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Sample records for cenozoic arc front

  1. Abanico East Formation: petrology and geochemistry of volcanic rocks behind the Cenozoic arc front in the Andean Cordillera, central Chile (33°50'S

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    Marcia Muñoz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The stratigraphy, chemistry and age of rocks assigned to the eastern portion of the Abanico Formation exposed along the El Volcán river valley, Principal Cordillera east of Santiago (30º50'S/70º12'-70º5'W, are reported and discussed. This ca. 3,300 m thick succession is mainly composed of basalts, basaltic andesites and volcaniclastic rocks. 40Ar/39Ar radiometric dates on plagioclase from the lava flows yield Oligocene-lower Miocene ages with a maximum age of 34.3 ±0.4 Ma for the lower part and a plateau age of 21.4±1.0 Ma for the upper part of the succession. The lava flows show calc-alkaline affinities and have chemical characteristics that are typical of arc volcanic rocks erupted in an active continental margin. A temporal chemical evolution in the sequence is indicated by upward increases in concentrations of LILE and LREE elements and LaN/YbN ratios. This pattern can be attributed to increasing contributions of fluids derived from the subducted lithosphere with time. A chemical comparison of these rocks with Oligocene-lower Miocene volcanic rocks from the Cerro Abanico and Chacabuco areas on the western border of the Principal Cordillera, east of Santiago, and at the northern end of the Central Depression reveals west to east compositional variations. From west to east these variations include: (1 increasing LILE and LREE concentrations, LaN/YbN ratios and Sr and Nd initial isotopic ratios, and (2 decreasing LILE/HFSE and LREE/HFSE ratios. These pattern can be attributed to a west to east decrease in the contribution of slab derived fluids and increase in the influence of crustal contamination processesLa formación Abanico Este: petrología y geoquímica de las rocas volcánicas detrás del arco Cenozoico en la Cordillera Andina, Chile central (33º50'S. Se presentan los resultados del estudio de la estratigrafía, química y edades de rocas asignadas a la franja oriental de la Formación Abanico expuestas en la ladera sur del R

  2. History of oceanic front development in the New Zealand sector of the Southern Ocean during the Cenozoic: a synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New Zealand sector of the Southern Ocean (NZSSO) has opened about the Indian-Pacific spreading ridge throughout the Cenozoic. Today the NZSSO is characterised by broad zonal belts of antarctic (cold), subantarctic (cool), and subtropical (warm) surface-water masses separated by prominent oceanic fronts: the Subtropical Front (STF) c. 43 degrees S, Subantarctic Front (SAF) c. 50 degrees S, and Antarctic Polar Front (AAPF) c. 60 degrees S. Despite a meagre database, the broad pattern of Cenozoic evolution of these fronts is reviewed from the results of Deep Sea Drilling Project-based studies of sediment facies, microfossil assemblages and diversity, and stable isotope records, as well as from evidence in onland New Zealand Cenozoic sequences. Results are depicted schematically on seven paleogeographic maps covering the NZSSO at 10 m.y. intervals through the Cenozoic. During the Paleocene and most of the Eocene (65-35 Ma), the entire NZSSO was under the influence of warm to cool subtropical waters, with no detectable oceanic fronts. In the latest Eocene (c. 35 Ma), a proto-STF is shown separating subantarctic and subtropical waters offshore from Antarctica, near 65 degrees S paleolatitude. During the earliest Oligocene, this front was displaced northwards by development of an AAPF following major global cooling and biotic turnover associated with ice sheet expansion to sea level on East Antarctica. Early Oligocene full opening (c. 31 Ma) of the Tasmanian gateway initiated vigorous proto-circum-Antarctic flow of cold/cool waters, possibly through a West Antarctic seaway linking the southern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, including detached northwards 'jetting' onto the New Zealand plateau where condensation and unconformity development was widespread in cool-water carbonate facies. Since this time, a broad tripartite division of antarctic, subantarctic, and subtropical waters has existed in the NZSSO, including possible development of a proto-SAF within the

  3. Temporal evolution of island arc magmatism: geochronology, petrology et geochemistry of mesozoic and cenozoic magmatic rocks from Sumatra (Indonesia)

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    Sumatra island (Western Indonesia) belongs to the Sunda magmatic arc, which results from the subduction of the Indian ocean plate beneath the margin of the Eurasiatic continental block. Plutonic and volcanic rocks of Mesozoic and Cenozoic ages are very abundant in Sumatra, where they mainly outcrop in a NNW-SSE trending, 1,650 km-long stripe in the western part of the island. The spatial and temporal distributions of magmatic rocks in Sumatra were not previously investigated in detail. We have performed 175 40K-40Ar datings on bulk rocks and minerals separated from samples which have also been analysed for major and trace elements by ICP-AES. These results allow to discuss the distribution of magmatic events in space of a long subduction period on the chemical composition of the Sunda arc mantle wedge. (author)

  4. Arc-oblique fault systems: their role in the Cenozoic structural evolution and metallogenesis of the Andes of central Chile

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    Piquer, Jose; Berry, Ron F.; Scott, Robert J.; Cooke, David R.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the Main Cordillera of Central Chile is characterized by the formation and subsequent inversion of an intra-arc volcano-tectonic basin. The world's largest porphyry Cu-Mo deposits were emplaced during basin inversion. Statistically, the area is dominated by NE- and NW-striking faults, oblique to the N-striking inverted basin-margin faults and to the axis of Cenozoic magmatism. This structural pattern is interpreted to reflect the architecture of the pre-Andean basement. Stratigraphic correlations, syn-extensional deposits and kinematic criteria on fault surfaces show several arc-oblique structures were active as normal faults at different stages of basin evolution. The geometry of syn-tectonic hydrothermal mineral fibers, in turn, demonstrates that most of these structures were reactivated as strike-slip ± reverse faults during the middle Miocene - early Pliocene. Fault reactivation age is constrained by 40Ar/39Ar dating of hydrothermal minerals deposited during fault slip. The abundance and distribution of these minerals indicates fault-controlled hydrothermal fluid flow was widespread during basin inversion. Fault reactivation occurred under a transpressive regime with E- to ENE-directed shortening, and was concentrated around major plutons and hydrothermal centers. At the margins of the former intra-arc basin, deformation was largely accommodated by reverse faulting, whereas in its central part strike-slip faulting was predominant.

  5. From folding to transpressional faulting: the Cenozoic Fusha structural belt in front of the Western Kunlun Orogen, northwestern Tibetan Plateau

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    Wang, Cong; Cheng, Xiao-Gan; Chen, Han-Lin; Li, Kang; Fan, Xiao-Gen; Wang, Chun-Yang

    2016-03-01

    Fusha structural belt (FSB) is one of the most important tectonic units in front of the Western Kunlun Orogen, northwestern Tibetan Plateau (NW China), in which the Kekeya oil field was discovered in 1971. However, there is no new oil field discovered since then due to the unclarity of the intense and complex Cenozoic deformation in this area. Based on field investigation, seismic interpretation and Continuous Electromagnetic Profile data, we analyze in detail the Cenozoic deformation history, emphasizing on the spatial and temporal variation of the deformation of the FSB in this paper. The result suggests that the FSB was dominated by two deformation events, (1) early (Miocene-early Pliocene) folding event expressed by anticline, with the western segment E-W orienting, while the eastern segment NWW-SEE orienting and (2) later (since late Pliocene) transpressional faulting event that destroyed and divided the earlier anticline into a number of fault blocks. The transpressional faulting caused dextral strike-slip reverse fault, with the dip angles decreasing eastward from ~90° to <45°. The dextral strike-slip reverse fault developed in the core of the anticline in the western part which caused the anticline into several fault blocks, while in the eastern part, the fault developed in the north limb of the anticline with the core of the anticline reserved. Based on the spatial variation of structural characteristics, we propose that the fault block traps and anticline traps in the eastern segment and fault block traps in western segment are favorable for hydrocarbon accumulation.

  6. From folding to transpressional faulting: the Cenozoic Fusha structural belt in front of the Western Kunlun Orogen, northwestern Tibetan Plateau

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    Wang, Cong; Cheng, Xiao-Gan; Chen, Han-Lin; Li, Kang; Fan, Xiao-Gen; Wang, Chun-Yang

    2016-07-01

    Fusha structural belt (FSB) is one of the most important tectonic units in front of the Western Kunlun Orogen, northwestern Tibetan Plateau (NW China), in which the Kekeya oil field was discovered in 1971. However, there is no new oil field discovered since then due to the unclarity of the intense and complex Cenozoic deformation in this area. Based on field investigation, seismic interpretation and Continuous Electromagnetic Profile data, we analyze in detail the Cenozoic deformation history, emphasizing on the spatial and temporal variation of the deformation of the FSB in this paper. The result suggests that the FSB was dominated by two deformation events, (1) early (Miocene-early Pliocene) folding event expressed by anticline, with the western segment E-W orienting, while the eastern segment NWW-SEE orienting and (2) later (since late Pliocene) transpressional faulting event that destroyed and divided the earlier anticline into a number of fault blocks. The transpressional faulting caused dextral strike-slip reverse fault, with the dip angles decreasing eastward from ~90° to <45°. The dextral strike-slip reverse fault developed in the core of the anticline in the western part which caused the anticline into several fault blocks, while in the eastern part, the fault developed in the north limb of the anticline with the core of the anticline reserved. Based on the spatial variation of structural characteristics, we propose that the fault block traps and anticline traps in the eastern segment and fault block traps in western segment are favorable for hydrocarbon accumulation.

  7. Extensional vs contractional Cenozoic deformation in Ibiza (Balearic Promontory, Spain): Integration in the West Mediterranean back-arc setting

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    Etheve, Nathalie; Frizon de Lamotte, Dominique; Mohn, Geoffroy; Martos, Raquel; Roca, Eduard; Blanpied, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Based on field work and seismic reflection data, we investigate the Cenozoic tectono-sedimentary evolution offshore and onshore Ibiza allowing the proposal of a new tectonic agenda for the region and its integration in the geodynamic history of the West Mediterranean. The late Oligocene-early Miocene rifting event, which characterizes the Valencia Trough and the Algerian Basin, located north and south of the study area respectively, is also present in Ibiza and particularly well-expressed in the northern part of the island. Among these two rifted basins initiated in the frame of the European Cenozoic Rift System, the Valencia Trough failed rapidly while the Algerian Basin evolved after as a back-arc basin related to the subduction of the Alpine-Maghrebian Tethys. The subsequent middle Miocene compressional deformation was localized by the previous extensional faults, which were either inverted or passively translated depending on their initial orientation. Despite the lateral continuity between the External Betics and the Balearic Promontory, it appears from restored maps that this tectonic event cannot be directly related to the Betic orogen, but results from compressive stresses transmitted through the Algerian Basin. A still active back-arc asthenospheric rise likely explains the stiff behavior of this basin, which has remained poorly deformed up to recent time. During the late Miocene a new extensional episode reworked the southern part of the Balearic Promontory. It is suggested that this extensional deformation developed in a trans-tensional context related to the westward translation of the Alboran Domain and the coeval right-lateral strike-slip movement along the Emile Baudot Escarpment bounding the Algerian Basin to the north.

  8. Significance of an Active Volcanic Front in the Far Western Aleutian Arc

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    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Hoernle, K.

    2015-12-01

    Discovery of a volcanic front west of Buldir Volcano, the western-most emergent Aleutian volcano, demonstrates that the surface expression of Aleutian volcanism falls below sea level just west of 175.9° E longitude, but is otherwise continuous from mainland Alaska to Kamchatka. The newly discovered sites of western Aleutian seafloor volcanism are the Ingenstrem Depression, a 60 km-long structural depression just west of Buldir, and an unnamed area 300 km further west, referred to as the Western Cones. These locations fall along a volcanic front that stretches from Buldir to Piip Seamount near the Komandorsky Islands. Western Aleutian seafloor volcanic rocks include large quantities of high-silica andesite and dacite, which define a highly calc-alkaline igneous series and carry trace element signatures that are unmistakably subduction-related. This indicates that subducting oceanic lithosphere is present beneath the westernmost Aleutian arc. The rarity of earthquakes below depths of 200 km indicates that the subducting plate is unusually hot. Some seafloor volcanoes are 6-8 km wide at the base, and so are as large as many emergent Aleutian volcanoes. The seafloor volcanoes are submerged in water depths >3000 m because they sit on oceanic lithosphere of the Bering Sea. The volcanic front is thus displaced to the north of the ridge of arc crust that underlies the western Aleutian Islands. This displacement, which developed since approximately 6 Ma when volcanism was last active on the islands, must be a consequence of oblique convergence in a system where the subducting plate and large blocks of arc crust are both moving primarily in an arc-parallel sense. The result is a hot-slab system where low subduction rates probably limit advection of hot mantle to the subarc, and produce a relatively cool and perhaps stagnant mantle wedge. The oceanic setting and highly oblique subduction geometry also severely limit rates of sediment subduction, so the volcanic rocks, which

  9. Temporal evolution of island arc magmatism: geochronology, petrology et geochemistry of mesozoic and cenozoic magmatic rocks from Sumatra (Indonesia); Evolution temporelle du magmatisme d`arc insulaire: geochronologie, petrologie et geochimie des magmatismes mesozoiques et cenozoiques de Sumatra (Indonesie)

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    Sutanto

    1997-07-07

    Sumatra island (Western Indonesia) belongs to the Sunda magmatic arc, which results from the subduction of the Indian ocean plate beneath the margin of the Eurasiatic continental block. Plutonic and volcanic rocks of Mesozoic and Cenozoic ages are very abundant in Sumatra, where they mainly outcrop in a NNW-SSE trending, 1,650 km-long stripe in the western part of the island. The spatial and temporal distributions of magmatic rocks in Sumatra were not previously investigated in detail. We have performed 175 {sup 40}K-{sup 40}Ar datings on bulk rocks and minerals separated from samples which have also been analysed for major and trace elements by ICP-AES. These results allow to discuss the distribution of magmatic events in space of a long subduction period on the chemical composition of the Sunda arc mantle wedge. (author)

  10. Geodynamic controls on the contamination of Cenozoic arc magmas in the southern Central Andes: Insights from the O and Hf isotopic composition of zircon

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    Jones, Rosemary E.; Kirstein, Linda A.; Kasemann, Simone A.; Dhuime, Bruno; Elliott, Tim; Litvak, Vanesa D.; Alonso, Ricardo; Hinton, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Subduction zones, such as the Andean convergent margin of South America, are sites of active continental growth and crustal recycling. The composition of arc magmas, and therefore new continental crust, reflects variable contributions from mantle, crustal and subducted reservoirs. Temporal (Ma) and spatial (km) variations in these contributions to southern Central Andean arc magmas are investigated in relation to the changing plate geometry and geodynamic setting of the southern Central Andes (28-32° S) during the Cenozoic. The in-situ analysis of O and Hf isotopes in zircon, from both intrusive (granitoids) and extrusive (basaltic andesites to rhyolites) Late Cretaceous - Late Miocene arc magmatic rocks, combined with high resolution U-Pb dating, demonstrates distinct across-arc variations. Mantle-like δ18O(zircon) values (+5.4‰ to +5.7‰ (±0.4 (2σ))) and juvenile initial εHf(zircon) values (+8.3 (±0.8 (2σ)) to +10.0 (±0.9 (2σ))), combined with a lack of zircon inheritance suggests that the Late Cretaceous (∼73 Ma) to Eocene (∼39 Ma) granitoids emplaced in the Principal Cordillera of Chile formed from mantle-derived melts with very limited interaction with continental crustal material, therefore representing a sustained period of upper crustal growth. Late Eocene (∼36 Ma) to Early Miocene (∼17 Ma) volcanic arc rocks present in the Frontal Cordillera have 'mantle-like' δ18O(zircon) values (+4.8‰ (±0.2 (2σ) to +5.8‰ (±0.5 (2σ))), but less radiogenic initial εHf(zircon) values (+1.0 (±1.1 (2σ)) to +4.0 (±0.6 (2σ))) providing evidence for mixing of mantle-derived melts with the Late Paleozoic - Early Mesozoic basement (up to ∼20%). The assimilation of both Late Paleozoic - Early Mesozoic Andean crust and a Grenville-aged basement is required to produce the higher than 'mantle-like' δ18O(zircon) values (+5.5‰ (±0.6 (2σ) to +7.2‰ (±0.4 (2σ))) and unradiogenic, initial εHf(zircon) values (-3.9 (±1.0 (2σ)) to +1.6 (±4.4 (2

  11. Cenozoic back-arc magmatism of the southern extra-Andean Patagonia (44° 30' - 52° S: A review of geochemical data and geodynamic interpretations

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    M. D'Orazio

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Huge amounts of basaltic s.l. lavas were persistently erupted along the eastern side of the Andean Cordillera, throughout Cenozoic time, forming extensive plateaus, hundreds of monogenetic scoria cones and other volcanic structures in a continental back-arc setting. The igneous products exposed in the southern sector of the extra-Andean Patagonia (44° 30' - 52° S are dominantly mafic with minor slightly evolved compositions and rare highly differentiated products. The many published chemical analyses of these rocks, indicate that the mafic lavas range from strongly silica - undersaturated basanites to oversaturated basaltic andesites, and that most of the lavas have a typical within-plate geochemical signature. However, a number of lavas, generally erupted in the western-central sectors of Patagonia, are characterized by different distributions of the incompatible elements with high LILE/HFSE and LREE/HFSE ratios. The REE distribution modelling suggests a low degree of melting of a deep (> 70 km garnet-bearing source for the alkaline magmas, and a higher degree of melting of the same source, or an even higher degree of melting of an enriched source, for the subalkaline magmas. The available Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions clearly attest to a major geographic variation: the southernmost lavas have lower 87Sr/86Sr and higher 143Nd/144Nd and 206Pb/204Pb ratios with respect to those erupted to the north. On the whole, the Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions of the southern Patagonia lavas fall within the typical range of within-plate continental magmas; in addition the Pb isotope ratios fall in the range of the Southern Hemisphere Dupal Pb isotope anomaly. The geochemical variations of the southern Patagonia lavas are discussed in terms of different geochemical components: depleted and enriched sub-slab asthenosphere, enriched continental lithospheric mantle, continental crust and subducted materials. The geodynamic significance is interpreted with in the

  12. Late Cenozoic exhumation and timing of the deformation front of the Kashmir Himalayas from U-Th/(He) thermochronometry

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    Gavillot, Y. G.; Meigs, A.; Stockli, D. F.; Malik, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He cooling ages are used to quantify the recent exhumation pattern associated with fault activity across the Kashmir Himalayas. Here we present data from thirty samples, totaling of 74 individual single-grain apatite and zircon dated aliquots. Cooling age data were collected from (1) molasse sediments of the Murree and Siwalik Formations from structures in the Sub-Himalayan belt (deformed foreland) and from (2) metasediments and plutonic rocks exhumed in the 'hinterland'. Structures of the Sub-Himalayan belt include the Suruin-Mastgarh anticline (SMA) at the deformation front, equivalent to the Himalayan Frontal thrust (HFT), and emergent local faults to the north (e.g. the Riasi thrust (RT)). In the hinterland, the Main Boundary (MBT) and Main Central (MCT) thrust sheets bound the Sub-Himalayan belt to the north. Apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) cooling ages for the molasses sediments are consistently younger than the sediment age indicating that Sub-Himalayan belt samples are reset. Mean cooling age data based on the single grain populations from each sample ranges from ~1-10 Ma. Single grain and mean age probability density plots reveal a period of rapid cooling and exhumation between 1.8-2.75 Ma throughout the Sub-Himalaya. Distributed deformation associated with northward underthrusting along the MHT, and the onset of folding related to the SMA explains the regional exhumation of the Sub-Himalaya after ~2.75 Ma. Four samples from the hinterland MBT and MCT thrust sheets yield AHe cooling ages between ~5-21 Ma. Three of the samples have cooling ages between 4.7-7.2 Ma, likely coeval with activity of the MBT. Zircon (U-Th)/He (ZHe) samples from the hinterland are younger than the ages of the metasedimentary or plutonic source rocks. Most sample ages from the Sub-Himalaya are older or the same to the depositional age and are therefore detrital. Probability density plots of hinterland ZHe data show a pronounced spike in cooling between 16-21 Ma

  13. Cross-arc geochemical variations in volcanic fields in Honduras C.A.: progressive changes in source with distance from the volcanic front

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    Patino, Lina C.; Carr, Michael J.; Feigenson, Mark D.

    A geochemical traverse across Honduras reveals the heterogeneity of the mantle underneath Central America. Alkali basalts from Lake Yojoa (170km behind the front) have low 87Sr/86Sr but high La/Yb, and elevated incompatible trace element abundances, consistent with derivation from a normal mid-ocean ridge basalt source mantle via low degrees of melting. These lavas lack evidence for an enriched source thought to be intermingled with normal mid-ocean ridge basalt source mantle beneath most of Central America. The amplitude of the subducted slab signature decreases smoothly with distance from the volcanic front. Lavas from Zacate Grande, the area nearest to the volcanic front (17 km behind the arc), display large ion lithophile element enrichment and high field strength element depletion indicating the involvement of subducted material in magma genesis. Components of subducted material are not evident in lavas from Lake Yojoa, the area furthest from the arc. Basalts and basaltic andesites from Tegucigalpa, 102 km behind the volcanic front, are geochemically intermediate between those of Lake Yojoa and Zacate Grande. The lavas from Tegucigalpa show a decreased influence of the subduction component, and are affected by assimilation-fractional crystallization processes at shallow depths. The gradual decrease in the subducted component from the volcanic front to Zacate Grande, Tegucigalpa and finally Lake Yojoa contrasts with the abrupt decrease documented for southeast Guatemala, the only other area in Central America where a cross-arc transect has been studied.

  14. Kinematics of Late Quaternary Slip along the Yabrai Range-front Fault: Implications for Cenozoic Tectonics across the Gobi Alashan Block, China

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    Yu, J.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, P.; Lei, Q.; Ge, W.; Wang, W.; Li, X.; Zhang, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Yabrai range-front fault (YRF) accommodates deformation within the middle Gobi Alashan block between Tibetan Plateau and the Ordos block. As such, it affords an opportunity to examine the transition between shortening and crustal thickening associated with growth of the Tibetan Plateau and extension in North China. Geomorphic mapping of the active fault trace and trench investigations reveal that the YRF is comprised of three segments with variable fault strike, sense of motion, scarp height, and slip history. Displaced Holocene and Late Pleistocene alluvial deposits indicate that southwestern segment is characterized by oblique-normal displacement with a minor left-lateral component, whereas the middle segment appears to exhibit dip-slip normal displacement. The northeastern segment appears to be primarily a left-lateral strike-slip fault. Geomorphically fresh fault scarps are present within Late Pleistocene-Holocene alluvial fans and terraces along the southwestern and northeastern segments, whereas the middle segment of the fault is coincident with the bedrock alluvial contact along the range front. Along the southwestern segment, 10Be exposure ages of offset fans yield a vertical slip rate of ~0.1 mm/yr over the late Pleistocene. Strike-slip rates along the northeastern fault segment are between 0.23 ± 0.02 and 0.78 ± 0.12 mm/yr. Regionally, the orientation, sense of motion, and slip rates along the Yabrai range-front fault is consistent with both NE-directed shortening across the margin of the Tibetan Plateau and NW-derected extension across the Ordos Block.

  15. Late Cenozoic calc-alkaline volcanism over the Payenia shallow subduction zone, South-Central Andean back-arc (34°30‧-37°S), Argentina

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    Litvak, Vanesa D.; Spagnuolo, Mauro G.; Folguera, Andrés; Poma, Stella; Jones, Rosemary E.; Ramos, Víctor A.

    2015-12-01

    A series of mesosilicic volcanic centers have been studied on the San Rafael Block (SRB), 300 km to the east of the present-day volcanic arc. K-Ar ages indicate that this magmatic activity was developed in at least two stages: the older volcanic centers (˜15-10 Ma) are located in the central and westernmost part of the SRB (around 36°S and 69°W) and the younger centers (8-3.5 Ma) are located in an eastern position (around 36°S and 69°30‧W) with respect to the older group. These volcanic rocks have andesitic to dacitic compositions and correspond to a high-K calc-alkaline sequence as shown by their SiO2, K2O and FeO/MgO contents. Elevated Ba/La, Ba/Ta and La/Ta ratios show an arc-like signature, and primitive mantle normalized trace element diagrams show typical depletions of high field strength elements (HFSE) relative to large ion lithophile elements (LILE). Rare earth element (REE) patterns suggest pyroxene and amphibole crystallization. Geochemical data obtained for SRB volcanic rocks support the proposal for a shallow subduction zone for the latest Miocene between 34°30″-37°S. Regionally, SRB volcanism is associated with a mid-Miocene to early Pliocene eastward arc migration caused by the shallowing of the subducting slab in the South-Central Andes at these latitudes, which represents the evolution of the Payenia shallow subduction segment. Overall, middle Miocene to early Pliocene volcanism located in the Payenia back-arc shows evidence for the influence of slab-related components. The younger (8-3.5 Ma) San Rafael volcanic rocks indicate the maximum slab shallowing and the easternmost extent of slab influence in the back-arc.

  16. Late Cenozoic Magmatic and Tectonic Evolution of the Ancestral Cascade Arc in the Bodie Hills, California and Nevada: Insights from Integrated Geologic, Geophysical, Geochemical and Geochronologic Studies

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    John, D. A.; du Bray, E. A.; Box, S. E.; Blakely, R. J.; Fleck, R. J.; Vikre, P. G.; Cousens, B.; Moring, B. C.

    2012-12-01

    Geologic mapping integrated with new geophysical, geochemical, and geochronologic data characterize the evolution of Bodie Hills volcanic field (BHVF), a long-lived eruptive center in the southern part of the ancestral Cascade arc. The ~700 km2 field was a locus of magmatic activity from ~15 to 8 Ma. It includes >25 basaltic andesite to trachyandesite stratovolcanoes and silicic trachyandesite to rhyolite dome complexes. The southeastern part of the BHVF is overlain by the ~3.9 to 0.1 Ma, post-arc Aurora Volcanic Field. Long-lived BHVF magmatism was localized by crustal-scale tectonic features, including the Precambrian continental margin, the Walker Lane, the Basin and Range Province, and the Mina deflection. BHVF eruptive activity occurred primarily during 3 stages: 1) dominantly trachyandesite stratovolcanoes (~15.0 to 12.9 Ma), 2) coalesced trachydacite and rhyolite lava domes and trachyandesite stratovolcanoes (~11.6 to 9.7 Ma), and 3) dominantly silicic trachyandesite to dacite lava dome complexes (~9.2 to 8.0 Ma). Small rhyolite domes were emplaced at ~6 Ma. Relatively mafic stratovolcanoes surrounded by debris flow aprons lie on the margins of the BHVF, whereas more silicic dome fields occupy its center. Detailed gravity and aeromagnetic data suggest the presence of unexposed cogenetic granitic plutons beneath the center of the BHVF. Isotopic compositions of BHVF rocks are generally more radiogenic with decreasing age (e.g., initial Sr isotope values increase from ~0.7049 to 0.7061), which suggests progressively greater magma contamination by crustal components during evolution of the BHVF. Approximately circular, polygenetic volcanoes and scarcity of dikes suggest a low differential horizontal stress field during BHVF formation. Extensive alluvial gravel deposits that grade laterally into fluvial gravels and finer grained lacustrine sediments and the westerly sourced Eureka Valley Tuff (EVT; ~9.4 Ma) blanket large parts of the BHVF. The earliest sediments

  17. Landscape evolution within a retreating volcanic arc, Costa Rica, Central America

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    Marshall, Jeffrey S.; Idleman, Bruce D.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Fisher, Donald M.

    2003-05-01

    Subduction of hotspot-thickened seafloor profoundly affects convergent margin tectonics, strongly affecting upper plate structure, volcanism, and landscape evolution. In southern Central America, low-angle subduction of the Cocos Ridge and seamount domain largely controls landscape evolution in the volcanic arc. Field mapping, stratigraphic correlation, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology for late Cenozoic volcanic rocks of central Costa Rica provide new insights into the geomorphic response of volcanic arc landscapes to changes in subduction parameters (slab thickness, roughness, dip). Late Neogene volcanism was focused primarily along the now-extinct Cordillera de Aguacate. Quaternary migration of the magmatic front shifted volcanism northeastward to the Caribbean slope, creating a new topographic divide and forming the Valle Central basin. Stream capture across the paleo Aguacate divide led to drainage reversal toward the Pacific slope and deep incision of reorganized fluvial networks. Pleistocene caldera activity generated silicic ash flows that buried the Valle Central and descended the Tárcoles gorge to the Orotina debris fan at the coast. Growth of the modern Cordillera Central accentuated relief along the new divide, establishing the Valle Central as a Pacific slope drainage basin. Arc migration, relocation of the Pacific-Caribbean drainage divide, and formation of the Valle Central basin resulted from slab shallowing as irregular, hotspot-thickened crust entered the subduction zone. The geomorphic evolution of volcanic arc landscapes is thus highly sensitive to changes in subducting plate character.

  18. The rise and fall of continental arcs: Interplays between magmatism, uplift, weathering, and climate

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    Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Thurner, Sally; Paterson, Scott; Cao, Wenrong

    2015-09-01

    high and continued to erode and weather well after (>50 My) the end of magmatism. Thus, in the aftermath of a global continental arc flare-up, both the total volcanic inputs of CO2 decline and the average weatherability of continents increases, the latter due to the increased proportion of widespread remnant topography available for weathering and erosion. This combination leads to a decrease in the long-term baseline of carbon in the ocean/atmosphere system, leading to cooling. Mid-Cenozoic cooling is often attributed solely to increased weathering rates associated with India-Eurasian collision and the Himalayan orogeny. However, the total area of now-extinct Cretaceous-Paleogene continental arcs is 1.3-2 times larger than that of the Himalayan range front and the Tibetan plateau combined, suggesting that weathering of these remnant volcanic arcs may also play a role in drawing down CO2 through silicate weathering and subsequent carbonate burial. In summary, if global continental arc flare-ups lead to greenhouse conditions, long-lived icehouse conditions should follow in the aftermath due to decreased CO2 inputs and an increase in regional weathering efficiency of remnant arc topography.

  19. Cenozoic Uplift, Erosion and Dynamic Support of Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Simon; White, Nicky

    2016-04-01

    The physiography of Madagascar is characterised by high-elevation but low-relief topography; 42% of the landscape is above 500 m in elevation. Eocene (marine) nummulitic (marine) limestones at elevations of ˜400 m above sea level and newly dated, emergent 125 ka coral reefs suggest that Madagascar has experienced differential vertical motions during Cenozoic times. Malagasy rivers are often deeply incised and contain steepened reaches, implying that they have responded to changes in regional uplift rate. However, low temperature thermochronology and 10Be derived erosion rates suggest that both Cenozoic and Recent average denudation rates have been low. Extensive laterite-capped, low-relief surfaces also suggest that there have been long periods of tectonic quiescence. In contrast, the modern landscape is characterised by erosional gullies (i.e. lavaka), with very high local erosion rates. To bridge the gap between this disparate evidence, we inverted 2566 longitudinal river profiles using a damped non-negative, least-squares linear inversion to determine the history of regional uplift. We used a simplified version of the stream power erosional law. River profiles were extracted from the 3 arc-second Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model. Calibration of the stream power erosional law is based upon Cenozoic limestones and new radiometrically dated marine terraces. The residual misfit between observed and calculated river profiles is small. Results suggest that Malagasy topography grew diachronously by 1-2 km over the last 15-20 Ma. Calculated uplift and denudation are consistent with independent observations. Thus drainage networks contain coherent signals that record regional uplift. The resultant waves of incision are the principal trigger for modern erosional processes. Admittance calculations, the history of basaltic volcanism and nearby oceanic residual age-depth measurements all suggest that as much as 0.8 - 1.1 km of Cenozoic uplift

  20. Cenozoic back-arc magmatism of the southern extra-Andean Patagonia (44° 30' - 52° S: A review of geochemical data and geodynamic interpretations Magmatismo de retroarco cenozoico de la Patagonia extra-andina austral (44° 30' - 52° S: Una revisión de los datos geoquímicos e interpretaciones geodinámicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D'Orazio

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Huge amounts of basaltic s.l. lavas were persistently erupted along the eastern side of the Andean Cordillera, throughout Cenozoic time, forming extensive plateaus, hundreds of monogenetic scoria cones and other volcanic structures in a continental back-arc setting. The igneous products exposed in the southern sector of the extra-Andean Patagonia (44° 30' - 52° S are dominantly mafic with minor slightly evolved compositions and rare highly differentiated products. The many published chemical analyses of these rocks, indicate that the mafic lavas range from strongly silica - undersaturated basanites to oversaturated basaltic andesites, and that most of the lavas have a typical within-plate geochemical signature. However, a number of lavas, generally erupted in the western-central sectors of Patagonia, are characterized by different distributions of the incompatible elements with high LILE/HFSE and LREE/HFSE ratios. The REE distribution modelling suggests a low degree of melting of a deep (> 70 km garnet-bearing source for the alkaline magmas, and a higher degree of melting of the same source, or an even higher degree of melting of an enriched source, for the subalkaline magmas. The available Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions clearly attest to a major geographic variation: the southernmost lavas have lower 87Sr/86Sr and higher 143Nd/144Nd and 206Pb/204Pb ratios with respect to those erupted to the north. On the whole, the Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions of the southern Patagonia lavas fall within the typical range of within-plate continental magmas; in addition the Pb isotope ratios fall in the range of the Southern Hemisphere Dupal Pb isotope anomaly. The geochemical variations of the southern Patagonia lavas are discussed in terms of different geochemical components: depleted and enriched sub-slab asthenosphere, enriched continental lithospheric mantle, continental crust and subducted materials. The geodynamic significance is interpreted with in the

  1. Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic exhumation history of the Malay Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Thomas; Daanen, Twan; Matenco, Liviu; Willingshofer, Ernst; van der Wal, Jorien

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of Peninsular Malaysia up to the collisional period in the Triassic is well described but the evolution since the collision between Indochina and the Sukhothai Arc in Triassic times is less well described in the literature. The processes affecting Peninsular Malaysia during the Jurassic up to current day times have to explain the emplacement multiple intrusions (the Stong Complex, and the Kemahang granite), the Jurassic/Cretaceous onland basins, the Cenozoic offshore basins, and the asymmetric extension, which caused the exhumation of Taku Schists dome. The orogenic period in Permo-Triassic times, which also formed the Bentong-Raub suture zone, resulted in thickening of the continental crust of current day Peninsular Malaysia due to the collision of the Indochina continental block and the Sukhothai Arc, and is related to the subduction of oceanic crust once present between these continental blocks. The Jurassic/Cretaceous is a period of extension, resulting in the onland Jurassic/Cretaceous basins, synchronous melting of the crust, resulting in the emplacement Stong Complex and the Kemahang granite and thinning of the continental crust on the scale of the Peninsular, followed by uplift of the Peninsular. Different models can explain these observations: continental root removal, oceanic slab detachment, or slab delamination. These models all describe the melting of the lower crust due to asthenospheric upwelling, resulting in uplift and subsequent extension either due to mantle convective movements or gravitational instabilities related to uplift. The Cenozoic period is dominated by extension and rapid exhumation in the area as documented by low temperature thermocrological ages The extension in this period is most likely related to the subduction, which resumed at 45 Ma, of the Australian plate beneath the Eurasian plate after it terminated in Cretaceous times due to the collision of an Australian microcontinental fragment with the Sunda margin in the

  2. Late Cenozoic deformation of the Gavrovo and Ionian zones in NW Peloponnesos (Western Greece)

    OpenAIRE

    S. Tsaila-Monopoli; O. Aximniotou; S. Sotiropoulos; E. Kamberis; C. Ioakim

    2000-01-01

    The structural deformation of Mesozoic-Tertiary sediments of the Ionian and Gavrovo zones in NW Peloponnesos is related to the propagation of a fold-thrust system during the Cenozoic. The sediments of the Gavrovo zone have been deformed by high angle reverse faulting generating an imbricate fan. Skolis mountain represents the Gavrovo thrust front. The detachment occurred in the underlying flysch of the Ionian zone. The Ionian zone has also been affected by shortening above a detachment horizo...

  3. Analysing the Cenozoic depositional record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goledowski, Bartosz; Clausen, O.R.; Nielsen, S.B.

    between the global climate record (oxygen isotopes) and lithology variations on the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the eastern North Sea. Due to the strongly limited time resolution of low temperature thermochronology, the Cenozoic sedimentary record potentially provides the most detailed history of...... lower limit to erosion rate in source areas of the respective sedimentary bodies. The lower limit arises because some erosional products are transported out of the mapped area, and some erosion is caused by chemical dissolution. The development of the source areas will be modelled using surface process...... models. The matrix mass deposition history will be compared with the paleoclimate record (e.g. oxygen isotope curves) to see if the previously observed correlation in the eastern North Sea can be extended to other ages and locations.  ...

  4. Cenozoic foreland-basin evolution in the northern Andes : insights from thermochronology and basin analysis in the Eastern Cordillera, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Parra, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    The modern foreland basin straddling the eastern margin of the Andean orogen is the prime example of a retro-arc foreland basin system adjacent to a subduction orogen. While widely studied in the central and southern Andes, the spatial and temporal evolution of the Cenozoic foreland basin system in the northern Andes has received considerably less attention. This is in part due to the complex geodynamic boundary conditions, such as the oblique subduction and accretion of the Caribbean plates ...

  5. Arc Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Meneghetti, M; Dahle, H; Limousin, M

    2013-01-01

    The existence of an arc statistics problem was at the center of a strong debate in the last fifteen years. With the aim to clarify if the optical depth for giant gravitational arcs by galaxy clusters in the so called concordance model is compatible with observations, several studies were carried out which helped to significantly improve our knowledge of strong lensing clusters, unveiling their extremely complex internal structure. In particular, the abundance and the frequency of strong lensing events like gravitational arcs turned out to be a potentially very powerful tool to trace the structure formation. However, given the limited size of observational and theoretical data-sets, the power of arc statistics as a cosmological tool has been only minimally exploited so far. On the other hand, the last years were characterized by significant advancements in the field, and several cluster surveys that are ongoing or planned for the near future seem to have the potential to make arc statistics a competitive cosmo...

  6. Modeling Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Zeke; Veitzer, Seth; Mahalingam, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    Although vacuum arcs were first identified over 110 years ago, they are not yet well understood. We have since developed a model of breakdown and gradient limits that tries to explain, in a self-consistent way: arc triggering, plasma initiation, plasma evolution, surface damage and gra- dient limits. We use simple PIC codes for modeling plasmas, molecular dynamics for modeling surface breakdown, and surface damage, and mesoscale surface thermodynamics and finite element electrostatic codes for to evaluate surface properties. Since any given experiment seems to have more variables than data points, we have tried to consider a wide variety of arcing (rf structures, e beam welding, laser ablation, etc.) to help constrain the problem, and concentrate on common mechanisms. While the mechanisms can be comparatively simple, modeling can be challenging.

  7. Did high Neo-Tethys subduction rates contribute to early Cenozoic warming?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Hoareau

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The 58–51 Ma interval was characterized by a long-term increase of global temperatures (+4 to +6 °C up to the Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, 52.9–50.7 Ma, the warmest interval of the Cenozoic. It was recently suggested that sustained high atmospheric pCO2, controlling warm early Cenozoic climate, may have been released during Neo-Tethys closure through the subduction of large amounts of pelagic carbonates and their recycling as CO2 at arc volcanoes ("carbonate subduction factory". To analyze the impact of Neo-Tethys closure on early Cenozoic warming, we have modeled the volume of subducted sediments and the amount of CO2 emitted at active arc volcanoes along the northern Tethys margin. The impact of calculated CO2 fluxes on global temperature during the early Cenozoic have then been tested using a climate carbon cycle model (GEOCLIM. We first show that CO2 production may have reached up to 1.55 × 1018 mol Ma−1 specifically during the EECO, ~ 4 to 37 % higher that the modern global volcanic CO2 output, owing to a dramatic India–Asia plate convergence increase. In addition to the background CO2 degassing, the subduction of thick Greater Indian continental margin carbonate sediments at ~ 55–50 Ma may also have led to additional CO2 production of 3.35 × 1018 mol Ma−1 during the EECO, making a total of 85 % of the global volcanic CO2 outgassed. However, climate modelling demonstrates that timing of maximum CO2 release only partially fit with the EECO, and that corresponding maximum pCO2 values (750 ppm and surface warming (+2 °C do not reach values inferred from geochemical proxies, a result consistent with conclusions arise from modelling based on other published CO2 fluxes. These results demonstrate that CO2 derived from decarbonation of Neo-Tethyan lithosphere may have possibly contributed to, but certainly cannot account alone for early Cenozoic warming, including the EECO. Other commonly cited sources of excess CO2 such as

  8. Paleocene initiation of cenozoic uplift in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, S.B.; Paulsen, G.E.; Hansen, D.L.; Gemmer, L.; Clausen, O.R.; Jacobsen, B.H.; Balling, N.; Huuse, M.; Gallagher, K.

    2003-12-01

    The timing of Cenozoic surface uplift in NW Europe relies on the assumption that the sedimentary response in basins is synchronous with tectonic processes in the source areas. However, many of the phenomena commonly used to infer recent uplift may as well be a consequence of climate change and sea-level fall. The timing of surface uplift therefore remains unconstrained from the sedimentary record alone, and it becomes necessary to consider the constraints imposed by physically and geologically plausible tectonic mechanisms, which have a causal relation to an initiating agent. The gradual reversal of the regional stress field following the break-up produced minor perturbations to the thermal subsidence on the Norwegian Shelf and in the North Sea. Pulses of increased compression cannot be the cause of Cenozoic land surface uplift and accelerated Neogene basin subsidence. Virtually deformation-free regional vertical movements could have been caused by changes in the density column of the lithosphere and asthenosphere following the emplacement of the Iceland plume. A transient uplift component was produced as the plume displaced denser asthenosphere at the base of the lithosphere. This component decayed as the plume material cooled. Permanent uplift as a result of igneous underplating occurred in areas of a thin lithosphere (some Palaeozoic and Mesozoic basins) or for lithosphere under extension at the time of plume emplacement (the ocean-continent boundary). In areas of a thicker lithosphere (East Greenland, Scotland and Norway) plume emplacement may have triggered a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, causing partial lithospheric delamination and associated transient surface uplift at a decreasing rate throughout Cenozoic time. A possible uplift history for the adjacent land areas hence reads: initial transient surface uplift around the break-up time at 53 Ma caused by plume emplacement, and permanent tectonic uplift caused by lithospheric delamination and associated

  9. The origin of Cenozoic magmatism of Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Finlay; Masoud, Abdelmoniem; Mark, Darren

    2014-05-01

    Cenozoic volcanic provinces cover 66,000 km2 of Libya. The main fields are aligned NNW-SSE where NE-SW trending structural features intersect the main regional uplift structures. They form some of the largest volcanic provinces in North Africa yet despite their size and relative accessibility they have been not studied in detail. We are engaged in a new study of the geochemistry (major-trace elements, REE, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes) and geochronology (40Ar/39Ar and cosmogenic 3He) of basalts of the four main Cenozoic volcanic provinces (Garian, Jabal Al Hasawinah, Jabal As Sawda and Jabal Al Haruj) in order to elucidate the nature and origin of the volcanism. The volcanic fields are dominated by basaltic flows, with small volumes of phonolites present at Garian and Jabal Al Hasawinah. Basalt piles rarely exceed a few 10s metres thick and the presence of NW-SE trending dykes on the periphery of most fields implies that existing flows probably represent the latest phase of a protracted volcanic history in each region. The basalts tend to be alkali to mildly alkali. Compositional variation is dominated by fractional crystalisation with little indication of crustal contamination. Trace element and REE support an origin in 5 to 15 % melts of heterogeneous sub-lithosphere mantle. Nd and Sr isotopic composition of the Garian and Jabal Al Haruj basalts (0.5128-0.51294 and 0.703-0.704) overlap the Cenozoic volcanism of southern Italy characterized by Etna and Pantelleria. This is typical of the common European asthenosphere mantle reservoir, and lacks the influence of enriched mantle present in other North African Cenozoic basalt provinces. There has been no systematic change in the location of volcanism with time that is indicative of plate movement over a fixed mantle hotspot. The major pulse of basaltic volcanism in the northern (Garian) and southern (Jabal Al Haruj) provinces overlap in time (6-1 Ma,) while Jabal Al Hasawinah and Jabal As Sawda basalts were erupted

  10. A synthesis of Cenozoic sedimentation in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anell, Ingrid Anna Margareta; Thybo, Hans; Rasmussen, E.S.

    2012-01-01

    sediment influx into the North Sea during the Cenozoic is more complex than previously suggested clockwise rotation from early northwestern to late southern sources. The Shetland Platform supplied sediment continuously, although at varying rates, until the latest Cenozoic. Sedimentation around Norway...... changed from early Cenozoic influx from the southwestern margin, to almost exclusively from the southern margin in the Oligocene and from all of southern Norway in the latest Cenozoic. Thick Eocene deposits in the Central Graben are sourced mainly from a western and a likely southern source, indicating...

  11. Cenozoic intracontinental deformation of the Kopeh Dagh Belt, Northeastern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yang; Wan, Bo; Chen, Ling; Talebian, Morteza

    2016-04-01

    Compressional intracontinental orogens represent large tectonic zones far from plate boundaries. Since intracontinental mountain belts cannot be framed in the conventional plate tectonics theory, several hypotheses have been proposed to account for the formations of these mountain belts. The far-field effect of collision/subduction at plate margins is now well accepted for the origin and evolution of the intracontinental crust thickening, as exemplified by the Miocene tectonics of central Asia. In northern Iran, the Binalud-Alborz mountain belt witnessed the Triassic tectonothermal events (Cimmerian orogeny), which are interpreted as the result of the Paleotethys Ocean closure between the Eurasia and Central Iran blocks. The Kopeh Dagh Belt, located to the north of the Binalud-Alborz Belt, has experienced two significant tectonic phases: (1) Jurassic to Eocene rifting with more than 7 km of sediments; and (2) Late Eocene-Early Oligocene to Quaternary continuous compression. Due to the high seismicity, deformation associated with earthquakes has received more and more attention; however, the deformation pattern and architecture of this range remain poorly understood. Detailed field observations on the Cenozoic deformation indicate that the Kopeh Dagh Belt can be divided into a western zone and an eastern zone, separated by a series of dextral strike-slip faults, i.e. the Bakharden-Quchan Fault System. The eastern zone characterized by km-scale box-fold structures, associated with southwest-dipping reverse faults and top-to-the NE kinematics. In contrast, the western zone shows top-to-the SW kinematics, and the deformation intensifies from NE to SW. In the northern part of this zone, large-scale asymmetrical anticlines exhibit SW-directed vergence with subordinate thrusts and folds, whereas symmetrical anticlines are observed in the southern part. In regard to its tectonic feature, the Kopeh Dagh Belt is a typical Cenozoic intracontinental belt without ophiolites or

  12. Location of silicic caldera formation in arc settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Gwyneth R; Mahood, Gail A [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, 450 Serra, Mall, Building 320, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Silicic calderas are the surface expressions of silicic magma chambers, and thus their study may yield information about what tectonic and crustal features favor the generation of evolved magma. The goal of this study is to determine whether silicic calderas in arc settings are preferentially located behind the volcanic front. After a global analysis of young, arc-related calderas, we find that silicic calderas at continental margins do form over a wide area behind the front, as compared to other types of arc volcanoes.

  13. Early cenozoic differentiation of polar marine faunas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Alistair Crame

    Full Text Available The widespread assumption that the origin of polar marine faunas is linked to the onset of major global cooling in the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene is being increasingly challenged. The Antarctic fossil record in particular is suggesting that some modern Southern Ocean taxa may have Early Eocene or even Paleocene origins, i.e. well within the Early Cenozoic greenhouse world. A global analysis of one of the largest marine clades at the present day, the Neogastropoda, indicates that not only is there a decrease in the number of species from the tropics to the poles but also a decrease in the evenness of their distribution. A small number of neogastropod families with predominantly generalist trophic strategies at both poles points to the key role of seasonality in structuring the highest latitude marine assemblages. A distinct latitudinal gradient in seasonality is temperature-invariant and would have operated through periods of global warmth such as the Early Cenozoic. To test this concept a second global analysis was undertaken of earliest Cenozoic (Paleocene neogastropods and this does indeed show a certain degree of faunal differentiation at both poles. The Buccinidae, s.l. is especially well developed at this time, and this is a major generalist taxon at the present day. There is an element of asymmetry associated with this development of Paleocene polar faunas in that those in the south are more strongly differentiated than their northern counterparts; this can in turn be linked to the already substantial isolation of the southern high latitudes. The key role of seasonality in the formation of polar marine faunas has implications for contemporary ecosystem structure and stability.

  14. Cenozoic stratigraphy of the Sahara, Northern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swezey, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cenozoic stratigraphic record in the Sahara, and shows that the strata display some remarkably similar characteristics across much of the region. In fact, some lithologies of certain ages are exceptionally widespread and persistent, and many of the changes from one lithology to another appear to have been relatively synchronous across the Sahara. The general stratigraphic succession is that of a transition from early Cenozoic carbonate strata to late Cenozoic siliciclastic strata. This transition in lithology coincides with a long-term eustatic fall in sea level since the middle Cretaceous and with a global climate transition from a Late Cretaceous–Early Eocene “warm mode” to a Late Eocene–Quaternary “cool mode”. Much of the shorter-term stratigraphic variability in the Sahara (and even the regional unconformities) also can be correlated with specific changes in sea level, climate, and tectonic activity during the Cenozoic. Specifically, Paleocene and Eocene carbonate strata and phosphate are suggestive of a warm and humid climate, whereas latest Eocene evaporitic strata (and an end-Eocene regional unconformity) are correlated with a eustatic fall in sea level, the build-up of ice in Antarctica, and the appearance of relatively arid climates in the Sahara. The absence of Oligocene strata throughout much of the Sahara is attributed to the effects of generally low eustatic sea level during the Oligocene and tectonic uplift in certain areas during the Late Eocene and Oligocene. Miocene sandstone and conglomerate are attributed to the effects of continued tectonic uplift around the Sahara, generally low eustatic sea level, and enough rainfall to support the development of extensive fluvial systems. Middle–Upper Miocene carbonate strata accumulated in northern Libya in response to a eustatic rise in sea level, whereas Upper Miocene mudstone accumulated along the south side of the Atlas Mountains because uplift of the

  15. Arc saw development report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arc saw is one of the key components of the Contaminated Equipment Volume Reduction (CEVR) Program. This report describes the progress of the arc saw from its inception to its current developmental status. History of the arc saw and early contributors are discussed. Particular features of the arc saw and their advantages for CEVR are detailed. Development of the arc saw including theory of operation, pertinent experimental results, plans for the large arc saw and advanced control systems are covered. Associated topics such as potential applications for the arc saw and other arc saw installations in the world is also touched upon

  16. Calc-alkaline rear-arc magmatism in the Fuegian Andes: Implications for the mid-cretaceous tectonomagmatic evolution of southernmost South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Mauricio González; Escayola, Mónica; Acevedo, Rogelio

    2011-02-01

    The magmatic arc of the Fuegian Andes is composed mostly of Upper Mesozoic to Cenozoic calc-alkaline plutons and subordinated lavas. To the rear arc, however, isolated mid-Cretaceous monzonitic plutons and small calc-alkaline dykes and sills crop out. This calc-alkaline unit (the Ushuaia Peninsula Andesites, UPA) includes hornblende-rich, porphyritic quartz meladiorites, granodiorites, andesites, dacites and lamprophyres. Radiometric dating and cross-cutting relationships indicate that UPA is younger than the monzonitic suite. The geochemistry of UPA is medium to high K, with high LILE (Ba 500-2000 ppm, Sr 800-1400 ppm), HFSE (Th 7-23 ppm, Nb 7-13 ppm, Ta 0.5-1.1 ppm) and LREE (La 16-51 ppm) contents, along with relatively low HREE (Yb 1.7-1.3 ppm) and Y (9-19 ppm). The similar mineralogy and geochemistry of all UPA rocks suggest they evolved from a common parental magma, by low pressure crystal fractionation, without significant crustal assimilation. A pure Rayleigh fractionation model indicates that 60-65% of crystal fractionation of 60% hornblende + 34% plagioclase + 4% clinopyroxene + 1% Fe-Ti oxide, apatite and sphene (a paragenesis similar of UPA mafic rocks) can explain evolution from lamprophyres to dacites. The UPA has higher LILE, HFSE and LREE, and lower HREE and Y than the calc-alkaline plutons and lavas of the volcanic front. The HREE and Y are lower than in the potassic plutons as well. High concentrations of Th, Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, LREE and Ce/Pb, and low U/Th, Ba/Th ratios in UPA, even in the least differentiated samples, suggest contributions from subducted sediments to the mantle source. On the other hand, relatively low HREE and Y, high LREE/HREE (La/Yb 11-38) ratios and Nb-Ta contents can be interpreted as mantle metasomatism by partial melts of either subducted garnetiferous oceanic sediment or basalt as well. Additionally, high LILE content in UPA, similar to the potassic plutons, suggests also a mantle wedge previously metasomatized by potassic

  17. Late cenozoic tectonic and geomorphic evolution of the Patagonian Andes between 42oS and 52oS, southern Chile assessed using fission-track thermochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission-track (FT) analysis has been applied in the Patagonian Andes of southern Chile to assess the late Cenozoic geomorphic and tectonic response of the overriding plate to subduction of the Chile rise active oceanic spreading centre (Thomson et al., 2001). The timing and nature of tectonic uplift and denudation along the southern parts of the major transpression intra-arc Liquine-Ofqui fault (LOF) system have also been investigated (Thomson, 2001, submitted). Results from 130 FT ages (72 zircon and 58 apatite ages) and 39 apatite track length measurements reveal initiation of rapid cooling and denudation at ca. 30 Ma at the western margin of southern continental South America. This was followed by a ca. 200km eastward migration of the locus of maximum denudation to the position of the present day topographic divide between ca. 30 Ma and ca. 12 to 10 Ma. East of the Andean divide less than 3 km of denudation has occurred since the Late Cretaceous. Enhanced denudation is interpreted to be the result of increased tectonic uplift driven by a large increase in convergence rates at ca. 28 to 26 Ma that triggered orographically enhanced precipitation on the west-side of the Patagonian Andes allowing increased erosion by fluvial incision and mass transport processes. The eastward migration of the locus of maximum denudation can be related to either coeval eastward migration of the retro-arc deformation front, the effects of subduction erosion in the overriding plate at the Peru-Chile trench or shallowing of the angle of subduction. Away from the influence of the LOF the process of spreading centre subduction and collision itself coincides with an overall slow-down in denudation rates in the overriding plate most likely caused by a major reduction in the main tectonic force driving tectonic uplift in the upper plate to subduction. In contrast to the Andes south of ca. 46oS, increased cooling and denudation related to transpression induced rock uplift and erosion along

  18. Cenozoic coupled basin-mountain and prospecting direction for sandstone-type uranium deposits in western Yunnan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial forming time of Cenozoic basins in western Yunnan is at 14 Ma or so, it was coupling in the later period tectonic activity time of Lushui-Ruili arc dextral strike-slip fault belt in the eastern fringe and Nabang dextral strike-slip fault belt in the western fringe of Tengchong microplate. The evolution of Cenozoic basins is divided into two stages of sedimentary basin and reformed basin, the former was coupling in the strike-slip tectonic activity of orogen, and formed strike-slip basins, the latter was closely related with the uplift of the whole basins, and formed residual basins. It is considered that there exists two sorts of Cenozoic basins, and they are different in sedimentary evolution, volcanic activity and geographic sight etc., the metallogenic conditions of sandstone-type uranium deposits are also different. The most favourable basins for prospecting sandstone-type uranium deposits are those basins that keeps on uplifting in reformed basin stages, exists volcanic activity and deep incised low mountain-hill-river valley terraces in northern Tengchong area. (authors)

  19. The Cenozoic Volcanoes in Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiaqi; HAN Jingtai; GUO Zhengfu

    2002-01-01

    There are more than 600 Cenozoic volcanic cones and craters with abeut 50 000 km2of lava flows in northeast China, which formed many volcanic clusters and shown the features of the continental rift - type volcanoes. Most volcanic activities in this area, especially in the east part of Songliao graben, were usually controlled by rifts and faults with the main direction of NE / NNE in parallel and become younger from the central graben towards its both sides, especially to the east continental margin. It is revealed that the volcanism occurred in northeast China was as strong as that occurred in Japan during the Miocene and the Quaternary. The Quaternary basalt that is usually distributed along river valley is called "valley basalt"while Neogene basalt usually distributed in the top of mounts is called "high position basalt". These volcanoes and volcanic rocks are usually composed of alkaline basalts with ultramafic inclusions, except Changbaishan volcano that is built by trachyte and pantellerite.

  20. The late Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the South China Sea: A petrologic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Quanshu; Shi, Xuefa; Castillo, Paterno R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a review of available petrological, geochonological and geochemical data for late Mesozoic to Recent igneous rocks in the South China Sea (SCS) and adjacent regions and a discussion of their petrogeneses and tectonic implications. The integration of these data with available geophysical and other geologic information led to the following tectono-magmatic model for the evolution of the SCS region. The geochemical characteristics of late Mesozoic granitic rocks in the Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB), micro-blocks in the SCS, the offshore continental shelf and Dalat zone in southern Vietnam, and the Schwaner Mountains in West Kalimantan, Borneo indicate that these are mainly I-type granites plus a small amount of S-type granites in the PRMB. These granitoids were formed in a continental arc tectonic setting, consistent with the ideas proposed by Holloway (1982) and Taylor and Hayes (1980, 1983), that there existed an Andean-type volcanic arc during later Mesozoic era in the SCS region. The geochonological and geochemical characteristics of the volcanics indicate an early period of bimodal volcanism (60-43 Ma or 32 Ma) at the northern margin of the SCS, followed by a period of relatively passive style volcanism during Cenozoic seafloor spreading (37 or 30-16 Ma) within the SCS, and post-spreading volcanism (tholeiitic series at 17-8 Ma, followed by alkali series from 8 Ma to present) in the entire SCS region. The geodynamic setting of the earlier volcanics was an extensional regime, which resulted from the collision between India and Eurasian plates since the earliest Cenozoic, and that of the post-spreading volcanics may be related to mantle plume magmatism in Hainan Island. In addition, the nascent Hainan plume may have played a significant role in the extension along the northern margin and seafloor spreading in the SCS.

  1. Parametric Study on Arc Behavior of Magnetically Diffused Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tang; Li, Hui; Bai, Bing; Liao, Mengran; Xia, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    A model coupling the plasma with a cathode body is applied in the simulation of the diffuse state of a magnetically rotating arc. Four parametric studies are performed: on the external axial magnetic field (AMF), on the cathode shape, on the total current and on the inlet gas velocity. The numerical results show that: the cathode attachment focuses in the center of the cathode tip with zero AMF and gradually shifts off the axis with the increase of AMF; a larger cathode conical angle corresponds to a cathode arc attachment farther away off axis; the maximum values of plasma temperature increase with the total current; the plasma column in front of the cathode tip expands more severely in the axial direction, with a higher inlet speed; the cathode arc attachment shrinks towards the tip as the inlet speed increases. The various results are supposed to be explained by the joint effect of coupled cathode surface heating and plasma rotating flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475174, 11035005 and 50876101)

  2. Continental arc volcanism as the principal driver of icehouse-greenhouse variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, N Ryan; Horton, Brian K; Loomis, Shannon E; Stockli, Daniel F; Planavsky, Noah J; Lee, Cin-Ty A

    2016-04-22

    Variations in continental volcanic arc emissions have the potential to control atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels and climate change on multimillion-year time scales. Here we present a compilation of ~120,000 detrital zircon uranium-lead (U-Pb) ages from global sedimentary deposits as a proxy to track the spatial distribution of continental magmatic arc systems from the Cryogenian period to the present. These data demonstrate a direct relationship between global arc activity and major climate shifts: Widespread continental arcs correspond with prominent early Paleozoic and Mesozoic greenhouse climates, whereas reduced continental arc activity corresponds with icehouse climates of the Cryogenian, Late Ordovician, late Paleozoic, and Cenozoic. This persistent coupled behavior provides evidence that continental volcanic outgassing drove long-term shifts in atmospheric CO2 levels over the past ~720 million years. PMID:27102480

  3. CENOZOIC VOLCANISM AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN NORTHEAST CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xi-kui

    2001-01-01

    Ke-qin, 1997. Paleoclimatic and environmental change since 2000a B. P. recorded in ice Core[J]. The Front of Ceo-science, 4(1): 95-100.(in Chiniese)[13]ZHANG Zhen-ke, WU Rui-jin, WANG Su-min, 1998. Paleoenvironmeal evolution during historic time reflected by frequency susceptibility of the lacustrine sediment in Daihai[J]. Geography Reaserch. 17(3) :297-300. (in Chinese)[14]ZHANG Pi-yuan, 1996. Climatic Changes During Historic Time in China[J]. Jinan: Shandong Science and Technology Press, 434-435. (in Chinese)[15]ZHANG Pi-yuan, GE Quan-sheng, 1997. The stage and abrupt ness of climatic evolution[J]. The Front of Geo-science, 4(1):122-126. (in Chinese)[16]ZHONG Wei, XIONG Hei-gang, Tashplati etal., 1998a. The preliminary study on the Spore-pollen combination of the Tagele section in Cele oasis[J]. Arid Zone Research, 15 (3):14-17. (in Chinese)[17]ZHONG Wei, XIONG Hei-gang, 1998b. Preliminary study on paleoclimatic evolution since about 12ka B.P. in Bosten Lake, southern Xinjiang, China[J]. Journal of Arid Land Resources and Enviorment, 12(3) :28-35. (in Chinese)[18]ZHU Ke-zhen. 1973, Preliminary study of climatic changes since about 5000 years in China[J]. Science in China, (2):291-296. (in Chinese)[19]CHEN Mo-xiang, WANG Ji-yang, DENG Xiao, 1994. Geothermal Resources in China[M] . Beijing: Science Press, 139 -159. (in Chinese)[20]CHEN Wen-ji, LI Da-ming, LI Qi et al. , 1992. Chronology and geochemistry of basalts in Lower Liaohe Basin[A] . In: LIU Ruo-xin. Chronology and Geochemistry of Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks in China [C] . Beijing: Seismological Press, 44-80. (in Chinese)[21]E Mo-lan, ZHAO Da-sheng, 1987. Cenozoic Basalts and Deep Source Rock Inclusions[M] . Beijing: Science Press, 86-132. (in Chinese)[22]LIU Jia-qi, 1987. Research on chronology of Cenozoic volcanic rocks in Northeast China[J]. Acta Petrologica Sinica, 3(4):21-31. (in Chinese)[23]MACHIDA H, ARAI F, 1983. Extensive ash falls in and around the Sea of Japan

  4. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, David; Barron, John; Renaudie, Johan; Diver, Patrick; Türke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂(18)O (climate) and carbon cycle records (∂(13)C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2). Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p.9, detrended r>.6, all prisk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls. PMID:24465441

  5. Fronts, fish, and predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Hunt, George L.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Zamon, Jeannette E.; Schick, Robert S.; Prieto, Rui; Brodziak, Jon; Teo, Steven L. H.; Thorne, Lesley; Bailey, Helen; Itoh, Sachihiko; Munk, Peter; Musyl, Michael K.; Willis, Jay K.; Zhang, Wuchang

    2014-09-01

    Ocean fronts play a key role in marine ecosystems. Fronts shape oceanic landscapes and affect every trophic level across a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, from meters to thousands of kilometers, and from days to millions of years. At some fronts, there is an elevated rate of primary production, whereas at others, plankton is aggregated by advection and by the behavior of organisms moving against gradients in temperature, salinity, light irradiance, hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical and biological factors. Lower trophic level organisms - phytoplankton and zooplankton - that are aggregated in sufficient densities, attract organisms from higher trophic levels, from planktivorous schooling fish to squid, large piscivorous fish, seabirds and marine mammals. Many species have critical portions of their life stages or behaviors closely associated with fronts, including spawning, feeding, ontogenetic development, migrations, and other activities cued to frontal dynamics. At different life stages, an individual species or population might be linked to different fronts. The nature and strength of associations between fronts and biota depend on numerous factors such as the physical nature and spatio-temporal scales of the front and the species and their life stages in question. In other words, fronts support many different niches and micro/macro-habitats over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales.

  6. The Eocene Big Timber stock, south-central Montana: Development of extensive compositional variation in an arc-related intrusion by side-wall crystallization and cumulate glomerocryst remixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Bray, E.A.; Harlan, S.S.

    1996-01-01

    may result from the important process documented herein. Compositional and geologic relationships are consistent with magma genesis related to subduction and magmatic-arc processes inboard from the western edge of the early Cenozoic North American plate. Arc magmatism in south-central Montana during Eocene time is consistent with models pertaining to early Cenozoic southward sweep and west-ward retreat of magmatism. Magmatism represented by the Big Timber stock provides significant new support for steepening subduction, westward retreat of the subduction hinge line, and development of an asthenospheric mantle wedge that fueled renewed magmatism beneath the western edge of the North American continent following early Cenozoic shallow subduction.

  7. Gas Contamination In Plasma-Arc-Welded Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclure, John C.; Torres, Martin R.; Gurevitch, Alan C.; Newman, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Document describes experimental investigation on visible and tactile effects of gaseous contaminants in variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding of 2219 T-87 aluminum alloy. Contaminant gases (nitrogen, methane, oxygen, and hydrogen) introduced in argon arc and in helium shield gas in various controlled concentrations. Report represents results of experiments in form of photographs of fronts, backs, polished cross sections, and etched cross sections of welds made with various contaminants at various concentrations. Provides detailed discussion of conditions under which welds made.

  8. Late Cenozoic stress field distribution in Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, S.; Bekler, T.; Tutkun, S. Z.; Kurcer, A.; Ates, O.; Bekler, F. N.; Kalafat, D.

    2009-04-01

    Biga Peninsula is a seismically active region both in instrumental and historical period in NW Turkey. In this part, middle and southern branches of North Anatolian Fault are represented by Etili, Can-Biga, Yenice-Gonen, Manyas-Danisment, Lapseki, Sinekci, Terzialan, Dogruca, Uluabat, Edincik, Pazarkoy-Hamdibey-Kalkim, Edremit, Yigitler, Sarikoy-Inova, Troia and Karabiga Faults. All of these faults are responsible of the seismic activity in Biga Peninsula. Historical earthquakes happened in 29, 155, 170, 543, 620, 1440, 1737, 1855, 1865 and 1875. Furthermore, as for instrumental period, Saros Gulf-Murefte earthquakes (M:7.3 and M:6.3) in 1912, Erdek Gulf (M:6.4) and Can-Biga (M:6.3) in 1935, Edremit Gulf-Ayvaci k (M:6.8) in 1944, Yenice-Gonen (M:7.2) in 1953, Gonen (M:5.8) in 1964, Edremit-Baki rcay (M:5.5) in 1971, Biga (M:5.8) in 1983, Kusgolu-Manyas (M:5.2) and Bandirma (M:5.0) in 2006. In this study, we determined the Late Cenozoic stress field distribution and present-day tectonic regimes both fault-slip data (by 253 fault planes) and earthquake focal mechanism solutions (by 58 earthquakes) were investigated by the inversion methods. The results indicate that a transtensional stress regime is dominant with a NW-SE to WNW-ESE directed compression (1) and NE-SW to ENE-WSW directed extension (3), which yielded a NE-SW, ENE-WSW and also E-W trending strike-slip faulting faults with a normal component. While a transtensional tectonic regime has an active component in Biga Peninsula, a local and consistent transpressional tectonic regime were determined along an E-W trending narrow zone in the northern part of the Biga Peninsula also. The tectonic regime and stress field is resulted from interactions both continental collision of Eurasian/Anatolian/Arabian plate in the east and subduction processes (roll back and/or slab-pull) of the African plate along the Cyprus and Hellenic arc in the Mediterranean region.

  9. Cenozoic extensional tectonics of the Western Anatolia Extended Terrane, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Western Anatolia Extended Terrane in Turkey is located on the eastern side of the Aegean Extended Terrane and contains one of the largest metamorphic core complexes in the world, the Menderes massif. It has experienced a series of continental collisions from the Late Cretaceous to the Eocene during the formation of the Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone. Based our field work and monazite ages, we suggest that the north-directed postcollisional Cenozoic extension in the region is the product of three consecutive stages, triggered by three different mechanisms. The first stage was initiated about 30 Ma ago, in the Oligocene by the Orogenic Collapse the thermally weakened continental crust along the north-dipping Southwest Anatolian shear zone. The shear zone was formed as an extensional simple-shear zone with listric geometry at depth and exhibits predominantly normal-slip along its southwestern end. But, it becomes a high-angle oblique-slip shear zone along its northeastern termination. Evidence for the presence of the shear zone includes (1) the dominant top to the north-northeast shear sense indicators throughout the Menderes massif, such as stretching lineations trending N10E to N30E; and (2) a series of Oligocene extensional basins located adjacent to the shear zone that contain only carbonate and ophiolitic rock fragments, but no high grade metamorphic rock fragments. During this stage, erosion and extensional unroofing brought high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Central Menderes massif to the surface by the early Miocene. The second stage of the extension was triggered by subduction roll-back and associated back-arc extension in the early Miocene and produced the north-dipping Alasehir and the south-dipping Bueyuek Menderes detachments of the central Menderes massif and the north-dipping Simav detachment of the northern Menderes massif. The detachments control the Miocene sedimentation in the Alasehir, Bueyuek Menderes, and Simav grabens, containing high

  10. Rotating arc spark plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  11. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lazarus

    Full Text Available Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂(18O (climate and carbon cycle records (∂(13C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2. Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p.9, detrended r>.6, all p<.001, but only weakly over the earlier Cenozoic, suggesting increasingly strong linkage of diatom and climate evolution in the Neogene. Our results suggest that many living marine planktonic diatom species may be at risk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  12. Making and breaking an Island arc: a new perspective from the Oligocene Kyushu-Palau arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, O.; Taylor, R. N.; Yuasa, M.; Ohara, Y.

    2010-12-01

    . Therefore the distinct isotopic composition and enriched trace element characteristics found at the intersection could be related to the involvement of sub-Daito Ridge lithospheric mantle. This mantle would have been metasomatised by the previous subduction event, and further melting of the enriched source induced by renewed subduction in the Eocene. These observations demonstrate that despite being regarded as a typical intra-oceanic island arc, the history and nature of arc basement can significantly affect its geochemical characteristics. Trace element relationships suggest that the KPR mantle wedge was more enriched, and the subduction fluid contribution smaller, than the Quaternary volcanic front. However, there are strong similarities with the composition of the IBM rear arc after 15 Ma. This strongly implies that the current KPR preserves the rear arc side. As the trace element characteristics are similarly rear-arc in nature along the entire length of the KPR, it seems likely that the virtually simultaneous opening of the Shikoku and Parece Vela Basins rifted the Kyushu-Palau arc at a similar distance from the trench at c. 25 Ma.

  13. CENOZOIC VOLCANISM AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN NORTHEAST CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper is concentrated on Cenozoic volcanism and geothermal resources in Northeast China. There are a lot of Cenozoic volcanoes, a large area of volcanic rocks, a large number of active faults and rich geothermal resources in Northeast China. The time and space characteristics of Cenozoic volcanism and the space distribution characters of hot springs and high geothermal flux regions in Northeast China are described and discussed on the basis of geological, geothermal, drilling and volcanological data. It is revealed that the hot springs and high geothermal flux regions are re lated to the Cenozoic volcanism, rifting and faulting in Northeast China. It is especially emphasized that the hot springs and high geothermal anomaly areas are controlled by active deep faults. It is proposed that the Cenozoic volcanism re gions, rift basins, active fault belts, activated plate suture zones and large earthquake occurrence points are the best areas for prospecting geothermal resources. The geothermal resources in younger volcanic zones are richer than those in older volcanic belts. The hot springs and active or activated faults might be a very good clue for looking for geothermal resources.

  14. Quantifying crustal thickness over time in magmatic arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profeta, Lucia; Ducea, Mihai N.; Chapman, James B.; Paterson, Scott R.; Gonzales, Susana Marisol Henriquez; Kirsch, Moritz; Petrescu, Lucian; DeCelles, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    We present global and regional correlations between whole-rock values of Sr/Y and La/Yb and crustal thickness for intermediate rocks from modern subduction-related magmatic arcs formed around the Pacific. These correlations bolster earlier ideas that various geochemical parameters can be used to track changes of crustal thickness through time in ancient subduction systems. Inferred crustal thicknesses using our proposed empirical fits are consistent with independent geologic constraints for the Cenozoic evolution of the central Andes, as well as various Mesozoic magmatic arc segments currently exposed in the Coast Mountains, British Columbia, and the Sierra Nevada and Mojave-Transverse Range regions of California. We propose that these geochemical parameters can be used, when averaged over the typical lifetimes and spatial footprints of composite volcanoes and their intrusive equivalents to infer crustal thickness changes over time in ancient orogens. PMID:26633804

  15. Relating Cenozoic North Sea sediments to topography in southern Norway:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anell, Ingrid Anna Margareta; Thybo, Hans; Stratford, Wanda Rose

    2010-01-01

    sources for progradational influx of clastic sediments from Scotland, the Shetland platform and, to a lesser degree, southwestern Norway. The Eocene sedimentation pattern was similar to the Palaeocene, with lower rates of accumulation associated with flooding and tectonic quiescence. Sediment influx from...... the Shetland platform continued throughout the Cenozoic while supply from southern Norway increased markedly around the Eocene–Oligocene, coeval with the greenhouse–icehouse transition. Mass balance calculations of sediment and eroded rock volumes suggest that while some topography along the western...... margin of Norway may be pre-Cenozoic, significant uplift of the main Paleic surface in southern Norway occurred around the early Oligocene. Sedimentation rates were almost ten-fold higher than the Cenozoic average in the Plio-Pleistocene, slightly higher than the global average. Mass balance calculations...

  16. Late-Paleozoic emplacement and Meso-Cenozoic reactivation of the southern Kazakhstan granitoid basement

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pelsmaeker, Elien; Glorie, Stijn; Buslov, Mikhail M.; Zhimulev, Fedor I.; Poujol, Marc; Korobkin, Valeriy V.; Vanhaecke, Frank; Vetrov, Evgeny V.; De Grave, Johan

    2015-11-01

    The Ili-Balkhash Basin in southeastern Kazakhstan is located at the junction of the actively deforming mountain ranges of western Junggar and the Tien Shan, and is therefore part of the southwestern Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The basement of the Ili-Balkhash area consists of an assemblage of mainly Precambrian microcontinental fragments, magmatic arcs and accretionary complexes. Eight magmatic basement samples (granitoids and tuffs) from the Ili-Balkhash area were dated with zircon U-Pb LA-ICP-MS and yield Carboniferous to late Permian (~ 350-260 Ma) crystallization ages. These ages are interpreted as reflecting the transition from subduction to (post-) collisional magmatism, related to the closure of the Junggar-Balkhash Ocean during the Carboniferous-early Permian and hence, to the final late Paleozoic accretion history of the ancestral Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Apatite fission track (AFT) dating of 14 basement samples (gneiss, granitoids and volcanic tuffs) mainly provides Cretaceous cooling ages. Thermal history modeling based on the AFT data reveals that several intracontinental tectonic reactivation episodes affected the studied basement during the late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Late Mesozoic reactivation and associated basement exhumation is interpreted as distant effects of the Cimmerian collisions at the southern Eurasian margin and possibly of the Mongol-Okhotsk Orogeny in SE Siberia during the Jurassic-Cretaceous. Following tectonic stability during the Paleogene, inherited basement structures were reactivated during the Neogene (constrained by Miocene AFT ages of ~ 17-10 Ma). This late Cenozoic reactivation is interpreted as the far-field response of the India-Eurasia collision and reflects the onset of modern mountain building and denudation in southeast Kazakhstan, which seems to be at least partially controlled by the inherited basement architecture.

  17. Tectonic implications of space-time patterns of Cenozoic magmatism in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, W.S.; Dickinson, W.R.; Silberman, M.L.

    1976-01-01

    Locations of 2,100 radiometrically dated igneous rocks were plotted on a series of 20 maps, each representing an interval within the period 80 m.y. B.P. to present. Derivative maps showing the distributions in space and time of dated granitic intrusive rocks, silicic lavas and domes, ash-flow tuffs, andesitic-dacitic rocks, and basalts depict well the two main petrogenetic assemblages noted previously by others: (1) mainly intermediate andesitic-dacitic suites, including associated granitic intrusive rocks, silicic extrusive rocks, and minor basaltic lavas, are interpreted as reflecting plate interactions related to subduction along the continental margin; and (2) bimodal suites, dominantly basaltic but with minor silicic extrusive rocks, are interpreted as reflecting extensional tectonics. Space-time distribution of the two assemblages suggests that magmatic arcs extended continously parallel to the continental margin from Canada to Mexico in latest Mesozoic and in Oligocene times. An early Cenozoic null in magmatism in the Great Basin may delineate the region where subduction was arrested temporarily by development of the proto-San Andreas fault as a transform in coastal California or, alternatively, may reflect complex subsurface configurations of subducted plates. The late Cenozoic transition from subduction-related magmatism to extention-related basaltic volcanism in the southern Cordillera occurred at different times in different areas in harmony with current concepts about the migration of the Mendocino triple junction as the modern San Andreas transform fault was formed. The plots also reveal the existence of several discrete magmatic loci where igneous activity of various kinds was characteristically more intense and long-lived than elsewhere. ?? 1976.

  18. Late Cenozoic deformation of the Gavrovo and Ionian zones in NW Peloponnesos (Western Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tsaila-Monopoli

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The structural deformation of Mesozoic-Tertiary sediments of the Ionian and Gavrovo zones in NW Peloponnesos is related to the propagation of a fold-thrust system during the Cenozoic. The sediments of the Gavrovo zone have been deformed by high angle reverse faulting generating an imbricate fan. Skolis mountain represents the Gavrovo thrust front. The detachment occurred in the underlying flysch of the Ionian zone. The Ionian zone has also been affected by shortening above a detachment horizon situated in the lower horizons of Triassic evaporites. The main compressional structure of the Ionian zone is a broad anticline revealed by a seismic survey west of Skolis mountain. The Gavrovo-sheet emplacement caused the downthrow and bending of the eastern part of the Ionian zone followed by halokinesis of Triassic evaporites to the west. Post-compressional normal faulting has predominated since the Pliocene, resulting in the formation of the Kato Achaia and Simopoulo basins in the peripheral area of Skolis mountain. Diapirs of Triassic evaporites occur in the mentioned basins that complicate the tectonic pattern in front of the Skolis thrust.

  19. Late cenozoic deformation of the Gavrovo and Ionian zones in NW Peloponnesos (Western Greece)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamberis, E.; Sotiropoulos, S.; Aximniotou, O. [Hellenic Petroleum, Exploration and Exploitation of Hydrocarbons Division, Maroussi, Athens (Greece); Tsaila-Monopoli, S. [Patras Univ., Patras (Greece). Dept. of Geology; Ioakim, C. [Institute of Geological and Mineral Explorations, Athens (Greece)

    2000-10-01

    The structural deformation of Mesozoic-Tertiary sediments of the Ionian and Gavrovo zones in NW Peloponnesos is related to the propagation of a fold-thrust system during the Cenozoic. The sediments of the Gavrovo zone have been deformed by high angle reverse faulting generating an imbricate fan. Skolis mountain represents the Gavrovo thrust front. The detachment occurred in the underlying flysch of the Ionian zone. The Ionian zone has also been affected by shortening above a detachment horizon situated in the lower horizons of Triassic evaporites. The main compressional structure of the Ionian zone is a broad anticline revealed by a seismic survey west of Skolis mountain. The Gavrovo-sheet emplacement caused the downthrow and bending of the eastern part of the Ionian zone followed by halokinesis of Triassic evaporites to the west. Post-compressional normal faulting has predominated since the Pliocene, resulting in the formation of the Kato Achaia and Simopoulo basins in the peripheral area of Skolis mountain. Diapirs of Triassic evaporites occur in the mentioned basins that complicate the tectonic pattern in front of the Skolis thrust.

  20. Lithospheric buckling and intra-arc stresses: A mechanism for arc segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kerri L.

    1989-01-01

    Comparison of segment development of a number of arcs has shown that consistent relationships between segmentation, volcanism and variable stresses exists. Researchers successfully modeled these relationships using the conceptual model of lithospheric buckling of Yamaoka et al. (1986; 1987). Lithosphere buckling (deformation) provides the needed mechanism to explain segmentation phenomenon; offsets in volcanic fronts, distribution of calderas within segments, variable segment stresses and the chemical diversity seen between segment boundary and segment interior magmas.

  1. Peek Arc Consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Bodirsky, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies peek arc consistency, a reasoning technique that extends the well-known arc consistency technique for constraint satisfaction. In contrast to other more costly extensions of arc consistency that have been studied in the literature, peek arc consistency requires only linear space and quadratic time and can be parallelized in a straightforward way such that it runs in linear time with a linear number of processors. We demonstrate that for various constraint languages, peek arc consistency gives a polynomial-time decision procedure for the constraint satisfaction problem. We also present an algebraic characterization of those constraint languages that can be solved by peek arc consistency, and study the robustness of the algorithm.

  2. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  3. Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stewart W.; Martina, Filomeno; Addison, Adrian C.; Ding, Jialuo; Pardal, Goncalo; Colegrove, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for additive manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to ...

  4. Light-Front QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In these lectures, I survey a number of applications of light-front methods to hadron and nuclear physics phenomenology and dynamics, including light-front statistical physics. Light-front Fock-state wavefunctions provide a frame-independent representation of hadrons in terms of their fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom. Nonperturbative methods for computing LFWFs in QCD are discussed, including string/gauge duality which predicts the power-law fall-off at high momentum transfer of light-front Fock-state hadronic wavefunctions with an arbitrary number of constituents and orbital angular momentum. The AdS/CFT correspondence has important implications for hadron phenomenology in the conformal limit, including an all-orders derivation of counting rules for exclusive processes. One can also compute the hadronic spectrum of near-conformal QCD assuming a truncated AdS/CFT space. Given the LFWFs, one can compute form factors, heavy hadron decay amplitudes, hadron distribution amplitudes, and the generalized parton distributions underlying deeply virtual Compton scattering. The quantum fluctuations represented by the light-front Fock expansion leads to novel QCD phenomena such as color transparency, intrinsic heavy quark distributions, diffractive dissociation, and hidden-color components of nuclear wavefunctions. A new test of hidden color in deuteron photodisintegration is proposed. The origin of leading-twist phenomena such as the diffractive component of deep inelastic scattering, single-spin asymmetries, nuclear shadowing and antishadowing is also discussed; these phenomena cannot be described by light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. Part of the anomalous NuTeV results for the weak mixing angle θW could be due to the non-universality of nuclear antishadowing for charged and neutral currents

  5. Cenozoic volcanism and lithospheric tectonic evolution in Qiangtang area, northern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHI; Xiaoguo; LI; Cai; JIN; Wei

    2005-01-01

    Following the collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates, the Cenozoic volcanic activities are rather frequent in the Qiangtang area of northern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. They can be divided into four series: alkaline basalt series, high-K calc-alkaline series, shoshonitic series and peralkaline potassic-ultrapotassic series. Geochemical data suggest that the magma sources of Cenozoic volcanic rocks have transferred from spinel Iherzolite mantle in the early stage to garnet peridotite enriched mantle (EM2) in the later stage. The high Mg# number and extremely high Cr-Ni-Co abundance of high-K calc-alkaline and shoshonitic series andesites in the Qiangtang area indicate that the primary magma might be derived from subduction of continent lithosphere from the Lhasa block. Incompatible element ratios of La/Rb, Zr/Rb, Rb/Nb, K/Nb,Pb/La and K/La of peralkaline potassic-ultrapotassic series lavas in northern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau are lower than island arc volcanic rocks and higher than and similar to oceanic island basalts. This signature indicates that the primary magma derive from a paleo-mantle wedge interfused by fluids derived from asthenosphere and/or subducted mantle lithosphere. But the above element ratios of ultrapotassic lavas in southern Tibet and ultrapotassic lamprophyres in eastern Tibet are higher than and similar to island arc volcanic rocks, which means that the primary magma sources contained a large quantity of crust contaminant from fluids and/or melts derived from subducted continent lithosphere. The studies result supports that the indian continental .lithosphere has underthrust beneath Tibet to about the middle of the plateau, and Eurasian (Qaidam basin) mantle lithosphere has underthrust beneath the Qiangtang area of northern Tibet Plateau. In the paper we demonstrate further that the pulsing cycles of potassic-ultrapotassic volcanism of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau result from an asthenospher pulsing upwelling caused by the intraplate subduction

  6. The Algerian Margin: an Example of a Reactivation in Compression of a Complex Cenozoic Passive Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domzig, A.; Deverchere, J.; Yelles, K.; Govers, R.; Wortel, R.; Petit, C.; Cataneo, A.; Kherroubi, A.; Teams, M.

    2007-12-01

    The Western Mediterranean underwent a complex Cenozoic history involving subduction of the Tethys Ocean as well as subduction roll-back and associated opening of back-arc basins. During the Oligo-Miocene, the subduction roll-back to the south led to the collision of the Kabylies into the African plate, but subduction continued towards west, causing the Alboran slab to migrate towards the Gibraltar Arc. Northern Africa is at the southern border of this system and is therefore a major study area in the context of slow convergent plates to study the reactivation in compression of a Cenozoic passive margin but also the records of past geodynamic processes. This work aims to characterize the multi-scale structure of the offshore Algerian margin, based on the MARADJA'03 and MARADJA2/SAMRA'05 cruises data (multibeam bathymetry, seismic-reflection, side-scan sonar, backscattering, CHIRP, gravimetry). Tectonic (geomorphology, folds, faults) records reveal large recent and active structures as well as the geological inheritance of the margin. In western Algeria, slab roll-back is likely to have been accompanied by lithospheric tearing (STEP fault) as it has been modelled at a regional scale (Govers and Wortel, 2005): we provide first evidence for the presence of such structure(s) offshore Algeria. The geodynamical conditions have now changed, and we are facing new types of structures. Two main tectonic styles are identified: reverse to the centre and east; and strike-slip to the west. In Central Algeria, the compressional structures are active blind thrusts (Plio-Quaternary) verging to the north (opposite to pre-existing features) expressed as asymmetrical folds, sub-perpendicular to the convergence direction and often en echelon. These faults may all trigger M=6-7.5 earthquakes (e.g. Khair al Din fault near Algiers). Among them, the fault associated with the 2003 Boumerdes event (Mw=6.8) would continue to the surface by flats and ramps creating piggy-back basins or

  7. Meso-Cenozoic basin evolution in northern Korean Peninsula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAK Hyon Uk; LYANG To Jun; LIU Yongjiang; HYON Yun Su; KIM Gyong Chol

    2009-01-01

    In the Korean Peninsula the Meso-Cenozoic basins were mainly formed due to fault block and block movement. The Mesozoic fracture structures correspond basically to modern large rivers in direction. Such faults were usually developed to rift and formed lake-type tectonic basin, such as the Amrokgang-, Taedonggang-, Ryesonggang-, Hochongang-, Jangphari-, Susongchon-, Pujon-, and Nampho basins. The Mesozoic strata are considered to be divided into the Lower Jurassic Taedong System, Upper Jurassic Jasong System, Upper Jurassic- -early Lower Cretaceous Taebo System, and the Upper Cretaceous- -Paleocene (Chonjaebong, Hongwon, Jaedok Series). The Cenozoic block movement succeeded the Mesozoic fault block movement. The Kilju-Myongchon Graben and Tumangang Basin, etc, are the basins related to the fault zones developed from the Oligocene to Miocene. In addition, the Tertiary basins were formed in many areas in the Miocene (e.g. Sinhung, Oro, Hamhung, Yonghung, Anbyon, Cholwon, etc). The Cenozoic sedimentation occurred mainly from the late Oligocene to Miocene. The Kilju-Myongchon Graben was the fore deep connected to the sea and the basins inclined in the Chugaryong Fault Zone are intramountain basins. Therefore, coal-bearing beds and clastic rocks in the intramountain basins and rare marine strata and terrigenous clastic rocks are main sedimentary sequences in the Cenozoic.

  8. Paleomagnetic results from Cenozoic volcanics of Lusatia, NW Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schnabl, Petr; Cajz, Vladimír; Tietz, O.; Buechner, J.; Suhr, P.; Pécskay, Z.; Čížková, Kristýna

    s. l: American Geophysical Union, 2013. [AGU Meeting of the Americas. 14.05.2013-17.05.2013, Cancun] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : paleomagnetism * Cenozoic * volcanics Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://moa.agu.org/2013/eposters/eposter/gp33a-03/

  9. Interactions between tectonic and sedimentation related to the Rides Prérifaines in the Volubilis basin (Rif front, Morocco)

    OpenAIRE

    Roldán García, F. J.; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Chalouan, Ahmed; Anahnah, Farida; Ahmamou, M.; Ruano, P.; Constán, Ana Ruiz; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos; Benmakhlouf, M.; Marín-Lechado, C.; López-Garrido, A. C.; Pedrera, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Volubilis Neogene basin (Morocco) was part of the South Rif Corridor that connected the Atlantic Ocean with the Mediterranean. This basin recorded the tectonic - sedimentary interactions of a foreland basin subjected to the progressive advance of the Rif mountain range front. Since the Miocene, the displacement of the Prerif to the WSW, caused the detachment of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic cover from the Variscan basement and the compartimentation of Saïss Basin. Simultaneously, ...

  10. ADSL Analog Front End

    OpenAIRE

    Stojković, Nino

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) analog front end (AFE) designs are described and compared. AFE is the part of ADSL modems most responsible for quality signal transmission over phone wires. It can be divided into the transmitting path (TX) circuitry, the receiving path (RX) circuitry and the hybrid network and transformer. The operations and realizations of each functional block are presented. There are the D/A converter, the filter and the line driver in the TX pat...

  11. Dynamics of curved fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Pelce, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made in the understanding of interface dynamics of various systems: hydrodynamics, crystal growth, chemical reactions, and combustion. Dynamics of Curved Fronts is an important contribution to this field and will be an indispensable reference work for researchers and graduate students in physics, applied mathematics, and chemical engineering. The book consist of a 100 page introduction by the editor and 33 seminal articles from various disciplines.

  12. Intelligent Front Ends

    OpenAIRE

    Bundy, Alan

    1984-01-01

    An intelligent front end is a user-friendly interface to a software package, which uses Artificial Intelligence techniques to enable the user to interact with the computer using his/her own terminology rather than that demanded by the package. Several such systems exist and provide interfaces for finite element. statistical and simulation packages, and the area is an important area of growth for expert systems. In this paper we discuss the techniques required in an intelligent ...

  13. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  14. Theory of pinned fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissmann, Haim; Shnerb, Nadav M.; Kessler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of a front between two different phases in the presence of a smoothly inhomogeneous external field that takes its critical value at the crossing point is analyzed. Two generic scenarios are studied. In the first, the system admits a bistable solution and the external field governs the rate in which one phase invades the other. The second mechanism corresponds to a continuous transition that, in the case of reactive systems, takes the form of a transcritical bifurcation at the crossing point. We solve for the front shape and for the response of competitive fronts to external noise, showing that static properties and also some of the dynamical features cannot discriminate between the two scenarios. A reliable indicator turns out to be the fluctuation statistics. These take a Gaussian form in the bifurcation case and a double-peaked shape in a bistable system. Our results are discussed in the context of biological processes, such as species and communities dynamics in the presence of a resource gradient.

  15. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  16. Solitary Wave and Wave Front as Viewed From Curvature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUShi-Kuo; FUZun-Tao; LIUShi-Da; LIANGFu-Ming; XINGuo-Jun

    2004-01-01

    The solitary wave and wave front are two important behaviors of nonlinear evolution equations. Geometrically, solitary wave and wave front are all plane curve. In this paper, they can be represented in terms of curvature c(s),which varies with arc length s. For solitary wave when s→±∞, then its curvature c(s) approaches zero, and whens = 0, the curvature c(s) reaches its maximum. For wave front, when s→±∞, then its curvature c(s) approaches zero,and when s = 0, the curvature c(s) is still zero, but c'(s)≠0. That is, s = 0 is a turning point. When c(s) is given,the variance at some point (x, y) in stream line with arc length s satisfies a 2-order linear variable-coeffcient ordinary differential equation. From this equation, it can be determined qualitatively whether the given curvature is a solitary wave or wave front.

  17. Thermal Fronts in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  18. Vacuum arc anode phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of anode phenomena in vacuum arcs is presented. Discussed in succession are: the transition of the arc into the anode spot mode; the temperature of the anode before, during and after the anode spot forms; and anode ions. Characteristically the anode spot has a temperature of the order of the atmospheric boiling point of the anode material and is a copious source of vapor and energetic ions. The dominant mechanism controlling the transition of the vacuum arc into the anode spot mode appears to depend upon the electrode geometry, the electrode material, and the current waveform of the particular vacuum arc being considered. Either magnetic constriction in the gap plasma or gross anode melting can trigger the transition; indeed, a combination of the two is a common cause of anode spot formation

  19. The Cenozoic Tectonic History of the Calabrian Orogen, Southern Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Shimabukuro, David Haruo

    2011-01-01

    The Cenozoic accretionary wedge of Calabria, Southern Italy, consists of several units of continental and oceanic affinity accreted beneath the former continental margin of the Sardinia-Corsica block. Each of these units bears the imprint of blueschist-facies metamorphism, indicating that it has been subducted to high-pressure/low-temperature conditions during the Alpine Orogeny. Structurally higher units, having been accreted first, record the early metamorphic history of the orogen; lower...

  20. Report on ICDP workshop CONOSC (COring the NOrth Sea Cenozoic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, Wim; Donders, Timme; Luthi, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    ICDP workshop COring the NOrth Sea Cenozoic focused on the scientific objectives and the technical aspects of drilling and sampling. Some 55 participants attended the meeting, ranging from climate scientists, drilling engineers, and geophysicists to stratigraphers and public outreach experts. Discussion on the proposed research sharpened the main research lines and led to working groups and the necessary technical details to compile a full proposal that was submitted in January 2016.

  1. Recurrent Cenozoic volcanic activity in the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ulrych, Jaromír; Dostal, J.; Adamovič, Jiří; Jelínek, E.; Špaček, Petr; Hegner, E.; Balogh, K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 123, 1/4 (2011), s. 133-144. ISSN 0024-4937 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA300130902; GA ČR(CZ) GA205/09/1170 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516; CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * Cenozoic * alkaline volcanism * paleostress fields * rift * mantle Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.246, year: 2011

  2. Single-Arc IMRT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea of delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multileaf collimator in a continuous dynamic mode during a single rotation of the gantry has recently gained momentum both in research and industry. In this note we investigate the potential of this Single-Arc IMRT technique at a conceptual level. We consider the original theoretical example case from Brahme et al that got the field of IMRT started. Using analytical methods, we derive deliverable intensity 'landscapes' for Single-Arc as well as standard IMRT and Tomotherapy. We find that Tomotherapy provides the greatest flexibility in shaping intensity landscapes and that it allows one to deliver IMRT in a way that comes close to the ideal case in the transverse plane. Single-Arc and standard IMRT make compromises in different areas. Only in relatively simple cases that do not require substantial intensity modulation will Single-Arc be dosimetrically comparable to Tomotherapy. Compared with standard IMRT, Single-Arc could be dosimetrically superior in certain cases if one is willing to accept the spreading of low dose values over large volumes of normal tissue. In terms of treatment planning, Single-Arc poses a more challenging optimization problem than Tomotherapy or standard IMRT. We conclude that Single-Arc holds potential as an efficient IMRT technique especially for relatively simple cases. In very complex cases, Single-Arc may unduly compromise the quality of the dose distribution, if one tries to keep the treatment time below 2 min or so. As with all IMRT techniques, it is important to explore the tradeoff between plan quality and the efficiency of its delivery carefully for each individual case. (note)

  3. ALICE - ARC integration

    OpenAIRE

    Anderlik, Csaba; Gregersen, Anders Rhod; Kleist, Josva; Peters, Andreas; Siaz, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Gridware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructur...

  4. Simple front tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glimm, J.; Grove, J.W.; Li, X.; Zhao, N.

    1999-04-01

    A new and simplified front tracking algorithm has been developed as an aspect of the extension of this algorithm to three dimensions. Here the authors emphasize two main results: (1) a simplified description of the microtopology of the interface, based on interface crossings with cell block edges, and (2) an improved algorithm for the interaction of a tracked contact discontinuity with an untracked shock wave. For the latter question, they focus on the post interaction jump at the contact, which is a purely 1D issue. Comparisons to other methods, including the level set method, are included.

  5. Volcanic evolution of the South Sandwich volcanic arc, South Atlantic, from multibeam bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leat, Philip T.; Day, Simon J.; Tate, Alex J.; Martin, Tara J.; Owen, Matthew J.; Tappin, David R.

    2013-09-01

    New multibeam bathymetry data are presented for the South Sandwich intra-oceanic arc which occupies the small Sandwich plate in the South Atlantic, and is widely considered to be a simple end-member in the range of intra-oceanic arc types. The images show for the first time the distribution of submarine volcanic, tectonic and erosional-depositional features along the whole length of the 540 km long volcanic arc, allowing systematic investigation of along-arc variations. The data confirm that the volcanic arc has a simple structure composed of large volcanoes which form a well-defined volcanic front, but with three parallel cross-cutting seamount chains extending 38-60 km from near the volcanic front into the rear-arc. There is no evidence for intra-arc rifting or extinct volcanic lines. Topographic evidence for faulting is generally absent, except near the northern and southern plate boundaries. Most of the volcanic arc appears to be built on ocean crust formed at the associated back-arc spreading centre, as previously proposed from magnetic data, but the southern part of the arc appears to be underlain by older arc or continental crust whose west-facing rifted margin facing the back-arc basin is defined by the new bathymetry. The new survey shows nine main volcanic edifices along the volcanic front and ca. 20 main seamounts. The main volcanoes form largely glaciated islands with summits 3.0-3.5 km above base levels which are 2500-3000 m deep in the north and shallower at 2000-2500 m deep in the south. Some of the component seamounts are interpreted to have been active since the last glacial maximum, and so are approximately contemporaneous with the volcanic front volcanism. Seven calderas, all either submarine or ice-filled, have been identified: Adventure volcano, a newly discovered submarine volcanic front caldera volcano is described for the first time. All but one of the calderas are situated on summits of large volcanoes in the southern part of the arc, and

  6. Cenozoic carbon cycle imbalances and a variable weathering feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caves, Jeremy K.; Jost, Adam B.; Lau, Kimberly V.; Maher, Kate

    2016-09-01

    The long-term stability of Earth's climate and the recovery of the ocean-atmosphere system after carbon cycle perturbations are often attributed to a stabilizing negative feedback between silicate weathering and climate. However, evidence for the operation of this feedback over million-year timescales and in response to tectonic and long-term climatic change remains scarce. For example, the past 50 million years of the Cenozoic Era are characterized by long-term cooling and declining atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). During this interval, constant or decreasing carbon fluxes from the solid Earth to the atmosphere suggest that stable or decreasing weathering fluxes are needed to balance the carbon cycle. In contrast, marine isotopic proxies of weathering (i.e., 87Sr/86Sr, δ7 Li , and 187Os/188Os) are interpreted to reflect increasing weathering fluxes. Here, we evaluate the existence of a negative feedback by reconstructing the imbalance in the carbon cycle during the Cenozoic using the surface inventories of carbon and alkalinity. Only a sustained 0.25-0.5% increase in silicate weathering is necessary to explain the long-term decline in pCO2 over the Cenozoic. We propose that the long-term decrease in pCO2 is due to an increase in the strength of the silicate weathering feedback (i.e., the constant of proportionality between the silicate weathering flux and climate), rather than an increase in the weathering flux. This increase in the feedback strength, which mirrors the marine isotope proxies, occurs as transient, 1 million year timescales remains invariant to match the long-term inputs of carbon. Over the Cenozoic, this results in stable long-term weathering fluxes even as pCO2 decreases. We attribute increasing feedback strength to a change in the type and reactivity of rock in the weathering zone, which collectively has increased the reactivity of the surface of the Earth. Increasing feedback strength through the Cenozoic reconciles mass balance in the carbon cycle with

  7. New Front End Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, D; Jovanovic, I; Comaskey, B J

    2001-02-01

    The next generation of Petawatt class lasers will require the development of new laser technology. Optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) holds a potential to increase the peak power level to >10 PW with existing grating technology through ultrashort pulses. Furthermore, by utilizing a new type of front-end system based on optical parametric amplification, pulses can be produced with substantially higher contrast than with Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier technology. We performed extensive study of OPCPA using a single crystal-based OPA. We developed a replacement for Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier for high peak power lasers based on OPCPA, with an output of 30 mJ, at 10 Hz repetition rate and 16.5 nm spectral bandwidth. We developed a 3D numerical model for OPCPA and we performed a theoretical study of influences of pump laser beam quality on optical parametric amplification. Our results indicate that OPCPA represents a valid replacement for Ti:sapphire in the front end of high energy short pulse lasers.

  8. Modeling of Arc Force in Plasma Arc Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhonglin; HU Shengsun; YIN Fengliang; WANG Rui

    2008-01-01

    A three. dimensional mathematical model for the transferred-type argon arc was developed to describe arc force on the anode surface. The software ANSYS was employed to solve the model. The model includes a part of torch and tungsten electrode to achieve m ore reasonable results. The arc temperature and flow fields were derived. And the influences of welding parameters on arc force were also studied. The simulated results show that arc pressure at the anode are dependent on the welding current, plasma gas flow rate and electrode neck-in, while not sensitive to arc length.

  9. ALICE-ARC integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a module implementing the functionalities necessary to achieve AliEn job submission and management to ARC enabled sites

  10. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  11. Arc Plasma Torch Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Trelles, J P; Vardelle, A; Heberlein, J V R

    2013-01-01

    Arc plasma torches are the primary components of various industrial thermal plasma processes involving plasma spraying, metal cutting and welding, thermal plasma CVD, metal melting and remelting, waste treatment and gas production. They are relatively simple devices whose operation implies intricate thermal, chemical, electrical, and fluid dynamics phenomena. Modeling may be used as a means to better understand the physical processes involved in their operation. This paper presents an overview of the main aspects involved in the modeling of DC arc plasma torches: the mathematical models including thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium models, turbulent and radiative transport, thermodynamic and transport property calculation, boundary conditions and arc reattachment models. It focuses on the conventional plasma torches used for plasma spraying that include a hot-cathode and a nozzle anode.

  12. Photoionization effects in ionization fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrayas, Manuel [Departamento de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Fontelos, Marco A [Departamento de Matematicas, Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, C/Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Trueba, Jose L [Departamento de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-12-21

    In this paper we study the effects of photoionization processes on the propagation of both negative and positive ionization fronts in streamer discharge. We show that negative fronts accelerate in the presence of photoionization events. The appearance and propagation of positive ionization fronts travelling with constant velocity is explained as the result of the combined effects of photoionization and electron diffusion. The photoionization range plays an important role in the selection of the velocity of the ionization front as we show in this work.

  13. Dynamic topography and the Cenozoic carbonate compensation depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S. M.; Moucha, R.; Raymo, M. E.; Derry, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The carbonate compensation depth (CCD), the ocean depth at which the calcium carbonate accumulation rate goes to zero, can provide valuable insight into climatic and weathering conditions over the Cenozoic. The paleoposition of the CCD can be inferred from sediment core data. As the carbonate accumulation rate decreases linearly with depth between the lysocline and CCD, the CCD can be calculated using a linear regression on multiple sediment cores with known carbonate accumulation rates and paleodepths. It is therefore vital to have well-constrained estimates of paleodepths. Paleodepths are typically calculated using models of thermal subsidence and sediment loading and compaction. However, viscous convection-related stresses in the mantle can warp the ocean floor by hundreds of meters over broad regions and can also vary significantly over millions of years. This contribution to paleobathymetry, termed dynamic topography, can be calculated by modeling mantle flow backwards in time. Herein, we demonstrate the effect dynamic topography has on the inference of the late Cenozoic CCD with an example from the equatorial Pacific, considering sites from IODP Expeditions 320/321. The equatorial Pacific, given its large size and high productivity, is closely tied to the global carbon cycle. Accordingly, long-term changes in the equatorial Pacific CCD can be considered to reflect global changes in weathering fluxes and the carbon cycle, in addition to more regional changes in productivity and thermohaline circulation. We find that, when the dynamic topography contribution to bathymetry is accounted for, the equatorial Pacific CCD is calculated to be appreciably shallower at 30 Ma than previous estimates would suggest, implying a greater deepening of the Pacific CCD over the late Cenozoic.

  14. Cenozoic Methane-Seep Faunas of the Caribbean Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Kiel

    Full Text Available We report new examples of Cenozoic cold-seep communities from Colombia, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Trinidad, and Venezuela, and attempt to improve the stratigraphic dating of Cenozoic Caribbean seep communities using strontium isotope stratigraphy. Two seep faunas are distinguished in Barbados: the late Eocene mudstone-hosted 'Joes River fauna' consists mainly of large lucinid bivalves and tall abyssochrysoid gastropods, and the early Miocene carbonate-hosted 'Bath Cliffs fauna' containing the vesicomyid Pleurophopsis, the mytilid Bathymodiolus and small gastropods. Two new Oligocene seep communities from the Sinú River basin in Colombia consist of lucinid bivalves including Elongatolucina, thyasirid and solemyid bivalves, and Pleurophopsis. A new early Miocene seep community from Cuba includes Pleurophopsis and the large lucinid Meganodontia. Strontium isotope stratigraphy suggests an Eocene age for the Cuban Elmira asphalt mine seep community, making it the oldest in the Caribbean region. A new basal Pliocene seep fauna from the Dominican Republic is characterized by the large lucinid Anodontia (Pegophysema. In Trinidad we distinguish two types of seep faunas: the mudstone-hosted Godineau River fauna consisting mainly of lucinid bivalves, and the limestone-hosted Freeman's Bay fauna consisting chiefly of Pleurophopsis, Bathymodiolus, and small gastropods; they are all dated as late Miocene. Four new seep communities of Oligocene to Miocene age are reported from Venezuela. They consist mainly of large globular lucinid bivalves including Meganodontia, and moderately sized vesicomyid bivalves. After the late Miocene many large and typical 'Cenozoic' lucinid genera disappeared from the Caribbean seeps and are today known only from the central Indo-Pacific Ocean. We speculate that the increasingly oligotrophic conditions in the Caribbean Sea after the closure of the Isthmus of Panama in the Pliocene may have been unfavorable for such large

  15. Cenozoic sequence stratigraphy in the eastern North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelsen, O.; Thomsen, E.; Danielsen, M.; Heilmann-Clausen, C.; Jordt, H.; Laursen, G.V.

    1995-05-01

    The Cenozoic evolution of the epicontinental North Sea Basin is described on the basis of sequence stratigraphy, comprising analyses of seismic sections, petrophysical logs, and biostratigraphic studies of foraminifera, dinoflagellates, and calcareous nannofossils. Stratigraphic, palaeogeographic, and palaeoecological information from the Danish onshore area is integrated in the study. The deposits are subdivided into 21 sequences, which groups into seven informal major units. The sequence boundaries are identified by differences in seismic facies and by seismic onlap, toplap, and truncation features. The maximum flooding surface is placed at an internal downlap surface which correlates with high values on the gamma ray log. The source of sediments and the direction of sediment transport changed several times during the Cenozoic. Transport was mainly from the north during the Late Paleocene and Early Eocene, from the west during the Middle and Late Eocene, and from the north and northwest during the Oligocene to quaternary. The depocenters of the seven major units are generally located marginally, probably adjoining the source areas. There is only minor evidence for changes in subsidence rates in the basin. A constant rate is assumed from the Paleocene to the mid Middle Miocene. For the remaining part of the Cenozoic and increased rate is indicated. A tentative relative sea-level curve for the North Sea Basin is proposed. The overall trends of the curve are broadly comparable with the global sea-level curve of Haq et al. Discrepancies may be caused by differences in the biostratigraphic calibrations. The most pronounced Oligocene sea-level fall is dated ot the latest Oligocene. (au) (83 refs.)

  16. Early Cenozoic Multiple Thrust in the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhan Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently completed regional geological mapping at a scale of 1 : 250,000 or larger across all of the Tibetan Plateau coupled with deep seismic surveys reveals for the first time a comprehensive depiction of the major early Cenozoic thrust systems resulting from the northward subduction of the Indian Continental Plate. These systems define a series of overlapping north-dipping thrust sheets that thickened the Tibetan crust and lead to the rise of the plateau. The few south-dipping thrusts present apparently developed within a sheet when the back moved faster than the toe. Many of the thrusts are shown to extend to the middle-lower crustal depths by seismic data. The regional thrust systems are the Main Central, Renbu-Zedong, Gangdese, Central Gangdese, North Gangdese, Bangoin-Nujiang, Qiangtang, Hohxil, and South Kunlun Thrusts. The minimal southward displacements of the South Kunlun, Hohxil, South Qiangtang, and Central Gangdese Thrusts are estimated to be 30 km, 25 km, 150 km and 50 km, respectively. Deep thrusting began in the Himalaya-Tibetan region soon after India-Eurasia continental collision and led to crustal thickening and subsequent uplift of the Tibetan Plateau during Late Eocene-Early Miocene when the systems were mainly active. The major thrust systems ceased moving in Early Miocene and many were soon covered by lacustrine strata. This activity succeeded in the late Cenozoic to crustal extension and strike-slip movement in the central Tibetan Plateau. The revelation of the full array of the early Cenozoic thrust systems provides a much more complete understanding of the tectonic framework of the Tibetan Plateau.

  17. Uranium and thorium in Cenozoic basaltods of Kamchatka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regularities in distribution of radioactive elements (RAE) in basaltoids of Kamchatka have been analyzed. The RAE concentration in samples was determined by γ-spectrometric method. The results compared with the instrumental neutron-activation analysis data are found to be in agreement. Results of evaluating the average contents of U, Th and roch-forming elements in ce-- nozoic basaltoids are presented. The radiogeochemical data enable to associate the origin of the Kamchatka Cenozoic basaltoids with both fractional melting of the upper mantle depleted of radioactive elements and the development of magmatic chambers in submerged blocks of the Pre-Cretaceous melanocratic basement the composition of which is close to oceanic tholeiite

  18. Radiometric age of Cenozoic volcanism and paleomagnetic research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cajz, Vladimír; Schnabl, Petr; Radoň, M.

    [Praha]: Česká geologická společnost, 2011 - (Verner, K.; Buriánek, D.; Budil, P.). s. 24-24 ISBN 978-80-87487-00-6. [Otevřený kongres České geologické společnosti a Slovenskej geologickej spoločnosti /2./. 21.09.2011-25.09.2011, Monínec] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : volcanism * paleomagnetism * Cenozoic Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.geologickykongres.eu/OGK11/abstrakty/OGK11_24.pdf

  19. Asymptotic Solutions of Detonation Propagation in a 2D Circular Arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Mark; Meyer, Chad; Quirk, James

    2015-11-01

    The large pressure of the product gas generated by detonating high explosives causes lateral motion of the explosive at the material interface between the explosive and its confinement. In turn, this leads to streamline divergence and curvature of the detonation front (typically in a divergent fashion). The propagation of a detonation front in a given geometry depends on the amount of curvature generated. Here we describe an asymptotic analysis of detonation propagation in a 2D circular arc, examining dependencies of the motion on the size of the inner and outer arc radii, and the relation between the detonation velocity and curvature for different types of explosive.

  20. Thermal state of the Roer Valley Graben, part of the European Cenozoic Rift System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijendijk, E.; Voorde, M. ter; Balen, R. van; Verweij, H.; Simmelink, E.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a detailed analysis of the thermal state of the Cenozoic Roer Valley Graben, the north-western branch of the European Cenozoic Rift System, based on a new set of temperature data. We developed a numerical technique for correcting bottom hole temperatures, including an evaluation of the

  1. First paleomagnetic results from Cenozoic volcanics of Lusatian region, Saxony/Bohemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cajz, Vladimír; Schnabl, Petr; Büchner, J.; Tietz, O.; Suhr, P.; Pécskay, Z.; Čížková, Kristýna; Šlechta, Stanislav

    Prague: Czech Geological Survey ; Senckenberg museum of natural History Görlitz, 2013 - (Büchner, J.; Rapprich, V.; Tietz, O.). s. 189-190 ISBN 978-80-7075-806-9. [Basalt 2013: Cenozoic magmatism in Central Europe. 24.04.2013-28.04.2013, Görlitz] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Cenozoic * paleomagnetism * Lusation region Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  2. U-Pb detrital zircon age patterns of Cenozoic clastic sedimentary rocks in Trinidad and its implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiangyang; Mann, Paul

    2014-06-01

    The Cenozoic evolution of northern South America can be simplified as a diachronous, west-to-east change from north-facing passive margin, to active convergence and transcurrent plate margin. As the current eastern end of the Caribbean-South America plate boundary, the Trinidad area records the most recent tectonic regime transition. Documenting the provenance of Cenozoic clastic rocks in Trinidad provides insights into the spatial and temporal relationships between mountain range uplifting, sediment dispersal, and drainage system development along the eastern end of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary. Four Eocene to Pliocene age outcropping sandstone samples were collected from Trinidad and 545 detrital zircon grains were analyzed using the U-Pb LA-ICP-MS method. A total of 404 analyses with less than 10% discordance were used for the final interpretation. Results show that the age distribution of the Eocene to the Early Oligocene samples is very restricted and dominated by Precambrian age grains with age peaks at ~ 1400 Ma, ~ 1800 Ma, and ~ 2000 Ma, typically derived from the Guyana Shield. In contrast, the Late Oligocene and younger samples show much broader and mixed age distribution that includes Mesozoic, Paleozoic, and Precambrian peaks. This age shift was interpreted as arriving of the Great Caribbean Arc and oblique collision between the South America and Caribbean plates. Continuing collision uplifted the Andes belts to the west. The Eastern Cordillera of Colombia, the Merida Andes, and the northern Venezuela coastal ranges then became the second primary sources. Offshore sedimentation switched from the passive margin with multiple small drainage systems to the active convergent and transcurrent plate margin with a single large river-dominated delivery system.

  3. Melanesian arc far-field response to collision of the Ontong Java Plateau: Geochronology and petrogenesis of the Simuku Igneous Complex, New Britain, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Robert J.; Spandler, Carl; Richards, Simon W.

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the evolution of the mid-Cenozoic Melanesian arc is critical for our knowledge of the regional tectonic development of the Australian-Pacific plate margin, yet there have been no recent studies to constrain the nature and timing of magmatic activity in this arc segment. In particular, there are currently no robust absolute age constraints at the plate margin related to either the initiation or cessation of subduction and arc magmatism. We present the first combined U-Pb zircon geochronology and geochemical investigation into the evolution of the Melanesian arc utilizing a comprehensive sample suite from the Simuku Igneous Complex of West New Britain, Papua New Guinea. Development of the embryonic island arc from at least 40 Ma and progressive arc growth was punctuated by distant collision of the Ontong Java Plateau and subduction cessation from 26 Ma. This change in subduction dynamics is represented in the Melanesian arc magmatic record by emplacement of the Simuku Porphyry Complex between 24 and 20 Ma. Petrological and geochemical affinities highlight genetic differences between 'normal' arc volcanics and adakite-like signatures of Cu-Mo mineralized porphyritic intrusives. The contemporaneous emplacement of both 'normal' arc volcanics and adakite-like porphyry intrusives may provide avenues for future research into the origin of diverse styles of arc volcanism. Not only is this one of few studies into the geology of the Melanesian arc, it is also among the first to address the distant tectono-magmatic effects of major arc/forearc collision events and subduction cessation on magmatic arcs, and also offers insight into the tectonic context of porphyry formation in island arc settings.

  4. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  5. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  6. ALICE: ARC integration

    CERN Document Server

    Anderlik, C; Kleist, J; Peters, A; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a modu...

  7. Cenozoic Tectonic Activity of the "Passive" North America Margin: Evidence for Cenozoic Activity on Mesozoic or Paleozoic Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedorub, O. I.; Knapp, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    The tectonic history of the Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) incorporates two cycles of continental assembly, multiple pulses of orogeny, rifting, and post-rift geodynamic evolution. This is reflected in the heterogeneous lithosphere of the ENAM which contains fault structures originated in Paleozoic to Mesozoic eras. The South Georgia Rift basin is probably the largest Mesozoic graben within its boundaries that is associated with the breakup of Pangea. It is composed of smaller sub-basins which appear to be bounded by high-angle normal faults, some of which may have been inverted in late Cretaceous and Cenozoic eras. Paleozoic structures may have been reactivated in Cenozoic time as well. The ENAM is characterized by N-NE maximum horizontal compressive stress direction. This maximum compressional stress field is sub-parallel to the strike of the Atlantic Coast province fault systems. Camden, Augusta, Allendale, and Pen Branch faults are four of the many such reactivated faults along the southern part of ENAM. These faults are now buried under the 0-400 m of loosely consolidated Cretaceous and Cenozoic age sediments and thus are either only partially mapped or currently not recognized. Some of the objectives of this study are to map the subsurface expression and geometry of these faults and to investigate the post Cretaceous deformation and possible causes of fault reactivation on a passive margin. This study employs an integrated geophysical approach to investigate the upper 200 m of identified locations of the above mentioned faults. 2-D high-resolution shallow seismic reflection and refraction methods, gravity surveys, GPR, 2-D electrical resistivity and well data are used for analyses and interpretation. Preliminary results suggest that Camden fault shows signs of Cenozoic reactivation through an approximately 30 m offset NW side up mainly along a steeply dipping fault zone in the basal contact of Coastal Plain sediments with the Carolina Piedmont. Drill

  8. SNS Front End Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Doornbos, J; Oshatz, D; Ratti, A; Staples, J W

    2000-01-01

    The Front End of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) extends from the Ion Source (IS), through a 65 keV LEBT, a 402.5 MHz RFQ, a 2.5 MeV MEBT, ending at the entrance to the DTL. The diagnostics suite in this space includes stripline beam position and phase monitors (BPM), toroid beam current monitors (BCM), and an emittance scanner. Provision is included for beam profile measurement, either gas fluorescence, laser-based photodissociation, or a crawling wire. Mechanical and electrical design and prototyping of BPM and BCM subsystems are proceeding. Significant effort has been devoted to packaging the diagnostic devices in minimal space. Close ties are maintained to the rest of the SNS effort, to ensure long term compatibility of interfaces and in fact share some design work and construction. The data acquisition, digital processing, and control system interface needs for the BPM, BCM, and LEBT diagnostic are similar, and we are committed to using an architecture common with the rest of the SNS collaboration.

  9. Light Front Boson Model Propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jorge Henrique Sales; Alfredo Takashi Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    stract The scope and aim of this work is to describe the two-body interaction mediated by a particle (either the scalar or the gauge boson) within the light-front formulation. To do this, first of all we point out the importance of propagators and Green functions in Quantum Mechanics. Then we project the covariant quantum propagator onto the light front time to get the propagator for scalar particles in these coordinates. This operator propagates the wave function from x+ = 0 to x+ > O. It corresponds to the definition of the time ordering operation in the light front time x+. We calculate the light-front Green's function for 2 interacting bosons propagating forward in x+. We also show how to write down the light front Green's function from the Feynman propagator and finally make a generalization to N bosons.

  10. Permian to late Cenozoic evolution of northern Patagonia: Main tectonic events, magmatic activity, and depositional trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliana, M. A.; Biddle, K. T.

    The late Paleozoic to late Cenozoic evolution of northern Patagonia was influenced significantly by events that occurred while the area was part of the South American sector of Gondwanaland. Late Paleozoic to Middle Triassic subduction along the edge of the supercontinent formed a broad convergent-margin system that is the underpinning of northern Patagonia. Deformation (Gondwanidian orogeny) associated with the subduction is recognized in both the forearc and the convergent backarc areas. Regional extension, accompanied by bimodal volcanism, began in the Late Triassic and led to the formation of a number of north-northwest trending rift basins in Patagonia, which generally followed the Gondwanidian basement grain. Continued extension in the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous led to the opening of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin in southern Chile and, ultimately, to the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. Once oceanic crust began to form, faulting and volcanism declined in Patagonia. During the late Early Cretaceous to the Late Cretaceous, sags over the rift basins coalesced to form a broad backarc basin behind the volcanic arc to the west. These sags are suggestive of thermally driven subsidence. Subsidence of the evolving Atlantic margin allowed extensive marine transgressions to take place from the east. The stratigraphic record of northern Patagonia reflects these events. The upper Paleozoic to upper Mesozoic sedimentary sequences were deposited in basins directly associated with convergent activity along the margin of Gondwanaland or in rift basins created during its breakup. Even though the Tertiary evolution of Patagonia was dominated by events along the western margin of South America, the patterns of sediment transport, thickness, and general shoreline position were still influenced by the locations of the Mesozoic rifts formed during the breakup of Gondwanaland.

  11. North Chilean forearc tectonics and cenozoic plate kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddin, Tim S.; Stimpson, Ian G.; Williams, Graham D.

    1993-04-01

    The continental forearc of northern Chile has been subjected to contemporaneous extension and compression. Here, cross-sections constructed across the forearc are presented which show that since initial shortening, deformation of the forearc has occurred in two tectonically distinct areas. These inner and outer forearc areas are separated by the strain discontinuity of the Atacama fault system and the tectonically neutral Central Depression. The outer forearc, the Coastal Cordillera, exhibits extensional tectonics, with large (up to 300 m) normal fault scarps preserved. These faults cut the earlier thrusts responsible for the elevation of Jurassic rocks at the coast above their regional elevation. The normal faults have been re-activated, displacing Quaternary salt deposits in the Salar Grande. This re-activation of the basement faults is probably due to the subduction of anomalously thick oceanic crust, producing an isostatic imbalance in the outer forearc. In the inner forearc, cross-sections through the Sierra del Medio and Cordillera de Domeyko show that structures of the Pre-Cordillera are best explained by a thick-skinned thrust system, with localized thin-skinned tectonics controlled by evaporite detachment horizons. Current forearc deformation features indicate a strong degree of correlation between subduction zone geometry and forearc tectonics. The timing of Cenozoic tectonism also fits well with established plate motion parameters, and the spatial and temporal variation in the state of stress of the forearc shows a close relationship throughout the Cenozoic to the plate kinematics and morphology of the subducting Nazca plate.

  12. Late Cenozoic Paleoceanography of the Central Arctic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Arctic Ocean is the smallest and perhaps least accessible of the worlds oceans. It occupies only 26% of the global ocean area, and less than 10% of its volume. However, it exerts a disproportionately large influence on the global climate system through a complex set of positive and negative feedback mechanisms directly or indirectly related to terrestrial ice and snow cover and sea ice. Increasingly, the northern high latitude cryosphere is seen as an exceptionally fragile part of the global climate system, a fact exemplified by observed reductions in sea ice extent during the past decades [2]. The paleoceanographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean can provide important insights into the physical forcing mechanisms that affect the form, intensity and permanence of ice in the high Arctic, and its sensitivity to these mechanisms in vastly different climate states of the past. However, marine records capturing the late Cenozoic paleoceanography of the Arctic are limited - most notably because only a single deep borehole exists from the central parts of this Ocean. This paper reviews the principal late Cenozoic (Neogene/Quaternary) results from the Arctic Coring Expedition to the Lomonosov Ridge and in light of recent data and observations on modern sea ice, outlines emerging questions related to three main themes: 1) the establishment of the 'modern' Arctic Ocean and the opening of the Fram Strait 2) the inception of perennial sea ice 3) The Quaternary intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciations.

  13. Mesozoic and Cenozoic formations uraniferous activity. Chapter 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main features of geological structure and history of forming Mesozoic and Cenozoic structure and formations complexes are given. Forming of Mesozoic-Cenozoic Depressive structures had been going on under the condition of infiltrations regime of artesian basins with forming of regional ground and stratum oxidation zones in Zhalpak and Paleogenic sediments which are including uranium deposits belonging to four uranium ore formation. The main raw materials base and extraction of uranium by in-situ leaching method are connected with deposits of epigenetic uranium-ore formation of regional stratum oxidation zones. There are most important deposits: Maikuduk, Inkai, Zhalpak, Uvanas, Suluchekenskoe, Koldzatskoe, Nizhneilyiskoe. All deposits are described according to same plan: stratigraphy, tectonic structure, hydrogeology, hydrochemics, uranium mineralization, morphology of deposits, mineral compound of ores, geologic characteristics of ores, genetics. Except uranium, the main deposit component, there is an information about the accompanied elements: rhenium, selenium, rare-earth ones, industrial concentration of which are in competitions with the same elements extracted from ores

  14. Algal constraints on the Cenozoic history of atmospheric CO2?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. M. Rickaby

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An urgent question for future climate, in light of increased burning of fossil fuels, is the temperature sensitivity of the climate system to atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2. To date, no direct proxy for past levels of pCO2 exists beyond the reach of the polar ice core records. We propose a new methodology for placing an upper constraint on pCO2 over the Cenozoic based on the living geological record. Specifically, our premise is that the contrasting calcification tolerance of various extant species of coccolithophore to raised pCO2 reflects an "evolutionary memory" of past atmospheric composition. The different times of first emergence of each morphospecies allows an upper constraint of past pCO2 to be placed on Cenozoic timeslices. Further, our hypothesis has implications for the response of marine calcifiers to ocean acidification. Geologically "ancient" species, which have survived large changes in ocean chemistry, are likely more resilient to predicted acidification.

  15. Fronts in Large Marine Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Cornillon, Peter C.; Sherman, Kenneth

    2009-04-01

    Oceanic fronts shape marine ecosystems; therefore front mapping and characterization are among the most important aspects of physical oceanography. Here we report on the first global remote sensing survey of fronts in the Large Marine Ecosystems (LME). This survey is based on a unique frontal data archive assembled at the University of Rhode Island. Thermal fronts were automatically derived with the edge detection algorithm of Cayula and Cornillon (1992, 1995, 1996) from 12 years of twice-daily, global, 9-km resolution satellite sea surface temperature (SST) fields to produce synoptic (nearly instantaneous) frontal maps, and to compute the long-term mean frequency of occurrence of SST fronts and their gradients. These synoptic and long-term maps were used to identify major quasi-stationary fronts and to derive provisional frontal distribution maps for all LMEs. Since SST fronts are typically collocated with fronts in other water properties such as salinity, density and chlorophyll, digital frontal paths from SST frontal maps can be used in studies of physical-biological correlations at fronts. Frontal patterns in several exemplary LMEs are described and compared, including those for: the East and West Bering Sea LMEs, Sea of Okhotsk LME, East China Sea LME, Yellow Sea LME, North Sea LME, East and West Greenland Shelf LMEs, Newfoundland-Labrador Shelf LME, Northeast and Southeast US Continental Shelf LMEs, Gulf of Mexico LME, and Patagonian Shelf LME. Seasonal evolution of frontal patterns in major upwelling zones reveals an order-of-magnitude growth of frontal scales from summer to winter. A classification of LMEs with regard to the origin and physics of their respective dominant fronts is presented. The proposed classification lends itself to comparative studies of frontal ecosystems.

  16. Late Cenozoic volcanism in central Myanmar: Geochemical characteristics and geodynamic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hao-Yang; Chung, Sun-Lin; Yang, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Late Cenozoic volcanism occurred in the central Myanmar basin, a region that is marked by the existence of the dextral Sagaing fault linking the eastern Himalayan Syntaxis to the north and the Andaman Sea to the south. Here we report new geochemical data of volcanic rocks from Monywa, Mt. Popa and Singu areas erupting in two distinct stages, i.e., mid-Miocene and Quaternary, respectively. While calc-alkaline rocks showing arc-like geochemical features are abundant, an apparent change in magma composition is observed between these two stages. The mid-Miocene rocks are mainly dominated by intermediate compositions (SiO2 = 53-61 wt.%) and typical of high-K calc-alkaline nature. They exhibit uniform Sr and Nd isotopic ratios (ISr ≈ ~ 0.705; εNd(T) = + 2.7 to + 1.6), suggesting a juvenile mantle origin related to the subduction of Indian oceanic lithosphere beneath this part of Asia. The Quaternary rocks consist mainly of basalts that, however, show variations in geochemical features. Three suites in this stage are observed: (1) calc-alkaline suite (basalts and basaltic andesites from Monywa and Mt. Popa: SiO2 = 48-56 wt.%; ISr = 0.704 to 0.705; εNd(T) = + 3.1 to + 2.1), originating from partial melting of a "remnant" juvenile mantle wedge, (2) alkali basalt suite I (basanites from Monywa: SiO2 ≈ 45 wt.%; MgO = 10-12 wt.%; K2O ≈ 2.0 wt.%; ISr = 0.704 to 0.705; εNd(T) ≈ + 3.6), interpreted as the product of small-degree melting from an amphibole lherzolite in the lithospheric mantle, and (3) alkali basalt suite II (trachybasalts from Singu: SiO2 ≈ 51 wt.%; K2O = 2.6-3.5 wt.%; ISr ≈ 0.706; εNd(T) = + 1.6 to + 0.9), interpreted as the product of partial melting from the asthenosphere. All processes of magma generation were related to the India-Asia collision that caused regional plate reorganization, a transition from oblique subduction to dextral movement in the Miocene, and subsequent "rollback" of the subducted Indian oceanic lithosphere in the

  17. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions

  18. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bin Siu, Zhuo, E-mail: a0018876@nus.edu.sg [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Advanced Concepts and Nanotechnology, Data Storage Institute, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1 (Off Kent Ridge Crescent, NUS), Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Jalil, Mansoor B. A. [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Ghee Tan, Seng [Advanced Concepts and Nanotechnology, Data Storage Institute, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1 (Off Kent Ridge Crescent, NUS), Singapore 117608 (Singapore)

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions.

  19. Plate flexure and volcanism: Late Cenozoic tectonics of the Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni alkalic province, New Ireland Basin, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, I. D.

    2016-05-01

    Late Cenozoic Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni (TLTF) alkaline volcanism, New Ireland Basin, PNG, is associated with extensional cracks along the crests of flexed ridges developed on the New Ireland Microplate (New name). The tectonic alignment of the TLTF volcanic arc is essentially perpendicular to the flexed ridges, suggesting that fractures parallel to the direction of maximum horizontal compression facilitated the rapid ascent of alkaline magmas from the mantle region, perhaps 60-70 km depth. The mainly Pliocene to Pleistocene volcanoes were localized at the intersection of ridge-parallel Kabang structures and arc-parallel Niffin structures, suggesting that the Kabang-Niffin structural intersections underlying each of the TLTF island groups provided a well developed, clustered network of open conduits which tapped the mantle source region. Periodic post-Miocene locking and unlocking along the strike-slip Kilinailau Fault (New name) are thought to have functioned as a valve, turning on (Pliocene) and then turning off (Pleistocene) volcanic activity, respectively. Partial locking of the Kilinailau Fault during the Pliocene resulted in the accumulation of intraplate stresses within the New Ireland Microplate, and caused plate flexure and ridge development, plate-cracking along ridge crests and the development of arc-parallel regional fractures parallel to the direction of maximum compression. Unlocking of the Kilinailau Fault in the Pleistocene resulted in the release of intraplate stresses in the New Ireland Microplate and a cessation of volcanic activity across most of the TLTF arc. The style and scale of plate flexure and cracking, accompanied by within-plate alkaline volcanism from equally spaced ridge-top eruptive centers confined to a narrow, linear volcanic arc are unknown from any other tectonic province.

  20. Asymmetric counterpropagating fronts without flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Silva, I; Clerc, M G; Odent, V

    2015-06-01

    Out-of-equilibrium systems exhibit domain walls between different states. These walls, depending on the type of connected states, can display rich spatiotemporal dynamics. In this Rapid Communication, we investigate the asymmetrical counterpropagation of fronts in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the different front shapes and propagation speeds. These fronts present dissimilar elastic deformations that are responsible for their asymmetric speeds. Theoretically, using a phenomenological model, we describe the observed dynamics with fair agreement. PMID:26172647

  1. Controls on segmentation and morphology along the back-arc Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeper, Jonathan D.; Martinez, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    Back-arc spreading centers increasingly depart from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) characteristics with proximity to the arc volcanic front. The close association of these departures with slab-derived materials in erupted lavas suggests that subduction-related chemical effects are their primary cause. The Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) are type examples of this process. Together they constitute a first-order spreading center in the Lau back-arc basin that progressively converges on the Tofua arc volcanic front from north to south. Here we use ship multibeam and deep-towed side-scan sonar data to examine variations in axial morphology and volcanism at the second- and third-order segment scale along these ridges and develop a model for the processes that control them. Closest to the arc, VFR, and the southern segment of the ELSC shoal toward second-order segment ends, in contrast to MORs. Northward and beyond ~70 km from the arc, the axis becomes abruptly deeper and flatter and no longer shoals toward second-order segment ends. At VFR, along-axis topographic highs correlate with the location of arc volcanoes along slab flow lines. These correlations are weaker along the southernmost ELSC segment and absent along ELSC segments farther north. The observations show a modulation of back-arc segmentation with arc proximity that rapidly diminishes with distance. They support a model of the mantle wedge with a strongly hydrous domain within ~70 km of the arc within which the arc and ridge interact and a much less hydrous domain farther from the arc without evident arc-ridge interactions.

  2. Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

    1996-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

  3. Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau's Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of open-quotes as-receivedclose quotes heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process

  4. Arc cathode spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arc spots are usually highly unstable and jump statistically over the cathode surface. In a magnetic field parallel to the surface, preferably they move in the retrograde direction; i.e., opposite to the Lorentzian rule. If the field is inclined with respect to the surface, the spots drift away at a certain angle with respect to the proper retrograde direction (Robson drift motion). These well-known phenomena are explained by one stability theory

  5. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, I.

    2014-01-01

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved into a more or less standard laboratory tool for the production of high-current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. Applications include primarily ion implantation for material surface modification research, and good performance has been obtained for the injection of high-current beams of heavy-metal ions, in particular uranium, into particle accelerators. As the use of the sourc...

  6. Circular arc structures

    KAUST Repository

    Bo, Pengbo

    2011-07-01

    The most important guiding principle in computational methods for freeform architecture is the balance between cost efficiency on the one hand, and adherence to the design intent on the other. Key issues are the simplicity of supporting and connecting elements as well as repetition of costly parts. This paper proposes so-called circular arc structures as a means to faithfully realize freeform designs without giving up smooth appearance. In contrast to non-smooth meshes with straight edges where geometric complexity is concentrated in the nodes, we stay with smooth surfaces and rather distribute complexity in a uniform way by allowing edges in the shape of circular arcs. We are able to achieve the simplest possible shape of nodes without interfering with known panel optimization algorithms. We study remarkable special cases of circular arc structures which possess simple supporting elements or repetitive edges, we present the first global approximation method for principal patches, and we show an extension to volumetric structures for truly threedimensional designs. © 2011 ACM.

  7. Electrical and hydrodynamic characterization of a high current pulsed arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa Martins, R.; Chemartin, L.; Zaepffel, C.; Lalande, Ph; Soufiani, A.

    2016-05-01

    High current pulsed arcs are of significant industrial interest and, aiming to reduce time and cost, there is progressively more and more need for computation tools that describe and predict the behaviour of these arcs. These simulation codes need inputs and validations by experimental databases, but accurate data is missing for this category of electric discharges. The principal lack of understanding is with respect to the transient phase of the current, which can reach thousands of amperes in a few microseconds. In this paper, we present the work realized on an experimental setup that simulates in the laboratory an arc column subjected to five levels of high pulsed current, ranging from 10 kA to 100 kA, with the last one corresponding to the standard lightning current waveform used in aircraft certification processes. This device was instrumented by high speed video cameras to assess the characteristic sizes of the arc channel and to characterize the shock wave generated by the arc expansion. The arc channel radius was measured over time during the axisymmetric phase and reached 3.2 cm. The position and velocity of the shock wave was determined during the first 140 μs. The background-oriented schlieren method was used to study the shock wave and a model for the light deflection inside the shock wave was developed. The mass density profile of the shock wave was estimated and showed good agreement with Rankine–Hugoniot relations at the wave front. Electrical measurements were also used to estimate the time-dependent resistance and conductivity of the arc for times lasting up to 50 μs.

  8. "Front" hotshet izvinitsja / Aleksandr Ikonnikov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ikonnikov, Aleksandr

    2003-01-01

    Põhiliselt vene rahvusest noori ühendava liikumise "Front" esindajad kavatsevad kohtuda USA suursaadikuga Eestis ja vabandada kevadel suursaatkonna ees vägivallatsemisega lõppenud meeleavalduse pärast

  9. Arc-preserving subsequences of arc-annotated sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Vladimir Yu

    2011-01-01

    Arc-annotated sequences are useful in representing the structural information of RNA and protein sequences. The longest arc-preserving common subsequence problem has been introduced as a framework for studying the similarity of arc-annotated sequences. In this paper, we consider arc-annotated sequences with various arc structures. We consider the longest arc preserving common subsequence problem. In particular, we show that the decision version of the 1-{\\sc fragment LAPCS(crossing,chain)} and the decision version of the 0-{\\sc diagonal LAPCS(crossing,chain)} are {\\bf NP}-complete for some fixed alphabet $\\Sigma$ such that $|\\Sigma| = 2$. Also we show that if $|\\Sigma| = 1$, then the decision version of the 1-{\\sc fragment LAPCS(unlimited, plain)} and the decision version of the 0-{\\sc diagonal LAPCS(unlimited, plain)} are {\\bf NP}-complete.

  10. Patterns of Cenozoic sediment flux from western Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gołędowski, Bartosz; Nielsen, S.B.; Clausen, O.R.

    2012-01-01

    tectonism, climate and climate change. Western Scandinavia, the northern British Isles and the Faeroe-Shetland Platform were significant sediment sources during the Paleocene, which is well founded in tectonic causes related to the opening of the North Atlantic. From the Eocene and onward, variations in the...... sediment flux from western Scandinavia correlate better with climate and climate change. During the Eocene, sediment production was low. From the late Eocene onward, increased seasonality may have contributed to stimulating the sediment flux. Significant climatic cooling episodes correlate with Oligocene......The significance of variations in the sediment flux from western Scandinavia during the Cenozoic has been a matter of debate for decades. Here we compile the sediment flux using seismic data, boreholes and results from other publications and discuss the relative importance of causal agents such as...

  11. The 13 million year Cenozoic pulse of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiasheng; Kravchinsky, Vadim A.; Liu, Xiuming

    2015-12-01

    The geomagnetic polarity reversal rate changes radically from very low to extremely high. Such process indicates fundamental changes in the Earth's core reorganization and core-mantle boundary heat flow fluctuations. However, we still do not know how critical such changes are to surface geology and climate processes. Our analysis of the geomagnetic reversal frequency, oxygen isotope record, and tectonic plate subduction rate, which are indicators of the changes in the heat flux at the core mantle boundary, climate and plate tectonic activity, shows that all these changes indicate similar rhythms on million years' timescale in the Cenozoic Era occurring with the common fundamental periodicity of ∼13 Myr during most of the time. The periodicity is disrupted only during the last 20 Myr. Such periodic behavior suggests that large scale climate and tectonic changes at the Earth's surface are closely connected with the million year timescale cyclical reorganization of the Earth's interior.

  12. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  13. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  14. Variation of plasma parameters of vacuum arc column with gap distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wen; Yuan, Zhao; He, Junjia

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of a two-dimensional (2D) magneto-hydrodynamic model, we studied long-gap-distance vacuum arcs in a uniform axial magnetic field and determined the effect of gap distance varying in a large range on plasma parameters. Simulation results showed that with increasing gap distance, the parameters of the plasma near the cathode are almost invariant, except for ion number density, but the parameters of the plasma in front of the anode clearly vary; meanwhile, joule heat gradually becomes the main source of energy for the arc column. In a short gap, a clear current constriction can be found in the entire arc column. Whereas when the gap distance exceeds a certain value, a sharp contraction of the current only arises in front of the anode.

  15. Types of Cenozoic Mollusca from Java in the Martin Collection of Naturalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leloux, J.; Wesselingh, F.P.

    2009-01-01

    An updated type catalogue of the Martin Collection (fossil Mollusca, predominantly from the Cenozoic of Java, Indonesia) is presented. Type specimen data, updated locality data, and illustrations are given.

  16. Granulite xenoliths from Cenozoic Basalts in SE China provide geochemical fingerprints to distinguish lower crust terranes from the North and South China tectonic blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin-Hai; Xu, Xisheng; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Griffin, W. L.; Zhang, Ming

    2003-03-01

    A large suite of lower crustal xenoliths from Cenozoic basaltic rocks from three widely spaced localities in the eastern part of the South China Block (SCB; Xilong, Qilin and Leizhou) and two localities (Nushan and Guizishan) close to the suture between the North and South China Blocks in Southeast China has been studied in detail. They are used to define the nature of the lower crust beneath these regions and to define two distinct types of lithospheric domains resulting from different tectonic episodes. Lower crustal xenoliths from the Nushan area have distinctive petrologic and geochemical (including isotopic) characteristics indicating formation by underplating of continental basaltic magmas around the crust-mantle boundary. Geochemistry of these granulites demonstrates that an isotopically enriched old source component had played a significant role in the formation of the Nushan xenoliths. The lower crustal xenoliths from the South China Block reveal different origins and source compositions from those from the Nushan area. The South China Block xenoliths are considered to be derived from the underplating of continental arc-type basaltic magmas, but also show evidence of significant assimilation and fractional crystallisation (AFC) that produced abundant cumulates and fractionated liquids with strong crustal contamination signatures. They are geochemically and isotopically similar to the outcropping Late Mesozoic gabbros and basalts in the same region and are inferred to be their underplated high-pressure analogues and products of AFC with the lower crustal sources parental to the more silicic Mesozoic outcropping magmatic rocks. These Mesozoic basaltic magmas from the South China Block are geochemically distinct from the Cenozoic basaltic volcanics in this region, indicating a secular source change from a continental arc setting to an intraplate extensional regime. This significant change from Mesozoic to Cenozoic may indicate eastward movement of the

  17. Cold fronts in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ghizzardi, Simona; Molendi, Silvano

    2010-01-01

    Cold fronts have been observed in a large number of galaxy clusters. Understanding their nature and origin is of primary importance for the investigation of the internal dynamics of clusters. To gain insight on the nature of these features, we carry out a statistical investigation of their occurrence in a sample of galaxy clusters observed with XMM-Newton and we correlate their presence with different cluster properties. We have selected a sample of 45 clusters starting from the B55 flux limited sample by Edge et al. (1990) and performed a systematic search of cold fronts. We find that a large fraction of clusters host at least one cold front. Cold fronts are easily detected in all systems that are manifestly undergoing a merger event in the plane of the sky while the presence of such features in the remaining clusters is related to the presence of a steep entropy gradient, in agreement with theoretical expectations. Assuming that cold fronts in cool core clusters are triggered by minor merger events, we esti...

  18. Cenozoic tectonics of the Tuz Gölü Basin (Central Anatolian Plateau, Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    FERNÁNDEZ-BLANCO, David; BERTOTTI, Giovanni; ÇİNER, T. Attila

    2013-01-01

    We present a new 3D geologic model for the architecture and Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Tuz Gölü Basin, a major sedimentary basin in the Central Anatolian orogenic plateau. This model is grounded on 7 depth-converted seismic reflection profiles in combination with the analysis of backstripped subsidence curves, isochore maps, and a palinspastically restored cross-section. Two stages of basin formation are detected during Cenozoic times. During the Palaeogene, around 2 km of basement su...

  19. Recent developments in DFD (depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Shiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-01

    We will report our recent developments in DFD (Depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display, both of which have smooth movement parallax. Firstly, fatigueless DFD display, composed of only two layered displays with a gap, has continuous perceived depth by changing luminance ratio between two images. Two new methods, called "Edge-based DFD display" and "Deep DFD display", have been proposed in order to solve two severe problems of viewing angle and perceived depth limitations. Edge-based DFD display, layered by original 2D image and its edge part with a gap, can expand the DFD viewing angle limitation both in 2D and 3D perception. Deep DFD display can enlarge the DFD image depth by modulating spatial frequencies of front and rear images. Secondly, Arc 3D display can provide floating 3D images behind or in front of the display by illuminating many arc-shaped directional scattering sources, for example, arcshaped scratches on a flat board. Curved Arc 3D display, composed of many directional scattering sources on a curved surface, can provide a peculiar 3D image, for example, a floating image in the cylindrical bottle. The new active device has been proposed for switching arc 3D images by using the tips of dual-frequency liquid-crystal prisms as directional scattering sources. Directional scattering can be switched on/off by changing liquid-crystal refractive index, resulting in switching of arc 3D image.

  20. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  1. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of the lassen volcanic center, California: Resolving crustal and mantle contributions to continental Arc magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, T.C.; Clynne, M.A.; Winer, G.S.; Grice, W.C.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports oxygen isotope ratios determined by laser fluorination of mineral separates (mainly plagioclase) from basaltic andesitic to rhyolitic composition volcanic rocks erupted from the Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC), northern California. Plagioclase separates from nearly all rocks have ??18O values (6.1-8.4%) higher than expected for production of the magmas by partial melting of little evolved basaltic lavas erupted in the arc front and back-arc regions of the southernmost Cascades during the late Cenozoic. Most LVC magmas must therefore contain high 18O crustal material. In this regard, the ??18O values of the volcanic rocks show strong spatial patterns, particularly for young rhyodacitic rocks that best represent unmodified partial melts of the continental crust. Rhyodacitic magmas erupted from vents located within 3.5 km of the inferred center of the LVC have consistently lower ??18 O values (average 6.3% ?? 0.1%) at given SiO2 contents relative to rocks erupted from distal vents (>7.0 km; average 7.1% ?? 0.1%). Further, magmas erupted from vents situated at transitional distances have intermediate values and span a larger range (average 6.8% ?? 0.2%). Basaltic andesitic to andesitic composition rocks show similar spatial variations, although as a group the ??18O values of these rocks are more variable and extend to higher values than the rhyodacitic rocks. These features are interpreted to reflect assimilation of heterogeneous lower continental crust by mafic magmas, followed by mixing or mingling with silicic magmas formed by partial melting of initially high 18O continental crust (??? 9.0%) increasingly hybridized by lower ??18O (???6.0%) mantle-derived basaltic magmas toward the center of the system. Mixing calculations using estimated endmember source ??18O values imply that LVC magmas contain on a molar oxygen basis approximately 42 to 4% isotopically heavy continental crust, with proportions declining in a broadly regular fashion toward the

  2. Self-turbulizing flame fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavin, P.; Searby, G.

    A heuristic derivation of a flame front model is presented that takes into account the effects of gravity, nonlinear effects introduced by advection of the front, and gradients in the tangential component of the flow. A local equation is defined to relate the normal flame speed to the upstream gas flow characteristics. Jump conditions are obtained from an asymptotic analysis of the local structure of the wrinkled flame in order to address the hydrodynamic problem possed by the front being treated as a free boundary between fresh and burnt gases. The expression for the jump conditions is defined in Fourier space. The model extends the equations defined in Fourier space. The model extends the equations defined by Sivashinsky (1977) to cover the effects of gas expansion.

  3. Paleomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility of the sedimentary cover in thrust units compared with tectonic strain. The Nice and Castellane arcs, SE France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In the SE France, the arcs of Castellane and Nice developed during the Cenozoic as fold-and-thrust belts in a thick sedimentary cover of Mesozoic-Cenozoic age. They represent the most external foreland thrust units of the Alps. As geological mapping and remote sensing observation show, these arcs exhibit a remarkable curvature of about 90 deg, with in both cases a west-verging, N-S trending branch to the west and a south-verging, E-W trending branch to the south. Below the sedimentary cover, the pre-Mesozoic basement is poorly affected by the fold-and-thrust deformation. This structural pattern is commonly explained by the compressive folding of the cover above a major decollement in Triassic layers, as a result of two major tectonic events with E-W compression first and N-S compression second. A crucial problem is: how did these arcs develop? As previous paleomagnetic studies in this area were few results have been obtained (mainly in the Callovian-Oxfordian black shales of the N-S branch of the Castellane arc and the Permian argillite of the Barrot dome in the E-W branch of the same arc). Although suitable layers are few and remanent magnetization is usually very weak in the sedimentary cover of these arcs, we intend to carry out a more systematic paleomagnetic study (paleo-rotations and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility AMS) associated with structural observations (especially palaeostress reconstruction based on inversion of brittle data). The paleomagnetic difficulties related to rock nature require a preliminary analysis of rock magnetization in the Eocene, Cretaceous, Jurassic argillites and shales in these areas, which is in progress. The AMS will allow comparison between paleostress orientations (reconstructed from brittle tectonic analysis) and the main structural directions (from geological mapping). The ultimate purpose of this study is to provide a consistent model of structural and kinematic development of

  4. Front dynamics in turbulent media

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, A C; Sancho, J M

    1997-01-01

    A study of a stable front propagating in a turbulent medium is presented. The front is generated through a reaction-diffusion equation, and the turbulent medium is statistically modeled using a Langevin equation. Numerical simulations indicate the presence of two different dynamical regimes. These regimes appear when the turbulent flow either wrinkles a still rather sharp propagating interfase or broadens it. Specific dependences of the propagating velocities on stirring intensities appropriate to each case are found and fitted when possible according to theoretically predicted laws. Different turbulent spectra are considered.

  5. ACEX: A First Look at Arctic Ocean Cenozoic History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, K.; Backman, J.

    2004-12-01

    The first Integrated Ocean Drilling Program mission specificplatform expedition (ACEX - Arctic Coring Expedition) drilled and recovered core from five holes at four sites through Cenozoic sediments draping the crest of the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean. Coring continued into the underlying Cretaceous sedimentary bedrock. Sites are located only a few nautical miles apart along a single seismic line (AWI-91090), showing an identical and coherent Cenozoic seismostratigraphy. Preliminary results from shipboard investigations of core-catcher-based bio- and lithostratigraphy, pore water analyses and core logger data describe a thick (~160 m) middle Miocene through Pleistocene sequence that shows large amplitude, cyclic variability in the density, magnetic susceptibility and acoustic velocity of the sediments. Sediments are largely carbonate free. Pleistocene sedimentation rates are close to 3 cm/ka, whereas Pliocene sediments are by-and-large missing. A sharp change in physical properties at ~200 m defines the transition into a 200+ m thick Paleogene sequence that is initially dominated by large numbers of dinoflagellate cysts. The early Miocene, Oligocene and late Eocene appear to be largely missing in a hiatus. However, a 32 m thick interval separates the overlying middle Miocene from the underlying middle Eocene and presumably preserves some of the early Neogene and late Paleogene sections. Dinoflagellate cysts, diatoms, ebridians and silicoflagellates are common to abundant in the middle Eocene section, which bottoms in a spectacular layer showing massive occurrences of glochidia and massulae (megaspores) of the freshwater hydropterid fern Azolla (duckweed) at the early/middle Eocene boundary (~306 m), suggesting strongly reduced surface water salinity or perhaps even a brief episode of fresh water conditions at the surface. Biosilica is not present prior to the late early Eocene (~320 m). The (sub-) tropical dinoflagellate species Apectodinium augustum

  6. Thick, Cold and Dry Roots: the Key to Longevity of Continental Arc Lithosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, E. J.; Soustelle, V.; Hirth, G.; Saal, A. E.; Kruckenberg, S. C.; Eiler, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to the continuity of mid-ocean ridge magmatism, arc volcanism is episodic, characterized by flareups lasting 10 - 50 My which, for reasons that remain unclear, end abruptly in transformed the depleted residues into refertilized lherzolite. Olivine crystal-preferred orientations (CPO) are weak and show predominantly axial-(010) and one lherzolite with B-type CPO. Measured water contents by SIMS in olivine and pyroxene are low, 5 - 9 ppm and 30 - 500 ppm, respectively. Assuming olivine lost water during eruption, recalculated olivine water in equilibrium with pyroxene does not exceed 35 ppm, resulting in reconstructed bulk rock water content similar to the MORB source. Extrapolation of experimental olivine water solubility to the xenoliths' final PT conditions ranges from 30 to 270 ppm, indicating that the peridotites are water-undersaturated. Such low water contents are not sufficient to produce axial-(010) and B-type CPO. Instead, we propose that the observed CPO was inherited from the prior melt infiltration event, which deformed the peridotites via grain-size sensitive, diffusion creep (e.g., grain boundary sliding). Therefore, water played little role in deformation of arc mantle. Low water contents in thick, cold arc roots result in very high viscosities which preclude significant deformation at final PT. In the Sierran case, rapid cooling also helped to freeze in geochemical and microstructural evidence of earlier melt-assisted deformation, and allowed the preservation of arc mantle lithosphere for ~80 My after it was formed. Only when the Farallon slab rolled back in the Late Cenozoic was the Sierran arc root finally destabilized. Thus, thickening, dehydration, and cooling of lithospheric roots (part of the upper plate) can modulate the tempo of arc magmatism by episodically growing into the melt-producing mantle wedge, thereby shutting off volcanism.

  7. Tectonic reconstruction of the Panama arc using paleomagnetic, geochronology and thermochronologic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, C.; Bayona, G.; Cardona, A.; Pardo, A.; Nova, G.; Montano, P.

    2013-05-01

    A recent update of the geochronologic and mapping database of the Isthmus of Panama suggests that the Isthmus represents an arc that was left-laterally fragmented between 38 and 28 Ma, and then oroclinally bent. This was hypothesis was tested using paleomagnetic data (24 sites and 192 cores) that indicated large counterclockwise vertical-axis rotations (70.9°, ± 6.7°), and moderate clockwise rotations (between 40° ± 4.1° and 56.2° ± 11.1) on either side of an east-west trending fault at the apex of the Isthmus (Rio Gatun Fault), consistent with Isthmus curvature. Sampling for paleomagnetism was performed on Cretaceous basaltic rocks of the Panama arc, some of them probably correlative to the Caribbean large igneous province. Also, sampling took place in younger Cenozoic cover rocks, as well as in the younger arc rocks. This database is here complemented with 15 new pilot paleomagnetic sites taken in eastern, central, and western Panama, and 3 new sites from Miocene cover rocks of what is now considered to be the southeastern-most tip of the Central American arc. The latter record clockwise vertical-axis rotations between 12 and 40°, in agreement with oroclinal bending hypothesis for the formation of the Isthmus of Panama. These new results begin to fill a gap in the paleomagnetic vertical-axis rotation database for the Panama arc. These results also support the continuity of the Central America arc to the east, into what is now docked to western South America.

  8. Major-elements trends in cenozoic volcanites of Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Fernández, Josep Antoni; Barceló i Vidal, Carles; Pawlowsky-Glahn, Vera; Kovács, L.Ó.; Kovács, G.P.

    2003-01-01

    Hungary lies entirely within the Carpatho-Pannonian Region (CPR), a dominant tectonic unit of eastern Central Europe. The CPR consists of the Pannonian Basin system, and the arc of the Carpathian Mountains surrounding the lowlands in the north, east, and southeast. In the west, the CPR is bounded by the Eastern Alps, whereas in the south, by the Dinaridic belt. (...) Geologische Vereinigung; Universitat de Barcelona, Equip de Recerca Arqueomètrica; Institut d’Estadística de Catalunya; Inte...

  9. Of Eggs and Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Thomas, P. C.; Helfenstein, P.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Hedman, M. M.; Agarwal, M.

    2012-10-01

    New scenarios for the origins of Saturn’s rings/interior moons have directed scientific attention to the region just exterior to Saturn’s main rings. Four satellites (Aegaeon = Ae; Anthe = An; Methone = Me; Pallene = Pa) discovered by the Cassini mission on either side of Mimas’s orbit perhaps comprise a distinct class of ring-moon. They are tiny (R = 0.3-2.5 km); three (AeAnMe) are trapped in co-rotation resonances with Mimas and reside within ring-arcs; and at least two (MePa) have remarkably regular shapes. Images with pixel scales as fine as 27 m taken in May 2012 reveal Methone to be ovoid within 10 m (from sub-pixel limb detection) and devoid of any craters (>130 m) across its 9 km2 of surface; Pallene and even tiny Aegaeon have similar appearances in lesser-quality images. Numerical simulations demonstrate that particles comprising the surrounding ring-arcs populate the same resonances as their embedded moons; escape speeds from the moons are bodies. In this environment, the moons’ shapes are smooth equipotentials; electrostatic effects may also determine how grains settle to surfaces. Considering these shapes to represent equipotential surfaces for rotating, tidally distorted, homogeneous bodies, we infer mean satellite densities of 250+/-60 (Pa), 310+/-30 (Me), and 540+/-120 (Ae) kg m-3. About half of Methone’s leading hemisphere is covered by a sharply bounded, lemon-shaped, relatively dark region, having a form reminiscent of Mimas’s thermal anomaly (Howett et al. 2011). Its (601 nm) albedo is 13% lower than the bounding brighter material. An irregularly shaped, even-darker (by 4%) blotch straddles the apex of the moon’s motion. Impacts with circum-planetary meteoroids and plasma are likely responsible for these features.

  10. Align the Front End First.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jim

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of management styles and front-end analysis focuses on a review of Douglas McGregor's theories. Topics include Theories X, Y, and Z; leadership skills; motivational needs of employees; intrinsic and extrinsic rewards; and faulty implementation of instructional systems design processes. (LRW)

  11. Trace Element Geochemistry of Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks in Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈道公; 李彬贤; 等

    1989-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rock of Shandong Province are mainly alkalic and strongly alkalic basaltic rocks.The Contents of major and trace elements including transitional,incompatible and rare-earth elements were determined.The chemical characterisitics of major and trace elements indicate that these basaltic rocks were derived from a mantle source and probably represent a primary magma,I,e.,unmodifiecd partical melts of mantle peridotite in terms of Mg values,correlatione between P2O5 and Ce,Sr,Ni and Rb concentrations,mantle xenoliths,etc.The abundances of trace elements vary systematically from west to east.The compatible transition elements such as Co,Ni,and Cr show a remarkable depletion,whereas the incompatible and rare-earth elements are abundant as viewed from the chondrite-nor-malized patterns.The chemical composition and correlation are consistent with the tectonic setting.According to the batch and fractional partial melting theory,the trace element contents of Shandong volcanic rocks can be calculated from the two-component mixing model.

  12. Successor Characteristics of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic Songliao Basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhongquan; Timothy KUSKY; YING Danlin; GUO Xiaoyu; LI Hongkui

    2008-01-01

    The Songliao basin is a complex successor basin that was initiated in the Mesozoic and experienced multiple periods of reactivation. Based on seismic and drilling data, as well as regional geologic research, we suggest that the Songliao basin contains several different successor basins resting on top of Carboniferous-Permian folded strata forming the basement to the Songliao basin. These basins include the Triassic-Mid Jurassic Paleo-foreland basin, the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous downfaulted basin, and an early Cretaceous depressed basin (since the Denglouku Group). This paper presents a systematic study of the basin-mountain interactions, and reveals that there are different types of prototype basin at different geologic times. These prototype basins sequentially superimposed and formed the large Songliao basin. Discovery of the Triassic-early Middle Jurassic paleo-foreland basin fills a Triassic-early Middle Jurassic gap in the geologic history of the Songliao basin. The paleoforeland basin, downfaulted basin, and depressed thermal subsidence basin all together represent the whole Mesozoic-Cenozoic geologic history and deformation of the Songliao basin. Discovery of the Triassic-early Middle Jurassic paleo-foreland basin plays an important role both for deep natural gas exploration and the study of basin-mountain coupling in north China and eastern China in general. This example gives dramatic evidence that we should give much more attention to the polyphase tectonic evolution of related basins for the next phase of exploration and study.

  13. Continental erosion and the Cenozoic rise of marine diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermeño, Pedro; Falkowski, Paul G.; Romero, Oscar E.; Schaller, Morgan F.; Vallina, Sergio M.

    2015-04-01

    Marine diatoms are silica-precipitating microalgae that account for over half of organic carbon burial in marine sediments and thus they play a key role in the global carbon cycle. Their evolutionary expansion during the Cenozoic era (66 Ma to present) has been associated with a superior competitive ability for silicic acid relative to other siliceous plankton such as radiolarians, which evolved by reducing the weight of their silica test. Here we use a mathematical model in which diatoms and radiolarians compete for silicic acid to show that the observed reduction in the weight of radiolarian tests is insufficient to explain the rise of diatoms. Using the lithium isotope record of seawater as a proxy of silicate rock weathering and erosion, we calculate changes in the input flux of silicic acid to the oceans. Our results indicate that the long-term massive erosion of continental silicates was critical to the subsequent success of diatoms in marine ecosystems over the last 40 My and suggest an increase in the strength and efficiency of the oceanic biological pump over this period.

  14. Late Cenozoic sedimentary and tectonic history of south Buton, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuin, A. R.; De Smet, M. E. M.; Hadiwasastra, S.; Van Marle, L. J.; Troelstra, S. R.; Tjokrosapoetro, S.

    A description and interpretation are given of the Upper Cenozoic sedimentary record of south Buton. Various sections and outcrops were studied and sampled for their microfossil content, to provide age and paleobathymetrical data. Together with information from the literature, these data from the base for a geohistory analysis to evaluate the vertical motions. Deposition started some 11 Ma ago, after the main deformation of the island, which was related to the collision of a microplate carrying Buton, with the southeast arm of Sulawesi. Coarse and fine terrigenous debris accumulated in a rapidly subsiding foreland basin; subsidence may have exceeded 100 cm/ka. When the rate of subsidence decreased a late Miocene-early Pliocene period of quiet pelagic sedimentation followed. From the late Pliocene onwards (around 3.5 Ma BP) an overall uplift took place, with rates between 30-120 cm/ka. This drastic change is explained by the collision of Buton with a submerged microcontinent that presently forms the Tukang Besi platform, situated southeast of Buton, which interaction resulted in wrench type tectonics and a clockwise rotation of over 60° for south Buton.

  15. Mid Cenozoic freshwater wetlands of the Sunda region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Morley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Sunda region was the scene of widespread rifting during the mid-Cenozoic, resulting in the development of numerous large lake-filled rifts, analogous in scale to the rift valley system of East Africa. The Tonle Sap in Cambodia forms the closest modern analogue for these lakes in the Southeast Asian region. Many of the palaeolakes were long lived, continuing uninterrupted as open lakes for several millions of years during the Oligocene. Smaller rift systems infilled with fluvial sediments, but the larger ones remained as lakes, and with Late Oligocene subsidence, were transformed by brackish, and in the earliest Miocene, by marine incursion, into large inland seas. These seas reached their greatest extent at the time of the mid Miocene thermal maximum. This paper describes the development and eventual demise of these lakes following marine transgression, and, based on their rich content of pollen and spores, illustrates the variety of fresh and brackish water swamp communities which developed around their margins. The marginal swamps can be divided into: i seasonally inundated swamps, mainly during the Oligocene, characterised by Barringtonia, Lagerstroemia and grasses/sedges; ii fern swamps and iii from the Late Oligocene onward alluvial swamps, often characterised by Pandanus; and iv peat swamps. The latter can be differentiated into kerapah peat swamps, first occurring during the Oligocene, and basinal peat swamps, becoming widespread from the Early Miocene onward.

  16. Interaction between Cenozoic fault activity and sediment influx in the Arctic region: new thermochronologic data and seismic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot-Buschendorf, Maelianna; Mouthereau, Frédéric; Fillon, Charlotte; Loget, Nicolas; Labrousse, Loïc; Werner, Philippe; Bernet, Matthias; Ehlers, Todd

    2015-04-01

    The Alaskan Brooks Range and its canadian counterpart, the British Mountains result from the Meso-Cenozoic collision of the Arctic continental margin with accreted volcanic arcs and adjacent continental terranes. Because of its location and known potential for oil industries, more attention has been brought to this area for the last few years. While the timing of collisional events, duration, and rates of exhumation associated with mountain building is now better understood, the causes of these exhumation events are still largely unknown. Published constraints and our present data are consistent with progressive cooling from 105 to 25 Ma, with rates of exhumation constant across the range until 35-25 Ma. From 35 Ma onwards, exhumation likely slowed in concomitance with underplating/duplexing in the inner part of the belt (Doonerak window) and activation of the northernmost thrust. The earliest cooling stage (from 100 Ma) marking the onset of the Brookian orogeny is recorded by a low order coarsening upward sequence in the foreland. On the contrary, the latest stage of cooling (at 35 Ma) is not linked to the construction of the range but more likely due to a reorganization of the wedge possibly related to changes in the regional climatic or geodynamic boundary conditions. First, we aim at reconstructing the time-temperature evolution of the British Mountains by combining new (U-Th)/He and fission-tracks ages on zircon and apatite ; our first thermochronological data in the British Mountains show ages ranging from 110 to 25 Ma from range to basin. These data will permit to reconstruct the thermal history of the British Mountains and its basin, and to estimate the exhumation rates associated to the main unities. Then, we also examine the role of climate during the Tertiary period. Some markers indicate a climate change at this period which could be registered in the sedimentation. Therefore we determine the part of climate by analyzing seismic lines in the Beaufort

  17. Arc Interference Behavior during Twin Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingjian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study arc interference behavior during twin wire gas metal arc welding process, the synchronous acquisition system has been established to acquire instantaneous information of arc profile including dynamic arc length variation as well as relative voltage and current signals. The results show that after trailing arc (T-arc is added to the middle arc (M-arc in a stable welding process, the current of M arc remains unchanged while the agitation increases; the voltage of M arc has an obvious increase; the shape of M arc changes, with increasing width, length, and area; the transfer frequency of M arc droplet increases and the droplet itself becomes smaller. The wire extension length of twin arc turns out to be shorter than that of single arc welding.

  18. Submarine Arc Volcanism in the Southern Mariana Arc: Results of Recent ROV studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, A. R.; Tamura, Y.; Stern, R. J.; Embley, R. W.; Hein, J. R.; Jordan, E.; Ribeiro, J. M.; Sica, N.; Kohut, E. J.; Whattam, S. A.; Hirahara, Y.; Senda, R.; Nunokawa, A.

    2009-12-01

    The submarine Diamante cross-arc volcanoes (~16°N) and the Sarigan-Zealandia Bank Multi-Volcano Complex (SZBMVC; ~16°45’N), north and south, respectively, of Anatahan Island in the southern Mariana Arc, were studied during several dives in June 2009 using the ROV Hyper-Dolphin, cruise NT09-08 (R/V Natsushima); neither has been studied in detail before. The data collected provide a new perspective on how the subduction factory operates to complement previous studies on other cross-arc volcanic chains in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc. The Diamante complex consists of three major edifices, two cones (West and Central Diamante) and a more complex caldera-like edifice at the volcanic front (East Diamante). West and Central Diamante are basaltic volcanoes but East Diamante has a more complex history. Our studies indicate initial construction of a basaltic volcano. Magmatic evolution led to a violent caldera-forming and quieter dome-building events. Post-caldera quiescence allowed a carbonate platform to grow, now preserved on the eastern caldera wall. Felsic magma or hot rock provides a heat source for an active hydrothermal field associated with felsic domes in the caldera, which NOAA investigators discovered in 2004. A new type of hydrothermal deposit was discovered in the hydrothermal field, consisting of large sulfide-sulfate mounds topped by bulbous constructions of low-temperature Fe and Mn oxides. Vents on the mounds were observed to emit shimmering water. The SZBMVC consists of six closely spaced edifices whose loci are aligned along two parallel trends, one along the volcanic front (Zealandia Bank, Sarigan and South Sarigan), and one about 15 km west towards the rear-arc (Northwest Zealandia, West Zealandia and West Sarigan). Zealandia Bank dives revealed that, as with East Diamante, initial activity was basaltic and became more evolved with time. The western half of Zealandia Bank is dominated by felsic lavas centered on a small (~2 km diameter) caldera and

  19. High current electric arcs; Les arcs electriques a fort courant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delalondre, C.; Simonin, O. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Lab. National d' Hydraulique; Mineau, L. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Dept. Systemes Energetiques; Verite, J.C. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Dept. Cables, Condensateurs, Materiel d' Automatisme et Materiaux

    1999-07-01

    The mechanisms called into play through the interaction between a high current electric arc and the surrounding environment have an essential role to play in the performance of arc furnaces and high voltage circuit breakers. Our knowledge of them remains poor, and because of the very high temperatures and speeds involved, experimental investigation is particularly difficult. What can numerical modelling teach us about these phenomena? (authors)

  20. Weather fronts and acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kveton, Vit

    1991-03-01

    Some methodological aspects are discussed of the investigation of acute infarct myocarditis (AIM) in relation to weather fronts. Results of a new method of analysis are given. Data were analysed from about the hour of the onset of symptoms, and led to the diagnosis of AIM either immediately or within a few hours or days (3019 cases observed over 4.5 years during 1982 1986 in Plzen, Czechoslovakia). Weather classification was based on three factors (the type of the foregoing front, the type of the subsequent front, the time section of the time interval demarcated by the passage of the surfaces of the fronts). AIM occurrence increased in particular types of weather fronts: (i) by 30% during 7 12 h after a warm front, if the time span between fronts exceeded 24 h; (ii) by 10% in time at least 36 h distant from the foregoing cold or occlusion front and from the succeeding warm or occlusion front; (iii) by 20% during 0 2 h before the passage of the front, provided the foregoing front was not warm and the interval between fronts exceeded 5 h. AIM occurrence decreased by 15% 20% for time span between fronts > 24 h at times 6 11, 6 23 and 6 35 h before a coming warm or occlusion front (for interfrontal intervals 25 48, 49 72 and possibly > 72 h), and also at 12 23 and possibly 12 35 h before a cold front (for intervals 49 72 and possibly > 72 h), if the foregoing front was cold or an occlusion front.

  1. FRIB Front End Design Status

    CERN Document Server

    Pozdeyev, E; Machicoane, G; Morgan, G; Rao, X; Zhao, Q; Stovall, J; Vorozhtsov, S; Sun, L

    2013-01-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will provide a wide range of primary ion beams for nuclear physics research with rare isotope beams. The FRIB SRF linac will be capable of accelerating medium and heavy ion beams to energies beyond 200 MeV/u with a power of 400 kW on the fragmentation target. This paper presents the status of the FRIB Front End designed to produce uranium and other medium and heavy mass ion beams at world-record intensities. The paper describes the FRIB high performance superconducting ECR ion source, the beam transport designed to transport two-charge state ion beams and prepare them for the injection in to the SRF linac, and the design of a 4-vane 80.5 MHz RFQ. The paper also describes the integration of the front end with other accelerator and experimental systems.

  2. Late Cenozoic structure and stratigraphy of south-central Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural framework of the Columbia Basin began developing before Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) volcanism. Prior to 17.5 Ma, the eastern part of the basin was a relatively stable area, with a basement of Paleozoic and older crystalline rock. The western part was an area of subsidence in which large volumes of sediment and volcanic rocks accumulated. Concurrent with eruption of the CRBG, anticlinal ridges of the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) were growing under north-south compression. Topographic expression of these features was later masked by the large volume of CRBG basalt flowing west from fissures in the eastern Columbia Basin. The folds continued to develop after cessation of volcanism, leading to as much as 1,000 m of structural relief in the past 10 million years. Post-CRBG evolution of the Columbia Basin is recorded principally in folding and faulting in the YFB and sediments deposited in the basins. The accompanying tectonism resulted in lateral migration of major depositional systems into subsiding structural lows. Although known late Cenozoic faults are on anticlinal ridges, earthquake focal mechanisms and contemporary strain measurements indicate most stress release is occurring in the synclinal areas under north-south compression. There is no obvious correlation between focal mechanisms for earthquakes whose foci are in the CRBG and the location of known faults. High in situ stress values help to explain the occurrence of microseismicity in the Columbia Basin but not the pattern. Microseismicity appears to occur in unaltered fresh basalt. Faulted basalt associated with the YFB is highly brecciated and commonly altered to clay. The high stress, abundance of ground water in confined aquifers of the CRBG, and altered basalt in fault zones suggest that the frontal faults on the anticlinal ridges probably have some aseismic deformation. 85 refs

  3. STUDY ON THE PRESSURE IN PLASMA ARC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The axial pressure in plasma arc is measured under different conditions. The effects of the parameters, such as welding current, plasma gas flow rate, electrode setback and arc length, on the pressure in plasma arc are investigated and quantitative analyzed to explain the relationship between the quality of weld and the matching of parameters in plasma arc welding process.

  4. Cold Fronts in CDM clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, D; Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, high-resolution Chandra observations revealed the existence of very sharp features in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature maps of several clusters (Vikhlinin et. al., 2001). These features, called ``cold fronts'', are characterized by an increase in surface brightness by a factor >2 over 10-50 kpc, accompanied by a drop in temperature of a similar magnitude. The existence of such sharp gradients can be used to put interesting constraints on the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM), if their mechanism and longevity are well understood. Here, we present results of a search for cold fronts in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters in cold dark matter (CDM) models. We show that sharp gradients with properties similar to those of observed cold fronts naturally arise in cluster mergers when the shocks heat gas surrounding the merging sub-cluster, while its dense core remains relatively cold. The compression induced by supersonic motions and shock heating during the merger enhance the ...

  5. Nonlocality-induced front interaction enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Gelens, Lendert; Gomila, Damià; Van der Sande, Guy; Matías, Manuel A.; Colet, Pere

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that nonlocal coupling strongly influences the dynamics of fronts connecting two equivalent states. In two prototype models we observe a large amplification in the interaction strength between two opposite fronts increasing front velocities several orders of magnitude. By analyzing the spatial dynamics we prove that way beyond quantitative effects, nonlocal terms can also change the overall qualitative picture by inducing oscillations in the front profile. This lead...

  6. Fluctuation charge effects in ionization fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrayas, Manuel; Trueba, Jose L [Area de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Camino del Molino s/n, 28943 Fuenlabrada, Madrid (Spain); Baltanas, J P [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2008-05-21

    In this paper, we study the effects of charge fluctuations on the propagation of both negative and positive ionization fronts in streamer discharges. We show that fronts accelerate when random charge creation events are present. This effect might play a similar role to photoionization in order to make the front move faster.

  7. Aeromagnetic search for Cenozoic magmatism over the Admiralty Mountains Block (East Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armadillo; E.; Ferraccioli, F.; Zunino, A.; Bozzo, E.; Rocchi, S.; Armienti, P.

    2007-01-01

    Cenozoic magmatic rocks of the Transantarctic Mountains provide an important window on the tectonic and magmatic processes of the West Antarctic Rift System. Previous aeromagnetic investigations in northern Victoria Land have delineated Cenozoic volcanic and intrusive complexes assigned to the McMurdo Volcanic Group and Meander Intrusives over the Transantarctic Mountains. We present a new aeromagnetic anomaly map for the region north of the Mariner Glacier to study the extent and spatial distribution of these Cenozoic rocks over the previously unexplored Admiralty Mountains. The new map shows that the Meander Intrusives are restricted to the coastal region between the Malta Plateau and the Daniell Peninsula. However, the McMurdo Volcanic Group rocks extend further inland, and may delineate a hitherto unrecognised volcano-tectonic rift zone, extending as far north as the Trafalgar Glacier.

  8. The Cenozoic geological evolution of the Central and Northern North Sea based on seismic sequence stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordt, Henrik

    1996-03-01

    This thesis represents scientific results from seismic sequence stratigraphic investigations. These investigations and results are integrated into an ongoing mineralogical study of the Cenozoic deposits. the main results from this mineralogical study are presented and discussed. The seismic investigations have provided boundary conditions for a forward modelling study of the Cenozoic depositional history. Results from the forward modelling are presented as they emphasise the influence of tectonics on sequence development. The tectonic motions described were important for the formation of the large oil and gas fields in the North Sea.

  9. Dosimetric and delivery characterizations of full-arc and half-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy for maxillary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared the efficiency and accuracy of full-arc and half-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery for maxillary cancer. Plans for gantry rotation angles of 360deg and 180deg (full-arc and half-arc VMAT) were created for six maxillary cancer cases with the Monaco treatment planning system, and delivered using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Full-arc and half-arc VMAT were compared with regard to homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), mean dose to normal brain, total monitor units (MU), delivery times, root mean square (r.m.s.) gantry accelerations (deg/s2), and r.m.s. gantry angle errors (deg). The half-arc VMAT plans achieved comparable HI and CI to the full-arc plans. Mean doses to the normal brain and brainstem with the half-arc VMAT plans were on average 16% and 17% lower than those with the full-arc VMAT plans. For other organs at risk (OARs), no significant dose volume histogram (DVH) differences were observed between plans. Half-arc VMAT resulted in 11% less total MU and 20% shorter delivery time than the full-arc VMAT, while r.m.s. gantry acceleration and r.m.s. gantry angle error during half-arc VMAT delivery were 30% and 23% less than those during full-arc VMAT delivery, respectively. Furthermore, the half-arc VMAT plans were comparable with the full-arc plans regarding dose homogeneity and conformity in maxillary cancer, and provided a statistical decrease in mean dose to OAR, total MU, delivery time and gantry angle error. Half-arc VMAT plans may be a suitable treatment option in radiotherapy for maxillary cancer. (author)

  10. Present-day climatic equivalents of European Cenozoic climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utescher, Torsten; Mosbrugger, Volker; Ivanov, Dimiter; Dilcher, David L.

    2009-07-01

    Recently, continental climate evolution in Central Europe over the last 45 Ma has been reconstructed from the palaeobotanical record using a Nearest Living Relative methodology (Coexistence Approach; CA). The reconstructed climate curves document in detail the transition from almost tropical conditions in the Mid-Eocene to a temperate climate at the Pliocene/Pleistocene transition. The observed climatic shifts are primarily expressed as non-proportional changes of the different variables taken into account. In the present study a published palaeoclimate data set for a total of 42 macrofloras complemented by new calculations is used as base to analyse the climatic space in which a fossil flora existed. To define these spaces CA intervals calculated for 3 temperature (mean annual temperature, cold and warm month mean) and 3 precipitation variables (mean annual precipitation, mean monthly precipitation of the driest and of the wettest month) are combined. Using a global gridded climatology (10' resolution), this climate space is then utilized to identify Recent climate analogues with respect to the variables regarded. For 18 macrofloras climatic analogue regions with respect to 6 variables are identified on the globe. For 16 macrofloras, analogues exist when three temperature parameters and mean annual precipitation are regarded. No Recent equivalents are found in 8 cases. This corroborates the assumption of the temporary existence of non-analogue climates in the Cenozoic. As shown by multivariate statistics the observed anomalies with respect to present-day conditions basically refer to high winter temperatures. Deploying a GIS, the Recent climate analogues can be presented as sets of grid cells for each flora that can be mapped on a globe. Once identified, these regions can be merged with adequate thematic layers to assess additional proxy data for the palaeofloras. To exemplify the procedure Koeppen climate type, numbers of days with ground frost, as well as

  11. Shallow gas in Cenozoic sediments of the Southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampe, Anna F.; Lutz, Rüdiger; Franke, Dieter; Thöle, Hauke; Arfai, Jashar

    2013-04-01

    Shallow petroleum systems in the southern North Sea are known for several decades but they were not actively explored for a long time. In recent years these unconventional shallow petroleum systems are studied in greater detail and one shallow gas field (A-12) is in production in the Netherlands. Additionally, oil was encountered in Miocene sandstones in the southern Danish North Sea (Lille John well) just north of the Danish-German border. Seismic amplitude anomalies are an indication for hydrocarbons in sediments. Therefore we have mapped the occurrence of seismic amplitude anomalies in the German North Sea based on more than 25.000 km of 2D seismic data and around 4.000 km2 of 3D seismic data. Amplitude anomalies are ubiquitous phenomena in the study area. These anomalies are not only caused by hydrocarbons but also by changing lithologies e.g. peat or fluid migration. Therefore several classes of seismic anomalies, e.g. bright spots, chimneys, blanking areas and velocity pull-down were mapped. Examples for these classes were studied with AVO (amplitude variation with offset) analyses to verify the existence or non-existence of gas in the sediments. Shallow gas can be produced and transported through the dense pipeline grid of the southern and central North Sea or it could be burned offshore close to wind parks in small power plants and the electric energy then transported through the existing power connections of the wind parks. Thus enabling a continuous energy supply during calm wind periods. This study is carried out within the framework of the project "Geoscientific Potential of the German North Sea (GPDN)" in which the Cenozoic sedimentary system was mapped in great detail. A detailed model of delta evolution (Baltic river system) was developed which serves as a structural framework. The studied interval is time equivalent to the Utsira formation which is used offshore Norway for sequestration of CO2. These different possibilities of using or exploiting

  12. Reconstructing geographical boundary conditions for palaeoclimate modelling during the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baatsen, Michiel; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; von der Heydt, Anna S.; Dijkstra, Henk A.; Sluijs, Appy; Abels, Hemmo A.; Bijl, Peter K.

    2016-08-01

    Studies on the palaeoclimate and palaeoceanography using numerical model simulations may be considerably dependent on the implemented geographical reconstruction. Because building the palaeogeographic datasets for these models is often a time-consuming and elaborate exercise, palaeoclimate models frequently use reconstructions in which the latest state-of-the-art plate tectonic reconstructions, palaeotopography and -bathymetry, or vegetation have not yet been incorporated. In this paper, we therefore provide a new method to efficiently generate a global geographical reconstruction for the middle-late Eocene. The generalised procedure is also reusable to create reconstructions for other time slices within the Cenozoic, suitable for palaeoclimate modelling. We use a plate-tectonic model to make global masks containing the distribution of land, continental shelves, shallow basins and deep ocean. The use of depth-age relationships for oceanic crust together with adjusted present-day topography gives a first estimate of the global geography at a chosen time frame. This estimate subsequently needs manual editing of areas where existing geological data indicate that the altimetry has changed significantly over time. Certain generic changes (e.g. lowering mountain ranges) can be made relatively easily by defining a set of masks while other features may require a more specific treatment. Since the discussion regarding many of these regions is still ongoing, it is crucial to make it easy for changes to be incorporated without having to redo the entire procedure. In this manner, a complete reconstruction can be made that suffices as a boundary condition for numerical models with a limited effort. This facilitates the interaction between experts in geology and palaeoclimate modelling, keeping reconstructions up to date and improving the consistency between different studies. Moreover, it facilitates model inter-comparison studies and sensitivity tests regarding certain

  13. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the late Cenozoic Qaidam Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Wang, Y.; Li, Q.; Wang, X.; Deng, T.; Tseng, Z. J.; Takeuchi, G.; Xie, G.; Xu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Reconstruction of paleoenvironments in the Tibetan region is important to understanding the linkage between tectonic force and climate change. Here we report new isotope data from the Qaidam Basin, China, which is located on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau, including stable C and O isotope analyses of a wide variety of late Cenozoic mammalian tooth enamel samples (including deer, giraffe, horse, rhino, and elephant), and O isotope compositions of phosphate (δ18Op) in fish bone samples. Mammalian tooth enamel δ13C values, when combined with fossil assemblage and other geological evidence, indicate that the Qaidam Basin was warmer and more humid during the late Miocene and early Pliocene, and that there was lush C3 vegetation with significant C4 components at that time, although the C4 plants were not consistently utilized. In contrast, the modern Qaidam Basin is dominated by C3 plants. Fish bone δ18Op values showed statistically significant enrichment from the Tuxi-Shengou-Naoge interval (late Miocene) to the Yahu interval (early Pliocene) and from the Yahu interval to the present day. This most likely reflects increases in the δ18O of lake water over time, as a result of increased aridification of the Qaidam Basin. Assuming that mammals drank exclusively from the lake, temperatures were calculated from average δ18Op values and average δ18Ow derived from large mammal tooth enamel δ18O. Temperatures were also estimated from δ18Op and δ18Ow estimated from co-ocurring large mammal tooth enamel δ18O. The temperature estimates were all lower than the average temperature of the modern Qinghai Lake surface water during the summer, and mostly too low to be reasonable, indicating that the fish and the large mammals were not in equilibrium with the same water. Assuming the relationship between salinity and δ18Ow observed for the modern Qinghai Lake and its surrounding lakes and ponds applied in the past, we calculated the paleosalinities of lake waters to be ~0 to

  14. Light-front quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An outstanding goal of physics is to find solutions that describe hadrons in the theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). For this goal, the light-front Hamiltonian formulation of QCD (LFQCD) is a complementary approach to the well-established lattice gauge method. LFQCD offers access to the hadrons' nonperturbative quark and gluon amplitudes, which are directly testable in experiments at existing and future facilities. We present an overview of the promises and challenges of LFQCD in the context of unsolved issues in QCD that require broadened and accelerated investigation. We identify specific goals of this approach and address its quantifiable uncertainties

  15. Fluctuating pulled fronts and Pomerons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I present a pedagogical discussion of the influence of particle number fluctuations on the high energy evolution in QCD. I emphasize the event-by-event description, and the correspondence with the problem of 'fluctuating pulled fronts' in statistical physics. I explain that the correlations generated by fluctuations reduce the phase-space for BFKL evolution up to saturation. Because of that, the evolution 'slows down', and the rate for the energy increase of the saturation momentum is considerably decreased. I also discuss the diagrammatic interpretation of the particle number fluctuations in terms of Pomeron loops

  16. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources: Recent Developments and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Ian; Oks, Efim

    2005-05-01

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved over the past twenty years into a standard laboratory tool for the production of high current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. The primary application of this kind of source has evolved to be ion implantation for material surface modification. Another important use is for injection of high current beams of heavy metal ions into the front ends of particle accelerators, and much excellent work has been carried out in recent years in optimizing the source for reliable accelerator application. The source also provides a valuable tool for the investigation of the fundamental plasma physics of vacuum arc plasma discharges. As the use of the source has grown and diversified, at the same time the ion source performance and operational characteristics have been improved in a variety of different ways also. Here we review the growth and status of vacuum arc ion sources around the world, and summarize some of the applications for which the sources have been used.

  17. Development of an annular arc accelerator shock tube driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    An annular arc accelerator (ANAA) shock tube driver has been developed that deposits the energy of an arc discharge into a flowing gas, which then expands and cools without any delay for the opening of a diaphragm. A simplified one-dimensional flow analysis of the ANAA shock tube has been performed, which indicates that shock velocities greater than 40 km/sec may be obtained using a 300-kJ capacitor bank. The ANAA driver consists of a high-pressure driver, an expansion section, and an electrode section. In operation, the cold gas driver is pressurized until the diaphragm bursts, sending a pressure front down the expansion tube to the arc section. When the accelerated flow arrives at the electrode section, a 100-capacitor, 300-kJ capacitor bank is discharged either by breaking an insulating diaphragm between the electrodes or by the triggering of a series of external switches. Shock velocities of 28 km/sec have been obtained, and modifications are described that are expected to improve performance.

  18. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources: Recent Developments and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved over the past twenty years into a standard laboratory tool for the production of high current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. The primary application of this kind of source has evolved to be ion implantation for material surface modification. Another important use is for injection of high current beams of heavy metal ions into the front ends of particle accelerators, and much excellent work has been carried out in recent years in optimizing the source for reliable accelerator application. The source also provides a valuable tool for the investigation of the fundamental plasma physics of vacuum arc plasma discharges. As the use of the source has grown and diversified, at the same time the ion source performance and operational characteristics have been improved in a variety of different ways also. Here we review the growth and status of vacuum arc ion sources around the world, and summarize some of the applications for which the sources have been used

  19. Dipolarization Fronts from Reconnection Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Swisdak, M. M.; Merkin, V. G.; Buzulukova, N.; Moore, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Dipolarization fronts observed in the magnetotail are often viewed as signatures of bursty magnetic reconnection. However, until recently spontaneous reconnection was considered to be fully prohibited in the magnetotail geometry because of the linear stability of the ion tearing mode. Recent theoretical studies showed that spontaneous reconnection could be possible in the magnetotail geometries with the accumulation of magnetic flux at the tailward end of the thin current sheet, a distinctive feature of the magnetotail prior to substorm onset. That result was confirmed by open-boundary full-particle simulations of 2D current sheet equilibria, where two magnetotails were separated by an equilibrium X-line and weak external electric field was imposed to nudge the system toward the instability threshold. To investigate the roles of the equilibrium X-line, driving electric field and other parameters in the reconnection onset process we performed a set of 2D PIC runs with different initial settings. The investigated parameter space includes the critical current sheet thickness, flux tube volume per unit magnetic flux and the north-south component of the magnetic field. Such an investigation is critically important for the implementation of kinetic reconnection onset criteria into global MHD codes. The results are compared with Geotail visualization of the magnetotail during substorms, as well as Cluster and THEMIS observations of dipolarization fronts.

  20. Prospects of airflow control by a gliding arc in a static magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcon, N; Benard, N; Braud, P; Touchard, G; Moreau, E [Laboratoire d' Etudes Aerodynamiques (LEA), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, CNRS Bld Marie et Pierre Curie, Teleport 2, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Mizuno, A [Toyohashi University of Technology, Japan, Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyoashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2008-10-21

    The electrical properties of a gliding arc operating in air at atmospheric pressure are studied to evaluate its possible applications to flow control. The electromechanical behaviour of the discharge travelling at 4 m s{sup -1} along diverging electrodes in a static magnetic field is analysed in detail. Two different methods are proposed to evaluate the velocity of the arc. An initial estimation is based on the arc current evolution during its transit and additional information is gained from fast digital imaging with a CCD camera. The displacement of the arc observed with short exposure time corroborates the electrical measurement and also exhibits the existence of luminous points on the cathode that can slow down the arc motion. In addition, a particle image velocimetry system is used to investigate the interaction between the gliding arc and the surrounding air. The displacement of the low current glidarc creates a low velocity convection (around 0.2 m s{sup -1}) in the gas and also generate faster structures up to 1 m s{sup -1} directly in front of the discharge. These electromechanical effects could be used to manipulate the boundary layer region of various aerodynamic shapes.

  1. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included

  2. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included.

  3. Front Propagation in Stochastic Neural Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic multiplicative noise on front propagation in a scalar neural field with excitatory connections. Using a separation of time scales, we represent the fluctuating front in terms of a diffusive-like displacement (wandering) of the front from its uniformly translating position at long time scales, and fluctuations in the front profile around its instantaneous position at short time scales. One major result of our analysis is a comparison between freely propagating fronts and fronts locked to an externally moving stimulus. We show that the latter are much more robust to noise, since the stochastic wandering of the mean front profile is described by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process rather than a Wiener process, so that the variance in front position saturates in the long time limit rather than increasing linearly with time. Finally, we consider a stochastic neural field that supports a pulled front in the deterministic limit, and show that the wandering of such a front is now subdiffusive. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  4. Minor arcs for Goldbach's problem

    OpenAIRE

    Helfgott, H. A.

    2012-01-01

    The ternary Goldbach conjecture states that every odd number n>=7 is the sum of three primes. The estimation of sums of the form \\sum_{p\\leq x} e(\\alpha p), \\alpha = a/q + O(1/q^2), has been a central part of the main approach to the conjecture since (Vinogradov, 1937). Previous work required q or x to be too large to make a proof of the conjecture for all n feasible. The present paper gives new bounds on minor arcs and the tails of major arcs. This is part of the author's proof of the ternar...

  5. Cenozoic alkaline volcanic rocks with carbonatite affinity in the Bohemian Massif: Their sources and magma generation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ulrych, Jaromír; Štěpánková-Svobodová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 46, 1/2 (2014), s. 45-58. ISSN 0369-2086 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA300130902 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : alkaline volcanic rocks * melilitic rocks * carbonatite s * magma generation * metasomatism * Cenozoic * Bohemian Massif Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  6. Late Cenozoic History of the Genus Micromys (Mammalia, Rodentia) in Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, I.; Knitlová, M.; Wagner, Jan; Kordos, L.; Nadachowski, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2013), e62498. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/0184 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Mammalia * Rodentia * Genus Micromys * Late Cenozoic Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  7. Greater India Basin hypothesis and a two-stage Cenozoic collision between India and Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinsbergen, D.J.J. van; Lippert, P.C.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; McQuarrie, N.; Doubrovine, P.V.; Spakman, W.; Torsvik, T.H.

    2012-01-01

    Cenozoic convergence between the Indian and Asian plates produced the archetypical continental collision zone comprising the Himalaya mountain belt and the Tibetan Plateau. How and where India–Asia convergence was accommodated after collision at or before 52 Ma remains a long-standing controversy. S

  8. Greater India Basin hypothesis and a two-stage Cenozoic collision between India and Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hinsbergen, D.J.J.; Lippert, P.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; McQuarrie, N.; Doubrovine, P.V.; Spakman, W.; Torsvik, T.H.

    2013-01-01

    Cenozoic convergence between the Indian and Asian plates produced the archetypical continental collision zone comprising the Himalaya mountain belt and the Tibetan Plateau. How and where India–Asia convergence was accommodated after collision at or before 52 Ma remains a long-standing controversy. S

  9. From mantle roots to surface eruptions: Cenozoic and Mesozoic continental basaltic magmatism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kämpf, H.; Németh, K.; Puziewicz, J.; Mrlina, Jan; Geissler, W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 8 (2015), s. 1909-1912. ISSN 1437-3254 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : continental basaltic volcanism * BASALT 2013 conference * Cenozoic * Mesozoic Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2014

  10. The Amazonian Craton and its influence on past fluvial systems (Mesozoic-Cenozoic, Amazonia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Hoorn; M. Roddaz; R. Dino; E. Soares; C. Uba; D. Ochoa-Lozano; R. Mapes

    2010-01-01

    The Amazonian Craton is an old geological feature of Archaean/Proterozoic age that has determined the character of fluvial systems in Amazonia throughout most of its past. This situation radically changed during the Cenozoic, when uplift of the Andes reshaped the relief and drainage patterns of nort

  11. Total Marrow Irradiation With RapidArc Volumetric Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-total marrow irradiation (TMI) technique for patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: VMAT planning was performed for 6 patients using RapidArc technology. The planning target volume consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, excluding the extremities, except for the humerus, plus a 3.0-mm margin. The organs at risk included the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, bowels, brain, eyes, and oral cavity. The VMAT-TMI technique consisted of three plans: the head and neck, the chest, and the pelvis, each with three 330o arcs. The plans were prescribed to ensure, at a minimum, 95% planning target volume dose coverage with the prescription dose (percentage of volume receiving dose of ≥12 Gy was 95%). The treatments were delivered and verified using MapCheck and ion chamber measurements. Results: The VMAT-TMI technique reported in the present study provided comparable dose distributions with respect to the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. RapidArc planning was less subjective and easier, and, most importantly, the delivery was more efficient. RapidArc reduced the treatment delivery time to approximately 18 min from 45 min with the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. When the prescription dose coverage was reduced to 85% from 95% and the mandible and maxillary structures were not included in the planning target volume as reported in a tomotherapy study, a considerable organ at risk dose reduction of 4.2-51% was observed. The average median dose for the lungs and lenses was reduced to 5.6 Gy from 7.2 Gy and 2.4 Gy from 4.5 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The RapidArc VMAT technique improved the treatment planning, dose conformality, and, most importantly, treatment delivery efficiency. The results from our study suggest that the RapidArc VMAT technology can be expected to facilitate the clinical transition of TMI.

  12. Late Cenozoic sedimentation in Pilot Knob Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittase, W. M.; Walker, J. D.; Kirby, E.; Andrew, J.; Wan, E.

    2012-12-01

    In Pilot Knob Valley (PKV), active inversion of a Pliocene-mid Pleistocene basin presents the opportunity to understand the spatial and temporal development of an enigmatic basin astride a major transform boundary in California. Here, a ~1000-m-thick package of exposed Late Cenozoic strata has been uplifted and tilted to the northeast. Based on new age and provenance data, we adopt the name Pilot Knob formation (PKfm) to describe much of these exposed rocks north of the Garlock fault (GF) and east of Christmas Canyon gate. Post-Miocene development of PKV is strongly influenced by the sinistral GF, the newly identified Marine Gate fault (MGF) and dextral Eastern California shear zone. The PKfm consists of three lithofacies members, from base to top: (1) rocks derived from Eagle Crags to the south; (2) Randsburg Wash lacustrine rocks; and (3) an upper member derived from the Slate Range. Tephrochronologic data from four PKfm ash samples brackets deposition of lacustrine Randsburg Wash Member rocks between 3.7-3.1 Ma and lacustrine rocks of the Slate Range Member between 1.2-0.6 Ma. A fifth tephrochronologic sample from lacustrine-distal alluvial sediments south of the GF near Christmas Canyon brackets deposition of a possible PKfm facies at ~3.1 Ma. A 3-stage tectonic model for northern PKV explains changing provenance patterns. Prior to ~3.1 Ma, the western PKV paleo-low lay north of the current GF adjacent to the southern Slate Range and connected to Searles Valley. The MGF cuts adjacent to the southern face of the Slate Range and southern Searles Valley with up to 7.5 km of sinistral oblique-normal slip between ~5-2.5 Ma. Eagle Crags fanglomerate deposition may continue after 3.7 Ma west of the Randsburg Wash-Searles Valley spillway, but these rocks have been eroded away. By ~3.7 Ma, northward progradation of Eagle Crags fanglomerate waned and lacustrine sediments were deposited north of the GF and east of the Randsburg Wash-Searles Valley spillway. At ~3.1 Ma

  13. Stability of cosmological deflagration fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Megevand, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    In a cosmological first-order phase transition, bubbles of the stable phase nucleate and expand in the supercooled metastable phase. In many cases, the growth of bubbles reaches a stationary state, with bubble walls propagating as detonations or deflagrations. However, these hydrodynamical solutions may be unstable under corrugation of the interface. Such instability may drastically alter some of the cosmological consequences of the phase transition. Here, we study the hydrodynamical stability of deflagration fronts. We improve upon previous studies by making a more careful and detailed analysis. In particular, we take into account the fact that the equation of motion for the phase interface depends separately on the temperature and fluid velocity on each side of the wall. Fluid variables on each side of the wall are similar for weakly first-order phase transitions, but differ significantly for stronger phase transitions. As a consequence, we find that for large enough supercooling, any subsonic wall velocity...

  14. Progress in front propagation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, Joaquim [Departament de Fisica, Campus de Montilivi, Universitat de Girona, 17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Pujol, Toni [Departament de Mecanica, Campus de Montilivi, Universitat de Girona, 17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    We review the progress in the field of front propagation in recent years. We survey many physical, biophysical and cross-disciplinary applications, including reduced-variable models of combustion flames, Reid's paradox of rapid forest range expansions, the European colonization of North America during the 19th century, the Neolithic transition in Europe from 13 000 to 5000 years ago, the description of subsistence boundaries, the formation of cultural boundaries, the spread of genetic mutations, theory and experiments on virus infections, models of cancer tumors, etc. Recent theoretical advances are unified in a single framework, encompassing very diverse systems such as those with biased random walks, distributed delays, sequential reaction and dispersion, cohabitation models, age structure and systems with several interacting species. Directions for future progress are outlined.

  15. Progress in front propagation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Joaquim; Pujol, Toni

    2008-08-01

    We review the progress in the field of front propagation in recent years. We survey many physical, biophysical and cross-disciplinary applications, including reduced-variable models of combustion flames, Reid's paradox of rapid forest range expansions, the European colonization of North America during the 19th century, the Neolithic transition in Europe from 13 000 to 5000 years ago, the description of subsistence boundaries, the formation of cultural boundaries, the spread of genetic mutations, theory and experiments on virus infections, models of cancer tumors, etc. Recent theoretical advances are unified in a single framework, encompassing very diverse systems such as those with biased random walks, distributed delays, sequential reaction and dispersion, cohabitation models, age structure and systems with several interacting species. Directions for future progress are outlined.

  16. Supporting radical front end innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth; Gertsen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    An organization benefits substantially by improving front end innovation (FEI) actively and may thereby enhance the chances of developing innovations, as emphasized by several authors e.g. Reinertsen (1999), Dahl & Moreau (2002), Boeddrich (2004), Williams et al. (2007) and Vernorn et al. (2008......). Pharmaceutical innovation is unique, as it opposed to most other industries’ product development is science-driven and not customer-driven. In addition, the pharmaceutical FEI, as represented by research, lasts up to 5 years and the entire R&D process constitutes a period of 10-12 years, which is highly...... regulated by external authorities, e.g. The American Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The research aim of this paper is: to contribute to the field of FEI by studying how FEI can be actively supported within the industry specific context of the pharmaceutical industry, and through a conceptual discussion...

  17. Progress in front propagation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the progress in the field of front propagation in recent years. We survey many physical, biophysical and cross-disciplinary applications, including reduced-variable models of combustion flames, Reid's paradox of rapid forest range expansions, the European colonization of North America during the 19th century, the Neolithic transition in Europe from 13 000 to 5000 years ago, the description of subsistence boundaries, the formation of cultural boundaries, the spread of genetic mutations, theory and experiments on virus infections, models of cancer tumors, etc. Recent theoretical advances are unified in a single framework, encompassing very diverse systems such as those with biased random walks, distributed delays, sequential reaction and dispersion, cohabitation models, age structure and systems with several interacting species. Directions for future progress are outlined

  18. The upgraded Tevatron front end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are replacing the computers which support the CAMAC crates in the Fermilab accelerator control system. We want a significant performance increase, but we still want to be able to service scores of different varieties of CAMAC cards in a manner essentially transparent to console applications software. Our new architecture is based on symmetric multiprocessing. Several processors on the same bus, each running identical software, work simultaneously at satisfying different pieces of a console's request for data. We dynamically adjust the load between the processors. We can obtain more processing power by simply plugging in more processor cards and rebooting. We describe in this paper what we believe to be the interesting architectural features of the new front-end computers. We also note how we use some of the advanced features of the MultibusTM II bus and the Intel 80386 processor design to achieve reliability and expandability of both hardware and software. (orig.)

  19. Front propagation and rejuvenation in flipping processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-naim, Eli [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krapivsky, P I [BOSTON UNIV; Antal, T [HARVARD UNIV; Ben - Avrahm, D [HARVARD UNIV

    2008-01-01

    We study a directed flipping process that underlies the performance of the random edge simplex algorithm. In this stochastic process, which takes place on a one-dimensional lattice whose sites may be either occupied or vacant, occupied sites become vacant at a constant rate and simultaneously cause all sites to the right to change their state. This random process exhibits rich phenomenology. First, there is a front, defined by the position of the leftmost occupied site, that propagates at a nontrivial velocity. Second, the front involves a depletion zone with an excess of vacant sites. The total excess {Delta}{sub k} increases logarithmically, {Delta}{sub k} {approx_equal}ln k, with the distance k from the front. Third, the front exhibits ageing -- young fronts are vigorous but old fronts are sluggish. We investigate these phenomena using a quasi-static approximation, direct solutions of small systems and numerical simulations.

  20. Vertical-axis rotations determined from paleomagnetism of Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata of the Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, David R.; Butler, Robert F.; Sempere, Thierry

    2004-07-01

    Thermal demagnetization and principal component analysis allowed determination of characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) directions from 256 sites at 22 localities in Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary strata of the Bolivian Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera. An inclination-only fold test of site-mean ChRM directions from Cenozoic units (principally the Santa Lucía Formation) indicates optimum unfolding at 97.1% unfolding, consistent with a primary origin for the ChRM. For Mesozoic strata, optimum unfolding occurred at 89.2%, perhaps indicating secondary remagnetization at some locations. For Cenozoic units, comparison of locality-mean directions with expected paleomagnetic directions indicates vertical-axis rotations from 33° counterclockwise to 24° clockwise. Euler pole analysis of along-strike variation in crustal shortening within the Subandean and Interandean zones indicates 18° clockwise rotation south of the axis of curvature of the Bolivian Andes and 6° counterclockwise rotation northwest of the axis during the past 10 m.y. Along-strike variation of shortening within the Eastern Cordillera indicates 8° clockwise rotation south of the axis and 8° counterclockwise rotation northwest of the axis from 35 to 10 Ma. These vertical-axis rotations produced by along-strike variations in crustal shortening during development of the Bolivian fold-thrust belt agree well with observed rotations determined from paleomagnetism of Cenozoic rocks in the Eastern Cordillera and in the Subandean and Interandean zones. However, local rotations are required to account for complex rotations in the Cochabamba Basin and within the Altiplano. The curvature of the Bolivian Andes has been progressively enhanced during Cenozoic fold-thrust belt deformation.

  1. Le front oriental de Lille

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Étienne Poncelet

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available De la porte d’eau de la Basse Deûle jusqu’au fort Saint-Sauveur, le front oriental de Lille, fortifié à l’époque espagnole, glisse ses courtines dans les entrelacs du périphérique et des gares. L’enjeu urbain actuel consiste à s’appuyer sur ces murs historiques pour « passer malgré tout » à travers cet écheveau urbain et retisser les fils de la continuité des promenades au cœur de la ville. Moins connus que le front occidental de la reine des citadelles, ces anciens espaces militaires sont une chance pour l’urbanisme de demain dont les opérations en cours de la Porte de Gand et de la Basse Deûle témoignent déjà.The east wall, at Lille, fortified during the period of Spanish occupation, extends from the Porte d'Eau de la Basse-Deûle to the Saint-Sauveur fort. Its curtain walls emerge today in a landscape of ring roads and railway territories. The issue today is to profit from these historic walls in order to make some sense of the urban chaos and to reinstate some urban continuity in the city-centre walkways. Although they are not as well known as the western wall of this major fortified city, these former military properties are an exciting opportunity for tomorrow's town-planners, as the operations already underway at the Porte de Gand et de la Basse Deûle suggest.

  2. Axisymmetric arc in a supersonic nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axisymmetric arc burning in a supersonic nozzle has wide technical applications (eg in gas blast circuit breaker, arc heaters etc.). Mathematical modelling of such an arc is usually based on boundary-layer assumption which assumes a known pressure distribution imposed on the arc or based on the integral method of arc analysis. Thus, the flow outside of the arc's thermal influence is assumed to be one dimensional. In practice, this is not the case as the nozzle is not sufficiently gentle in the axial direction or the presence of the upstream electrode makes the assumption of one-dimensional flow invalid. The purpose of the present investigation is to model the arc based on Navier-Stokes equations which are modified to take into account of electrical power input and radiation transport. The arcing gas is SF6, the transport properties of which (electrical conductivity, viscosity, thermal conductivity etc.) are highly nonlinear functions of temperature but only weakly dependent on the pressure

  3. The fundamental principles of the Liberation Front

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Title: Temeljne točke Osvobodilne fronte (slovenskega naroda) (The fundamental principles of the Liberation Front [of the Slovenian people]) Originally published: Slovenski poročevalec, 8 November, 1941 and 1 January, 1942 Language: SloveneThe excerpts used are from Tone Ferenc, Temeljne točke Osvobodilne fronte in Enciklopedija Slovenije (Ljubljana: Mladinska knjiga, 1999), p. 227. Context In the aftermath of the First World War, the Slovenian workers’ movement split into a non-revolutionary...

  4. Craniospinal irradiation using Rapid Arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fandino, J. M.; Silva, M. C.; Marino, A.; Candal, A.; Diaz, I.; Fernandez, C.; Gesto, C.; Izquierdo, P.; Losada, C.; Poncet, M.; Soto, M.; Triana, G.

    2013-07-01

    Cranio-Spinal Irradiation is technically very challenging, historically field edge matching is needed because of the mechanical limitations of standard linear accelerators. The purpose of this study is to assess the Volumetric Arc Therapy as a competitive technique for Cranio-Spinal Irradiation compared to the conventional 3D Conformal Radiotherapy technique. (Author)

  5. A rotating arc plasma invertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device is described for the inversion of direct current to alternating current. The main feature is the use of a rotating plasma arc in crossed electric and magnetic fields as a switch. This device may provide an economic alternative to other inversion methods in some circumstances

  6. Effect of volatiles erupted from Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanic activities on paleo-environmental changes in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the determination of composition of volcanic volatiles and petrologic estimation of the total mass of volatiles erupted,we showed important advances in the study of the impact of Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanic activities on paleo-environmental changes in China.The volcanic activities include western Liaoning and Zhangjiakou Mesozoic intermediate-acidic explosive eruptions,southern Tibet and Shanwang Cenozoic volcanism,and Mt.Changbai volcanic eruption around one thousand years ago.The paper predominantly discusses the earth's surface temperature changes,ozone depletion,acidic rain formation and mass mortalities of vertebrate induced by the Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanism in China.

  7. Burning invariant manifolds in reactive front propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Mahoney, John; Mitchell, Kevin; Solomon, Tom

    2011-01-01

    We present theory and experiments on the dynamics of reaction fronts in a two-dimensional flow composed of a chain of alternating vortices. Inspired by the organization of passive transport by invariant manifolds, we introduce burning invariant manifolds (BIMs), which act as one-sided barriers to front propagation. The BIMs emerge from the theory when the advection-reaction- diffusion system is recast as an ODE for reaction front elements. Experimentally, we demonstrate how these BIMs can be measured and compare their behavior with simulation. Finally, a topological BIM formalism yields a maximum front propagation speed.

  8. The next-generation ARC middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appleton, O.; Cameron, D.; Cernak, J.;

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) is a light-weight, non-intrusive, simple yet powerful Grid middleware capable of connecting highly heterogeneous computing and storage resources. ARC aims at providing general purpose, flexible, collaborative computing environments suitable for a range of uses...... the next-generation ARC middleware, implemented as Web Services with the aim of standard-compliant interoperability....

  9. Stability of alternating current gliding arcs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Leipold, Frank;

    2014-01-01

    on Ohm’s law indicates that the critical length of alternating current (AC) gliding arc discharge columns can be larger than that of a corresponding direct current (DC) gliding arc. This finding is supported by previously published images of AC and DC gliding arcs. Furthermore, the analysis shows...

  10. Making Conductive Polymers By Arc Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daech, Alfred F.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental technique for fabrication of electrically conductive polymeric filaments based on arc tracking, in which electrical arc creates conductive carbon track in material that initially was insulator. Electrically conductive polymeric structures made by arc tracking aligned along wire on which formed. Alignment particularly suited to high conductivity and desirable in materials intended for testing as candidate superconductors.

  11. The Cretaceous and Cenozoic tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahirovic, S.; Seton, M.; Müller, R. D.

    2014-04-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of Southeast Asia have given rise to numerous controversies that include the accretionary history of Sundaland and the enigmatic tectonic origin of the proto-South China Sea. We assimilate a diversity of geological and geophysical observations into a new regional plate model, coupled to a global model, to address these debates. Our approach takes into account terrane suturing and accretion histories, the location of subducted slabs imaged in mantle tomography in order to constrain the evolution of regional subduction zones, as well as plausible absolute and relative plate velocities and tectonic driving mechanisms. We propose a scenario of rifting from northern Gondwana in the latest Jurassic, driven by northward slab pull from north-dipping subduction of Tethyan crust beneath Eurasia, to detach East Java, Mangkalihat, southeast Borneo and West Sulawesi blocks that collided with a Tethyan intra-oceanic subduction zone in the mid-Cretaceous and subsequently accreted to the Sunda margin (i.e., southwest Borneo core) in the Late Cretaceous. In accounting for the evolution of plate boundaries, we propose that the Philippine Sea plate originated on the periphery of Tethyan crust forming this northward conveyor. We implement a revised model for the Tethyan intra-oceanic subduction zones to reconcile convergence rates, changes in volcanism and the obduction of ophiolites. In our model the northward margin of Greater India collides with the Kohistan-Ladakh intra-oceanic arc at ∼53 Ma, followed by continent-continent collision closing the Shyok and Indus-Tsangpo suture zones between ∼42 and 34 Ma. We also account for the back-arc opening of the proto-South China Sea from ∼65 Ma, consistent with extension along east Asia and the formation of supra-subduction zone ophiolites presently found on the island of Mindoro. The related rifting likely detached the Semitau continental fragment from South China, which accreted to northern Borneo in the mid

  12. Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic thermotectonic evolution along a transect from the north China craton through the Qinling orogen into the Yangtze craton, central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shengbiao; Raza, Asaf; Min, Kyoungwon; Kohn, Barry P.; Reiners, Peter W.; Ketcham, Richard A.; Wang, Jiyang; Gleadow, Andrew J. W.

    2006-12-01

    Cretaceous and Cenozoic reactivation of the Triassic Qinling-Dabie orogen between the north China and Yangtze cratons resulted from the combined effects of Pacific subduction-back-arc extension in east China and collisions in west China. We report new apatite fission track and apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He data from east Qinling along a >400-km-long N-S transect from Huashan through the Qinling orogen to Huangling. The ages show a general pattern of younging northward. Three major cooling phases are defined by modeling the multiple thermochronologic data sets. The first phase occurred locally in the North and South Qinling during the late Triassic to early Jurassic, following heating associated with the Triassic Yangtze subduction and exhumation of the Wudang metamorphic core complex on the cratonal edge. A second phase represents regional exhumation between 100 and 60 Ma, coeval with rifting marked by the Late Cretaceous-Eocene (K2-E) red bed deposition in eastern China and possibly indicating a link with Pacific subduction-back-arc extension in eastern China; however, it may also have been superimposed by eastward tectonic escape resulting from the Lhasa-West Burma-Qiangtang-Indochina collision. The third cooling phase was initiated at ˜45 Ma exclusively in the north Qinling and in the footwall of the graben-bounding normal fault of the Weihe graben in the Lesser Qinling. We suggest the third phase was related to reactivation of the Qinling fault system as a result of eastward tectonic escape imposed by the India-Asia collision at ˜50 Ma.

  13. Cenozoic vegetation, climate changes and hominid evolution in tropical Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefille, Raymonde

    2010-07-01

    This paper reviews information on past vegetation of tropical Africa during the Cenozoic, focused upon the last 10 Ma, a time spanning hominid record in Central and East Africa. Summary of palaeobotanical data collected at terrestrial sites are compared with new results on the long term evolution of the continental vegetation zones documented from marine pollen record of two deep sea cores recovered from the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Section 2 includes a summary of modern distribution of vegetation belts in the African continent and a synthesis of the results of both macrobotanical (fossil wood, leaves and fruits) and microbotanical (mainly pollen) studies presented according to time scale and geographical location. The main features emphasized by the palaeobotanical results are 1) seasonal vegetation and climate documented as soon as the Eocene in Tanzania 2) well diversified forests existing in northern West Ethiopia during the Oligocene 3) high temporal and spatial variabilities of forests composition during the Miocene when deciduous Legume woodland was documented in Ethiopia whereas wetter evergreen forests existed in Western Kenya 4) lack of evidence for an evergreen forest belt, continuous from Western Congo to East Africa. Section 3 presents new original pollen data recovered from a long core in the Gulf of Aden documenting large scale past vegetation changes in East Africa during the last 11 Ma. These results are discussed in comparison with a summarized long pollen sequence previously published from a marine core offshore the Niger delta. This comparison illustrates variations in geographical distribution of large vegetation zone at the continental scale, through time. In Section 4, vegetation changes registered during the last 10 Ma are discussed in relation with the results of isotopic studies and an updated presentation of hominids evolution in Africa. Several changes are shown in the marine records. An expansion of savanna/grassland is shown at 10

  14. Relationship between arc voltage current and arc length in TIG welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between arc voltage, arc length and current in Tungsten Inert Gas welding has been investigated. It was not possible to determine a correlation between arc voltage, current and arc length because of the inherent variability in the experimental results. A typical value for the error in controlling the arc length using arc voltage was calculated and found to be ± 0.5mm. The variation in arc voltage at constant conditions has two components, long term and short term. Long term is the variation in voltage between welds, short term is voltage variation within a few seconds. Both are about 5% of the total arc voltage. Since only a fraction of the arc voltage depends on arc length, this leads to a much larger variation in arc length if Arc Voltage Control (AVC) is used to control arc length (about 15% in each case at 3mm arc length). A weld procedure based on AVC is likely to yield a different variability in weld bead geometry from one based on constant arc length. (author)

  15. Simulation of Magnetically Dispersed Arc Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白冰; 查俊; 张晓宁; 王城; 夏维东

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically dispersed arc plasma exhibits typically dispersed uniform arc column as well as diffusive cathode root and diffusive anode root. In this paper magnetically dispersed arc plasma coupled with solid cathode is numerically simulated by the simplified cathode sheath model of LOWKE . The numerical simulation results in argon show that the maximum value of arc root current density on the cathode surface is 3.5×10^7 A/m^2), and the maximum value of energy flux on the cathode surface is 3× 10^7 J/m^2, both values are less than the average values of a contracted arc, respectively.

  16. A mechanism that triggers double arcing during plasma arc cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian, E-mail: nemchinsky@bellsouth.ne [Keiser University, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 (United States)

    2009-10-21

    Double arcing (DA) is a phenomenon when a transferred arc, flowing inside an electrically insulated nozzle, breaks into two separate arcs: one that connects the cathode and the nozzle and another that connects the nozzle and a work-piece. It is a commonly accepted opinion that the reason for DA is high voltage drop in the plasma inside the nozzle. However, the specific mechanism that triggers the DA development is not clear. In this paper, we propose such a mechanism. Dielectric films deposited inside the nozzle's orifice play the key role in this mechanism. These films are charged by ion current from plasma. A strong electric field is created inside the film and at the boundary of the film and clean metal of the nozzle. This gives rise to a thermo-field electron emission from the clean metal that borders the film. Emitted electrons are accelerated at the voltage drop between the nozzle and plasma. These electrons produce extra ions, which in turn move back to the film and additionally charge it. This sequence of events leads to explosive instability if the voltage drop inside the nozzle is high enough. Experiments to check the proposed mechanism are suggested.

  17. Detrital zircon provenance analysis of the Great Valley Group, California: Evolution of an arc-forearc system

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraaff-Surpless, K.; Graham, S.A.; Wooden, J.L.; McWilliams, M.O.

    2002-01-01

    The improved resolution of sediment provenance from detrital zircon analysis of Great Valley stratigraphy enables recognition of previously undocumented arc magmatism and the evolution of regional drainage systems within the Cretaceous arc-forearc system related to uplift, magmatism, and structure in the arc. Great Valley detrital zircon age data confirm previous studies that indicate that the locus of the sediment source in the southern Sierra Nevada arc migrated east with the active volcanic front and suggest rapid rates of uplift and unroofing of the southern arc. Sacramento Valley detrital zircon age data indicate a more complex history of drainage in the northern Klamath-Sierran arc than previously documented. Detrital zircon age distributions from the Cache Creek section of the Great Valley Group broaden through time from nearly unimodal age distributions to signatures with multiple age peaks. This transition to more broadly distributed detrital zircon age spectra likely results from a combination of (1) expanding subaerial drainage systems from highly localized to more broadly distributed catchments; (2) changing shelf and submarine-canyon morphology with rising sea level and/or basin subsidence; (3) increased degree of dissection of the Klamath-Sierran arc; and (4) potential drainage capture and redirection within the arc. Sacramento Valley detrital zircon age data also record a pulse of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous magmatism in the northwestern Sierra Nevada arc, an age of Cordilleran magmatism and deformation represented by limited exposure in the modern Sierra Nevada. These results offer significant new insights into the evolution of a well-studied arc-forearc system.

  18. Nuclear Physics on the Light Front

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Gerald A.

    1999-01-01

    High energy scattering experiments involving nuclei are typically analyzed in terms of light front variables. The desire to provide realistic, relativistic wave functions expressed in terms of these variables led me to try to use light front dynamics to compute nuclear wave functions. The progress is summarized here.

  19. Up front in the CIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A picture is drawn of the current supply side of the front-end fuel cycle production capacities in the CIS. Uranium production has been steadily declining, as in the West. Market realities have been reflected in local costs of production since the break-up of the former Soviet Union and some uneconomic mines have been closed. In terms of actual production, Kazakhstan, Russia and Uzbekistan, remain among the top five uranium producers in the world. Western government action has been taken to restrict the market access for natural uranium from the CIS. Reactors in the CIS continue to be supplied with fabricated fuel solely by Russian, though Western fuel fabricators have reduced Russian supplies to Eastern Europe. Russia's current dominance in conversion and enrichment services in both the CIS and Eastern Europe is likely to continue as long as the present surplus low enriched uranium stocks last and surplus production capacity exists. Market penetration in the West has been limited by government action but Russia in 1993 still held about 20% of the world's conversion market and nearly 19% of the enrichment market. (6 figures, 2 tables, 4 references) (UK)

  20. Meso-Cenozoic tectonics of the Central Kyrgyz Tien Shan (Central Asia), based on apatite fission track thermochronology.

    OpenAIRE

    Glorie, Stijn

    2008-01-01

    Apatite fission track thermochronology on the Kyrgyz Tien Shan basement revealed a polyphased thermal history of the study-area. We interpret the Mesozoic and Cenozoic cooling-events as periods of tectonic reactivation.

  1. Ink jet printable silver metallization with zinc oxide for front side metallization for micro crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurk, Robert; Fritsch, Marco; Eberstein, Markus; Schilm, Jochen; Uhlig, Florian; Waltinger, Andreas; Michaelis, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Ink jet printable water based inks are prepared by a new silver nanoparticle synthesis and the addition of nanoscaled ZnO particles. For the formation of front side contacts the inks are ink jet printed on the front side of micro crystalline silicon solar cells, and contact the cell directly during the firing step by etching through the wafers’ anti-reflection coating (ARC). In terms of Ag dissolution and precipitation the mechanism of contact formation can be compared to commercial glass containing thick film pastes. This avoids additional processing steps, like laser ablation, which are usually necessary to open the ARC prior to ink jet printing. As a consequence process costs can be reduced. In order to optimize the ARC etching and contact formation during firing, zinc oxide nanoparticles are investigated as an ink additive. By utilization of in situ contact resistivity measurements the mechanism of contacting was explored. Our results show that silver inks containing ZnO particles realize a specific contact resistance below 10 mΩṡcm2. By using a multi-pass ink jet printing and plating process a front side metallization of commercial 6  ×  6 inch2 standard micro crystalline silicone solar cells with emitter resistance of 60 Ω/◽ was achieved and showed an efficiency of 15.7%.

  2. Models of plasma arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complex model of energy transfer from ionized gas through a weld-pool to a heat affected zone (HAZ) is considered here. The model consists of three sub-models: a model of the arc column with skin layers - sheaths coating electrodes, a model of liquid metal flow in a weld-pool, and a model of coupled thermo-mechanical-metallurgical processes in HAZ. These sub-models are descried in three reports. The first report is devoted to a short review of welding plasma models based mostly on the Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD) theory successfully applied to the simulation of welding process. This report is illustrated by arc models for TIG and PAW welding. The description of thermal energy transfer between three sub-regions of the complex welding domain refers to a large number of processes observed in gaseous electronics, thermodynamics of reacting gases, electro-dynamics of fluid, micro-metallurgy. (author)

  3. Novel non-equilibrium modelling of a DC electric arc in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeva, M.; Benilov, M. S.; Almeida, N. A.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-06-01

    A novel non-equilibrium model has been developed to describe the interplay of heat and mass transfer and electric and magnetic fields in a DC electric arc. A complete diffusion treatment of particle fluxes, a generalized form of Ohm’s law, and numerical matching of the arc plasma with the space-charge sheaths adjacent to the electrodes are applied to analyze in detail the plasma parameters and the phenomena occurring in the plasma column and the near-electrode regions of a DC arc generated in atmospheric pressure argon for current levels from 20 A up to 200 A. Results comprising electric field and potential, current density, heating of the electrodes, and effects of thermal and chemical non-equilibrium are presented and discussed. The current–voltage characteristic obtained is in fair agreement with known experimental data. It indicates a minimum for arc current of about 80 A. For all current levels, a field reversal in front of the anode accompanied by a voltage drop of (0.7–2.6) V is observed. Another field reversal is observed near the cathode for arc currents below 80 A.

  4. Zircon Recycling in Arc Intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Barth, A.; Matzel, J.; Wooden, J.; Burgess, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recycling of zircon has been well established in arc intrusions and arc volcanoes, but a better understanding of where and how zircons are recycled can help illuminate how arc magma systems are constructed. To that end, we are conducting age, trace element (including Ti-in-zircon temperatures; TzrnTi) and isotopic studies of zircons from the Late Cretaceous (95-85 Ma) Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS) in the Sierra Nevada Batholith (CA). Within the TIS zircons inherited from ancient basement sources and/or distinctly older host rocks are uncommon, but recycled zircon antecrysts from earlier periods of TIS-related magmatism are common and conspicuous in the inner and two most voluminous units of the TIS, the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak Granodiorites. All TIS units have low bulk Zr ([Zr]825°C), [Zr] in the TIS is a factor of 2 to 3 lower than saturation values. Low [Zr] in TIS rocks might be attributed to a very limited supply of zircon in the source, by disequilibrium melting and rapid melt extraction [1], by melting reactions involving formation of other phases that can incorporate appreciable Zr [2], or by removal of zircon at an earlier stage of magma evolution. Based on a preliminary compilation of literature data, low [Zr] is common to Late Cretaceous N.A. Cordilleran granodioritic/tonalitic intrusions (typically Tzrnsat [3]. A corollary is that slightly older zircon antecrysts that are common in the inner units of the TIS could be considered inherited if they are derived from remelting of slightly older intrusions. Remelting at such low temperatures in the arc would require a source of external water. Refs: [1] Sawyer, J.Pet 32:701-738; [2] Fraser et al, Geology 25:607-610; [3] Harrison et al, Geology 35:635- 638

  5. Late Cenozoic sedimentary process and its response to the slip history of the central Altyn Tagh fault, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈正乐; 张岳桥; 陈宣华; 王小凤; A.S.Ramon; W.B.Zack

    2001-01-01

    The ENE-striking Altyn Tagh fault (ATF), extending along the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, is one of the major important strike-slip faults, and has been known as one of the key areas to debate the eastward extrusion and crustral shortening models of the Tibetan Plateau during and after India-Asia collision. This paper mainly presents new evidence of Late Cenozoic sedimentary process to reconstruct the slip history of the ATF during the Late Cenozoic. Field measurements and laboratory analyses of the sedimentary characteristics in the Late Cenozoic basins in the central Altyn Tagh fault suggest that Late Cenozoic sedimentary sequence should be divided into three units according to facies changes. The paleo-topography reconstruction shows that the sedimentation in these basins was tightly related with the fault, indicating that the ATF has experienced at least three stages of strike slipping in the Late Cenozoic. New geological data from the Late Cenozoic sedimentary basins and the formation of th

  6. Minor arcs for Goldbach's problem

    CERN Document Server

    Helfgott, H A

    2012-01-01

    The ternary Goldbach conjecture states that every odd number $n\\geq 7$ is the sum of three primes. The estimation of sums of the form $\\sum_{p\\leq x} e(\\alpha p)$, $\\alpha = a/q + O(1/q^2)$, has been a central part of the main approach to the conjecture since (Vinogradov, 1937). Previous work required $q$ or $x$ to be too large to make a proof of the conjecture for all $n$ feasible. The present paper gives new bounds on minor arcs and the tails of major arcs. For $q\\geq 4\\cdot 10^6$, these bounds are of the strength needed to solve the ternary Goldbach conjecture. Only the range $q\\in \\lbrack 10^5, 4\\cdot 10^6\\rbrack$ remains to be checked, possibly by brute force, before the conjecture is proven for all $n$. The new bounds are due to several qualitative improvements. In particular, this paper presents a general method for reducing the cost of Vaughan's identity, as well as a way to exploit the tails of minor arcs in the context of the large sieve.

  7. Cenozoic Volcanism and Intraplate Subduction at the Northern Margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓万明

    1991-01-01

    Developed in the Mt.Kunlun orogenic belt at the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau is an active Cenozoic volcanic zone which is more than 1000km in length and some ten to hundred kilometers in width.It extends east-westwards and is roughly parallet to the strike of Mt.Kunlun.The Cenozoic volcanic rocks are divided into the northern(N-)and southern(S-)subzones.Eruptions of volcanic lavas in the S-subzone are related to an initial rift zone within the north Qiangtang terrane,but the volcanic rocks in the N-subzone are relatively close to the contact zone between the Mt.Kunlun and the Tarim terrane.The space-time distribution,petrological and geochemical features can be explained by a model of southward intraplate subduction of the Tarim terrane.

  8. Characteristics and geological significance of olivine xenocrysts in Cenozoic volcanic rocks from western Qinling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Benxun; ZHANG Hongfu; XIAO Yan; ZHAO Xinmiao

    2006-01-01

    Cenozoic volcanic rocks from the Haoti, Dangchang County of the western Qinling Mountains, contain a few clearlyzoned olivines. These olivines are relatively big in grain sizes and usually have cracks or broken features. Their cores have similar compositions (Mg# = 90.4- 91.0) to those for the peridotitic xenoliths entrained in host volcanic rocks and their rims are close to the compositions of olivine phenocrysts (Mg# = 85.5 81.9). The CaO contents in these zoned olivines are lower than 0.1%. These features demonstrate that the clearly zoned olivines are xenocrysts and disaggregated from mantle peridotites. The zoned texture was the result of the interaction between the olivine and host magma. Available data show that the volcanic rocks would have been derived from the mantle source metasomatized by subducted hydrathermally-altered oceanic crust. The formation of these Cenozoic volcanic rocks was perhaps related to the rapid uplift of the Tibetan Plateau.

  9. LATE CREATACEOUS-CENOZOIC SEDIMENTS OF THE BAIKAL RIFT BASIN AND CHANGING NATURAL CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor D. Mats

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The late Cretaceous-Cenozoic sediments of fossil soils and weathering crusts of the Baikal rift have been subject to long-term studies. Based on our research results, it is possible to distinguish the following litho-stratigraphic complexes which are related to particular stages of the rift development: the late Cretaceous–early Oligocene (crypto-rift Arheo-baikalian, the late Oligocene–early Pliocene (ecto-rift early orogenic Pra-baikalian, and the late Pliocene-Quaternary (ecto-rift late orogenic Pra-baikalian – Baikalian complexes. Changes of weathering modes (Cretaceous-quarter, soil formation (Miocene-quarter and differences of precipitation by vertical and lateral stratigraphy are analysed with regard to specific features of climate, tectonics and facial conditions of sedimentation. Tectonic phases are defined in the Cenozoic period of the Pribaikalie.

  10. Climate vs. tectonic induced variations in Cenozoic sediment supply from western Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gołędowski, Bartosz; Nielsen, S.B.; Clausen, O.R.

    on a particular rudimentary understanding of the Davisian cyclic landscape evolution model, which does not consider the occurrence of flexural isostasy or glacial buzzsaw processes. Observations of small scale sedimentary structures of ambiguous origin and activity of salt-related structures is not evidence...... for this hypothesised large-scale uplift [13]. Furthermore, there is little if any evidence for onshore Cenozoic tectonic activity, which is also not constrained by fission track dating [2, 14-20]. Climate variations during Cenozoic times are constrained by oxygen isotope values in benthic foraminifera [21...... by extensive vegetation cover as little bedrock is exposed and soils are well-developed. In case of climate cooling the tree limit lowers, exposing more bedrock for erosion. Furthermore, the erosional regime changes dramatically in the presence of alpine glaciers and cirques and when periglacial processes...

  11. Climate vs. tectonic induced variations in Cenozoic sediment supply from western Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gołędowski, Bartosz; Nielsen, S.B.; Clausen, O.R.

    , faulting), tectonic disturbance related to ocean opening could be responsible for deposition of thick Paleocene wedges along the western coast of Norway. During subsequent Cenozoic periods domal structures in the Norwegian shelf are a proof for mild and protracted compression. However, depositional......) changed the erosional regime in western Scandinavia from fluvial (inefficient in tectonically stable settings, almost regardless of the amount of precipitation) to glacial. Glacial erosion is much more effective and is apparently able to outpace tectonic processes responsible for development of high...... topography. Therefore, a hypothesis of climate control on erosion and deposition during the Cenozoic history of western Scandinavia and adjacent sedimentary basins emerges. This theory is further supported by higher sediment input and pronounced progradation patterns of the Molo Formation (deposited during...

  12. The Norwegian Danish Basin: A key to understanding the Cenozoic in the eastern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Thomas L.; Clausen, Ole R.; Andresen, Katrine J.; Goledowski, Bartosz

    2015-04-01

    The Danish part of Norwegian-Danish Basin, which constitutes the eastern part of the North Sea Basin, has been the key area for sequence stratigraphic subdivision and analysis of the Cenozoic succession since the mid 1990's. Widespread 3D seismic data, in the central parts of the North Sea Basin, as well as more scattered 3D seismic data in the Danish part of the Norwegian-Danish Basin, have given a more detailed understanding of the sequences and indicate that climate is tenable for the origin of Cenozoic sequence boundaries. The previous sequence stratigraphic interpretations have been an integrated part of an ongoing debate concerning vertical movements of the Fennoscandian shield versus the impact of climate and erosion. A newly accessed coherent regional 2D and reprocessed 3D seismic data set, in the Norwegian part of the Norwegian-Danish Basin, constitute the database for a new sequence stratigraphic analysis of the entire area. The objective of the new study is to test previous subdivisions and introduce a coherent 3D sequence stratigraphic analysis and depositional model for the entire Norwegian-Danish Basin. This analysis is necessary to get out of the stalemate with the uplift discussion. The study shows that the original subdivision by Michelsen et al. (1995, 1998) stands. However, revision of few a sequence boundaries may have to be adjusted due to new biostratigraphic information published. Furthermore, high-angle clinoforms and geomorphological transport complexes observed in the Danish North Sea Basin can be traced into the Norwegian sector. This together with the recognition of several other high-angle clinoform complexes, and their associated seismic facies distribution maps and thickness-maps, enhances the level of detail and constrains the previous published paleogeographic reconstructions of the Cenozoic. The geometry of the Cenozoic infill, in the Norwegian part of the Norwegian-Danish Basin, is here interpreted to be controlled by relative sea

  13. Life on the front lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hern, W M

    1994-01-01

    Warren Hern's reminiscences about his experiences as medical director of the Boulder (Colorado) Abortion Clinic and as an abortion provider in private practice provide support for his statement, "Every doctor in America who does abortions lives under a death threat." Shortly after the clinic was opened, a group of anti-abortion physicians pressured the Boulder County Medical Society to pass a resolution declaring the clinic a "clear and present danger" that should be shut down by local health boards. As the only freestanding abortion clinic in the state in the mid-1970's, the Boulder center was targeted by the Right-to-Life Committee picketers and Dr. Hern was harassed in his home and in public. When Dr. Hern left the clinic a year later to establish a private practice specializing in pregnancy termination, the picketers followed. After release of a textbook he prepared on abortion practice, the publisher was deluged with hate mail and threats of boycott, leading them to withdraw the text from its list. Violent attacks on abortion clinics accelerated after Reagan's election and bullets were fired into Hern's waiting room. Randall Terry, national head of Operation Rescue, prayed for Hern's death at a rally in front of his clinic. By the time Dr. David Gunn was assassinated by an anti-abortionist in March 1993, there had been over 1285 acts of violence against abortion facilities and more than 100 facilities had been completely destroyed. The transgression for which Dr. Gunn was murdered was that he sought to save the lives and futures of countless women and support their right to become full participants in society. PMID:8186726

  14. Study of blade aspect ratio on a compressor front stage aerodynamic and mechanical design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, G. D.; Lee, D.; Snow, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    A single stage compressor was designed with the intent of demonstrating that, for a tip speed and hub-tip ratio typical of an advanced core compressor front stage, the use of low aspect ratio can permit high levels of blade loading to be achieved at an acceptable level of efficiency. The design pressure ratio is 1.8 at an adiabatic efficiency of 88.5 percent. Both rotor and stator have multiple-circular-arc airfoil sections. Variable IGV and stator vanes permit low speed matching adjustments. The design incorporates an inlet duct representative of an engine transition duct between fan and high pressure compressor.

  15. Cenozoic evolution of Neotethys and implications for the causes of plate motions

    OpenAIRE

    McQuarrie, N.; J. M. Stock; Verdel, C.; B. P. Wernicke

    2003-01-01

    Africa-North America-Eurasia plate circuit rotations, combined with Red Sea rotations and new estimates of crustal shortening in Iran define the Cenozoic history of the Neotethyan ocean between Arabia and Eurasia. The new constraints indicate that Arabia-Eurasia convergence has been fairly constant at 2 to 3 cm/yr since 56 Ma with slowing of Africa-Eurasia motion to

  16. A universal driver of macroevolutionary change in the size of marine phytoplankton over the Cenozoic

    OpenAIRE

    Finkel, Z. V.; Sebbo, J.; Feist-Burkhardt, S.; Irwin, A. J.; Katz, M. E.; Schofield, O. M. E.; Young, J. R.; Falkowski, P G

    2007-01-01

    The size structure of phytoplankton assemblages strongly influences energy transfer through the food web and carbon cycling in the ocean. We determined the macroevolutionary trajectory in the median size of dinoflagellate cysts to compare with the macroevolutionary size change in other plankton groups. We found the median size of the dinoflagellate cysts generally decreases through the Cenozoic. Diatoms exhibit an extremely similar pattern in their median size over time, even though species d...

  17. Cold Fronts in Cold Dark Matter Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, high-resolution Chandra observations revealed the existence of very sharp features in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature maps of several clusters. These features, called cold fronts, are characterized by an increase in surface brightness by a factor >~2 over 10-50 kpc accompanied by a drop in temperature of a similar magnitude. The existence of such sharp gradients can be used to put interesting constraints on the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM) if their mechanism and longevity are well understood. Here, we present results of a search for cold fronts in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters in cold dark matter models. We show that sharp gradients with properties similar to those of observed cold fronts naturally arise in cluster mergers when the shocks heat gas surrounding the merging subcluster, while its dense core remains relatively cold. The compression induced by supersonic motions and shock heating during the merger enhance the amplitude of gas density and temperature gradients across the front. Our results indicate that cold fronts are nonequilibrium transient phenomena and can be observed for a period of less than a billion years. We show that the velocity and density fields of gas surrounding the cold front can be very irregular, which would complicate analyses aiming to put constraints on the physical conditions of the ICM in the vicinity of the front.

  18. Izu-Bonin-Mariana Rear Arc - The missing half of the subduction factory, 30 March – 30 May 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Y.; Barker, A. K.; Busby, C. J.; Berger, J. L. R.; Blum, P; Bongiolo, E. M.; Guèrin, G.; BORDIGA, M.; Andrews, G. D. M.; DeBari, S. M.; Gill, J. B.; Kars, M. A. C.; Hamelin, C.; Kita, Z. A.; Jia, Jihui

    2014-01-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Hole U1436A (proposed Site IBM-4GT) lies in the western part of the Izu fore-arc basin, ~60 km east of the arc-front volcano Aogashima, ~170 km west of the axis of the Izu-Bonin Trench, 1.5 km west of Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 792, and at 1776 meters below sea level (mbsl). It was drilled as a 150 m deep geotechnical test hole for potential future deep drilling (5500 meters below seafloor [mbsf]) at proposed Site IBM-4 using the D/V Chikyu....

  19. Biogeographical consequences of Cenozoic tectonic events within East Asian margins: a case study of Hynobius biogeography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    Full Text Available Few studies have explored the role of Cenozoic tectonic evolution in shaping patterns and processes of extant animal distributions within East Asian margins. We select Hynobius salamanders (Amphibia: Hynobiidae as a model to examine biogeographical consequences of Cenozoic tectonic events within East Asian margins. First, we use GenBank molecular data to reconstruct phylogenetic interrelationships of Hynobius by bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses. Second, we estimate the divergence time using the bayesian relaxed clock approach and infer dispersal/vicariance histories under the 'dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis' model. Finally, we test whether evolutionary history and biogeographical processes of Hynobius should coincide with the predictions of two major hypotheses (the 'vicariance'/'out of southwestern Japan' hypothesis. The resulting phylogeny confirmed Hynobius as a monophyletic group, which could be divided into nine major clades associated with six geographical areas. Our results show that: (1 the most recent common ancestor of Hynobius was distributed in southwestern Japan and Hokkaido Island, (2 a sister taxon relationship between Hynobius retardatus and all remaining species was the results of a vicariance event between Hokkaido Island and southwestern Japan in the Middle Eocene, (3 ancestral Hynobius in southwestern Japan dispersed into the Taiwan Island, central China, 'Korean Peninsula and northeastern China' as well as northeastern Honshu during the Late Eocene-Late Miocene. Our findings suggest that Cenozoic tectonic evolution plays an important role in shaping disjunctive distributions of extant Hynobius within East Asian margins.

  20. Cenozoic Volcanism in South China Sea and Its Vicinity and South China Sea Spreading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The rock series, rock types and Sr-Nd isotopic dating of the Cenozoic volcanic rocks in the South China Sea are similar to those in its vicinity. On the basis of the spreading age of the South China Sea, the Cenozoic volcanic rocks are divided into three stages: the pre-spreading stage, the spreading stage and the post-spreading stage. The deep process characteristics of the asthenosphere and lithosphere may be inferred from the study on primary basaltic magma. The top layers of the asthenosphere both in the spreading stage and in the pre-spreading stage are closer to the earth surface than that in the post-spreading stage. From the pre-spreading stage to the spreading stage, the top layer of the asthenosphere decreased in depth, while the amount of interstitial partial melts increased. The evolution of the primary basaltic magma shows a progressive evolution sequence of the rifting volcanism and a faster lithospheric spreading velocity. From the spreading stage to the post-spreading stage, the top layer of the asthenosphere gradually increased in depth, but the amount of interstitial partial melts decreased. The evolution of primary basaltic magma shows a retrogressive evolution sequence of the rifting volcanism and a gradual decrease in the lithospheric spreading velocity. The depth recognized by the study on the Cenozoic volcanism demonstrates the deep environment for the formation and evolution of the South China Sea.

  1. Cenozoic Antarctic DiatomWare/BugCam: An aid for research and teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, S.W.; Olney, M.; Covington, J.M.; Egerton, V.M.; Jiang, S.; Ramdeen, D.K.; Kulhanek S.; Schrader, H.; Sims, P.A.; Wood, A.S.; Davis, A.; Davenport, D.R.; Doepler, N.; Falcon, W.; Lopez, C.; Pressley, T.; Swedberg, O.L.; Harwood, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    Cenozoic Antarctic DiatomWare/BugCam© is an interactive, icon-driven digital-image database/software package that displays over 500 illustrated Cenozoic Antarctic diatom taxa along with original descriptions (including over 100 generic and 20 family-group descriptions). This digital catalog is designed primarily for use by micropaleontologists working in the field (at sea or on the Antarctic continent) where hard-copy literature resources are limited. This new package will also be useful for classroom/lab teaching as well as for any paleontologists making or refining taxonomic identifications at the microscope. The database (Cenozoic Antarctic DiatomWare) is displayed via a custom software program (BugCam) written in Visual Basic for use on PCs running Windows 95 or later operating systems. BugCam is a flexible image display program that utilizes an intuitive thumbnail “tree” structure for navigation through the database. The data are stored on Micrsosoft EXCEL spread sheets, hence no separate relational database program is necessary to run the package

  2. Cenozoic Mineralization in China, as a Key to Past Mineralization and a Clue to Future Prospecting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Many Cenozoic metal deposits have been found during the past decade. Among them, the Fuwan Ag deposit in Guangdong is the largest Ag deposit in China. Besides, the largest Cu deposit of China in Yulong, Tibet, the largest Pb-Zn deposit of China in Jinding, Yunnan, and the largest Au deposit of China in Jinguashi,Taiwan, were also formed in the Cenozoic. Why so many important "present" deposits formed during such a short period of geological history is the key problem. The major reason is that different tectonic settings control different kinds of magmatic activity and mineralization at the same time. In southwestern China, porphyry-type Cu deposits such as Yulong were formed during the early stage of the Himalayan orogeny, sediment-hosted Pb-Zn deposits such as Jinding were formed within intermontane basins related to deep faults, and carbonatite-related deposits such as the Maoniuping REE deposit and alkalic magmatic rock-related deposits such as the Beiya Au deposit originated from the mantle source. In southeastern China, the Fuwan Ag deposit was related to continental rifting which was triggered by the mantle plume. In Taiwan, the Jinguashi Au deposit was formed during the subduction process of an oceanic plate beneath a continental plate. Besides, the features such as the diversification, inheritance, large size, deep source of metals and fluids of the Cenozoic (Present or Recent ) mineralization can be used as a key to the search for past deposits.

  3. Metallogenic systems related to Mesozoic and Cenozoic granitoids in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA; Renmin; (华仁民); CHEN; Peirong; (陈培荣); ZHANG; Wenlan; (张文兰); LIU; Xiaodong; (刘晓东); LU; Jianjun; (陆建军); LIN; Jinfu; (林锦富); YAO; Junming; (姚军明); QI; Huawen; (戚华文); ZHANG; Zhanshi; (张展适); GU; Shengyan; (顾晟彦)

    2003-01-01

    Large scale mineralizations of nonferrous, precious, and rare metals took place in South China in Mesozoic and Cenozoic Eras, which were mostly closely related with granitic magmatisms of different sources and features. Four metallogenic systems related to Mesozoic and Cenozoic granitoids are put forward in this paper. They are: (i) the porphyry-epithermal copper-gold system related to calc-alkaline volcanic-intrusive magmatism, (ii) rare metal (mainly W, Sn, Ta, Nb, etc) metallogenic system related with continental crust re-melting type granitoids, (iii) copper and polymetallic metallogenic system related with intra-plate high potassium calc-alkaline and shoshonitic magmatism, and (iv) Au-Cu and REE metallogenic system related to A-type granites. The main characteristics of these systems are briefly discussed. These Mesozoic and Cenozoic granitoids of different sources were the products of different periods of lithosphere evolution in that area under different tectonic-dynamic environments. Fundamentally speaking, however, the granitoids and related metallogeneses are the results of mantle-crust interactions under a tensile tectonic environment in South China.

  4. Construction of the seawater 87Sr/86Sr curve for the Cenozoic and Cretaceous: supporting data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the data used to construct the Cenozoic and Cretaceous portion of the Phanerozoic curve of seawater 87Sr/86Sr that had been given in summary form by W.H. Burke and coworkers. All Cenozoic samples (128) and 22 Cretaceous samples are foram-nannofossil oozes and limestones from DSDP cores distributed among 13 sites in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, and the Caribbean Sea. Non-DSDP Cretaceous samples (126) include limestone, anhydrite and phosphate samples from North America, Europe and Asia. Determination of the 87Sr/86Sr value of seawater at particular times in the past is based on comparison of ratios derived from coeval marine samples from widely separated geographic areas. The general configuration of the Cenozoic and Cretaceous curve appears to be strongly influenced by the history of plate interactions and sea-floor spreading. Specific rises and falls in the 87Sr/86Sr of seawater, however, may be caused by a variety of factors such as variation in lithologic composition of the crust exposed to weathering, configuration and topographic relief of continents, volcanic activity, rate of sea-floor spreading, extent of continental inundation by epeiric seas, and variations in both climate and paleo-oceanographic conditions. Many or all of these factors are probably related to global tectonic processes, yet their combined effect on the temporal variation of seawater 87Sr/86Sr can complicate a direct plate-tectonic interpretation for portions of the seawater curve. (Auth.)

  5. "Arc-continent collision" of the Aleutian-Komandorsky arc into Kamchatka: Insight into Quaternary tectonic segmentation through Pleistocene marine terraces and morphometric analysis of fluvial drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedoja, K.; Authemayou, C.; Pinegina, T.; Bourgeois, J.; Nexer, M.; Delcaillau, B.; Regard, V.

    2013-07-01

    At the NW corner of the Pacific region, just south of the Kamchatsky Peninsula, the northern tip of the Pacific plate subduction and associated volcanic arc interacts with the western end of the Aleutian-Komandorsky dextral transform plate boundary and associated arc. Study of both Holocene and Pleistocene sequences of uplifted marine terraces and also of fluvial drainage patterns on the Kamchatsky Peninsula allows us to highlight active tectonics produced by complex plate interaction. Our results show that the central eastern coast of the peninsula is currently divided into four different zones consisting in uplifted blocks associated with various uplift rates in front of a fold-and-thrust zone to the west. Our main tectonic benchmark—the altitude of the shoreline correlated to the Last Interglacial Maximum (Marine Isotopic Stage 5e)—yields late Pleistocene uplift rates ranging from 0.2 to 2.74 mm/yr. One of the main active faults bounding the coastal blocks is dextral and is interpreted as a prolongation of an offshore fault of the Aleutian-Komandorsky dextral transform plate boundary. We suggest that structures on the Kamchatsky Peninsula accommodate a part of the transform motion, but that mainly, the arc-continent collision of the Aleutian arc against Kamchatka produces a "bulldozer" effect on the Kamchatsky Peninsula.

  6. FACE RECOGNITION FROM FRONT-VIEW FACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Lifang; Shen Lansun

    2003-01-01

    This letter presents a face normalization algorithm based on 2-D face model to recognize faces with variant postures from front-view face. A 2-D face mesh model can be extracted from faces with rotation to left or right and the corresponding front-view mesh model can be estimated according to the facial symmetry. Then based on the inner relationship between the two mesh models, the normalized front-view face is formed by gray level mapping. Finally, the face recognition will be finished based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Experiments show that better face recognition performance is achieved in this way.

  7. O, Sr and Nd isotopic constraints on Cenozoic granitoids of Northwestern Anatolia, Turkey: Enrichment by subduction zone fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel-Öztürk, Yeşim

    2016-05-01

    The oxygen and strontium isotope compositions of Cenozoic granitoids cropping out in the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone help constrain the petrological evolution of magmatism in northwest Anatolia. The magmatism was mostly widespread between late Eocene (∼37 Ma) and the middle Miocene (∼14-15 Ma), and is represented by volcanic and plutonic rocks of orogenic affinity, of which Ezine, Eğrigöz, Çataldağ and Kozak are the largest Tertiary granitic plutons exposed in northwest Anatolia. They vary from granite to granodiorite, and are subalkaline, belonging to the high-K calc-alkaline I-type granite series. All these characteristics, combined with major, trace element geochemical data as well as mineralogical and textural evidence, reveal that the Oligocene-Miocene granitoids of NW Anatolia are comparable with volcanic arc granites, formed in a transitional oceanic to continental collisional tectonic setting, from a hybrid source, having crustal and mantle components that underwent further interaction with the upper crust. These plutons have initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7072-0.7094, and εNd(t) values ranging from -3.48 to -1.20. These characteristics also indicate that a crustal component played an important role in the petrogenesis of NW Anatolian Oligocene-Miocene granitoids. The moderately evolved Ezine, Eğrigöz, Çataldağ and Kozak granitoids, have δ18O values that are consistent with those of normal I-type granites (6-10‰), but the δ18O relationships among minerals of samples collected from the intrusive contacts which are closest to mineralized zones, indicate a major influence of hydrothermal processes under subsolidus conditions. The oxygen isotope systematics of the samples from these plutons result from the activity of high-δ18O fluids (magmatic water), with major involvement of low-δ18O fluids (meteoric water) evident, near the edge zone of these plutons. This is most evident in δ18O quartz-feldspar pairs from these granitoids, which

  8. SPD very front end electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Scintillator Pad Detector (SPD) is part of the LHCb calorimetry system [D. Breton, The front-end electronics for LHCb calorimeters, Tenth International Conference on Calorimetry in Particle Physics, CALOR, Pasadena, 2002] that provides high-energy hadron, electron and photon candidates for the first level trigger. The SPD is designed to distinguish electrons from photons. It consists of a plastic scintillator layer, divided into about 6000 cells of different size to obtain better granularity near the beam [S. Amato, et al., LHCb technical design report, CERN/LHCC/2000-0036, 2000]. Charged particles will produce, and photons will not, ionization in the scintillator. This ionization generates a light pulse that is collected by a WaveLength Shifting (WLS) fiber that is coiled inside the scintillator cell. The light is transmitted through a clear fiber to the readout system that is placed at the periphery of the detector. Due to space constraints, and in order to reduce costs, these 6000 cells are divided in groups using a MAPMT [Z. Ajaltouni, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 504 (2003) 9] of 64 channels that provides information to the VFE readout electronics. The SPD signal has rather large statistical fluctuations because of the low number (20-30) of photoelectrons per MIP. Therefore the signal is integrated over the whole bunch crossing length of 25 ns in order to have the maximum value. Since in average about 85% of the SPD signal is within 25 ns, 15% of a sample is subtracted from the following one using an operational amplifier. The SPD VFE readout system that will be presented consists of the following components. A specific ASIC [D. Gascon, et al., Discriminator ASIC for the VFE SPD of the LHCb Calorimeter, LHCB Technical Note, LHCB 2004-xx] integrates the signal, makes the signal-tail subtraction, and compares the level obtained to a programmable threshold (to distinguish electrons from photons). A FPGA programmes the ASIC threshold and the value for

  9. Cenozoic tectono-geomorphological growth of the SW Chinese Tian Shan: insight from AFT and detrital zircon U-Pb data

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Yingying; Fu, Bihong; Jolivet, Marc; Zheng, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    As a unique example of the intracontinental mountain building, the Cenozoic deformation of the Tian Shan has been widely studied. The onset of Cenozoic exhumation of the SW Chinese Tian Shan was constrained at the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. However, the Cenozoic tectono-geomorphological growth process of the SW Chinese Tian Shan and adjacent piedmont basins remains a challenge. In this study, we carried out the geological mapping of satellite images and field investigations together with the...

  10. Constraining the vertical surface motions of the Hampshire Basin, south England During the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip; England, Richard; Zalasiewicz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The potential effect of rising sea level on the UK has received considerable attention in recent years. However, the ongoing long-term changes in surface topography of the UK driven by regional tectonics and the mechanisms responsible are not fully understood. It is thought that glacial loading/unloading is the primary influence. However, this is inconsistent with present-day vertical surface motions recorded from Continuous Global Positioning Stations (CGPS) across the UK. The lateral variations in the present day motions are too complex to be explained by glacial isostatic rebound. We are investigating the hypothesis that the vertical motions of SE England also reflect the long term tectonic history by backstripping the Cenozoic geological record. So far the Paleogene stratigraphic record of the Hampshire basin in southern England has been investigated and using a series of deep boreholes that reach the chalk basement, a 2-D backstripping method has been applied. Subsidence analysis of cliff sections and boreholes reveal the Hampshire Basin was tectonically subsiding at a steady rate from 56.5Ma and any major periods of uplift and denudation to the present day state must have occurred from the mid Oligocene onwards. At this time the northern and western regions of the UK were believed to be uplifting as evidenced by heavy mineral transport directionns and sediment drainage patterns. A rapid increase in tectonic subsidence from 42Ma recorded by the three Isle of Wight sections in close proximity to an existing Variscan fault, thought to reactivate as a thrust during the Cenozoic, suggests a compressional stress regime in this region. The stress pattern observed from the tectonic subsidence data and evidence from drainage patterns supports a model in which the UK was uplifting in the north and west while the south east was subsiding. As this pattern is similar to the present day vertical surface motions and pre-dates glaciation, we propose glacial unloading as a

  11. Variations in Cenozoic seawater uranium reconstructed from well preserved aragonitic fossil corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothmann, A. O.; Higgins, J. A.; Bender, M. L.; Stolarski, J.; Adkins, J. F.; McKeon, R. E.; Farley, K. A.; Wang, X.; Planavsky, N.

    2015-12-01

    U/Ca ratios were measured in a subset (n ≈ 30) of well preserved scleractinian fossil corals previously described by Gothmann et al. (2015) in order to investigate Cenozoic changes in seawater [U]. He/U dating studies and measurements of 234U/238U and δ238/235U provide constraints on fossil coral U preservation. He/U ages also demonstrate the ability of well preserved coral aragonite to retain most of its radiogenic He over million year timescales. We find that fossil coral U/Ca has increased by a factor of ~4 between the Early Cenozoic and today. This number is calculated from the change in seawater [Ca2+] implied by brine inclusions and other proxies, and the assumption that the U/Ca in shallow water corals equals the seawater ratio. The change cannot be attributed to a dependence of coral U uptake on seawater pH or [CO32-] (e.g., Inoue et al., 2011), which would lead to a decrease in U/Ca going forward in time. Instead, we suggest that seawater [U] has increased since the Early Cenozoic. Possible explanations for the inferred change include: (1) a small decrease in uranium uptake in suboxic and anoxic sediments over the Cenozoic, (2) a decrease in the rate of low-temperature hydrothermal alteration, and associated U uptake, over the Cenozoic, and (3) a decrease in U removal from seawater resulting from an increase in UO2-CO3 complexation, as originally suggested by Broecker (1971). References: Broecker, W. S. (1971) A Kinetic Model for the Chemical Composition of Sea Water. Quaternary Research, 1, 188-207. Gothmann, A.M., Stolarski, J., Adkins, J.F., Dennis, K.J., Schrag, D.P., Schoene, B., Bender, M.L. (2015) Fossil corals as an archive of secular variations in seawater chemistry. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 160, 188-208. Inoue, M., Suwa, R., Suzuki, A., Sakai, K., and Kawahata, H., (2011) Effects of seawater pH on growth and skeletal U/Ca ratios of Acropora digitifera coral polyps. Geophysical Research Letters 38, 12801-12804.

  12. ARC length control for plasma welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A control system to be used with a plasma arc welding apparatus is disclosed. The plasma arc welding apparatus includes a plasma arc power supply, a contactor, and an electrode assembly for moving the electrode relative to a work piece. The electrode assembly is raised or lowered by a drive motor. The present apparatus includes a plasma arc adapter connected across the power supply to measure the voltage across the plasma arc. The plasma arc adapter forms a dc output signal input to a differential amplifier. A second input is defined by an adjustable resistor connected to a dc voltage supply to permit operator control. The differential amplifier forms an output difference signal provided to an adder circuit. The adder circuit then connects with a power amplifier which forms the driving signal for the motor. In addition, the motor connects to a tachometor which forms a feedback signal delivered to the adder to provide damping, therby avoiding servo loop overshoot.

  13. Managing Controversies in the Fuzzy Front End

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, John K.; Gasparin, Marta

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates the controversies that emerge in the fuzzy front end (FFE) and how they are closed so the innovation process can move on. The fuzzy front has been characterized in the literature as a very critical phase, but controversies in the FFE have not been studied before. The...... processes demonstrates how the fuzzy front requires managers to deal with controversies that emerge from many different places and involve both human and non-human actors. Closing the controversies requires managers to take account of the situation, identify the problem that needs to be addressed, and...... analysis investigates the microprocesses around the controversies that emerge during the fuzzy front end of four products. Five different types of controversies are identified: profit, production, design, brand and customers/market. Each controversy represents a threat, but also an opportunity to search...

  14. Coarsening to chaos-stabilized fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Ka-Fai; Wittenberg, Ralf W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a model for pattern formation in the presence of Galilean symmetry proposed by Matthews and Cox [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.62.R1473 62, R1473 (2000)], which has the form of coupled generalized Burgers- and Ginzburg-Landau-type equations. With only the system size L as a parameter, we find distinct “small-L” and “large-L” regimes exhibiting clear differences in their dynamics and scaling behavior. The long-time statistically stationary state contains a single L-dependent front, stabilized globally by spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics confined away from the front. For sufficiently large domains, the transient dynamics include a state consisting of several viscous shocklike structures that coarsens gradually, before collapsing to a single front when one front absorbs the others.

  15. Nonperturbative light-front Hamiltonian methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    We examine the current state-of-the-art in nonperturbative calculations done with Hamiltonians constructed in light-front quantization of various field theories. The language of light-front quantization is introduced, and important (numerical) techniques, such as Pauli-Villars regularization, discrete light-cone quantization, basis light-front quantization, the light-front coupled-cluster method, the renormalization group procedure for effective particles, sector-dependent renormalization, and the Lanczos diagonalization method, are surveyed. Specific applications are discussed for quenched scalar Yukawa theory, ϕ4 theory, ordinary Yukawa theory, supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, quantum electrodynamics, and quantum chromodynamics. The content should serve as an introduction to these methods for anyone interested in doing such calculations and as a rallying point for those who wish to solve quantum chromodynamics in terms of wave functions rather than random samplings of Euclidean field configurations.

  16. Strings in plane-fronted gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Duval, C.; Horvath, Z.; Horvathy, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    Brinkmann's plane-fronted gravitational waves with parallel rays --~shortly pp-waves~-- are shown to provide, under suitable conditions, exact string vacua at all orders of the sigma-model perturbation expansion.

  17. Heat conduction fronts in planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soker, Noam

    1994-01-01

    We present arguments which suggest that many of the x-ray, some optical, and some UV observations of planetary nebulae, can be explained by the presence of heat conduction fronts. The heat flows from the hot bubble formed by the shocked fast wind to the cool shell and halo. Heat conduction fronts are likely to account for emission of x rays from plasma at lower temperature than the expected temperature of the hot bubble. In the presence of magnetic fields, only a small fraction of the fast wind luminosity emerges as radiation. Heat conduction fronts can naturally produce some unusual line flux ratios, which are observed in some planetary nebulae. Heat conduction fronts may heat the halo and cause some material at the inner surface of the shell to expand slower than the rest of the shell. In the presence of an asymmetrical magnetic field, this flow, the x-ray intensity, and the emission lines, may acquire asymmetrical structure as well.

  18. Nonperturbative light-front Hamiltonian methods

    CERN Document Server

    Hiller, J R

    2016-01-01

    We examine the current state-of-the-art in nonperturbative calculations done with Hamiltonians constructed in light-front quantization of various field theories. The language of light-front quantization is introduced, and important (numerical) techniques, such as Pauli--Villars regularization, discrete light-cone quantization, basis light-front quantization, the light-front coupled-cluster method, the renormalization group procedure for effective particles, sector-dependent renormalization, and the Lanczos diagonalization method, are surveyed. Specific applications are discussed for quenched scalar Yukawa theory, $\\phi^4$ theory, ordinary Yukawa theory, supersymmetric Yang--Mills theory, quantum electrodynamics, and quantum chromodynamics. The content should serve as an introduction to these methods for anyone interested in doing such calculations and as a rallying point for those who wish to solve quantum chromodynamics in terms of wave functions rather than random samplings of Euclidean field configurations...

  19. The temperature minimum at tidal fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Bowers

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mechanism to explain the observed formation of a surface temperature minimum at tidal fronts in shelf seas. Tidal fronts mark the boundary between water which is kept vertically mixed by fast tidal currents and water which stratifies in summer. The fronts are associated with strong horizontal surface gradients of several water properties, including temperature. In the early studies of tidal fronts, a minimum in surface temperature was occasionally observed between the cool surface waters on the mixed side of the front and the warm surface waters on the stratified side. It was suggested that this was caused by upwelling of deep water at the front. In this paper we describe an alternative and simpler explanation based on the local balance of heating and stirring. The net heat flux into the sea in spring and early summer is greater on the mixed side of the front than on the stratified side. This happens because the heat loss mechanism is dependent on sea surface temperature and stratified waters, having a higher surface temperature, lose more heat. The stratified water near the front therefore has lower heat content (and lower depth-mean temperature than the mixed water. If some of the stratified water becomes mixed, for example with increased tidal stirring at spring tides, a zone of minimum surface temperature will be formed at the front. A numerical model for the study of this mechanism shows that the temperature minimum at tidal fronts can be explained by the process described above. The minimum appears most clearly at spring tides, but can still be present in a weaker form at neap tides. A further prediction of the model is an increase of the horizontal temperature gradient at spring tides, which is in agreement with observations. An unexpected outcome of the modelling is the prediction of the formation of a marked sea surface temperature minimum, not yet observed, occurring in the autumn and located at the summer

  20. On the formation of auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new mechanism for auroral arc formation is presented. The characteristic linear shape of auroral arcs is determined by magnetically connected plasma clouds in the distant equatorial magnetosphere. These clouds originate as high speed plasma beams in the magnetotail and in the solar wind. It is found that the free energy for driving an auroral arc is provided by the difference of pressure between the cloud and the ambient plasma. (author)

  1. Programming ArcGIS with Python cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pimpler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Programming ArcGIS with Python Cookbook, Second Edition, is written for GIS professionals who wish to revolutionize their ArcGIS workflow with Python. Whether you are new to ArcGIS or a seasoned professional, you almost certainly spend time each day performing various geoprocessing tasks. This book will teach you how to use the Python programming language to automate these geoprocessing tasks and make you a more efficient and effective GIS professional.

  2. FASTER MUSE CSP ARC CONSISTENCY ALGORITHMS

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, Mary P.; White, Christopher M.; Helzerman, Randall A.; Hockema, Stephen A.

    1997-01-01

    MUSE CSP (Multiply SEgmented Constraint Satisfaction Problem) [5, 61 is an extension to the constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) which is especially useful for problems that segment into riultiple instances of CSP that share variables. In Belzerman and Harper [6], the concepts of MUSE node, arc, and path consistency were defined and algorithms for MUSE arc consistency, MUSE AC-1, and MUSE path consistency were developed. MUSE AC-1 is similar to the CSP arc consistency algorithm AC-4 [ l j ] ...

  3. Reaction-diffusion fronts under stochastic advection

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, A C; Sancho, J M

    1997-01-01

    We study front propagation in stirred media using a simplified modelization of the turbulent flow. Computer simulations reveal the existence of the two limiting propagation modes observed in recent experiments with liquid phase isothermal reactions. These two modes respectively correspond to a wrinkled although sharp propagating interface and to a broadened one. Specific laws relative to the enhancement of the front velocity in each regime are confirmed by our simulations.

  4. A_k singularities of wave fronts

    OpenAIRE

    Saji, Kentaro; UMEHARA, Masaaki; Yamada, Kotaro

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the recognition problem for A_k-type singularities on wave fronts. We give computable and simple criteria of these singularities, which will play a fundamental role in generalizing the authors' previous work "the geometry of fronts" for surfaces. The crucial point to prove our criteria for A_k-singularities is to introduce a suitable parametrization of the singularities called the "k-th KRSUY-coordinates". Using them, we can directly construct a versal unfolding for ...

  5. Ionization fronts in negative corona discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Arrayas, M; Trueba, J L; Arrayas, Manuel; Fontelos, Marco A.; Trueba, Jose L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we use a hydrodynamic minimal streamer model to study negative corona discharge. By reformulating the model in terms of a quantity called shielding factor, we deduce laws for the evolution in time of both the radius and the intensity of ionization fronts. We also compute the evolution of the front thickness under the conditions for which it diffuses due to the geometry of the problem and show its self-similar character.

  6. An Observation of an Oceanic Front

    OpenAIRE

    Knauss, John A.

    2011-01-01

    A detailed temperature section across an oceanic front in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific is described. The frontal zone was moving at about one knot from the colder water toward the warmer water. The temperature difference across the front was 5° F. In the temperature section it is possible to see the cold water overrunning the warm water and creating an unstable zone approximately 100 yards wide.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1957.tb01878.x

  7. K-Ar ages of Early Miocene arc-type volcanoes in northern New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the temporal and spatial development of the Early Miocene Northland Volcanic Arc is critical to interpreting the patterns of volcanic activity in northern New Zealand through the Late Cenozoic. The northwesterly trending arc is considered to have developed above a southwest-dipping subduction system. The distribution of its constituent eruptive centres is described in terms of an eastern belt that extends along the eastern side of Northland and a complementary broad western belt which includes subaerial and submarine volcanic edifices. Critical examination of all 216 K-Ar ages available, including 180 previously unpublished ages, and their assessment against tectonic, lithostratigraphic, seismic stratigraphic, and biostratigraphic constraints, leads us to deduce a detailed chronology of periods of activity for the various Early (and Middle) Miocene arc-type volcanic complexes and centres of northern New Zealand: Waipoua Shield Volcano Complex (19-18 Ma, Altonian); Kaipara Volcanic Complex (23-16 Ma, Waitakian-Altonian); Manukau Volcanic Complex (c. 23-15.5 Ma, Waitakian-Clifdenian); North Cape Volcanic Centre (23-18 Ma, Waitakian-Altonian); Whangaroa Volcanic Complex (22.5-17.5 Ma, Waitakian-Altonian); Taurikura Volcanic Complex (22-15.5 Ma, Otaian-Clifdenian); Parahaki Dacites (22.5-18 Ma, Waitakian-Altonian); Kuaotunu Volcanic Complex (18.5-11 Ma, Altonian-Waiauan). In general, volcanic activity does not show geographic migration with time, and the western (25-15.5 Ma) and eastern (23-11 Ma) belts appear to have developed concurrently. (author). 123 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  8. The Patagonian Orocline: New paleomagnetic data from the Andean magmatic arc in Tierra del Fuego, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, W. Dickson; Klepeis, Keith A.; Gose, Wulf A.; Dalziel, Ian W. D.

    1991-09-01

    The Hardy Formation is a 1300-m-thick succession of Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks interbedded with lava flows on Hoste Island at the southernmost tip of South America (55.5°S, 291.8°E). The strata are gently folded and metamorphosed to the prehnite-pumpellyite grade. A well-defined characteristic direction of magnetization, carried by magnetite, was readily identified in 95 samples from seven sites. At a given site, the directions group slightly better without structural correction. However, the means of the seven sites cluster better without tilt correction at the 99% significance level, implying that the magnetization postdates the folding event. It is most likely that the magnetization was acquired during the mid- to Late Cretaceous Andean orogeny that involved the folding and emplacement of the Patagonian Batholith. The fact that all samples are normally magnetized supports this age assignment. The pole position of 42.9°N, 156.6°E, α95=3.3° implies that the sampling area has rotated counterclockwise relative to cratonic South America by 90.1±11.9° with no significant flattening of inclination (F=1.9 ± 3.7°). Geologic considerations indicate that the rotation involved the entire Andean magmatic arc in Tierra Del Fuego. The results support interpretation of the Hardy Formation as part of the Andean magmatic arc deposited on the Pacific side of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Rocas Verdes marginal basin. Oroclinal bending of the arc in southernmost South America accompanied inversion of the marginal basin and the development of a Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic left-lateral transform system (South America-Antarctica) that later developed into the North Scotia Ridge.

  9. Effect of Gravity on Arc Shape in GTA Welding-for Low Electric Arc Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hidetoshi FUJII; Yosuke SUMI; Manabu TANAKA; Kiyoshi NOGI

    2003-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding was performed both in a microgravity environment and in a terrestrial environment,and the arc shapes in both environments were compared. A microgravity condition was obtained using the free fallsystem at the Japan Microgravi

  10. Diffuse and spot mode of cathode arc attachments in an atmospheric magnetically rotating argon arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model including the cathode, near-cathode region, and arc column was constructed. Specifically, a thermal perturbation layer at the arc fringe was calculated in order to couple sheath/presheath modelling with typical arc column modelling. Comparative investigation of two modes of attachment of a dc (100, 150, 200 A) atmospheric-pressure arc in argon to a thermionic cathode made of pure tungsten was conducted. Computational data revealed that there exists two modes of arc discharge: the spot mode, which has an obvious cathode surface temperature peak in the arc attachment centre; and the diffuse mode, which has a flat cathode surface temperature distribution and a larger arc attachment area. The modelling results of the arc attachment agree with previous experimental observations for the diffuse mode. A further 3D simulation is obviously needed to investigate the non-axisymmetrical features, especially for the spot mode. (paper)

  11. Major arcs for Goldbach's problem

    OpenAIRE

    Helfgott, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    The ternary Goldbach conjecture states that every odd number $n\\geq 7$ is the sum of three primes. The estimation of the Fourier series $\\sum_{p\\leq x} e(\\alpha p)$ and related sums has been central to the study of the problem since Hardy and Littlewood (1923). Here we show how to estimate such Fourier series for $\\alpha$ in the so-called major arcs, i.e., for $\\alpha$ close to a rational of small denominator. This is part of the author's proof of the ternary Goldbach conjecture. In contrast ...

  12. Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanner, Frank J.; Williamson, Rodney L.; Smith, Mark F.

    1994-12-13

    The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

  13. Electrode Evaporation Effects on Air Arc Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xingwen; CHEN Degui; LI Rui; WU Yi; NIU Chunping

    2008-01-01

    A numerical study of the effects of copper and silver vapours on the air arc behavior is performed. The commercial software FLUENT is adapted and modified to develop a two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) models of arc with the thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients, net emission coefficient for the radiation model of 99% ai-1% Cu, 99% air-1% Ag, and pure air, respectively. The simulation result demonstrates that vaporization of the electrode material may cool the arc center region and reduce the arc velocity. The effects of Ag vapour are stronger compared to those of Cu vapour.

  14. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  15. Performance tracking under ARCS contracts. Directive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The directive discusses the development of a non-resource intensive method for reporting performance based work allocation results under the ARCS (Alternative Remedial Contracting Strategy) contractors

  16. Generalized hyperfocused arcs in $PG(2,p)$

    OpenAIRE

    Blokhuis, A Aart; Marino, G.; Mazzocca, F.

    2013-01-01

    A {\\em generalized hyperfocused arc} $\\mathcal H $ in $PG(2,q)$ is an arc of size $k$ with the property that the $k(k-1)/2$ secants can be blocked by a set of $k-1$ points not belonging to the arc. We show that if $q$ is a prime and $\\mathcal H$ is a generalized hyperfocused arc of size $k$, then $k=1,2$ or 4. Interestingly, this problem is also related to the (strong) cylinder conjecture [Ball S.: The polynomial method in Galois geometries, in Current research topics in Galois geometry, Chap...

  17. Life on the front lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hern, W M

    1993-01-01

    honor those who advanced the cause of women's rights. They honored the physician who had to shout over hecklers to make his remarks heard. After a year of operation, the physician encountered differences with the Board of Directors of the clinic. Soon after that, he resigned and opened his own clinic with a bank loan of $7000. Within 4 years, his clinic had expanded, and he purchased its building. The harassment from antiabortion protesters continued, with broken windows, pickets, and, in February 1988, bullets fired through the front windows of the waiting room. This necessitated the installation of bullet-proof glass and a security system which cost $17,000. As of March 1, 1993, there had been 1285 acts of violence towards abortion clinics, which led to the destruction of more than 100. On March 10 of that year, a physician who performed abortions in Florida was gunned down by an anti-abortion protestor. People who provide abortions hope for legal protection and respect for their civil liberties, but they will continue to provide this service even if conditions do not improve. PMID:8274868

  18. Isotopic gradient along the new hebrides arc (Vanuatu, SW Pacific). Collision of the d'entrecasteaux zone and heterogeneity of mantle sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent volcanic activity of the New Hebrides arc (Vanuatu) has been influenced by the collision with the d'Entrecasteaux Zone, the composition of which remains uncertain. New trace elements and isotopic data from these lavas allow previous interpretations of compositional gradients along the arc to be qualified. The geochemical compositions of lavas display abrupt changes from calc-alkaline compositions straight in front of the collision zone, to arc-tholeiites on both sides. In contrast, isotopic compositions display a progressive variation related to less and less enriched sources away from the collision zone, evolving toward 'normal' MORB-type sources. Such a trend suggests that two types of contamination have occurred in front of the collision zone, a magmatic contamination due to the subduction of an older lithosphere (206Pb/204Pb trend) and contamination by an 'enriched-type' mantle component (Dupal feature). (authors)

  19. Micro-arcing and arc erosion minimization using a DC hybrid switching device

    OpenAIRE

    Swingler, J.; McBride, J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Hybrid switching devices utilize the advantages of both conventional electrical contacts and solid state electronics to minimize arcing during opening and closing operations. This can result in higher reliability and reduces the need for high cost specialist contact materials. The hybrid switch does not eliminate arcing completely, due to the inductive nature of circuits; micro-arcing is known to occur. An experimental dc hybrid switching device is introduced which minimizes arcing for 42 ...

  20. Interaction of a cold front with a sea-breeze front Numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodin, A.

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of a front which passed the coast between the North Sea and northern Germany and thereby experienced some modifications of its mesoscale characteristics. The event was observed during the field experiment FRONTEX'89. The two-dimensional non-hydrostatic simulations presented in this paper resemble some of the observed characteristics and yield a detailed description of the evolution of the surface front. Over the sea several narrow frontal rain bands develop in the boundary layer which becomes unstable due to the increasing sea surface temperature near the coast. The rain bands move forward relative to the front due to the cross frontal circulation which is enhanced by the release of latent heat in the ascending warm air and by the cooling of the cold air below by evaporating precipitation. Over the heated land surface a sea-breeze front develops ahead of the synoptic-scale cold front. The strong frontal gradients of the sea-breeze front mask the broader frontal zone of the cold front at the ground. The sea-breeze front triggers deep convection ahead of the cold front in the afternoon and takes over all characteristics of the synoptic-scale front in the evening. The simulations show the mechanisms that caused the observed evolution and modification of the synoptic-scale cold front. They emphasize the strong influence of the surface heat fluxes on the characteristics of fronts on the mesoscale. The most important feature of the numerical model, necessary for the proper representation of the frontal characteristics on the mesoscale, is its high resolution. The simulations are restricted by the difficulties of finding an initial state and appropriate boundary conditions so that the results fit the observations for a long time period and that spin-up problems are avoided.

  1. Magmatism and Epithermal Gold-Silver Deposits of the Southern Ancestral Cascade Arc, Western Nevada and Eastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, David A.; du Bray, Edward A.; Henry, Christopher D., (compiler); Vikre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    hornblende, biotite, and pyroxene phenocrysts. Seven epithermal gold-silver deposits with >1 Moz gold production, several large elemental sulfur deposits, and many large areas (10s to >100 km2) of hydrothermally altered rocks are present in the southern ancestral arc, especially south of latitude 40°N. These deposits are principally hosted by intermediate to silicic lava dome complexes; only a few deposits are associated with mafic- to intermediate-composition stratovolcanoes. Large deposits are most abundant and well developed in volcanic fields whose evolution spanned millions of years. Most deposits are hundreds of thousands to several million years younger than their host rocks, although some quartz-alunite deposits are essentially coeval with their host rocks. Variable composition and thickness of crustal basement is the primary control on mineralization along the length of the southern ancestral arc; most deposits and large alteration zones are localized in basement rock terranes with a strong continental affinity, either along the edge of the North American craton (Goldfield, Tonopah) or in an accreted terrane with continental affinities (Walker Lake terrane; Aurora, Bodie, Comstock Lode, Paradise Peak). Epithermal deposits and quartz-alunite alteration zones are scarce to absent in the northern part of the ancestral arc above an accreted island arc (Black Rock terrane) or unknown basement rocks (Modoc Plateau). Walker Lane structures and areas that underwent large magnitude extension during the Late Cenozoic (areas with Oligocene-early Miocene volcanic rocks dipping >40°) do not provide regional control on mineralization. Instead, these features may have served as local-scale conduits for mineralizing fluids.

  2. QCD and Light-Front Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /Costa Rica U.

    2011-01-10

    AdS/QCD, the correspondence between theories in a dilaton-modified five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space and confining field theories in physical space-time, provides a remarkable semiclassical model for hadron physics. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate {zeta} which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time and determines the off-shell dynamics of the bound state wavefunctions as a function of the invariant mass of the constituents. The hadron eigenstates generally have components with different orbital angular momentum; e.g., the proton eigenstate in AdS/QCD with massless quarks has L = 0 and L = 1 light-front Fock components with equal probability. Higher Fock states with extra quark-anti quark pairs also arise. The soft-wall model also predicts the form of the nonperturbative effective coupling and its {beta}-function. The AdS/QCD model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method to systematically include QCD interaction terms. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates. A method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level is outlined.

  3. Seismic stratigraphy of barrier-island arc retreat paths in Mississippi River delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penland, S.; Suter, J.R.

    1983-09-01

    The stratigraphic record preserved in the retreat path of Mississippi delta barrier-island arcs is controlled by erosional shoreface retreat processes, relative sea level rise, and sediment supply. More than 500 km (300 mi) of high resolution shallow seismic profiles correlated with vibracores from retreat paths fronting the Isles Dernieres and Chandeleur barrier-island arcs, show contrasting stratigraphic sequences preserved on the inner continental shelf (Mississippian delta). The Isles Dernieres barrier-island arc developed as a consequence of the Caillou Headland abandonment in the early Lafourche delta approximately 800 years B.P. On the lower shoreface, channels can be seen projecting seaward under the central part of the island arc; associated with it is a beach-ridge plain extending eastward. On the inner shelf, a sand sheet up to 60 cm (2 ft) thick marks the retreat path of the Isles Dernieres. The Chandeleur barrier-island arc was generated by abandonment of the St. Bernard delta complex 1,500 years ago. Scattered outcrops of shell reefs and lagoonal deposits occur on the lower shoreface. Beyond the shoreface, a 1 to 5 m (3 to 16 ft) thick sand sheet, caps tidal inlet scars up to 10 m (33 ft) thick, as well as the basal portions of migrating barrier-island sequences associated with earlier shoreline positions. Differences seen in the two stratigraphic sequences are a function of distributary size and depositional history of each barrier-island arc. The Isles Dernieres developed from a series of small sand-deficient distributaries in the Lafourche delta complex, whereas the Chandeleur Islands developed from large sand-rich distributaries of the St. Bernard delta complex.

  4. Three-dimensional seismic attenuation structure beneath Kyusyu, Japan: Implications for arc magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, H.; Nakajima, J.; Shiina, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Philippine Sea (PHS) plate is subducting beneath Kyusyu and a clear volcanic front is formed through the middle of the arc. However, there is a volcanic gap in the central part of Kyushu, between Aso and Kirishima volcanoes. Many studies have discussed arc magmatism in Kyushu in terms of 3D seismic velocity structure, but little is known on seismic attenuation structure. Seismic attenuation structure provides additional insights into subduction-zone dynamics, because higher-temperature environments or the existence of fluids may have different effects on seismic attenuation from on seismic velocity. Therefore the estimate of seismic attenuation is very important to understand arc magmatism and mantle dynamics in subduction zone. This study estimates seismic attenuation structure beneath Kyushu using a large number of high-quality waveform data. We applied the method of Nakajima et al. (2013, JGR) to waveform data derived from 3052 earthquakes that occurred from April 2003 to May 2014. We determined the corner frequency of earthquakes by the spectral ratio method of S-coda waves. Then, we determined a whole-path attenuation term (t*), site-amplification factors and spectrum level simultaneously by a joint inversion. Finally, the t* values (N= 62290) were inverted to obtain three-dimensional attenuation structure. The obtained results show several interesting features. First, the subducting PHS slab is imaged as a low attenuation zone. Second, high-attenuation zone exists in the fore-arc mantle. This high-attenuation zone corresponds spatially to a high Poisson's ratio area, suggesting that the mantle is serpentinized as a result of fluids released by dehydration in the subducting crust. Third, an inclined high-attenuation zone that is interpreted as a mantle upwelling flow is observed in the back-arc mantle. However, the inclined high-attenuation zone is less developed in the volcanic gap between Aso and Kirishima volcanoes. This observation suggests the

  5. Automated alignment of the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) target area at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Randy S.; Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Bliss, Erlan S.; Heebner, John E.; Leach, Richard R.; Orth, Charles D.; Rushford, Michael C.; Lowe-Webb, Roger R.; Wilhelmsen, Karl C.

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a petawatt-class, short-pulse laser system designed to provide x-ray backlighting of NIF targets. ARC uses four NIF beamlines to produce eight beamlets to create a sequence of eight images of an imploding fuel capsule using backlighting targets and diagnostic instrumentation. ARC employs a front end that produces two pulses, chirps the pulses out to 2 ns, and then injects the pulses into the two halves of each of four NIF beamlines. These pulses are amplified by NIF pre- and main amplifiers and transported to compressor vessels located in the NIF target area. The pulses are then compressed and pointed into the NIF target chamber where they impinge upon an array of backlighters. The interaction of the ARC laser pulses and the backlighting material produces bursts of high-energy x-rays that illuminate an imploding fuel capsule. The transmitted x-rays are imaged by diagnostic instrumentation to produce a sequence of radiograph images. A key component of the success of ARC is the automatic alignment system that accomplishes the precise alignment of the beamlets to avoid damaging equipment and to ensure that the beamlets are directed onto the tens-of-microns scale backlighters. In this paper, we describe the ARC automatic alignment system, with emphasis on control loops used to align the beampaths. We also provide a detailed discussion of the alignment image processing, because it plays a critical role in providing beam centering and pointing information for the control loops.

  6. The structure and singularities of arc complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penner, Robert

    A classical combinatorial fact is that the simplicial complex consisting of disjointly embedded chords in a convex planar polygon is a sphere. For any surface F with non-empty boundary, there is an analogous complex Arc(F) consisting of suitable equivalence classes of arcs in F connecting its bou...

  7. Risk assessment of metal vapor arcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Monika C. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing metal vapor arcing risk for a component is provided. The method comprises acquiring a current variable value associated with an operation of the component; comparing the current variable value with a threshold value for the variable; evaluating compared variable data to determine the metal vapor arcing risk in the component; and generating a risk assessment status for the component.

  8. Implementing RapidArc into clinical routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Esch, Ann; Huyskens, Dominique P; Behrens, Claus F;

    2011-01-01

    With the increased commercial availability of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) comes the need for comprehensive QA programs, covering the different aspects of this newly available technology. This manuscript proposes such a program for the RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto) I...

  9. Characterization of Micro-arc Oxidized Titanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The observation of the sparkling discharges during the micro-arc oxidation process in KOH aqueous electrolyte was achieved. The change of surface morphology was progressively observed and a plausible pore formation mechanism is proposed. Cell proliferation and ALP activity of micro-arc oxidized titanium was evaluated by human body derived osteoblasts and slightly better than those of blasted surface.

  10. Numerical Study on Arc Plasma Behavior During Arc Commutation Process in Direct Current Circuit Breaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the numerical investigation of arc plasma behavior during arc commutation process in a medium-voltage direct current circuit breaker (DCCB) contact system. A three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model of air arc plasma in the contact system of a DCCB is developed, based on commercial software FLUENT. Coupled electromagnetic and gas dynamic interactions are considered as usual, and a thin layer of nonlinear electrical resistance elements is used to represent the voltage drop of plasma sheath and the formation of new arc root. The distributions of pressure, temperature, gas flow and current density of arc plasma in arc region are calculated. The simulation results indicate that the pressure distribution related to the contact system has a strong effect on the arc commutation process, arising from the change of electrical conductivity in the arc root region. In DCCB contact system, the pressure of arc root region will be concentrated and higher if the space above the moving contact is enclosed, which is not good for arc root commutation. However, when the region is opened, the pressure distribution would be lower and more evenly, which is favorable for the arc root commutation.

  11. Arc flash hazard analysis and mitigation

    CERN Document Server

    Das, J C

    2012-01-01

    "All the aspects of arc flash hazard calculations and their mitigation have been covered. Knowledge of electrical power systems up to undergraduate level is assumed. The calculations of short-circuits, protective relaying and varied electrical system configurations in industrial power systems are addressed. Protection systems address differential relays, arc flash sensing relays, protective relaying coordination, current transformer operation and saturation and applications to major electrical equipments from the arc flash considerations. Current technologies and strategies for arc flash mitigation have been covered. A new algorithm for the calculation of arc flash hazard accounting for the decaying nature of the short-circuit currents is included. There are many practical examples and study cases. Review questions and references follow each chapter"--

  12. Sensor Control of Robot Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sias, F. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The potential for using computer vision as sensory feedback for robot gas-tungsten arc welding is investigated. The basic parameters that must be controlled while directing the movement of an arc welding torch are defined. The actions of a human welder are examined to aid in determining the sensory information that would permit a robot to make reproducible high strength welds. Special constraints imposed by both robot hardware and software are considered. Several sensory modalities that would potentially improve weld quality are examined. Special emphasis is directed to the use of computer vision for controlling gas-tungsten arc welding. Vendors of available automated seam tracking arc welding systems and of computer vision systems are surveyed. An assessment is made of the state of the art and the problems that must be solved in order to apply computer vision to robot controlled arc welding on the Space Shuttle Main Engine.

  13. Cenozoic stratigraphy and geologic history of the Tucson Basin, Pima County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    This report was prepared as part of a geohydrologic study of the Tucson basin conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Tucson. Geologic data from more than 500 water supply and test wells were analyzed to define characteristics of the basin sediments that may affect the potential for land subsidence induced by groundwater withdrawal. The Tucson basin is a structural depression within the Basin and Range physiographic province. The basin is 1,000 sq mi in units area and trends north to northwest. Three Cenozoic stratigraphic unit--the Pantano Formation of Oligocene age, the Tinaja beds (informal usage) of Miocene and Pliocene age, and the Fort Lowell Formation of Pleistocene age--fill the basin. The Tinaja beds include lower, middle, and upper unconformable units. A thin veneer of stream alluvium of late Quaternary age overlies the Fort Lowell Formation. The Pantano Formation and the lower Tinaja beds accumulated during a time of widespread continental sedimentation, volcanism, plutonism, uplift, and complex faulting and tilting of rock units that began during the Oligocene and continued until the middle Miocene. Overlying sediments of the middle and upper Tinaja beds were deposited in response to two subsequent episodes of post-12-million-year block faulting, the latter of which was accompanied by renewed uplift. The Fort Lowell Formation accumulated during the Quaternary development of modern through-flowing the maturation of the drainage. The composite Cenozoic stratigraphic section of the Tucson basin is at least 20,000 ft thick. The steeply tilted to flat-lying section is composed of indurated to unconsolidated clastic sediments, evaporites, and volcanic rocks that are lithologically and structurally complex. The lithology and structures of the section was greatly affected by the uplift and exhumation of adjacent metamorphic core-complex rocks. Similar Cenozoic geologic relations have been identified in other parts of southern

  14. Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, W.A.; Bacon, C.R.; Dalrymple, G.B.

    1980-05-10

    The Coso Range lies at the west edge of the Great Basin, adjacent to the southern part of the Sierra Nevada. A basement complex of pre-Cenozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks is partly buried by approx.35 km/sup 3/ of late Cenozoic volcanic rocks that were erupted during two periods, as defined by K-Ar dating: (1) 4.0--2.5 m.y., approx.31 km/sup 3/ of basalt, rhyodacite, dacite, andesite, and rhyolite, in descending order of abundance, and (2) < or =1.1 m.y., nearly equal amounts of basalt and rhyolite, most of the rhyolite being < or =0.3 m.y. old. Vents for the volcanic rocks of the younger period are localized on and near a horst of basement rocks within a concavity defined by the distribution of vents of the older period. The alignment of many vents and the presence of a considerable number of roughly north-trending normal faults of late Cenozoic age reflect basin and range tectonics dominated by roughly east-west lithospheric extension. Fumaroles, intermittently active thermal springs, and associated altered rocks occur within and immediately east of the central part of the field of Quaternary rhyolite, in an area characterized by various geophysical anomalies that are evidently related to an active hot-water geothermal system. This system apparently is heated by a reservoir of silicic magma at > or =8-km depth, itself produced and sustained through partial melting of crustal rocks by thermal energy contained in mantle-derived basaltic magma that intrudes the crust in repsonse to lithospheric extension.

  15. Mechanisms of Cenozoic deformation in the Bohai Basin, Northeast China: Physical modelling and discussions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The Bohai Basin is a Cenozoic petroliferous extensional basin in China and has apparent geometrical and kinematic similarities with the other Meso-Cenozoic extensional basins located along the eastern margin of Eurasian Plate. However, the deformation mechanisms of the basin are still in dispute. Physcial modelling referring to the Huanghua Depression, located in the central part of the Bohai Basin was conducted employing four sets of planar sandbox experimental models with different extension directions. Only experimental results of the model with N-S extension show good structural similarity with the depression. The results also indicate that complex variations of fault strike in a rift basin are not necessarily the results of complex kinematic mechanisms or polyphase deformation. Based on comparison of experimental results with the actual structures and the good structural similarity between Huanghua Depression and the whole Bohai Basin, it is concluded that the Bohai Basin was formed by the N-S extension. The strike slip deformation along the NNE-trending border faults of the basin resulted from the N-S extension and played the role of lateral transformation for the N-S extension. In addition, according to the apparent geometrical and kinematic similarities among the Bohai Basin and other Meso-Cenozoic extensional basins located along the eastern margin of the Eurasian Plate, it is proposed that: (1) this "N-S extension" model provides a better kinematic interpretation for the formation of Bohai Basin and the other adjacent basins located along the eastern margin of the Eurasian Plate; and (2) the N-S extension was probably the effect of the "slab window" formed by the subduction of the nearly E-W trending oceanic ridge between the Kula and Pacific Plates. The "slab window" effect can also provide reasonable explanations for the phenomena that initial rifting ages of basins become progressively younger westwards along the eastern margin of the Eurasian Plate

  16. Late Cenozoic fire enhancement response to aridification in mid-latitude Asia: Evidence from microcharcoal records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yunfa; Fang, Xiaomin; Song, Chunhui; Yan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Ping; Meng, Qingquan; Li, Fang; Wu, Fuli; Yang, Shengli; Kang, Shuyuan; Wang, Yuanping

    2016-05-01

    Fire provides an important indicator of paleoclimatic change. However, little information relating to late Cenozoic fire history has been gathered in mid-latitude Asia (including Inner Asia and East Asia), a key region for understanding the development of the arid-monsoon climate system as well as the driving forces behind it. Here we first report the records of microcharcoal concentrations (MC) covering the Holocene (10-0 ka) and late Pleistocene (0.8-0 Ma), which we use to analyze the fire activity patterns at an orbital time scale; then we compile the late Cenozoic MC record to investigate the long-term fire history by analyzing four cores from the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) area, East Asia (representing 8-0 Ma) and three sites in Inner Asia (representing 18-2 Ma). The results show that the (i) MC remained higher during the relatively dry late Holocene/glacial stages than that during the humid middle Holocene/interglacial stages at individual sites; (ii) MC increased with time in both Inner Asia and East Asia after 18 and 8 Ma, respectively; and (iii) MC always remained higher in the dry Inner Asia than in the contemporaneous wet East Asia. All these characteristics imply that late Cenozoic fire occurrence in mid-latitude Asia experienced a gradual increasing trend along with the global temperature/ice volume change, and indicates a continuous aridification trend across mid-latitude Asia. The global cooling, rather than the Tibetan Plateau uplift, might have played a key role in this observed trend.

  17. Optimization of a DC Vacuum Arc to Obtain Anatase Phase TiO2 Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the characterization of TiO2 coatings obtained with a dc cathodic arc is presented. The arc was run with a current of 100 A. Glass samples placed in front of the cathode on the chamber axis were exposed to the discharge during 5 min. The samples were mounted on a heater that allows heating the sample up to 400 deg. C. The gas flow and the sample temperature were varied in order to find the optimum conditions for growing TiO2 in anatase phase. The coatings were analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results obtained by varying the gas flow in a range of 30-40 sccm and the sample temperature from 200 to 400 deg. C are presented

  18. Discovery of Enclaves from Cenozoic Pulu Volcanic Rocks in West Kunlun Mountains and Its Geological Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present the occurrence and mineral components of the enclaves firstly discovered in the Cenozoic Pulu volcanic rocks in west Kunlun Mountains, and propose that the enclave is accumulated by fractional crystallization within high-level magma chamber. In addition, the chemical compositions of its primary magma are calculated. The calculated compositions are similar to those of the Kangxiwa volcanic rocks that belong to the same volcanic belt in the Pulu volcanic region, suggesting their origin from the same source region. However, the temperatures and oxygen fugacity of magmas at high-level magma chamber decreased along with fractional crystallization.

  19. Greater India Basin Hypothesis and A Two-Stage Cenozoic Collision Between India and Asia

    OpenAIRE

    D. J. J. van Hinsbergen; Lippert, P.C.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; McQuarrie, N.; Doubrovine, P. V.; Spakman, W.; T. H. Torsvik

    2013-01-01

    Cenozoic convergence between the Indian and Asian plates produced the archetypical continental collision zone comprising the Himalaya mountain belt and the Tibetan Plateau. How and where India–Asia convergence was accommodated after collision at or before 52 Ma remains a long-standing controversy. Since 52 Ma, the two plates have converged up to 3,600 ± 35 km, yet the upper crustal shortening documented from the geological record of Asia and the Himalaya is up to approximately 2,350-km less. ...

  20. Signatures of downgoing plate-buoyancy driven subduction in Cenozoic plate motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, S.; Capitanio, F. A.; Morra, G.; Seton, M.; Giardini, D.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of plate tectonics are strongly related to those of subduction. To obtain a better understanding of the driving forces of subduction, we compare relations between Cenozoic subduction motions at major trenches with the trends expected for the simplest form of subduction. i.e., free subduction, driven solely by the buoyancy of the downgoing plate. In models with an Earth-like plate stiffness (corresponding to a plate-mantle viscosity contrast of 2-3 orders of magnitude), free plates subduct by a combination of downgoing plate motion and trench retreat, while the slab is draped and folded on top of the upper-lower mantle viscosity transition. In these models, the slabs sink according to their Stokes' velocities. Observed downgoing-plate motion-plate-age trends are compatible with >80% of the Cenozoic slabs sinking according to their upper-mantle Stokes' velocity, i.e., subducting-plate motion is largely driven by upper-mantle slab pull. Only in a few cases, do young plates move at velocities that require a higher driving force (possibly supplied by lower-mantle-slab induced flow). About 80% of the Cenozoic trenches retreat, with retreat accounting for about 10% of the total convergence. The few advancing trench sections are likely affected by regional factors. The low trench motions are likely encouraged by low asthenospheric drag (equivalent to that for effective asthenospheric viscosity 2-3 orders below the upper-mantle average), and low lithospheric strength (effective bending viscosity ˜2 orders of magnitude above the upper-mantle average). Total Cenozoic trench motions are often very oblique to the direction of downgoing-plate motion (mean angle of 73°). This indicates that other forces than slab buoyancy exert the main control on upper-plate/trench motion. However, the component of trench retreat in the direction of downgoing plate motion (≈ slab pull) correlates with downgoing-plate motion, and this component of retreat generally does not

  1. Review of the upper Cenozoic stratigraphy overlying the Columbia River Basalt Group in western Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a synthesis of information currently available on the rocks that stratigraphically overlie the Columbia River Basalt Group in Idaho. The primary objective is to furnish a brief but comprehensive review of the literature available on upper Cenozoic rocks in western Idaho and to discuss their general stratigraphic relationships. This study also reviews the derivation of the present stratigraphy and notes weaknesses in our present understanding of the geology and the stratigraphy. This report was prepared in support of a study to evaluate the feasibility of nuclear waste storage in the Columbia River Basalt Group of the Pasco Basin, Washington

  2. Long-term Stability of Global Erosion Rates and Weathering Fluxes during late Cenozoic Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Willenbring, J.K.; Friedhelm von Blanckenburg

    2009-01-01

    Over geologic timescales, removal of atmospheric CO2 by weathering of silicate rocks balances CO2 input from the Earth´s interior. The coincidence of global cooling and the rise of mountain belts during the late Cenozoic has led geologists to suggest feedbacks between these two events. A centerpiece of t5his hypothesis was partially founded on observations of a young (0-5 My) 4-fold increase in global sedimentation rates, which seemed like a clear proxy for increased denudation and uplift of ...

  3. MESOZOIC-CENOZOIC INVERSION OFTHE TURPAN-HAMI BASIN, NORTHWEST CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaoDaiyong; QianGuangmo; ZhangPengfei; MeiMeitang; JinKuili; TangYuegang

    1996-01-01

    The Turpan-Hami basin, rich in coal and petroleum, is a superimposedbasin of three types basins in different tectonic environments. This coal, oil and gasbasin has undergone a complex tectonic-sedimentary evolution, in which two important stages were the negative inversion from a foredeep to a extensional basin duringEarly Mesozoic and the positive inversion to a thrust foreland basin in Late MesozoicEarly Cenozoic. The early normal faults residues are recognized with the addition oftectonic-sedimentary analysis to confirm the basin extension during Jurassic time andits tectonic inversion subsequently.

  4. Wrench-Slip Reversals and Structural Inversions: Cenozoic Slide-Rule Tectonics in Sundaland

    OpenAIRE

    Tjia, H.D.

    2014-01-01

    DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.174Most of continental Southeast Asia, that is, Sundaland and Indosinia, achieved a relative tectonic stability by the beginning of the Cenozoic. Since then a strong tectonic activity in Sundaland has been restricted to existing regional fault zones and to regional slow, vertical crustal movements elsewhere that produced small to very large sedimentary basins. On the other hand, regional deformation of Indosinia as a consequence of ductile shearing has continued into t...

  5. New Eocene damselflies and first Cenozoic damsel-dragonfly of the isophlebiopteran lineage (Insecta: Odonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste, Romain; Nel, André

    2015-01-01

    The study of a new specimen of Petrolestes hendersoni from the Eocene Green Formation allows a more precise description of the enigmatic damselfly and the diagnosis of the Petrolestini. Petrolestes messelensis sp. nov. is described from the Eocene Messel Formation in Germany, extending the distribution of the Petrolestini to the European Eocene. The new damsel-dragonfly family Pseudostenolestidae is described for the new genus and species Pseudostenolestes bechlyi, from the Eocene Messel Formation. It is the first Cenozoic representative of the Mesozoic clade Isophlebioptera. PMID:26624314

  6. Role of arc mode in laser-metal active gas arc hybrid welding of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pulsed arc is more effective to improve the stability of laser-arc hybrid welding. • LCHW has the highest fraction of acicular ferrite and high-angle grain boundaries. • Grain refinement depends on effective current of the arc. • LSHW has the most apparent vestige of texture components. • The microstructure and microtexture formation mechanisms were summarized. - Abstract: Arc mode plays an important role in joint characterizations of arc welding, but it has been seldom considered in laser-arc hybrid welding. This paper investigated the role of arc mode on laser-metal active gas (MAG) arc hybrid welding of mild steel. Three arc modes were employed, which were cold metal transfer (CMT), pulsed spray arc and standard short circuiting arc. Microtexture of the joints were observed and measured via electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) system to reveal the effect of arc mode on microstructure. Mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated by tensile and Charpy V-notch impact tests. It was found that both the stability and mechanical properties of laser-CMT hybrid welding (LCHW) is the best, while those of laser-standard short circuiting arc welding (LSHW) is the worst. OM and EBSD results showed that the fraction of acicular ferrite and high-angle grain boundaries in fusion zone decreases gradually in the sequence of LCHW, laser-pulsed spray arc welding and LSHW, while the mean grain size increases gradually. Finally, the microstructure formation mechanisms and the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties were summarized by the loss of alloying element and the stirring effect in molten pool

  7. INTERPOLATION WITH RESTRICTED ARC LENGTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petar Petrov

    2003-01-01

    For given data (ti,yi), I= 0,1,…,n,0 = t0 <t1 <…<tn = 1we study constrained interpolation problem of Favard type inf{‖f"‖∞|f∈W2∞[0,1],f(ti)=yi,i=0,…,n,l(f;[0,1])≤l0}, wherel(f";[0,1])=∫1 0 / 1+f'2(x)dx is the arc length off in [0,1]. We prove the existence of a solution f* of the above problem, that is a quadratic spline with a second derivative f"* , which coincides with one of the constants - ‖f"*‖∞,0,‖f"*‖∞ between every two consecutive knots. Thus, we extend a result ofKarlin concerning Favard problem, to the case of restricted length interpolation.

  8. Computer simulation to arc spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁志芳; 李午申; 王迎娜

    2004-01-01

    The arc spraying process is divided into two stages: the first stage is atomization-spraying stream (ASS) and the second one is spraying deposition (SD). Then study status is described of both stages' physical model and corresponding controlling-equation. Based on the analysis of study status, the conclusion as follows is got. The heat and mass transfer models with two or three dimensions in ASS stage should be established to far deeply analyses the dynamical and thermal behavior of the overheat droplet. The statistics law of overheated droplets should be further studied by connecting simulation with experiments. More proper validation experiments should be designed for flattening simulation to modify the models in SD stage.

  9. Gauge Theories on the Light-Front

    CERN Document Server

    Brodsky, S J

    2004-01-01

    The light-front quantization of gauge theories in light-cone gauge provides a frame-independent wavefunction representation of relativistic bound states, simple forms for current matrix elements, explicit unitary, and a trivial vacuum. The light-front Hamiltonian form of QCD provides an alternative to lattice gauge theory for the computation of nonperturbative quantities such as the hadronic spectrum and the corresponding eigenfunctions. In the case of the electroweak theory, spontaneous symmetry breaking is represented by the appearance of zero modes of the Higgs field. Light-front quantization then leads to an elegant ghost-free theory of massive gauge particles, automatically incorporating the Lorentz and 't Hooft conditions, as well as the Goldstone boson equivalence theorem.

  10. Interpolating between instant and light front dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We 'instant' and 'light front' forms of relativistic dynamics postulated by Dirac refer to physical conditions on flat spacelike surfaces in the Minkowski space. We consider another flat surface in the Minkowski space that upon parametric rotation interpolates between 'instant' and 'light front' surfaces. A projection of the covariant perturbation theory on the new surface is then considered. One limit of the theory reproducesd the usual instant dynamics, whereas a different limit gives a light front dynamics. Neither infinite momentum frame limit nor infinite momenta are involved. Although the interpolating surface is the 'instant' surface in the moving system of reference, we argue why our procedure should not be associated with a Lorentz transformation. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of the clinical usefulness of modulated Arc treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Yeon Sil; Choi, Byung Ock; Nam, Sang Hee; Park, Hyeong Wook; Kim, Shin Wook; Shin, Hun Joo; Lee, Jae Choon; Kim, Ji Na; PARK, SUNG KWANG; Kim, Jin Young; Kang, Young-Nam

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of modulated arc (mARC) treatment techniques. The mARC treatment plans of the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were performed in order to verify the clinical usefulness of mARC. A pre study was conducted to find the most competent plan condition of mARC treatment and the usefulness of mARC treatment plan was evaluated by comparing it with the other Arc treatment plans such as Tomotherapy and RapidArc. In the case of m...

  12. Evolución tectónica, paleogeográfica y metalogénica durante el Cenozoico en los Andes de Chile norte y central e implicaciones para las regiones adyacentes de Bolivia y Argentina Tectonic, paleogeographic, and metallogenic evolution during the Cenozoic in the Andes of Central and Northern Chile and implication for the adjacent regions of Bolivia and Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Charrier

    2009-10-01

    southern Peru to central Chile and formed the boundary between two paleogeographical domains with dissimilar geological evolutions during the rest of the Cenozoic. The western domain was characterized by erosion and sedimentation processes. The eastern domain also included significant erosional episodes, but was characterized by different evolutions north and south of ~27°S. Northward of this latitude, within the Altiplano-Puna realm, the magmatic arc remained in a fixed position, coinciding with the current active arc, and was bordered by a back-arc foreland basin; whereas southward of ~27°S a succession of magmatic arcs developed with a prominent eastward migration. The Late Eocene to Late Oligocene- Early Miocene was characterized by the development of an extensive intra-arc extensional basin, the Abanico Basin. A succession of volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks, with minor sedimentary intercalations, up to 3,000 m thick were deposited within this basin. At about the boundary between the Oligocene and the Miocene a compressive tectonism affected the whole orogen rejuvenating the core of the Incaic Cordillera and resulted in the tectonic inversion of the Abanico Basin; leading to the syntectonic sedimentation on both sides of the new elevated terrain. The beginning of this tectonism is coincident with the Pehuenche orogeny, but the compression extended until the Early Pliocene. During the Early to Middle Miocene the deformation extended to the east with the development of foreland fold and thrust belts and basins. Within the western domain in northern Chile, area of the current Central Depression and Precordillera, the accumulation of thick sedimentary deposits from the western slope of the Incaic Cordillera originated the Tarapacá and Atacama pediments; whereas an extensive peneplanation developed in central Chile. In Late Miocene the prolonged development of the east-verging fold and thrust belts and the generation of overthrusts deep under the Cordillera, which

  13. Propagation of back-arc extension into the arc lithosphere in the southern New Hebrides volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriat, M.; Collot, J.; Danyushevsky, L.; Fabre, M.; Meffre, S.; Falloon, T.; Rouillard, P.; Pelletier, B.; Roach, M.; Fournier, M.

    2015-09-01

    New geophysical data acquired during three expeditions of the R/V Southern Surveyor in the southern part of the North Fiji Basin allow us to characterize the deformation of the upper plate at the southern termination of the New Hebrides subduction zone, where it bends eastward along the Hunter Ridge. Unlike the northern end of the Tonga subduction zone, on the other side of the North Fiji Basin, the 90° bend does not correspond to the transition from a subduction zone to a transform fault, but it is due to the progressive retreat of the New Hebrides trench. The subduction trench retreat is accommodated in the upper plate by the migration toward the southwest of the New Hebrides arc and toward the south of the Hunter Ridge, so that the direction of convergence remains everywhere orthogonal to the trench. In the back-arc domain, the active deformation is characterized by propagation of the back-arc spreading ridge into the Hunter volcanic arc. The N-S spreading axis propagates southward and penetrates in the arc, where it connects to a sinistral strike-slip zone via an oblique rift. The collision of the Loyalty Ridge with the New Hebrides arc, less than two million years ago, likely initiated this deformation pattern and the fragmentation of the upper plate. In this particular geodynamic setting, with an oceanic lithosphere subducting beneath a highly sheared volcanic arc, a wide range of primitive subduction-related magmas has been produced including adakites, island arc tholeiites, back-arc basin basalts, and medium-K subduction-related lavas.

  14. Pulse front adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The accurate focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important in multiphoton microscopy. Using adaptive optics to manipulate the incident ultrafast beam in either the spectral or spatial domain can introduce significant benefits when imaging. Here we introduce pulse front adaptive optics: manipulating an ultrashort pulse in both the spatial and temporal domains. A deformable mirror and a spatial light modulator are operated in concert to modify contours of constant intensity in space and time within an ultrashort pulse. Through adaptive control of the pulse front, we demonstrate an enhancement in the measured fluorescence from a two photon microscope.

  15. Universality Class of Fluctuating Pulled Fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has recently been proposed that fluctuating 'pulled' fronts propagating into an unstable state should not be in the standard Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class for rough interface growth. We introduce an effective field equation for this class of problems, and show on the basis of it that noisy pulled fronts in d+1 bulk dimensions should be in the universality class of the ((d+1)+1) D KPZ equation rather than of the (d+1)D KPZ equation. Our scenario ties together a number of heretofore unexplained observations in the literature, and is supported by previous numerical results

  16. RF front-end world class designs

    CERN Document Server

    Love, Janine

    2009-01-01

    All the design and development inspiration and direction a harware engineer needs in one blockbuster book! Janine Love site editor for RF Design Line,columnist, and author has selected the very best RF design material from the Newnes portfolio and has compiled it into this volume. The result is a book covering the gamut of RF front end design from antenna and filter design fundamentals to optimized layout techniques with a strong pragmatic emphasis. In addition to specific design techniques and practices, this book also discusses various approaches to solving RF front end design problems and h

  17. Pole solutions for flame front propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Kupervasser, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with solving mathematically the unsteady flame propagation equations. New original mathematical methods for solving complex non-linear equations and investigating their properties are presented. Pole solutions for flame front propagation are developed. Premixed flames and filtration combustion have remarkable properties: the complex nonlinear integro-differential equations for these problems have exact analytical solutions described by the motion of poles in a complex plane. Instead of complex equations, a finite set of ordinary differential equations is applied. These solutions help to investigate analytically and numerically properties of the flame front propagation equations.

  18. Light-front nuclear shell-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I examine the effects of nuclear structure on high-energy, high-momentum transfer processes, specifically the EMC effect. For pedagogical reasons, a fictitious but simple two-body system consisting of two equal-mass particles interacting in a harmonic oscillator potential has been chosen. For this toy nucleus, I utilize a widely-used link between instant-form and light-front dynamics, formulating nuclear structure and deep-inelastic scattering consistently in the laboratory system. Binding effects are compared within conventional instant-form and light-front dynamical frameworks, with appreciable differences being found in the two cases. 20 refs

  19. Pulse front control with adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important for processes including microscopy, laser fabrication and fundamental science. Adaptive optic elements, such as liquid crystal spatial light modulators or membrane deformable mirrors, are routinely used for the correction of aberrations in these systems, leading to improved resolution and efficiency. Here, we demonstrate that adaptive elements used with ultrashort pulses should not be considered simply in terms of wavefront modification, but that changes to the incident pulse front can also occur. We experimentally show how adaptive elements may be used to engineer pulse fronts with spatial resolution.

  20. A note on the front spinning construction

    OpenAIRE

    Golovko, R.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a notion of front S^m-spinning for Legendrian submanifolds of R^{2n+1}. It generalizes the notion of front S^1-spinning which was invented by Ekholm, Etnyre and Sullivan. We use it to prove that there are infinitely many pairs of exact Lagrangian cobordant and not pairwise Legendrian isotopic Legendrian S^1 x S^{i_1} x ... x S^{i_k} in the standard contact Euclidean space which have the same classical invariants if one of i_j's is odd.

  1. K—Ar Geochronology and Evolution of Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks in Eastrn China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧芬; 杨学昌; 等

    1989-01-01

    Cenozoic volcanic rocks widespread in eastern China constitute an important part of the circum-Pacific volcanic belt.This paper presents more than 150K-Ar dates and a great deal of petrochemical analysis data from the Cenozoic volcanic rocks distributed in Tengchong,China's southeast coast,Shandong,Hebei,Nei Monggol and Northeast China.An integrated study shows that ubiquitous but uneven volcanic activities prevailed from the Eogene to the Holocene,characterized as being multi-eqisodic and multicycled.For example,in the Paleocene(67-58Ma),Eocene(57-37.5Ma),Miocene(22-18,16-19Ma),Pliocene(8-3Ma),and Early Pleistocene-Middle Pleistocene(1.2-0.5Ma) there were upsurges of volcanism,while in the Oligocene there was a repose period.In space,the older Eogene volcanic rocks are distributed within the region or in the central part of the NE-NNE-striking fault depression,while the younger Neogene and Quaternary volcanic rocks are distributed in the eastern and western parts.Petrologically,they belong essentially to tholeiite-series and alkali-series basalts,with alkalinity in the rocks increasing from old to youg.The above regularities are controlled by both global plate movement and regional inherent tectonic pattern.

  2. Meso-Cenozoic evolution of the Tuareg Shield (Algeria, Sahara): insights from new thermochronological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, Sylvain; Missenard, Yves; Gautheron, Cécile; Barbarand, Jocelyn; Zeyen, Hermann; Pinna, Rosella; Liégeois, Jean-Paul; Bonin, Bernard; Ouabadi, Aziouz; El-Messaoud Derder, Mohammed; Frizon de Lamotte, Dominique; Kettouche, Djouher

    2013-04-01

    In North Africa, Meso-Cenozoic large scale topographic swells, such as Hoggar, Tibesti or Darfur domes, are superimposed to a Paleozoic arch and basin morphology which characterizes this region. Although these topographic highs are associated to Cenozoic intraplate volcanism, their development remains poorly constrained, both from temporal and spatial points of view. This study is focused on the Tuareg Shield bulge, a topographic high where Precambrian rocks, exposed over 500000 km², can reach 2400 m above sea level (Atakor district, Hoggar, South Algeria). While presumed Cretaceous sedimentary remnants, resting unconformably over the basement, suggest a possible stage of weak topography during the Mesozoic, current high topography is emphasized by time-temperature history were performed. As previously deduced from apatite (U-Th)/He analyzes, these modelings show that samples underwent a heating to at least 80°C before their Late Eocene exhumation. Moreover, they also indicate that samples underwent another cooling stage during Lower Cretaceous, prior to Upper Cretaceous/Paleogene heating. We interpret these results as an evidence of a large-scale subsidence stage after the Cretaceous and until the Eocene, which allowed the deposition of a 1.5 to 3 km thick sedimentary cover and a heating at ~80°C of the currently outcropping basement. During the Eocene, the establishment of a thermal anomaly beneath the Tuareg Shield lithosphere resulted in erosion of the major part of this cover and, since 35 Ma, the development of intraplate volcanism.

  3. On tectonic movement in the South China Sea during the Cenozoic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Changsong; CHU Fengyou; GAO Jinyao; TAN Yonghua

    2009-01-01

    The tectonic movement taking place at the end of Cretaceous and the beginning of Cenozoic had opened the Ce-nozoic phase of polycyclic tectonic movements, then the whole crust of the South China Sea had been mainly subjected to the regional stress field of tectonic tension, which was characterized by rifting depression. Seven times of regional tectonic movement and sedimentation had been assembled into a geological development history of polycyclic oscillation. Especially, the tectonic movements were strongly intensified at the end of Cretacious and the beginning of Paleagene, between Late Eocene and Mid-Oligocene, during Mid- and Late Miocene. These three times of tectonic movement had built the most important regional tectonic interfaces in the South China Sea. Crust movements of the South China Sea were the result and epitome of interaction of the Eurasia, Pacific and Indo-Australia plates, that is, they were introduced by polycyclic changes of directions, rates and strengths of lithospheric movements and asthenospheric flows across the Pacific and Indo-Australia plates.

  4. Origin of low δ26Mg Cenozoic basalts from South China Block and their geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Li, Shu-Guang; Xiao, Yilin; Ke, Shan; Li, Wang-Ye; Tian, Ye

    2015-09-01

    Origin of low δ26Mg basalts is a controversial subject and has been attributed to interaction of isotopically light carbonatitic melts derived from a subducted oceanic slab with the mantle (Yang et al., 2012), or alternatively, to accumulation of isotopically light ilmenite (FeTiO3) in their mantle source (Sedaghatpour et al., 2013). To study the origin of low δ26Mg basalts and evaluate whether Mg isotope ratios of basalts can be used to trace deeply recycled carbon, high-precision major and trace element and Mg isotopic analyses on the Cenozoic alkaline and tholeiitic basalts from the South China Block (SCB), eastern China have been carried out in this study. The basalts show light Mg isotopic compositions, with δ26Mg ranging from -0.60 to -0.35. The relatively low TiO2 contents (eclogite transformed from carbonate-bearing oceanic crust during plate subduction. As only the Pacific slab has an influence on both the North China Block (NCB) and SCB, our results together with the study of Yang et al. (2012) demonstrate that the recycled carbonatitic melts might have originated from the stagnant Pacific slab beneath East Asia in the Cretaceous and Cenozoic and that a widespread carbonated upper mantle exists beneath eastern China, which may serve as the main source for the <110 Ma basalts in this area. Thus, our study demonstrates that Mg isotope ratios of basalts are a powerful tool to trace deeply recycled carbon.

  5. The uplifting process of the Bogda Mountain during the Cenozoic and its tectonic implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Tianshan Mountains have undergone its initial orogeny, extension adjusting and re-orogeny since the Late Paleozoic. The re-orogeny and uplifting process of the orogeny in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic are two of most important events in the geological evolution of Euro-Asian continent, which resulted in the formation of the present range-and-basin pattern in topography of the Tianshan Mountains and its adjacent areas. Thermochronology results by the method of fission-track dating of apatite suggest three obvious uplifting stages of the Bogad Mountain Chain re-orogeny during the Cenozoic, i.e. 5.6-19 Ma, 20-30 Ma, and 42-47 Ma. The strongest uplifting stage of the mountain is the second one at 20 -30 Ma, when the mountain uplifted as a whole, and the beginning of re-orogeny was no less than 65 Ma. Furthermore, our studies also show that the uplifting types of the mountain are variable in the dif-ferent time periods, including uplifting of mountain as a whole and differential uplifting. The apparently diversified uplifting processes of the mountain chain are characterized by the migration (or transfor-mation) of the uplifting direction of the mountain from west to east and from north to south, and the main process of mountain extending is from north to south.

  6. The uplifting process of the Bogda Mountain during the Cenozoic and its tectonic implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZongXiu; LI Tao; ZHANG Jin; LIU YongQing; MA ZongJin

    2008-01-01

    Institute of Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing 100037, China The Tianshan Mountains have undergone its initial orogeny, extension adjusting and re-orogeny since the Late Paleozoic. The re-orogeny and uplifting process of the orogeny in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic are two of most important events in the geological evolution of Euro-Asian continent, which resulted in the formation of the present range-and-basin pattern in topography of the Tianshan Mountains and its adjacent areas. Thermochronology results by the method of fission-track dating of apatite suggest three obvious uplifting stages of the Bogad Mountain Chain re-orogeny during the Cenozoic, i.e. 5.6-19 Ma, 20-30 Ma, and 42-47 Ma. The strongest uplifting stage of the mountain is the second one at 20-30 Ma, when the mountain uplifted as a whole, and the beginning of re-orogeny was no less than 65Ma. Furthermore, our studies also show that the uplifting types of the mountain are variable in the different time periods, including uplifting of mountain as a whole and differential uplifting. The apparently diversified uplifting processes of the mountain chain are characterized by the migration (or transformation) of the uplifting direction of the mountain from west to east and from north to south, and the main process of mountain extending is from north to south.

  7. Progress and outlook of uranium exploration in meso-cenozoic basins in north China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through the efforts in last decades on the research of geology setting and regional assessment for uranium exploration in the Meso-Cenozoic basins in North China, rich accomplishment have been gotten in metallogenic theory, temporal and spatial distribution pattern, zone division, Classification, mineralization of different type, ore-controlling factors, metallogenic model, principle of valuation and prognostication, exploration criteria and great breakthrough in the prospecting of key areas. However, the extensive territory make the effort limited only to some region, the exploration level is fairly lower in the whole country, and there is wide space for uranium exploration. The further exploration should be basically guided by 'highlighting the exploration of key areas, strengthening the evaluation of regional potential and accelerating the implementation of new reserve bases' and persisted in principle of 'deployment with different level and execution according to region' and oriented with different types of deposit by 'wholly evaluation and systematic exploration'. By deploying the new effort frame in large base exploration, regional evaluation and solving the important geological and geophysical problem, we can put forward the uranium exploration in Meso-Cenozoic basins in North China. (author)

  8. Late cenozoic magmatism in the South Patagonian batholith: SHRIMP U-Pb zircon age evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The North Patagonian Batholith (NPB) has a zonal age pattern which includes a well defined belt of Miocene and Mio-Pliocene plutons in its central portion (Pankhurst et al., 1999) which are spatially, and probably genetically related to the Liquine-Ofqui Fault Zone. Previous geochronological studies in the Southern Patagonian Batholith (SPB), as summarized by Bruce et al. (1991), have yielded 9 late Cenozoic K-Ar or Ar-Ar ages out of a total of 116 age determinations. None of these young ages correspond to U-Pb determinations on zircons, and some of the young ages correspond to satellite plutons east of the SPB proper, such as the Torres del Paine intrusion. In this paper we present the first late Cenozoic SHRIMP U-Pb zircon ages in the area of the SPB. The morphology of the analysed zircon crystals is described and leads to some inferences on the methodology and on the geological interpretation of the obtained ages (au)

  9. Atypical occlusion process caused by the merger of a sea-breeze front and gust front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulikemu, Abuduwaili; Xu, Xin; Wang, Yuan; Ding, Jinfeng; Wang, Yan

    2015-10-01

    An atypical occlusion process that occurred in North China on 14 July 2011 is studied based on both observations and a real-data Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulation. The results show that this atypical occlusion process was significantly different from the traditional, synoptic-scale occlusion process that occurs within extratropical cyclones. It was caused by the merger of two cold-type mesoscale fronts. One of the fronts developed from the gust front of convective storms, while the other was a sea-breeze front. As the two fronts moved towards each other, the warm air between them was squeezed and separated from the surface. An atypical occluded front was formed when the two fronts merged, with the warm air forced aloft. This kind of occlusion is termed a "merger" process, different from the well-known "catch-up" and "wrap-up" processes. Moreover, local convection was found to be enhanced during the merger process, with severe convective weather produced in the merger area.

  10. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels;

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied with....... With the addition of a plasma arc, the hardness could overall be reduced to between 200 and 220 HV1, i.e. about 27 percent. In the seam middle, the reduction was 36 percent....

  11. Arc saw and its application to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arc saw is a toothless, circular saw that cuts by arc erosion. A model was built to study the arc saw's usefulness in cutting up radioactively contaminated metal scrap. It was chosen because it cuts with very little contact to the work piece and because cutting is not affected by material hardness. After installation of several improvements it was found it could cut almost any combination of metals and that clamping or fixturing requirements were minimum. Cutting proceeds rapidly and efficiently. 10 figures

  12. Nonlinear Study of Industrial Arc Spring Dampers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahriri, Said; Santos, Ilmar; Hartmann, Henning

    2011-01-01

    for varying the damping characteristics of the SFD as well as the dynamic forces acting on the SFD. Phase plane orbits together with Poincar´e maps are given for different arc spring damping and static and dynamic load cases. Besides, bifurcation diagrams as a function of the arc spring damping and...... forces acting on the SFD are presented. It is worth mentioning, that the maps and diagrams can be used as design guidance. Finally, a comparison between the numerical results and experimental result is facilitated in form of waterfall diagrams. For this, a full scale model of the arc-spring damper was...

  13. Modeling Multi-Arc Spraying Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2016-06-01

    The use of plasma as energy source in thermal spraying enables among others the processing of feed stock materials with very high melting temperatures as coating materials. New generation multi-arc plasma spraying systems are widely spread and promise several advantages in comparison to the conventional single-arc systems. Numerical modeling of multi-arc plasma spraying offers the possibility to increase the understanding about this process. This study focuses on the numerical modeling of three-cathode spraying systems, introducing the recent activities in this field and discussing the numerical aspects which influence the prediction power of the models.

  14. Formation of the G-ring arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, N. C. S.; Vieira Neto, E.; Foryta, D. W.

    2016-05-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves raising the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario that the excitation of Mimas' eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance and given a possible explanation for the origin for the arcs.

  15. Arc pressure control in GTA welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relationships are established between the peak current of a pulsed, rectangular current waveform and the pulse current duty cycle under conditions of constant arc power. By appropriate choice of these interrelated parameters, it is shown that the arc pressure may be varied over a wide range even though the arc power is held constant. The methodology is suggested as a means of countering the effect of gravity in 5-G welding, while maintaining constant heat input to the weld. Combined with appropriate penetration sensors, the methodology is additionally suggested as a means of controlling penetration

  16. Formation of the G-ring arc

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, N C S; Foryta, D W

    2016-01-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves raising the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario that the excitation of Mimas' eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance and given a possible explanation for the origin for the arcs.

  17. Front-end conceptual platform modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðlaugsson, Tómas Vignir; Ravn, Poul Martin; Mortensen, Niels Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    Platform thinking has been the subject of investigation and deployment in many projects in both academia and industry. Most contributions involve the restructuring of product programs, and only a few support front-end development of a new platform in parallel with technology development. This con...... market requirements....

  18. JFET-CMOS microstrip front-end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the CMOS version of the front-end chip developed for the microstrip vertex detector of the Aleph experiment is ready to go into operation, a new development is being carried on to achieve a reduction in noise. The improvement is related to the use of a JFET-CMOS chip design which is described in the present paper. (orig.)

  19. Morphology of solidification front in eutectic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trepczyńska - Łent

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the analysis of morphology of solidification front in eutectic made. It was present influence of composition, solidification velocity, concentration micro-field and capillarity effects on the morphology of the solid/liquid interface. It was introduced phase-field model.

  20. Morphology of solidification front in eutectic

    OpenAIRE

    M. Trepczyńska - Łent; T. Giętka; T. Szykowny

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the analysis of morphology of solidification front in eutectic made. It was present influence of composition, solidification velocity, concentration micro-field and capillarity effects on the morphology of the solid/liquid interface. It was introduced phase-field model.

  1. QCD and Light-Front Holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2010-10-27

    The soft-wall AdS/QCD model, modified by a positive-sign dilaton metric, leads to a remarkable one-parameter description of nonperturbative hadron dynamics. The model predicts a zero-mass pion for zero-mass quarks and a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in the leading orbital angular momentum L of hadrons and the radial quantum number N. Light-Front Holography maps the amplitudes which are functions of the fifth dimension variable z of anti-de Sitter space to a corresponding hadron theory quantized on the light front. The resulting Lorentz-invariant relativistic light-front wave equations are functions of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron at equal light-front time. The result is to a semi-classical frame-independent first approximation to the spectra and light-front wavefunctions of meson and baryon light-quark bound states, which in turn predict the behavior of the pion and nucleon form factors. The theory implements chiral symmetry in a novel way: the effects of chiral symmetry breaking increase as one goes toward large interquark separation, consistent with spectroscopic data, and the the hadron eigenstates generally have components with different orbital angular momentum; e.g., the proton eigenstate in AdS/QCD with massless quarks has L = 0 and L = 1 light-front Fock components with equal probability. The soft-wall model also predicts the form of the non-perturbative effective coupling {alpha}{sub s}{sup AdS} (Q) and its {beta}-function which agrees with the effective coupling {alpha}{sub g1} extracted from the Bjorken sum rule. The AdS/QCD model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method in order to systematically include the QCD interaction terms. A new perspective on quark and gluon condensates is also reviewed.

  2. Numerical investigations of arc behaviour in gas metal arc welding using ANSYS CFX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnick, M.; Fuessel, U.; Hertel, M.; Spille-Kohoff, A.; Murphy, A. B.

    2011-06-01

    Current numerical models of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are trying to combine magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models of the arc and volume of fluid (VoF) models of metal transfer. They neglect vaporization and assume an argon atmosphere for the arc region, as it is common practice for models of gas tungsten arc welding. These models predict temperatures above 20 000 K and a temperature distribution similar to tungsten inert gas (TIG) arcs. However, current spectroscopic temperature measurements in GMAW arcs demonstrate much lower arc temperatures. In contrast to TIG arcs they found a central local minimum of the radial temperature distribution. The paper presents a GMAW arc model that considers metal vapour and which is in a very good agreement with experimentally observed temperatures. Furthermore, the model is able to predict the local central minimum in the radial temperature and the radial electric current density distributions for the first time. The axially symmetric model of the welding torch, the work piece, the wire and the arc (fluid domain) implements MHD as well as turbulent mixing and thermal demixing of metal vapour in argon. The mass fraction of iron vapour obtained from the simulation shows an accumulation in the arc core and another accumulation on the fringes of the arc at 2000 to 5000 K. The demixing effects lead to very low concentrations of iron between these two regions. Sensitive analyses demonstrate the influence of the transport and radiation properties of metal vapour, and the evaporation rate relative to the wire feed. Finally the model predictions are compared with the measuring results of Zielińska et al.

  3. Prostate treatments, 1MRT o RapidArc; Tratamiento de prostata, IMART o RapidArc?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro novais, J.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Pardo Perez, E.; Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Cerro Penalver, E.

    2015-07-01

    Techniques that modulate the dose (as IMRT or RapidArcTM) improve dose homogeneity within the target volume decreasing the dose in healthy organs. The aim of this work is to study the dosimetric differences in prostate radiotherapy treatments with IMRT and RapidArcTM. The results of the 109 patients studied show that plans to RapidArcTM have better coverage, compliance and dose gradient outside the target volume. (Author)

  4. Sitka, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  5. Sitka, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 3 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  6. Stretched arc discharge in produced water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y I; Wright, K C; Kim, H S; Cho, D J; Rabinovich, A; Fridman, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost. PMID:25638080

  7. Magneto-plasma-dynamic arc thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, J. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The performance of a magnetoplasmadynamic arc thruster, in the 600 to 2,100 seconds specific impulse range, was improved by locating its cathode in the exhaust beam downstream of the anode and main propellant injection point.

  8. Observation of gliding arc surface treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, A.;

    2015-01-01

    . Water contact angle measurements indicate that the treatment uniformity improves significantly when the AC gliding arc is tilted to the polymer surface. Thickness reduction of the gas boundary layer, explaining the improvement of surface treatment, by the ultrasonic irradiation was directly observed for......An alternating current (AC) gliding arc can be conveniently operated at atmospheric pressure and efficiently elongated into the ambient air by an air flow and thus is useful for surface modification. A high speed camera was used to capture dynamics of the AC gliding arc in the presence of polymer...... surfaces. A gap was observed between the polymer surface and the luminous region of the plasma column, indicating the existence of a gas boundary layer. The thickness of the gas boundary layer is smaller at higher gas flow-rates or with ultrasonic irradiation to the AC gliding arc and the polymer surface...

  9. Archival Research Catalog (ARC) Archival Descriptions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — The Archival Research Catalog (ARC) data set provides archival descriptions of the permanent holdings of the federal government in the custody of the National...

  10. Seward, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1 arc-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of .89-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  11. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  12. Effect of arc on radiation thermometry in welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亮玉; 王燕; 武宝林

    2002-01-01

    The effect of arc on radiation thermometry is analyzed in a field close to the arc during the welding process, and the ratio of signal to noise and other factors are obtained for a small current arc .The method of the temperature measurement is feasible when the arc current is decreased to a smaller value in the welding process.

  13. Geologic map of the Basque-Cantabrian Basin and a new tectonic interpretation of the Basque Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ábalos, B.

    2016-01-01

    A new printable 1/200.000 bedrock geological map of the onshore Basque-Cantabrian Basin is presented, aimed to contribute to future geologic developments in the central segment of the Pyrenean-Cantabrian Alpine orogenic system. It is accompanied in separate appendixes by a historic report on the precedent geological maps and by a compilation above 350 bibliographic citations of maps and academic reports (usually overlooked or ignored) that are central to this contribution. Structural scrutiny of the map permits to propose a new tectonic interpretation of the Basque Arc, implementing previously published partial reconstructions. It is presented as a printable 1/400.000 tectonic map. The Basque Arc consists of various thrust slices that can expose at the surface basement rocks (Palaeozoic to Lower Triassic) and their sedimentary cover (uppermost Triassic to Tertiary), from which they are detached by intervening (Upper Triassic) evaporites and associated rocks. The slice-bounding thrusts are in most cases reactivated normal faults active during Meso-Cenozoic sedimentation that can be readily related to basement discontinuities generated during the Hercynian orogeny.

  14. Sensitivity of collapsed arc QA method for delivery errors in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the sensitivity of an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to detecting introduced Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) treatment errors was studied using the Collapsed Arc method. Two clinical Head and Neck (H and N) and Prostate treatment plans had gantry dependent dose and MLC errors introduced to the plans. These plans were then delivered to an Elekta Synergy Linear Accelerator EPID and compared to the original treatment planning system Collapsed Arc dose matrix. With the Collapsed Arc technique the EPID was able to detect MLC errors down to 2mm and dose errors of down to 3% depending on the treatment plan complexity and gamma tolerance used

  15. Spectral characteristics of arc plasma during laser-arc double-sided welding for aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kezhao Zhang; Zhenglong Lei; Xianglong Wang; Yanbin Chen; Yaobang Zhao

    2015-01-01

    In laser-arc double-sided welding,the spectral characteristics of the arc plasma are calculated and analyzed by spectroscopic diagnosis.The results show that,compared with conventional tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding,the introduction of a laser changes the physical characteristics of the arc plasma regardless of whether laser plasma penetration takes place,and that the influence of the laser mainly affects the near-anode region of the arc.When the laser power is relatively low,the arc column tends to compress,and the arc spectral characteristics show no significant difference.When the arc root constricts,compared with pure TIG arc,the electron density increases by ~2.7 times and the electron temperature decreases by ~3000 K.When the arc column expands,the intensities of spectral lines of both the metal and Ar atoms are the strongest.But it is also observed that the electron density reduces,whereas there is no obvious decrease of electron temperature.

  16. Heat flow in the Lesser Antilles island arc and adjacent back arc Grenada basin

    OpenAIRE

    Manga, Michael; Hornbach, Matthew J.; Friant, Anne Le; Ishizuka, Osamu; Stroncik, Nicole; Adachi, Tatsuya; Aljahdali, Mohammed; Boudon, Georges; Breitkreuz, Christoph; Fraass, Andrew; Fujinawa, Akihiko; Hatfield, Robert; Jutzeler, Martin; Kataoka, Kyoko; Lafuerza, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Using temperature gradients measured in 10 holes at 6 sites, we generate the first high fidelity heat flow measurements from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program drill holes across the northern and central Lesser Antilles arc and back arc Grenada basin. The implied heat flow, after correcting for bathymetry and sedimentation effects, ranges from about 0.1 W/m2 on the crest of the arc, midway between the volcanic islands of Montserrat and Guadeloupe, to 15 km from the crest in the back arc direct...

  17. Emergence of fluctuating traveling front solutions in macroscopic theory of noisy invasion fronts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerson, Baruch; Vilenkin, Arkady; Sasorov, Pavel V

    2013-01-01

    The position of an invasion front, propagating into an unstable state, fluctuates because of the shot noise coming from the discreteness of reacting particles and stochastic character of the reactions and diffusion. A recent macroscopic theory [Meerson and Sasorov, Phys. Rev. E 84, 030101(R) (2011)] yields the probability of observing, during a long time, an unusually slow front. The theory is formulated as an effective Hamiltonian mechanics which operates with the density field and the conjugate "momentum" field. Further, the theory assumes that the most probable density field history of an unusually slow front represents, up to small corrections, a traveling front solution of the Hamilton equations. Here we verify this assumption by solving the Hamilton equations numerically for models belonging to the directed percolation universality class. PMID:23410293

  18. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding Tanks Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, G.; Tsibulskiy, I.; Kuznetsov, M.; Akhmetov, A.; Klimova-Korsmik, O.

    2016-04-01

    The results investigate hybrid laser-arc welding of high strength steels using design responsible metallic construction and the highest strength body of vehicles. Welds from modern high strength steels grade Hardox 400, Hardox 450, Armox 600T and AB were created. High power fiber laser LS-15 with output 15 kW and arc rectifier VDU - 1500 DC were used in the experiment. Results of the metallographic research and mechanical tests are presented.

  19. Overtwisted open books from sobering arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Noah

    2004-01-01

    We study open books on three manifolds which are compatible with an overtwisted contact structure. We show that the existence of certain arcs, called sobering arcs, is a sufficient condition for an open book to be overtwisted, and is necessary up to stabilization by positive Hopf-bands. Using these techniques we prove that some open books arising as the boundary of symplectic configurations are overtwisted, answering a question of Gay in Algebr. Geom. Topol. 3 (2003) 569--586.

  20. Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Monika C.; Leidecker, Henning W.

    2010-01-01

    The Tin Whisker Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool has been designed to evaluate the risk of metal vapor arcing and to help facilitate a decision toward a researched risk disposition. Users can evaluate a system without having to open up the hardware. This process allows for investigating components at risk rather than spending time and money analyzing every component. The tool points to a risk level and provides direction for appropriate action and documentation.

  1. Multi-color detection of gravitational arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Maturi, Matteo; Mizera, Sebastian; Seidel, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Strong gravitational lensing provides fundamental insights into the understanding of the dark matter distribution in massive galaxies, galaxy clusters and the background cosmology. Despite their importance, the number of gravitational arcs discovered so far is small. The urge for more complete, large samples and unbiased methods of selecting candidates is rising. A number of methods for the automatic detection of arcs have been proposed in the literature, but large amounts of spurious detecti...

  2. Catalogue of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic holotypes in the collection of plant fossils in the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum, Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijnenburg-van Cittert, van J.H.A.; Waveren, van I.M.; Jonckers, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    This is an inventory of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic type material in the original palaeobotanical collections of the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum, Leiden, The Netherlands. In total 60 holotypes are documented and one is noted as missing from the collections. One new combination is made (Cinnamomu

  3. Electric arc furnace models for flicker study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina González Castaño

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this paper is to evaluate voltage fluctuations or flicker of two electric arc furnace models through comparison with real data.Method: The first proposed model is founded on the energy conservation principle, which generates a non-linear differential equation modelling the electric arc voltage – current characteristics. Voltage fluctuations are generated using a chaotic circuit that modulates the amplitude of arc voltage. The second model is based on the empirical relationship between the arc diameter or length as well as voltage and electrical current on the arc. Voltage fluctuations are considered adding a random signal in the arc length. Both models are implemented in PSCADTM.Results: The results of both models are compared with real data taken at the most critical stage of the operation of the furnace, and they show that the model based on energy conservation has a lower average mean square error in the voltages and currents 5.6 V and 1.7 kA against 27,2 V y 3.38 kA obtained with the second model.Conclusions: Both models consider the nonlinearity and random behavior present in this type of load, validating their inclusion in computer models of electric power systems.

  4. Recent ARC developments: Through modularity to interoperability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnova, O; Cameron, D; Ellert, M; Groenager, M; Johansson, D; Kleist, J [NDGF, Kastruplundsgade 22, DK-2770 Kastrup (Denmark); Dobe, P; Joenemo, J; Konya, B [Lund University, Experimental High Energy Physics, Institute of Physics, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Fraagaat, T; Konstantinov, A; Nilsen, J K; Saada, F Ould; Qiang, W; Read, A [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, P. O. Box 1048, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Kocan, M [Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Faculty of Science, Jesenna 5, SK-04000 Kosice (Slovakia); Marton, I; Nagy, Zs [NIIF/HUNGARNET, Victor Hugo 18-22, H-1132 Budapest (Hungary); Moeller, S [University of Luebeck, Inst. Of Neuro- and Bioinformatics, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538 Luebeck (Germany); Mohn, B, E-mail: oxana.smirnova@hep.lu.s [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Div. of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Box 535, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-04-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware introduced by NorduGrid is one of the basic Grid solutions used by scientists worldwide. While being well-proven in daily use by a wide variety of scientific applications at large-scale infrastructures like the Nordic DataGrid Facility (NDGF) and smaller scale projects, production ARC of today is still largely based on conventional Grid technologies and custom interfaces introduced a decade ago. In order to guarantee sustainability, true cross-system portability and standards-compliance based interoperability, the ARC community undertakes a massive effort of implementing modular Web Service (WS) approach into the middleware. With support from the EU KnowARC project, new components were introduced and the existing key ARC services got extended with WS technology based standard-compliant interfaces following a service-oriented architecture. Such components include the hosting environment framework, the resource-coupled execution service, the re-engineered client library, the self-healing storage solution and the peer-to-peer information system, to name a few. Gradual introduction of these new services and client tools into the production middleware releases is carried out together with NDGF and thus ensures a smooth transition to the next generation Grid middleware. Standard interfaces and modularity of the new component design are essential for ARC contributions to the planned Universal Middleware Distribution of the European Grid Initiative.

  5. Physics of arcs in circuit breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some typical examples of circuit breakers are shown. Common to all these devices is that an electric arc is formed when the breaker operates which is responsible for the current interruption. The physics of those arcs can be described by the simplest single-fluid model of plasma physics which differs from the set of gas dynamic equations only by the following three terms: radiative energy transfer magnetic force and Joulean heating. These terms describe typical circuit breaker arc phenomena. This is discussed by means of three examples. The first example treats the influence of the radiative energy transfer on the temperature distribution of high-voltage circuit-breaker arcs. The second example is a discussion of the magnetic stability of circuit breaker arcs and the third example is concerned with the problem of flow turbulence produced at the arc boundary. The last effect is closely related to the current interruption process in high-voltage circuit breakers. A semi-empirical description of the turbulent heat exchange leads to a prediction of the breaking capacity for this type of circuit breaker. (author)

  6. Recent ARC developments: Through modularity to interoperability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware introduced by NorduGrid is one of the basic Grid solutions used by scientists worldwide. While being well-proven in daily use by a wide variety of scientific applications at large-scale infrastructures like the Nordic DataGrid Facility (NDGF) and smaller scale projects, production ARC of today is still largely based on conventional Grid technologies and custom interfaces introduced a decade ago. In order to guarantee sustainability, true cross-system portability and standards-compliance based interoperability, the ARC community undertakes a massive effort of implementing modular Web Service (WS) approach into the middleware. With support from the EU KnowARC project, new components were introduced and the existing key ARC services got extended with WS technology based standard-compliant interfaces following a service-oriented architecture. Such components include the hosting environment framework, the resource-coupled execution service, the re-engineered client library, the self-healing storage solution and the peer-to-peer information system, to name a few. Gradual introduction of these new services and client tools into the production middleware releases is carried out together with NDGF and thus ensures a smooth transition to the next generation Grid middleware. Standard interfaces and modularity of the new component design are essential for ARC contributions to the planned Universal Middleware Distribution of the European Grid Initiative.

  7. New method for capturing arc of moving on switching apparatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiao-min; WANG Jing-hong

    2007-01-01

    The switching arc that occurs in contact gap when contact of low voltage apparatus closes or breaks in electric circuit is harmful to the contacts, insulation, and reliability of electrical gear because of its very high temperature. As arcing time is very short in switching gear, it is very difficult to observe arc phenomena directly for researchers. Therefore, visualization of switching arc is important for understanding arc phenomena, to analyze the arc features, and to improve the design and reliability of switching gear. Based on analyzing the visualization methods proposed by researchers, a new switching arc capturing approach is introduced in this paper. Arc image acquisition, and image processing techniques were studied. A switching arc image acquisition and visual simulation software based on high speed CCD camera hard ware system was designed and implemented to yield enhanced arc image with good visual effect.

  8. The role of block rotations and oroclinal bending in Iran during the Cenozoic Arabia-Eurasia shortening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifelli, F.; Mattei, M.; Alimohammadian, H.; Sabouri, J.; Rashid, H.; Ghassemi, M.

    2012-04-01

    Shortening related to the Arabia-Eurasia convergence in the Cenozoic has been - and is at present being - taken up mainly by displacements in the Zagros, Alborz, and Kopeh Dag thrust-and-fold belts of Iran, whereas the intervening, fault-bounded crustal blocks of Central Iran (Yazd, Tabas and Lut blocks) show little internal deformation. Central Iran is separated from the Alborz belt by NE-SW left-lateral strike-slip and thrust faults (e.g., the Great Kavir fault), whereas N-S right-lateral strike-slip faults define the boundary between the Tabas and Lut blocks within Central Iran (e.g., the Neyband fault). Based on structural and seismological data, it has been proposed that NE-SW left-lateral and N-S right-lateral faults can accommodate the NNE-SSW Arabia-Eurasia convergence if they are allowed to rotate clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW), respectively. A rotating-fault deformation model predicts that the intervening fault-bounded rigid blocks should rotate accordingly. To test this hypothesis, paleomagnetic sampling was carried out on Oligocene-Miocene sediments from different areas of Central Iran (Torud, Jandaq, Anarak, Tabas, Yazd, Bafq, Ferdows), dominated by right-lateral and left-lateral strike slip faults activity, and along the southeastern margin of the Alborz Mts. (Bastam, Tall, Gardaneye-Ahovan, Momenabad Abdolabad), where left lateral and thrust faults prevail. Large counterclockwise (CCW) rotations (20°-35°) have been measured in the Tabas and Yazd blocks, characterized by the presence of N-S to NNW-SSE trending, right-lateral strike-slip faults. This structural domain is bounded to the north by the ENE-WSW oriented Great Kavir-Doruneh left-lateral strike-slip fault system. North of this fault paleomagnetic data show a different behaviour, with no or small CW rotation about vertical axis during the late Tertiary. In particular a small amount of CW rotation has been measured in the Jandaq and Torud area, to the north of the Great Kavir fault

  9. Propagation of BBFs and Dipolarization Fronts in the Global MHD simulation of February 27, 2009 Substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Y.; Raeder, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Gilson, M. L.; Runov, A.

    2010-12-01

    A global MHD simulation has been performed to investigate the THEMIS substorm on February 27, 2009. During this substorm the conjugated observations from the space and on the THEMIS ground observatories are available. The location and time of this substorm onset can be determined based on these observations. The initial auroral brightening is found at around 07:49 UT in the field of view of Fort Smith station (FSMI), with a pre-existing auroral arc located equatorward. A couple minutes later, the in situ observations recorded a sharp dipolarization front sunward passing through THEMIS spacecraft, which travels almost 10 RE in the magnetotail. In this study our global MHD model, i.e., OpenGGCM, driven by the real-time solar wind/IMF conditions, is able to reproduce the key features of these substorm signatures, including the auroral breakup at FSMI with the same onset time as the observations, and a strong earthward Bursty Bulk Flow (BBF) and dipolarization fronts that cause the substorm onset signatures. It is found in the simulation that the auroral breakup is caused by the strong flow shear and the flow vortices which form as the BBF moves earthward. Investigation of the tail BBF and its dipolarization front (DF) reveals that the bipolar change of the Bz component ahead of the DF can be produced by the interaction between two distinct plasmas from separate X lines: the anti-sunward moving southward flux tubes in the tailward flows emanating from an inner magnetic reconnection region, and the sunward traveling dipolarized tubes within the front of a strong earthward BBF that originates in a mid-tail reconnection region. The rebound and oscillations of the intruding BBF reported by the recent THEMIS observations are also seen in the simulation when the BBF encounters the high-pressure inner magnetosphere.

  10. Vacuum arc under axial magnetic fields: experimental and simulation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axial magnetic field (AMF) technology is a most important control method of vacuum arc, particularly for high-current vacuum arcs in vacuum interrupters. In this paper, a review of the state of current research on vacuum arcs under AMF is presented. The major aspects of vacuum arc in an AMF such as arc voltage, the motion of cathode spots, and anode activities are discussed, and the most recent progress both of experimental and simulation research is presented. (topical review)

  11. On Front Slope Stability of Berm Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    reshaping of a large Norwegian breakwater exposed to the North Sea waves. As a motivation for applying the Van der Meer formula a discussion of design parameters related to berm breakwater stability formulae is given. Comparisons of front erosion predicted by the use of the Van der Meer formula with model......The short communication presents application of the conventional Van der Meer stability formula for low-crested breakwaters for the prediction of front slope erosion of statically stable berm breakwaters with relatively high berms. The method is verified (Burcharth, 2008) by comparison with the......, relative berm width, method of armour stone placement, and hydraulic parameters. The formulae should cover the structure range from statically stable berm breakwaters to conventional double layer armoured breakwaters....

  12. Partical acceleration at collisionless shock fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic field of the sun is not a simple static dipole field but comprises much more complicated structures. When magnetic reconnection changes the topology of a structure the large amount of energy that was stored in the magnetic field is released and can eject the remainder of the magnetic structure and the plasma that is frozen to the magnetic field lines from the solar corona at large velocities. This event is called a coronal mass ejection (CME). Given that the upward motion happens at velocities larger than the local Alfven speed, the critical speed in the solar wind, the CME will act as a piston that drives a shock front through the solar wind ahead of itself. Satellites that monitor solar wind conditions detect an enhanced flux of high energy particles associated with the shock front. Radio instruments typically pick up bursts of electromagnetic emission, termed radio bursts, that are also consistent with processes driven by energetic particles. Thus, and due to theoretical considerations, it is safe to assume that particles can be accelerated at the shock front. Particle acceleration at collisionless shock fronts is an interesting topic for another reason. Earth is constantly bombarded by very energetic particles called (due to historical reasons) cosmic rays. The leading theory for the production of at least the fraction of cosmic rays that originate in our galaxy is acceleration at shock fronts, e.g. in super nova remnants. The large distance and consequently limited observation of these shock fronts restrict more detailed investigations. It is therefore useful to study the process of shock acceleration at shocks in the solar system that are much closer and more approachable to develop and test models and simulation methods that can be applied in different regimes. This dissertation aims at simulations of shock fronts with parameters that are close to the ones occurring in CME driven shocks. Since the goal is the investigation of the changing

  13. Interaction Dynamics of Singular Wave Fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, Darryl D

    2013-01-01

    Some of the most impressive singular wave fronts seen in Nature are the transbasin oceanic internal waves, which may be observed from the Space Shuttle as they propagate and interact with each other, for example, in the South China Sea. The characteristic feature of these strongly nonlinear wavefronts is that they reconnect when two of them collide transversely. We derive the EPDiff equation, and use it to model this phenomenon as elastic collisions between singular wave fronts (solitons) whose momentum is distributed along curves moving in the plane. Numerical methods for EPDiff based on compatible differencing algorithms (CDAs) are used for simulating these collisions among curves. The numerical results show the same nonlinear behavior of wavefront reconnections as that observed for internal waves in the South China Sea. We generalize the singular solutions of EPDiff for other applications, in computational anatomy and in imaging science, where the singular wavefronts are evolving image outlines, whose mome...

  14. Radar observations of land breeze fronts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a radar-observed apparent land breeze front 12 to 14 n mi off the coast of Wallops Island, Va. Accompanying meteorological data show the land breeze at the shore to be a layer of cold air less than 300 ft deep moving seaward at approximately 2 knots. The radar observations show the land breeze vertical frontal surface sloping landward at about 20 deg, with convection over the warm water increasing the layer thickness to 2000 ft near the frontal zone. The radar-observed horizontal frontal surface is a sharp scalloped line echo in the lower 1000 ft, but becomes diffuse above. As the local circulation during daylight hours changes to a sea breeze, the land breeze front recedes toward land and dissipates.

  15. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF GIANT ARCS IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measure the redshift distribution of a sample of 28 giant arcs discovered as a part of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey. Gemini/GMOS-North spectroscopy provides precise redshifts for 24 arcs, and 'redshift desert' constrains for the remaining 4 arcs. This is a direct measurement of the redshift distribution of a uniformly selected sample of bright giant arcs, which is an observable that can be used to inform efforts to predict giant arc statistics. Our primary giant arc sample has a median redshift z = 1.821 and nearly two-thirds of the arcs, 64%, are sources at z ∼> 1.4, indicating that the population of background sources that are strongly lensed into bright giant arcs resides primarily at high redshift. We also analyze the distribution of redshifts for 19 secondary strongly lensed background sources that are not visually apparent in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging, but were identified in deeper follow-up imaging of the lensing cluster fields. Our redshift sample for the secondary sources is not spectroscopically complete, but combining it with our primary giant arc sample suggests that a large fraction of all background galaxies that are strongly lensed by foreground clusters reside at z ∼> 1.4. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests indicate that our well-selected, spectroscopically complete primary giant arc redshift sample can be reproduced with a model distribution that is constructed from a combination of results from studies of strong-lensing clusters in numerical simulations and observational constraints on the galaxy luminosity function.

  16. Alken en Zeekoeten op het Friese Front

    OpenAIRE

    Bemmelen, van, R.S.A.; Arts, F.; Leopold, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Het Friese Front, zoals omschreven en geografisch aangeduid in het rapport van Lindeboom et al. (2005) zal worden aangewezen als Vogelrichtlijngebied, c.q. Natura 2000 gebied. Eén belangrijke reden voor de aanwijzing is de aanwezigheid, in zomer, nazomer en herfst, van internationaal belangrijke aantallen Zeekoeten Uria aalge. Vanwege de bijzondere status van het gebied is het belangrijk om te weten welke aantallen Zeekoeten het gebied bezoeken en wat de trends in aantallen zijn. Nederland mo...

  17. Prototype ALICE front-end card

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    This circuit board is a prototype 48-channel front end digitizer card for the ALICE time projection chamber (TPC), which takes electrical signals from the wire sensors in the TPC and shapes the data before converting the analogue signal to digital data. A total of 4356 cards will be required to process the data from the ALICE TPC, the largest of this type of detector in the world.

  18. Picosecond Dynamics Behind the Shock Front

    OpenAIRE

    Dlott, D.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the microscopic details of shock-wave initiation of energetic materials requires a realistic picture of picosecond time scale processes occurring in large molecules located in an ≈100 nanometer thin layer just behind the front. In this paper, I discuss a theoretical model for shock wave induced chemistry which highlights the role of molecular mechanical energy transfer processes, especially multiphonon up-pumping. Picosecond laser measurements of multiphonon up-pumping in a high...

  19. Nanophotonic front electrodes for perovskite solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Paetzold, Ulrich Wilhelm; Qiu, Weiming; Finger, Friedhelm; POORTMANS, Jef; Cheyns, David

    2015-01-01

    In less than 3 years' time, a vast progress in power conversion efficiencies of organometal halide perovskite solar cells has been achieved by optimization of the device architecture, charge transport layers, and interfaces. A further increase in these efficiencies is expected from an improvement in the optical properties via anti-reflection coatings and nanophotonic light management concepts. In this contribution, we report on the development and implementation of a nanophotonic front electr...

  20. An island in front of Izola

    OpenAIRE

    Franci Steinman; Leon Gosar

    2002-01-01

    Maritime construction in front of Izola restitutes an enriched former state. The island is positioned in a place where there are no legal regimes enforced by the state or local community. Legal regimes that determine the exploitation of water rights and limitations (management, exploitation, use) can actually limit all. Therefore their synthesis has to be the starting point for analysing the harmony of present uses and for planning future uses of the sea and coastal area. For example the aqua...

  1. The front line: Community health workers

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Diana

    2012-01-01

    This video clip comprises one of the 5 presentations of the PANEL SESSION: “The Front Line – Home Care Providers” held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Diana Hill, Director, Home Support Services, Greater Vancouver Community Support Society. It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independen...

  2. Nocturnal coastal fronts in the Mediterranean basin

    OpenAIRE

    Mazón, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to investigate the formation of nocturnal coastal fronts (hereafter CF) in the Mediterranean basin producing nocturnal offshore precipitation near the coastline. After sunset the cooled inland air moves to the coastline driven by drainage winds as a density current. When this air encounters the warm and wet sea-air a CF is formed. Therefore the warm air mass is lifted and when ascending clouds may form producing in some cases precipitation. The influence of ...

  3. Active rollback in the Gibraltar Arc: Evidences from CGPS data in the western Betic Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Castillo, L.; Galindo-Zaldivar, J.; de Lacy, M. C.; Borque, M. J.; Martinez-Moreno, F. J.; García-Armenteros, J. A.; Gil, A. J.

    2015-11-01

    The Gibraltar Arc, located in the western Mediterranean Sea, is an arcuate Alpine orogen formed by the Betic and Rif Cordilleras, separated by the Alboran Sea. New continuous GPS data (2008-2013) obtained in the Topo-Iberia stations of the western Betic Cordillera allow us to improve the present-day deformation pattern related to active tectonics in this collision area between the Eurasian and African plates. These data indicate a very consistent westward motion of the Betic Cordillera with respect to the relatively stable Iberian Massif foreland. The displacement in the Betics increases toward the south and west, reaching maximum values in the Gibraltar Strait area (4.27 mm/yr in Ceuta, CEU1, and 4.06 mm/yr in San Fernando, SFER), then progressively decreasing toward the northwestern mountain front. The recent geological structures and seismicity evidence moderate deformation in a roughly NW-SE to WNW-ESE compressional stress setting in the mountain frontal areas, and moderate extension toward the internal part of the cordillera. The mountain front undergoes progressive development of folds affecting at least up to Pliocene deposits, with similar recent geological and geodetical rates. This folded strip helps to accommodate the active deformation with scarce associated seismicity. The displacement pattern is in agreement with the present-day clockwise rotation of the tectonic units in the northern branch of the Gibraltar Arc. Our data support that the westward emplacement of the Betic Cordillera continues to be active in a rollback tectonic scenario.

  4. Lightweight design of automotive front crossbeam assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Zaiqi; Liu Qiang; Ma Fangwu; Zhao Fuquan; Liu Zongwei; Wang Guan; Wan Yinhui; Li Luoxing

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the development course of the front crossbeam assembly for a self-owned brand vehicle model based on lightweight and passive safety performance. Combining with an A00 model variant, the paper details the design of extruded aluminum-alloy front crossbeam assembly from the perspectives of optimal design, performance verifi- cation, lightweight effect and cost control. The following results in the technical and engineering applications have been achieved. The weight of the developed aluminum-alloy crossbeam can be reduced by 51%. The simulated analysis of the collision rigid wall, the 40 % offset hammering as well as the static crush test of energy-absorbing box show that af- ter reasonable materials matching and size optimization of the crossbeam and the energy-absorbing boxes, the level of crash safety can be improved. The price of aluminum-alloy front crossbeam can be lowered by using the extruding die in- stead of the stamping die to reduce the die cost-sharing.

  5. Mesozoic-Cenozoic thermal history of Turpan-Hami Basin: apatite fission track constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wenbin; WAN Jinglin; SHU Liangshu; SUN Yan; GUO Jichun; WANG Feng

    2005-01-01

    Apatite fission track dating is carried out on nine samples collected from the central part (Lianmuqin section) and from both northern and southern margins of Turpan-Hami Basin. The fission-track ages of seven Jurassic samples are distinctly younger than depositional ages. In contrast, the fission-track ages of two Cretaceous samples are older than, or as old as depositional ages. These observations indicate that the Jurassic samples have been annealed or partially annealed, whereas the Cretaceous samples have not been annealed.The further thermal modelling results show that Turpan-Hami Basin experienced a Late Cretaceous period (120-100 Ma) of tectonic uplift with rapid cooling and exhumation of sediments. The samples underwent a Cenozoic period of reburial and re-heating and were exhumed again at 10-8 Ma.

  6. ESR dating of late Cenozoic molassic deposits in the Jiuxi Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史正涛; 业渝光; 赵志军; 方小敏; 李吉均

    2001-01-01

    In the Hexi Corridor, foreland depression at the north periphery of the Tibetan Plateau, late Cenozoic sediments can be divided into the lacustrine to deltaic Red Bed. The unconformably overlying coarse fan-conglomerate was shed from the northern plateau. This remarkable alternation of sedimentary environment and discontinuity reflect intensive rise of the plateau. Moreover, this suite of coarse molasses is divided into two formations as the Yumen conglomerate and the Jiuquan Gravel by another angular discontinuity. Tentatively, we applied ESR dating on this suite of molassic deposits at the Laojunmiao Section in the Jiuxi Basin, west of the Hexi Corridor, which shows that the bottom of the Yumen conglomerate and the Jiuquan Gravel are about 3.4 and 0.9 Ma respectively, indicating that the northern plateau at least experienced two intensive tectonic movements at about 3.5 and 0.9 Ma.

  7. Thermal structure research on cenozoic in Songliao basin and Daxinganling Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal history simulation of Apatite Fission Track shows the thermal structure history in Cenozoic and the relationship between Songliao Basin and Daxinganling Mountain. Uplift of Daxinganling reveals its act character; its velocity shows 5 decreasing phases and 4 increasing ones. Although basin evolvement is quite complex, it behaved as three uplifts and two sedimentations. It is considered here that the relationship between Songliao Basin and Daxinganling includes three styles and 4 phases, that is, basin uplifted with mountain during 65.5-50 Ma; basin subsided while mountain uplifted slowly and basin uplifted rapidly while mountain uplifted rapidly during 50-36 Ma; basin subsided slowly while mountain uplifted slowly and basin subsided rapidly while mountain uplifted rapidly during 36-5.83 Ma; the latest phase was the same with the first one. (authors)

  8. Structural Evolution of the Eastern Margin of Eurasia in Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. P. Sorokin; T. V. Artyomenko

    2003-01-01

    This paper features the structural evolution of the eastern margin of Eurasia in Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic.It is characterized by three stages of development: the riftogenic stage (Jurassic-Early Cretaceous), the platform stage (Late Cretaceous) and the neotectonic one (Paleogene-Quarternary). The boundaries between these stages are distinctly fixed by the geological time limits of planetary range. It is demonstrated that the riftogenic and neotectonic stages were characterized by a high degree of geodynamic activity, and the platform one by a decrease in contrast of tectonic movements. The main river net was formed in the Early Cretaceous and in the Neogene. It experienced a serious reconstruction accompanied by the formation of the Amur River valley being similar to the modem one.

  9. Sediment budget of cratons: insights from West Africa over the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Louis, G.; Chardon, D.; Rouby, D.; Beauvais, A.

    2015-12-01

    The sediment load of rivers constitutes the material that builds the stratigraphic successions found from continental margins to the deep ocean. Measure of this flux is relevant to understanding continental controls on denudation, riverine transport and basin filling. An increasing number of sediment yield measures is available but whether these modern values can be extrapolated at geological timescales for large watersheds is still questioned. One reason is the lack of long-term data. Here, we present a sediment budget for Sub-Saharan West Africa over the Cenozoic to compare with the modern rates. The denudation of this cratonic area is constrained using three regional lateritic paleo-landsurfaces that formed during periods of enhanced weathering since the Paleocene-Eocene greenhouse peak. The 3D interpolation of these surfaces allowed building three successive denudation maps for the 45-24, 24-11 and 11-0 Ma intervals together with reconstructions of the paleo-drainage. The regional distribution of erosion suggests the influence of lithospheric deformation, concentrated around a southern marginal upwarp and eastern hotspot swells. The export of large-scale drainages was calculated by converting denudated volumes into sediment fluxes using the porosity and density of lateritic regolith. Exported volumes calculated for the Niger watershed fall within the same range as the Cenozoic clastic accumulations of the Niger delta. Comparisons also show that modern fluxes can be an order of magnitude above the long-term fluxes for moderately large watersheds but that modern and long-term yields are similar for the largest watersheds (e.g. Niger, Volta, Senegal). These results suggest that the export of very large cratonic watersheds is independent of the measurement timescale and that their modern yields can be extrapolated at long-timescale. Finally, it allows assessing the relative contribution of cratons, i.e. non-active orogenic areas, to the global sediment budgets at

  10. Disentangling Topographic and Climatic Change during the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic in the Western US Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, K. E.; Eiler, J. M.; Wernicke, B. P.; Peppe, D. J.; Fox, D. L.; Fetrow, A. C.; Passey, B. H.

    2014-12-01

    A diverse suite of tectonic and climatic drivers influenced the topographic evolution of the western USA Cordillera. Despite years of study, considerable uncertainty remains about fundamentals of this evolution, such as the timing and magnitude of maximum average elevations for the different physiographic provinces; the drivers and topographic effects of different episodes of extension during the Cenozoic; and the relative relief of peaks and intermontane basins within the Cordillera at different times and in different places. Numerous tectonic models have been developed to explain the evolution of the Cordillera, and understanding these details is key for distinguishing between these different models. In addition, the topographic changes in the Cordillera have important implications for regional and local climate of the western US at different times in the past, and may drive important differences in local climatic responses to global climate changes through the Cenozoic. The majority of the tools that currently exist for quantitatively reconstructing changes in topography through time and space rely on paleoclimate proxy data. Thus it is also important to be able to disentangle climatic change from elevation change in terrestrial paleoclimate records. To address some of these outstanding questions, we have generated and compiled paleotemperature estimates from the Late Cretaceous through the Miocene of the western US. In this presentation, we will focus on the latest installment of the project, which utilizes Oligocene paleotemperature records from central Utah and South Dakota and Miocene-Holocene paleotemperature records from Kansas. The data are dominantly composed of mean annual temperature estimates from leaf margin analysis and summer temperature estimates from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry. We will discuss how these data compare to temperature data from the Paleogene from the western US, what general trends exist within all the data and how these

  11. Cenozoic magmatism in the northern continental margin of the South China Sea: evidence from seismic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiao; Wu, Shiguo; Dong, Dongdong

    2016-06-01

    Igneous rocks in the northern margin of the South China Sea (SCS) have been identified via high resolution multi-channel seismic data in addition to other geophysical and drilling well data. This study identified intrusive and extrusive structures including seamounts and buried volcanoes, and their seismic characteristics. Intrusive features consist of piercement and implicit-piercement type structures, indicating different energy input associated with diapir formation. Extrusive structures are divided into flat-topped and conical-topped seamounts. Three main criteria (the overlying strata, the contact relationship and sills) were used to distinguish between intrusive rocks and buried volcanos. Three criteria are also used to estimate the timing of igneous rock formation: the contact relationship, the overlying sedimentary thickness and seismic reflection characteristics. These criteria are applied to recognize and distinguish between three periods of Cenozoic magmatism in the northern margin of the SCS: before seafloor spreading (Paleocene and Eocene), during seafloor spreading (Early Oligocene-Mid Miocene) and after cessation of seafloor spreading (Mid Miocene-Recent). Among them, greater attention is given to the extensive magmatism since 5.5 Ma, which is present throughout nearly all of the study area, making it a significant event in the SCS. Almost all of the Cenozoic igneous rocks were located below the 1500 m bathymetric contour. In contrast with the wide distribution of igneous rocks in the volcanic rifted margin, igneous rocks in the syn-rift stage of the northern margin of the SCS are extremely sporadic, and they could only be found in the southern Pearl River Mouth basin and NW sub-sea basin. The ocean-continent transition of the northern SCS exhibits high-angle listric faults, concentrated on the seaward side of the magmatic zone, and a sharply decreased crust, with little influence from a mantle plume. These observations provide further evidence to

  12. Declining sensitivity of the carbonate compensation depth to sea level during the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong McKay, David I.; Tyrrell, Toby; Wilson, Paul A.

    2016-04-01

    Over the course of the Cenozoic the global carbonate compensation depth (CCD), the depth in the ocean below which carbonate deposited on the seafloor is not preserved, has shifted from a relatively shallow average position (~3000 to 3500 m in the equatorial Pacific) in the Palaeocene to a relatively deep position (~4600 m in the equatorial Pacific) today. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain this shift, including increased input of terrestrial weathering products to the ocean, decreased bottom-water corrosivity due to increased ocean ventilation, and the decline of shelf carbonates leading to carbonate burial shifting to the deep ocean (known as 'shelf-basin carbonate burial fractionation'). Here we build on earlier attempts to quantify the impacts of carbonate burial fractionation on the CCD by analysing global hypsometric and carbonate burial data and determining the relationship between sea level, shelf carbonate burial extent, and the CCD. We show that if carbonate burial rates remain constant across the Cenozoic then carbonate burial fractionation can explain between 550 and 800 m of the long-term ~1600 m CCD deepening in the equatorial Pacific, ~430 m of which occurring across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT) ~34 million years ago when the CCD permanently deepened by ~500 m. This finding indicates that other processes dominated CCD change before and after the EOT and during events such as the Mid-Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO), but a higher resolution global CCD record is required to better constrain the global magnitude of CCD change during these times. We find that the sensitivity of the CCD to sea level change was at its greatest prior to the EOT and then declined by approximately half due to the loss of extensive carbonate platforms at the end of the Eocene and the intersection of the CCD with large tracts of the abyssal plain.

  13. Origin of the Adventure Subglacial Trench linked to Cenozoic extension in the East Antarctic Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfarra, P.; Salvini, F.

    2016-02-01

    The Antarctic plate occupies a unique geodynamic setting being mostly surrounded by divergent or transform margins. Major intracontinental basins and highlands characterize its bedrock, buried under the 34 Ma East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). Their formation atop of the cratonic lithosphere in the interior of East Antarctica remains a major open question. Post-Mesozoic intraplate extensional tectonic activity has been proposed for their development and is supported by this work. Here we focus on the Adventure Subglacial Trench (AST) whose origin is poorly constrained and controversial, as currently available geophysical models suggest either extensional or compressional tectonic origin. The AST is an over 250-km-long, 60-km-wide subglacial trough, elongated in the NNW-SSE direction adjacent to the westernmost flank of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin, and is parallel to regional scale alignments of magnetic and gravimetric anomalies. Geophysical campaigns allowed better definition of the AST physiography showing its typical half-graben geometry. The rounded morphology of the western flank of the AST was simulated through tectonic numerical modelling. We consider the subglacial landscape to primarily reflect a preserved relict of the tectonic processes affecting the interior of East Antarctica in the Cenozoic, due to the negligible erosion/deposition capability of the EAIS. The bedrock morphology was replicated through the activity of the listric Adventure Fault, characterized by a basal detachment at the base of the crust (34 km) and a vertical displacement of 2.5 km. This length suggests its regional/crustal importance. The predicted displacement is interpreted either as a newly formed fault or as the partial reactivation of a weaker zone along a major Precambrian crustal-scale tectonic boundary. The extensional regime in the AST is part of a more extensive 800-km long intraplate corridor characterized by nearly along-strike extension in Cenozoic times with a left

  14. Cenozoic Source-to-Sink of the African margin of the Equatorial Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouby, Delphine; Chardon, Dominique; Huyghe, Damien; Guillocheau, François; Robin, Cecile; Loparev, Artiom; Ye, Jing; Dall'Asta, Massimo; Grimaud, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the Transform Source to Sink Project (TS2P) is to link the dynamics of the erosion of the West African Craton to the offshore sedimentary basins of the African margin of the Equatorial Atlantic at geological time scales. This margin, alternating transform and oblique segments from Guinea to Nigeria, shows a strong structural variability in the margin width, continental geology and relief, drainage networks and subsidence/accumulation patterns. We analyzed this system combining onshore geology and geomorphology as well as offshore sub-surface data. Mapping and regional correlation of dated lateritic paleo-landscape remnants allows us to reconstruct two physiographic configurations of West Africa during the Cenozoic. We corrected those reconstitutions from flexural isostasy related to the subsequent erosion. These geometries show that the present-day drainage organization stabilized by at least 29 Myrs ago (probably by 34 Myr) revealing the antiquity of the Senegambia, Niger and Volta catchments toward the Atlantic as well as of the marginal upwarp currently forming a continental divide. The drainage rearrangement that lead to this drainage organization was primarily enhanced by the topographic growth of the Hoggar swell and caused a major stratigraphic turnover along the Equatorial margin of West Africa. Elevation differences between paleo-landscape remnants give access to the spatial and temporal distribution of denudation for 3 time-increments since 45 Myrs. From this, we estimate the volumes of sediments and associated lithologies exported by the West African Craton toward different segments of the margin, taking into account the type of eroded bedrock and the successive drainage reorganizations. We compare these data to Cenozoic accumulation histories in the basins and discuss their stratigraphic expression according to the type of margin segment they are preserved in.

  15. Long-term stability of global erosion rates and weathering during late-Cenozoic cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbring, Jane K; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2010-05-13

    Over geologic timescales, CO(2) is emitted from the Earth's interior and is removed from the atmosphere by silicate rock weathering and organic carbon burial. This balance is thought to have stabilized greenhouse conditions within a range that ensured habitable conditions. Changes in this balance have been attributed to changes in topographic relief, where varying rates of continental rock weathering and erosion are superimposed on fluctuations in organic carbon burial. Geological strata provide an indirect yet imperfectly preserved record of this change through changing rates of sedimentation. Widespread observations of a recent (0-5-Myr) fourfold increase in global sedimentation rates require a global mechanism to explain them. Accelerated uplift and global cooling have been given as possible causes, but because of the links between rates of erosion and the correlated rate of weathering, an increase in the drawdown of CO(2) that is predicted to follow may be the cause of global climate change instead. However, globally, rates of uplift cannot increase everywhere in the way that apparent sedimentation rates do. Moreover, proxy records of past atmospheric CO(2) provide no evidence for this large reduction in recent CO(2) concentrations. Here we question whether this increase in global weathering and erosion actually occurred and whether the apparent increase in the sedimentation rate is due to observational biases in the sedimentary record. As evidence, we recast the ocean dissolved (10)Be/(9)Be isotope system as a weathering proxy spanning the past approximately 12 Myr (ref. 14). This proxy indicates stable weathering fluxes during the late-Cenozoic era. The sum of these observations shows neither clear evidence for increased erosion nor clear evidence for a pulse in weathered material to the ocean. We conclude that processes different from an increase in denudation caused Cenozoic global cooling, and that global cooling had no profound effect on spatially and

  16. Episodicity in back-arc tectonic regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stuart R.; Stegman, Dave; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2008-12-01

    The evolution of back-arc basins is tied to the development of the dynamics of the subduction system they are a part of. We present a study of back-arc basins and model their development by implementing 3D time-dependant computer models of subduction including an overriding plate. We define three types of episodicity: pseudo-, quasi- and hyper-episodicity, and find evidence of these in nature. Observations of back-arc basin ages, histories of spreading, quiescence and compression in the overriding plate give us an understanding of the time-development of these subduction zones and back-arc basins. Across the globe today, a number of trenches are advancing—the Izu-Bonin Trench, the Mariana Trench, the Japan Trench, the Java-Sunda Trench and the central portion of the Peru-Chile Trench (the Andes subduction zone). The Izu-Bonin, Mariana and Japan all have established back-arc basins, while the others have documented episodes of spreading, quiescence, compression or a combination of these. The combination of advancing and retreating trench motion places these subduction zones in the category of hyper-episodicity. Quasi-episodicity, in which the back-arc shifts between phases of rifting, spreading and quiescence, is the dominant form of episodic back-arc development in the present. We find this type of episodicity in models for which the system is dynamically consistent—that we have allowed the subducting plate's velocity to be determined by the sinking slabs' buoyancy. Quasi- and hyper-episodicity are only found in subduction zones with relatively high subducting plate velocities, between 6 and 9 cm/year. Finally, those subduction zones for which the subducting plate is moving slowly, such as in the Mediterranean or the Scotia Sea, experience only pseudo-episodicity, where the spreading moves linearly towards the trench but often does so in discrete ridge-jump events.

  17. arcControlTower: the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PanDA, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses a specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the job resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the PanDA server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with the arcControlTower load parameters, the jobs can be controlled by ARC client tools. The system could be extended to other submission systems using central distribution.

  18. Effect of arc distance on temperature field and weld shape during double-sided arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guangjun; ZHANG Huajun; GAO Hongming; WU Lin

    2009-01-01

    A new high efficiency welding method, double-sided double arc welding with double powers (DSAW-D), is developed for thick plate of low alloy high strength steel in this study. It is well known that the thermal cycles have an important influence on the microstructure, shape, stress, distortion and mechanical property. The DSA W-D method can control the tempernture field on a wide range by regulating the distance between two arcs, improve the rnicrostructure and prevent hot and cold cracking of high strength steel. But at present, the effect of arc distance on the temperature field and shape is not clear. Therefore, the paper researches the effect of arc distance on the temperature field and weld pool during DSA W-D using finite element method. The transient temperature field of different arc distance in DSAW-D is calculated.To verify the numerical results, the temperature is measured by the thermo-couple and the calculated results agree approximately with experimental data. Farther, the thermal property and mutual effect of double-sided arcs are investigated. The temperature distributions and weld pool profile at different arc distances are obtained. The results show that arc distance is a very important factor to affect the heat process.

  19. ANALYSIS OF ENERGY AND MASS FLOWS IN AN ARC HEATER WITH INTENSIVELY BLOWN ELECTRIC ARC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gregor, Jan; Jakubová, I.; Šenk, J.

    Brno : Masaryk University, 2008. s. 173-174. ISBN N. [Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry/2nd./. 31.08.2008-04.09.2008, Brno] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Electric arc * mathematical model * energy flows * temperature distribution * velocity distribution * electric intensity * arc radius Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  20. Slab-derived fluids, fore-arc hydration, and sub-arc magmatism beneath Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Hiroto; Nakajima, Junichi; Shiina, Takahiro; Kimura, Jun-Ichi

    2015-03-01

    We estimate the three-dimensional (3-D) P wave attenuation structure beneath Kyushu, Japan, using a large number of high-quality waveform data. Our results show that the mantle wedge is characterized by high-attenuation regions in the fore-arc corner and in the back-arc beneath volcanoes, with the two regions separated by a low-attenuation area. The volcanic gap in central Kyushu is underlain by low attenuation below the Moho. High attenuation in the fore arc is probably associated with serpentinized peridotite, while that in the back arc is interpreted as an upwelling flow that is the source of arc magmas. The presence of low-attenuation mantle that separates the high-attenuation hydrated, fore-arc, and back-arc mantle regions suggests that fluids are supplied from two depth levels of the slab by different mechanisms. Low attenuation beneath the volcanic gap probably results from intricate 3-D mantle flow that is caused by tectonic processes such as back-arc extension and ridge collision.

  1. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. PMID:26558995

  2. Cenozoic stratigraphic development in the north Chilean forearc: Implications for basin development and uplift history of the Central Andean margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Adrian J.; Evenstar, Laura

    2010-11-01

    Analysis of the Cenozoic stratigraphic development of the forearc of northern Chile between 18°S and 23°30'S, allows constraints to be placed on the timing and nature of basin formation and the uplift history of the Central Andes. Chronostratigraphic charts have been constructed from 20 lithostratigraphic sections distributed throughout the forearc. Sections were taken from the Longitudinal Valley, Central Depression, Calama Basin, Salar de Atacama, Precordillera and the western flank of the Western Cordillera. Correlation and timing of events is largely based on the presence of dated volcanic horizons in all the studied sections. Three chronostratigraphic units are defined based upon the presence of regional unconformities. Deposition of the Late Eocene to Early Miocene chronostratigraphic unit (38-19 Ma) commenced across an irregular unconformity surface between ˜ 38 and 30 Ma with alluvial fan and fluvial sediments derived from the east interbedded with rhyolitic ignimbrites. Aggradation after 25 Ma resulted in development of a large broad basin over much of northern Chile that expanded eastwards through onlap onto basement. Deposition terminated around 19 Ma with the development of an angular unconformity over much, but not all of the study area. During deposition of the Early to Late Miocene chronostratigraphic unit (18-10 Ma) emergent volcanic source areas to the east provided catchments for large fluvial systems that drained westwards into endorheic ephemeral lacustrine basins. Fold growth affected sedimentation restricting accommodation space to small intra-thrust basins in the Precordillera and localised disruption and unconformity development in the Longitudinal Valley. The Late Miocene to present day chronostratigraphic unit (10-0 Ma) followed the development of a regional angular unconformity at 10 Ma. Sedimentation was restricted to a series of thrust-bounded endorheic basins in both the Central Depression and the Precordillera sourced from the east

  3. Fronts of Stress Wave in Anisotropic Piezoelectric Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘颖; 刘凯欣; 高凌天

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic of wave fronts in anisotropic piezoelectric media is analysed by adopting the generalized characteristic theory. Analytical expressions for wave velocities and wave fronts are formulated. Apart from the ordinary characteristics, a new phenomenon, energy velocity funnel, is formed on the wave fronts of quasitransverse waves in anisotropic piezoelectric materials. A three-dimensional representation of wave fronts in anisotropic piezoelectric materials is given for a better understanding of the new phenomena.

  4. Permanent GPS network around the bend of the Jura Arc: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Christian; Walpersdorf, Andrea; Sakic, Pierre; Rabin, Mickael; Champagnac, Jean daniel

    2014-05-01

    The Jura Mountain, the westernmost belt of the alpine orogeny, is one of the best-studied orogenic arcs in the world. The Jura arc is a typical fold-and-thrust belt, with a main décollement thrust localized in the Triasic evaporites under the Jurassic-Cretaceous series. It is directly linked to the alpine orogenic wedge, especially in term of critical taper. It is supposed to be still active in collision mode, which would rise up the issue of its relation with the Alps to the East, currently undergoing post-orogenic gravitational potential adjustment. Nevertheless, its current activity and recent deformation remain a matter of debate, few neotectonic-related data being available in this area. The Jura is crosscut by left-lateral strike-slip faults in a radial scheme with respect to the arc, and recent seismicity along one of them, the Vuache fault (Annecy earthquake Ml 5.3 1996), and at the northern front of the belt (Beaume-les-Dames earthquake, Ml 5.1, 2004), argues for ongoing active deformation across the Jura Mountain. Here we present preliminary results of permanent GPS network surrounding the Jura belt (RENAG and RPG data), which tend to show very slow, yet self-consistent strain pattern of the order of some tenth of mm/yr over 100 km-long typical baselines, with shortening perpendicular to the arc, and extension parallel to its axial trend. We also characterize a slow uplift in the same order of magnitude, which appears to be correlated to the current uplift observed in the Alps. Indeed, the uplift velocities are continuously decreasing from the core of the Alps (+2 mm/yr) to the westernmost part of the Jura (+0,4 mm/yr) and to the stable foreland (-0.1 mm/yr). Actually, from the Po plain to the Jura foreland, the GPS-related uplift velocities are well correlated to the topography, and the Jura arc appears connected to the Alps from this point of view. In order to better determine the deformation pattern in the Jura arc, we present a new regional GNSS

  5. Method to reduce arc blow during DC arc welding of pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espina-Hernandez, J. H.; Rueda-Morales, G.L.; Caleyo, F.; Hallen, J. M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, (Mexico); Lopez-Montenegro, A.; Perz-Baruch, E. [Pemex Exploracion y Produccion, Tabasco, (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Steel pipelines are huge ferromagnetic structures and can be easily subjected to arc blow during the DC arc welding process. The development of methods to avoid arc blow during pipeline DC arc welding is a major objective in the pipeline industry. This study developed a simple procedure to compensate the residual magnetic field in the groove during DC arc welding. A Gaussmeter was used to perform magnetic flux density measurements in pipelines in southern Mexico. These data were used to perform magnetic finite element simulations using FEMM. Different variables were studied such as the residual magnetic field in the groove or the position of the coil with respect to the groove. An empirical predictive equation was developed from these trials to compensate for the residual magnetic field. A new method of compensating for the residual magnetic field in the groove by selecting the number of coil turns and the position of the coil with respect to the groove was established.

  6. Research of Arc Chamber Optimization Techniques Based on Flow Field and Arc Joint Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianying; Guo, Yujing; Zhang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    The preliminary design of an arc chamber in the 550 kV SF6 circuit breaker was proposed in accordance with the technical requirements and design experience. The structural optimization was carried out according to the no-load flow field simulation results and verified by no-load pressure measurement. Based on load simulation results such as temperature field variation at the arc area and the tendency of post arc current under different recovery voltage, the second optimal design was completed and its correctness was certificated by a breaking test. Results demonstrate that the interrupting capacity of an arc chamber can be evaluated by the comparison of the gas medium recovery speed and post arc current growth rate.

  7. Argon-dominated plasma beam generated by filtered vacuum arc and its substrate etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique to etch a substrate as a pre-treatment prior to functional film deposition was developed using a filtered vacuum arc plasma. An Ar-dominated plasma beam was generated from filtered carbon arc plasma by introducing appropriate flow rate of Ar gas in a T-shape filtered arc deposition (T-FAD) system. The radiation spectra emitted from the filtered plasma beam in front of a substrate table were measured. The substrate was etched by the Ar-dominated plasma beam. The principal results are summarized as follows. At a high flow rate of Ar gas (50 ml/min), when the bias was applied to the substrate, the plasma was attracted toward the substrate table and the substrate was well etched without film formation on the substrate. Super hard alloy (WC), bearing steel (SUJ2), and Si wafer were etched by the Ar-dominated plasma beam. The etching rate was dependent on the kind of substrate. The roughness of the substrate increased, when the etching rate was high. A pulse bias etched the substrate without roughening the substrate surface excessively.

  8. The geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Paleoproterozoic Green Mountain arc: A composite(?), bimodal, oceanic, fringing arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D.S.; Barnes, C.G.; Premo, W.R.; Snoke, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    The inferred subduction affinity of the ~1780-Ma Green Mountain arc, a dominantly bimodal igneous terrane (together with immature marine and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks) accreted to the southern margin of the Wyoming province, is integral to arc-accretion models of the Paleoproterozoic growth of southern Laurentia. Conversely, the dominantly bimodal nature of many putative arc-related igneous suites throughout southern Laurentia, including the Green Mountain arc, has also been used to support models of growth by extension of pre-existing crust. We report new geochemical and isotopic data from ~1780-Ma gabbroic and granodioritic to tonalitic rocks of the Big Creek Gneiss, interpreted as consanguineous with previously studied metavolcanic rocks of the Green Mountain Formation.The ~1780-Ma Big Creek Gneiss mafic rocks show clear geochemical signatures of a subduction origin and provide no supporting evidence for extensional tectonism. The ~1780-Ma Big Creek Gneiss felsic rocks are attributed to partial melting of mafic and/or mixed lower-crustal material. The bimodal nature of the suite results from the combination of arc basalts and felsic crustal melts. The lack of andesite is consistent with the observed tholeiitic differentiation trend of the mafic magmas. The lower e{open}Nd(1780Ma) values for the felsic rocks vs. the mafic rocks suggest that the unexposed lower crust of the arc may be older than the arc and that Trans-Hudson- or Penokean-aged rocks possibly form the substratum of the arc. Our results reinforce previous interpretations that arc-related magmatism played a key role in the Paleoproterozoic crustal growth of southern Laurentia, but also support the possibility of unexposed older crust as basement to the arcs. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Auxiliary-Arc Electrodes for MHD Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The important role of electrode phenomena in the operation of magneto aerodynamic machines is well known. In particular, the voltage drops which occur in the boundary layer in the immediate neighbourhood of the electrode may reduce the output of the apparatus. These voltage drops are caused partly by the increased resistance presented by the boundary layer in the neighbourhood of the electrode when the latter is appreciably colder than the gas, and partly by the fact that the electrode is not at a temperature sufficient to be emissive. Auxiliary-arc electrodes that have been constructed and tested seem to provide a solution both of the cold boundary layer problem and of the cathode emissivity problem. For this purpose an arc is established between a refractory metal cathode placed behind and clear of the generator wall and an anode forming part of the wall. The arc column can be activated by a rotational movement under the effect of a magnetic field, which may be that of the machine itself. The mechanical arrangement of the electrodes is such that, with a weak flow of gas (argon for example), it is possible to maintain a protective atmosphere around the arc cathode, while the arc anode is strongly cooled by the wall. The gas flow also has the effect of forcing the arc column towards the stream, thus increasing the conductivity of the boundary layer. Furthermore, the arc column behaves as a virtual cathode, from which a sizeable electron current can be extracted. Electrodes constructed on this principle have been tested on gas streams composed of fuel-oil combustion products. By using them as cathodes it has been possible to extract a current of 5 A without the voltage drop between the electrode and the gas exceeding 10 V. Comparative tests have been carried out with cooled metal electrodes, in which case the voltage drop is of the order of 120 V. The arc electrodes tested have operated for several hours without any apparent damage. In spite of the energy which has

  10. Forearc Deformation, Arc Volcanism, and Landscape Evolution near the Cocos-Nazca-Caribbean Triple Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, K. D.; Fisher, D.; Gardner, T.; Protti, M.

    2005-12-01

    New geologic mapping in SE Costa Rica and SW Panama reveals a system of structures and landscape features that are actively propagating with the Cocos-Nazca-Caribbean Triple Junction. The triple junction migrates to the SE at ~50 km/my, so the upper plate inboard of the Nazca plate experiences a rapid change from steep, slow subduction of the Nazca plate to shallow, rapid subduction of the Cocos plate. High plate boundary coupling for ~100 km NW of the triple junction has led to the development of the Fila Costena Thrust Belt. Balanced cross-sections indicate that shortening rates are highest near the center of the thrust belt, and decrease to the SE nearest the triple junction, where the thrust belt abruptly terminates. Right lateral tear faults cut the thrusts of the Fila Costena and allow for a sharp gradient in upper plate shortening above the subducted projection of the Panama Fracture Zone (PFZ), or the Cocos-Nazca boundary. East of the triple junction, a ridge exposes a fault-related anticline that may represent the incipient propagation of the Fila Costena into Panama. The volcanic arc is active just to the east of the onland projection of the subducting PFZ (e.g., Volcan Baru), with the extinct Talamanca arc lying to the west of this projection. Lahar fans on the slopes of the active Volcan Baru are analogous to the backtilted lahars now restricted to the rear of the Fila Costena. The spatial and temporal distribution of arc volcanism is consistent with a mantle wedge restricted to the east of the PFZ that migrates eastward with the triple junction. The Rio Chiriqui drainage system is currently the only river that carries arc volcanics to the eastern thrust front. The river skirts the southeast edge of the thrust belt and is inset into lahar fans on the slopes of Volcan Baru. Uplifted Quaternary fluvial terraces, located several kilometers west from the current drainage system, are offset at the thrust front by about 100-150 m. Andesite clasts in these

  11. Light Front Nuclear Physics Toy Models, Static Sources and Tilted Light Front Coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Blunden, P G; Miller, G A

    2000-01-01

    The principles behind the detailed results of a light-front mean field theory of finite nuclei are elucidated by deriving the nucleon mode equation using a simple general argument, based on the idea that a static source in equal time coordinates corresponds to a moving source in light front coordinates. This idea also allows us to solve several simple toy model examples: scalar field in a box, 1+1 dimensional bag model, three-dimensional harmonic oscillator and the Hulthén potential. The latter provide simplified versions of momentum distributions and form factors of relevance to experiments. In particular, the relativistic correction to the mean square radius of a nucleus is shown to be very small. Solving these simple examples suggests another more general approach-- the use of tilted light front coordinates. The simple examples are made even simpler.

  12. Novel Perspectives from Light-Front QCD, Superconformal Algebra, and Light-Front Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Brodsky, Stanley J

    2015-01-01

    Light-Front Quantization -- Dirac's "Front Form" -- provides a physical, frame-independent formalism for hadron dynamics and structure. Observables such as structure functions, transverse momentum distributions, and distribution amplitudes are defined from the hadronic LFWFs. One obtains new insights into the hadronic mass scale, the hadronic spectrum, and the functional form of the QCD running coupling in the nonperturbative domain using light-front holography. In addition, superconformal algebra leads to remarkable supersymmetric relations between mesons and baryons. I also discuss evidence that the antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is non-universal, i.e., flavor dependent, and why shadowing and antishadowing phenomena may be incompatible with the momentum and other sum rules for the nuclear parton distribution functions.

  13. Novel Perspectives from Light-Front QCD, Super-Conformal Algebra, and Light-Front Holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Light-Front Quantization – Dirac’s “Front Form” – provides a physical, frame-independent formalism for hadron dynamics and structure. Observables such as structure functions, transverse momentum distributions, and distribution amplitudes are defined from the hadronic LFWFs. One obtains new insights into the hadronic mass scale, the hadronic spectrum, and the functional form of the QCD running coupling in the nonperturbative domain using light-front holography. In addition, superconformal algebra leads to remarkable supersymmetric relations between mesons and baryons. I also discuss evidence that the antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is nonuniversal; i.e., flavor dependent, and why shadowing and antishadowing phenomena may be incompatible with the momentum and other sum rules for the nuclear parton distribution functions.

  14. Light front nuclear physics: Toy models, static sources, and tilted light front coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles behind the detailed results of a light-front mean field theory of finite nuclei are elucidated by deriving the nucleon mode equation using a simple general argument, based on the idea that a static source in equal time coordinates corresponds to a moving source in light front coordinates. This idea also allows us to solve several simple toy model examples: scalar field in a box, (1+1)-dimensional bag model, three-dimensional harmonic oscillator and the Hulthen potential. The latter provide simplified versions of momentum distributions and form factors of relevance to experiments. In particular, the relativistic correction to the mean square radius of a nucleus is shown to be very small. Solving these simple examples suggests another more general approach--the use of tilted light front coordinates. The simple examples are made even simpler. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  15. STRUCTURE OF WAVE FRONT AND ORGANIZATION CENTER IN EXCITABLE MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘深泉

    2004-01-01

    With help of establishing the moving coordinate on the wave front surface and the perturbation analysis in the boundary layer, the structures of wave front and organization center in excitable media were studied. The eikonal equation of wave front surface and general equation of organization center were obtained. These eikonal equations reveal the wave front surfaces have structures of twisted scroll wave and Mobius band, the organization centers have structures of knotted and linked ring. These theoretical results not only explain the wave patterns of BZ ( Belousov-Zhabotinskii ) chemical reaction but also give several possibility structures of wave front surface and organization center in general excitable media.

  16. Residual gauge fixing in light-front QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, W M; Zhang, Wei-Min; Harindranth, Avaroth

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the nontrivial features of light-front QCD is a central goal in current investigations of nonperturbative light-front field theory. We find that, with the choice of light-front gauge with antisymmetric boundary conditions for the field variables, the residual gauge freedom is fixed and the light-front QCD vacuum is trivial. The nontrivial structure in light-front QCD is determined by non-vanishing asymptotic physical (transverse) gauge fields at longitudinal infinity, which are responsible for nonzero topological winding number.

  17. Wave-front recovery from two orthogonal sheared interferograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servin, M.; Malacara, Daniel; Marroquin, J. L.

    1996-08-01

    We present a new technique for using the information of two orthogonal lateral-shear interferograms to estimate an aspheric wave front. The wave-front estimation from sheared inteferometric data may be considered an ill-posed problem in the sense of Hadamard. We apply Thikonov regularization theory to estimate the wave front that has produced the lateral sheared interferograms as the minimizer of a positive definite-quadratic cost functional. The introduction of the regularization term permits one to find a well-defined and stable solution to the inverse shearing problem over the wave-front aperture as well as to reduce wave-front noise as desired.

  18. Study on Expansion Process of EDM Arc Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsu, Wataru; Shimoyamada, Mayumi; Kunieda, Masanori

    In order to understand the phenomena of electrical discharge machining (EDM), the characteristics of transition arc plasma in EDM were investigated. The arc plasma was directly observed with a high speed video camera. In addition, to learn more about arc plasma expansion, plasma temperature was measured by spectroscopy. The arc plasma temperature was obtained by measuring the radiant fluxes of two different wavelengths from the arc plasma and applying the line pair method. Furthermore, a new expansion model for EDM arc plasma was proposed based on the observations, and validated by comparing experimental and computed results of the discharge crater.

  19. Photoelectric detection electric arc in energetic arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leks, Jan

    2001-08-01

    The evolution of photoelectric converter, fiber optics and integrated circuits, in particular optic detectors, increases area of applying of the industrial measuring and control systems that used IR detectors. One of the more important is optic detection of electric arc in industrial energetic arrangements. That kind of detection is sure, easy to apply in existing industrial apparatus a d it is cheaper than another way of detection. Additionally optic detection of electric arc is safety for attendance persons and may work on computer system. The article presents an example of circuit with semiconductor IR photoelectric detector to detection of electric arc and points at the most important questions which should be taken into consideration in designing instruments like described one.

  20. Circular arc snakes and kinematic surface generation

    KAUST Repository

    Barton, Michael

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the theory, discretization, and numerics of curves which are evolving such that part of their shape, or at least their curvature as a function of arc length, remains unchanged. The discretization of a curve as a smooth sequence of circular arcs is well suited for such purposes, and allows us to reduce evolution of curves to the evolution of a control point collection in a certain finite-dimensional shape space. We approach this evolution by a 2-step process: linearized evolution via optimized velocity fields, followed by optimization in order to exactly fulfill all geometric side conditions. We give applications to freeform architecture, including "rationalization" of a surface by congruent arcs, form finding and, most interestingly, non-static architecture. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Evolution of the stress field in the southern Scotia Arc from the late Mesozoic to the present-day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro, Adolfo; López-Martínez, Jerónimo; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Bohoyo, Fernando; Mink, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    The geological evolution of the Scotia Arc, which developed between Antarctica and South America, has facilitated the connection between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and, has important global implications. To improve the knowledge of the late Mesozoic evolution of the southern Scotia Arc, over 6000 brittle mesostructures were measured over the last 20 years at different outcrops from the northern Antarctic Peninsula and the South Shetland Islands as well as the James Ross and South Orkney archipelagos. This dataset covers a length of more than 1000 km of the arc. Fault data were analysed using the Etchecopar, y-R, Right Dihedra, Stress Inversion and Search Grid Inversion Palaeostress Determination methods. A total of 275 stress tensors were obtained. The results showed that the maximum horizontal stress was in the ENE-WSW and the NW-SE orientations and that the horizontal extension tensors were oriented NE-SW and NW-SE. In addition, seismic activity and focal mechanism solutions were analysed using the Gephart method to establish the present-day stress field and characterise the active tectonics. The results obtained suggest that there is a regional NE-SW compression and a NW-SE extension regime at the present day. The Southern Scotia Arc has a complex geological history due to the different tectonic settings (transform, convergent and divergent) that have affected this sector during its geological evolution from the late Mesozoic until the present day. Six stress fields were obtained from the brittle mesostructure population analysis in the region. The NW-SE and N-S maximum horizontal stresses were related to a combination of Mesozoic oceanic subduction of the former Phoenix Plate under the Pacific margin of the Antarctic Plate, Mesozoic-Cenozoic subduction of the northern Weddell Sea and the Oligocene to the Middle Miocene dextral strike-slip movement between the Scotia and Antarctic plates along the South Scotia Ridge. The NE-SW compression was related to

  2. Light-Front Quantization of Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, Prem P.

    1996-01-01

    Some basic topics in Light-Front (LF) quantized field theory are reviewed. Poincar\\`e algebra and the LF Spin operator are discussed. The local scalar field theory of the conventional framework is shown to correspond to a non-local Hamiltonian theory on the LF in view of the constraint equations on the phase space, which relate the bosonic condensates to the non-zero modes. This new ingredient is useful to describe the spontaneous symmetry breaking on the LF. The instability of the symmetric ...

  3. Covariance constraints for light front wave functions

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Light front wave functions (LFWFs) are often utilized to model parton distributions and form factors where their transverse and longitudinal momenta are tied to each other in some manner that is often guided by convenience. On the other hand, the cross talk of transverse and longitudinal momenta is governed by Poincar\\'e symmetry and thus popular LFWF models are often not usable to model more intricate quantities such as generalized parton distributions. In this contribution a closer look to this issue is given and it is shown how to overcome the issue for two--body LFWFs.

  4. AIRS Storm Front Approaching California (animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the AIRS Storm Front Approaching California Animation NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument is able to peel back cloud cover to reveal 3-D structure of a storm's water vapor content, information that can be used to improve weather forecast models. In this animation the initial visible cloud image series shows a front moving toward the West Coast of the United States as a low pressure area moves into the Pacific Northwest. The 'Pineapple Express,' a stream of moisture that originates in the tropics South of Hawaii and usually crosses Mexico to enter New Mexico and Texas, has shifted Westward and is also visible moving into Baja California. The area preceding the front appears to be relatively clear in the visible images. As the view shifts from the visible to the infrared wavelengths which highlight water vapor, we see both cloud areas contain heavy burdens of moisture. The area which appears clear in the visible images is seen to contain water vapor near the coastline as well. The viewpoint then rotates so that we can see the vertical cross section of the fronts. The variability of the vertical extent of water vapor and the amount is now clearly visible. The storm moving in from the Gulf of Alaska is more heavily laden with water vapor than that moving in from the Southwest. The moisture is concentrated in the lower atmosphere. The colors indicate the amount of water vapor present. Blue areas denote low water vapor content; green areas are medium water vapor content; red areas signify high water vapor content. The vertical grid for the final frame ranges from 250 millibar pressure at the top to 1000 millibar pressure at the bottom. The top is about 10 km (6.2 miles) above the surface of the Earth. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments

  5. CDF front end electronics: The RABBIT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new crate-based front end system has been built featuring low cost, compact packaging, fast readout, command capability, 16 bit digitiziation, and a high degree of redundancy. The crate can contain a variety of instrumentation modules and is designed to be placed near the detector. Remote, special purpose processors direct the data readout. Channel-by-channel pedestal subtraction and threshold comparison in the crate allow the skipping of empty channels. The system is suitable for the readout of a very large number of channels. (orig.)

  6. Cold Fronts by Merging of Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Birnboim, Yuval; Keshet, Uri; Hernquist, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Cold fronts (CFs) are found in most galaxy clusters, as well as in some galaxies and groups of galaxies. We propose that some CFs are relics of merging between two shocks propagating in the same direction. Such shock mergers typically result in a quasi-spherical, factor ~1.4-2.7 discontinuity in density and in temperature. These CFs may be found as far out as the virial shock, unlike what is expected in other CF formation models. As a demonstration of this effect, we use one dimensional simul...

  7. On the Trail of Joan of Arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Joyce Forristal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The year 2012 marked the 600th anniversary of the birthday of Joan of Arc (Fr., Jeanne d’Arc (1412–1431. Tributes to this national heroine can be found all over France. There are literally countless statues, streets and restaurants named after her and many sites dedicated to her life. However, despite widespread social and mechanical reproduction and cultural naming in relation to the Maid of Orléans, there is no official network or integrated signage in France to promote cultural heritage tourism to the numerous Joan of Arc sites and festivals, even though her life and death, by any measure, were seminal events in the country’s history. Unfortunately, the pilgrim who wants to follow or intersect with Joan of Arc’s trail through France, for cultural, historical or religious reasons, must do so without much help. Using Actor Network Theory and Site Sacralization Theory as framing devices, this paper explores human actors and tangible and intangible non-human factors that may have contributed to the lack of a unified tourism product despite the existence of an adequate Joan of Arc tourismscape. Insights gleaned from this research include Joan’s conflicted status as both/either saint and/or patriot, the existence of no cooperation or linkage between Joan of Arc sites, and cautious French tourism development policies. Several possible scenarios are suggested as suitable means to help implement or foster the creation of an on-the-ground or virtual Joan of Arc trail or tour.

  8. Speed and structure of turbulent fronts in pipe flow

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Baofang; Hof, Björn; Avila, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of laminar-turbulent fronts in pipe flow is investigated for Reynolds numbers between Re=1900 and Re=5500 using extensive direct numerical simulations. In this range the flow undergoes a continuous transition from localised puffs to weakly expanding and ultimately to strongly expanding turbulent slugs (Barkley et al. 2015). We here investigate the physical distinction between these two types of slug by analysing time-resolved statistics of their downstream fronts in the frame moving at the bulk turbulent advection speed. While weak fronts travel slower than the bulk turbulent advection speed, implying local relaminarisation, strong fronts travel faster and so feed on the laminar flow ahead. At Re$\\approx$2900 the downstream front speed becomes faster than the advection speed, marking the onset of strong fronts. We argue that large temporal fluctuations of production and dissipation at the laminar-turbulent interface drive the dynamical switches between the two types of front observed up to Re$\\si...

  9. ArcAid interactive archery assistant

    OpenAIRE

    Jeroen Vervaeke; Jente Ameye; Sievert van Esch; Jelle Saldien; Steven Verstockt

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design process of a bow aiming system, called ArcAid, which is an interactive archery assistant. The main goal of ArcAid is to introduce a way for beginner Robin Hoods to learn the art of archery to its fullest. In order to achieve this goal, our smartphone-based design focuses on a fun and interactive learning process that gives constant feedback to the user on how to hit a certain goal. A SPIKE high- end laser sensor is used for the distance measurement and the smar...

  10. Electric-arc steam plasma generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshakov, A. S.; Urbakh, E. K.; Radko, S. I.; Urbakh, A. E.; Faleev, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigation results on the arc plasmatorch for water-steam heating are presented. The construction arrangement of steam plasma generator with copper electrodes of the stepped geometry was firstly implemented. The energy characteristics of plasmatorch and erosion of electrodes reflect the features of their behavior at arc glow in the plasma-forming environment of steam. The results of numerical study of the thermal state of the composite copper-steel electrodes had a significant influence on optimization of anode water-cooling aimed at improvement of its operation life.

  11. Dynamic Arc-Flags in Road Networks

    OpenAIRE

    D 'angelo, Gianlorenzo; Frigioni, Daniele; Vitale, Camillo

    2011-01-01

    International audience In this work we introduce a new data structure, named Road-Signs, which allows us to efficiently update the Arc-Flags of a graph in a dynamic scenario. Road-Signs can be used to compute Arc-Flags, can be efficiently updated and do not require large space consumption for many real-world graphs like, e.g., graphs arising from road networks. In detail, we define an algorithm to preprocess Road-Signs and an algorithm to update them each time that a weight increase operat...

  12. Architectural Surfaces and Structures from Circular Arcs

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Ling

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades, the popularity of freeform shapes in contemporary architecture poses new challenges to digital design. One of them is the process of rationalization, i.e. to make freeform skins or structures affordable to manufacture, which draws the most attention from geometry researchers. In this thesis, we aim to realize this process with simple geometric primitives, circular arcs. We investigate architectural surfaces and structures consisting of circular arcs. Our focus is lying on how to employ them nicely and repetitively in architectural design, in order to decrease the cost in manufacturing. Firstly, we study Darboux cyclides, which are algebraic surfaces of order ≤ 4. We provide a computational tool to identify all families of circles on a given cyclide based on the spherical model of M ̈obius geometry. Practical ways to design cyclide patches that pass through certain inputs are presented. In particular, certain triples of circle families on Darboux cyclides may be suitably arranged as 3-webs. We provide a complete classification of all possible 3-webs of circles on Darboux cyclides. We then investigate the circular arc snakes, which are smooth sequences of circu- lar arcs. We evolve the snakes such that their curvature, as a function of arc length, remains unchanged. The evolution of snakes is utilized to approximate given surfaces by circular arcs or to generated freeform shapes, and it is realized by a 2-step pro- cess. More interestingly, certain 6-arc snake with boundary constraints can produce a smooth self motion, which can be employed to build flexible structures. Another challenging topic is approximating smooth freeform skins with simple panels. We contribute to this problem area by approximating a negatively-curved 5 surface with a smooth union of rational bilinear patches. We provide a proof for vertex consistency of hyperbolic nets using the CAGD approach of the rational B ́ezier form. Moreover, we use Darboux transformations for the

  13. A numerical simulation of ablation controlled arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godin, D.; Trepanier, J.Y. [Ecole Polytechnique, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Eby, S.D. [Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de Recherche en Calcul Applique, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Robin-Jouan, P. [GEC-Alsthom T and D, Villeurbanne, (France)

    1998-09-01

    An approach to model the ablation phenomenon of ablation controlled arcs using computational fluid dynamics was presented. Ablation controlled arcs are found in high voltage electrical equipment such as fuses and circuit-breakers. A qualitative prediction of the ablation level is critical from an industrial point of view because deliberate use of ablation is made to increase the pressure in a circuit-breaker chamber to allow for an efficient extinction when the current returns to zero. The numerical model was validated by comparing results of published experimental data. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Small Universal Petri Nets with Inhibitor Arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, Sergiu; Pelz, Elisabeth; Verlan, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the problem of construction of small-size universal Petri nets with inhibitor arcs. We consider four descriptional complexity parameters: the number of places, transitions, inhibitor arcs, and the maximal degree of a transition, each of which we try to minimize. We give six constructions having the following values of parameters (listed in the above order): $(30,34,13,3)$, $(14, 31, 51, 8)$, $(11, 31, 79, 11)$, $(21,25,13,5)$, $(67, 64, 8, 3)$, $(58, 55, 8, 5)$ that improve the...

  15. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  16. Arcing Model of a Disconnector and its Effect on VFTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the computational process of very fast transient over-voltage (VFTO), it is essential to find an accurate model for a gas insulated substation. The arcing model of the disconnector is particularly important. The general arcing model is not able to give a good description of the arc development process. In this paper, based on the physical process of arcing and existing arc models (the exponential time-varying resistance model and the segmental arcing models), a dynamic arcing model is proposed, which is divided into two stages before and after the zero crossing. The dynamic arcing model combines hyperbola time-varying resistance and the Mayr model to describe the dynamic process of arcing. The present paper creates an arc model blockset upon the Matlab/Simulink software platform. Moreover for a specific 1100 kV station, VFTO is simulated in detail based on different arcing models. It is demonstrated that the dynamic arcing model can describe the physical arc process precisely and is useful for improving the accuracy of VFTO simulations

  17. Geochemical Characteristics of the Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks in Central Qiangtang, Tibet: Relation with the Uplift of the Qinghai Tibet Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Fuwen; PAN Guitang; XU Qiang

    2001-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rocks in central Qiangtang are tectonically outcropped in the transitional area where crust of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau thins northwards and the Passion's ratios of the crust increases abnormally northwards. Of all Cenozoic volcanic rocks of northern Tibet, the volcanic rocks in Qiangtang area is the oldest one with ages from 44.1±1.0 Ma to 32.6±0.8 Ma. Petrological and geochemical studies of the volcanic rocks in central Qiangtang suggest they formed in the extension environment of post collision-orogeny and were the product of mixture of magmas from crust and mantle. The uplift of the northern plateau is closely related to decoupling of mantle lithosphere,crustal extension and thinning as well as volcanism. Therefore, it is inferred that the main uplift of the northern plateau began from about 40 Ma ago.

  18. Universal Millimeter-Wave Radar Front End

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Raul M.

    2010-01-01

    A quasi-optical front end allows any arbitrary polarization to be transmitted by controlling the timing, amplitude, and phase of the two input ports. The front end consists of two independent channels horizontal and vertical. Each channel has two ports transmit and receive. The transmit signal is linearly polarized so as to pass through a periodic wire grid. It is then propagated through a ferrite Faraday rotator, which rotates the polarization state 45deg. The received signal is propagated through the Faraday rotator in the opposite direction, undergoing a further 45 of polarization rotation due to the non-reciprocal action of the ferrite under magnetic bias. The received signal is now polarized at 90deg relative to the transmit signal. This signal is now reflected from the wire grid and propagated to the receive port. The horizontal and vertical channels are propagated through, or reflected from, another wire grid. This design is an improvement on the state of the art in that any transmit signal polarization can be chosen in whatever sequence desired. Prior systems require switching of the transmit signal from the amplifier, either mechanically or by using high-power millimeter-wave switches. This design can have higher reliability, lower mass, and more flexibility than mechanical switching systems, as well as higher reliability and lower losses than systems using high-power millimeter-wave switches.

  19. AFEII Analog Front End Board Design Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinov, Paul; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This document describes the design of the 2nd iteration of the Analog Front End Board (AFEII), which has the function of receiving charge signals from the Central Fiber Tracker (CFT) and providing digital hit pattern and charge amplitude information from those charge signals. This second iteration is intended to address limitations of the current AFE (referred to as AFEI in this document). These limitations become increasingly deleterious to the performance of the Central Fiber Tracker as instantaneous luminosity increases. The limitations are inherent in the design of the key front end chips on the AFEI board (the SVXIIe and the SIFT) and the architecture of the board itself. The key limitations of the AFEI are: (1) SVX saturation; (2) Discriminator to analog readout cross talk; (3) Tick to tick pedestal variation; and (4) Channel to channel pedestal variation. The new version of the AFE board, AFEII, addresses these limitations by use of a new chip, the TriP-t and by architectural changes, while retaining the well understood and desirable features of the AFEI board.

  20. An island in front of Izola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franci Steinman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Maritime construction in front of Izola restitutes an enriched former state. The island is positioned in a place where there are no legal regimes enforced by the state or local community. Legal regimes that determine the exploitation of water rights and limitations (management, exploitation, use can actually limit all. Therefore their synthesis has to be the starting point for analysing the harmony of present uses and for planning future uses of the sea and coastal area. For example the aquatorium of the shellfish mariculture positioned in the Strunjan Bay without adequate analysis of the prevailing conditions is causing conflicts of uses, unacceptable limiting of general use of the sea and prohibitive limitations in neighbouring areas. The analysis done for the island in front of Izola shows that there are no such consequences. Only uses in the public interest were proposed, since when assessing suitability first public and then common interests where considered, possible specific (e.g. entrepreneurial uses were permitted only if the afore mentioned weren’t obstructed. Thus integral management of the coastal area was enabled, with respect to functional ties between the land and sea.

  1. Biomechanics of front and back squat exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squat constitutes one of the most popular exercises to strengthen the muscles of the lower limbs. It is considered one of the most widely spread exercises for muscle sport training and is part of the competition movements comprised within olympic weight-lifting. In physical rehabilitation, squats are used for muscular recovery after different injuries of the lower limbs, especially the knee. In previous anterior cruciate ligament injuries, the mini-squats are generally used, in a knee flexion motion range from 0 deg. to 50 deg. because in this range the shear forces, the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral compression forces decrease related to greater flexion angles. The aim of this work is to make a comparative bidimensional study of the kinematic and dynamic variables of the excecution of the parallel squat exercise with the front and back bar. It is observed in the knee a better development of energy with the front bar, allowing a better muscular exercise with the same load. The mean power absorbed by the hip with the back bar is considerably greater, associated to the speed of the gesture

  2. Travelling fronts in stochastic Stokes’ drifts

    KAUST Repository

    Blanchet, Adrien

    2008-10-01

    By analytical methods we study the large time properties of the solution of a simple one-dimensional model of stochastic Stokes\\' drift. Semi-explicit formulae allow us to characterize the behaviour of the solutions and compute global quantities such as the asymptotic speed of the center of mass or the effective diffusion coefficient. Using an equivalent tilted ratchet model, we observe that the speed of the center of mass converges exponentially to its limiting value. A diffuse, oscillating front attached to the center of mass appears. The description of the front is given using an asymptotic expansion. The asymptotic solution attracts all solutions at an algebraic rate which is determined by the effective diffusion coefficient. The proof relies on an entropy estimate based on homogenized logarithmic Sobolev inequalities. In the travelling frame, the macroscopic profile obeys to an isotropic diffusion. Compared with the original diffusion, diffusion is enhanced or reduced, depending on the regime. At least in the limit cases, the rate of convergence to the effective profile is always decreased. All these considerations allow us to define a notion of efficiency for coherent transport, characterized by a dimensionless number, which is illustrated on two simple examples of travelling potentials with a sinusoidal shape in the first case, and a sawtooth shape in the second case. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Shearlet-based detection of flame fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisenhofer, Rafael; Kiefer, Johannes; King, Emily J.

    2016-03-01

    Identifying and characterizing flame fronts is the most common task in the computer-assisted analysis of data obtained from imaging techniques such as planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), laser Rayleigh scattering (LRS), or particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). We present Complex Shearlet-Based Ridge and Edge Measure (CoShREM), a novel edge and ridge (line) detection algorithm based on complex-valued wavelet-like analyzing functions—so-called complex shearlets—displaying several traits useful for the extraction of flame fronts. In addition to providing a unified approach to the detection of edges and ridges, our method inherently yields estimates of local tangent orientations and local curvatures. To examine the applicability for high-frequency recordings of combustion processes, the algorithm is applied to mock images distorted with varying degrees of noise and real-world PLIF images of both OH and CH radicals. Furthermore, we compare the performance of the newly proposed complex shearlet-based measure to well-established edge and ridge detection techniques such as the Canny edge detector, another shearlet-based edge detector, and the phase congruency measure.

  4. Internal waves and temperature fronts on slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Thorpe

    Full Text Available Time series measurements from an array of temperature miniloggers in a line at constant depth along the sloping boundary of a lake are used to describe the `internal surf zone' where internal waves interact with the sloping boundary. More small positive temperature time derivatives are recorded than negative, but there are more large negative values than positive, giving the overall distribution of temperature time derivatives a small negative skewness. This is consistent with the internal wave dynamics; fronts form during the up-slope phase of the motion, bringing cold water up the slope, and the return flow may become unstable, leading to small advecting billows and weak warm fronts. The data are analysed to detect `events', periods in which the temperature derivatives exceed a set threshold. The speed and distance travelled by `events' are described. The motion along the slope may be a consequence of (a instabilities advected by the flow (b internal waves propagating along-slope or (c internal waves approaching the slope from oblique directions. The propagation of several of the observed 'events' can only be explained by (c, evidence that the internal surf zone has some, but possibly not all, the characteristics of the conventional 'surface wave' surf zone, with waves steepening as they approach the slope at oblique angles.

    Key words. Oceanography: general (benthic boundary layers; limnology, Oceanography: physical (internal and inertial waves

  5. Wave front-ray synthesis for solving the multidimensional quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Robert E; Chou, Chia-Chun

    2011-08-21

    A Cauchy initial-value approach to the complex-valued quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation (QHJE) is investigated for multidimensional systems. In this approach, ray segments foliate configuration space which is laminated by surfaces of constant action. The QHJE incorporates all quantum effects through a term involving the divergence of the quantum momentum function (QMF). The divergence term may be expressed as a sum of two terms, one involving displacement along the ray and the other incorporating the local curvature of the action surface. It is shown that curvature of the wave front may be computed from coefficients of the first and second fundamental forms from differential geometry that are associated with the surface. Using the expression for the divergence, the QHJE becomes a Riccati-type ordinary differential equation (ODE) for the complex-valued QMF, which is parametrized by the arc length along the ray. In order to integrate over possible singularities in the QMF, a stable and accurate Möbius propagator is introduced. This method is then used to evolve rays and wave fronts for four systems in two and three dimensions. From the QMF along each ray, the wave function can be easily computed. Computational difficulties that may arise are described and some ways to circumvent them are presented. PMID:21861551

  6. Wave front-ray synthesis for solving the multidimensional quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyatt, Robert E.; Chou, Chia-Chun [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2011-08-21

    A Cauchy initial-value approach to the complex-valued quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation (QHJE) is investigated for multidimensional systems. In this approach, ray segments foliate configuration space which is laminated by surfaces of constant action. The QHJE incorporates all quantum effects through a term involving the divergence of the quantum momentum function (QMF). The divergence term may be expressed as a sum of two terms, one involving displacement along the ray and the other incorporating the local curvature of the action surface. It is shown that curvature of the wave front may be computed from coefficients of the first and second fundamental forms from differential geometry that are associated with the surface. Using the expression for the divergence, the QHJE becomes a Riccati-type ordinary differential equation (ODE) for the complex-valued QMF, which is parametrized by the arc length along the ray. In order to integrate over possible singularities in the QMF, a stable and accurate Moebius propagator is introduced. This method is then used to evolve rays and wave fronts for four systems in two and three dimensions. From the QMF along each ray, the wave function can be easily computed. Computational difficulties that may arise are described and some ways to circumvent them are presented.

  7. Mesozoic extension and Cenozoic contraction in an intraplate setting (Maestrat basin, Iberian Chain, E Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot Miralles, M.; Guimerà Roso, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Iberian Chain, located in the eastern Iberian Peninsula, is a fold-and-thrust belt developed during the Cenozoic, because of the contractional inversion of the Mesozoic Iberian Rift System. The extension in the Iberian Chain took place in two major rifting cycles (late Permian to late Triassic and late Oxfordian to late Albian) followed by episodes of lower rifting activity (early and middle Jurassic, and late Albian to Maastrichtian). The Maestrat basin (containing up to 6.5 km of Mesozoic sediments) is one of the most subsident basins during the late Oxfordian to late Albian cycle. A system of listric extensional faults, which involve the basement, bounded the basin, and also divided it into minor sub-basins, containing different thicknesses of the Mesozoic sedimentary fill. An E-W-trending, N-verging, fold-and-thrust belt developed in the northern boundary of the basin, as the result of the Cenozoic inversion. This belt involved the Mesozoic cover in the northern -foreland- areas, with a detachment level located within the Triassic: in the Middle Muschelkalk (Middle Triassic) and Keuper (Upper Triassic), both formed by lutites and evaporites. Southwards, the thrust-system also involved the Variscan basement. A study of the region containing the transition between the thin-skinned and the thick-skinned areas is presented, based on seismic profiles, oil-exploration wells and field data. A progressive northward thickening of Jurassic and lower Cretaceous units, related to a S-dipping listric extensional fault located to the N, can be observed both in the field and the seismic profiles. In the Triassic rocks, depositional thickness variations in the Middle Muschelkalk unit are observed, related to sub-vertical faults active during the Triassic rifting. Salt anticlines, pillows and welds are also observed in the Middle Muschelkalk. These halocynetic structures developed during the Keuper, as it is deduced from the onlap geometries of the Keuper seismic reflectors

  8. Cenozoic Mammals and Climate Change: The Contrast between Coarse-Scale versus High-Resolution Studies Explained by Species Sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Donald Prothero

    2012-01-01

    Many paleontologists have noticed the broadly similar patterns between the changes in Cenozoic mammalian diversity and taxonomic dominance and climate changes. Yet detailed studies of fossil population samples with fine-scale temporal resolution during episodes of climate change like the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the White River Group, and the late Pleistocene at Rancho La Brea tar pits, demonstrates that most fossil mammal species are static and show no significant microevolutionary res...

  9. Discussion on the characteristics of Meso-Cenozoic U-productive basins in northern China and their prospecting direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the study of sedimentary evolution characteristics of main sedimentary basins and combined with characteristics of known uranium-productive basins in northern China, and the analysis on airborne geophysical survey data, the principles for selecting prospecting and target area have been set up. And the prospecting direction for uranium in Meso-Cenozoic basins of northern China has been proposed through a preliminary analysis. (authors)

  10. Stabilization of large drainage basins over geological time scales : Cenozoic West Africa, hot spot swell growth, and the Niger River

    OpenAIRE

    Chardon, Dominique; Grimaud, J. L.; Rouby, D.; BEAUVAIS, Anicet; Christophoul, F.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing the evolving geometry of large river catchments over geological time scales is crucial to constraining yields to sedimentary basins. In the case of Africa, it should further help deciphering the response of large cratonic sediment routing systems to Cenozoic growth of the basin-and-swell topography of the continent. Mapping of dated and regionally correlated lateritic paleolandscape remnants complemented by onshore sedimentological archives allows the reconstruction...

  11. The Ajo Mining District, Pima County, Arizona--Evidence for Middle Cenozoic Detachment Faulting, Plutonism, Volcanism, and Hydrothermal Alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Dennis P.; Force, Eric R.; Wilkinson, William H.; More, Syver W.; Rivera, John S.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The Ajo porphyry copper deposit and surrounding Upper Cretaceous rocks have been separated from their plutonic source and rotated by detachment faulting. Overlying middle Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks have been tilted and show evidence for two periods of rotation. Following these rotations, a granitic stock (23.7?0.2 Ma) intruded basement rocks west of the Ajo deposit. This stock was uplifted 2.5 km to expose deep-seated Na-Ca alteration.

  12. Late Palaeozoic to Cenozoic Evolution of the Black Sea-Southern Eastern Europe Region: A View from the Russian Platform

    OpenAIRE

    NIKISHIN, ANATOLY M.; Ziegler, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    A synthesis of the Late Palaeozoic to Cenozoic evolution of the Black Sea region and the southern parts of the East European Platform (EEP) is presented. During Carboniferous to Early Permian times the Cordillera-type Euxinus Orogen evolved along the southern margin of the EEP in response to progressive closure of the Rheic and Palaeotethys oceans and the accretion of Gondwana-derived continental terranes. Permian development of the north-dipping Palaeotethys subduction system along the south...

  13. Scanning the Front Range Environment: A Statistical Snapshot of the Front Range Community College Service Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Front Range Community Coll., Westminster, CO.

    This environmental scanning report from Front Range Community College (FRCC) in Colorado examines trends in population, demographics, income, and education in the college's service area. The report begins with Kathleen Cain's essay, "Environmental Scanning," indicating that the four major objectives of environmental scanning are to detect…

  14. PNW River Reach Files -- 1:100k Watercourses (arcs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This feature class includes the ARC features from the 2001 version of the PNW River Reach files Arc/INFO coverage. Separate, companion feature classes are also...

  15. Modeling Vacuum Arcs On Spacecraft Solar Panel Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft charging and subsequent vacuum arcing poses a significant threat to satellites in LEO and GEO plasma conditions. Localized arc discharges can cause a...

  16. Cenozoic exhumation history of Sulu terrane: Implications from (U-Th)/He thermochrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Monié, Patrick; Wang, Fei; Lin, Wei; Ji, Wenbin; Bonno, Michael; Münch, Philippe; Wang, Qingchen

    2016-03-01

    The Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogen is the most prominent Phanerozoic orogenic belt in China. The discovery of ultra-high pressure (UHP) minerals in zircon inclusions suggests that the crust was subducted to deeper than 120 km into the mantle and then exhumed to shallow crustal. Recently, low temperature thermochronology has been applied to constrain the final exhumation of Dabie Shan, while there are few studies describing the Cenozoic exhumation history of the Sulu belt. Here we report some (U-Th)/He ages for various lithologies from Sulu Orogenic belt and its northern part-Jiaobei terrane. The single grain He ages range between 18 and 154 Ma, and most of the samples having large intra-sample age scattering. Several reasons such as invisible U/Th-rich inclusions, grain size effect, slow cooling rate, and zonation of parent nuclide or radiation damage effect may account for this dispersion. For all samples, the pattern of the single grain age data exhibits a peak at ~ 45 Ma which is consistent with the borehole fission-track age pattern in adjacent Hefei Basin. Both (U-Th)/He and fission track ages of the Sulu area suggest an enhanced exhumation/cooling in Early-Middle Eocene in the southern part of Tan-Lu fault zone. This enhanced cooling event coincides with rapid subsidence of North China Basin and rapid uplift of its surrounding reliefs, which indicates basin-mountain coupling. This Eocene event is widespread in central China and could be far-field consequence of India-Asia collision. The convergence rate between Pacific Plate and Eurasia decreased substantially during early Tertiary and reached a minimum in Eocene (~ 30-40 mm/yr) while at the same time the collision between India and Asia was completed. Therefore, the Cenozoic exhumation history of the Sulu Orogenic Belt was a combined result of far-field effect of India-Asia collision and declined subduction rate of the Pacific Plate under Eurasia.

  17. Cenozoic intraplate volcanism in Mongolia; if not a mantle plume then what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, T. L.; Saunders, A. D.; Kempton, P. D.

    2003-04-01

    Diffuse, small-volume basaltic volcanism has occurred throughout Mongolia for the past 30 My. This region provides an excellent opportunity to study intraplate volcanism because it is clearly on continental crust and far removed from the effects of subduction-related processes. Although magma has been erupted onto 45 km thick crust, there appears to be very little crustal contamination (Barry et al., 2003). The volcanism also provides an important link between the basaltic volcanism to the north around the Baikal rift zone, which has often been related to a mantle plume and Cenozoic basaltic volcanism that infills extensional grabens within NE China. Very clear chemical similarities within all the Baikal-Mongolia-NE China Cenozoic basalts exists (Barry &Kent, 1998) suggesting that the mantle source region beneath this vast area may be the same. Therefore, one general model should be able to explain all the volcanism. Trace element, REE and isotopic modeling of Mongolian basalt compositions indicate that the melts most likely formed within the lowermost lithospheric mantle from recently metasomatised lithosphere. There is no evidence for high heat flow within the mantle (Khutorskoy &Yarmolyuk, 1989), but geophysical studies infer anomalously dense material to be present at the base of the lithospheric mantle (Petit et al., 2002) which is coincident with a low velocity zone at ~200 km depth (Villaseñor et al., 2001). However, there does not appear to be anomalous low velocity material within the asthenospheric mantle. Geochemistry of the basalts give no positive indication for the presence of an underlying mantle plume. Conversely, whilst localized extensional tectonics may have aided the extrusion of basaltic melts, the small amount of extension cannot account for the generation of the basalts (McKenzie &Bickle, 1988). Lacking evidence for a high heat flux mantle plume, we may suggest the presence of a thermal anomaly, i.e. additional heat within the asthenosphere

  18. Mesozoic-Cenozoic Reconstruction of the East Gobi Fault Zone, Southern Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heumann, M. J.; Johnson, C. L.; Webb, L. E.; Taylor, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    We present reconstructions based on multifaceted sedimentary basin and structural analyses that constrain the timing and character of intracontinental deformation observed in Mesozoic rift sub-basins (Unegt and Zuunbayan) and Permian deposystems (Bulgan Uul and Nomgon) along the East Gobi Fault Zone (EGFZ), southeastern Mongolia. The rocks studied throughout the EGFZ record nearly 300 million years of history including final closure of the paleo Tethys Sea during the Permian, Late Triassic sinistral shearing, Jurassic transpression followed by rift initiation, Early Cretaceous rifting, mid-Cretaceous basin inversion, and early Cenozoic left-lateral strike-slip faulting. Integrated studies of detrital zircon geochronology, field mapping and 2-D seismic survey fault-generation interpretation are critical to unraveling deformational events recorded in the pre-, syn-, and post-rift sedimentary units of these sub-basins. These efforts also shed light on paleogeographic reconstructions for the south Gobi following closure of the paleo Tethys Sea and docking of the North China block in the late Permian. Extensive detrital zircon analyses on 23 sandstone units used as piercing points along the EGFZ to indicate roughly 270 km of total sinistral offset has occurred along the EGFZ since the Late Permian, approximately 90 km of which has occurred since the mid Cretaceous. Therefore ~180 km of left-lateral offset along the EGFZ has occurred in the Triassic and Jurassic periods of deformation and have implications for published tectonic models. Fault generation maps produced from proprietary 2-D seismic reflection surveys, and correlation to outcrop, suggest the localized partitioning of deformation throughout the basins with time, often focusing along basin-bounding faults. Reinterpretation of the available seismic data highlights areas north (e.g., Har Hotol locality) of the main North Zuunbayan strike-slip fault (the NZB fault), which show a strikingly different deformational

  19. Mesozoic and Cenozoic exhumation history of the SW Iberian Variscides inferred from low-temperature thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Vílchez, Mercedes; Jabaloy-Sánchez, Antonio; Azor, Antonio; Stuart, Finlay; Persano, Cristina; Alonso-Chaves, Francisco M.; Martín-Parra, Luis Miguel; Matas, Jerónimo; García-Navarro, Encarnación

    2015-11-01

    The post-Paleozoic tectonothermal evolution of the SW Iberian Variscides is poorly known mainly due to the scarce low-temperature geochronological data available. We have obtained new apatite fission-tracks and apatite (U-Th)/He ages to constrain the Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic evolution of this portion of the Iberian Massif located just north of the Betic-Rif Alpine orogen. We have obtained nine apatite fission-track ages on samples from Variscan and pre-Variscan granitoids. These ages range from 174.4 (± 10.8) to 54.1 (± 4.9) Ma, with mean track lengths between 10.3 and 13.9 μm. We have also performed 5 (U-Th)/He datings on some of the same samples, obtaining ages between 74.6 (± 1.6) and 18.5 (± 1.4) Ma. Time-temperature path modeling of these low-temperature geochronological data leads us to envisage four post-Paleozoic tectonically controlled exhumation episodes in the SW Iberian Variscides. Three of these episodes occurred in Mesozoic times (Middle Triassic to Early Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous) at rates of ≈ 1.1 to 2.5 °C Ma- 1, separated by periods with almost no cooling. We relate these Mesozoic cooling events to the formation of important marginal reliefs during the rifting and opening of the central and northern Atlantic realm. The fourth exhumation episode occurred in Cenozoic times at rates of ≈ 3.2 to 3.6 °C Ma- 1, being only recorded in samples next to faults with topographic escarpments. These samples cooled below 80 °C at ≈ 20 Ma at rates of 3-13 °C Ma- 1 due to roughly N-S oriented compressional stresses affecting the whole Iberian plate, which, in the particular case of SW Iberia, reactivated some of the previous Late Paleozoic thrusts.

  20. Pacific Plate slab pull and intraplate deformation in the early Cenozoic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Butterworth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large tectonic plates are known to be susceptible to internal deformation, leading to a range of phenomena including intraplate volcanism. However, the space and time dependence of intraplate deformation and its relationship with changing plate boundary configurations, subducting slab geometries, and absolute plate motion is poorly understood. We utilise a buoyancy driven Stokes flow solver, BEM-Earth, to investigate the contribution of subducting slabs through time on Pacific Plate motion and plate-scale deformation, and how this is linked to intraplate volcanism. We produce a series of geodynamic models from 62 to 42 Ma in which the plates are driven by the attached subducting slabs and mantle drag/suction forces. We compare our modelled intraplate deformation history with those types of intraplate volcanism that lack a clear age progression. Our models suggest that changes in Cenozoic subduction zone topology caused intraplate deformation to trigger volcanism along several linear seafloor structures, mostly by reactivation of existing seamount chains, but occasionally creating new volcanic chains on crust weakened by fracture zones and extinct ridges. Around 55 Ma subduction of the Pacific-Izanagi ridge reconfigured the major tectonic forces acting on the plate by replacing ridge push with slab pull along its north-western perimeter, causing lithospheric extension along pre-existing weaknesses. Large scale deformation observed in the models coincides with the seamount chains of Hawaii, Louisville, Tokelau, and Gilbert during our modelled time period of 62 to 42 Ma. We suggest that extensional stresses between 72 and 52 Ma are the likely cause of large parts of the formation of the Gilbert chain and that localised extension between 62 and 42 Ma could cause late-stage volcanism along the Musicians Volcanic Ridges. Our models demonstrate that early Cenozoic changes in Pacific plate driving forces only cause relatively minor changes in Pacific

  1. The Miocene mammal Necrolestes demonstrates the survival of a Mesozoic nontherian lineage into the late Cenozoic of South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, Guillermo W.; Wible, John R.; Beck, Robin M. D.; Apesteguía, Sebastian

    2012-12-01

    The early Miocene mammal Necrolestes patagonensis from Patagonia, Argentina, was described in 1891 as the only known extinct placental "insectivore" from South America (SA). Since then, and despite the discovery of additional well-preserved material, the systematic status of Necrolestes has remained in flux, with earlier studies leaning toward placental affinities and more recent ones endorsing either therian or specifically metatherian relationships. We have further prepared the best-preserved specimens of Necrolestes and compared them with newly discovered nontribosphenic Mesozoic mammals from Argentina; based on this, we conclude that Necrolestes is related neither to marsupials nor placentals but is a late-surviving member of the recently recognized nontherian clade Meridiolestida, which is currently known only from SA. This conclusion is supported by a morphological phylogenetic analysis that includes a broad sampling of therian and nontherian taxa and that places Necrolestes within Meridiolestida. Thus, Necrolestes is a remnant of the highly endemic Mesozoic fauna of nontribosphenic mammals in SA and extends the known record of meridiolestidans by almost 45 million years. Together with other likely relictual mammals from earlier in the Cenozoic of SA and Antarctica, Necrolestes demonstrates the ecological diversity of mammals and the mosaic pattern of fauna replacement in SA during the Cenozoic. In contrast to northern continents, the Cenozoic faunal history of SA was characterized by a long period of interaction between endemic mammalian lineages of Mesozoic origin and metatherian and eutherian lineages that probably dispersed to SA during the latest Cretaceous or earliest Paleocene.

  2. Magnetostratigraphy of syntectonic growth strata and implications for the late Cenozoic deformation in the Baicheng Depression, Southern Tian Shan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiliang; Sun, Jimin; Tian, Zhonghua; Gong, Zhijun

    2016-03-01

    The collision between India and Eurasia in the Cenozoic has caused a series of intracontinental deformation in the foreland basins of Tian Shan, but there are debates about the timing of tectonic deformation and the relationship between tectonic uplift and sediment accumulation in the foreland basins. Based on the magnetostratigraphy of growth strata in the Baicheng Depression, Southern Tian Shan, we suggest that an episode of crustal shortening in the late Cenozoic evidenced by syntectonic growth strata in the Kelasu-Yiqikelike structural belt (KYSB) initiated at ∼5.3 Ma, since then the sedimentation rate accelerated abruptly and coarse molasse deposits accumulated. Combined with the results of growth strata on both flanks of Tian Shan and the fact that the Xiyu Formation on the southern limb of the Kasangtuokai Anticline was involved into the growth strata, we conclude that the period from ∼7-5 Ma to the early Pleistocene was one of the important episodes of intracontinental deformation in the foreland basins of Tian Shan, as a response to the Cenozoic collision between India and Eurasia.

  3. Stochastic properties of circuit breaking arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothhardt, L.

    1985-09-01

    Results are discussed for research work concerning the influence of cooling gas turbulence onto the breaker arc and the dielectric properties of the widely used cooling gases, air, and SF6, at elevated temperatures, both needed for numerical simulation of the breaking action.

  4. Rejuvenating Allen's Arc with the Geometric Mean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, William A.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that, despite ongoing criticism, Allen's arc elasticity formula remains entrenched in the microeconomics principles curriculum. Reviews the evolution and continuing scrutiny of the formula. Argues that the use of the geometric mean offers pedagogical advantages over the traditional arithmetic mean approach. (CFR)

  5. ArcAid Interactive Archery Assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Vervaeke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design process of a bow aiming system, called ArcAid, which is an interactive archery assistant. The main goal of ArcAid is to introduce a way for beginner Robin Hoods to learn the art of archery to its fullest. In order to achieve this goal, our smartphone-based design focuses on a fun and interactive learning process that gives constant feedback to the user on how to hit a certain goal. A SPIKE high- end laser sensor is used for the distance measurement and the smartphone’s accelerometer is used to define the angle of inclination. To measure the force on the arrow and the displacement of the string, a flex sensor is attached upon one of the arcs of the bow. All sensor data is processed in an Arduino Nano microprocessor and feedback to the user is given by a dedicated smartphone app. In this paper, we mainly focus on the construction, mechanics and electronics of the ArcAid bow and on the design of the mobile app, which is the game controller. Furthermore, we briefly discuss some future development ideas.

  6. Secondary arc description on satellite solar generators

    OpenAIRE

    Crispel, Pierre; Degond, Pierre; Vignal, Marie-Helene; Roussel, Jean-Francois; Amorim, Emmanuel; Payan, Denis; Cho, Mengu

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a quasi-neutral model with non-vanishing current describing the expansion of a plasma in an inter-cellular gap on a satellite solar array. Moreover, an electric arc cathode spot model is proposed in order to give suitable boundary conditions for the expansion model.

  7. Thermal Plasma Generators with Water Stabilized Arc

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabovský, Milan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2009), s. 99-104. ISSN 1876-5343 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/1084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Thermal plasma * plasma torch * Gerdien arc Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.bentham.org/open/toppj/openaccess2.htm

  8. Arc spraying solderable tabs to glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindmayer, J.

    1981-01-01

    Tabs suitable for electrical or mechanical connections in solar cells and integrated circuits are made by spraying technique. Solder wets copper, copper bonds to aluminum, and aluminum adheres to glass. Arc spraying is automated and integrated with encapsulation, eliminating hand tabbing, improving reliability, and reducing cost.

  9. Portable machine welding head automatically controls arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksiak, C. E.; Robb, M. A.

    1967-01-01

    Portable weld tool makes weld repairs out-of-station and on the side opposite the original weld. It provides full automatic control of the arc voltage, current, wire feed, and electrode travel speed in all welding attitudes. The device is readily adaptable to commercially available straight polarity dc weld packs.

  10. Roadmap for the ARC Grid Middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleist, Josva; Eerola, Paula; Ekelöf, Tord;

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) or the NorduGrid middleware is an open source software solution enabling production quality computational and data Grids, with special emphasis on scalability, stability, reliability and performance. Since its first release in May 2002, the middleware is depl...

  11. Collection of arc welding process data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Luksa

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the research was to examine the possibility of detecting welding imperfections by recording the instant values of welding parameters. The microprocessor controlled system for real-time collection and display of welding parameters was designed, implemented and tested.Design/methodology/approach: The system records up to 4 digital or analog signals collected from welding process and displays their run on the LCD display. To disturb the welding process artificial disturbances were introduced.Findings: The occurrence of some welding imperfections is followed by changes of the welding parameters. In this case they can be revealed by the analysis of the instant values of the welding parameters.Research limitations/implications: In the paper results of monitoring manual metal arc welding and gas metal arc welding are presented.Practical implications: Monitoring of gas metal arc welding is a good tool for evaluation of the quality of weld. All introduced, artificial disturbances of the welding process destabilize the welding arc and produce changes in the instant values of the welding parameters.Originality/value: The paper presents a modern microprocessor controlled system for real-time collection and display of welding parameters. Results of tests show that simple statistical approach to welding parameters can help in evaluation of weld quality.

  12. Clinical Applications of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present treatment planning case studies for several treatment sites for which volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) could have a positive impact; and to share an initial clinical experience with VMAT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Four case studies are presented to show the potential benefit of VMAT compared with conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in pediatric cancer, bone marrow-sparing whole-abdominopelvic irradiation (WAPI), and SBRT of the lung and spine. Details of clinical implementation of VMAT for SBRT are presented. The VMAT plans are compared with conventional techniques in terms of dosimetric quality and delivery efficiency. Results: Volumetric modulated arc therapy reduced the treatment time of spine SBRT by 37% and improved isodose conformality. Conformal and VMAT techniques for lung SBRT had similar dosimetric quality, but VMAT had improved target coverage and took 59% less time to deliver, although monitor units were increased by 5%. In a complex pediatric pelvic example, VMAT reduced treatment time by 78% and monitor units by 25% compared with IMRT. A double-isocenter VMAT technique for WAPI can spare bone marrow while maintaining good delivery efficiency. Conclusions: Volumetric modulated arc therapy is a new technology that may benefit different patient populations, including pediatric cancer patients and those undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and WAPI. Volumetric modulated arc therapy has been used and shown to be beneficial for significantly improving delivery efficiency of lung and spine SBRT.

  13. An approach for optimizing arc welding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic and transport mechanisms involved in the arc plasma and the weld pool of arc welding operations are numerous and strongly coupled. They produce a medium the magnitudes of which exhibit rapid time variations and very marked gradients which make any experimental analysis complex in this disrupted environment. In this work, we study the TIG and MIG processes. An experimental platform was developed to allow synchronized measurement of various physical quantities associated with welding (process parameters, temperatures, clamping forces, metal transfer, etc.). Numerical libraries dedicated to applied studies in arc welding are developed. They enable the treatment of a large flow of data (signals, images) with a systematic and global method. The advantages of this approach for the enrichment of numerical simulation and arc process control are shown in different situations. Finally, this experimental approach is used in the context of the chosen application to obtain rich measurements to describe the dynamic behavior of the weld pool in P-GMAW. Dimensional analysis of these experimental measurements allows to identify the predominant mechanisms involved and to determine experimentally the characteristic times associated. This type of approach includes better description of the behavior of a macro-drop of molten metal or the phenomena occurring in the humping instabilities. (author)

  14. Evaluation of the clinical usefulness of modulated arc treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Yeon Sil; Choi, Byung Ock; Kang, Young-Nam; Nam, Sang Hee; Park, Hyeong Wook; Kim, Shin Wook; Shin, Hun Joo; Lee, Jae Choon; Kim, Ji Na; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Jin Young

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of modulated arc (mARC) treatment techniques. The mARC treatment plans for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were made in order to verify the clinical usefulness of mARC. A pre-study was conducted to find the best plan condition for mARC treatment, and the usefulness of the mARC treatment plan was evaluated by comparing it with other Arc treatment plans such as tomotherapy and RapidArc plans. In the case of mARC, the optimal condition for the mARC plan was determined by comparing the dosimetric performance of the mARC plans developed by using various parameters, which included the photon energy (6 MV, 10 MV), the optimization point angle (6°- 10°intervals), and the total number of segments (36 - 59 segments). The best dosimetric performance of mARC was observed at a 10 MV photon energy, a point angle 6 degrees, and 59 segments. The treatment plans for the three different techniques were compared by using the following parameters: the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), the target coverage, the dose to the OARs, the number of monitor units (MU), the beam on time, and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). As a result, the three different treatment techniques showed similar target coverages. The mARC plan had the lowest V20 (volume of lung receiving > 20 Gy) and MU per fraction compared with both the RapidArc and the tomotherapy plans. The mARC plan reduced the beam on time as well. Therefore, the results of this study provide satisfactory evidence that the mARC technique can be considered as a useful clinical technique for radiation treatment.

  15. PyroArc novel Waste-to-energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a growing interest in using solid waste as a raw material in the production of gas and materials. A new proprietary technology - called PyroArc - utilizes a wide range of waste fractions combined with a reduction of almost the entire volume. The process employs high temperature plasma technology developed by ScanArc. The Norwegian based enterprise, EnviroArc Technologies AS, has the exclusive rights to use PyroArc technology. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the clinical usefulness of modulated Arc treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Young Kyu; Kim, Yeon Sil; Choi, Byung Ock; Nam, Sang Hee; Park, Hyeong Wook; Kim, Shin Wook; Shin, Hun Joo; Lee, Jae Choon; Kim, Ji Na; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Jin Young; Kang, Young-Nam

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of modulated arc (mARC) treatment techniques. The mARC treatment plans of the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were performed in order to verify the clinical usefulness of mARC. A pre study was conducted to find the most competent plan condition of mARC treatment and the usefulness of mARC treatment plan was evaluated by comparing it with the other Arc treatment plans such as Tomotherapy and RapidArc. In the case of mARC, the optimal condition for the mARC plan was determined by comparing the dosimetric performance of the mARC plans with the use of various parameters. The various parameters includes the photon energies (6 MV, 10 MV), optimization point angle (6{\\deg}-10{\\deg} intervals), and total segment number (36-59 segment). The best dosimetric performance of mARC was observed at 10 MV photon energy and the point angle 6 degree, and 59 segments. The each treatment plans of three different techniques were compared with the followin...

  17. Investigation of diffuse current in arc boundary by electric probes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chumak, Oleksiy; Hrabovský, Milan; Kavka, Tetyana; Kopecký, Vladimír

    Brno, 2005, s. 36-39. ISBN 80-214-2931-3. [Symposium on Physics of Switching Arc/16th./. Brno (CZ), 05.09.2005-09.09.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : arc boundary * anode attachment * arc root Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  18. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahrle, A; Schnick, M; Rose, S; Demuth, C; Beyer, E; Fuessel, U, E-mail: achim.mahrle@iws.fraunhofer.de [Dresden University of Technology, Institute of Surface and Manufacturing Technology, PO Box, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-08-31

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) were performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In the case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In the case of aluminium welding, a sharp decline in arc voltage and stabilization and guiding of the anodic arc root was observed whereas in steel welding the arc voltage was slightly increased after the laser beam was switched on. However, significant improvement of the melting efficiency with the combined action of plasma arc and laser beam was achieved for both types of material. Theoretical results of additional numerical simulations of the arc behaviour suggest that the properties of the arc plasma are mainly influenced not by a direct interaction with the laser radiation but by the laser-induced evaporation of metal. Arc stabilization with increased current densities is predicted for moderate rates of evaporated metal only whereas metal vapour rates above a certain threshold causes a destabilization of the arc and reduced current densities along the arc axis.

  19. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrle, A.; Schnick, M.; Rose, S.; Demuth, C.; Beyer, E.; Füssel, U.

    2011-08-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) were performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In the case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In the case of aluminium welding, a sharp decline in arc voltage and stabilization and guiding of the anodic arc root was observed whereas in steel welding the arc voltage was slightly increased after the laser beam was switched on. However, significant improvement of the melting efficiency with the combined action of plasma arc and laser beam was achieved for both types of material. Theoretical results of additional numerical simulations of the arc behaviour suggest that the properties of the arc plasma are mainly influenced not by a direct interaction with the laser radiation but by the laser-induced evaporation of metal. Arc stabilization with increased current densities is predicted for moderate rates of evaporated metal only whereas metal vapour rates above a certain threshold causes a destabilization of the arc and reduced current densities along the arc axis.

  20. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) were performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In the case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In the case of aluminium welding, a sharp decline in arc voltage and stabilization and guiding of the anodic arc root was observed whereas in steel welding the arc voltage was slightly increased after the laser beam was switched on. However, significant improvement of the melting efficiency with the combined action of plasma arc and laser beam was achieved for both types of material. Theoretical results of additional numerical simulations of the arc behaviour suggest that the properties of the arc plasma are mainly influenced not by a direct interaction with the laser radiation but by the laser-induced evaporation of metal. Arc stabilization with increased current densities is predicted for moderate rates of evaporated metal only whereas metal vapour rates above a certain threshold causes a destabilization of the arc and reduced current densities along the arc axis.

  1. Single Arc VMAT of H&N patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Hansen, Christian Rønn; Johansen, Jørgen;

    2009-01-01

      Background: A few planning systems are currently able to plan volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) which can be delivered on Elekta and Varian accelerators. Pinnacles version of a VMAT algorithm is called SmartArc. SmartArcs capability to modulate complicated treatment plans is to be tested...

  2. Single Arc VMAT of H&N patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Hansen, Christian Rønn; Johansen, Jørgen;

      Background: A few planning systems are currently able to plan volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) which can be delivered on Elekta and Varian accelerators. Pinnacles version of a VMAT algorithm is called SmartArc. SmartArcs capability to modulate complicated treatment plans is to be tested...

  3. The Plio Quaternary Ambon arc, Eastern Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honthaas, Christian; Maury, René C.; Priadi, Bambang; Bellon, Hervé; Cotten, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    Plio-Quaternary lavas and granites have been collected from Ambon, Seram, Kelang, Haruku, Saparua, Ambelau and Banda Api islands, Eastern Indonesia. They include low-K calc-alkaline basalts, andesites, dacites and rhyolites and high-K calc-alkaline andesites, dacites, rhyolites and granites. All these rocks present the usual chemical characteristics of island-arc magmas. The high-K suite of Ambon is mostly represented by cordierite-bearing dacites (known as ambonites) and granites. Low-K and high-K magmas were emplaced in neighbouring islands or even in the same island (Ambon), often concomitantly, during two magmatic pulses at 5-3.2 Ma and 2.3-1 Ma, respectively. We propose that the low-K suite results from the evolution of basaltic magmas derived from mantle melting above the Western Irian Jaya plate which subducts along the Seram trough. Intermediate and acidic rocks of the high-K suite (e.g. ambonites) are thought to derive from low-K mafic magmas through massive assimilation of the Seram-Ambon continental crust, as originally proposed by Van Bemmelen in 1949. The timing of magmatic events and the geochemical features of the studied lavas are clearly different from those of the southern part of the Banda arc, in which the low-K suite is lacking. In agreement with earlier seismic evidence for two different slabs subducting beneath the Seram-Ambon continental block and beneath the southern Banda arc (from Wetar to Manuk), respectively, we propose to recognise a new Plio-Quaternary island arc, i.e. the Ambon arc, extending west-east from Ambelau to the Banda Archipelago active low-K volcanoes through Kelang, southwestern Seram, Ambon, Haruku and Saparua.

  4. Radiation of long and high power arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cressault, Y.; Bauchire, J. M.; Hong, D.; Rabat, H.; Riquel, G.; Sanchez, F.; Gleizes, A.

    2015-10-01

    The operators working on electrical installations of low, medium and high voltages can be accidentally exposed to short-circuit arcs ranging from a few kA to several tens of kA. To protect them from radiation, according to the exposure limits, we need to characterize the radiation emitted by the powerful arc. Therefore, we have developed a general experimental and numerical study in order to estimate the spectral irradiance received at a given distance from the arc. The experimental part was based on a very long arc (up to 2 m) with high ac current (between 4 and 40 kA rms, duration 100 ms) using 3 kinds of metallic contacts (copper, steel and aluminium). We measured the irradiance received 10m from the axis of the arc, and integrated on 4 spectral intervals corresponding to the UV, visible, IRA  +  B and IRC. The theoretical part consisted of calculating the radiance of isothermal plasmas in mixtures of air and metal vapour, integrated over the same spectral intervals as defined in the experiments. The comparison between the theoretical and experimental results has allowed the defining of three isothermal radiation sources whose combination leads to a spectral irradiation equivalent to the experimental one. Then the calculation allowed the deduction of the spectral description of the irradiance over all the wavelength range, between 200 nm and 20 μm. The final results indicate that the influence of metal is important in the visible and UVA ranges whereas the IR radiation is due to the air plasma and surrounding hot gas and fumes.

  5. Geochemical studies on island arc volcanoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes advances in three topics of geochemical studies on island arc volcanoes, which I and my colleagues have been investigating. First one is strontium isotope studies of arc volcanic rocks mainly from Japanese island arcs. We have shown that the precise spatial distribution of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio reflects natures of the subduction structure and slab-mantle interaction. Based on the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of volcanic rocks in the northern Kanto district, where two plates subduct concurrently with different directions, the existence of an aseismic portion of the Philippine Sea plate ahead of the seismic one was suggested. Second one is geochemical monitoring of active arc volcanoes. 3He/4He ratio of volcanic volatiles was shown to be a good indicator to monitor the behavior of magma: ascent and drain-back of magma result in increase and decrease in the ratio, respectively. In the case of 1986 eruptions of Izu-Oshima volcano, the ratio began to increase two months after big eruptions, reaching the maximum and decreased. Such delayed response is explained in terms of travelling time of magmatic helium from the vent area to the observation site along the underground steam flow. Third one is remote observation of volcanic gas chemistry of arc volcanoes, using an infrared absorption spectroscopy. During Unzen eruptions starting in 1990, absorption features of SO2 and HCl of volcanic gas were detected from the observation station at 1.3 km distance. This was the first ground-based remote detection of HCl in volcanic gas. In the recent work at Aso volcano, we could identify 5 species (CO, COS, CO2, SO2 and HCl) simultaneously in the volcanic plume spectra. (author)

  6. Numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancinelli, B. R., E-mail: bmancinelli@frvt.utn.edu.ar [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ingeniería Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651 (2600) Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe (Argentina); Minotti, F. O.; Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ingeniería Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651 (2600) Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Plasma (CONICET), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA) Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Prevosto, L. [Instituto de Física del Plasma (CONICET), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA) Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-07-14

    A numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch is reported. The dynamics of the double-arcing were simulated by using a two-dimensional model of the gas breakdown development in the space-charge layer contiguous to the nozzle of a cutting arc torch operated with oxygen. The kinetic scheme includes ionization of heavy particles by electron impact, electron attachment, electron detachment, electron–ion recombination, and ion–ion recombination. Complementary measurements during double-arcing phenomena were also conducted. A marked rise of the nozzle voltage was found. The numerical results showed that the dynamics of a cathode spot at the exit of the nozzle inner surface play a key role in the raising of the nozzle voltage, which in turn allows more electrons to return to the wall at the nozzle inlet. The return flow of electrons thus closes the current loop of the double-arcing. The increase in the (floating) nozzle voltage is due to the fact that the increased electron emission at the spot is mainly compensated by the displacement current (the ions do not play a relevant role due to its low-mobility) until that the stationary state is achieved and the electron return flow fully-compensates the electron emission at the spot. A fairly good agreement was found between the model and the experiment for a spot emission current growth rate of the order of 7 × 10{sup 4} A/s.

  7. Numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch is reported. The dynamics of the double-arcing were simulated by using a two-dimensional model of the gas breakdown development in the space-charge layer contiguous to the nozzle of a cutting arc torch operated with oxygen. The kinetic scheme includes ionization of heavy particles by electron impact, electron attachment, electron detachment, electron–ion recombination, and ion–ion recombination. Complementary measurements during double-arcing phenomena were also conducted. A marked rise of the nozzle voltage was found. The numerical results showed that the dynamics of a cathode spot at the exit of the nozzle inner surface play a key role in the raising of the nozzle voltage, which in turn allows more electrons to return to the wall at the nozzle inlet. The return flow of electrons thus closes the current loop of the double-arcing. The increase in the (floating) nozzle voltage is due to the fact that the increased electron emission at the spot is mainly compensated by the displacement current (the ions do not play a relevant role due to its low-mobility) until that the stationary state is achieved and the electron return flow fully-compensates the electron emission at the spot. A fairly good agreement was found between the model and the experiment for a spot emission current growth rate of the order of 7 × 104 A/s.

  8. The investigation of carbon nitride films prepared at various arc currents by vacuum cathode arc method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon nitride films have been prepared in the arc currents range of 20-60 A at the Ar/N2 atmosphere of 50/400 sccm by the vacuum cathode arc deposition method. The properties of the films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The N concentration showed a maximum of 35 at% at 20 A and decreased gradually with the arc currents. The films below 40 A consisted of linear polymeric-like component and sp2 graphitic cluster. With the increasing of the arc current from 20 to 40 A, the ID/IG rose and the photoluminescence (PL) fell gradually, which resulted from the development of the sp2 graphitic phase and the decrease of the polymeric-like phase. As a result, the CC bonds increased and sp3CN and sp2CN decreased. Above 40 A, with the increasing of arc currents, ID/IG fell and the PL increased gradually, which reflected the decreasing of sp2 graphitic phase and the modification of C and N atoms in sp2 cluster. The CC bonds and sp3CN fell and the sp2CN rose. The nanohardness of films showed increasing tendency with the arc currents. The variation of the relative ratio and the average energy of N-containing species and C-containing species at the atmosphere would be responsible for the change in the properties of films. (author)

  9. Light-front quantization of field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some basic topics in Light-Front (LF) quantized field theory are reviewed. Poincare algebra and the LF spin operator are discussed. The local scalar field theory of the conventional framework is shown to correspond to a non-local Hamiltonian theory on the LF in view of the constraint equations on the phase space, which relate the bosonic condensates to the non-zero modes. This new ingredient is useful to describe the spontaneous symmetry breaking on the LF. The instability of the symmetric phase in two dimensional scalar theory when the coupling constant grows is shown in the LF theory renormalized to one loop order. Chern-Simons gauge theory, regarded to describe excitations with fractional statistics, is quantized in the light-cone gauge and a simple LF Hamiltonian obtained which may allow us to construct renormalized theory of anyons. (author). 20 refs

  10. Light-Front quantization of field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, P P

    1996-01-01

    Some basic topics in Light-Front (LF) quantized field theory are reviewed. Poincarè algebra and the LF Spin operator are discussed. The local scalar field theory of the conventional framework is shown to correspond to a non-local Hamiltonian theory on the LF in view of the constraint equations on the phase space, which relate the bosonic condensates to the non-zero modes. This new ingredient is useful to describe the spontaneous symmetry breaking on the LF. The instability of the symmetric phase in two dimensional scalar theory when the coupling constant grows is shown in the LF theory renormalized to one loop order. Chern-Simons gauge theory regarded to describe excitations with fractional statistics, is quantized in the light-cone gauge and a simple LF Hamiltonian obtained which may allow us to construct renormalized theory of anyons.

  11. ACTIVE FRONT STEERING DURING BRAKING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Deling; CHEN Li; YIN Chengliang; ZHANG Yong

    2008-01-01

    An active front steering (AFS) intervention control during braking for vehicle stability is presented. Based on the investigation of AFS mechanism, a simplified model of steering system is established and integrated with vehicle model. Then the AFS control on vehicle handling dynamics during braking is designed. Due to the difficulties associated with the sideslip angle measurement of vehicle, a state observer is designed to provide real time estimation. Thereafter, the controller with the feedback of both sideslip and yaw angle is implemented. To evaluate the system control, the proposed AFS controlled vehicle has been tested in the Hardware-in-the-loop-simulation (HILS) system and compared with that of conventional vehicle. Results show that AFS can improve vehicle lateral stability effectively without reducing the braking performance.

  12. Nanophotonic front electrodes for perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetzold, Ulrich Wilhelm; Qiu, Weiming; Finger, Friedhelm; Poortmans, Jef; Cheyns, David

    2015-04-01

    In less than 3 years' time, a vast progress in power conversion efficiencies of organometal halide perovskite solar cells has been achieved by optimization of the device architecture, charge transport layers, and interfaces. A further increase in these efficiencies is expected from an improvement in the optical properties via anti-reflection coatings and nanophotonic light management concepts. In this contribution, we report on the development and implementation of a nanophotonic front electrode for perovskite solar cells. The nanostructures were replicated via the versatile and large-area compatible UV-nanoimprint lithography. The shallow design of the used transparent and conductive nanostructures enabled easy integration into our solution-based baseline process. Prototype methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells show an improvement of 5% in short-circuit current density and an improvement from 9.6% to 9.9% in power conversion efficiency compared to the flat reference device.

  13. Front-end electronics development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AT BNL the monolithic front-end electronics development effort is an outgrowth of work in discrete and hybrid circuits over the past 30 years. BNL's area of specialization centers on circuits for precision amplitude measurement, with signal-to-noise ratios of 100:1 and calibration to the same level of precision. Circuits are predominantly classical, continuous-time implementation of the functions now performed by hybrids, with little or no loss of performance. Included in this category are charge and current-sensitive preamplifiers, pulse shapers, sample/hold, multiplexing, and associated calibration and control circuits. Presently integration densities are limited to 16 channels per chip. Two examples are presented to illustrate the techniques needed to adopt hybrid circuits to the constraints of monolithic CMOS technology. They are programmable pulse shapes and a charge-sensitive preamp for very low detector capacitance

  14. Front instabilities in evaporatively dewetting nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancea, I.; Thiele, U.; Pauliac-Vaujour, E.; Stannard, A.; Martin, C. P.; Blunt, M. O.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2008-10-01

    Various experimental settings that involve drying solutions or suspensions of nanoparticles—often called nanofluids—have recently been used to produce structured nanoparticle layers. In addition to the formation of polygonal networks and spinodal-like patterns, the occurrence of branched structures has been reported. After reviewing the experimental results we use a modified version of the Monte Carlo model first introduced by Rabani [Nature 426, 271 (2003)] to study structure formation in evaporating films of nanoparticle solutions for the case that all structuring is driven by the interplay of evaporating solvent and diffusing nanoparticles. After introducing the model and its general behavior we focus on receding dewetting fronts which are initially straight but develop a transverse fingering instability. We analyze the dependence of the characteristics of the resulting branching patterns on the driving effective chemical potential, the mobility and concentration of the nanoparticles, and the interaction strength between liquid and nanoparticles. This allows us to understand the underlying instability mechanism.

  15. Light-front higher-helicity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reformulation, using Fock space vertex operators, of the original light-front cubic interaction terms for higher spin gauge fields is reviewed with comments on quantum higher spin gravity. The formalism is generalized to all orders in the interaction. The ensuing recursive equations for the higher order vertices, if they can be explicitly solved, will encode all interaction data into a denumerable set of rational functions of p+, the overall transverse momentum structure being fixed already at the kinematical level. A more thorough exposition can be found in the archive. This work was presented at the XVII European Workshop on String Theory, Padua, 5-9 September 2011. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Driving the LHCb front-end readout

    CERN Document Server

    Guzik, Z; Jost, B

    2004-01-01

    The timing and fast control (TFC) system is responsible for controlling and distributing timing, trigger and synchronous commands to the LHCb front-end (FE) electronics. It is different from the equivalent systems of the other LHC experiments in that it has to support two levels of high-rate triggers. Furthermore, the TFC mastership of a configurable ensemble of FE electronics is centralized in one module: the Readout Supervisor. A pool of optional Readout Supervisors allows mastering of all or separate combinations of subsystems in parallel by remote programming of a patch panel in the distribution network. The speed requirements and the multifunctionality of the Readout Supervisor necessitate optimal technological solutions. At the same time the logic must be modifiable to support extensions or changes in the running modes. A first prototype has been built using field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) for the entire logic and it has been tested successfully. This paper gives an overview of the system archite...

  17. Light-Front Holography, Light-Front Wavefunctions, and Novel QCD Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    Light-Front Holography is one of the most remarkable features of the AdS/CFT correspondence. In spite of its present limitations it provides important physical insights into the nonperturbative regime of QCD and its transition to the perturbative domain. This novel framework allows hadronic amplitudes in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time. The model leads to an effective confining light-front QCD Hamiltonian and a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate {zeta} which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time and determines the off-shell dynamics of the bound-state wavefunctions, and thus the fall-off as a function of the invariant mass of the constituents. The soft-wall holographic model modified by a positive-sign dilaton metric, leads to a remarkable one-parameter description of nonperturbative hadron dynamics - a semi-classical frame-independent first approximation to the spectra and light-front wavefunctions of meson and baryons. The model predicts a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in the leading orbital angular momentum L of hadrons and the radial quantum number n. The hadron eigensolutions projected on the free Fock basis provides the complete set of valence and non-valence light-front Fock state wavefunctions {Psi}{sub n/H} (x{sub i}, k{sub {perpendicular}i}, {lambda}{sub i}) which describe the hadron's momentum and spin distributions needed to compute the direct measures of hadron structure at the quark and gluon level, such as elastic and transition form factors, distribution amplitudes, structure functions, generalized parton distributions and transverse

  18. Time series analysis of Cenozoic era sea level and paleotemperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, George H.; Huffman, Tod E.

    1983-01-01

    A statistical analysis of Cenozoic era sea level and paleotemperature data was performed to determine the cycles of each data set and the correspondence between them. Accordingly, each of the four time series were first analyzed independently in the univariate mode of a spectral analysis. The two basic data sets were then analyzed in a paired cross-spectral analysis. The prominent periodic cycles remaining in the data sets after linear trend removal, were: sea level surface from seismic stratigraphy--9.6 million years, updated version of sea level surface from seismic stratigraphy--9.5 million years, continental paleotemperatures from paleobotanical interpretations--9.6 million years, and marine paleotemperatures from foraminiferal isotopic data--12.7 million years. The cross-correlation properties between the data sets of continental paleotemperatures from paleobotanical interpretations and sea level surface from seismic stratigraphy at the common prominent period of 9.6 million years were: (1) The squared coherency value which measures cross correlation between the two data sets has the value 0.30, and (2) the amount by which the continental paleotemperatures from paleobotanical interpretations data lags the sea level surface from seismic stratigraphy data is 2.70 million years.

  19. Late Cenozoic Tectonic Deformation in the Dongsha Islands and Adjacent Sea Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shiguo(吴时国); LIU Zhan(刘展); WANG Wanyin(王万银); GUO Junhua(郭军华); T. Lüdmann; H. K. Wong

    2003-01-01

    Dongsha Island and the adjacent sea area locate at the northern continental margin of the South China Sea (SCS), and is connected to the east by the Manila Trench. Analyses of seismic stratigraphy and gravity, magnetic and drilling wells data led to the discovery of three post-fault sequences (V, VI, VII). Extensive tectonic uplift, magma activity and erosion occurred in Dongsha Island and the adjacent area, where most of the faults in the northeastern SCS were still active during Pliocene and Quaternary. Two groups of faults trending NEE and NW were developed during Late Cenozoic. We conclude that three important tectonic movements, especially Dongsha movement (4.4-5.2 Ma) and Liuhua movement (1.4-1.89 Ma), controlled the structural framework in the Dongsha rise; whose deformation in the east is stronger than that in the west and whose stress field variation suggests that the tectonic uplift in the study area contributed to magmato-tectonic events correlated to the main collision phases between the East China and Taiwan 5-3 and 3-0 Ma ago.

  20. Book Review: Late Cenozoic Climate Change in Asia: Loess, Monsoon and Monsoon-arid Environment Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Loess-Paleosol deposits drape >500,000 km2 of eastern China, spanning environments from the humid, monsoon-influenced regions near the coast to the arid, westerlies-dominated regions inland. Sections, up to hundreds of meters thick, are exposed in deeply incised river valleys and can be accessed as well by drilling. Combined, the high sedimentation rates and extensive geographic coverage make these sections unique among global terrestrial sediment archives. The Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, and the arid interior regions to the northwest, record diverse aspects of geologic and environmental change ranging from the tectonic evolution of the Tibetan Plateau (106 year time scale) through glacial-interglacial scale changes in global ice volume and greenhouse gasses (105 year time scale) on down through the orbital (104 years) to millennial and centennial scale events (103-102 year) relevant to the underpinnings of human interactions with changing environmental pressures. 'Late Cenozoic Climate Chang in Asia: Loess, Monsoon and Monsoon-arid Environment Evolution' is a timely contribution that synthesizes findings derived from the extensive work in these areas, places the findings in the broader context of global climate change and helps to define avenues for future research.