of the metal surface, and the spectral absorption and scattering coefficients of the radiative participating flue gas are retrieved simultaneously using an inverse method called quantum particle swarm optimization. Meanwhile, the detected radiation energy simulated using a forward simulation method (named the source multi-flux method) is set as the input of the retrieval. Then, the temperature of the metal surface detected by an infrared CCD camera is modified using the source multi-flux method in combination with these retrieved physical properties. Finally, an infrared measurement system for metal surface temperature is built to assess the proposed method. Experimental results show that the modified temperature is closer to the true value than that of the direct measured temperature.

  8. Investigation of the Impacts of Measured and Calculated Radiation Balance Components on Evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akataş, Nilcan; Yeşilköy, Serhan; Şaylan, Levent

    2016-04-01

    Determination of surface energy balance over agricultural lands plays a crucial role to better investigation of sustainable agriculture and food security which are related to evapotranspiration. Surface energy balance components that include net shortwave and longwave radiation depend on surface conditions like surface albedo and climate of a region. Surface albedo is ratio between reflected longwave radiation and incoming shortwave radiation. There are many different crops in agriculture ecosystem. Thus, surface energy balance components vary by vegetation surfaces. Net radiation is most important component of surface energy balance which is difference between net shortwave and longwave radiation. These are calculated by commonly used equations and applied to the FAO Penman& Monteith equation using meteorological stations' data located in cities. However, there are differences between urban areas and agricultural ecosystems. This situation causes to the calculation errors. In this research, it is aimed to investigate the changes between estimated and measured surface energy balance components which are estimated by meteorological stations' data in the urban area and measurements from an rural area over winter wheat surface 2014-2015 growing season in Thrace Region located in the Northwestern part of Turkey, Kırklareli city. Keywords: Surface energy balance, winter wheat, FAO Penman-Monteith, Kırklareli/Turkey

  9. A New Natural Gamma Radiation Measurement System for Marine Sediment and Rock Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Vasiliev, M A; Chubarian, G; Olsen, R; Bennight, C; Cobine, T; Fackler, D; Hastedt, M; Houpt, D; Mateo, Z; Vasilieva, Y B

    2010-01-01

    A new high-efficiency and low-background system for the measurement of natural gamma radioactivity in marine sediment and rock cores retrieved from beneath the seabed was designed, built, and installed on the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. The system includes eight large NaI(Tl) detectors that measure adjacent intervals of the core simultaneously, maximizing counting times and minimizing statistical error for the limited measurement times available during drilling expeditions. Effect to background ratio is maximized with passive lead shielding, including both ordinary and low-activity lead. Large-area plastic scintillator active shielding filters background associated with the high-energy part of cosmic radiation. The new system has at least an order of magnitude higher statistical reliability and significantly enhances data quality compared to other offshore natural gamma radiation (NGR) systems designed to measure geological core samples. Reliable correlations and interpretations of cored intervals are ...

  10. A new natural gamma radiation measurement system for marine sediment and rock analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, M. A.; Blum, P.; Chubarian, G.; Olsen, R.; Bennight, C.; Cobine, T.; Fackler, D.; Hastedt, M.; Houpt, D.; Mateo, Z.; Vasilieva, Y. B.

    2011-11-01

    A new high-efficiency and low-background system for the measurement of natural gamma radioactivity in marine sediment and rock cores retrieved from beneath the seabed was designed, built, and installed on the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. The system includes eight large NaI(Tl) detectors that measure adjacent intervals of the core simultaneously, maximizing counting times and minimizing statistical error for the limited measurement times available during drilling expeditions. Effect to background ratio is maximized with passive lead shielding, including both ordinary and low-activity lead. Large-area plastic scintillator active shielding filters background associated with the high-energy part of cosmic radiation. The new system has at least an order of magnitude higher statistical reliability and significantly enhances data quality compared to other offshore natural gamma radiation (NGR) systems designed to measure geological core samples. Reliable correlations and interpretations of cored intervals are possible at rates of a few counts per second.

  11. Novel On-wafer Radiation Pattern Measurement Technique for MEMS Actuator Based Reconfigurable Patch Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a novel on-wafer, antenna far field pattern measurement technique for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based reconfigurable patch antennas. The measurement technique significantly reduces the time and the cost associated with the characterization of printed antennas, fabricated on a semiconductor wafer or dielectric substrate. To measure the radiation patterns, the RF probe station is modified to accommodate an open-ended rectangular waveguide as the rotating linearly polarized sampling antenna. The open-ended waveguide is attached through a coaxial rotary joint to a Plexiglas(Trademark) arm and is driven along an arc by a stepper motor. Thus, the spinning open-ended waveguide can sample the relative field intensity of the patch as a function of the angle from bore sight. The experimental results include the measured linearly polarized and circularly polarized radiation patterns for MEMS-based frequency reconfigurable rectangular and polarization reconfigurable nearly square patch antennas, respectively.

  12. Noninvasive measurement of micron electron beam size of high energy using diffraction radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Naumenko, G A

    2003-01-01

    Treatments of the usage of diffraction radiation from the relativistic electrons moving though a conductive slit for the transverse beam size measurement encounter hard limitation of the method sensitivity for the electron energy larger than 1 GeV. We consider in this article a possibility of application of the artificial phase shift, which can take place when transverse electron position varies. This allows us to realize the measurements of transverse size of supper-relativistic electron beams with the small emittance.

  13. Formation of diverse ring-satellite systems around Centaurs through tidal disruption at close encounters with giant planet

    CERN Document Server

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Genda, Hidenori; Ohtsuki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Centaurs are minor planets orbiting between Jupiter and Neptune that have or had crossing orbits with one or more giant planets. Recent observations and reinterpretation of previous observations have revealed the existence of ring systems around 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron. However, the origin of the ring systems around such a minor planet is still an open question. Here, we propose that the tidal disruption of a differentiated object that experiences a close encounter with a giant planet could naturally form diverse ring-satellite systems around the Centaurs. During the close encounter, the icy mantle of the passing object is preferentially ripped off by the planet's tidal force and the debris is distributed mostly within the Roche limit of the largest remnant body. Assuming the existence of $20-50$wt% silicate core below the icy mantle, a disk of particles is formed when the objects pass within $0.4-0.8$ of the planet's Roche limit with the relative velocity at infinity $3-6$km s$^{-1}$ and 8h initial sp...

  14. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose measurement and health hazard along river Alaknanda and Ganges in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerna Sharma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct measurement of absorbed dose rate in air due to exposure from outdoor terrestrial γ radiation and assessment of consequent public health hazard continues to be of environmental and public concern. Present study was aimed to establish a baseline data of annual effective dose and to assess the associated health risk from outdoor terrestrial γ radiation along the river Alaknanda and Ganges of India. Terrestrial γ radiation exposure doses (excluding cosmic radiation were measured using a Plastic Scintillation Counter. Absorbed dose rates in air were measured at eight designated locations from Nandprayag to Allahabad along the river. From the average absorbed dose rates, annual effective dose (AED and excess life time cancer risks (ELCR were calculated by standard method. Results showed that absorbed dose rates in air ranged between 81.33 ± 2.34 nSv.h−1 and 144 ± 5.77 nSv.h−1 and calculated AED ranged between 0.10 ± 0.012 mSv.y−1 to 0.18 ± 0.007 mSv.y−1 at the designated locations along these rivers. Calculated ELCR were found in the range of 0.375 × 10−3 to 0.662 × 10−3. Present study measured the outdoor γ radiation levels along the rivers. The calculated annual effective doses and life time cancer risk were found higher than the world average value at higher altitudes. But the measured doses and calculated risks at plains were close to that of reported average values.

  15. Angular measurement of the cobalt-60 emitted radiation spectrum from a radiosurgery irradiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzymala, R E; Sohn, J W; Guo, C; Sobotka, L G; Purdy, J A

    2001-04-01

    The photon energy spectrum emanating from a Leksell Gamma Knife, Model 23004B, was measured between 0.250 and 3.5 MeV with the sources exposed. Measurements were made using a 2x2 inch NaI detector enclosed in a lead-shielded apparatus having a 1/4 inch diameter measurement aperture, which reduced the amount of radiation received by the crystal. All measurements were made one meter above the floor within a quadrant toward one side of the Gamma Knife couch. The measured spectra displayed the expected 60Co doublet of photon peaks at energies of 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. These peaks appeared in spectra beginning at approximately 50 degrees, as one proceeds from a point directly lateral to the source enclosure (0 degrees) toward the foot of the couch (90 degrees). The average photon energy of the spectrum shifts to lower values as the doublet decreases in magnitude with increasing angle until almost vanishing at an angle equal to 90 degrees. Inserting a 16 cm diameter plastic sphere phantom, provided with the Gamma Knife, into the radiation beams increases the low energy photon emissions appearing in the spectrum, especially for measurements at the foot of the couch. Implications for the design of shielding a treatment room containing the Gamma Knife, Model B, and estimation of the radiation exposure to personnel during an emergency procedure in the treatment room with the sources exposed are discussed.

  16. Measurement of the radiative decay width \\Gamma[\\Lambda(1520) --> \\Lambda \\gamma] with the SPHINX spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Antipov, Y M; Batarin, V A; Vavilov, D V; Victorov, V A; Eroshin, O V; Golovkin, S V; Gorin, Yu P; Kolganov, V Z; Kozhevnikov, A P; Konstantinov, A S; Kubarovskii, V P; Kurshetsov, V F; Landsberg, L G; Leontiev, V M; Lomkatsi, G S; Molchanov, V V; Mukhin, V A; Nilov, A F; Patalakha, D I; Petrenko, S V; Smolyankin, V T; Antipov, Yu.M.; Gorin, Yu.P.

    2004-01-01

    The radiative decay \\Lambda(1520) --> \\Lambda \\gamma was measured directly in the study of exclusive diffractive-like reaction p + N --> \\Lambda(1520) K^+ + N, \\Lambda(1520) --> \\Lambda \\gamma with the SPHINX spectrometer. The values of the branching and partial width of this radiative decay were obtained: BR[\\Lambda(1520) --> \\Lambda \\gamma] = (1.02+/-0.21)x10^{-2} and \\Gamma[\\Lambda(1520) \\to \\Lambda \\gamma] = 159+/-35 keV (statistical uncertainty). The systematic uncertainty is estimated to be below 15%.

  17. Chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo as a probe for rapid measurement of tolerance to ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smillie, R.M. (Macquarie Univ., North Ryde (Australia). School of Biological Sciences)

    1983-02-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo was progressively lost in pea leaves irradiated with either short or long-wave light. The changes were consistent with the development in the intact leaves of an inhibitory site on the photooxidizing side of photosystem II. In contrast, leaves of two species of Agave, plants regarded as more resistant to UV radiation, showed only minor changes in chlorophyll fluorescence. Agave americana was affected less than A. attenuata. The application of measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo to screening for tolerance to UV radiation is discussed.

  18. Measurement and analysis of radiated sound from a low speed fan with a large tip gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilka, M J; Anthoine, J; Schram, C

    2014-05-01

    The wake flow field and radiated sound from a low speed axial fan is studied experimentally. The fan geometry uses controlled diffusion blades and is designed with a low aspect ratio (0.9). The fan is installed with a large tip gap, approximately 10% of the blade span. The radiated sound field is analyzed using a known trailing edge noise formulation. First, the model is compared to an experiment of a single airfoil in a wind tunnel to assess the predictive capabilities. Second, measurements of the fan are made at two different blade loading conditions. Hot wire measurements are made in the near wake of the fan to assess the extent of the tip leakage flow for each condition. The radiated sound fields are compared with the trailing edge noise theory. Use is made of the wake measurements as an input to a surface pressure model. When the fan is operated with the optimal blade loading, the influence of the tip leakage flow is found to be of secondary acoustic impact. When the fan is operated at a high loading condition for the blades, a more significant leakage flow develops and is found to be responsible for the dominant radiated sound.

  19. An improved method for correction of air temperature measured using different radiation shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xinghong; Su, Debin; Li, Deping; Chen, Lu; Xu, Wenjing; Yang, Meilin; Li, Yongcheng; Yue, Zhizhong; Wang, Zijing

    2014-11-01

    The variation of air temperature measurement errors using two different radiation shields (DTR502B Vaisala, Finland, and HYTFZ01, Huayun Tongda Satcom, China) was studied. Datasets were collected in the field at the Daxing weather station in Beijing from June 2011 to May 2012. Most air temperature values obtained with these two commonly used radiation shields were lower than the reference records obtained with the new Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) Stevenson screen. In most cases, the air temperature errors when using the two devices were smaller on overcast and rainy days than on sunny days; and smaller when using the imported rather than the Chinese shield. The measured errors changed sharply at sunrise and sunset, and reached maxima at noon. Their diurnal variation characteristics were, naturally, related to changes in solar radiation. The relationships between the record errors, global radiation, and wind speed were nonlinear. An improved correction method was proposed based on the approach described by Nakamura and Mahrt (2005) (NM05), in which the impact of the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the temperature error is considered and extreme errors due to changes in SZA can be corrected effectively. Measurement errors were reduced significantly after correction by either method for both shields. The error reduction rate using the improved correction method for the Chinese and imported shields were 3.3% and 40.4% higher than those using the NM05 method, respectively.

  20. Economic impact and effectiveness of radiation protection measures in aviation during a ground level enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthiä Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the omnipresent irradiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR and their secondary products, passengers and aircraft crew may be exposed to radiation from solar cosmic rays during ground level enhancements (GLE. In general, lowering the flight altitude and changing the flight route to lower latitudes are procedures applicable to immediately reduce the radiation exposure at aviation altitudes. In practice, however, taking such action necessarily leads to modifications in the flight plan and the consequential, additional fuel consumption constrains the mitigating measures. In this work we investigate in a case study of the ground level event of December 13th 2006 how potential mitigation procedures affect the total radiation exposure during a transatlantic flight from Seattle to Cologne taking into account constraints concerning fuel consumption and range.

  1. Measurement of radiation dose to ovaries from CT of the head and trunk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Habdhan, M.A.M.; Kinsara, A.R. [King Abdul Aziz Univ., Nuclear Engineering Dept., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2001-07-01

    With the rise in concern about doses received by patients over recent years, there has been a growing requirement for information on typical doses and the range of dose received during Computerized Tomography (CT). This study was performed for the assessment of radiation dose to the ovaries from various CT protocols for head and trunk imaging. Thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used for the dosimetry measurement in an anthropomorphic Rando Alderson phantom. The wanted (obligatory) and unwanted (non-useful) radiation doses delivered to the ovaries during CT examinations of head, facial bone, orbits, abdomen, chest, pelvis, neck, nasopharynx, cervical spine, lumber spine and sacroiliac joint were assessed. The results are compared with the corresponding values published in the literature. A comparison of the received dose from CT examinations and general radiography examinations by the ovaries was made. It is found that relatively high doses of unwanted radiation are delivered with computerized tomography. (author)

  2. GLOBAL ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION POLLUTION: RISK ASSESSMENT FROM FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkopoulou, A. F.; Margaritis, L. H.

    2009-12-01

    The extended use of wireless technology throughout the globe in almost all developed and non-developed countries has forced a large number of scientists to get involved in the investigation of the effects. The major issue is that unlike other forms of radiation exposure, this “non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation” was not present throughout the evolution of life in earth and therefore there are no adaptive mechanisms evolved. All organisms are vulnerable to the possible effects of radiation depending on the actual exposure level. “Safety limits” on the power density have been proposed but ongoing research has shown that these limits are not really safe for humans, not mentioning the entire population of living creatures on earth. The so called “Electrosmog Pollution” originating from the numerous radio and TV stations, communication satellite emission, but most importantly from mobile phone mast antennas, are of major concern, because it is gradually increasing at exponential rate. Therefore the key question is, do living organisms react upon their exposure to fields of non ionizing electromagnetic radiation? To have this question answered extensive research is being performed in various laboratories. One approach of our research includes field measurements within houses and classrooms, since a considerable proportion of the population in each country is exposed to the radiation coming from the nearby mast stations, in order to make a risk assessment. The measurements showed that in many cases the actual radiation present was potentially harmful. In other words, although the measured values were below the national safety levels, nevertheless they were above the levels of other countries. Therefore it has been suggested that a new cellular network should be constructed in order to minimize radiation levels in living areas and schools. Our experimental work is focusing on the elucidation of the effects of non-ionizing EMFs on mice exposed to mobile

  3. Measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates from Vernita, Hanford Reach, and Richland area shores. Addendum 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, A.T.

    1995-02-01

    Environmental radiation exposure rate measurements are taken on and around the Hanford Site for Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. In 1992, environmental radiation exposure rate measurements were taken from shoreline and island areas ranging from Vernita, along the Hanford Reach, down to the Richland Pumphouse. Measurements were taken primarily at locations known or expected to have elevated exposure rates as determined by examination of aerial photographs depicting radiation exposure measurements. Results from the 1992 survey indicated radiation exposure rates taken from the Hanford Reach area were elevated in comparison to the measurements taken from the Vernita area with ranges of 8 to 28 {mu}R/hr and 4 to 11 {mu}R/hr, respectively. In January 1994, additional shoreline radiation exposure rate measurements were taken from the Vernita, Hanford Reach, and Richland areas to determine the relationship of radiation exposure rates along the Richland area shores when compared to Vernita and Hanford Reach area exposure rates (measurements along the Richland area were not collected during the 1992 survey). This report discusses the 1994 results and is an addendum to the report that discussed the 1992 survey. An analysis of variance indicated a significant location interaction at a p-value of 0.0014. To determine differences between paried locations a post-hoc comparison of location means was performed on log transformed data using the Scheff{acute e}`s F-test. This test indicated a significant difference between Hanford Reach and Richland area means with a mean difference of 0.075 /{mu}R/hr and a p-value of 0.0014. No significant difference was found between Hanford Reach and Vernita area means: The mean difference was 0.031 {mu}R/hr and the p-value was 0.3138. No significant difference was found between Vernita and Richland area means with a mean difference of 0.044 {mu}R/hr and a p-value of 0.1155.

  4. Olive Crown Porosity Measurement Based on Radiation Transmittance: An Assessment of Pruning Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Castro-Garcia, Sergio; Blanco-Roldan, Gregorio L.; Sola-Guirado, Rafael R.; Gil-Ribes, Jesus A.

    2016-01-01

    Crown porosity influences radiation interception, air movement through the fruit orchard, spray penetration, and harvesting operation in fruit crops. The aim of the present study was to develop an accurate and reliable methodology based on transmitted radiation measurements to assess the porosity of traditional olive trees under different pruning treatments. Transmitted radiation was employed as an indirect method to measure crown porosity in two olive orchards of the Picual and Hojiblanca cultivars. Additionally, three different pruning treatments were considered to determine if the pruning system influences crown porosity. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of four algorithms in measuring crown porosity under different solar zenith angles. From a 14° to 30° solar zenith angle, the selected algorithm produced an absolute error of less than 5% and a repeatability higher than 0.9. The described method and selected algorithm proved satisfactory in field results, making it possible to measure crown porosity at different solar zenith angles. However, pruning fresh weight did not show any relationship with crown porosity due to the great differences between removed branches. A robust and accurate algorithm was selected for crown porosity measurements in traditional olive trees, making it possible to discern between different pruning treatments. PMID:27213391

  5. Statistical theory for estimating sampling errors of regional radiation averages based on satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. L.; Bess, T. D.; Minnis, P.

    1983-01-01

    The processes which determine the weather and climate are driven by the radiation received by the earth and the radiation subsequently emitted. A knowledge of the absorbed and emitted components of radiation is thus fundamental for the study of these processes. In connection with the desire to improve the quality of long-range forecasting, NASA is developing the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), consisting of a three-channel scanning radiometer and a package of nonscanning radiometers. A set of these instruments is to be flown on both the NOAA-F and NOAA-G spacecraft, in sun-synchronous orbits, and on an Earth Radiation Budget Satellite. The purpose of the scanning radiometer is to obtain measurements from which the average reflected solar radiant exitance and the average earth-emitted radiant exitance at a reference level can be established. The estimate of regional average exitance obtained will not exactly equal the true value of the regional average exitance, but will differ due to spatial sampling. A method is presented for evaluating this spatial sampling error.

  6. Establishment of Experimental Equipment for Training of Professionals in the Nuclear Radiation Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S. K.; Seo, K. W.; Joo, Y. C.; Kim, I. C.; Woo, C. K.; Yoo, B. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    The main purpose of this project is to establish experimental equipment for training of professionals and students in the field of radiation measurement, and settle the foundation for the advanced education system and program. The priority for the experimental equipment had been deduced by reviewing of the Nuclear Training and Education Center of KAERI and other country's training courses. Equipment for training of radiation professionals are High-Purity Germanium spectroscopic systems, alpha analyzers, and hand-held gamma/neutron inspector systems. For the basic experiments, electric personal dosimeters and a reader, radiation survey meters, and various alpha, beta and gamma radiation isotopes have been equipped. Some old or disused equipment and devices were disposed and re-arranged, and a new experiment lab had been settled for gamma spectroscopy. Along with the preparation of equipment, 14 experimental modules have been selected for practical and essential experiments training to professionals from industries, universities and research organizations. Among the modules, 7 important experiment notes had been prepared in Korea and also in English. As a consequence, these advanced radiation experimental setting would be a basis to cooperate with IAEA or other countries for international training courses. These activities would be a foundation for our contribution to the international nuclear society and for improving our nuclear competitiveness. The experimental equipment and application notes developed in this study will be used also by other training institutes and educational organizations through introducing and encouraging to use them to the nuclear society.

  7. Comparative Study of Ground Measured, Satellite-Derived, and Estimated Global Solar Radiation Data in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boluwaji M. Olomiyesan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the performance of three global solar radiation models and the accuracy of global solar radiation data derived from three sources were compared. Twenty-two years (1984–2005 of surface meteorological data consisting of monthly mean daily sunshine duration, minimum and maximum temperatures, and global solar radiation collected from the Nigerian Meteorological (NIMET Agency, Oshodi, Lagos, and the National Aeronautics Space Agency (NASA for three locations in North-Western region of Nigeria were used. A new model incorporating Garcia model into Angstrom-Prescott model was proposed for estimating global radiation in Nigeria. The performances of the models used were determined by using mean bias error (MBE, mean percentage error (MPE, root mean square error (RMSE, and coefficient of determination (R2. Based on the statistical error indices, the proposed model was found to have the best accuracy with the least RMSE values (0.376 for Sokoto, 0.463 for Kaduna, and 0.449 for Kano and highest coefficient of determination, R2 values of 0.922, 0.938, and 0.961 for Sokoto, Kano, and Kaduna, respectively. Also, the comparative study result indicates that the estimated global radiation from the proposed model has a better error range and fits the ground measured data better than the satellite-derived data.

  8. Ce-doped SiO2 optical fibers for remote radiation sensing and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, Norberto; Vedda, Anna; Fasoli, Mauro; Moretti, Federico; Lauria, Alessandro; Cantone, Marie Claire; Veronese, Ivan; Tosi, Giampiero; Brambilla, Marco; Cannillo, Barbara; Mones, Eleonora; Brambilla, Gilberto; Petrovich, Marco

    2009-05-01

    Scintillating materials, able to convert energy of ionizing radiation into light in the visible-UV interval, are presently used in a wide class of applications such as medical imaging, industrial inspection, security controls and high energy physics detectors. In the last few years we studied and developed a new radiation sensor based on silica-glass fiber-optic technology. In its simplest configuration such device is composed by a short portion (about 10 mm) of scintillating fiber coupled to a photomultiplier through a suitably long passive silica fiber. In this work, we present new results concerning the characterization of silica based Ce and Eu doped fibers glasses obtained by a modified sol-gel method and drawn by a conventional drawing tower for optical fibers. The radio-luminescence of Eu doped fibers is rather weak; moreover it displays a marked sensitivity increase during subsequent irradiations, preventing the use of such fibers in dosimetry. On the other hand Ce-doped fibers show very high radiation hardness, signal stability and reproducibility, and high sensitivity to radiations with energies from 10 keV to several tens of MeV. Numerous tests with photons (X and gamma rays), electrons, and protons have already been successfully performed. At the early stage of its market introduction it is the smallest radiation sensor, also compared to MOSFET and diode technology and it appears to be the ideal choice for in vivo measurements in medical field or remote sensing.

  9. Measurement of Cerenkov Radiation Induced by the Gamma-Rays of Co-60 Therapy Units Using Wavelength Shifting Fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Kyoung Won Jang; Sang Hun Shin; Seon Geun Kim; Jae Seok Kim; Wook Jae Yoo; Young Hoon Ji; Bongsoo Lee

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a wavelength shifting fiber that shifts ultra-violet and blue light to green light was employed as a sensor probe of a fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor. In order to characterize Cerenkov radiation generated in the developed wavelength shifting fiber and a plastic optical fiber, spectra and intensities of Cerenkov radiation were measured with a spectrometer. The spectral peaks of light outputs from the wavelength shifting fiber and the plastic optical fiber were measured at...

  10. The Use of Compressive Sensing to Reconstruct Radiation Characteristics of Wide-Band Antennas from Sparse Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    ARL-TR-7328 ● JUN 2015 US Army Research Laboratory The Use of Compressive Sensing to Reconstruct Radiation Characteristics of...Army Research Laboratory The Use of Compressive Sensing to Reconstruct Radiation Characteristics of Wide- Band Antennas from Sparse Measurements... Compressive Sensing to Reconstruct Radiation Characteristics of Wide-Band Antennas from Sparse Measurements 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  11. Calculation of the Scattered Radiation Profile in 64 Slice CT Scanners Using Experimental Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Akbarzadeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most important parameters in x-ray CT imaging is the noise induced by detected scattered radiation. The detected scattered radiation is completely dependent on the scanner geometry as well as size, shape and material of the scanned object. The magnitude and spatial distribution of the scattered radiation in x-ray CT should be quantified for development of robust scatter correction techniques. Empirical methods based on blocking the primary photons in a small region are not able to extract scatter in all elements of the detector array while the scatter profile is required for a scatter correction procedure. In this study, we measured scatter profiles in 64 slice CT scanners using a new experimental measurement. Material and Methods: To measure the scatter profile, a lead block array was inserted under the collimator and the phantom was exposed at the isocenter. The raw data file, which contained detector array readouts, was transferred to a PC and was read using a dedicated GUI running under MatLab 7.5. The scatter profile was extracted by interpolating the shadowed area. Results: The scatter and SPR profiles were measured. Increasing the tube voltage from 80 to 140 kVp resulted in an 80% fall off in SPR for a water phantom (d=210 mm and 86% for a polypropylene phantom (d = 350 mm. Increasing the air gap to 20.9 cm caused a 30% decrease in SPR. Conclusion: In this study, we presented a novel approach for measurement of scattered radiation distribution and SPR in a CT scanner with 64-slice capability using a lead block array. The method can also be used on other multi-slice CT scanners. The proposed technique can accurately estimate scatter profiles. It is relatively straightforward, easy to use, and can be used for any related measurement.

  12. Active Radiation Level Measurement on New Laboratory Instrument for Evaluating the Antibacterial Activity of Radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joh, Eunha; Park, Jang Guen [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    A disc method has been widely used to measure the antibacterial effect of chemical agents. However, it is difficult to measure the antibacterial effect of radioisotopes using a disc method. A disc method is a method for diffusing a drug by placing the drug containing disc on the medium. In this method, radioisotopes are diffused on the medium and it is difficult to measure the exact effect by radiation. Thus, new laboratory equipment needs to evaluate the antibacterial activity by the radioisotopes. In this study, we measured the radiation level of radioisotopes on a new laboratory instrument using a MCNP. A disc method has been widely used to measure the antibacterial effect of chemical agents. This method uses a drug diffusion system for the measurement of anti-bacterial antibiotics. To measure the antimicrobial activity of a radioisotope, a new type of laboratory instrument is necessary to prevent the drug from spreading. The radioisotopes are used to diagnose and treat cancer. However, studies for anti-biotical use have not progressed. The radiation of radioisotopes has the effect of killing bacteria. Before this study proceeds further, it is necessary to be able to measure the antimicrobial activity of the radioisotope easily in the laboratory. However, in this study, it was possible to measure the antimicrobial activity of the radioisotope in the laboratory using a new laboratory instrument. We intend to start evaluation studies of the antibacterial activity of specific radioisotopes. In addition, it will be possible to develop research to overcome diseases caused by bacteria in the future.

  13. Integration of acoustic radiation force and optical imaging for blood plasma clot stiffness measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caroline W; Perez, Matthew J; Helmke, Brian P; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood's transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties.

  14. Measurement of the optical fiber numeric aperture exposed to thermal and radiation aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderka, Ales; Bednarek, Lukas; Hajek, Lukas; Latal, Jan; Poboril, Radek; Zavodny, Petr; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with the aging of optical fibers influenced by temperature and radiation. There are analyzed changes in the structure of the optical fiber, related to the propagation of light in the fiber structure. In this case for numerical aperture. For experimental measurement was used MM fiber OM1 with core diameter 62.5 μm, cladding diameter 125 μm in 2.8 mm secondary coating. Aging of the optical fiber was achieved with dry heat and radiation. For this purpose, we were using a temperature chamber with a stable temperature of 105 °C where the cables after two months. Cables were then irradiated with gamma radiation 60Co in doses of 1.5 kGy and then 60 kGy. These conditions simulated 50 years aging process of optical cables. According to European Standard EN 60793-1-43:2015 was created the automatic device for angular scan working with LabVIEW software interface. Numerical aperture was tested at a wavelength of 850 nm, with an output power 1 mW. Scanning angle was set to 50° with step 0.25°. Numerical aperture was calculated from the position where power has fallen from maximal power at e2 power. The measurement of each sample was performed 10 hours after thermal and radiation aging. The samples were subsequently tested after six months from the last irradiation. In conclusion, the results of the experiment were analyzed and compared.

  15. Modelling and measurement of the absolute level of power radiated by antenna integrated THz UTC photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natrella, Michele; Liu, Chin-Pang; Graham, Chris; van Dijk, Frederic; Liu, Huiyun; Renaud, Cyril C; Seeds, Alwyn J

    2016-05-30

    We determine the output impedance of uni-travelling carrier (UTC) photodiodes at frequencies up to 400 GHz by performing, for the first time, 3D full-wave modelling of detailed UTC photodiode structures. In addition, we demonstrate the importance of the UTC impedance evaluation, by using it in the prediction of the absolute power radiated by an antenna integrated UTC, over a broad frequency range and confirming the predictions by experimental measurements up to 185 GHz. This is done by means of 3D full-wave modelling and is only possible since the source (UTC) to antenna impedance match is properly taken into account. We also show that, when the UTC-to-antenna coupling efficiency is modelled using the classical junction-capacitance/series-resistance concept, calculated and measured levels of absolute radiated power are in substantial disagreement, and the maximum radiated power is overestimated by a factor of almost 7 dB. The ability to calculate the absolute emitted power correctly enables the radiated power to be maximised through optimisation of the UTC-to-antenna impedance match.

  16. SU-E-QI-12: Morphometry Based Measurements of the Structural Response to Whole Brain Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, D; Castillo, R; Castillo, E; Guerrero, T [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although state of the art radiation therapy techniques for treating intracranial malignancies have eliminated acute brain injury, cognitive impairment occurs in 50–90% of patients who survive >6mo post irradiation. Quantitative characterization of therapy response is needed to facilitate therapeutic strategies to minimize radiation induced cognitive impairment [1]. Deformation based morphometry techniques [2, 3] are presented as a quantitative imaging biomarker of therapy response in patients receiving whole brain radiation for treating medulloblastoma. Methods: Post-irradiation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets were retrospectively analyzed in N=15 patients, >60 MR image datasets. As seen in Fig 1(a), volume changes at multiple time points post-irradiation were quantitatively measured in the cerebrum and ventricles with respect to pre-irradiation MRI. A high resolution image Template, was registered to the pre-irradiation MRI of each patient to create a brain atlas for the cerebrum, cerebellum, and ventricles. Skull stripped images for each patient were registered to the initial pre-treatment scan. Average volume changes in the labeled regions were measured using the determinant of the displacement field Jacobian. Results: Longitudinal measurements, Fig 1(b-c), show a negative correlation p=.06, of the cerebral volume change with the time interval from irradiation. A corresponding positive correlation, p=.01, between ventricular volume change and time interval from irradiation is seen. One sample t-test for correlations were computed using a Spearman method. An average decrease in cerebral volume, p=.08, and increase in ventricular volume, p<.001, was observed. The radiation dose was seen directly proportional to the induced volume changes in the cerebrum, r=−.44, p<.001, Fig 1(d). Conclusion: Results indicate that morphometric monitoring of brain tissue volume changes may potentially be used to quantitatively assess toxicity and response to

  17. Southern Hemisphere Measurement of the Anisotropy in the CosmicMicrowave Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, George F.; Lubin, Phil M.

    1979-06-01

    A recent measurement of the anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation from the southern hemisphere (Lima, Peru) is essentially in agreement with previous measurements from the northern hemisphere. The net anisotropy can be described as a first order spherical harmonic (Doppler) anisotropy of amplitude 3.1 {+-} 0.4 m{sup o}K with a quadrupole anisotropy of less than 1 m{sup o}K. In addition, measurements of the linear polarization yield an upper limit of 1 m{sup o}K, or one part in 3000, at 95% C.L. for the amplitudes of any spherical harmonic through third order.

  18. Aerial measurements of snow water equivalent in Norway using terrestrial gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollan, O.; Dahl, J.B.; Qvenild, C.

    1979-01-01

    Airborne measurement of gamma radiation is used to determine the water equivalent of the snow magazines in 8000 km/sup 2/ of mountainous areas in Southern Norway. The terrain in the areas is exposed to the weather, causing considerable variation in the snow cover. This is regarded as a major source of error. As the terrain is inhomogeneous in most of the measurement areas careful selection of survey lines is important. The cost of surveying 1000 km of measurement routes was N.kr. 40,000 or US$ 8000 in 1978.

  19. A Leakage Current-based Measurement of the Radiation Damage in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelov, Igor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A measurement has been made of the radiation damage incurred by the ATLAS Pixel Detector barrel silicon modules from the beginning of operations through the end of 2012. This translates to hadronic fluence received over the full period of operation at energies up to and including 8 TeV. The measurement is based on a per-module measurement of the silicon sensor leakage current. The results are presented as a function of integrated luminosity and compared to predictions by the Hamburg Model. This information can be used to predict limits on the lifetime of the Pixel Detector due to current, for various operating scenarios.

  20. Radiation dosimetry measurements with real time radiation monitoring device (RRMD)-II in Space Shuttle STS-79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, T; Doke, T; Hayashi, T; Kikuchi, J; Hasebe, N; Kashiwagi, T; Takashima, T; Takahashi, K; Nakano, T; Nagaoka, S; Takahashi, S; Yamanaka, H; Yamaguchi, K; Badhwar, G D

    1997-12-01

    The real-time measurement of radiation environment was made with an improved real-time radiation monitoring device (RRMD)-II onboard Space Shuttle STS-79 (S/MM#4: 4th Shuttle MIR Mission, at an inclination angle of 51.6 degrees and an altitude of 250-400km) for 199 h during 17-25 September, 1996. The observation of the detector covered the linear energy transfer (LET) range of 3.5-6000 keV/micrometer. The Shuttle orbital profile in this mission was equivalent to that of the currently planned Space Station, and provided an opportunity to investigate variations in count rate and dose equivalent rate depending on altitude, longitude, and latitude in detail. Particle count rate and dose equivalent rate were mapped geographically during the mission. Based on the map of count rate, an analysis was made by dividing whole region into three regions: South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region, high latitude region and other regions. The averaged absorbed dose rate during the mission was 39.3 microGy/day for a LET range of 3.5-6000 keV/micrometer. The corresponding average dose equivalent rates during the mission are estimated to be 293 microSv/day with quality factors from International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-Pub. 60 and 270 microSv/day with quality factors from ICRP-Pub. 26. The effective quality factors for ICRP-Pub. 60 and 26 are 7.45 and 6.88, respectively. From the present data for particles of LET > 3.5keV/micrometer, we conclude that the average dose equivalent rate is dominated by the contribution of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles. The dose-detector depth dependence was also investigated.

  1. The Martian surface radiation environment – a comparison of models and MSL/RAD measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthiä Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL has been measuring the radiation environment on the surface of Mars since August 6th 2012. MSL-RAD is the first instrument to provide detailed information about charged and neutral particle spectra and dose rates on the Martian surface, and one of the primary objectives of the RAD investigation is to help improve and validate current radiation transport models. Aims: Applying different numerical transport models with boundary conditions derived from the MSL-RAD environment the goal of this work was to both provide predictions for the particle spectra and the radiation exposure on the Martian surface complementing the RAD sensitive range and, at the same time, validate the results with the experimental data, where applicable. Such validated models can be used to predict dose rates for future manned missions as well as for performing shield optimization studies. Methods: Several particle transport models (GEANT4, PHITS, HZETRN/OLTARIS were used to predict the particle flux and the corresponding radiation environment caused by galactic cosmic radiation on Mars. From the calculated particle spectra the dose rates on the surface are estimated. Results: Calculations of particle spectra and dose rates induced by galactic cosmic radiation on the Martian surface are presented. Although good agreement is found in many cases for the different transport codes, GEANT4, PHITS, and HZETRN/OLTARIS, some models still show large, sometimes order of magnitude discrepancies in certain particle spectra. We have found that RAD data is helping to make better choices of input parameters and physical models. Elements of these validated models can be applied to more detailed studies on how the radiation environment is influenced by solar modulation, Martian atmosphere and soil, and changes due to the Martian seasonal pressure cycle. By extending the range of the calculated particle

  2. Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibration Process for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) maintains a fleet of monitoring stations to aid in the improved scientific understanding of the basic physics related to radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere, particularly the interactions among clouds and aerosols. ARM obtains continuous measurements and conducts field campaigns to provide data products that aid in the improvement and further development of climate models. All of the measurement campaigns include a suite of solar measurements. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory supports ARM's full suite of stations in a number of ways, including troubleshooting issues that arise as part of the data-quality reviews; managing engineering changes to the standard setup; and providing calibration services and assistance to the full fleet of solar-related instruments, including pyranometers, pyrgeometers, pyrheliometers, as well as the temperature/relative humidity probes, multimeters, and data acquisition systems that are used in the calibrations performed at the Southern Great Plains Radiometer Calibration Facility. This paper discusses all aspects related to the support provided to the calibration of the instruments in the solar monitoring fleet.

  3. Development of a HPGe shielding system for radioactivity measurements at Cheongpyeong Underground Radiation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. I.; Huh, J. Y.; Lee, E. K.; Choi, S. H.; Hahn, I. S.; Kang, W. G.; Kim, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, K. W.; Park, S. Y.; Yoo, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    We constructed an underground laboratory called Cheongpyeong Underground Radiation Laboratory (CURL) for measuring the radioactivity levels of various samples by using HPGe detectors. CURL is located underground at a depth of 1000-m water equivalent in the Cheongpyeong Pumped Storage Power Plant. We developed a shielding system, which consists of 15-cm-thick Pb blocks and 5-cm-thick Cu blocks and completely surrounds a 100% HPGe detector. We measured the background radiations and the gamma peaks from sources with and without the shield. The shielding efficiencies were also estimated using MCNP5 simulations, and they were compared to our measured data. The shielding system blocked more than 99.99% of gamma rays with energies up to 3.0 MeV. The HPGe detector with the shielding system at CURL blocked both high-energy cosmic rays and background radiation from surrounding rocks and materials. Our CURL detector system was optimized for gamma-ray measurements of meterials with ultra-low radioactivity.

  4. Influence of ambient meteorology on the accuracy of radiation measurements: insights from field and laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Sandro M.; Pietsch, Helga; Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Rieder, Harald E.

    2016-04-01

    A precise knowledge of the surface energy budget, which includes the solar and terrestrial radiation fluxes, is needed to accurately characterize the global energy balance which is largely determining Earth's climate. To this aim national and global monitoring networks for surface radiative fluxes have been established in recent decades. The most prominent among these networks is the so-called Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) operating under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) (Ohmura et al., 1998). National monitoring networks such as the Austrian RADiation Monitoring Network (ARAD), which has been established in 2010 by a consortium of the Central Agency of Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG), the University of Graz, the University of Innsbruck, and the University of Natural Resources and Applied Sciences, Vienna (BOKU), orient themselves on BSRN standards (McArthur, 2005). ARAD comprises to date five sites (Wien Hohe Warte, Graz/University, Innsbruck/University, Kanzelhöhe Observatory and Sonnblick (which is also a BSRN site)) and aims to provide long-term monitoring of radiation budget components at highest accuracy and to capture the spatial patterns of radiation climate in Austria (Olefs et al., 2015). Given the accuracy requirement for the local monitoring of radiative fluxes instrument offsets, triggered by meteorological factors and/or instrumentation, pose a major challenge in radiation monitoring. Within this study we investigate effects of ambient meteorology on the accuracy of radiation measurements performed with pyranometers contained in various heating/ventilation systems (HV-systems), all of which used in regular operation within the ARAD network. We focus particularly on instrument offsets observed following precipitation events. To quantify pyranometer responses to precipitation we performed a series of controlled laboratory experiments as well as targeted field campaigns in 2015 and 2016. Our results indicate

  5. Radiation dose measurement and risk estimation for paediatric patients undergoing micturating cystourethrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulieman, A; Theodorou, K; Vlychou, M; Topaltzikis, T; Kanavou, D; Fezoulidis, I; Kappas, C

    2007-09-01

    Micturating cystourethrography (MCU) is considered to be the gold-standard method used to detect and grade vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and show urethral and bladder abnormalities. It accounts for 30-50% of all fluoroscopic examinations in children. Therefore, it is crucial to define and optimize the radiation dose received by a child during MCU examination, taking into account that children have a higher risk of developing radiation-induced cancer than adults. This study aims to quantify and evaluate, by means of thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD), the radiation dose to the newborn and paediatric populations undergoing MCU using fluoroscopic imaging. Evaluation of entrance surface dose (ESD), organ and surface dose to specific radiosensitive organs was carried out. Furthermore, the surface dose to the co-patient, i.e. individuals helping in the support, care and comfort of the children during the examination, was evaluated in order to estimate the level of risk. 52 patients with mean age of 0.36 years who had undergone MCU using digital fluoroscopy were studied. ESD, surface doses to thyroid, testes/ovaries and co-patients were measured with TLDs. MCU with digital equipment and fluoroscopy-captured image technique can reduce the radiation dose by approximately 50% while still obtaining the necessary diagnostic information. Radiographic exposures were made in cases of the presence of reflux or of the difficulty in evaluating a finding. The radiation surface doses to the thyroid and testes are relatively low, whereas the radiation dose to the co-patient is negligible. The risks associated with MCU for patients and co-patients are negligible. The results of this study provide baseline data to establish reference dose levels for MCU examination in very young patients.

  6. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R.; Panisko, M. E.; Seifert, A.; Warren, G. A.; Runkle, R. C.

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  7. Double-cavity radiometer for high-flux density solar radiation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parretta, A; Antonini, A; Armani, M; Nenna, G; Flaminio, G; Pellegrino, M

    2007-04-20

    A radiometric method has been developed, suitable for both total power and flux density profile measurement of concentrated solar radiation. The high-flux density radiation is collected by a first optical cavity, integrated, and driven to a second optical cavity, where, attenuated, it is measured by a conventional radiometer operating under a stationary irradiation regime. The attenuation factor is regulated by properly selecting the aperture areas in the two cavities. The radiometer has been calibrated by a pulsed solar simulator at concentration levels of hundreds of suns. An optical model and a ray-tracing study have also been developed and validated, by which the potentialities of the radiometer have been largely explored.

  8. A Shallow Underground Laboratory for Low-Background Radiation Measurements and Materials Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Cantaloub, Michael G.; Day, Anthony R.; Erikson, Luke E.; Fast, James E.; Forrester, Joel B.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Merriman, Jason H.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.; Overman, Nicole R.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Runkle, Robert C.

    2012-11-08

    Abstract: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths worldwide houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This manuscript describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  9. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); and others

    2012-11-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  10. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalseth, C E; Bonicalzi, R M; Cantaloub, M G; Day, A R; Erikson, L E; Fast, J; Forrester, J B; Fuller, E S; Glasgow, B D; Greenwood, L R; Hoppe, E W; Hossbach, T W; Hyronimus, B J; Keillor, M E; Mace, E K; McIntyre, J I; Merriman, J H; Myers, A W; Overman, C T; Overman, N R; Panisko, M E; Seifert, A; Warren, G A; Runkle, R C

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  11. On the Light Speed Anisotropy vs Cosmic Microwave Background Dipole: European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A; Margarian, A T; Bartalini, O; Bellini, V; Castoldi, M; D'Angelo, A; Didelez, J P; Salvo, R D; Fantini, A; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Guidal, M; Hourany, E; Knyazyan, S; Kouznetsov, V; Kunne, Ronald Alexander; Lapik, A; Levi-Sandri, P; Llères, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Moricciani, D; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Rebreyend, D; Russo, G; Rudnev, N; Schärf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of the Compton edge of the scattered electrons in GRAAL facility in European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background dipole reveals up to 10 sigma variations larger than the statistical errors. We now show that the variations are not due to the frequency variations of the accelerator. The nature of Compton edge variations remains unclear, thus outlining the imperative of dedicated studies of light speed anisotropy.

  12. Setup for measurements of partial ion yields at the Synchrotron Radiation Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehlitz, R.; Lukić, D.; Koncz, C.; Sellin, I. A.

    2002-03-01

    A new setup for measuring partial photoion yields was developed and built at the Synchrotron Radiation Center. The vacuum chamber, which accommodates an ion time-of-flight spectrometer, a metal vapor oven, and a liquid nitrogen cooled trap, consists mainly of a standard conflat 6 in. six-way cross and a 6 in. tee. A differential pumping stage separates the vacuum chamber from the beam line. First experiments with this apparatus were performed using neon, lithium, and beryllium.

  13. Determination of electron bunch shape using transition radiation and phase-energy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosson, E.R.; Berryman, K.W.; Richman, B.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    We present data comparing microbunch temporal information obtained from electron beam phase-energy measurements with that obtained from transition radiation auto-correlation measurements. The data was taken to resolve some of the ambiguities in previous transition radiation results. By measuring the energy spectrum of the electron beam as a function of its phase relative to the accelerating field, phase-energy information was extracted. This data was analyzed using tomographic techniques to reconstruct the phase-space distribution assuming an electron energy dependence of E({var_phi}) = E{sub o} + E{sub acc}cos({var_phi}), where E{sub o} is the energy of an electron entering the field, E{sub acc} is the peak energy gain, and {var_phi} is the phase between the crest of the RF wave and an electron. Temporal information about the beam was obtained from the phase space distribution by taking the one dimensional projection along the time axis. We discuss the use of this technique to verify other transition radiation analysis methods.

  14. Electronic instrumentation for the nuclear radiation measurement; Instrumentacion electronica para la medicion de la radiacion nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez J, F.J

    2005-07-01

    This work presents the obtained results in the research, development and construction of the electronic instrumentation required for the measurement of the essential characteristics of the nuclear radiation: The quantity of radiation and its energy components. With this information, many practical instruments can be developed and applied in different fields of science and technology. In this work, some instruments were developed for their application in the areas of medicine, industry, and particle physics research. Several measurement systems based on PIN type diodes are proposed for: a) the measurement of the operational characteristics of the X-ray machines and the X-rays emitted in medical radio-diagnostic, b) X-ray spectroscopy and c) radiation spectroscopy of charged particles. The contribution of this work is, precisely, the development of new instruments that use the PIN diode as the sensorial element. In this way, existing problems in nuclear instrumentation are overcame, specially in the fields of medical physics and particle physics. Likewise, different types of charge and current preamplifiers, with a high signal-to-noise ratio, were developed for these instruments. (Author)

  15. Radiative Characteristics of Clouds Embedded in Smoke Derived from Airborne Multiangular Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Ritesh; Gatebe, Charles K.; Singh, Manoj; Varnai, Tamas; Poudyal, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Clouds in the presence of absorbing aerosols result in their apparent darkening, observed at the top of atmosphere (TOA), which is associated with the radiative effects of aerosol absorption. Owing to the large radiative effect and potential impacts on regional climate, above-cloud aerosols have recently been characterized in multiple satellite-based studies. While satellite data are particularly useful in showing the radiative impact of above-cloud aerosols at the TOA, recent literature indicates large uncertainties in satellite retrievals of above-cloud aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA), which are among the most important parameters in the assessment of associated radiative effects. In this study, we analyze radiative characteristics of clouds in the presence of wildfire smoke using airborne data primarily from NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer, collected during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites campaign in Canada during the 2008 summer season. We found a strong positive reflectance (R) gradient in the UV-visible (VIS)-near infrared (NIR) spectrum for clouds embedded in dense smoke, as opposed to an (expected) negative gradient for cloud-free smoke and a flat spectrum for smoke-free cloud cover. Several cases of clouds embedded in thick smoke were found, when the aircraft made circular/spiral measurements, which not only allowed the complete characterization of angular distribution of smoke scattering but also provided the vertical distribution of smoke and clouds (within 0.5-5 km). Specifically, the largest darkening by smoke was found in the UV/VIS, with R(sub 0.34 microns) reducing to 0.2 (or 20%), in contrast to 0.8 at NIR wavelengths (e.g., 1.27 microns). The observed darkening is associated with large AODs (0.5-3.0) and moderately low SSA (0.85-0.93 at 0.53 microns), resulting in a significantly large instantaneous aerosol forcing efficiency of 254 +/- 47 W/sq m/t. Our

  16. Radiative characteristics of clouds embedded in smoke derived from airborne multiangular measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Ritesh; Gatebe, Charles K.; Singh, Manoj K.; Várnai, Tamás.; Poudyal, Rajesh

    2016-08-01

    Clouds in the presence of absorbing aerosols result in their apparent darkening, observed at the top of atmosphere (TOA), which is associated with the radiative effects of aerosol absorption. Owing to the large radiative effect and potential impacts on regional climate, above-cloud aerosols have recently been characterized in multiple satellite-based studies. While satellite data are particularly useful in showing the radiative impact of above-cloud aerosols at the TOA, recent literature indicates large uncertainties in satellite retrievals of above-cloud aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA), which are among the most important parameters in the assessment of associated radiative effects. In this study, we analyze radiative characteristics of clouds in the presence of wildfire smoke using airborne data primarily from NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer, collected during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites campaign in Canada during the 2008 summer season. We found a strong positive reflectance (R) gradient in the UV-visible (VIS)-near infrared (NIR) spectrum for clouds embedded in dense smoke, as opposed to an (expected) negative gradient for cloud-free smoke and a flat spectrum for smoke-free cloud cover. Several cases of clouds embedded in thick smoke were found, when the aircraft made circular/spiral measurements, which not only allowed the complete characterization of angular distribution of smoke scattering but also provided the vertical distribution of smoke and clouds (within 0.5-5 km). Specifically, the largest darkening by smoke was found in the UV/VIS, with R0.34μm reducing to 0.2 (or 20%), in contrast to 0.8 at NIR wavelengths (e.g., 1.27 µm). The observed darkening is associated with large AODs (0.5-3.0) and moderately low SSA (0.85-0.93 at 0.53 µm), resulting in a significantly large instantaneous aerosol forcing efficiency of 254 ± 47 W m-2 τ-1. Our observations of smoke

  17. Bio-optics of the Chesapeake Bay from measurements and radiative transfer closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortziou, Maria; Herman, Jay R.; Gallegos, Charles L.; Neale, Patrick J.; Subramaniam, Ajit; Harding, Lawrence W., Jr.; Ahmad, Ziauddin

    2006-06-01

    We combined detailed bio-optical measurements and radiative transfer modeling to perform an 'optical closure' experiment for an optically complex and biologically productive region of the Chesapeake Bay. We used this experiment to evaluate certain assumptions commonly used in bio-optical models, and to investigate which optical characteristics are most important to accurately model and interpret remote sensing ocean-color observations in these Case 2 waters. Direct measurements were made of the magnitude, variability, and spectral characteristics of backscattering and absorption that are critical for accurate parameterizations in satellite bio-optical algorithms and underwater radiative transfer simulations. We found that the ratio of backscattering to total scattering (i.e. the backscattering fraction, bb/ b) varied considerably depending on particulate loading, distance from land, and mixing processes, and had an average value of 0.0128 at 530 nm. Incorporating information on the magnitude, variability, and spectral characteristics of particulate backscattering into the radiative transfer model, rather than using a volume scattering function commonly assumed for turbid waters, was critical to obtaining agreement between model calculations and measured radiometric quantities. In-situ measurements of absorption coefficients need to be corrected for systematic overestimation due to scattering errors, and this correction commonly employs the assumption that absorption by particulate matter at near-infrared wavelengths is zero. Direct measurements, however, showed that particulate matter in the Bay had small, but non-zero, absorption in the 700-730 nm wavelength region. Accounting for this residual particulate absorption when correcting in-situ measured absorption spectra for scattering errors was important in model simulations of water reflectance in the green wavelengths, where reflectance spectra in estuarine waters peak. Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

  18. Solar absorption estimated from surface radiation measurements and collocated satellite products over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyta Hakuba, Maria; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is physically speaking a perturbation of the atmospheric energy budget through the insertion of constituents such as greenhouse gases or aerosols. Changes in the atmospheric energy budget largely affect the global climate and hydrological cycle, but the quantification of the different energy balance components is still afflicted with large uncertainties. The overall aim of the present study is the assessment of the mean state and the spatio-temporal variations in the solar energy disposition, in which we focus on obtaining an accurate partitioning of absorbed solar radiation between the surface and the atmosphere. Surface based measurements of solar radiation (GEBA, BSRN) are combined with collocated satellite-retrieved surface albedo (MODIS, CERES FSW, or CM SAF GAC-SAL) and top-of-atmosphere net incoming solar radiation (CERES EBAF) to quantify the absorbed solar radiation (ASR) at the surface and within the atmosphere over Europe for the period 2001-2005. In a first step, we examine the quality and temporal homogeneity of the monthly time series beyond 2000 provided by GEBA in order to identify a subset of sufficient quality. We find the vast majority of monthly time series to be suitable for our purposes. Using the satellite-derived CM SAF surface solar radiation product at 0.03° spatial resolution, we assess the spatial representativeness of the GEBA and BSRN sites for their collocated 1° grid cells as we intend to combine the point measurements with the coarser resolved CERES EBAF products (1° resolution), and we find spatial sampling errors of on average 3 Wm-2 or 2% (normalized by point values). Based on the combination of 134 GEBA surface solar radiation (SSR) time series with MODIS white-sky albedo and CERES EBAF top-of-atmosphere net radiation (TOAnet), we obtain a European mean partitioning (2001-2005) of absorbed solar radiation (relative to total incoming radiation) of: ASRsurf= 41% and ASRatm= 25%, together equaling

  19. Development of radiation detection and measurement systems - The development of a domestic model of portable radiation survey meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Koo; Choi, Kang; Kim, Jong Nam; Son, Keum Jong; Kim, Ji Kwang [Radiation Technology Research Lab., Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The internal circuit board and operating program were developed for the portable radiation survey meter with a small GM tube, and then tested for the performance verification. The signal of GM tube in the detection unit is taken form the cathode and pulsed out to be a standard digital pulse by a signal processor. The control and operation unit counts the signals and also calculates the counting errors. The data of signal counts and errors are transferred to the display unit. The LCD panel of the display unit is manufactured as the design resulted from this work. The panel attached with EL back-light displays in multiplex mode. The whole circuit is designed to have a small power consumption sufficiently for the portable instrument. The operating program is coded by C language. The program is on-power performs a self-test on counting circuit and then operates the main functions of the pulse counting, switch scanning, LCD panel controlling and the battery voltage measuring of the detector system with the time-interrupter. The prototype board of the internal circuit is tested with respect to the functional operation, counting performance, signal response characteristics and battery life-time. It was founded that the circuit is operated as the design functions. Also, these test result shows that those performances of the prototype board are better than those of the existing foreign products. 23 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  20. Mode Content Determination of Terahertz Corrugated Waveguides Using Experimentally Measured Radiated Field Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawla, Sudheer K; Nanni, Emilio A; Shapiro, Michael A; Woskov, Paul P; Temkin, Richard J

    2012-06-01

    This work focuses on the accuracy of the mode content measurements in an overmoded corrugated waveguide using measured radiated field patterns. Experimental results were obtained at 250 GHz using a vector network analyzer with over 70 dB of dynamic range. The intensity and phase profiles of the fields radiated from the end of the 19 mm diameter helically tapped brass waveguide were measured on planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm from the waveguide end. The measured fields were back propagated to the waveguide aperture to provide three independent estimates of the field at the waveguide exit aperture. Projecting that field onto the modes of the guide determined the waveguide mode content. The three independent mode content estimates were found to agree with one another to an accuracy of better than ±0.3%. These direct determinations of the mode content were compared with indirect measurements using the experimentally measured amplitude in three planes, with the phase determined by a phase retrieval algorithm. The phase retrieval technique using the planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm yielded a mode content estimate in excellent agreement, within 0.3%, of the direct measurements. Phase retrieval results using planes at 10, 20, and 30 cm were less accurate due to truncation of the measurement in the transverse plane. The reported measurements benefited greatly from a precise mechanical alignment of the scanner with respect to the waveguide axis. These results will help to understand the accuracy of mode content measurements made directly in cold test and indirectly in hot test using the phase retrieval technique.

  1. A novel method for sub-micrometer transverse electron beam size measurements using optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryshev, A; Boogert, S T; Karataev, P [John Adams Institute at Royal Holloway, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Howell, D [John Adams Institute at Oxford University, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J, E-mail: alar@post.kek.j [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) appearing when a charged particle crosses a boundary between two media with different dielectric properties has widely been used as a tool for transverse profile measurements of charged particle beams in various facilities worldwide. The resolution of the monitor is defined by so-called Point Spread Function (PSF), source distribution generated by a single electron and projected by an optical system onto a screen. In this paper we represent the development of a novel sub-micrometre electron beam profile monitor based on the measurements of the PSF structure. The first experimental results are presented and future plans on the optimization of the monitor are discussed

  2. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation: 2016 project annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, Sergei O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-04

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 3, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) the demonstration of the measurement of thermally activated defect-interaction processes by pulsed ion beam techniques and (ii) the demonstration of alternative characterization techniques to study defect dynamics. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  3. Gamma spectroscopic measurements using the PID350 pixelated CdTe radiation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Karafasoulis, K; Seferlis, S; Papadakis, I; Loukas, D; Lambropoulos, C; Potiriadis, C

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements are presented using the PID350 pixelated gamma radiation detectors. A high-speed data acquisition system has been developed in order to reduce the data loss during the data reading in case of a high flux of photons. A data analysis framework has been developed in order to improve the resolution of the acquired energy spectra, using specific calibration parameters for each PID350's pixel. Three PID350 detectors have been used to construct a stacked prototype system and spectroscopic measurements have been performed in order to test the ability of the prototype to localize radioactive sources.

  4. Summary of round robin measurements of radiation induced conductivity in Wesgo AL995 alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This existing data on radiation induced conductivity (RIC) measurements performed on the same heat of the IEA reference ceramic insulator are summarized. Six different sets of RIC measurements have been performed on Wesgo AL995 at dose rates between 10 Gy/s and 1 MGy/s. In general, good agreement was obtained between the different groups of researchers. The data indicate that the RIC at a test temperature of 400-500{degrees}C is approximately linear with ionizing dose rate up to {approximately}1000 Gy/s, and exhibits an approximately square root dependence on dose rate between 1 kGy/s and 1 MGy/s.

  5. Measuring Air Temperature in Glazed Ventilated Facades in the Presence of Direct Solar Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena; Zanghirella, Fabio; Heiselberg, Per

    2007-01-01

    part of the complete ventilation system. Assessment of necessary cooling/heating loads and of the whole building energy performance will then depend on the accuracy of measured air temperature. The presence of direct solar radiation is an essential element for the façade operation, but it can heavily...... affect measurements of air temperature and may lead to errors of high magnitude using bare thermocouples and even adopting shielding devices. Two different research groups, from Aalborg University and Politecnico di Torino, tested separately various techniques to shield thermocouples from direct...

  6. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  7. Measurement of DNA damage after exposure to 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyapa, R S; Ahern, E W; Straube, W L; Moros, E G; Pickard, W F; Roti Roti, J L

    1997-12-01

    Recent reports suggest that exposure to 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation causes DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cells of rat brain irradiated in vivo (Lai and Singh, Bioelectromagnetics 16, 207-210, 1995; Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 69, 513-521, 1996). Therefore, we endeavored to determine if exposure of cultured mammalian cells in vitro to 2450 MHz radiation causes DNA damage. The alkaline comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis), which is reportedly the most sensitive method to assay DNA damage in individual cells, was used to measure DNA damage after in vitro 2450 MHz irradiation. Exponentially growing U87MG and C3H 10T1/2 cells were exposed to 2450 MHz continuous-wave (CW) radiation in specially designed radial transmission lines (RTLs) that provided relatively uniform microwave exposure. Specific absorption rates (SARs) were calculated to be 0.7 and 1.9 W/kg. Temperatures in the RTLs were measured in real time and were maintained at 37 +/- 0.3 degrees C. Every experiment included sham exposure(s) in an RTL. Cells were irradiated for 2 h, 2 h followed by a 4-h incubation at 37 degrees C in an incubator, 4 h and 24 h. After these treatments samples were subjected to the alkaline comet assay as described by Olive et al. (Exp. Cell Res. 198, 259-267, 1992). Images of comets were digitized and analyzed using a PC-based image analysis system, and the "normalized comet moment" and "comet length" were determined. No significant differences were observed between the test group and the controls after exposure to 2450 MHz CW irradiation. Thus 2450 MHz irradiation does not appear to cause DNA damage in cultured mammalian cells under these exposure conditions as measured by this assay.

  8. Procedural and practical applications of radiation measurements for BNCT at the HFR Petten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, R. L.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Rassow, J.; Morrissey, J.; Voorbraak, W.; Verbakel, W.; Appelman, K.; Daquino, G. G.; Muzi, L.; Wittig, A.; Bourhis-Martin, E.; Sauerwein, W.

    2004-01-01

    Since October 1997, a clinical trial of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma patients has been in progress at the High Flux Reactor, Petten, the Netherlands. The trial is a European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) protocol (#11 961) and, as such, must be conducted following the highest quality management and procedures, according to good clinical practice and also other internationally accepted codes. The complexity of BNCT involves not only strict international procedures, but also a variety of techniques to measure the different aspects of the irradiation involved when treating the patient. Applications include: free beam measurements using packets of activation foils; in-phantom measurements for beam calibration using ionisation chambers, pn-diodes and activation foils; monitoring of the irradiation beam during patient treatment using fission chambers and GM-counters; boron in blood measurements using prompt gamma ray spectroscopy; radiation protection of the patient and staff using portable radiation dosimeters and personal dosimeters; and in vivo measurements of the boron in the patient using a prompt gamma ray telescope. The procedures and applications of such techniques are presented here, with particular emphasis on the importance of the quality assurance/quality control procedures and its reporting.

  9. Synchrotron radiation measurement of multiphase fluid saturations in porous media: Experimental technique and error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, David M.; Bierck, Barnes R.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    1998-06-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is an important research topic. In situ, nondestructive experimental methods for studying multiphase flow are important for improving our understanding and the theory. Rapid changes in fluid saturation, characteristic of immiscible displacement, are difficult to measure accurately using gamma rays due to practical restrictions on source strength. Our objective is to describe a synchrotron radiation technique for rapid, nondestructive saturation measurements of multiple fluids in porous media, and to present a precision and accuracy analysis of the technique. Synchrotron radiation provides a high intensity, inherently collimated photon beam of tunable energy which can yield accurate measurements of fluid saturation in just one second. Measurements were obtained with precision of ±0.01 or better for tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in a 2.5 cm thick glass-bead porous medium using a counting time of 1 s. The normal distribution was shown to provide acceptable confidence limits for PCE saturation changes. Sources of error include heat load on the monochromator, periodic movement of the source beam, and errors in stepping-motor positioning system. Hypodermic needles pushed into the medium to inject PCE changed porosity in a region approximately ±1 mm of the injection point. Improved mass balance between the known and measured PCE injection volumes was obtained when appropriate corrections were applied to calibration values near the injection point.

  10. Measuring Earth Radiation Imbalance from a Massive Constellation of Flux Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiscombe, W. J.; Chiu, J.; Ardanuy, P. E.; Barker, H.; Han, S.; Lorentz, S. R.; Schwartz, S. E.; Trenberth, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    The most important climate variable that is not now measured from space with sufficient accuracy (not even one significant digit on any time scale) is Earth Radiation Imbalance (ERI), a subject of much discussion lately in relation to the "global warming hiatus". The greatest temporal challenges for ERI measurements are very long (decadal) and very short (diurnal) time scales. The decadal challenge is mainly one of calibration and continuity, whereas the diurnal challenge is mainly one of temporal coverage. ERI measurements must meet both challenges. We discuss here a massive constellation of flux radiometers in Low Earth Orbit that is capable of meeting both challenges. At least 30-40 satellites are required for diurnal coverage, an order of magnitude more than in any previous Earth science mission. This same diurnal coverage would make possible, for the first time, the use of ERI measurements in data assimilation, as well as providing a much more temporally resolved dataset for tuning and evaluating climate models. Although a large number of instruments on many satellites might seem to pose a gargantuan calibration challenge, actually, the more satellites, the better the intercalibration: satellites can not only follow each other closely in the same orbit plane, viewing exactly the same scene a few minutes apart, but they can engage in a spider web of crossovers in the polar regions, allowing many further such intercalibrations. Furthermore, keystone satellites can roll over to obtain an absolute calibration from the Sun and deep space, which can then be transferred to the other satellites. Simulations of ERI from such a constellation will be shown, along with the tradeoffs necessary to create an optimal configuration and to mitigate the problems experienced by previous generations of Earth radiation budget radiometers. A tentative instrument design will also be described.Constellation of flux radiometers for measuring Earth Radiation Imbalance

  11. [Multispectral Radiation Algorithm Based on Emissivity Model Constraints for True Temperature Measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mei; Sun, Xiao-gang; Luan, Mei-sheng

    2015-10-01

    Temperature measurement is one of the important factors for ensuring product quality, reducing production cost and ensuring experiment safety in industrial manufacture and scientific experiment. Radiation thermometry is the main method for non-contact temperature measurement. The second measurement (SM) method is one of the common methods in the multispectral radiation thermometry. However, the SM method cannot be applied to on-line data processing. To solve the problems, a rapid inversion method for multispectral radiation true temperature measurement is proposed and constraint conditions of emissivity model are introduced based on the multispectral brightness temperature model. For non-blackbody, it can be drawn that emissivity is an increasing function in the interval if the brightness temperature is an increasing function or a constant function in a range and emissivity satisfies an inequality of emissivity and wavelength in that interval if the brightness temperature is a decreasing function in a range, according to the relationship of brightness temperatures at different wavelengths. The construction of emissivity assumption values is reduced from multiclass to one class and avoiding the unnecessary emissivity construction with emissivity model constraint conditions on the basis of brightness temperature information. Simulation experiments and comparisons for two different temperature points are carried out based on five measured targets with five representative variation trends of real emissivity. decreasing monotonically, increasing monotonically, first decreasing with wavelength and then increasing, first increasing and then decreasing and fluctuating with wavelength randomly. The simulation results show that compared with the SM method, for the same target under the same initial temperature and emissivity search range, the processing speed of the proposed algorithm is increased by 19.16%-43.45% with the same precision and the same calculation results.

  12. Natural Radioactivity Measurements and Radiation Dose Estimation in Some Sedimentary Rock Samples in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Akkurt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural radioactivity existed since creation of the universe due to the long life time of some radionuclides. This natural radioactivity is caused by γ-radiation originating from the uranium and thorium series and 40K. In this study, the gamma radiation has been measured to determine natural radioactivity of 238U, 232Th, and 40K in collected sedimentary rock samples in different places of Turkey. The measurements have been performed using γ-ray spectrometer containing NaI(Tl detector and multichannel analyser (MCA. Absorbed dose rate (D, annual effective dose (AED, radium equivalent activities (Raeq, external hazard index (Hex, and internal hazard index (Hin associated with the natural radionuclide were calculated to assess the radiation hazard of the natural radioactivity in the sedimentary rock samples. The average values of absorbed dose rate in air (D, annual effective dose (AED, radium equivalent activity (Raeq, external hazard index (Hex, and internal hazard index (Hin were calculated and these were 45.425 nGy/h, 0.056 mSv/y, 99.014 Bq/kg, 0.267, and 0.361, respectively.

  13. Measurement, analysis and correction of the closed orbit distortion in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Riyasat Husain; A D Ghodke; Surendra Yadav; A C Holikatti; R P Yadav; P Fatnani; T A Puntambekar; P R Hannurkar

    2013-02-01

    The paper presents the measurement, analysis and correction of closed orbit distortion (COD) in Indus-2 at 550 MeV injection energy and 2 GeV synchrotron radiation user run energy. The measured COD was analysed and fitted to understand major sources of errors in terms of the effective quadrupole misalignments. The rms COD was corrected down to less than 0.6 mm in both horizontal and vertical planes. A golden orbit was set for the operating synchrotron radiation beamlines. With COD correction, the injection efficiency at 550 MeV was improved by ∼ 50% and the beam lifetime at 2 GeV was increased by ∼8 h. In this paper, the method of global COD correction based on singular value decomposition (SVD) of the orbit response matrix is described. Results for the COD correction in both horizontal and vertical planes at 550 MeV injection energy and at 2 GeV synchrotron radiation user run energy are discussed.

  14. Measurements of the temperature dependence of radiation induced conductivity in polymeric dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Jodie

    This study measures Radiation Induced Conductivity (RIC) in five insulating polymeric materials over temperatures ranging from ~110 K to ~350 K: polyimide (PI or Kapton HN(TM) and Kapton E(TM)), polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE or Teflon(TM)), ethylene-tetraflouroethylene (ETFE or Tefzel(TM)), and Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE). RIC occurs when incident ionizing radiation deposits energy and excites electrons into the conduction band of insulators. Conductivity was measured when a voltage was applied across vacuum-baked, thin film polymer samples in a parallel plate geometry. RIC was calculated as the difference in sample conductivity under no incident radiation and under an incident ~4 MeV electron beam at low incident dose rates of 0.01 rad/sec to 10 rad/sec. The steady-state RIC was found to agree well with the standard power law relation, sigmaRIC(D˙) = kRIC(T) D˙Delta(T) between conductivity, sigmaRIC and adsorbed dose rate, D˙. Both the proportionality constant, kRIC, and the power, Delta, were found to be temperature-dependent above ~250 K, with behavior consistent with photoconductivity models developed for localized trap states in disordered semiconductors. Below ~250 K, kRIC and Delta exhibited little change in any of the materials.

  15. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Ricardo [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Balascuta, S. [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bertozzi, William [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyce, James R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cowan, Ray [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Evtushenko, Pavel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fisher, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ihloff, Ernest E. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kalantarians, Narbe [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aidan Michael [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Krossler, W. J. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Long, Elena [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Ou, Longwu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schmookler, Barack Abraham [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tschalar, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

  16. Radiation measurements in Egyptian pyramids and tombs -- occupational exposure of workers and the public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigu, J.; Hussein, Mohamed I.; Hussein, A.Z

    2000-02-01

    A radiation survey of seven archaeological sites within Egyptian pyramids and tombs has been conducted in the Saggara area. Measurements were made of radon ({sup 222}Rn) and its short-lived decay products (progeny), as well as thoron ({sup 220}Rn) progeny and {gamma}-radiation. The results of these measurements have been used to calculate the maximum annual effective dose (MAD) and other important occupational radiation exposure variables. It was found that for the limited time to which occupational workers and visitors were exposed, their respective MAD values were lower than that recommended by the regulatory agency (i.e., 20 mSv per year for occupational workers and 1 mSv in a year for the public). However, it is shown that if the exposure times for occupational workers were to increase to 'normal' working schedules their MAD would be exceeded at three archaeological sites. Implementation of improved ventilation practices is recommended in those sites to reduce the exposure to occupational workers were their working schedules to be significantly increased. It is also recommended that further monitoring be conducted in the future to verify these results.

  17. Smith-Purcell experiment utilizing a field-emitter array cathode measurements of radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, H; Yokoo, K; Shimawaki, H; Hosono, A

    2001-01-01

    Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation at wavelengths of 350-750 nm was produced in a tabletop experiment using a field-emitter array (FEA) cathode. The electron gun was 5 cm long, and a 25 mmx25 mm holographic replica grating was placed behind the slit provided in the anode. A regulated DC power supply accelerated electron beams in excess of 10 mu A up to 45 keV, while a small Van de Graaff generator accelerated smaller currents to higher energies. The grating had a 0.556 mu m period, 30 deg. blaze and a 0.2 mu m thick aluminum coating. Spectral characteristics of the radiation were measured both manually and automatically; in the latter case, the spectrometer was driven by a stepping motor to scan the wavelength, and AD-converted signals from a photomultiplier tube were processed by a personal computer. The measurement, made at 80 deg. relative to the electron beam, showed good agreement with theoretical wavelengths of the SP radiation. Diffraction orders were -2 and -3 for beam energies higher than 45 keV, -3 to -5 ...

  18. High-resolution Tangential AXUV Arrays for Radiated Power Density Measurements on NSTX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L [PPPL; Bell, R E [PPPL; Faust, I [MIT; Tritz, K [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21209, USA; Diallo, A [PPPL; Gerhardt, S P [PPPL; Kozub, T A [PPPL; LeBlanc, B P [PPPL; Stratton, B C [PPPL

    2014-07-01

    Precise measurements of the local radiated power density and total radiated power are a matter of the uttermost importance for understanding the onset of impurity-induced instabilities and the study of particle and heat transport. Accounting of power balance is also needed for the understanding the physics of various divertor con gurations for present and future high-power fusion devices. Poloidal asymmetries in the impurity density can result from high Mach numbers and can impact the assessment of their flux-surface-average and hence vary the estimates of P[sub]rad (r, t) and (Z[sub]eff); the latter is used in the calculation of the neoclassical conductivity and the interpretation of non-inductive and inductive current fractions. To this end, the bolometric diagnostic in NSTX-U will be upgraded, enhancing the midplane coverage and radial resolution with two tangential views, and adding a new set of poloidally-viewing arrays to measure the 2D radiation distribution. These systems are designed to contribute to the near- and long-term highest priority research goals for NSTX-U which will integrate non-inductive operation at reduced collisionality, with high-pressure, long energy-confinement-times and a divertor solution with metal walls.

  19. Creation of a homogeneous plasma column by means of hohlraum radiation for ion-stopping measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Faik, Steffen; Basko, Mikhail M; Maruhn, Joachim A; Rosmej, Olga; Rienecker, Tim; Novikov, Vladimir G; Grushin, Alexander S

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present the results of two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of a hohlraum target whose outgoing radiation is used to produce a homogeneously ionized carbon plasma for ion-beam stopping measurements. The cylindrical hohlraum with gold walls is heated by a frequency-doubled (\\lambda_l = 526.5 \\mu m) 1.4 ns long laser pulse with the total energy of E_l = 180 J. At the laser spot, the peak matter and radiation temperatures of, respectively, T ~ 380 eV and T_r ~ 120 eV are observed. X-rays from the hohlraum heat the attached carbon foam with a mean density of \\rho_C = 2 mg/cm^3 to a temperature of T ~ 25 eV. The simulation shows that the carbon ionization degree (Z ~ 3.75) and its column density stay relatively stable (within variations of about +-7%) long enough to conduct the ion-stopping measurements. Also, it is found that a special attention should be paid to the shock wave, emerging from the x-ray heated copper support plate, which at later times may significantly distort the ...

  20. Measurement of the acoustic radiation force on a sphere embedded in a soft solid

    CERN Document Server

    Lidon, Pierre; Taberlet, Nicolas; Manneville, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic radiation force exerted on a small sphere located at the focus of an ultrasonic beam is measured in a soft gel. It is proved to evolve quadratically with the local amplitude of the acoustic field. Strong oscillations of the local pressure are observed and attributed to an acoustic Fabry-P{\\'e}rot effect between the ultrasonic emitter and the sphere. Taking this effect into account with a simple model, a quantitative link between the radiation force and the acoustic pressure is proposed and compared to theoretical predictions in the absence of dissipation. The discrepancy between experiment and theory suggests that dissipative effects should be taken into account for fully modeling the observations.

  1. New Measurements of the Cosmic Background Radiation Temperature at3.3 mm Wavelength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witebsky, C.; Smoot, G.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S.D.

    1986-02-01

    We have measured the temperature of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 3.3 mm wavelength in 1982, 1983, and 1984 as part of a larger project to determine the CBR temperature at five wavelengths from 12 cm to 3.3 mm (Smoot et al. 1985). The 3.3-mm measurements yield a brightness temperature of 2.57 K with a 1{sigma} uncertainty of 20.12 K. This paper describes the instrument, the measurement techniques, and the data-analysis procedures used. Our result is in good agreement with recent measurements at comparable wavelengths by Meyer and Jura (1985) and by Peterson, Richards, and Timusk (1985), but it disagrees with the temperatures reported by Woody and Richards (1981).

  2. The evaluation of four different diffuse radiation correction models applied to shadow ring measurements for Beer Sheva, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudish, Avraham I.; Evseev, Efim G.

    2007-09-01

    The measurement of the horizontal diffuse radiation, a priori a straightforward task, is fraught with difficulties. It is possible to measure the diffuse radiation by both direct and indirect methods. The most accurate method is probably the indirect one, which utilizes concurrent measurements of the horizontal global and the normal incidence beam radiation. The disadvantage of this method is the relatively expensive tracking system required for measuring the latter. The diffuse radiation can be measured directly with a pyranometer outfitted with either an occulting disk or shadow ring, which prevent the beam radiation from impinging on the pyranometer sensor. The former method can provide accurate measurements of the diffuse radiation but requires a relatively expensive sun tracking system in the east-west axis. The shadow ring is a stationary device with regard to the east-west axis and blocks the beam radiation component by creating a permanent shadow on the pyranometer sensor. The disadvantage of the shadow ring is that it also blocks a portion of the sky, which necessitates a geometrical correction factor. There is also a need to correct for anisotropic sky conditions. Four correction models have been applied to the data and the results evaluated and ranked.

  3. The Spectrumof the Cosmic Background Radiation: Early and RecentMeasurements from the White Mountain Research Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, G.F.

    1985-09-01

    The White Mountain Research Station has provided a support facility at a high, dry, radio-quiet site for measurements that have established the blackbody character of the cosmic microwave background radiation. This finding has confirmed the interpretation of the radiation as a relic of the primeval fireball and helped to establish the hot Big Bang theory as the standard cosmological model.

  4. INFORMATION-MEASURING SYSTEM FOR EVALUATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION POWER LEVELS INFLUENCE TO ITS WEAKENED BY PROTECTIVE SHIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Boiprav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An information-measuring system and realized on the basis of its methodology used for evaluation of electromagnetic radiation power levels passing via the protective shielding construction are described. It’s proposed to use the developed methodology for the testing of electromagnetic radiation shields for anechoic chambers

  5. Non-contact skin emissivity: measurement from reflectance using step change in ambient radiation temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togawa, T

    1989-02-01

    A method of estimating skin emissivity based on reflectance measurement upon transient stepwise change in the ambient radiation temperature was proposed. To effect this change, two shades at different temperatures were switched mechanically, and the change in radiation from the skin surface was recorded through an aperture for each shade by a high-resolution, fast-response radiometer having a sensitivity within the 8-14 microns range. Measurements were made on the forehead, forearm, palm and back of the hand in 10 male and 10 female subjects. No significant differences in emissivity were observed among sites and between sexes. The overall average of the skin emissivity obtained was 0.971 +/- 0.005 (SD). This result is inconsistent with most reported skin emissivity values. However, as the former studies had many inherent inadequacies, both theoretical and experimental, it is considered that most of these reported skin emissivities are unacceptable. The method proposed in this study has the following advantages: (1) relative calibration between instruments is unnecessary, (2) non-contact measurement can be achieved, and (3) each measurement can be made within one minute.

  6. Plasma scattering measurement using a submillimeter wave gyrotron as a radiation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, I.; Idehara, T.; Itakura, Y.; Myodo, M. [Fukui Univ., Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region (Japan); Hori, T. [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Basic and Advanced Research Division, Nukui-Kita, Koganei (Japan); Hatae, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Mukoyama, Naka (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Plasma scattering measurement is an effective technique to observe low frequency density fluctuations excited in plasma. The spatial and wave number resolutions and the S/N ratio of measurement depend on the wavelength range, the size and the intensity of a probe beam. A well-collimated, submillimeter wave beam is suitable for improving the spatial and wave number resolutions. Application of high frequency gyrotron is effective in improving the S/N ratio of the measurement because of its capacity to deliver high power. Unlike the molecular vapor lasers, the gyrotrons generate diverging beam of radiation with TE{sub mn} mode structure. It is therefore necessary to convert the output radiation into a Gaussian beam. A quasi-optical antenna is a suitable element for the conversion system under consideration since it is applicable to several TE{sub 0n} and TE{sub 1n} modes. In order to apply the gyrotron to plasma scattering measurement, we have stabilized the output (P = 110 W, f = 354 GHz) of gyrotron up to the level ({delta}P/P < 1 %, {delta}f< 10 kHz). The gyrotron output can be stabilized by decreasing the fluctuation of the cathode potential. (authors)

  7. Manufacture of Single 60Co Source Irradiation Facility and the Measurement of Reference Radiation Filed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Fei; WANG; Hong-yu; NI; Ning; ZHANG; Li; HOU; Jin-bing; SONG; Ming-zhe

    2012-01-01

    <正>Reference radiation filed produced by isotope source is necessary for calibration of radiation dose meter. 60Co single source radiation facility is an important method to produce reference radiation. Collimation design of the facility is good for characteristics of the field, but there are scattered photon influences however. Scattered radiation is mainly come from collimation, source shield, floor, walls and

  8. Measurement of the radiative vacancy transfer probabilities from the $L_{3}$ to M and to N shells for W, Re and Pb using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bonzi, E V

    2006-01-01

    The radiative vacancy transfer probabilities from L/sub 3/ to M shell, eta/sub L3/M(R) and L/sub 3/ to N shell, eta/sub L3/N(R), have been determined for W, Re and Pb. The pure elements samples were excited by monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The X-rays were generated by excitation of L/sub 3/ edge and measured using a high resolution Si(Li) detector. The experimentally determined radiative vacancy transfer probabilities were compared with the theoretical values deduced using radiative X-ray emission rates based on the relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Slater (RDHS) model. In the case of Pb, the experimental data were compared as well with experimental values of Simsek. In both cases, a good agreement was found between the datasets.

  9. Calibration of GOES-derived solar radiation data using a distributed network of surface measurements in Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, David M.; Pathak, Chandra S.; Mecikalski, John R.; Paech, Simon J.; Wu, Qinglong; Sangoyomi, Taiye; Babcock, Roger W.; Walton, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation data are critically important for the estimation of evapotranspiration. Analysis of visible-channel data derived from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) using radiative transfer modeling has been used to produce spatially- and temporally-distributed datasets of solar radiation. An extensive network of (pyranometer) surface measurements of solar radiation in the State of Florida has allowed refined calibration of a GOES-derived daily integrated radiation data product. This refinement of radiation data allowed for corrections of satellite sensor drift, satellite generational change, and consideration of the highly-variable cloudy conditions that are typical of Florida. To aid in calibration of a GOES-derived radiation product, solar radiation data for the period 1995–2004 from 58 field stations that are located throughout the State were compiled. The GOES radiation product was calibrated by way of a three-step process: 1) comparison with ground-based pyranometer measurements on clear reference days, 2) correcting for a bias related to cloud cover, and 3) deriving month-by-month bias correction factors. Pre-calibration results indicated good model performance, with a station-averaged model error of 2.2 MJ m–2 day–1 (13 percent). Calibration reduced errors to 1.7 MJ m–2 day–1 (10 percent) and also removed time- and cloudiness-related biases. The final dataset has been used to produce Statewide evapotranspiration estimates.

  10. Spatiotemporal characteristics of ultraviolet radiation in recent 54 years from measurements and reconstructions over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Hu, B.; Zhang, L.; Wang, Y. S.; Tian, P. F.

    2016-07-01

    Based on measurements of ultraviolet radiation (UV) for the period of 2005-2014 that were obtained from the Chinese Ecosystem Research Network, we developed an efficient model to estimate UV radiation under various sky conditions. This model can provide an accurate reconstruction of UV radiation data with absolute mean bias error less than 9.65%. We combined this reconstruction model with a hybrid model to obtain the historical data set of daily UV radiation from 1961 to 2014 at 37 weather stations belonging to the China Meteorological Administration over the Tibetan Plateau (TP). Based on the historical data set, the spatial distribution and temporal variation of UV radiation over the TP region were discussed. The decreasing and increasing periods of ultraviolet radiation over the TP were significantly different from those over the entire China. There was an increasing trend in UV radiation over the TP from 1961 to 1983, followed by a decreasing one until 2014, while UV radiation decreased from 1961 to 1989 and then increased slightly after 1989 for the entire China. The average UV radiation values in the increasing and decreasing periods over the TP were 0.598 MJ · m-2 · d-1 and 0.594 MJ · m-2 · d-1, respectively. In addition, aerosol optical depth, column ozone, and cloud prevent approximately 7.13%, 1.31%, and 15.05% of UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface, respectively.

  11. Radiation Resistance testing of commercial components for the new SPS Beam Position Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Deplano, C; Bogey, T; Gonzalez, J L; Savioz, J J

    2013-01-01

    A new Front-End (FE) electronics is under development for the SPS Multi Orbit POsition System (MOPOS). To cover the large dynamic range of beam intensities (70 dB) to be measured in the SPS, the beam position monitor signals are processed using logarithmic amplifiers. They are then digitized locally and transmitted via optical fibers over long distances (up to 1 km) to VME acquisition boards located in surface buildings. The FE board is designed to be located in the SPS tunnel, where it must withstand radiation doses of up to 100 Gy per year. Analogue components, such as Logarithmic Amplifiers (LA), ADC-Drivers (ADC-D) and Voltage Regulators (VR), have been tested at PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute) for radiation hardness, while several families of bidirectional SFP, both single-fiber and double-fiber, have been tested at both PSI and CNRAD. This paper gives a description of the overall system architecture and presents the results of the radiation hardness tests in detail.

  12. Potential for improved radiation thermometry measurement uncertainty through implementing a primary scale in an industrial laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Jon R.; Lowe, David; Broughton, Mick; White, Ben S.; Machin, Graham

    2016-09-01

    A primary temperature scale requires realising a unit in terms of its definition. For high temperature radiation thermometry in terms of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 this means extrapolating from the signal measured at the freezing temperature of gold, silver or copper using Planck’s radiation law. The difficulty in doing this means that primary scales above 1000 °C require specialist equipment and careful characterisation in order to achieve the extrapolation with sufficient accuracy. As such, maintenance of the scale at high temperatures is usually only practicable for National Metrology Institutes, and calibration laboratories have to rely on a scale calibrated against transfer standards. At lower temperatures it is practicable for an industrial calibration laboratory to have its own primary temperature scale, which reduces the number of steps between the primary scale and end user. Proposed changes to the SI that will introduce internationally accepted high temperature reference standards might make it practicable to have a primary high temperature scale in a calibration laboratory. In this study such a scale was established by calibrating radiation thermometers directly to high temperature reference standards. The possible reduction in uncertainty to an end user as a result of the reduced calibration chain was evaluated.

  13. Energetic particle radiations measured by particle detector on board CBERS-1 satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO YongQiang; XIAO Zuo; ZOU Hong; ZHANG DongHe

    2007-01-01

    Using the data measured by energetic particle detector on board CBERS-01 and -02 for the past five years, statistics was made to show the general features of MeV electrons and protons along a solar synchronous orbit at an altitude of 780 km. This height is in the bottom region of the Earth's radiation belts. Detectors are inside the satellite cabinet and such continuous monitoring of particle radiation environment inside a satellite has seldom conducted so far. After a proper and careful treatment, it is indicated that the data inside satellite are well correlated with the radiation environment outside. Besides the agreement of the general distribution characteristics of energetic electrons and protons with similar observations from other satellites, attention is particularly paid to the disturbed conditions. Variations of particle fluxes are closely related with solar proton events, in general, electron fluxes of outer belt are well correlated with Dst index after three days' delay while the electron injection occurred almost at the same day during great magnetic storms. It is confirmed that both energetic electrons and protons appear in the Polar Cap region only after the solar proton events.

  14. The Possibility of Noninvasive Micron High Energy Electron Beam Size Measurement Using Diffraction Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Naumenko, Gennady; Aryshev, Alexander; Cline, David B; Fukui, Yasuo; Hamatsu, Ryosuke; Hayano, Hitoshi; Karataev, Pavel; Muto, Toshiya; Potylitsyn, Alexander; Ross, Marc; Urakawa, Junji

    2005-01-01

    During the last years a noninvasive method for beam size measurement based on the optical diffraction radiation (ODR) has been in progress (P. Karataev, et al., Physical Review Letters 93, 244802 (2004). However this technique encounters with hard sensitivity limitation for electron energies larger than several GeV. For example, for SLAC conditions the sensitivity of this method is 4 orders smaller than an appropriate one. We suggest to use a "dis-phased" slit target, where two semi-planes are turned with respect to each other at a small "dis-phased" angle. In order to ensure the interference between the diverged radiation beams we use a cylindrical lens. This method has much better sensitivity and resolution. A "dis-phased" angle 10 milliradians gives the optimal sensitivity to 5 microns transversal beam size. The theoretical model for calculating the ODR radiation from such targets (including focusing by cylindrical lens) is presented. It is shown that the sensitivity of this method does not depend on the L...

  15. Radiative transfer with POLARIS. I. Analysis of magnetic fields through synthetic dust continuum polarization measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissl, S.; Wolf, S.; Brauer, R.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We present POLARIS (POLArized RadIation Simulator), a newly developed three-dimensional Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code. POLARIS was designed to calculate dust temperature, polarization maps, and spectral energy distributions. It is optimized to handle data that results from sophisticated magneto-hydrodynamic simulations. The main purpose of the code is to prepare and analyze multi-wavelength continuum polarization measurements in the context of magnetic field studies in the interstellar medium. An exemplary application is the investigation of the role of magnetic fields in star formation processes. Methods: We combine currently discussed state-of-the-art grain alignment theories with existing dust heating and polarization algorithms. We test the POLARIS code on multiple scales in complex astrophysical systems that are associated with different stages of star formation. POLARIS uses the full spectrum of dust polarization mechanisms to trace the underlying magnetic field morphology. Results: Resulting temperature distributions are consistent with the density and position of radiation sources resulting from magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) - collapse simulations. The calculated layers of aligned dust grains in the considered cirumstellar disk models are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Finally, we compute unique patterns in synthetic multi-wavelength polarization maps that are dependent on applied dust-model and grain-alignment theory in analytical cloud models.

  16. Instrumentation for beam radiation and luminosity measurement in the CMS experiment using novel detector technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Guthoff, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    The higher energy and luminosity of the LHC initiated the development of dedicated technologies for radiation monitoring and luminosity measurement. A pixelated luminosity detector counts coincidences in several three layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to measure the luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. In addition, charged particle tracking allows to monitor the location of the collision point.The upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using 24 two pad single crystalline diamond sensors, equipped with a fast front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background.A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cerenkov light produced by relativistic charged particles in fused quartz crystals to provide direction sensitivity and time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles. The back-end electronics of the beam monitoring systems includes dedicated modules...

  17. Anomalous effects on radiation detectors and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milián-Sánchez, V.; Mocholí-Salcedo, A.; Milián, C.; Kolombet, V. A.; Verdú, G.

    2016-08-01

    We present experimental results showing certain anomalies in the measurements performed inside a modified Faraday cage of decay rates of Ra-226, Tl-204 and Sr-90/I-90, of the gamma spectrum of a Cs-137 preparation, and of the capacitance of both a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor and of the interconnection cable between the radiation detector and the scaler. Decay rates fluctuate significantly up to 5% around the initial value and differently depending on the type of nuclide, and the spectrum photopeak increases in 4.4%. In the case of the capacitor, direct capacitance measurements at 100 Hz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz show variations up to 0.7%, the most significant taking place at 100 Hz. In the case of the interconnection cable, the capacitance varies up to 1%. Dispersion also tends to increase inside the enclosure. However, the measured capacitance variations do not explain the variations observed in decay rates.

  18. Experimental measurement of radiation dose in a dedicated breast CT system

    CERN Document Server

    Shan-Wei, Shen; Hang, Shu; Xiao, Tang; Cun-Feng, Wei; Yu-Shou, Song; Rong-Jian, Shi; Long, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Radiation dose is an important performance indicator of a dedicated breast CT (DBCT). In this paper, the method of putting thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) into a breast shaped PMMA phantom to study the dose distribution in breasts was improved by using smaller TLDs and a new half-ellipsoid PMMA phantom. Then the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was introduced to average glandular assessment in DBCT for the first time and two measurement modes were proposed for different sizes of breasts. The dose deviations caused by using cylindrical phantoms were simulated using the Monte Carlo method and a set of correction factors were calculated. The results of the confirmatory measurement with a cylindrical phantom (11cm/8cm) show that CTDIw gives a relatively conservative overestimate of the average glandular dose comparing to the results of Monte Carlo simulation and TLDs measurement. But with better practicability and stability, the CTDIw is suitable for dose evaluations in daily clinical practice. Both of the TLDs ...

  19. Measurement of Elastic Properties of Tissue by Shear Wave Propagation Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaru, Marie; Azuma, Takashi; Hashiba, Kunio

    2010-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) imaging has been developed as a novel elastography technology to diagnose hepatic disease and breast cancer. The accuracy of shear wave speed estimation, which is one of the applications of ARF elastography, is studied. The Young's moduli of pig liver and foie gras samples estimated from the shear wave speed were compared with those measured the static Young's modulus measurement. The difference in the two methods was 8%. Distance attenuation characteristics of the shear wave were also studied using finite element method (FEM) analysis. We found that the differences in the axial and lateral beam widths in pressure and ARF are 16 and 9% at F-number=0.9. We studied the relationship between two branch points in distance attenuation characteristics and the shape of ARF. We found that the maximum measurable length to estimate shear wave speed for one ARF excitation was 8 mm.

  20. Simultaneous equatorial measurements of waves and precipitating electrons in the outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, W. L.; Robinson, R. M.; Collin, H. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Anderson, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous wave and precipitating electron measurements near the equator in the outer radiation belt have been made from the CRRES satellite. The electron data of principal concern here were acquired in and about the loss cone with narrow angular resolution spectrometers covering the energy range 340 eV to 5 MeV. The wave data included electric field measurements spanning frequencies from 5 Hz to 400 kHz and magnetic field measurements from 5 Hz to 10 kHz. This paper presents examples in which the variations in electron fluxes in the loss cone and the wave intensities were correlated. These variations in electron flux were confined to pitch angles less than about 30 deg. The association between the flux enhancements and the waves is consistent with wave-induced pitch angle diffusion processes.

  1. Measurement of neutron dose equivalent to proton therapy patients outside of the proton radiation field

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, X; Köhler, A; Newhauser, W D

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of neutron dose equivalent values and neutron spectral fluences close to but outside of the therapeutic proton radiation field are presented. The neutron spectral fluences were determined at five locations with Bonner sphere measurements and established by unfolding techniques. More than 50 additional neutron dose equivalent values were measured with LiI and BF sub 3 thermal neutron detectors surrounded by a 25 cm polyethylene moderating sphere. For a large-field treatment, typical values of neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic proton absorbed dose, H/D, at 50 cm distance from isocenter, range from 1 mSv/Gy (at 0 deg.with respect to the proton beam axis) to 5 mSv/Gy (at 90 deg.). Experiments reveal that H/D varies significantly with the treatment technique, e.g., patient orientation, proton beam energy, and range-modulation. The relative uncertainty in H/D values is approximately 40% (one standard deviation).

  2. Measurements of environmental radiation exposure dose rates at selected sites in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, W C; Penna-Franca, E; Ribeiro, C C; Nogueira, A R; Londres, H; Oliveira, A E

    1981-12-01

    Two types of portable instruments were developed by the former Health and Safety Laboratory of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to characterize external gamma radiation fields and to estimate individual exposure dose rates from major natural or fission radionuclides distributed in the soil: a pressurized ionization chamber and a NaI(T1) gamma-ray spectrometer. The two instruments were used to measure environmental radiation exposure rates at three distinct geological areas of Brazil: - in the towns of Guarapari and Meaípe located on the monazite sand belt, ES. - on the vicinities of the uranium mine of Poços de Caldas, MG. - around the site of the Brazilian first nuclear power plant, in Angra dos Reis, RJ. The radiometric survey demonstrated once more the usefulness and versatility of the two instruments used. The measurements around the nuclear installations of Poços de Caldas and Angra dos Reis, allowed a rapid assessment of the local radiation background and its variability, as well as the selection of stations for the routine monitoring program. Radioactive anomalies were detected and characterized previously to the start of plant operations. The survey in Guarapari and Meaípe confirmed the results obtained by Roser and Cullen in 1958 and 1962, except on sites where considerable changes took place since then. The spectrometric measurements gave estimations of the relative proportion of 40K, 238U and 232Th series in the ground and also indications on the homogeneity of their distribution in the soil.

  3. Bernoulli particle filter with observer altitude for maritime radiation source tracking in the presence of measurement uncertainty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Xiaobo; Fan Hongqi; Song Zhiyong; Fu Qiang

    2013-01-01

    For maritime radiation source target tracking in particular electronic counter measures (ECM) environment, there exists two main problems which can deteriorate the tracking perfor-mance of traditional approaches. The first problem is the poor observability of the radiation source. The second one is the measurement uncertainty which includes the uncertainty of the target appear-ing/disappearing and the detection uncertainty (false and missed detections). A novel approach is proposed in this paper for tracking maritime radiation source in the presence of measurement uncertainty. To solve the poor observability of maritime radiation source target, using the radiation source motion restriction, the observer altitude information is incorporated into the bearings-only tracking (BOT) method to obtain the unique target localization. Then the two uncertainties in the ECM environment are modeled by the random finite set (RFS) theory and the Bernoulli filtering method with the observer altitude is adopted to solve the tracking problem of maritime radiation source in such context. Simulation experiments verify the validity of the proposed approach for tracking maritime radiation source, and also demonstrate the superiority of the method compared with the traditional integrated probabilistic data association (IPDA) method. The tracking perfor-mance under different conditions, particularly those involving different duration of radiation source opening and switching-off, indicates that the method to solve our problem is robust and effective.

  4. Measurement of soil radioactivity levels and radiation hazard assessment in southern Rechna interfluvial region, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Arshed, Waheed; Bhatti, Arshad Saleem; Ahmad, Syed Salman; Akhter, Perveen; Rehman, Saeed-Ur; Anjum, Muhammad Iftikhar

    2010-10-01

    Rechna interfluvial region is one of the main regions of Punjab, Pakistan. It is the area which is lying between River Ravi and River Chenab, alluvial-filled. Radioactivity levels in soil samples, collected from southern Rechna interfluvial region, Pakistan, have been estimated by using gamma-ray spectrometric technique. (226)Ra, (232)Th, the primordial radionuclide (40)K, and the artificial radionuclide (137)Cs have been measured in the soil of the study area. The mean radioactivity levels of (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs were found to be 50.6 +/- 1.7, 62.3 +/- 3.2, 662.2 +/- 32.1, and 3.1 +/- 0.3 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The mean radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), outdoor radiation hazard index (H(out)), indoor radiation hazard index (H(in)), and terrestrial absorbed dose rate for the area under study were determined as 190.8 +/- 8.7 Bq kg(-1), 0.52, 0.65, and 69.8 nGy h(-1), respectively. The annual effective dose to the general public was found to be 0.43 mSv. This value lies well below the limit of 1 mSv for general public as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The measured values are comparable with other global radioactivity measurements and are found to be safe for the public and the environment.

  5. Measurement of amide hydrogen exchange rates with the use of radiation damping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing-Song; Lim, Jackwee; Yu, Binhan; Yang, Daiwen

    2011-09-01

    A simple method for measuring amide hydrogen exchange rates is presented, which is based on the selective inversion of water magnetization with the use of radiation damping. Simulations show that accurate exchange rates can be measured despite the complications of radiation damping and cross relaxation to the exchange process between amide and water protons. This method cannot eliminate the contributions of the exchange-relayed NOE and direct NOE to the measured exchange rates, but minimize the direct NOE contribution. In addition, the amides with a significant amount of such indirect contributions are possible to be identified from the shape of the exchange peak intensity profiles or/and from the apparent relaxation rates of amide protons which are extracted from fitting the intensity profiles to an equation established here for our experiment. The method was tested on ubiquitin and also applied to an acyl carrier protein. The amide exchange rates for the acyl carrier protein at two pHs indicate that the entire protein is highly dynamic on the second timescale. Low protection factors for the residues in the regular secondary structural elements also suggest the presence of invisible unfolded species. The highly dynamic nature of the acyl carrier protein may be crucial for its interactions with its substrate and enzymes.

  6. Measurements and simulations of the BLM response to a radiation field inside the CERF target area

    CERN Document Server

    Lebbos, E; Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Ferrari, A; Kramer, D; Nordt, A; Roeed, K; Roesler, S; Sapinski, M; Vlachoudis, V; CERN. Geneva. EN Department

    2010-01-01

    The CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility is installed in one of the secondary beam lines (H6) of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), in the North Experimental Area at CERN. This facility is used as a reference for testing, inter-comparing and calibrating passive and active instruments. In May 2009, the SPS provided a mixed hadron beam (protons, pions and kaons) during a few days, in order to perform several measurements with different devices such as the Radiation Protection Monitor used for residual dose rates due to Induced Radioactivity in the LHC (PMI), the Secondary Emission Monitor used for high beam losses (SEM), the Radiation Monitor for electronics (RadMon), and the Beam Loss Monitor for the LHC (BLM). This report focuses on the measurements of the BLM response during this year’s operation at CERF. The measurements evaluate the sensitivity of the BLM signal to the particle energy spectrum, with special attention to the contribution coming from thermal neutrons. For this purpose, meas...

  7. Indirect measurement of radiative capture cross sections relevant in astrophysical scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Ushasi Datta

    2007-07-01

    Radiative capture cross sections play a significant role in many cosmic phenomena, e.g. galactic evolution, star formation and planet formation etc. In explosive stellar burning scenarios, a large number of unstable nuclei play a crucial role, and reliable reaction cross sections are necessary for astrophysical model calculations, which will help in turn to understand the phenomena. A number of indirect methods are being explored by experimental nuclear physicists to avoid radioactive targets and other difficulties of direct measurements of radiative capture cross sections. The Coulomb dissociation of radioactive ion beams at intermediate energy is one of the most powerful indirect methods for measuring capture cross sections, and is being explored at various laboratories in the world. Here, a brief current status report is presented. This indirect method has a number of advantages compared to direct measurements, but there are also a number of limitations to this method with the presently available experimental facilities. A discussion on these aspects is given, together with an outlook on future experimental prospects.

  8. Inference of the microwave absorption coefficient from stray radiation measurements in Wendelstein 7-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseev, D.; Laqua, H. P.; Marsen, S.; Marushchenko, N.; Stange, T.; Braune, H.; Gellert, F.; Hirsch, M.; Hoefel, U.; Knauer, J.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Turkin, Y.; The Wendelstein 7-X Team

    2017-03-01

    The efficiency of electron cyclotron heating is determined by the microwave absorption of the plasma. Good microwave absorption is also crucial for the machine safety. In this paper we present a method of evaluating the microwave absorption coefficient from stray radiation measurements. The discussed method is computationally simple and can be applied potentially in real time. Evolution of the second harmonic extraordinary mode (X2) microwave absorption coefficient in Wendelstein 7-X during the start-up phase is presented, as well as an estimate of the absorption coefficient for the second harmonic ordinary mode (O2) wave.

  9. Continuous Water Vapor Profiles for the Fixed Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Troyan, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2006-01-09

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program defined a specific metric for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2006 to complete a continuous time series of the vertical profile of water vapor for selected 30-day periods from each of the fixed ARM sites. In order to accomplish this metric, a new technique devised to incorporate radiosonde data, microwave radiometer data and analysis information from numerical weather forecast models has been developed. The product of this analysis, referred to as the merged sounding value-added product, includes vertical profiles of atmospheric water vapor concentration and several other important thermodynamic state variables at 1-minute time intervals and 266 vertical levels.

  10. Radiative Lifetime Measurements of Even-Parity Levels of Singly Ionized Erbium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huai-Liang(徐淮良); JIANG Hong-Mei(蒋红梅); LIU Qian(刘倩); JIANG Zhan-Kui(蒋占魁); S.Svanberg

    2004-01-01

    Radiative lifetime measurements were performed by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for eight even-parity levels of the astrophysically importantion Er+ over the energy range from 33753 to 55317 cm-1.Free erbium ions were generated by a laser-induced plasma. A narrow bandwidth UV laser pulse (1 ns) was employed to populate selectively the short-lived upper levels, and the lifetime value were evaluated from the time-resolved fluorescence signals. The lifetimes reported fall in the range of 3-35 ns with the experimental accuracy 5-8%.

  11. Radon measurements by etched track detectors applications in radiation protection, earth sciences and the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Durrani, Saeed A

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to radon gas, which is present in the environment naturally, constitutes over half the radiation dose received by the general public annually. At present, the most widely used method of measuring radon concentration levels throughout the world, both in dwellings and in the field, is by etched track detectors - also known as Solid State Nuclear Detectors (SSNTDs). Although this is not only the most widely used method but is also the simplest and the cheapest, yet there is at present no book available on the market globally, devoted exclusively or largely to the methodology of, and deal

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-10-10

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2013-01-11

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  14. Space charge effect measurements for a multi-channel ionization chamber used for synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr, Amgad

    2012-07-18

    In vivo coronary angiography is one of the techniques used to investigate the heart diseases, by using catheter to inject a contrast medium of a given absorption coefficient into the heart vessels. Taking X-ray images produced by X-ray tube or synchrotron radiation for visualizing the blood in the coronary arteries. As the synchrotron radiation generated by the relativistic charged particle at the bending magnets, which emits high intensity photons in comparison with the X-ray tube. The intensity of the synchrotron radiation is varies with time. However for medical imaging it's necessary to measure the incoming intensity with the integrated time. The thesis work includes building a Multi-channel ionization chamber which can be filled with noble gases N{sub 2}, Ar and Xe with controlled inner pressure up to 30 bar. This affects the better absorption efficiency in measuring the high intensity synchrotron beam fluctuation. The detector is a part of the experimental setup used in the k-edge digital subtraction angiography project, which will be used for correcting the angiography images taken by another detector at the same time. The Multi-channel ionization chamber calibration characteristics are measured using 2 kW X-ray tube with molybdenum anode with characteristic energy of 17.44 keV. According to the fast drift velocity of the electrons relative to the positive ions, the electrons will be collected faster at the anode and will induce current signals, while the positive ions is still drifting towards the cathode. However the accumulation of the slow ions inside the detector disturbs the homogeneous applied electric field and leads to what is known a space charge effect. In this work the space charge effect is measured with very high synchrotron photons intensity from EDR beam line at BESSYII. The strong attenuation in the measured amplitude signal occurs when operating the chamber in the recombination region. A plateau is observed at the amplitude signal when

  15. Long wavelength infrared radiation thermometry for non-contact temperature measurements in gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, J.; Zipf, M.; Stark, T.; Arduini, M.; Ebert, H.-P.; Tutschke, A.; Hallam, A.; Hanspal, J.; Langley, M.; Hodge, D.; Hartmann, J.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the EU project "Sensors Towards Advanced Monitoring and Control of Gas Turbine Engines (acronym STARGATE)" is the development of a suite of advanced sensors, instrumentation and related systems in order to contribute to the developing of the next generation of green and efficient gas turbine engines. One work package of the project deals with the design and development of a long wavelength infrared (LWIR) radiation thermometer for the non-contact measurement of the surface temperature of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during the operation of gas turbine engines. For opaque surfaces (e.g. metals or superalloys) radiation thermometers which are sensitive in the near or short wavelength infrared are used as state-of-the-art method for non-contact temperature measurements. But this is not suitable for oxide ceramic based TBCs (e.g. partially yttria stabilized zirconia) as oxide ceramics are semi-transparent in the near and short wavelength infrared spectral region. Fortunately the applied ceramic materials are non-transparent in the long wavelength infrared and additionally exhibit a high emittance in this wavelength region. Therefore, a LWIR pyrometer can be used for non-contact temperature measurements of the surfaces of TBCs as such pyrometers overcome the described limitation of existing techniques. For performing non-contact temperature measurements in gas turbines one has to know the infrared-optical properties of the applied TBCs as well as of the hot combustion gas in order to properly analyse the measurement data. For reaching a low uncertainty on the one hand the emittance of the TBC should be high (>0.9) in order to reduce reflections from the hot surrounding and on the other hand the absorbance of the hot combustion gas should be low (<0.1) in order to decrease the influence of the gas on the measured signal. This paper presents the results of the work performed by the authors with focus on the implementation of the LWIR pyrometer and the

  16. Climatological and radiative properties of midlatitude cirrus clouds derived by automatic evaluation of lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienast-Sjögren, Erika; Rolf, Christian; Seifert, Patric; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Luo, Bei P.; Krämer, Martina; Peter, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus, i.e., high, thin clouds that are fully glaciated, play an important role in the Earth's radiation budget as they interact with both long- and shortwave radiation and affect the water vapor budget of the upper troposphere and stratosphere. Here, we present a climatology of midlatitude cirrus clouds measured with the same type of ground-based lidar at three midlatitude research stations: at the Swiss high alpine Jungfraujoch station (3580 m a.s.l.), in Zürich (Switzerland, 510 m a.s.l.), and in Jülich (Germany, 100 m a.s.l.). The analysis is based on 13 000 h of measurements from 2010 to 2014. To automatically evaluate this extensive data set, we have developed the Fast LIdar Cirrus Algorithm (FLICA), which combines a pixel-based cloud-detection scheme with the classic lidar evaluation techniques. We find mean cirrus optical depths of 0.12 on Jungfraujoch and of 0.14 and 0.17 in Zürich and Jülich, respectively. Above Jungfraujoch, subvisible cirrus clouds (τ change in cloud morphology at Jungfraujoch above ˜ 13 km, possibly because high particle number densities form in the observed cirrus clouds, when many ice crystals nucleate in the high supersaturations following rapid uplifts in lee waves above mountainous terrain. The retrieved optical properties are used as input for a radiative transfer model to estimate the net cloud radiative forcing, CRFNET, for the analyzed cirrus clouds. All cirrus detected here have a positive CRFNET. This confirms that these thin, high cirrus have a warming effect on the Earth's climate, whereas cooling clouds typically have cloud edges too low in altitude to satisfy the FLICA criterion of temperatures below -38 °C. We find CRFNET = 0.9 W m-2 for Jungfraujoch and 1.0 W m-2 (1.7 W m-2) for Zürich (Jülich). Further, we calculate that subvisible cirrus (τ < 0.03) contribute about 5 %, thin cirrus (0.03 < τ < 0.3) about 45 %, and opaque cirrus (0.3 < τ) about 50 % of the total cirrus radiative forcing.

  17. Measurement and Analysis of the Noise Radiated by Low Mach Number Centrifugal Blowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, David Marvin

    An investigation was performed of the broad band, aerodynamically generated noise in low tip-speed Mach number, centrifugal air moving devices. An interdisciplinary experimental approach was taken which involved investigation of the aerodynamic and acoustic fields, and their mutual relationship. The noise generation process was studied using two experimental vehicles: (1) a scale model of a homologous family of centrifugal blowers typical of those used to cool computer and business equipment, and (2) a single blade from a centrifugal blower impeller placed in a known, controllable flow field. The radiation characteristics of the model blower were investigated by measuring the acoustic intensity distribution near the blower inlet and comparing it with the intensity near the inlet to an axial flow fan. Results showed that the centrifugal blower is a distributed, random noise source, unlike an axial fan which exhibited the effects of a coherent, interacting source distribution. Aerodynamic studies of the flow field in the inlet and at the discharge to the rotating impeller were used to assess the mean flow distribution through the impeller blade channels and to identify regions of excessive turbulence near the rotating blade row. Both circumferential and spanwise mean flow nonuniformities were identified along with a region of increased turbulence just downstream of the scroll cutoff. The fluid incidence angle, normally taken as an indicator of blower performance, was estimated from mean flow data as deviating considerably from an ideal impeller design. An investigation of the noise radiated from the single, isolated airfoil was performed using modern correlation and spectral analysis techniques. Radiation from the single blade in flow was characterized using newly developed expressions for the correlation area and the dipole source strength per unit area, and from the relationship between the blade surface pressure and the incident turbulent flow field. Results

  18. Discovery of A New Retrograde Trans-Neptunian Object: Hint of A Common Orbital Plane for Low Semi-Major Axis, High Inclination TNOs and Centaurs

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ying-Tung; Holman, Matthew J; Payne, Matthew J; Fraser, Wesley C; Lacerda, Pedro; Ip, Wing-Huen; Chen, Wen-Ping; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Wainscoat, Richard J; Tonry, John L; Magnier, Eugene A; Waters, Christopher; Kaiser, Nick; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Lehner, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Although the majority of Centaurs are thought to have originated in the scattered disk, with the high-inclination members coming from the Oort cloud, the origin of the high inclination component of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) remains uncertain. We report the discovery of a retrograde TNO, which we nickname "Niku", detected by the Pan-STARRS 1 Outer Solar System Survey. Our numerical integrations show that the orbital dynamics of Niku are very similar to that of 2008 KV$_{42}$ (Drac), with a half-life of $\\sim 500$ Myr. Comparing similar high inclination TNOs and Centaurs ($q > 10$ AU, $a 60^\\circ$), we find that these objects exhibit a surprising clustering of ascending node, and occupy a common orbital plane. This orbital configuration has high statistical significance: 3.8-$\\sigma$. An unknown mechanism is required to explain the observed clustering. This discovery may provide a pathway to investigate a possible reservoir of high-inclination objects.

  19. Small and useful. A comparative evaluation of hand radiation measurement devices; Klein und nuetzlich. Handeinstrahlungsmessgeraete im Vergleich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinreich, Bernhard

    2009-05-15

    They exist at least as long as the photovoltaic industry itself, however they are not spread too much - we talk about hand radiation measurement devices. These devices originally come from the field of meteorology. Even though they measure the most important magnitude in the field of photovoltaics at all, namely the global radiation, the eke out a wretched existence. Hence it's about high time to draw the attention to these helpers. (orig.)

  20. Verification of absorbed dose rates in reference beta radiation fields: Measurements with an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaldo, S R; Benavente, J A; Da Silva, T A

    2016-11-01

    Beta Secondary Standard 2 (BSS 2) provides beta radiation fields with certified values of absorbed dose to tissue and the derived operational radiation protection quantities. As part of the quality assurance, the reliability of the CDTN BSS2 system was verified through measurements in the (90)Sr/(90)Y and (85)Kr beta radiation fields. Absorbed dose rates and their angular variation were measured with a 23392 model PTW extrapolation chamber and with Gafchromic radiochromic films on a PMMA slab phantom. The feasibility of using both methods was analyzed.

  1. Measurement of personal dose equivalent of X and gamma radiation by ring dosimeter: Results of intercomparison measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Adamowicz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to present the results of the interlaboratory comparisons for ring dosimeters and to confirm that the applied method is suitable for measuring the personal dose equivalent HP(0.07. In addition, calibration procedures used in dosimetric measurements in persons occupationally exposed to ionizing photon radiation X and γ were presented. Materials and Methods: Ring dosimeters made of flexible plastics with the diameter of approximately 20 mm, equipped with two thermoluminescence (TL detectors type MTS-N, were the subject of interlaboratory comparisons. Irradiated detectors were red out using a new manual TLD's reader (FIMEL, France. All TLD exposures were done for validation of TLD readers and were performed using the reference X-ray and γ beams with the ISO rod phantom. The methodology of performed exposures corresponded with the methods applied by the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS, the European organizer of interlaboratory comparisons. Results: The energy, dose and angular characteristics of the ring dosimeter allowed to elaborate the formula for estimating and verifying the personal dose equivalent HP(0.07. The test was performed to check and confirm the correctness of the estimated characteristics. The test results were satisfactory, and thus the readiness to implement TLD reader in the used method and to participate in interlaboratory comparisons was confirmed. Conclusions: According to the requirements of the Polish Centre for Accreditation, the laboratory was participating in the interlaboratory comparison organized by EURADOS in terms of the personal dose equivalent HP(0.07. The result of the comparison was satisfactory, therefore the correctness of the testing procedure was confirmed. Med Pr 2013;64(5:631–637

  2. Evaluation of detectors for the small field measurements used for clinical radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Miljenko

    Advanced radiation therapy treatments with very small field sizes are complex. Increasingly higher doses delivered in single or few fractions are being commonly used for the treatments of the small target volume. Absolute or relative small field dosimetry is difficult due to radiation transport. Therefore it is very important to understand characteristics of the small field, detector selection as well as correction factors that have to be taken into account for the accurate measurements. Reducing uncertainty in relative dose measurement and modeling dose on treatment planning systems are factors contributing to the accuracy of the small field radiation treatments. Several challenges in small field dosimetry arise because of the lack of lateral charge particle equilibrium as well as the occlusion of the direct photon beam source and collimator settings. Presence of low-density media in irradiation geometry does complicate dosimetry even more. All those conditions are representing the challenge when it comes to dosimetric measurements. Size and construction are crucial when it comes to choice of the detector. Depending on beam energy, resolving the beam profile and penumbra for the small field sizes are a challenge and practically impossible with detectors commonly used in clinics. With decreasing field size and due to changes in particle spectrum, variations in radiological parameters have to be taken into account. To measure percent depth dose, tissue maximum ratios, tissue phantom ratios as well as output factors for the small field size experimental studies and Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted to determine appropriate detectors for the measurements. The primary goal of Specific Aim 1 was experimental quantification of the performance parameters for single detectors used for dosimetric verification of the small fields in radiotherapy. The proposed method and qualitative value for appropriate detectors selection defined by field size has been set. The

  3. The Dynamics of Centaurs in the Vicinity of the 2:1 Mean Motion Resonance of Neptune and Uranus Trojan Region

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the results of a suite of dynamical simulations following the orbital evolution of 8,022 hypothetical Centaur objects. These Centaurs begin our integrations on orbits in the vicinity of the 2:1 mean motion resonance with Neptune, and we follow their dynamical evolution for a period of 3 Myr under the gravitational influence of a motionless Sun and the four Jovian planets. The great majority of the test particles studied rapidly escaped from the vicinity of the 2:1 mean motion resonance of Neptune and diffused throughout the Solar System. The average libration time of Centaurs in the vicinity of 2:1 mean motion resonance of Neptune was found to be just 27 kyr. Although two particles did remain near the resonance for more than 1 Myr. Upon leaving the vicinity of the 2:1 resonance, the majority of test particles evolved by a process of random walk in semi-major axis, due to repeated close encounters with the giant planets.

  4. On the Thematic Mode and Narrative Patterns of The Centaur%论《马人》的主题和叙事模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦丹丹

    2016-01-01

    In light of Northrop Frye's theory on romance, the present thesis sets out to analyze the the-matic mode as well as the narrative patterns of John Updike's The Centaur. True to the traditional quest motif, The Centaur demonstrates fidelity to God-centered myth by embodying Greek characters and plots. At the same time, it is also a parody of the quest myth. For its simultaneous treatment of both Gods in myth and men in novel, The Centaur is a typical American romance.%从弗莱的罗曼司理论出发,分析厄普代克《马人》的主题和叙事模式.回溯传统、忠实于神话原型的《马人》在主题上延续传统文学的追寻母题.与此同时,文本又多处对追寻母题进行戏仿.这是一部游离于真实和神话世界之间、横亘于以人为本的小说和以神为本的神话之间的文本罗曼司.

  5. Radiative emission of solar features in the Ca II K line: comparison of measurements and models

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolli, I; Uitenbroek, H; Giorgi, F; Rast, M P; Solanki, S K

    2010-01-01

    We study the radiative emission of various types of solar features, such as quiet Sun, enhanced network, plage, and bright plage regions, identified on filtergrams taken in the Ca II K line. We analysed fulldisk images obtained with the PSPT, by using three interference filters that sample the Ca II K line with different bandpasses. We studied the dependence of the radiative emission of disk features on the filter bandpass. We also performed a NLTE spectral synthesis of the Ca II K line integrated over the bandpass of PSPT filters. The synthesis was carried out by utilizing both the PRD and CRD with the most recent set of semi­empirical atmosphere models in the literature and some earlier atmosphere models. We measured the CLV of intensity values for various solar features identified on PSPT images and compared the results obtained with those derived from the synthesis. We find that CRD calculations derived using the most recent quiet Sun model, on average, reproduce the measured values of the quiet Sun regi...

  6. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    CERN Document Server

    Alarcon, R; Benson, S.V.; Bertozzi, W.; Boyce, J.R.; Cowan, R.; Douglas, D.; Evtushenko, P.; Fisher, P.; Ihloff, E.; Kalantarians, N.; Kelleher, A.; Kossler, W.J.; Legg, R.; Long, E.; Milner, R.G.; Neil, G.R.; Ou, L.; Schmookler, B.; Tennant, C.; TschaläR, C.; Williams, G.P.; Zhang, S.

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is ...

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Chuck [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.

    2016-07-01

    Every 30–90 days during the Northern Hemisphere winter, the equatorial tropical atmosphere experiences pulses of extraordinarily strong deep convection and rainfall. This phenomenon is referred to as the Madden–Julian Oscillation, or MJO, named after the scientists who identified this cycle. The MJO significantly affects weather and rainfall patterns around the world (Zhang 2013). To improve predictions of the MJO—especially about how it forms and evolves throughout its lifecycle—an international group of scientists collected an unprecedented set of observations from the Indian Ocean and western Pacific region from October 2011 through March 2012 through several coordinated efforts. The coordinated field campaigns captured six distinct MJO cycles in the Indian Ocean. The rich set of observations capturing several MJO events from these efforts will be used for many years to study the physics of the MJO. Here we highlight early research results using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment (AMIE), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility.

  8. Personal reflections on the highlights and changes in radiation and radioisotope measurement applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Robin P.; Lee, Kyoung O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes the recent changes that the authors have perceived in the use of radiation and radioisotope measurement applications. The first change is that due to the increased use of Monte Carlo simulation which has occurred from a normal evolutionary process. This is due in large part to the increased accuracy that is being obtained by the use of detector response functions (DRFs) and the simultaneous increased computational efficiency that has become available with these DRFs, the availability of a greatly improved weight windows variance reduction method, and the availability of inexpensive computer clusters. This first change is a happy one. The other change that is occurring is in response to recent terrorist activities. That change is the replacement or major change in the use of long-lived radioisotopes in radioisotope measurement and other radioisotope source applications. In general this can be done by improving the security of these radioisotope sources or by replacing them altogether by using machine sources of radiation. In either case one would like to preclude altogether or at least minimize the possibility of terrorists being able to obtain radioisotopes and use them for clandestine purposes.

  9. Measurement Of Electromagnetic Field Radiation In The Internet Halls And Educational Computer Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Thiab Hasan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available     There are more concerns about possible health effects related to electromagnetic fields from computer monitors and other video display terminals because of the widespread using of computers in laboratories ,offices and internet halls. This research aims to detect the effect of electromagnetic field radiations in these halls and laboratories and study the successful ways of minimizing its negative  health  effect on human health. The research has been performed on both the mathematical calculations and practical measurements. The obtaining results show that the practical measurements are consistent with the  mathematical calculations results. Comparison of  these results with the safety standard guideline  limits shows that they are within the acceptable exposuring limits recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection  (ICNIRP and that means there is no health risk from exposure to these fields if the exposure is within the acceptable limits.     

  10. Time-Resolved Measurement of Radiatively Heated Iron 2p-3d Transmission Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yang; SHANG Wan-Li; XIONG Gang; JIN Feng-Tao; HU Zhi-Min; WEI Min-Xi; YANG Guo-Hong; ZHANG Ji-Yan; YANG Jia-Min

    2010-01-01

    @@ An experimental measurement of radiatively heated iron plasma transmission spectra was performed on Shenguang Ⅱ laser facility.In the measurement,the self-emission spectrum,the backlighting spectrum,and the absorption spectrum were imaged with a fiat filed grating and recorded on a gated micro channel plate detector to obtain the time-resolved transmission spectra in the range 10-20 A (approximately 0.6-1.3 keV).Experimental results are compared with the calculation results of an unsolved transition array (UTA) code.The time-dependent relative shift in the positions of the 2p-3d transmission array is interpreted in terms of the plasma temperature variations.

  11. Method for measuring violin sound radiation based on bowed glissandi and its application to sound synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Carrillo, Alfonso; Bonada, Jordi; Patynen, Jukka; Valimaki, Vesa

    2011-08-01

    This work presents a method for measuring and computing violin-body directional frequency responses, which are used for violin sound synthesis. The approach is based on a frame-weighted deconvolution of excitation and response signals. The excitation, consisting of bowed glissandi, is measured with piezoelectric transducers built into the bridge. Radiation responses are recorded in an anechoic chamber with multiple microphones placed at different angles around the violin. The proposed deconvolution algorithm computes impulse responses that, when convolved with any source signal (captured with the same transducer), produce a highly realistic violin sound very similar to that of a microphone recording. The use of motion sensors allows for tracking violin movements. Combining this information with the directional responses and using a dynamic convolution algorithm, helps to improve the listening experience by incorporating the violinist motion effect in stereo.

  12. An empirical approach to the measurement of the cosmic radiation field at jet aircraft altitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Green, A R; Lewis, B J; Kitching, F; McCall, M J; Desormeaux, M; Butler, A A

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at the Royal Military College of Canada have accumulated extensive dose measurements performed at jet altitudes on over 160 flights and with a wide variety of detectors including a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), a smart wide energy neutron detection instrument (SWENDI), bubble detectors, thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and an ion chamber. The summation of the individual low and high LET results from the latter equipment compared successfully to those from the TEPC on each flight. The data from these numerous worldwide flights have been encapsulated into a program that calculates the radiation dose for any flight in the world at any period in the solar cycle. This experimentally based program, Predictive Code for AIRcrew Exposure (PCAIRE) has been designed to be used by the airline industry to meet national dosimetry requirements. In Canada, for example, such a code can be used, supported by periodic measurements. With this latter requirement in mind and a desire to decrease equip...

  13. An experiment to measure the one-way velocity of propagation of electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolen, P.; Torr, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment involving commercially available instrumentation to measure the velocity of the earth with respect to absolute space is described. The experiment involves the measurement of the one-way propagation velocity of electromagnetic radiation down a high-quality coaxial cable. It is demonstrated that the experiment is both physically meaningful and exceedingly simple in concept and in implementation. It is shown that with currently available commercial equipment one might expect to detect a threshold value for the component of velocity of the earth's motion with respect to absolute space in the equatorial plane of approximately 10 km/s, which greatly exceeds the velocity resolution required to detect the motion of the solar system with respect to the center of the galaxy.

  14. Quasi-real-time photon pulse duration measurement by analysis of FEL radiation spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Robin, E-mail: robin.engel@uni-oldenburg.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany); Düsterer, Stefan; Brenner, Günter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Teubner, Ulrich [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Considering the second-order spectral correlation function of SASE-FEL radiation allows a real-time observation of the photon pulse duration during spectra acquisition. For photon diagnostics at free-electron lasers (FELs), the determination of the photon pulse duration is an important challenge and a complex task. This is especially true for SASE FELs with strongly fluctuating pulse parameters. However, most techniques require an extensive experimental setup, data acquisition and evaluation time, limiting the usability in all-day operation. In contrast, the presented work uses an existing approach based on the analysis of statistical properties of measured SASE FEL spectra and implements it as a software tool, integrated in FLASH’s data acquisition system. This allows the calculation of the average pulse durations from a set of measured spectral distributions with only seconds of delay, whenever high-resolution spectra are recorded.

  15. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3mm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anistropy at 90 GHz (3 mm wavelength) is 2.82 +- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anistropy of 3.48 +- mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.7/sup 0/ +- 1.8/sup 0/ declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anistropy. 22 figures, 17 tables.

  16. Determining astrophysical three-body radiative capture reaction rates from inclusive Coulomb break-up measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Casal, J; Arias, J M; Gómez-Camacho, J

    2016-01-01

    A relationship between the Coulomb inclusive break-up probability and the radiative capture reaction rate for weakly-bound three-body systems is established. This direct link provides a robust procedure to estimate the reaction rate for nuclei of astrophysical interest by measuring inclusive break-up processes at different energies and angles. This might be an advantageous alternative to the determination of reaction rates from the measurement of $B(E1)$ distributions through exclusive Coulomb break-up experiments. In addition, it provides a reference to assess the validity of different theoretical approaches that have been used to calculate reaction rates. The procedure is applied to $^{11}$Li ($^{9}$Li+n+n) and $^6$He ($^{4}$He+n+n) three-body systems for which some data exist.

  17. Determining astrophysical three-body radiative capture reaction rates from inclusive Coulomb break-up measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, J.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.; Arias, J. M.; Gómez-Camacho, J.

    2016-04-01

    A relationship between the Coulomb inclusive break-up probability and the radiative capture reaction rate for weakly bound three-body systems is established. This direct link provides a robust procedure to estimate the reaction rate for nuclei of astrophysical interest by measuring inclusive break-up processes at different energies and angles. This might be an advantageous alternative to the determination of reaction rates from the measurement of B (E 1 ) distributions through exclusive Coulomb break-up experiments. In addition, it provides a reference to assess the validity of different theoretical approaches that have been used to calculate reaction rates. The procedure is applied to 11Li (9Li+n +n ) and 6He (4He+n +n ) three-body systems for which some data exist.

  18. Second Order Harmonics Suppression With Glass Filters for Synchrotron UV Radiation Calibration Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Burattini, E; Gambicorti, L; Malvezzi, F; Marcelli, A; Monti, F; Pace, E

    2005-01-01

    This development is the latest result of the cooperation between the National Laboratories of Frascati and the Department of Astronomy and Space Science of the University of Florence to improve the capabilities of the existing DXR-2 beam line at the DAΦNE-LIGHT laboratories. This collaboration has assessed a new facility in order to characterize optics and sensors in a wide spectral range (ranging from VUV to IR). Previous measurements [1] have highlighted some limitations in the present setup, as higher signal levels due to the diffracted radiation of the grating in the second order have to be removed to allow an accurate detection. In this work a glass filter is used to remove such spurious signal present in the spectral region with λ > 360 nm. The characteristics of the filter and its application to the optical system used to measure the sensitivity of a diamond-based photoconductor have been discussed.

  19. Outdoor workers' acceptance of personal protective measures against solar ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Marko; Uller, Andreas; Schulmeister, Karl; Brusl, Helmut; Hann, Hans; Kindl, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The acceptance and usability of personal protection against solar UV radiation was evaluated in a field study with a group of tinsmiths in Austria. The personal protective measures (PPM) tested involved four categories: shirts, headwear, sunglasses and topically applied sunscreens; at least six different products per category were tested. Recommendations for the "ideal" shirt, headwear, pair of sunglasses and topical sunscreen are given based on data from questionnaires, i.e., from the point of view of the workers, independently from the actual physical level of protection (such as low transmittance or area of coverage) provided. It is argued that in practice it is important to consider the acceptance and usability of protective measures as well as the level of physical protection when providing PPM.

  20. Optical transition radiation measurements for the Los Alamos and Boeing Free-Electron Laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Feldman, D.W.; Apgar, S.A.; Calsten, B.E.; Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) measurements of the electron-beam emittance have been performed at a location just before the wiggler in the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. Beam profiles and beam divergence patterns from a single macropulse were recorded simultaneously using two intensified charge-injection device (CID) television cameras and an optical beamsplitter. Both single-foil OTR and two-foil OTR interference experiments were performed. Preliminary results are compared to a reference variable quadrupole, single screen technique. New aspects of using OTR properties for pointing the e-beam on the FEL oscillator axis, as well as measuring e-beam emittance are addressed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  1. A review of measurement-based assessments of the aerosol direct radiative effect and forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols affect the Earth's energy budget directly by scattering and absorbing radiation and indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and, thereby, affecting cloud properties. However, large uncertainties exist in current estimates of aerosol forcing because of incomplete knowledge concerning the distribution and the physical and chemical properties of aerosols as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. In recent years, a great deal of effort has gone into improving measurements and datasets. It is thus feasible to shift the estimates of aerosol forcing from largely model-based to increasingly measurement-based. Our goal is to assess current observational capabilities and identify uncertainties in the aerosol direct forcing through comparisons of different methods with independent sources of uncertainties. Here we assess the aerosol optical depth (τ, direct radiative effect (DRE by natural and anthropogenic aerosols, and direct climate forcing (DCF by anthropogenic aerosols, focusing on satellite and ground-based measurements supplemented by global chemical transport model (CTM simulations. The multi-spectral MODIS measures global distributions of aerosol optical depth (τ on a daily scale, with a high accuracy of ±0.03±0.05τ over ocean. The annual average τ is about 0.14 over global ocean, of which about 21%±7% is contributed by human activities, as estimated by MODIS fine-mode fraction. The multi-angle MISR derives an annual average AOD of 0.23 over global land with an uncertainty of ~20% or ±0.05. These high-accuracy aerosol products and broadband flux measurements from CERES make it feasible to obtain observational constraints for the aerosol direct effect, especially over global the ocean. A number of measurement-based approaches estimate the clear-sky DRE (on solar radiation at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA to be about -5.5±0.2 Wm-2 (median ± standard error from various methods over the global ocean. Accounting for thin cirrus

  2. Design of x-ray diagnostic beam line for a synchrotron radiation source and measurement results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Akash Deep; Karnewar, A. K.; Ojha, A.; Shrivastava, B. B.; Holikatti, A. C.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Navathe, C. P.

    2014-08-01

    Indus-2 is a 2.5 GeV synchrotron radiation source (SRS) operational at the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) in India. We have designed, developed and commissioned x-ray diagnostic beam line (X-DBL) at the Indus-2. It is based on pinhole array imaging (8-18 keV). We have derived new equations for online measurements of source position and emission angle with pinhole array optics. Measured values are compared with the measurements at an independent x-ray beam position monitor (staggered pair blade monitor) installed in the X-DBL. The measured values are close to the theoretical expected values within ±12 μm (or ±1.5 μrad) for sufficiently wide range of the beam movements. So, beside the beam size and the beam emittance, online information for the vertical position and angle is also used in the orbit steering. In this paper, the various design considerations of the X-DBL and online measurement results are presented.

  3. Monte Carlo study of the measurement of the Michel parameters in the radiative decay of the τ at Belle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, N.; Aihara, H.; Epifanov, D.

    2016-07-01

    Michel parameters are kinematic values defined as bilinear combinations of the coupling terms in the general matrix element of the Fermi interaction where all possible Lorentz-invariant scalar, vector and tensor terms are included. The leptonic τ decays provide an excellent laboratory in which to measure the Michel parameters. Any deviation of these parameters from the Standard Model expectation would indicate New Physics. Two Michel parameters, η bar and ξκ, can only be measured in the radiative leptonic decay. These parameters have previously been measured in the radiative decay of the muon but as yet have not been measured in τ decays. We report the results of a feasibility study of the measurement of η bar and ξκ in radiative leptonic τ decays at Belle and Belle II.

  4. Hepatic CT perfusion measurements: A feasibility study for radiation dose reduction using new image reconstruction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negi, Noriyuki, E-mail: noriyuki@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Kobe University Hospital, 7-5-2 Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi, E-mail: yoshikawa0816@aol.com [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Kobe University Hospital, 7-5-2 Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Somiya, Yuichiro, E-mail: somiya13@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Kobe University Hospital, 7-5-2 Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Sekitani, Toshinori, E-mail: atieinks-toshi@nifty.com [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Sugihara, Naoki, E-mail: naoki.sugihara@toshiba.co.jp [Toshiba Medical Systems Co., 1385 Shimoishigami, Otawara 324-0036 (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu, E-mail: hkoyama@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Kanda, Tomonori, E-mail: k_a@hotmail.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Kanata, Naoki, E-mail: takikina12345@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Murakami, Tohru, E-mail: mura@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Kobe University Hospital, 7-5-2 Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Kawamitsu, Hideaki, E-mail: kawamitu@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Kobe University Hospital, 7-5-2 Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro, E-mail: sugimura@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunokicho, Chuoku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To assess the effects of image reconstruction method on hepatic CT perfusion (CTP) values using two CT protocols with different radiation doses. Materials and methods: Sixty patients underwent hepatic CTP and were randomly divided into two groups. Tube currents of 210 or 250 mA were used for the standard dose group and 120 or 140 mA for the low dose group. The higher currents were selected for large patients. Demographic features of the groups were compared. CT images were reconstructed by using filtered back projection (FBP), image filter (quantum de-noising, QDS), and adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR). Hepatic arterial and portal perfusion (HAP and HPP, ml/min/100 ml) and arterial perfusion fraction (APF, %) were calculated using the dual-input maximum slope method. ROIs were placed on each hepatic segment. Perfusion and Hounsfield unit (HU) values, and image noises (standard deviations of HU value, SD) were measured and compared between the groups and among the methods. Results: There were no significant differences in the demographic features of the groups, nor were there any significant differences in mean perfusion and HU values for either the groups or the image reconstruction methods. Mean SDs of each of the image reconstruction methods were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) for the standard dose group than the low dose group, while mean SDs for AIDR were significantly lower than those for FBP for both groups (p = 0.0006 and 0.013). Radiation dose reductions were approximately 45%. Conclusions: Image reconstruction method did not affect hepatic perfusion values calculated by dual-input maximum slope method with or without radiation dose reductions. AIDR significantly reduced images noises.

  5. Application of red and near infrared emission from rare earth ions for radiation measurements based on optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, E.; Hosono, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Nakazawa, M. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science; Kakuta, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Yamazaki, M. [Sumita Optical Glass, Inc., Urawa, Saitama (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    When optical fiber radiation measurements are applied for a high dose rate area, there has been a problem of radiation induced loss in the optical fibers. In this study, red and near infrared (IR) fluorescence from rare earth ions has been used to reduce the problem. From continuous measurements using Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Pr{sup 3+}, the superiority of using long wavelength emission has been shown from the view point of radiation hardness. Linear relation between dose rate and peak counts was confirmed and it shows the possibility of using the long wavelength emission for radiation measurements. For calibration of the radiation induced loss, the Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR) technique has been applied. It has been shown that this method can broaden the dose rate limit of the optical fiber based measurements. Also, glass samples doped with rare-earth ions have been made and irradiated by gamma rays. Emission at longer wavelength than 700 nm has been observed for Eu{sup 3+} ions doped into silica, fluorophosphate and ZBLAN glass samples. Considering that it is easy to make silica glass and to connect it to usual silica glass optical fiber, silica glass doped with Eu{sup 3+} is thought to be the most promising material for new scintillating fibers with high radiation resistivity.

  6. Evaluation of the implementation of radiation protection measures for aircrew in EU member states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierfeldt, S; Haider, C; Hans, P; Kaleve, M; Neuenfeldt, F

    2009-10-01

    An evaluation of the implementation of radiation protection measures for aircrew in EU Member States has recently been performed in a study sponsored by the European Commission. A comprehensive database has been gathered using questionnaires for civil aviation authorities, aircraft operators and radiation protection authorities in each country. The study has revealed the following results: all countries within the scope of this study where aircrew might receive annual doses >1 mSv have implemented appropriate legislation. The treatment of limits or constraints (action levels) for annual doses of 1, 6, 20 mSv could be an area where clear guidance by the European Commission might be needed. The way in which doses are determined might also be treated in a more harmonized way in the EU, including the transfer of dose data of freelancers or crew members working for other airlines. The establishment of the European Aviation Safety Agency leads to a gradual shift in responsibilities from the national civil aviation authorities towards this centralised European agency. Currently, however, tracking of doses for aircrew still lies with national bodies.

  7. Simulation of decay processes and radiation transport times in radioactivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Toraño, E.; Peyres, V.; Bé, M.-M.; Dulieu, C.; Lépy, M.-C.; Salvat, F.

    2017-04-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENNUC, which simulates random decay pathways of radioactive nuclides, is described. The decay scheme of the active nuclide is obtained from the NUCLEIDE database, whose web application has been complemented with the option of exporting nuclear decay data (possible nuclear transitions, branching ratios, type and energy of emitted particles) in a format that is readable by the simulation subroutines. In the case of beta emitters, the initial energy of the electron or positron is sampled from the theoretical Fermi spectrum. De-excitation of the atomic electron cloud following electron capture and internal conversion is described using transition probabilities from the LLNL Evaluated Atomic Data Library and empirical or calculated energies of released X rays and Auger electrons. The time evolution of radiation showers is determined by considering the lifetimes of nuclear and atomic levels, as well as radiation propagation times. Although PENNUC is designed to operate independently, here it is used in conjunction with the electron-photon transport code PENELOPE, and both together allow the simulation of experiments with radioactive sources in complex material structures consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The reliability of these simulation tools is demonstrated through comparisons of simulated and measured energy spectra from radionuclides with complex multi-gamma spectra, nuclides with metastable levels in their decay pathways, nuclides with two daughters, and beta plus emitters.

  8. Neutron measurements with Time-Resolved Event-Counting Optical Radiation (TRECOR) detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandis, M.; Vartsky, D.; Dangendorf, V.; Bromberger, B.; Bar, D.; Goldberg, M. B.; Tittelmeier, K.; Friedman, E.; Czasch, A.; Mardor, I.; Mor, I.; Weierganz, M.

    2012-04-01

    Results are presented from the latest experiment with a new neutron/gamma detector, a Time-Resolved, Event-Counting Optical Radiation (TRECOR) detector. It is composed of a scintillating fiber-screen converter, bending mirror, lens and Event-Counting Image Intensifier (ECII), capable of specifying the position and time-of-flight of each event. TRECOR is designated for a multipurpose integrated system that will detect Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) and explosives in cargo. Explosives are detected by Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography, and SNM by Dual Discrete-Energy gamma-Radiography. Neutrons and gamma-rays are both produced in the 11B(d,n+γ)12C reaction. The two detection modes can be implemented simultaneously in TRECOR, using two adjacent radiation converters that share a common optical readout. In the present experiment the neutron detection mode was studied, using a plastic scintillator converter. The measurements were performed at the PTB cyclotron, using the 9Be(d,n) neutron spectrum obtained from a thick Be-target at Ed ~ 13 MeV\\@. The basic characteristics of this detector were investigated, including the Contrast Transfer Function (CTF), Point Spread Function (PSF) and elemental discrimination capability.

  9. An analysis of Japan radiation protection measurements after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Arlene A. dos; Souza-Santos, Denison; Melo, Dunstana R. de; Hunt, John G.; Juliao, Ligia M.Q C.; Conti, Luiz F.C.; Pires do Rio, Monica A.; Reis, Rocio G., E-mail: arlene@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    On March 11th 2011, Japan was struck by a devastating earthquake followed by a tsunami wave that took the lives of thousands and started a major nuclear accident in the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant complex. Right from the beginning, the information published by the Japanese government and by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was followed by a team of experts at the Institute for Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) of Brazil. Radiation monitoring data, such as radionuclide activity concentration in water and food, ambient dose rate and fallout concentration in specific cities have been compiled and analyzed, with emphasis on dose limits established by Brazilian regulatory authority. A computer code for dose assessment, developed at the IRD and based upon the IAEA documents TECDOC-1162 and TECDOC-955, was used to assess the doses due to intakes of radionuclides and external exposure for individuals of different age groups. The IAEA model predictions for the ambient dose rates, when the fallout is known, are compared with the measured values in different cities. The Japanese recommendations for evacuation, sheltering and restriction of food and water consumption are evaluated with regards to the Brazilian limits defined in the CNEN NN 3.01 standard. (author)

  10. Instrumentation for beam radiation and luminosity measurement in the CMS experiment using novel detector technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthoff, Moritz

    2017-02-01

    The higher energy and luminosity of the LHC initiated the development of dedicated technologies for radiation monitoring and luminosity measurement. A dedicated pixelated luminosity detector measures coincidences in several three-layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to arrive at a luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. In addition, charged particle tracking allows to monitor the location of the collision point. The upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using 24 two-pad single crystalline diamond sensors, equipped with a fast front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background. A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cherenkov light produced by relativistic charged particles in fuzed quartz crystals to provide direction sensitivity and time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles. The back-end electronics of the beam monitoring systems includes dedicated modules with high bandwidth digitizers developed in both VME and microTCA standards for per bunch beam measurements and gain monitoring. All new and upgraded sub-detectors have been taking data from the first day of LHC operation in April 2015. Results on their commissioning and essential characteristics using data since the start-up of LHC will be presented.

  11. Measurements and radiation tests on scintillating fibres for the LHCb SciFi project

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian; Shatalov, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    This note describes a number of measurements and a radiation test performed on the baseline fibre of the LHCb SciFi upgrade project. These include measurements of the optical attenuation length - globally and wavelength resolved -, measurements of the photoelectric yield, and finally the assessment of the impact of proton irradiation on these quantities. The fibres were irradiated at the CERN PS with 24 GeV/c protons up to a fluence of 7•10$^{13}$ p/cm$^2$ equivalent to an ionizing dose of about 22 kGy. Measurements on the fibres, in particular in view of possible recovery effects, are still ongoing and the report is expected to be updated in the coming months. This report is meant as backup document for the LHCb internal SciFi review in February 2013. It had to be produced in a short available time. Missing information will be added and style as well as formatting will be improved in the forthcoming version.

  12. Measurements of indoor gamma radiation and radon concentrations in dwellings of Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saleh, Ferdoas S. [Physics Department, Girls College of Education in Riyadh, P.O. Box 27329, Riyadh 11417 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: ferdoasalsaleh@hotmail.com

    2007-07-15

    Indoor gamma radiation measurement at dwellings of Riyadh city in Saudi Arabia using TLD has been performed. Measurements were carried out from October 2004 to June 2005. The city was divided into five sectors, for four categories of bed rooms, living rooms, bathrooms and kitchens. The indoor gamma annual absorbed dose of Riyadh city is in the range from 303{+-}57 to 700{+-}38 {mu}Gy y{sup -1} with an average value of 455.1{+-}45 {mu}Gy y{sup -1}. The calculated corresponding annual effective dose to the adult population of the locations will vary from 212{+-}40 to 490{+-}27 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} with an average value of 318.57{+-}31 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}.{sup 222}Rn concentration was measured at dwellings of Riyadh city in Saudi Arabia to estimate effective annual dose to the public from {sup 222}Rn and its progeny. The {sup 222}Rn concentrations were measured using CR-39 detector. The range of annual mean {sup 222}Rn concentrations for all sites was 2-69 Bq m{sup -3} with an average of 18.4 Bq m{sup -3}. The effective annual dose was estimated to be 0.46 mSv y{sup -1}.

  13. Measurements of indoor gamma radiation and radon concentrations in dwellings of Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Ferdoas S

    2007-07-01

    Indoor gamma radiation measurement at dwellings of Riyadh city in Saudi Arabia using TLD has been performed. Measurements were carried out from October 2004 to June 2005. The city was divided into five sectors, for four categories of bed rooms, living rooms, bathrooms and kitchens. The indoor gamma annual absorbed dose of Riyadh city is in the range from 303+/-57 to 700+/-38microGyy(-1) with an average value of 455.1+/-45microGyy(-1). The calculated corresponding annual effective dose to the adult population of the locations will vary from 212+/-40 to 490+/-27microSvy(-1) with an average value of 318.57+/-31microSvy(-1).(222)Rn concentration was measured at dwellings of Riyadh city in Saudi Arabia to estimate effective annual dose to the public from (222)Rn and its progeny. The (222)Rn concentrations were measured using CR-39 detector. The range of annual mean (222)Rn concentrations for all sites was 2-69Bqm(-3) with an average of 18.4Bqm(-3). The effective annual dose was estimated to be 0.46mSvy(-1).

  14. Solving Inverse Radiation Transport Problems with Multi-Sensor Data in the Presence of Correlated Measurement and Modeling Errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Edward V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stork, Christopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mattingly, John K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Inverse radiation transport focuses on identifying the configuration of an unknown radiation source given its observed radiation signatures. The inverse problem is traditionally solved by finding the set of transport model parameter values that minimizes a weighted sum of the squared differences by channel between the observed signature and the signature pre dicted by the hypothesized model parameters. The weights are inversely proportional to the sum of the variances of the measurement and model errors at a given channel. The traditional implicit (often inaccurate) assumption is that the errors (differences between the modeled and observed radiation signatures) are independent across channels. Here, an alternative method that accounts for correlated errors between channels is described and illustrated using an inverse problem based on the combination of gam ma and neutron multiplicity counting measurements.

  15. Measurement of Acoustic Intensity Distribution and Radiation Power of Flat-Plate Phased-Array Sound Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tomoki; Takahashi, Kumiko; Seki, Daizaburou; Hasegawa, Akio

    2002-05-01

    The acoustic intensity distribution and radiation power of a flat-plate phased-array sound source consisting of Tonpilz-type transducers were measured. This study shows that the active acoustic intensity is skewed in the direction of wave propagation. In addition, it clarifies that if the measurement is carried out in the immediate vicinity of the sound source, the reactive acoustic intensity distribution is effective for identifying the positions of the individual sound source elements. Experimental values of active radiation power agree well with theoretical values. Conversely, experimental values of reactive radiation power do not agree with theoretical values; it is clear that they fluctuate significantly with distance from the radiating surface. The reason for this is explained in the case of a point sound source.

  16. Development of Radiation protection and measurement technology - Evaluation of monetory values of radiation dose for implementation of ALARA in radiation protection practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jai Ki; Chang, Jae Kwon; Lee, Choon Sik; Won, In Ho [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Chung Woo [Korean Association for Radiation Protection, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    Approaches for estimation of the monetory values of radiation dose were reviewed to establish an appropriate model for evaluation of .alpha. values for quantitative optimization in radiation protection in Korea. Relevant socio-economical factors such as human capital, willingness to pay for saving a life, GNP, medicare cost for a cancer patient, were estimated as input data for the calculation. Base case alpha values were evaluated for low doses of different exposure situations; occupational exposure, exposure of member of the public, medical exposure of adults and children, exposure to natural radiation, and potential exposure. The estimated generic alpha value per sievert for base case was approximately the same as the GNP per caput. The alpha value at high doses were calculated by escalating the base case values with appropriate exponential risk aversion factor. Special values of alpha, $100000/Sv for base for example, were assigned for radiation protection in nuclear power plants for which contribution of non-quantifiable factors is much larger. Quantitative optimization procedures were explained with numerical illustrations using the protection options and related factors provided in ICRP 55 for a uranium mine. 34 refs., 18 tabs., 8 figs. (author)

  17. On the suitability of longitudinal profile measurements using Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation for high current proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Barros, Joanna; Vieille-Grosjean, Mélissa; Kittelmann, Irena Dolenc; Thomas, Cyrille

    2014-01-01

    The use of Smith-Purcell radiation to measure electrons longitudinal profiles has been demonstrated at several facilities in the picosecond and sub-picosecond range. There is a strong interest for the development of non intercepting longitudinal profile diagnostics for high current proton beams. We present here results of simulations on the expected yield of longitudinal profile monitors using Smith-Purcell radiation for such proton beams.

  18. Application of the modified Wheeler cap method for radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas in complex environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiaying; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, application of a modified Wheeler cap method for the radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas is presented. It is shown that the limitations on the cavity dimension can be overcome and thus measurement in a large cavity is possible. The cavity loss...... is investigated, and a modified radiation efficiency formula that includes the cavity loss is introduced. Moreover, a modification of the technique is proposed that involves the antenna working complex environment inside the Wheeler Cap and thus makes possible measurement of an antenna close to a hand or head...

  19. Monte Carlo generator comparisons to ATLAS measurements constraining QCD radiation in top anti-top final states

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Recently the ATLAS collaboration has measured several final state observables that are sensitive to additional parton radiation in top anti-top quark final states produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energies of $sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. These measurements are compared to modern Monte Carlo generators implementing several different models and with systematic model parameter variations. Future measurements to constrain parton radiation are also proposed and the predictions of various Monte Carlo generators are compared.

  20. Reanalyzing the visible colors of Centaurs and KBOs: what is there and what we might be missing

    CERN Document Server

    Peixinho, Nuno; Doressoundiram, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Visible colors (BVRI) are a reasonable proxy for real spectra of Centaurs and Kuiper Belt Objects, which are rather linear in this range. Colors provide limited information but remain the best tool to study the bulk surface properties. We explore recurrent effects in the study of visible colors: i) how a correlation could be missed or weakened as a result of the data error bars, ii) the "risk" of missing an existing trend because of low sampling, and the possibility of making quantified predictions on the sample size needed to detect a trend at a given significance level, iii) the use of partial correlations to distinguish the mutual effect of two or more parameters, and iv) the sensitivity of the "reddening line" tool to the central wavelength of the filters used. We have compiled the visible colors of about 370 objects available in the literature and carried out an analysis per dynamical family. Our results show how a) data error bars impose a limit on the detectable correlations regardless of sample size a...

  1. Infrared radiation method for measuring ice segregation temperature of artificially frozen soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Guoqing; Zhang Qi; Xu Zhiwei; Zhou Yang

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the evolution of the freezing fringe and final lenses of frost susceptible soils and advance the understanding of frost heave and mechanism of frost heave control,we used an open one-dimensional frost heave test system of infrared radiation technology,instead of a traditional thermistor method.Temperatures of the freezing fringe and segregated ice were measured in a non-contact mode.The results show that accurate and precise temperatures of ice segregation can be obtained by infrared thermal imaging systems.A self-developed inversion program inverted the temperature field of frozen soils.Based on our analysis of temperature variation in segregated ice and our study of the relationship between temperature and rate of ice segregation in cooling and warming processes during intermittent freezing,the mechanism of decreasing frost heave of frozen soils by controlling the growth of final lenses with an intermittent freezing mode,can be explained properly.

  2. Measurement of Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure Using Methylene Blue and PvP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deantonio, Michael

    2004-10-01

    This study was performed to create a device that can detect UV radiation levels in an attempt to lower the skin cancer rates in the Southwest United States. An Ultraviolet sensitive dye was combined with a polymer and the absorption was measured. With the help of Dr. Mike DeAntonio and Dr. Amanda Ellis, the students at Mesilla Valley Christain School did the experiments and recorded data on the UV absorption. This method was found to enable the public to monitor Ultraviolet absorption on the skin. And so, it is expected to reduce the rate of skin cancer. The students entered this project into a nation-wide competition called E-Cybermission and received a prize for second place in the Southwest Region.

  3. A Method for Measuring Thermal Radiation Properties of Semi—Transparent Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.P.Zhang; X.S.Ge; 等

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a method(F method)for determining the optical constants and the thicknesses of semitransparent thin films.It has the following distinctive features:high precision;rapid determination of the measured quantities;wide range of convergence of solutions;capable of judging whether of not the results are reasonable,In order to meet the needs of application and engineering desigen,a family of curves designated Fig.n-F was prepared.Using it n,k,d of the thicknesses of the films determined by the F method.all important thermal radiation properties of the semi-transparent films needed in application can be obtained.

  4. Conception of thermoelectric flux meters for infrared radiation measurements in industrial furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploteau, J.P. [Laboratoire LET2E, Universite de Bretagne Sud, Centre de Recherche, Rue St Maude, BP 92116, 56321 Lorient Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jean-pierre.ploteau@univ-ubs.fr; Glouannec, P. [Laboratoire LET2E, Universite de Bretagne Sud, Centre de Recherche, Rue St Maude, BP 92116, 56321 Lorient Cedex (France); Noel, H. [Laboratoire LET2E, Universite de Bretagne Sud, Centre de Recherche, Rue St Maude, BP 92116, 56321 Lorient Cedex (France)

    2007-02-15

    To help optimise the design and command of infrared (IR) emitters which are frequently used in industrial installations [A.C. Metaxas, Foundations of Electro-Heat a Unified Approach, John Wiley, Chichester, 1996; H. Lihan, Infrared surface pasteurisation of Turkey frankfurters, Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies 5 (3) (2004) 345-351; F.M. Schmidt, Y. Le Maoult, S. Monteix, Modelling of infrared heating of thermoplastic sheet used in thermoforming process, Journal of Materials Processing Technology 143-144 (2003) 225-231; M.T. Brogan, P.F. Monaghan, Thermal simulation of quartz tube infrared heaters used in the processing of thermoplastic composites, Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing 27 (4) (1996) 301-306; S. Le Person, J.R. Puiggali, M. Baron, M. Roques, Near infrared drying of pharmaceutical thin films: experimental analysis of internal mass transport, Chemical Engineering and Processing 37 (3) (1998) 257-263; K. Esser, E. Haberstroh, U. Huesgen, D. Weinand, Infrared radiation in the processing of plastics: precise adjustment-the key to productivity, Advances in Polymer Technology 7 (2) (1987) 89-128; D. Blanc, P. Laurent, J. Andrieu, J.F. Gerard, Convective and radiant (IR) curing of bulk and waterborne epoxy coatings as thin layers, part II: infrared curing polymer, Engineering and Science 39 (12) (1999) 2487-2497], this paper aims at presenting the development, the construction, the calibration, and the test of flux meters designed to make 'in situ' measurements of infrared radiation in industrial furnaces. These sensors must be able to measure high heat flux in difficult thermal ambiances, and be adapted to the characterization of existing processes, therefore the output signal has to directly reflect the IR received flux. The sensible part is made with a semiconductor thermoelectric module which offers a great sensitivity. While the top part of the module is exposed to convection and infrared radiation, the bottom

  5. In situ measurements of the radiation stability of amino acids at 15-140 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.; Bell, Jan-Luca

    2012-08-01

    We present new kinetics data on the radiolytic destruction of amino acids measured in situ with infrared spectroscopy. Samples were irradiated at 15, 100, and 140 K with 0.8-MeV protons, and amino-acid decay was followed at each temperature with and without H2O present. Observed radiation products included CO2 and amines, consistent with amino-acid decarboxylation. The half-lives of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were estimated for various extraterrestrial environments. Infrared spectral changes demonstrated the conversion from the non-zwitterion structure NH2sbnd CH2(R)sbnd COOH at 15 K to the zwitterion structure +NH3sbnd CH2(R)sbnd COO- at 140 K for each amino acid studied.

  6. Comparison of aerosol optical thickness retrieval from spectroradiometer measurements and from two radiative transfer models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utrillas, M.P.; Martinez-Lozano, J.A.; Tena, F. [Universitat de Valencia, Dept. de Termodinamica, Valencia (Spain); Cachorro, V.E. [Universidad de Valladolid, Dept. de Fisica Aplicada 1, Valladolid (Spain); Hernandez, S. [Universidad de Valladolid, Dept. de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Valladolid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The spectral values of the aerosol optical thickness {tau}{sub a{lambda}} in the 400-670 nm band have been determined from 500 solar direct irradiance spectra at normal incidence registered at Valencia (Spain) in the period from July 1993 to March 1997. The {tau}{sub a{lambda}} values obtained from experimental measurements have been compared with the boundary layer aerosol models implemented in the radiative transfer codes ZD-LOA and LOWTRAN 7. For the ZD-LOA code, the continental and maritime models have been considered and for the LOWTRAN 7 code the rural, maritime, urban and tropospheric models have been used. The obtained results show that the aerosol model that best represents the average turbidity of the boundary layer for the urban area of Valencia (Spain) is the continental model when the ZD-LOA code is used and the urban model when the LOWTRAN 7 code is used. (Author)

  7. In-Situ Measurements of the Radiation Stability of Amino Acids at 15-140 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.; Bell, Jan-Luca

    2012-01-01

    We present new kinetics data on the radiolytic destruction of amino acids measured in situ with infrared spectroscopy. Samples were irradiated at 15, 100, and 140 K with D.8-MeV protons, and amino-acid decay was followed at each temperature with and without H2O present. Observed radiation products included CO2 and amines, consistent with amino-acid decarboxylation. The half-lives of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were estimated for various extraterrestrial environments. Infrared spectral changes demonstrated the conversion from the non-zwitterion structure NH2-CH2(R)-COOH at 15 K to the zwitterion structure +NH3-CH2(R)-COO- at 140 K for each amino acid studied.

  8. Investigating the reliability of coronal emission measure distribution diagnostics using 3D radiative MHD simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Determining the temperature distribution of coronal plasmas can provide stringent constraints on coronal heating. Current observations with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph onboard Hinode and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide diagnostics of the emission measure distribution (EMD) of the coronal plasma. Here we test the reliability of temperature diagnostics using 3D radiative MHD simulations. We produce synthetic observables from the models, and apply the Monte Carlo Markov chain EMD diagnostic. By comparing the derived EMDs with the "true" distributions from the model we assess the limitations of the diagnostics, as a function of the plasma parameters and of the signal-to-noise of the data. We find that EMDs derived from EIS synthetic data reproduce some general characteristics of the true distributions, but usually show differences from the true EMDs that are much larger than the estimated uncertainties suggest, especially when structures with signif...

  9. Radiative transfer with POLARIS: I. Analysis of magnetic fields through synthetic dust continuum polarization measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Reissl, Stefan; Wolf, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    \\textbf{Aims}: We present POLARIS (\\textbf{POLA}rized \\textbf{R}ad\\textbf{I}ation \\textbf{S}imulator), a newly developed three-dimensional Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code. POLARIS was designed to calculate dust temperature, polarization maps, and spectral energy distributions. It is optimized to handle data that results from sophisticated magneto-hydrodynamic simulations. The main purpose of the code is to prepare and analyze multi-wavelength continuum polarization measurements in the context of magnetic field studies in the interstellar medium. An exemplary application is the investigation of the role of magnetic fields in star formation processes.\\\\ \\textbf{Methods}: We combine currently discussed state-of-the-art grain alignment theories with existing dust heating and polarization algorithms. We test the POLARIS code on multiple scales in complex astrophysical systems that are associated with different stages of star formation. POLARIS uses the full spectrum of dust polarization mechanisms to trace the...

  10. In-situ measurements of the radiation stability of amino acids at 15-140 K

    CERN Document Server

    Gerakines, P A; Moore, M H; Bell, J -L

    2015-01-01

    We present new kinetics data on the radiolytic destruction of amino acids measured in situ with infrared spectroscopy. Samples were irradiated at 15, 100, and 140 K with 0.8-MeV protons, and amino-acid decay was followed at each temperature with and without H$_2$O present. Observed radiation products included CO$_2$ and amines, consistent with amino-acid decarboxylation. The half-lives of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were estimated for various extraterrestrial environments. Infrared spectral changes demonstrated the conversion from the non-zwitterion structure NH$_2$-CH$_2$(R)-COOH at 15 K to the zwitterion structure $^+$NH$_3$-CH$_2$(R)-COO$^-$ at 140 K for each amino acid studied.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-01-09

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-04-13

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, DL

    2011-03-02

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-10-10

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  15. Measurement of acoustic field radiated by low frequency power ultrasonic transducer with laser-interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Menglu; GAO Wen; HU Wenxiang

    2000-01-01

    Based on the piezo-optic effect of medium, the refractive index of medium is the function of its density, and so it's also the function of acoustic pressure. Therefore, acoustic pressure in the optical path everywhere can be determined absolutely by laser-interferometric technique and relative distribution of pressure in the middle and far acoustic field, which can be obtained from theory or experiment respectively. Theory and experiment of measurement of pressure in acoustic field with laser-interferometer are introduced. Distribution of pressure radiated by a power ultrasonic transducer is determined by laser interferometric technique.The theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement. The receiving sensitivity of a PVDF (Polyvinylidene fluoride) transducer in free field is also calibrated absolutely due to above results and its sensitivity is -118.5 dB.

  16. First results of measurements of extreme ultraviolet radiation onboard a geostationary satellite "ELECTRO-L"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusinov, Anatoliy; Kazachevskaya, Tamara; Gonjukh, David

    Measurements of the intensity of EUV emission in the hydrogen Lyman-alpha line were conducted by a broadband photometer VUSS-E onboard geostationary Hydrometeorological satellite "Electro" since March 2011. The solar hydrogen Lyman-alpha line (lambda = 121.6 nm) was monitored. The photomultiplier with LiF window used as a detector insensitive to visible light. Long-wavelength limit of the spectral band sensitivity of the instrument is about 200 nm, so the signal of the device is defined as the flux of solar radiation in the region of 123-200 nm. Its exclusion was carried out by calculation. Since the satellite "Electro" designed for remote sensing of the Earth, its line of sight focused on Earth. Alignment of instrument in the Sun direction was achieved by installing it on the solar panel, periodically moved in the solar direction. Correction of instrument readings, reduced due to the deviation of its axis from the Sun direction, carried out by calculation. Measurements were carried out every second. The first results of the measurements are presented. The difference in absolute calibration Electro-L/VUSS-E is within 5% of corresponding values for measurements TIMED satellite in those days, that is in agreement with laboratory calibrations. It is useful to measure the temperature of the instrument, as its variation on a small interval of time makes change the value of the output signal about 1-2 %. During first year of operation, the sensitivity of the apparatus remained within ± 2% of measured value, significant degradation of sensitivity was not observed. Over time of observation there have been several large flares of X class. The increase of the signal in the ultraviolet range does not exceed a few percent during these flares.

  17. Atmospheric dispersion of argon-41 from anuclear research reactor: measurement and modeling of plume geometry and gamma radiation field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Bent; Astrup, Poul; Drews, Martin

    2003-01-01

    An atmospheric dispersion experiment was conducted using a visible tracer along with the routine release of argon-41 from the BR1 research reactor in Mol, Belgium. Simultaneous measurements of plume geometry and radiation fields for argon-41 decay were performed as well as measurements of the argon...

  18. Solar radiation measurement stations - measurement instruments and signal acquisition system - stations managed by the LABSOLAR; Estacoes solarimetricas - instrumentos de medicao e sistema de aquisicao de sinais - estacoes gerenciadas pelo LABSOLAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Samuel Luna de [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Energia Solar (LABSOLAR)]. E-mail: samuel@emc.ufsc.br

    2000-07-01

    This chapter presents a general description of solar radiation measurement stations stations, measurement instruments, signal acquisition system and the LABSOLAR managed stations at Santa Catarina University, Florianopolis, Brazil.

  19. Radiation Measurement Systems and Experiences in Japan after the Fukushima Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    In the approximately 4 years since the March 2011 earthquake and subsequent Tsunami damaged the three Dai-Ichi nuclear power plants, the AREVA and Canberra team have deployed a variety of different radiation measurement machines in Japan. These measurement projects or instruments include: - Dose-rate mapping of the close-in areas on the damaged reactor site using the stored output of dose rate meters carried by workers planning for the installing of a water processing unit; - Spectroscopic on-line measurements of the first water processing unit on the site, where these nuclide-specific measurements at multiple points allowed remote users to determine the optimum processing parameters - General purpose food measurement units, both high precision HPGe systems and low cost NaI systems, which were used throughout the country for food quality measurements; - In-vivo measurement systems, both fixed and mobile whole body counting units, that were used on at least 500,000 people, demonstrating to them that internal doses were very low; - In-vivo measurements with special high-sensitivity whole body counters on babies and children, demonstrating to the parents of these children that internal doses are very low; - Automatic systems for high throughput assay of bags of rice that are part of the consumer confidence plan to prove to customers that Fukushima Prefecture rice is safe; - High sensitivity automatic system to assay boxes of special semi-dry persimmons and to report the activity of each individual item within the box meets the regulatory limit; - System to assay soil on a conveyor belt and sort the output according to level of radioactivity, which would then reduce the volume of material that must be treated as radioactive; - System to assay a truck loaded with 1 cubic meter sacks of soil and vegetation, and report the results of each individual sack. - On-line water measurement system for SrY90 at levels that are suitable for release to the environment; - Mobile

  20. First measurement of low momentum dielectrons radiated off cold nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Agakishiev, G; Belver, D; Belyaev, A; Berger-Chen, J C; Blanco, A; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Cabanelas, P; Chernenko, S; Dybczak, A; Epple, E; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzón, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Göbel, K; Golubeva, M; González-Díaz, D; Guber, F; Gumberidze, M; Heinz, T; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Ierusalimov, A; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Karavicheva, T; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kornakov, G; Kotte, R; Krása, A; Krizek, F; Krücken, R; Kuc, H; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Ladygin, V; Lalik, R; Lang, S; Lapidus, K; Lebedev, A; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, L; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Schmah, A; Schwab, E; Siebenson, J; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Vasiliev, T; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wendisch, C; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y

    2012-01-01

    We present data on dielectron emission in proton induced reactions on a Nb target at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy measured with HADES installed at GSI. The data represent the first high statistics measurement of dielectrons radiated from cold nuclear matter in a kinematic regime, where strong medium effects are expected. Combined with the good mass resolution of 2%, it is the first measurement sensitive to changes of the spectral functions of vector mesons, as predicted by models for hadrons at rest or small relative momenta. Comparing the e+e- invariant mass spectra to elementary p+p data, we observe for e+e- momenta P<0.8 GeV/c a strong modification of the shape of the spectra, which we attribute to an additional rho-like contribution and a decrease in omega yield. These opposite trends are tentatively interpreted as a strong coupling of the rho meson to baryonic resonances and an absorption of the omega meson, which are two aspects of in-medium modification of vector mesons.

  1. Studies of longitudinal profile of electron bunches and impedance measurements at Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Akash Deep; Yadav, S.; Kumar, Mukesh; Shrivastava, B. B.; Karnewar, A. K.; Ojha, A.; Puntambekar, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    Indus-2 is a 3rd generation synchrotron radiation source at the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) in India. We study the longitudinal profile of electrons in Indus-2 by using dual sweep synchroscan streak camera at visible diagnostic beamline. In this paper, the longitudinal profiles of electron bunch are analyzed by filling beam current in a single bunch mode. These studies are carried at injection energy (550 MeV) and at ramped beam energy (2.5 GeV). The effects of the wakefield generated interactions between the circulating electrons and the surrounding vacuum chamber are analyzed in terms of measured effects on longitudinal beam distribution. The impedance of the storage ring is obtained by fitting the solutions of Haissinski equation to the measured bunch lengthening with different impedance models. The impedance of storage ring obtained by a series R+L impedance model indicates a resistance (R) of 1350±125 Ω, an inductance (L) of 180±25 nH and broadband impedance of 2.69 Ω. These results are also compared with the values obtained from measured synchronous phase advancing and scaling laws. These studies are very useful in better understanding and control of the electromagnetic interactions.

  2. Measurement of the Space Radiation Dose for the Flight Aircrew at High-Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewon; Park, Inchun; Kim, Junsik; Lee, Jaejin; Hwang, Junga; Kim, Young-chul

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes an experimental approach to evaluate the effective doses of space radiations at high-altitude by combining the measured data from the Liulin-6K spectrometer loaded onto the air-borne RC-800 cockpit and the calculated data from CARI-6M code developed by FAA. In this paper, 15 exposed dose experiments for the flight missions at a highaltitude above 10 km and 3 experiments at a normal altitude below 4 km were executed over the Korean Peninsula in 2012. The results from the high-altitude flight measurements show a dramatic change in the exposed doses as the altitude increases. The effective dose levels (an average of 15.27 mSv) of aircrew at the high-altitude are an order of magnitude larger than those (an average of 0.30 mSv) of the normal altitude flight. The comparison was made between the measure dose levels and the calculated dose levels and those were similar each other. It indicates that the annual dose levels of the aircrew boarding RC- 800 could be above 1 mSv. These results suggest that a proper procedure to manage the exposed dose of aircrew is required for ROK Air Force.

  3. Using the FMA for radiative capture cross-section measurements of interest to astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    We assessed the capability of the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) to study radiative capture reactions of astrophysical interest using inverse kinematics. Results from measurements on the {sup 1}H({sup 13}C,{sup 14}N){gamma} reaction show that the FMA is an ideal high-efficiency tool for these experiments, where the recoil ion is detected and identified at the FMA focal plane. Intermediate slits acting on energy/charge and mass/charge were introduced into the FMA, which reduced the scattered primary beam fraction at the focal plane to <10{sup -11}. A small gas ionization chamber was placed behind the position-sensitive focal-plane detector, followed by a Si detector. Measurements of mass/charge, energy loss, and residual energy of the transmitted ions were made, giving at least another two orders of magnitude separation of recoils from scattered beam. A new ionization detector operating in the same gas volume as the focal plane detector will provide even better separation by eliminating the need for two of the three windows used in the test measurement. At energies of {approximately} 0.5 MeV/nucleon, the recoil ions populate primarily a single charge state, resulting in a detection efficiency of > 50%. This will be particularly valuable for use with radioactive beams.

  4. Measurement of the branching fraction and $CP$ asymmetry in radiative $D^0 \\to V \\gamma$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abdesselam, A; Adamczyk, K; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Arinstein, K; Arita, Y; Asner, D M; Aso, T; Atmacan, H; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Aziz, T; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Ban, Y; Bansal, V; Barberio, E; Barrett, M; Bartel, W; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Behera, P; Belhorn, M; Belous, K; Besson, D; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Bischofberger, M; Biswal, J; Bloomfield, T; Blyth, S; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bookwalter, C; Boulahouache, C; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Breibeck, F; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chang, M -C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, K -F; Chen, P; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Crnkovic, J; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, N; Di Carlo, S; Dingfelder, J; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dubey, S; Dutta, D; Dutta, K; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Esen, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Feindt, M; Ferber, T; Frey, A; Frost, O; Fujikawa, M; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Giordano, F; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Greenwald, D; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Grygier, J; Grzymkowska, O; Guo, H; Haba, J; Hamer, P; Han, Y L; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hasenbusch, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Heck, M; Hedges, M T; Heffernan, D; Heider, M; Heller, A; Higuchi, T; Himori, S; Hirose, S; Horiguchi, T; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, W -S; Hsiung, Y B; Hsu, C -L; Huschle, M; Hyun, H J; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Imamura, M; Inami, K; Inguglia, G; Ishikawa, A; Itagaki, K; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Iwata, S; Jacobs, W W; Jaegle, I; Jeon, H B; Joffe, D; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kakuno, H; Kang, J H; Kang, K H; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Kato, E; Kato, Y; Katrenko, P; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Keck, T; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, B H; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, H -J; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Kleinwort, C; Klucar, J; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, N; Koblitz, S; Kodyš, P; Koga, Y; Korpar, S; Kotchetkov, D; Kouzes, R T; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kronenbitter, B; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kumita, T; Kurihara, E; Kuroki, Y; Kuzmin, A; Kvasnička, P; Kwon, Y -J; Lai, Y -T; Lange, J S; Lee, D H; Lee, I S; Lee, S -H; Leitgab, M; Leitner, R; Levit, D; Lewis, P; Li, C H; Li, H; Li, J; Li, L; Li, X; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Limosani, A; Liu, C; Liu, Y; Liu, Z Q; Liventsev, D; Loos, A; Louvot, R; Lubej, M; Lukin, P; Luo, T; MacNaughton, J; Masuda, M; Matsuda, T; Matvienko, D; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Mikami, Y; Miyabayashi, K; Miyachi, Y; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mohanty, S; Mohapatra, D; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mori, T; Morii, T; Moser, H -G; Müller, T; Muramatsu, N; Mussa, R; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakamura, K R; Nakano, E; Nakano, H; Nakano, T; Nakao, M; Nakayama, H; Nakazawa, H; Nanut, T; Nath, K J; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nedelkovska, E; Negishi, K; Neichi, K; Ng, C; Niebuhr, C; Niiyama, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nitoh, O; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, Y; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Oswald, C; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Palka, H; Panzenböck, E; Park, C -S; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Paul, S; Peak, L S; Pedlar, T K; Peng, T; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Prasanth, K; Prim, M; Prothmann, K; Pulvermacher, C; Purohit, M V; Rauch, J; Reisert, B; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Röhrken, M; Rorie, J; Rostomyan, A; Rozanska, M; Rummel, S; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Saito, T; Sakai, K; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santel, D; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sasao, N; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schlüter, T; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schönmeier, P; Schram, M; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Schwenker, B; Seidl, R; Seino, Y; Sekiya, A; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Seong, I S; Sevior, M E; Shang, L; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shibuya, H; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Singh, J B; Sinha, R; Smerkol, P; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Soloviev, Y; Solovieva, E; Stanič, S; Starič, M; Steder, M; Strube, J F; Stypula, J; Sugihara, S; Sugiyama, A; Sumihama, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Z; Takeichi, H; Takizawa, M; Tamponi, U; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, S; Tanida, K; Taniguchi, N; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Trusov, V; Tse, Y F; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uchida, T; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Uozumi, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Y; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wehle, S; White, E; Wiechczynski, J; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamada, S; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yashchenko, S; Ye, H; Yelton, J; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, L; Zhilich, V; Zhukova, V; Zhulanov, V; Ziegler, M; Zivko, T; Zupanc, A; Zwahlen, N; Zyukova, O

    2016-01-01

    We report a measurement of the branching fractions of the radiative decays $D^0 \\to V \\gamma$, where $V=\\phi,~\\overline{K}{}^{*0}$ or $\\rho^0$. This is the first observation of the decay $D^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\gamma$. We measure preliminary branching fractions $\\mathcal{B}(D^0 \\to \\phi \\gamma)=(2.76 \\pm 0.20 \\pm 0.08) \\times 10^{-5}$, $\\mathcal{B}(D^0 \\to \\overline{K}{}^{*0} \\gamma)=(4.66 \\pm 0.21 \\pm 0.18) \\times 10^{-4} $ and $\\mathcal{B}(D^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\gamma)=(1.77 \\pm 0.30 \\pm 0.08) \\times 10^{-5}$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. We also present the first measurement of $CP$ asymmetry in these decays. The preliminary values are $\\mathcal{A}_{CP}(D^0 \\to \\phi \\gamma)=-(0.094 \\pm 0.066 \\pm 0.001)$, $\\mathcal{A}_{CP}(D^0 \\to \\overline{K}{}^{*0} \\gamma)=-(0.003 \\pm 0.020 \\pm 0.000)$ and $\\mathcal{A}_{CP}(D^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\gamma)=0.056 \\pm 0.151 \\pm 0.006$. The analysis was conducted using 943 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB $e^+e^-$ collider.

  5. Gamma radiation measurements and dose rates in commercially-used natural tiling rocks (granites)

    CERN Document Server

    Tzortzis, M; Christofides, S; Christodoulides, G

    2003-01-01

    The gamma radiation in samples of a variety of natural tiling rocks (granites) imported in Cyprus for use in the building industry was measured, employing high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The rock samples were pulverized, sealed in 1 litre plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory with a live-time between 10 and 14 hours each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, activity concentrations were determined for Th-232 (range from 1 to 906 Bq/kg), U-238 (from 1 to 588 Bq/kg) and K-40 (from 50 to 1606 Bq/kg). Elemental concentrations mean values of (35.2 +- 8.4) ppm, (6.2 +- 1.8) ppm and (4.0 +- 0.2) % were deduced, for thorium, uranium and potassium, respectively. The total absorbed dose rates in air calculated from the concentrations of the three radionuclides, Th-232 and U-238 series and K-40, ranged from 7 to 1209 nGy/h for full utilization of the materials, from 4 to 605 nGy/h for half utilization and from 2 to 302 nGy/h for one quarter utilization. The total effective dose rates per pers...

  6. Development of the laser absorption radiation thermometry technique to measure thermal diffusivity in addition to temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levick, Andrew; Lobato, Killian; Edwards, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    A comparative technique based on photothermal radiometry has been developed to measure thermal diffusivity of semi-infinite targets with arbitrary geometry. The technique exploits the principle that the frequency response of the temperature modulation induced by a periodic modulated heating source (in this case a laser spot) scales with thermal diffusivity. To demonstrate this technique, a photothermal radiometer has been developed, which detects modulated thermal radiance at a wavelength of 2 μm due to a small temperature modulation induced on the target surface by a modulated erbium fiber laser of power 1 W. Two frequency responses were measured for platinum and oxidized Inconel 600 targets (the frequency response is a scan of the amplitude of the modulated thermal radiance over laser modulation frequency). Scaling the two responses with respect to frequency gives a ratio of thermal diffusivities Dplatinum/DInconel of 4.45(33) which compares with a literature value of 4.46(50). The aim is to combine this technique with laser absorption radiation thermometry to produce multithermal property instrument for measuring "industrial" targets.

  7. Anomalous effects on radiation detectors and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milián-Sánchez, V., E-mail: vicmisan@iqn.upv.es [Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain); Mocholí-Salcedo, A., E-mail: amocholi@eln.upv.es [Traffic Control Systems Group, ITACA Institute, Universitat Politécnica de, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain); Milián, C., E-mail: carles.milian@cpht.polytechnique.fr [Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS, École Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Kolombet, V.A., E-mail: kolombet@iteb.ru [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow Region, Pushchino 142290 (Russian Federation); Verdú, G., E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Universitat Politécnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-08-21

    We present experimental results showing certain anomalies in the measurements performed inside a modified Faraday cage of decay rates of Ra-226, Tl-204 and Sr-90/I-90, of the gamma spectrum of a Cs-137 preparation, and of the capacitance of both a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor and of the interconnection cable between the radiation detector and the scaler. Decay rates fluctuate significantly up to 5% around the initial value and differently depending on the type of nuclide, and the spectrum photopeak increases in 4.4%. In the case of the capacitor, direct capacitance measurements at 100 Hz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz show variations up to 0.7%, the most significant taking place at 100 Hz. In the case of the interconnection cable, the capacitance varies up to 1%. Dispersion also tends to increase inside the enclosure. However, the measured capacitance variations do not explain the variations observed in decay rates. - Highlights: • Background counts and decay rates changes of different nuclides are described. • Those changes are observed inside a multilayer modified Faraday cage. • Noise in a multichannel analyzer increases inside the multilayer enclosure. • Capacitance of a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor varies inside the enclosure. • Capacitance changes depend on the used frequency.

  8. Measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. C.; Longo, R.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Arfelli, F.; Dreossi, D.; Menk, R.-H.; Vallazza, E.; Xiao, T. Q.; Castelli, E.

    2010-09-01

    The measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues is of fundamental importance in the field of breast x-ray diagnostic imaging. Different groups have evaluated the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by carrying out direct attenuation measurements in which the specimens were thin and selected as homogeneous as possible. Here, we use monochromatic and high-intensity synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR CT) to evaluate the linear attenuation coefficients of surgical breast tissues in the energy range from 15 to 26.5 keV. X-ray detection is performed by a custom digital silicon micro-strip device, developed in the framework of the PICASSO INFN experiment. Twenty-three human surgical breast samples were selected for SR CT and histological study. Six of them underwent CT, both as fresh tissue and after formalin fixation, while the remaining 17 were imaged only as formalin-fixed tissues. Our results for fat and fibrous tissues are in good agreement with the published values. However, in contrast to the published data, our measurements show no significant differences between fibrous and tumor tissues. Moreover, our results for fresh and formalin-fixed tissues demonstrate a reduction of the linear attenuation coefficient for fibrous and tumor tissues after fixation.

  9. Measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, R C; Xiao, T Q [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Longo, R; Arfelli, F; Castelli, E [Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Rigon, L; Dreossi, D; Menk, R-H; Vallazza, E [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Zanconati, F; De Pellegrin, A, E-mail: rongchang.chen@gmail.co [Department of Pathologic Anatomy, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy)

    2010-09-07

    The measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues is of fundamental importance in the field of breast x-ray diagnostic imaging. Different groups have evaluated the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by carrying out direct attenuation measurements in which the specimens were thin and selected as homogeneous as possible. Here, we use monochromatic and high-intensity synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR CT) to evaluate the linear attenuation coefficients of surgical breast tissues in the energy range from 15 to 26.5 keV. X-ray detection is performed by a custom digital silicon micro-strip device, developed in the framework of the PICASSO INFN experiment. Twenty-three human surgical breast samples were selected for SR CT and histological study. Six of them underwent CT, both as fresh tissue and after formalin fixation, while the remaining 17 were imaged only as formalin-fixed tissues. Our results for fat and fibrous tissues are in good agreement with the published values. However, in contrast to the published data, our measurements show no significant differences between fibrous and tumor tissues. Moreover, our results for fresh and formalin-fixed tissues demonstrate a reduction of the linear attenuation coefficient for fibrous and tumor tissues after fixation.

  10. Modeling of the radiation measurement device FALCON 5000 by MCNPX: simulated efficiency for the on-site measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courageot, Estelle; Duong, Emilie; Gaillard-Lecanu, Emmanuelle; Jahan, Sylvie

    2014-06-01

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of the new spectrometry detector available in the STEP unit of the R&D from EDF, a numerical model of the FALCON 5000 radiation measurement system, based on the Ge technology, has been constructed thanks to the computer calculation code MCNPX. Due to the ignorance of the source term and the geometry of irradiation in our facilities, some cases of irradiation induce by a radioactive source has been planed to be simulated with different parameters which has been studied. For different energies and different distances and angles of incidence, simulations have been performed in order to assess an average the response of the modeled detector by MCNPX. Thanks to all these results, a global curve for the efficiency has been established taking into account of the energy, the distance between the source and the detector and the angle of incidence of the photon. The modeling of the detector, its validation and the efficiency curve have been presented in this paper.

  11. Photometry of Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects: 2060 Chiron (1977 UB), 10199 Chariklo (1997 CU26), 38628 Huya (2000 EB173), 28978 Ixion (2001 KX76), and 90482 Orcus (2004 DW)

    CERN Document Server

    Galiazzo, Mattia; Marcos, Raul de la Fuente; Carraro, Giovanni; Maris, Michele; Montalto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Both Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) are minor bodies found in the outer Solar System. Centaurs are a transient population that moves between the orbits of Jupiter and Neptune, and they probably diffused out of the TNOs. TNOs move mainly beyond Neptune. Some of these objects display episodic cometary behaviour; a few percent of them are known to host binary companions. Here, we study the light-curves of two Centaurs -2060 Chiron (1977 UB) and 10199 Chariklo (1997 CU26)- and three TNOs -38628 Huya (2000 EB173), 28978 Ixion (2001 KX76), and 90482 Orcus (2004 DW)- and the colours of the Centaurs and Huya. Precise, ~1%, R-band absolute CCD photometry of these minor bodies acquired between 2006 and 2011 is presented; the new data are used to investigate the rotation rate of these objects. The colours of the Centaurs and Huya are determined using BVRI photometry. The point spread function of the five minor bodies is analysed, searching for signs of a coma or close companions. Astrometry is also discusse...

  12. Measurement of radiative proton capture on 18F and implications for oxygen-neon novae reexamined

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, C.; Laird, A. M.; Fulton, B. R.; Ruiz, C.; Bardayan, D. W.; Buchmann, L.; Christian, G.; Davids, B.; Erikson, L.; Fallis, J.; Hager, U.; Hutcheon, D.; Martin, L.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nelson, K.; Ottewell, D.; Rojas, A.; Spyrou, A.

    2016-12-01

    Background: The rate of the 18F(p ,γ )19Ne reaction affects the final abundance of the radioisotope 18F ejected from novae. This nucleus is important as its abundance is thought to significantly influence the first-stage 511-keV and continuum γ -ray emission in the aftermath of novae. No successful measurement of this reaction existed prior to this work, and the rate used in stellar models had been calculated based on incomplete information from contributing resonances. Purpose: Of the two resonances thought to provide a significant contribution to the astrophysical reaction rate, located at Ec .m .=330 and 665 keV, the former has a radiative width estimated from the assumed analog state in the mirror nucleus, 19F, while the latter resonance does not have an analog state assignment, resulting in an arbitrary radiative width being assumed. As such, a direct measurement was needed to establish what role this resonance plays in the destruction of 18F at nova temperatures. This paper extends and takes the place of a previous Letter which reported the strength of the Ec .m .=665 keV resonance. Method: The DRAGON recoil separator was used to directly measure the strength of the important 665-keV resonance in this reaction, in inverse kinematics, by observing 19Ne reaction products. A radioactive 18F beam was provided by the ISAC facility at TRIUMF. R -matrix calculations were subsequently used to evaluate the significance of the results at astrophysical energies. Results: We report the direct measurement of the 18F(p ,γ )19Ne reaction with the reevaluation of several detector efficiencies and the use of an updated 19Ne level scheme in the reaction rate analysis. The strength of the 665-keV resonance (Ex=7.076 MeV) is found to be an order of magnitude weaker than currently assumed in nova models. An improved analysis of the previously reported data is presented here, resulting in a slightly different value for the resonance strength. These small changes, however, do

  13. Measuring Neutrons and Gamma Rays on Mars - The Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector MSL/RAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Martin, C.; Kortmann, O.; Boehm, E.; Kharytonov, A.; Ehresmann, B.; Hassler, D. M.; Zeitlin, C.; Rad Team

    2010-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) will measure the radiation environment on the Martian surface. One of the difficult measurements is that of the neutral radiation component consisting of neutrons and gamma rays. Different from Earth, this neutral component contributes substantially to the total dose on the planetary surface, principally because the Martian atmosphere is so thin. The RAD instrument is capable of measuring neutral particles through a combination of sensitive anti-coincidence and organic and inorganic scintillator materials. In this work, we will explain how RAD will measure the neutral particle radiation on Mars and compare with calibration results. The problem of inverting measured neutron and gamma data is a non-trivial task. For all inversions, one generally assumes that the measurement process can be described by a system of linear equations, A ěc{f} = ěc{z}, where the matrix A describes the instrument response function (IRF), ěc{f} the underlying, but unknown, ``real'' physical parameters, and ěc{z} the measured data. The inversion of this deceptively simple-looking set of equations is in fact a key example of an ill-posed or inverse problem. Such problems are notoriously difficult to solve.

  14. [Radiation measures and trend after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Ryuji

    2014-02-01

    The radioactive materials spread by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident in March, 2011 caused NPP workers to be exposed to radiation above ordinance limits. The number of workers exposed to radiation within ordinance limits is increasing. Decontamination began at many places in Fukushima, although new laws were enforced in the decontamination work, in the current situation, medical examinations for radiation are limited due to a shortage of doctors. In this paper, I introduce the ordinances on the prevention of ionizing radiation hazards and the revised points about radiation exposure doses of the NPP workers, as well as the new ordinance for decontamination.

  15. Emergency monitoring strategy and radiation measurements document of the NKS project emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahtinen, J. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)

    2006-04-15

    This report is one of the deliverables of the NKS Project Emergency management and radiation monitoring in nuclear and radiological accidents (EMARAD) (20022005). The project and the overall results are briefly described in the NKS publication 'Emergency Management and Radiation Monitoring in Nuclear and Radiological Accidents. Summary Report on the NKS Project EMARAD' (NKS-137, April 2006). In a nuclear or radiological emergency, all radiation measurements must be performed efficiently and the results interpreted correctly in order to provide the decision-makers with adequate data needed in analysing the situation and carrying out countermeasures. Managing measurements in different situations in a proper way requires the existence of pre-prepared emergency monitoring strategies. Preparing a comprehensive yet versatile strategy is not an easy task to perform because there are lots of different factors that have to be taken into account. The primary objective of this study was to discuss the general problematics concerning emergency monitoring strategies and to describe a few important features of an efficient emergency monitoring system as well as factors affecting measurement activities in practise. Some information concerning the current situation in the Nordic countries has also been included. (au)

  16. Investigation the optical and radiative properties of aerosol vertical profile of boundary layer by lidar and ground based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Chou, C.; Lin, P.; Wang, S.

    2011-12-01

    The planetary boundary layer is the air layer near the ground directly affected by diurnal heat, moisture, aerosol, and cloud transfer to or from the surface. In the daytime solar radiation heats the surface, initiating thermal instability or convection. Whereas, the scattering and absorption of aerosols or clouds might decrease the surface radiation or heat atmosphere which induce feedbacks such as the enhanced stratification and change in relative humidity in the boundary layer. This study is aimed to understand the possible radiative effect of aerosols basing on ground based aerosol measurements and lidar installed in National Taiwan University in Taipei. The optical and radiative properties of aerosols are dominated by aerosol composition, particle size, hygroscopicity property, and shape. In this study, aerosol instruments including integrating nephelometer, open air nephelometer, aethalometer are applied to investigate the relationship between aerosol hygroscopicity properties and aerosol types. The aerosol hygroscopicity properties are further applied to investigate the effect of relative humidity on aerosol vertical profiles measured by a dual-wavelength and depolarization lidar. The possible radiative effect of aerosols are approached by vertical atmospheric extinction profiles measured by lidar. Calculated atmospheric and aerosol heating effects was compared with vertical meteorological parameters measured by radiosonde. The result shows light-absorbing aerosol has the potential to affect the stability of planetary boundary layer.

  17. Analysis of diffuse radiation data for Beer Sheva: Measured (shadow ring) versus calculated (global-horizontal beam) values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudish, A.I. (Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)); Ianetz, A. (Israel Meteorological Service, Bet Dagan (Israel))

    1993-12-01

    The authors have utilized concurrently measured global, normal incidence beam, and diffuse radiation data, the latter measured by means of a shadow ring pyranometer to study the relative magnitude of the anisotropic contribution (circumsolar region and nonuniform sky conditions) to the diffuse radiation. In the case of Beer Sheva, the monthly average hourly anisotropic correction factor varies from 2.9 to 20.9%, whereas the [open quotes]standard[close quotes] geometric correction factor varies from 5.6 to 14.0%. The monthly average hourly overall correction factor (combined anisotropic and geometric factors) varies from 8.9 to 37.7%. The data have also been analyzed using a simple model of sky radiance developed by Steven in 1984. His anisotropic correction factor is a function of the relative strength and angular width of the circumsolar radiation region. The results of this analysis are in agreement with those previously reported for Quidron on the Dead Sea, viz. the anisotropy and relative strength of the circumsolar radiation are significantly greater than at any of the sites analyzed by Steven. In addition, the data have been utilized to validate a model developed by LeBaron et al. in 1990 for correcting shadow ring diffuse radiation data. The monthly average deviation between the corrected and true diffuse radiation values varies from 4.55 to 7.92%.

  18. Unexpected Up/Down asymmetry measured in axial radiation exiting high-temperature dynamic-hohlraum x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, T. W. L.; Lemke, R. W.; Mock, R. C.; Oliver, B. V.; Chandler, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Nash, T. J.; Ruiz, C. L.; Waisman, E. M.; Peterson, D. L.; Chrien, R. E.; Idzorek, G. C.; Watt, R. G.; Roderick, N. F.; Haines, M. G.

    2002-11-01

    A 10 TW radiation source has been developed on the 20-MA Z facility that produces a high-temperature ( 215 eV) x-ray pulse. The pulse is generated in the positive z-direction through a REH (radiation exit hole), primarily from the interior of a collapsing dynamic-hohlraum (DH) centered within a z-pinch [1]. By adding an identical REH at the bottom of the hohlraum, radiation generated in the negative z direction through the bottom offers the possibility of doubling the utility of the hohlraum. Because of the up/down symmetry of the DH about the mid-plane of the z-axis (aside from the power feed), a radiation pulse similar to that exiting the top-REH (anode) is expected leaving the bottom-REH (cathode). Measurements indicate, however, that the peak radiated power exiting the top-REH is 2±0.2 times that exiting the bottom-REH. In contrast, the total energy radiated from either REH is about the same. Detailed measurements of this unexpected asymmetry, apparently dependent on polarity, together with potential origins of the asymmetry are discussed. [1] T. W. L. Sanford, et al, in press, Phys. Plasmas 9, (Aug. 2002). *Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by the Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Measurements of an Intrusion of Water Vapor into the High Arctic and its Effect on Wintertime Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nott, G. J.; Doyle, J. G.; Lesins, G. B.; Thackray, C. P.; Perro, C. W.; Duck, T. J.; Drummond, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas, yet little is known about it in the High Arctic during winter due to a historic lack of measurements and difficulties associated with satellite retrievals. With cold temperatures and a very stable boundary layer, the water vapor mixing ratio peaks around only 0.3 g kg-1. Any influxes of moist air from more moderate latitudes are thus likely to have a significant impact on Arctic tropospheric processes and the radiation budget. With lidar and accompanying radiometer measurements at Eureka (79°59'N, 85°56'W) we present one highly dynamic instance of such an intrusion from the winter of 2009/10. Measurements with the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar, shown in the figure, display distinct and seperate wet and dry air parcels during the case study. Two significant influxes of moist air (mixing ratio peaking at 1.2 g kg-1) are observed while aerosol profiles show associated cloud and precipitation. An animated map of precipitable water measured by the Microwave Humidity Sounder will be presented that shows the moist air originating over the Bering Sea and sweeping north-east into the Arctic, reaching Eureka on Feburary 9. Radiometer measurements of downwelling radiation during this time period show that the influx of water vapor alone caused a 13% increase in longwave radiation at the surface. A radiative transfer model (SBDART) has been used to isolate the effect of the water vapor, temperature, and cloud cover variations associated with this intrusion, on the overall radiation flux. Only the single event will be presented in detail however longer term data sets of water vapor indicate that such intrusions happen once or twice a month each winter. With such significant influxes of water vapor it is possible that these intrusions significantly affect the average wintertime radiation budget. Lidar measurements of water vapor mixing ratio over Eureka showing two

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan. Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Ellingson, Robert G.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Klein, Steve A.; McFarquhar, Gregory M.; Lamb, Peter J.; Long, Charles M.; Verlinde, Johannes

    2004-10-30

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years; Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square; Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds; Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations; Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites; Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale; and, Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote

  1. Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Analysis of Clinical Performance Measures in the Management of Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Khalid, Najma [Quality Research in Radiation Oncology, American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Minsky, Bruce D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD, Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crozier, Cheryl; Owen, Jean B. [Quality Research in Radiation Oncology, American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Devlin, Phillip M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute at the Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Background: The specific aim was to determine national patterns of radiation therapy (RT) practice in patients treated for stage IB-IV (nonmetastatic) gastric cancer (GC). Methods and Materials: A national process survey of randomly selected US RT facilities was conducted which retrospectively assessed demographics, staging, geographic region, practice setting, and treatment by using on-site record review of eligible GC cases treated from 2005 to 2007. Three clinical performance measures (CPMs), (1) use of computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning; (2) use of dose volume histograms (DVHs) to evaluate RT dose to the kidneys and liver; and (3) completion of RT within the prescribed time frame; and emerging quality indicators, (i) use of intensity modulated RT (IMRT); (ii) use of image-guided tools (IGRT) other than CT for RT target delineation; and (iii) use of preoperative RT, were assessed. Results: CPMs were computed for 250 eligible patients at 45 institutions (median age, 62 years; 66% male; 60% Caucasian). Using 2000 American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria, 13% of patients were stage I, 29% were stage II, 32% were stage IIIA, 10% were stage IIIB, and 12% were stage IV. Most patients (43%) were treated at academic centers, 32% were treated at large nonacademic centers, and 25% were treated at small to medium sized facilities. Almost all patients (99.5%) underwent CT-based planning, and 75% had DVHs to evaluate normal tissue doses to the kidneys and liver. Seventy percent of patients completed RT within the prescribed time frame. IMRT and IGRT were used in 22% and 17% of patients, respectively. IGRT techniques included positron emission tomography (n=20), magnetic resonance imaging (n=1), respiratory gating and 4-dimensional CT (n=22), and on-board imaging (n=10). Nineteen percent of patients received preoperative RT. Conclusions: This analysis of radiation practice patterns for treating nonmetastatic GC indicates widespread adoption of CT

  2. Data management and scientific integration within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracio, Deborah K.; Hatfield, Larry D.; Yates, Kenneth R.; Voyles, Jimmy W.; Tichler, Joyce L.; Cederwall, Richard T.; Laufersweiler, Mark J.; Leach, Martin J.; Singley, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy with the goal to improve the predictive capabilities of General Circulation Models (GCM's) in their treatment of clouds and radiative transfer effects. To achieve this goal, three experimental testbeds were designed for the deployment of instruments that will collect atmospheric data used to drive the GCM's. Each site, known as a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART), consists of a highly available, redundant data system for the collection of data from a variety of instrumentation. The first CART site was deployed in April 1992 in the Southern Great Plains (SGP), Lamont, Oklahoma, with the other two sites to follow in September 1995 in the Tropical Western Pacific and in 1997 on the North Slope of Alaska. Approximately 400 MB of data are transferred per day via the Internet from the SGP site to the ARM Experiment Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington. The Experiment Center is central to the ARM data path and provides for the collection, processing, analysis, and delivery of ARM data. Data are received from the CART sites from a variety of instrumentation, observational systems, amd external data sources. The Experiment Center processes these data streams on a continuous basis to provide derived data products to the ARM Science Team in near real-time while providing a three-month running archive of data. A primary requirement of the ARM Program is to preserve and protect all data produced or acquired. This function is performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory where leading edge technology is employed for the long-term storage of ARM data. The ARM Archive provides access to data for participation outside of the ARM Program. The ARM Program involves a collaborative effort by teams from various DOE National Laboratories, providing multi-disciplinary areas of expertise. This paper will discuss the collaborative methods in which the ARM teams

  3. Evaluation of measurement methods for diffuse solar radiation; Avaliacao de metodos de medicao da radiacao solar difusa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricieri, Reinaldo Prandini; Escobedo, Joao Francisco; Almeida Frisina, Valeria de [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agronomicas. Dept. de Ciencias Ambientais

    1998-07-01

    The evaluation results from measuring methods of the diffuse solar radiation, disc and shadow ring are described compared to the method by difference between the global radiation and the direct radiation projected in a horizontal plane. The disc method is dependent on the diffuse radiation anisotropy, with an average relative deviation around 7.1% with percentages according to the sky cover; 11.56% for open sky days; 4.8% for partly cloudy days and 2.43% for cloudy days. The shadow ring method is also sky cover dependent with an average relative deviation 8.0% ranging from 8.99% for open sky days; 7.70% for partly cloudy and 2.5% for cloudy days. (author)

  4. Radiative Heat Loss Measurements During Microgravity Droplet Combustion in a Slow Convective Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Kaib, Nathan; Easton, John; Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiative heat loss from burning droplets in a slow convective flow under microgravity conditions is measured using a broad-band (0.6 to 40 microns) radiometer. In addition, backlit images of the droplet as well as color images of the flame were obtained using CCD cameras to estimate the burning rates and the flame dimensions, respectively. Tests were carried out in air at atmospheric pressure using n-heptane and methanol fuels with imposed forced flow velocities varied from 0 to 10 centimeters per second and initial droplet diameters varied from 1 to 3 millimeters. Slow convective flows were generated using three different experimental configurations in three different facilities in preparation for the proposed International Space Station droplet experiments. In the 2.2 Second Drop-Tower Facility a droplet supported on the leading edge of a quartz fiber is placed within a flow tunnel supplied by compressed air. In the Zero-Gravity Facility (five-second drop tower) a tethered droplet is translated in a quiescent ambient atmosphere to establish a uniform flow field around the droplet. In the KC 135 aircraft an electric fan was used to draw a uniform flow past a tethered droplet. Experimental results show that the burn rate increases and the overall flame size decreases with increases in forced-flow velocities over the range of flow velocities and droplet sizes tested. The total radiative heat loss rate, Q(sub r), decreases as the imposed flow velocity increases with the spherically symmetric combustion having the highest values. These observations are in contrast to the trends observed for gas-jet flames in microgravity, but consistent with the observations during flame spread over solid fuels where the burning rate is coupled to the forced flow as here.

  5. Radon-thoron discriminative measurements in the high natural radiation areas of southwestern Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïdou; Tokonami, Shinji; Janik, Miroslaw; Samuel, Bineng Guillaume; Abdourahimi; Joseph Emmanuel, Ndjana Nkoulou I I

    2015-12-01

    Although indoor radon was initially measured in the uranium regions of Poli and Lolodorf using Electret Ionization Chambers, discriminative RADUET detectors were deployed in 70 houses of the high natural radiation areas of Bikoue and Ngombas in the uranium region of Lolodorf in Southwestern Cameroon. Radon and thoron concentrations were determined using Image-J and Microscope Methods for track evaluation. Radon and thoron concentrations follow lognormal distributions and ranged respectively from 27 ± 26 to 937 ± 5 Bq m(-3) and from 48 ± 40 to 700 ± 128 Bq m(-3). The arithmetic means of radon and thoron concentrations were found to be 92 ± 3 Bq m(-3) and 260 ± 13 Bq m(-3.) Less than 2% of houses have indoor radon above the reference level of 300 Bq m(-3) and 30% of houses have thoron concentrations above 300 Bq m(-3.) Inhalation doses due to radon and thoron range respectively between 0.6-17.7 mSv yr(-1) and 0.2-3 mSv yr(-1) with the mean values of 1.4 mSv yr(-1) and 1 mSv yr(-1). The contribution of indoor thoron to the total inhalation dose ranges between 15%- 78.5% with the mean value of 47%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation dose.

  6. Global top-down smoke aerosol emissions estimation using satellite fire radiative power measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ichoku

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning occurs seasonally in most vegetated parts of the world, consuming large amounts of biomass fuel, generating intense heat energy, and emitting corresponding amounts of smoke plumes that comprise different species of aerosols and trace gases. Accurate estimates of these emissions are required as model inputs to evaluate and forecast smoke plume transport and impacts on air quality, human health, clouds, weather, radiation, and climate. Emissions estimates have long been based on bottom-up approaches that are not only complex, but also fraught with compounding uncertainties. Fortunately, a series of recent studies have revealed that both the rate of biomass consumption and the rate of emission of aerosol particulate matter (PM by open biomass burning are directly proportional to the rate of release of fire radiative energy (FRE, which is fire radiative power (FRP that is measurable from satellite. This direct relationship enables the determination of coefficients of emission (Ce, which can be used to convert FRP or FRE to smoke aerosol emissions in the same manner as emission factors (EFs are used to convert burned biomass to emissions. We have leveraged this relationship to generate the first global 1° × 1° gridded Ce product for smoke aerosol or total particulate matter (TPM emissions using coincident measurements of FRP and aerosol optical thickness (AOT from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS sensors aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. This new Fire Energetics and Emissions Research version 1.0 (FEER.v1 Ce product has now been released to the community and can be obtained from http://feer.gsfc.nasa.gov/, along with the corresponding 1-to-1 mapping of their quality assurance (QA flags that will enable the Ce values to be filtered by quality for use in various applications. The regional averages of Ce values for different ecosystem types were found to be in the ranges of: 16–21 g MJ−1 for savanna

  7. Radiation dose to children in diagnostic radiology. Measurements and methods for clinical optimisation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, A.J.

    1995-09-01

    A method for estimating mean absorbed dose to different organs and tissues was developed for paediatric patients undergoing X-ray investigations. The absorbed dose distribution in water was measured for the specific X-ray beam used. Clinical images were studied to determine X-ray beam positions and field sizes. Size and position of organs in the patient were estimated using ORNL phantoms and complementary clinical information. Conversion factors between the mean absorbed dose to various organs and entrance surface dose for five different body sizes were calculated. Direct measurements on patients estimating entrance surface dose and energy imparted for common X-ray investigations were performed. The examination technique for a number of paediatric X-ray investigations used in 19 Swedish hospitals was studied. For a simulated pelvis investigation of a 1-year old child the entrance surface dose was measured and image quality was estimated using a contrast-detail phantom. Mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues in urography, lung, pelvis, thoracic spine, lumbar spine and scoliosis investigations was calculated. Calculations of effective dose were supplemented with risk calculations for special organs e g the female breast. The work shows that the examination technique in paediatric radiology is not yet optimised, and that the non-optimised procedures contribute to a considerable variation in radiation dose. In order to optimise paediatric radiology there is a need for more standardised methods in patient dosimetry. It is especially important to relate measured quantities to the size of the patient, using e g the patient weight and length. 91 refs, 17 figs, 8 tabs.

  8. Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-03-01

    The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

  9. Measurement of the radiation in the accelerator-therapy room; Messung der Strahlung im Beschleuniger-Therapieraum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zutz, Hayo [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Photonendosimetrie'

    2013-06-15

    The measurement of the scattering radiation in the accelerator-therapy room of the PTB is described. The accelerators are commercial linear accelerators of the firm Elektra of the type ''Precise''. The measurements were performed by means of secondary-normal ionization chambers and a special measurement technique developed in the PTB both with and without the used beam. (HSI)

  10. Simulated Radiative Transfer DOAS - A new method for improving volcanic SO2 emissions retrievals from ground-based UV-spectroscopic measurements of scattered solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, C.; Deutschmann, T.; Vogel, L.; Bobrowski, N.; Hoermann, C.; Werner, C. A.; Sutton, A. J.; Elias, T.

    2011-12-01

    Passive Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) has become a standard tool for measuring SO2 at volcanoes. More recently, ultra-violet (UV) cameras have also been applied to obtain 2D images of SO2-bearing plumes. Both techniques can be used to derive SO2 emission rates by measuring SO2 column densities, integrating these along the plume cross-section, and multiplying by the wind speed. Recent measurements and model studies have revealed that the dominating source of uncertainty in these techniques often originates from an inaccurate assessment of radiative transfer through the volcanic plume. The typical assumption that all detected radiation is scattered behind the volcanic plume and takes a straight path from there to the instrument is often incorrect. We recently showed that the straight path assumption can lead to column density errors of 50% or more in cases where plumes with high SO2 and aerosol concentrations are measured from several kilometers distance, or where the background atmosphere contains a large amount of scattering aerosols. Both under- and overestimation are possible depending on the atmospheric conditions and geometry during spectral acquisition. Simulated Radiative Transfer (SRT) DOAS is a new evaluation scheme that combines radiative transfer modeling with spectral analysis of passive DOAS measurements in the UV region to derive more accurate SO2 column densities than conventional DOAS retrievals, which in turn leads to considerably more accurate emission rates. A three-dimensional backward Monte Carlo radiative transfer model is used to simulate realistic light paths in and around the volcanic plume containing variable amounts of SO2 and aerosols. An inversion algorithm is then applied to derive the true SO2 column density. For fast processing of large datasets, a linearized algorithm based on lookup tables was developed and tested on a number of example datasets. In some cases, the information content of the spectral data is

  11. Measurement of Radiation Damage of Water-based Liquid Scintillator and Liquid Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Bignell, Lindsey J; Hans, Sunej; Jaffe, David E; Rosero, Richard; Vigdor, Steven; Viren, Brett; Worcester, Elizabeth; Yeh, Minfang; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of $5\\%$ scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of $1.74 \\pm 0.55 \\%$ and $1.31 \\pm 0.59 \\%$ after $\\approx$ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Whilst some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical conte...

  12. High spatial resolution dosimetric response maps for radiotherapy ionization chambers measured using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, D. J.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wright, T. E.; Harty, P. D.; Lehmann, J.; Livingstone, J.; Crosbie, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Small circular beams of synchrotron radiation (0.1 mm and 0.4 mm in diameter) were used to irradiate ionization chambers of the types commonly used in radiotherapy. By scanning the chamber through the beam and measuring the ionization current, a spatial map of the dosimetric response of the chamber was recorded. The technique is able to distinguish contributions to the large-field ionization current from the chamber walls, central electrode and chamber stem. Scans were recorded for the NE 2571 Farmer chamber, the PTW 30013, IBA FC65-G Farmer-type chambers, the NE 2611A and IBA CC13 thimble chambers, the PTW 31006 and 31014 pinpoint chambers, the PTW Roos and Advanced Markus plane-parallel chambers, and the PTW 23342 thin-window soft x-ray chamber. In all cases, large contributions to the response arise from areas where the incident beam grazes the cavity surfaces. Quantitative as well as qualitative information about the relative chamber response was extracted from the maps, including the relative contribution of the central electrode. Line scans using monochromatic beams show the effect of the photon energy on the chamber response. For Farmer-type chambers, a simple Monte Carlo model was in good agreement with the measured response.

  13. Measurement and analysis of radiofrequency radiations from some mobile phone base stations in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoako, J K; Fletcher, J J; Darko, E O

    2009-08-01

    A survey of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation at public access points in the vicinity of 50 cellular phone base stations has been carried out. The primary objective was to measure and analyse the electromagnetic field strength levels emitted by antennae installed and operated by the Ghana Telecommunications Company. On all the sites measurements were made using a hand-held spectrum analyser to determine the electric field level with the 900 and 1800 MHz frequency bands. The results indicated that power densities at public access points varied from as low as 0.01 microW m(-2) to as high as 10 microW m(-2) for the frequency of 900 MHz. At a transmission frequency of 1800 MHz, the variation of power densities is from 0.01 to 100 microW m(-2). The results were found to be in compliant with the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiological Protection guidance level but were 20 times higher than the results generally obtained for such a practice elsewhere. There is therefore a need to re-assess the situation to ensure reduction in the present level as an increase in mobile phone usage is envisaged within the next few years.

  14. Measurements of Coherent Cherenkov Radiation in Rock Salt: Implications for GZK Neutrino Underground Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Milincic, R; Saltzberg, D; Field, R C; Guillian, G; Walz, D; Williams, D

    2005-01-01

    We report on further SLAC measurements of the Askaryan effect: coherent radio emission from charge asymmetry in electromagnetic cascades. We used synthetic rock salt as the dielectric medium, with cascades produced by GeV bremsstrahlung photons at the Final Focus Test Beam. We extend our prior discovery measurements to a wider range of parameter space and explore the effect in a dielectric medium of great potential interest to large scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors: rock salt. We observed strong coherent pulsed radio emission over a frequency band from 0.2-15 GHz. A grid of embedded dual-polarization antennas was used to confirm the linear polarization and track the change of direction of the electric-field vector around the shower. Coherence was observed over 4 orders of magnitude of shower energy. The frequency dependence of the radiation was tested over two orders of magnitude of UHF and microwave frequencies. Based on these results we have performed a simulation of a realistic GZK neutrino teles...

  15. Interannual variation of global net radiation flux as measured from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Wild, Martin; Ruymbeke, Michel; Thuillier, Gérard; Meftah, Mustapha; Karatekin, Ozgur

    2016-06-01

    The global net radiation flux (NRF) in and out of the climate system at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) varies at interannual time scales, reflecting the complexity of the processes responsible for attaining global energy equilibrium. These processes are investigated in this study using the previously unexplored data acquired by a bolometric type sensor installed in the PICARD microsatellite. The obtained anomalies in the NRF (PICARD-NRF) are compared to the global NRF changes at the TOA measured by the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System mission (CERES-NRF). The interanual PICARD-NRF is strongly correlated with the matching period CERES-NRF; the bootstrapped correlation at the 95%(+0.85 and +0.97) confidence intervals is +0.93. Consistency in the interannual variability in the NRF derived by two completely independent measurement systems enhances confidence in the estimated magnitude of these variations. To reveal the possible drivers of the NRF interannual variability, the NRF values were compared with the multivariate El Niño-Southern Oscillation index.

  16. Measurement of radiative widths of $a_2(1320)$ and $\\pi_2(1670)$

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C; Alekseev, M G; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Andrieux, V; Anosov, V; Austregesilo, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Baum, G; Beck, R; Bedfer, Y; Berlin, A; Bernhard, J; Bicker, K; Bieling, J; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bodlak, M; Boer, M; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bressan, A; Buchele, M; Burtin, E; Capozza, L; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Curiel, Q; Dalla Torre, S; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dunnweber, W; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Elia, C; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Filin, A; Finger, M; Finger jr, M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N; Friedrich, J.M; Frolov, V; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Gnesi, I; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Gorzellik, M; Grabmuller, S; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Guskov, A; Guthorl, T; Haas, F; von Harrach, D; Hahne, D; Hashimoto, R; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hinterberger, F; Hoppner, Ch; Horikawa, N; d'Hose, N; Huber, S; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, A; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jary, V; Jasinski, P; Jorg, P; Joosten, R; Kabuss, E; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Konigsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Kral, Z; Kramer, M; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuchinski, N; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Kurjata, R P; Lednev, A.A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matousek, J; Matsuda, H; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Miyachi, Y; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Novy, J; Nowak, W D; Nunes, A S; Orlov, I; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Pesek, M; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Reicherz, G; Rocco, E; Rychter, A; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schluter, T; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, K; Schmieden, H; Schonning, K; Schopferer, S; Schott, M; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sirtl, S; Slunecka, M; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Steiger, L; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Suzuki, H; Szabelski, A; Szameitat, T; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; ter Wolbeek, J; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Thibaud, F; Uhl, S; Uman, I; Vandenbroucke, M; Virius, M; Vondra, J; Wang, L; Weisrock, T; Wilfert, M; Windmolders, R; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M

    2014-01-01

    The COMPASS Collaboration at CERN has investigated the reaction $\\pi^- \\gamma \\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ embedded in the Primakoff reaction of $190~\\textrm{GeV}$ pions scattering in the Coulomb field of a lead target, $\\pi^- \\text{Pb} \\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+ \\text{Pb}$. Exchange of quasi-real photons is selected by isolating the sharp Coulomb peak observed at momentum transfer below $0.001~(\\text{GeV}/c)^2$. Using a partial-wave analysis the amplitudes and relative phases of the $a_2(1320)$ and $\\pi_2(1670)$ mesons have been extracted, and the Coulomb and the diffractive contributions have been disentangled. Measuring absolute production cross sections we have determined the radiative width of the $a_2(1320)$ to be $\\Gamma_0(a_2(1320) \\rightarrow \\pi\\gamma) = (358 \\pm 6_{\\textrm{stat}} \\pm 42_{\\textrm{syst}})~\\textrm{keV}$. As the first measurement, $\\Gamma_0(\\pi_2(1670) \\rightarrow \\pi\\gamma) = (181 \\pm 11_{\\textrm{stat}} \\pm 27_{\\textrm{syst}})~\\textrm{keV} \\cdot (\\textrm{BR}^{\\textrm{PDG}}_{f_2 \\pi}/...

  17. Measurement of the radiative decay of polarized muons in the MEG experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, A.M.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; D' Onofrio, A.; Dussoni, S.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Nicolo, D.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Tenchini, F. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Pisa Univ. (Italy); Bao, Y.; Hildebrandt, M.; Kettle, P.R.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Papa, A.; Ritt, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Baracchini, E. [ICEPP, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Berg, F.; Hodge, Z.; Rutar, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Biasotti, M.; De Gerone, M.; Gatti, F.; Pizzigoni, G. [INFN, Sezione di Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa Univ. (Italy); Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P.W.; De Bari, A.; Rossella, M. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Pavia Univ. (Italy); Cavoto, G.; Graziosi, A.; Piredda, G.; Ripiccini, E.; Voena, C. [INFN, Sezione di Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, ' ' Sapienza' ' Univ. Rome (Italy); Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Grancagnolo, F.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Tassielli, G.F. [INFN, Sezione di Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Salento Univ. Lecce (Italy); Fujii, Y.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Mori, Toshinori; Nakaura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Sawada, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K. [ICEPP, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Grigoriev, D.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Haruyama, T.; Mihara, S.; Nishiguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ieki, K. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); ICEPP, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Ignatov, F.; Khazin, B.I.; Popov, A.; Yudin, Yu.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kang, Tae Im; Lim, G.M.A.; Molzon, W.; You, Z. [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Renga, F. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); INFN, Sezione di Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, ' ' Sapienza' ' Univ. Rome (Italy); Venturini, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Pisa Univ. (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Collaboration: The MEG Collaboration

    2016-03-15

    We studied the radiative muon decay μ{sup +} → e{sup +}νanti νγ by using for the first time an almost fully polarized muon source. We identified a large sample (∝13,000) of these decays in a total sample of 1.8 x 10{sup 14} positive muon decays collected in the MEG experiment in the years 2009-2010 and measured the branching ratio B(μ{sup +} → eνanti νγ) = (6.03 ± 0.14(stat.) ± 0.53(sys.)) x 10{sup -8} for E{sub e} > 45 MeV and E{sub γ} > 40 MeV, consistent with the Standard Model prediction. The precise measurement of this decay mode provides a basic tool for the timing calibration, a normalization channel, and a strong quality check of the complete MEG experiment in the search for μ{sup +} → e{sup +}γ process. (orig.)

  18. Determining the radon exhalation rate from a gold mine tailings dump by measuring the gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongori, Joash N; Lindsay, Robert; Newman, Richard T; Maleka, Peane P

    2015-02-01

    The mining activities taking place in Gauteng province, South Africa have caused millions of tons of rocks to be taken from underground to be milled and processed to extract gold. The uranium bearing tailings are placed in an estimated 250 dumps covering a total area of about 7000 ha. These tailings dumps contain considerable amounts of radium and have therefore been identified as large sources of radon. The size of these dumps make traditional radon exhalation measurements time consuming and it is difficult to get representative measurements for the whole dump. In this work radon exhalation measurements from the non-operational Kloof mine dump have been performed by measuring the gamma radiation from the dump fairly accurately over an area of more than 1 km(2). Radon exhalation from the mine dump have been inferred from this by laboratory-based and in-situ gamma measurements. Thirty four soil samples were collected at depths of 30 cm and 50 cm. The weighted average activity concentrations in the soil samples were 308 ± 7 Bq kg(-1), 255 ± 5 Bq kg(-1) and 18 ± 1 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U, (40)K and (232)Th, respectively. The MEDUSA (Multi-Element Detector for Underwater Sediment Activity) γ-ray detection system was used for field measurements. The radium concentrations were then used with soil parameters to obtain the radon flux using different approaches such as the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) formula. Another technique the MEDUSA Laboratory Technique (MELT) was developed to map radon exhalation based on (1) recognising that radon exhalation does not affect (40)K and (232)Th activity concentrations and (2) that the ratio of the activity concentration of the field (MEDUSA) to the laboratory (HPGe) for (238)U and (40)K or (238)U and (232)Th will give a measure of the radon exhalation at a particular location in the dump. The average, normalised radon flux was found to be 0.12 ± 0.02 Bq m(-2) s(-1) for the mine dump.

  19. Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, B.; Arnott, P.; Bucholtz, A.; Colarco, P.; Covert, D.; Eilers, J.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Flagan, R.; Jonsson, H.

    2003-01-01

    In order to meet one of its goals - to relate observations of radiative fluxes and radiances to the atmospheric composition - the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has pursued measurements and modeling activities that attempt to determine how aerosols impact atmospheric radiative transfer, both directly and indirectly. However, significant discrepancies between aerosol properties measured in situ or remotely remain. One of the objectives of the Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (TOP) conducted by ARM in May 2003 at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north central Oklahoma was to examine and hopefully reduce these differences. The IOP involved airborne measurements from two airplanes over the heavily instrumented SGP site. We give an overview of airborne results obtained aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. The Twin Otter performed 16 research flights over the SGP site. The aircraft carried instrumentation to perform in-situ measurements of aerosol absorption, scattering, extinction and particle size. This included such novel techniques as the photoacoustic and cavity ring-down methods for in-situ absorption (675 nm) and extinction (675 and 1550 nm) and a new multiwavelength, filter-based absorption photometer (467, 530, 660 nm). A newly developed instrument measured cloud condensation nucleus concentration (CCN) concentrations at two supersaturation levels. Aerosol optical depth and extinction (354-2139 nm) were measured with the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel sunphotometer. Furthermore, up-and downwelling solar (broadband and spectral) and infrared radiation were measured using seven individual radiometers. Three up-looking radiometers werer mounted on a newly developed stabilized platform, keeping the instruments level up to aircraft pitch and roll angles of approximately 10(exp 0). This resulted in unprecedented continuous vertical profiles

  20. Radiation Pattern Measurement of a Low-Profile Wearable Antenna Using an Optical Fibre and a Solid Anthropomorphic Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Hong Loh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study into radiation pattern measurements of an electrically small dielectric resonator antenna (DRA operating between 2.4 and 2.5 GHz in the industrial, scientific and medical (ISM radio band for body-centric wireless communication applications. To eliminate the distortion of the radiation pattern associated with the unwanted radiation from a metallic coaxial cable feeding the antenna we have replaced it with a fibre optic feed and an electro-optical (EO transducer. The optical signal is then converted back to RF using an Opto-Electric Field Sensor (OEFS system. To ensure traceable measurements of the radiation pattern performance of the wearable antenna a generic head and torso solid anthropomorphic phantom model has been employed. Furthermore, to illustrate the benefits of the method, numerical simulations of the co-polar and cross-polar H-plane radiation patterns at 2.4, 2.45, and 2.5 GHz are compared with the measured results obtained using: (i an optical fibre; and (ii a metallic coaxial cable.