WorldWideScience

Sample records for cement

  1. Cement Conundrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China aims to streamline the crowded cement industry Policymakers are looking to build a concrete wall around the cement-making industry as they seek to solidify the fluid cement market and cut excessive production.

  2. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including an...... overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  3. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    OpenAIRE

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec; Davorin Matanović; Gracijan Krklec

    1994-01-01

    During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures) and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production...

  4. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job

  6. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweigh cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary surface pipe and intermediate casing cementing conditions historically encountered in the US and establishment of average design conditions for ULHS cements. Russian literature concerning development and use of ultra-lightweight cements employing either nitrogen or ULHS was reviewed, and a summary is presented. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was conducted to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS. This protocol is presented and discussed. finally, results of initial testing of ULHS cements is presented along with analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project

  7. Advanced cementation concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this programme of work was to investigate whether improvements could be made to existing formulations for cement suitable for the immobilization of intermediate level radioactive waste. Two additives were selected, microsilica and limestone flour. Improvements to the cement were only slight. (author)

  8. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those in a...... > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy...

  9. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  10. Asphalt cement poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphalt; Pavement ... The substances in asphalt that can be harmful are: Hydrocarbons Industrial glues Industrial solvents Tar ... Asphalt is found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for ...

  11. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  12. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  13. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  14. Concrete = aggregate, cement, water?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concrete for the Temelin nuclear power plant is produced to about 70 different formulae. For quality production, homogeneous properties of aggregates, accurate proportioning devices, technological discipline and systematic inspections and tests should be assured. The results are reported of measuring compression strength after 28 days for different concrete samples. The results of such tests allow reducing the proportion of cement, which brings about considerable savings. Reduction in cement quantities can also be achieved by adding ash to the concrete mixes. Ligoplast, a plasticizer addition is used for improving workability. (M.D). 8 figs

  15. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  16. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  17. Produktie van cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit JRK; Coenen PWHG; Matthijsen AJCM; LAE; TAUW

    1995-01-01

    This document on cement production has been published within the SPIN project. In this project information has been collected on industrial plants or industrial processes to afford support to governmental policy on emission reduction. This document contains information on the processes, emission sou

  18. US cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  20. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    Patients with isolated erosion of the long incus process suffer from severe hearing loss caused by lack of continuity of the ossicular chain. This study is a retrospective evaluation of the hearing results using two different surgical procedures. Since January 1993, 12 consecutive patients with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those in a group of 20 historical controls who underwent surgery in 1991 and 1992 using incus autograft interposition. Among the 12 index patients, 7 (58%) achieved improvement in PTA of > 10 dB, in 3 there was no difference and in 2 a slight decline. Among the 20 controls, 14 (70%) achieved improvement in PTA of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy to perform, presents less risk of damage to the stapes and cochlea, requires less extensive surgery and does not exclude other surgical methods in cases of reoperation. PMID:10909000

  1. Barium aluminate cement: its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology of manufacturing barium aluminate cement from barium sulfate and alumina, using a rotary kiln for firing the clinker is described. The method of granulation of the homogenized charge was used. Conditions of using the ''to mud'' method in industry were indicated. The physical and chemical properties of barium aluminate cement are determined and the quality of several batches of cement prepared on a semi-industrial scale and their suitability for making highly refractory concretes are tested. The optimal composition of the concretes is determined as a function of the mixing water and barium aluminate cement contents. Several experimental batches of concretes were used in the linings of furnaces in the steel industry. The suitability of these cements for use in fields other than steelmaking is examined. It is established that calcium aluminate cement has certain limited applications

  2. [Haemotoxicity of dental luting cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, A; Welker, D

    1989-06-01

    A glass ionomer luting cement (AquaCem) shows a relatively low haemolytic activity in comparison with two zinc phosphate cements. Especially the initial irritation by this cement is smaller. Although it is possible that AquaCem particularly, in unfavourable cases, may damage the pulpa dentin system; this is due to the slowly decrease of the haemolytic activity with increasing of the probes. We found that Adhesor showed in dependence of the batches a varying quality. PMID:2626769

  3. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement. PMID:19010682

  4. Respiratory Health among Cement Workers in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Zeleke, Zeyede K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known on dust exposure and respiratory health among cement cleaners. There are only a few follow-up studies on respiratory health among cement factory workers and also studies on acute effects of cement dust exposure are limited in numbers. Objective: This study aimed at assessing cement dust exposure and adverse respiratory health effects among Ethiopian cement production workers, with particular focus on cement cleaners. Method: The first paper was...

  5. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  6. Health hazards of cement dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  7. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Misra; Renu Mathur

    2007-06-01

    The scope of magnesium oxychloride (MOC) cement in concrete works has been evaluated. MOC cement concrete compositions of varying strengths having good placing and finishing characteristics were prepared and investigated for their compressive and flexural strengths, -values, abrasion resistance etc. The durability of MOC concrete compositions against extreme environmental conditions viz. heating–cooling, freezing–thawing, wetting–drying and penetration and deposition of salts etc were investigated. The results reveal that MOC concrete has high compressive strength associated with high flexural strength and the ratio of compressive to flexural strength varies between 6 and 8. The elastic moduli of the compositions studied are found to be 23–85 GPa and the abrasion losses between 0.11 and 0.20%. While alternate heating–cooling cycles have no adverse effect on MOC concrete, it can be made durable against freezing–thawing and the excessive exposure to water and salt attack by replacing 10% magnesium chloride solution by magnesium sulphate solution of the same concentration.

  8. Cement/slag chemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of cement-based matrices intended for radwaste immobilization is assessed. The long-term performance of the matrix is characterized by thermodynamic evaluation of experimental data. The results are presented in a general form, amenable to a range of specific formulations. The interaction of specific radwaste components with cements has been studied, using Iodine as an example. It occurs as both I- and IO3- species, but these differ sharply in sorption characteristics. The effect of ionizing radiation of the pH and Eh of cement matrices is reported. (author)

  9. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  10. Cementing porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadachkoria, D

    2009-12-01

    The clinical success of fixed prosthodontic restorations can be complex and involve multifaceted procedures. Preparation design, oral hygiene/micro flora, mechanical forces, and restorative materials are only a few of the factors which contribute to overall success. One key factor to success is choosing the proper cement. Popular use of cements for PFM crowns has shifted from zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements to resin-reinforced glass ionomer, or RRGI, cements. This change has been rapid and profound. Dental cements have always been less than ideal materials, but this is shift to the relatively new RRGI category justified. Resin-reinforced glass ionomer (RRGI) cements appear to be better than zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements when placing porcelain-to-metal crowns. RRGI cements, such as RelyX Luting, Fuji Plus and Vitremer Luting Cement, satisfy more of the ideal characteristics of PFM cementation than any other previous cement. Expansion of all three cements has not caused any apparent problems with the cements when used with PFM or metal crowns, but these cements, however, should be avoided when cementing all-ceramic crowns. PMID:20090144

  11. Sliding wear of cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemented carbides are known to be very hard and wear resistant and are therefor often used in applications involving surface damage and wear. The wear rate of cemented carbides is often measured in abrasion. In such tests it has been shown that the wear rate is inversely dependent on the material hardness. The sliding wear is even more of a surface phenomenon than a abrasion, making it difficult to predict friction and wear from bulk properties. This paper concentrates on the sliding wear of cemented carbides and elucidates some wear mechanisms. It is especially shown that a fragmenting wear mechanism of WC is very important for the description of wear of cemented carbides. (author)

  12. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Boberg

    The substitution of alternative for fossil fuels in cement production has increased significantly in the last decade. Of these new alternative fuels, solid state fuels presently account for the largest part, and in particular, meat and bone meal, plastics and tyre derived fuels (TDF) accounted for...... the most significant alternative fuel energy contributors in the German cement industry. Solid alternative fuels are typically high in volatile content and they may differ significantly in physical and chemical properties compared to traditional solid fossil fuels. From the process point of view......, considering a modern kiln system for cement production, the use of alternative fuels mainly influences 1) kiln process stability (may accelerate build up of blockages preventing gas and/or solids flow), 2) cement clinker quality, 3) emissions, and 4) decreased production capacity. Kiln process stability in...

  13. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  14. Assessment of Natural Radioactivity Levels of Cements and Cement Composites in the Slovak Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Eštoková; Lenka Palaščáková

    2013-01-01

    The radionuclide activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and radiological parameters (radium equivalent activity, gamma and alpha indices, the absorbed gamma dose rate and external and internal hazard indices) of cements and cement composites commonly used in the Slovak Republic have been studied in this paper. The cement samples of 8 types of cements from Slovak cement plants and five types of composites made from cement type CEM I were analyzed in the experiment. The radionuclide activities in t...

  15. Assessment of the compatibility of wood and plastic with cement for their recycling in cement composites

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, André De; Caldeira, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The compatibility between maritime pine wood and cement, and between plastic (LDPE) and cement, was assessed for the recycling of wood and plastic in cement composites. Temperature vs. time profiles of cement setting were registered and compatibility indices were calculated. Results indicate that recycling of plastics in plastic-cement composites does not pose any questions regarding chemical compatibility. However, maritime pine hinders cement setting in some extent. So, in or...

  16. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    This research work aimed at characterising composition, hydration and physical properties of fluoride cement, by studying samples of the cement obtained from Malawi, and comparing them to ordinary Portland cement. By confirming the suitable characteristics of fluoride cement through this work, the results of the research work provide a good basis for the wider adoption of fluoride cement as an alternative to ordinary Portland cement, especially in developing economies. Numerous accounts have been cited regarding the production and use of fluoride cement. Since there have not been conclusive agreement as to its properties, this study was limited to the theories of successful incorporation of fluoride compounds in the manufacture of fluoride cement. Hence, the properties and characteristics reported in this study relate to the cement currently manufactured in Malawi, and, on a comparative basis only, to that manufactured in other parts of the world. Samples of the fluoride cement used in the study were obtained by synthetic manufacture of the cement using common raw materials for the manufacture of fluoride cement that is limestone, silica sand, and fluorspar. These samples were subjected to several comparative tests used to characterise cements including examination under x-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and tests for setting time and compressive strength. Under similar laboratory conditions, it was possible to prove that fluoride cement hardens more rapidly than ordinary Portland cement. Also observed during the experimental work is that fluoride cement develops higher compressive strengths than ordinary Portland cement. The hardening and setting times are significantly different between the two cements. Also the nature of the hydration products, that is the microstructural development is significantly different in the two cements. The differences brought about between the two cements are because of the presence of fluorine during the clinkering

  17. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  18. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  19. The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waanders, Daan; Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A; Verdonschot, Nico

    2010-11-16

    The cement-bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement-bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage or microcracks and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect the mechanical response of the cement-bone interface at various load levels in terms of plastic displacement and crack formation. Two FEA models were created, which were based on micro-computed tomography data of two physical cement-bone interface specimens. These models were subjected to tensile fatigue loads with four different magnitudes. Three deformation modes of the cement were considered: 'only creep', 'only damage' or 'creep and damage'. The interfacial plastic deformation, the crack reduction as a result of creep and the interfacial stresses in the bone were monitored. The results demonstrate that, although some models failed early, the majority of plastic displacement was caused by fatigue damage, rather than cement creep. However, cement creep does decrease the crack formation in the cement up to 20%. Finally, while cement creep hardly influences the stress levels in the bone, fatigue damage of the cement considerably increases the stress levels in the bone. We conclude that at low load levels the plastic displacement is mainly caused by creep. At moderate to high load levels, however, the plastic displacement is dominated by fatigue damage and is hardly affected by creep, although creep reduced the number of cracks in moderate to high load region. PMID:20692663

  20. Cementation of Loose Sand Particles based on Bio-cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Hui; QIAN Chunxiang

    2014-01-01

    Loose sand particles could be cemented to sandstone by bio-cement (microbial induced magnesium carbonate). The bio-sandstone was firstly prepared, and then the compressive strength and the porosity of the sandstone cemented by microbial induced magnesium carbonate were tested to characterize the cementation effectiveness. In addition, the formed mineral composition and the microstructure of bio-sandstone were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The experimental results show that the feasibility of binding loose sand particles using microbial induced magnesium carbonate precipitation is available and the acquired compressive strength of bio-sandstone can be excellent at certain ages. Moreover, the compressive strength and the porosity could be improved with the increase of microbial induced magnesium carbonate content. XRD results indicate that the morphology of magnesium carbonate induced by microbe appears as needles and SEM results show that the cementation of loose sand particles to sandstone mainly relies on the microbial induced formation of magnesium carbonate precipitation around individual particles and at particle-particle contacts.

  1. Seepage/Cement Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) pertaining to this task defines the work scopes and objectives for development of various submodels for the Physical and Chemical Environment Abstraction Model for TSPA-LA. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) for this specific task establishes that an evaluation be performed of the chemical reactions between seepage that has entered the drift and concrete which might be used in the repository emplacement drifts. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) then states that the potential effects of these water/grout reactions on chemical conditions in the drift be assessed factoring in the influence of carbonation and the relatively small amount of grout. This task is also directed at: (1) developing a conceptualization of important cement/seepage interactions and potential impacts on EBS performance, (2) performing a screening analysis to assess the importance of cement/seepage interactions. As the work progresses and evolves on other studies, specifically the Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment (P andCE) Model (in progress), many of the issues associated with items 1 and 2, above, will be assessed. Such issues include: (1) Describing the mineralogy of the specified cementitious grout and its evolution over time. (2) Describing the composition of the water before contacting the grout. (3) Developing reasonable upper-bound estimates for the composition of water contacting grout, emphasizing pH and concentrations for anions such as sulfate. (4) Evaluating the equilibration of cement-influenced water with backfill and gas-phase CO2. (5) Developing reasonable-bound estimates for flow rate of affected water into the drift. The concept of estimating an ''upper-bound'' range for reaction between the grout and the seepage, particularly in terms of pH is based on equilibrium being established between the seepage and the grout. For example, this analysis can be based on equilibrium being established as

  2. A modified PMMA cement (Sub-cement) for accelerated fatigue testing of cemented implant constructs using cadaveric bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A; Mann, Kenneth A

    2008-10-20

    Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress-intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for Sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25+/-19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2-D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models. PMID:18774136

  3. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  4. Retention of Root Canal Posts: Effect of Cement Film Thickness, Luting Cement, and Post Pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Flury, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the cement film thickness of a zinc phosphate or a resin cement on retention of untreated and pretreated root canal posts. Prefabricated zirconia posts (CosmoPost: 1.4 mm) and two types of luting cements (a zinc phosphate cement [DeTrey Zinc...

  5. [Antimicrobial activity of orthodontic band cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavic, J; Arriagada, M; Elgueta, J; García, C

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of enamel decalcification and caries beneath orthodontic bands, has indicated the need for a new enamel binding adhesive orthodontic cement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, in vitro, on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus, acidophillus, of three materials used to cements the orthodontic bands. The cements studied were: Zinc phosphate cement, Glass-ionomer cement, and Policarboxylate cement. Thirty petri plates were seeded with S. mutans, and thirty with L. acidophillus; on each plate three pellet were placed, one of each cement studied. Petri plates were incubated under microaerophilic conditions at 37 C, and checked at 72 hrs. for Streptococcus, mutans, and four days for Lactobacillus acidophillus to evaluate the inhibition zone. The results were tabulated for each material. It was demonstrated that exists important variations in the antimicrobial properties of the materials studied, as in the microbial sensitivity to these cements. PMID:2135908

  6. Cement radwaste solidification studies third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarises cement radwaste studies carried out at AEE Winfrith during 1981 on the encapsulation of medium and low active waste in cement. During the year more emphasis has been placed on the work which is directly related to the solidification of SGHWR active sludge. Information has been obtained on the properties of 220 dm3 drums of cemented waste. The use of cement grouts for the encapsulation of solid items has also been investigated during 1981. (U.K.)

  7. Cement Sheath Integrity During Thermal Cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Jesús De

    2015-01-01

    In the construction process of oil and gas wells, primary cementing constitutes a critical procedure of placing a cement sheath in the annulus between casing and formation, or between the casing strings. The main purpose is to provide mechanical stability to the wellbore and to ensure zonal isolation through the entire well service lifetime. Failures to achieve a proper primary cementing, and to ensure long-term sealing capabilities of the cement sheath, may severely limit the abi...

  8. Neutron Scattering Studies of Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Despite more than a century of research, basic questions remain regarding both the internal structure and the role of water in Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete, the world's most widely used manufactured material. Most such questions concern the primary hydration product and strength-building phase of OPC paste, the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. When cement and water are mixed, this phase precipitates as clusters of nanoscale (nearly amorphous) colloidal particles with an associated water-filled inter-particle pore system. Most attempts to characterize the C-S-H gel and the behavior of the associated water involve drying or other processes that, themselves, change the bound water content within and around the gel. Neutron scattering methods do not suffer from this disadvantage. Furthermore, the neutron isotope effect and the neutron's sensitivity to molecular motion have enabled considerable progress to be made in recent years by: (i) determining the C-S-H composition, density and gel structure in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) H/D contrast variation studies; (ii) elucidating the changing state of water within cement as hydration progresses using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS); and (iii) measuring the production and consumption of nanoscale calcium hydroxide (CH), a by-product of cement hydration that co-exists with the C-S-H gel, using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). These experiments have provided new insights into the physics and chemistry of cement hydration, and have implications for the design of new concretes with pozzolanic cement additions that are intended to address environmental concerns and sustainability issues.

  9. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well

  10. PERFORMANCE OF PULVERIZED SLAG-SUBSTITUTED CEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The Portland cement is equivalently substituted by slag micropowders with various specific areas. The workability,activity and acid-corrosion resistance of the slag-substituted cements are investigated,the activation of gypsum is discussed,also the porosity and pore distribution of mortars of the slag micropowders cement are determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry.

  11. Microscale Investigation of Arsenic Distribution and Species in Cement Product from Cement Kiln Coprocessing Wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Yufei Yang; Jingchuan Xue; Qifei Huang

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As) in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O) were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, ...

  12. The comparison between sulfate salt weathering of portland cement paste and calcium sulfoaluminate cement paste

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zanqun; Deng, Dehua; De Schutter, Geert

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the damage performances of sulfate salt weathering of Portland cement paste and calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement paste were compared according to authors' previous studies. It was found that the evaporation zone of speciments partially immersed in 10% Na2SO4 solution were both severely deteriorated for Portland cement and CSA cement. However, the differences were more significant: (1) the CSA cement paste were damaged just after 7 days exposure compared to the 5 months expos...

  13. Thoughts on the Current Cement Industry Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zhihe

    2003-01-01

    According to the analysis of cement capacity andits relations with macro economy running index, the mainreasons for the present rapid development of cement capacityare the rapid development of economy and the shot up ofwhole society fixed asset investment. According to the presentspeed of economy development, cement still enjoys a po-tential increase, So here has not been an overall excessivepopularity of cement industry. The best way to prevent lowlevel repeated construction is to promote the development ofnew dry- process cement as well as try to get rid of blindness.

  14. Special recipe for cement solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABB Atom's MOSS is a compact, mobile system for immobilizing radwaste in cement. Various ''recipes'' have been developed to meet stringent end product requirements. A version of MOSS, described here, was delivered to Borssele last year and has completed two solidification campaigns to date. (author)

  15. Effect of temporary cements on the shear bond strength of luting cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fiori-Júnior

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, by shear bond strength (SBS testing, the influence of different types of temporary cements on the final cementation using conventional and self-etching resin-based luting cements. Material and Methods: Forty human teeth divided in two halves were assigned to 8 groups (n=10: I and V (no temporary cementation; II and VI: Ca(OH2-based cement; III and VII: zinc oxide (ZO-based cement; IV and VIII: ZO-eugenol (ZOE-based cement. Final cementation was done with RelyX ARC cement (groups I to IV and RelyX Unicem cement (groups V to VIII. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. RESULTS: Means were (MPa: I - 3.80 (±1.481; II - 5.24 (±2.297; III - 6.98 (±1.885; IV - 6.54 (±1.459; V - 5.22 (±2.465; VI - 4.48 (±1.705; VII - 6.29 (±2.280; VIII - 2.47 (±2.076. Comparison of the groups that had the same temporary cementation (Groups II and VI; III and VII; IV and VIII showed statistically significant difference (p0.05 for the different luting cements (RelyX TM ARC and RelyX TM Unicem. The groups that had no temporary cementation (Groups I and V did not differ significantly from each other either (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: When temporary cementation was done with ZO- or ZOE-based cements and final cementation was done with RelyX ARC, there was an increase in the SBS compared to the control. In the groups cemented with RelyX Unicem, however, the use of a ZOE-based temporary cement affected negatively the SBS of the luting agent used for final cementation.

  16. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-02-23

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C-S-H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C-S-H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C-S-H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C-S-H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  17. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Hjuler, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used as the...... sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone...... capacity (Xr). This shows that raw meal could be used as a sorbent for the easy integration of the carbonate looping process into the cement pyro process for reducing CO2 emissions from the cement production process....

  18. Leaching of tritium from a cement composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching of tritium from cement composites into an aqueous phase has been studied to evaluate the safety of incorporation of the tritiated liquid waste into cement. Leaching tests were performed by the method recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Leaching fraction was measured as functions of waste-cement ratio (Wa/C), temperature of leachant and curing time. The tritium leachability of cement in the long term test follows the order: alumina cement portland cement slag cement. The fraction of tritium leached increases with increasing Wa/C and temperature and decreasing curing period. A deionized water as a leachant gives a slightly higher leachability than synthetic sea water. The amount leached of tritium from a 200 l drum size specimen was estimated on the basis of the above results. (author)

  19. The cement recycling of the earthquake disaster debris by Hachinohe Cement Co., Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tremendous quantity of earthquake disaster debris and tsunami sediment was resulted by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Hachinohe Cement Co., Ltd., a Sumitomo Osaka Cement subsidiary, was the first cement industry company to receive and process such waste materials outside of their usual prefecture area, while the company is performing their treatment and recycling services locally in Hachinohe City and Aomori Prefecture. This report provides an explanation about the recycling mechanism of waste materials and by-products in cement manufacturing process, and introduces an example of actual achievements for the disaster debris treatment by utilizing the cement recycling technologies at the Hachinohe Cement Plant. (author)

  20. Carbonation on ternary cement systems

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Ramírez, Sagrario; Fernández Carrasco, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    The main hydration reaction product in the ternary system fly ash, calcium sulphate and calcium aluminate cement (40/20/40) at 20°C is a hydrated calcium sulfoaluminate compound, an AFt phase slightly different from “traditional ettringite”. The carbonation of ettringite develops gypsum but in this case rapidcreekite is formed. For the first time it has been observed that carbonation of the mentioned calcium sulfoaluminate compound (AFt), an hydrated calcium sulphate carbonated phase (Ca2(SO4...

  1. WHITE CEMENT IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Y.C.P RAMANA BABU; B.SAI DOONDI; N. M .V .VAMSI KRISHNA; K.Prasanthi

    2013-01-01

    India is one among the fast developing countries in the world in the areas of Infrastructure. Now a day, Carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the temporary atmospheric pollutants in the environment chiefly emitted from the fuel burning vehicles and street lights which lead to global warming and pose a major threat tothe survival and sustainable development. This paper deals with the principal purpose of use of white cement in pavement design which will take care of the Green hous...

  2. ROTARY SCREW SYSTEMS IN CEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Taratuta V. D.; Belokur K. A.; Serga G. V.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results of research of rotary-screw systems in relation to the creation of rotary kilns for the annealing of-cuttings in the preparation of cement clinker. Using the proposed design, in comparison with known designs of similar purpose, it significantly improves performance, reduces size and power consumption through the use of rotary screw systems in the form of screw rotors and drums made hollow with sidewalls assembled from separate strips or plates of different geometr...

  3. WHITE CEMENT IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.C.P RAMANA BABU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available India is one among the fast developing countries in the world in the areas of Infrastructure. Now a day, Carbon monoxide (CO and carbon dioxide (CO2 are the temporary atmospheric pollutants in the environment chiefly emitted from the fuel burning vehicles and street lights which lead to global warming and pose a major threat tothe survival and sustainable development. This paper deals with the principal purpose of use of white cement in pavement design which will take care of the Green house gases (i.e., CO and CO2 and also saves lot of money in the long run process. A small amount of these gases in environment can cause major problems over time. Use of white cement in composite pavement design where there is heavy traffic loads are acting as well as number of vehicles are more such as junctions, bus stops, check posts etc., can perform better and acts asenvironment friendly. Its light colour reflects more than bituminous pavement so that it can be easily identified and avoid accidents to some extent. White cement helps to lower the average bus stop, junction temperature providing comfort to the people because it has high solar reflectance there by reducing “urban heat island” effect. In addition to this it has some more advantages which increase the sustainability, durability and workability of the pavements.

  4. Cement replacement materials. Properties, durability, sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramezanianpour, Ali Akbar [Amirkabir Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Concrete Technology Center

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this book is to present the latest findings in the properties and application of Supplementary Cementing Materials and blended cements currently used in the world in concrete. Sustainability is an important issue all over the world. Carbon dioxide emission has been a serious problem in the world due to the greenhouse effect. Today many countries agreed to reduce the emission of CO2. Many phases of cement and concrete technology can affect sustainability. Cement and concrete industry is responsible for the production of 7% carbon dioxide of the total world CO2 emission. The use of supplementary cementing materials (SCM), design of concrete mixtures with optimum content of cement and enhancement of concrete durability are the main issues towards sustainability in concrete industry.

  5. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Radivoje D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the characteristics of different types of luting cements (zinc phosphate, glass-ionomer and resin based composite cement using scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis and microleakage for the quality range of materials. Dental cements were mixed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and formed with posts in dental root canals of extracted teeth. The quality of cement was determined by SEM observation on horizontal sectioned roots with fixed posts according to specific pore and marginal gap diameter. The microleakage was measured on specimens immersed in Lofler (methylene blue solution. The mean values of the maximal diameter of pores, marginal gaps and microleakage of conventional cements are remarkably larger in comparison with composite luting agents. In conclusion, the quality and efficiency of composite luting agents in comparison with conventional cements are more successful in protecting the interior of tooth from penetration of oral fluids, bacteria and bacterial toxins into unprotected dentine.

  6. Sustainable Development of the Cement Industry and Blended Cements to Meet Ecological Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantin Sobolev

    2003-01-01

    The world production of cement has greatly increased in the past 10 years. This trend is the most significant factor affecting technological development and the updating of manufacturing facilities in the cement industry. Existing technology for the production of cement clinker is ecologically damaging; it consumes much energy and natural resources and also emits pollutants. A new approach to the production of blended or high-volume mineral additive (HVMA) cement helps to improve its ecologi...

  7. Global Cement Industry: Competitive and Institutional Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Selim, Tarek; Salem, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The cement industry is a capital intensive, energy consuming, and vital industry for sustaining infrastructure of nations. The international cement market –while constituting a small share of world industry output—has been growing at an increasing rate relative to local production in recent years. Attempts to protect the environment in developed countries –especially Europe—have caused cement production plants to shift to countries with less stringent environmental regulations. Along with con...

  8. Characterization of cement composites with mineral additives

    OpenAIRE

    Korat, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral dissertation is aimed at characterizing cement composites with mineral additives representing the industrial waste material (fly ash, granulated blast furnace slag and biomass fly ash). Their usage can replace high cement shares in individual cases and is, however, favourable due to the production costs reduction and environment burden decrease, including the decreased emission of greenhouse gases as well as lower energy use. Cement composites (in fresh or hardened state)...

  9. Premixed calcium silicate cement for endodontic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Calcium silicate-based materials (also called MTA) are increasingly being used in endodontic applications. However, the handling properties of MTA are not optimal when it comes to injectability and cohesion. Premixing the cements using glycerol avoids these issues. However, there is a lack of data on the effect of common cement variables on important properties of premixed cements for endodontic applications. In this study, the effects of liquid-to-powder ratio, amount of radiopacifier and am...

  10. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  11. Retention of Root Canal Posts: Effect of Cement Film Thickness, Luting Cement, and Post Pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahafi, A; Benetti, A R; Flury, S; Peutzfeldt, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the cement film thickness of a zinc phosphate or a resin cement on retention of untreated and pretreated root canal posts. Prefabricated zirconia posts (CosmoPost: 1.4 mm) and two types of luting cements (a zinc phosphate cement [DeTrey Zinc] and a self-etch adhesive resin cement [Panavia F2.0]) were used. After removal of the crowns of 360 extracted premolars, canines, or incisors, the root canals were prepared with a parallel-sided drill system to three different final diameters. Half the posts did not receive any pretreatment. The other half received tribochemical silicate coating according to the manufacturer's instructions. Posts were then luted in the prepared root canals (n=30 per group). Following water storage at 37°C for seven days, retention of the posts was determined by the pull-out method. Irrespective of the luting cement, pretreatment with tribochemical silicate coating significantly increased retention of the posts. Increased cement film thickness resulted in decreased retention of untreated posts and of pretreated posts luted with zinc phosphate cement. Increased cement film thickness had no influence on retention of pretreated posts luted with resin cement. Thus, retention of the posts was influenced by the type of luting cement, by the cement film thickness, and by the post pretreatment. PMID:25764045

  12. The influence of ultrasound on removal of prefabricated metal post cemented with different resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiyeh Feiz

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasonic energy did not decrease the retention of posts cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Furthermore, it seems that there is no significant difference between removal force of self-etch (Panavia and the self-etch self-adhesive (Maxcem Elite resin cements.

  13. Case Study of the California Cement Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    California is the largest cement producing state in the U.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cement production and cement industry employment. The cement industry in California consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy, annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3 million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of waste materials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paper focused on providi...

  14. Immobilisation of radwaste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solubilities and influence on cement pH are reported for calcium aluminate and aluminosulphate hydrates. The solubility of Ca(OH)2 is reported to 700 bars. Polymerization of C-S-H is investigated by NMR. Specific interactions of U6+ and iodine (I-, IO3-) with cement components are described. The impact of radiation on cements and the influence of higher temperature are documented. The role of dissolved Ca and CO2 in groundwaters as dissolution media for cements are reported. (author)

  15. Acoustic evaluation of cementing quality using obliquely incident ultrasonic signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Wen-Xing; Qiao Wen-Xiao; Che Xiao-Hua; Xie Hui

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic cement bond logging is a widely used method for evaluating cementing quality. Conventional ultrasonic cement bond logging uses vertical incidence and cannot accurately evaluate lightweight cement bonding. Oblique incidence is a new technology for evaluating cement quality with improved accuracy for lightweight cements. In this study, we simulated models of acoustic impedance of cement and cementing quality using ultrasonic oblique incidence, and we obtained the relation between cementing quality, acoustic impedance of cement, and the acoustic attenuation coeffi cient of the A0-mode and S0-mode Lamb waves. Then, we simulated models of different cement thickness and we obtained the relation between cement thickness and the time difference of the arrival between the A0 and A0′ modes.

  16. Design and manufacture of Portland cement Application of statistical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Svinning, Ketil

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the work is to enable design and manufacture of cement with emphasis on the quality and the properties of cement. Data used in the design and manufacture were collected from predictions of properties and characteristics of cement. The properties of cement were predicted from its characteristics and from the production conditions in cement kiln and mill. The cement characteristics were in some investigations predicted from the production conditions. The design was based on sensi...

  17. Microscopic evaluation regarding time behavior of orthodontic cements used for disjunctor cementing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Bartok

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to fulfill their function, orthodontic devices must be cemented on teeth using orthodontic rings. The retention of the orthodontic ring is influenced mainly by the type of dental-ring adhesion. This study was initiated to determine possible microleakage events while using zinc phosphate cement Adhesor (Spofa Dental, conventional glass ionomer Ketac Cem (3M ESPE and Fuji Ortho (GC and a compomer Transbond Plus (3M Unitek. The results of the study are consistent with those reported in the literature reference, the compomer is the preferred adhesive material for cementing the orthodontic rings, compared to conventional glass ionomer cements and zinc-phosphate cement.

  18. The influence of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Korzen, Migge Sofie Hoffmann; Skibsted, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes effects of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste, which is an important subject in relation to life-time modelling of reinforced concrete structures. The influence of cement type on chloride binding is investigated by substituting cement with pure...... cement clinker. Both theoretical considerations and experimental data for chloride binding in cement pastes are presented. A physico-chemically based model to describe the influence of temperature on physical binding of chloride is presented. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear...... magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used for quantification of the anhydrous and hydrated aluminate and silicate phases in the chloride exposed cement pastes. The 27Al isotropic chemical shift and nuclear quadrupole coupling is reported for a synthetic sample of Friedel's salt, Ca2Al(OH)6Cl×2H2O....

  19. Cements in radioactive waste management. Characterization requirements of cement products for acceptance and quality assurance purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementitious materials are used as immobilizing matrices for low (LLW) and medium-level wastes (MLW) and are also components of the construction materials in the secondary barriers and the repositories. This report has concerned itself with a critical assessment of the quality assurance aspects of the immobilization and disposal of MLW and LLW cemented wastes. This report has collated the existing knowledge of the use and potential of cementitious materials in radioactive waste immobilization and highlighted the physico-chemical parameters. Subject areas include an assessment of immobilization objectives and cement as a durable material, waste stream and matrix characterization, quality assurance concepts, nature of cement-based systems, chemistry and modelling of cement hydration, role and effect of blending agents, radwaste-cement interaction, assessment of durability, degradative and radiolytic processes in cements and the behaviour of cement-based matrices and their near-field interactions with the environment and the repository conditions

  20. Copper Slag Blended Cement: An Environmental Sustainable Approach for Cement Industry in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagmeet Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Indian cement industry is facing environmental issue of emission of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas. Blended cements including supplementary cementitious materials are substitute of Portland cement to reduce CO2 emission. The present paper investigates theappropriateness of copper slag (CS as supplementary cementitious material. Strength properties and hydration of mixes were determined at different replacement levels of CS with cement. Compressive, flexural and tensile strength of each mix was found out at different curing periods. The hydration of cement was investigated through X-ray diffraction (XRD. The strength test results showed that substitution of up to 20% of CS can significantly replace Portland cement.XRD test results were corresponding to strength test results. The present study encourages the utilization of CS as supplementary cementitious material to make economical and environmentally sustainable blended cement

  1. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification. Zinc oxide-eugenol is a device composed of zinc oxide-eugenol intended to serve as a temporary tooth... chapter subject to § 872.9. (b) Dental cement other than zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification....

  2. A Pause for China's Cement Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhen

    2009-01-01

    @@ Cement industry suffers excess productionWith the advent of global financial crisis,the Chinese government has laid out a stimulus package on infrastructure construction.Driven by the investment spree,China's cement makers are flocking to expand output capacity,which is now leading the industry into a much-higher-thanneeded state.

  3. Pre-portland cements and geopolymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Perná, Ivana; Ertl, Z.; Miller, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2012), s. 57-62. ISSN 1214-9705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : caementum * cement itious * calcareous cement Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2011 http://www.irsm.cas.cz/materialy/acta_content/2012_01/5_Hanzlicek.pdf

  4. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Coats, Alison M.; Glasser, Fred P.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature), The measurements are...

  5. Synthesis of pure Portland cement phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesselsky, Andreas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    Pure phases commonly found in Portland cement clinkers are often used to test cement hydration behaviour in simplified experimental conditions. The synthesis of these phases is covered in this paper, starting with a description of phase relations and possible polymorphs of the four main phases in...

  6. Investigation of a Hardened Cement Paste Grout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Sørensen, Eigil Verner

    This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S.......This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S....

  7. A note on cement in asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Bilalbegovic, G

    2016-01-01

    Cement mineral tobermorite was formed in hydrothermal experiments on alternation of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Unidentified bands at 14 microns were measured for CAIs and the matrix of the Allende meteorite sample, as well as for Hektor and Agamemnon asteroids. The presence of cement nanoparticles may explain the feature at 14 microns.

  8. Conditioning of radioactive waste solutions by cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the cementation of the low and intermediate level evaporator concentrates resulting from the reprocessing of spent fuel numerous experiments were performed to optimize the waste form composition and to characterize the final waste form. Concerning the cementation process, properties of the waste/cement suspension were investigated. These investigations include the dependence of viscosity, bleeding, setting time and hydration heat from the waste cement slurry composition. For the characterization of the waste forms, the mechanical, thermal and chemical stability were determined. For special cases detailed investigations were performed to determine the activity release from waste packages under defined mechanical and thermal stresses. The investigations of the interaction of the waste forms with aqueous solutions include the determination of the Cs/Sr release, the corrosion resistance and the release of actinides. The Cs/Sr release was determined in dependence of the cement type, additives, setting time and sample size. (orig./DG)

  9. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll;

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used as the...... sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone....... The CO2 capture capacity of limestone in the raw meal is lower than for pure limestone. The difference in the CO2 capture capacity decreases with an increase in cycle number. The calcination conditions and composition are major factors that influence the CO2 capture capacity of limestone. At 850 °C in...

  10. Energetically Modified Cement (EMC) - Performance Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronin, Vladimir; Elfgren, Lennart [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Centre for High Performance Cement

    2003-03-01

    Energetically Modified Cements, EMC, made of intensively milled cement (50%) and fillers (50%) of quartz or fly ash have been compared to blends of Ordinary Portland Cement, OPC, and fillers. The EMCs have better properties than other blends and are comparable to unblended OPC. This remarkable fact can probably be explained as follows. The grinding process reduces the size of both cement grains and fillers. This combined with the creation of micro defects gives the ground cement a very high degree of hydration. The increased early hydration and a better distribution of hydration products results in an extensive pore size refinement of the hardened binder. This pore size refinement leads to a favorably reduced permeability and diffusivity and very good mechanical properties.

  11. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  12. ROTARY SCREW SYSTEMS IN CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taratuta V. D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of research of rotary-screw systems in relation to the creation of rotary kilns for the annealing of-cuttings in the preparation of cement clinker. Using the proposed design, in comparison with known designs of similar purpose, it significantly improves performance, reduces size and power consumption through the use of rotary screw systems in the form of screw rotors and drums made hollow with sidewalls assembled from separate strips or plates of different geometrical shapes with form inside the screw breaks or smooth edges, screw surfaces and screw grooves. It is shown that the housing of the rotary kiln is expedient to produce helical surfaces whose centers of curvature are located within the housing. Using the proposed constructions rotary kiln during the firing when preparing cement wedge can increase the speed of rotation of the housing, furnaces 5-10 times due to changes in the rotary-screw systems increase efficiency and reduce the size of furnaces

  13. Cements with low Clinker Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Lodeiro, I.; Fernández-Jiménez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2015-11-01

    Hybrid alkaline cements are multi-component systems containing a high percentage of mineral additions (fly ash, blast furnace slag), low proportions (alkaline activators. The substantially lower amount of clinker needed to manufacture these binders in comparison to ordinary Portland cement is both economically and ecologically beneficial. Their enormous versatility in terms of the raw materials used has made them the object of considerable interest. The present study explored the mechanical strength of binary blends mixes; B1= 20% clinker (CK) + 80% fly ash (FA) and B2=20% clinker + 80% blast furnace slag (BFS), both hydrated in the presence and absence of an alkaline activator specifically designed for this purpose. The use of the activator enhanced the development of early age strength considerably. All the hydrated matrices were characterised with XRD, SEM/EDX and (29Si and 27Al) NMR. The use of the alkaline activator generated reaction products consisting primarily of a mix of gels ((N,C)-A-S-H and C-A-S-H) whose respective proportions were found to depend upon system composition and initial reactivity.

  14. Cement and concrete options paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhouse gas emissions associated with the production of concrete are projected to increase from 10.5 million tonnes in 1990 to almost 14 million tonnes in 2010. Over half of this amount will be non-energy related emissions of carbon dioxide resulting from the conversion of limestone to lime. According to this report by industry experts, the industry has an excellent record of improving energy efficiency and there are few easy gains remaining. Nevertheless, improvements in energy efficiency and fuel use, increased use of concrete where it can be shown to result in net reduction of GHG emissions, and partial replacement of cement by supplementary cementitious materials that involve no additional generation of GHGs, could yield an approximate reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of nearly seven million tons in 2010. The industry proposes three measures to realise these benefits: (1) encouraging replacement of fossil fuels by otherwise waste material, (2) encouraging increased use of concrete in constructing houses and roads, and (3) encouraging increased use of supplementary cementing materials. The industry is opposed to carbon or energy taxes that increase the cost of doing business, on the grounds that such taxes would adversely affect the industry's competitive position internationally. tabs

  15. Extraoral Cementation Technique to Minimize Cement-Associated Peri-implant Marginal Bone Loss: Can a Thin Layer of Zinc Oxide Cement Provide Sufficient Retention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Eberhard; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Weigl, Paul; Woelber, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the use of laboratory-fabricated crown intaglio replicas for extraorally prepared cementation of fixed restorations to implants. This technique minimizes excess cement and may therefore reduce the risk of cement-related marginal peri-implant bone loss. It is unclear whether the remaining thin layer of luting agent provides sufficient retention if low-adhesive zinc oxide (ZnO) cement is used. In 85 consecutive patients, 113 single crowns were cemented to implants using extraoral cementation technique (ECT) and ZnO cement. All patients were followed for 6 months and investigated for decementation. Seven events of decementation (incidence: 6.19%) were found in 7 patients (8.24%). ECT may represent a viable cementation technique for implant-supported single crowns, even using low-adhesion cements. PMID:27479343

  16. Modelling Quartz Cementation of Quartzose Sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangen, Magnus

    1999-10-01

    Porosity estimation in sandstones is an important part of oil reservoir quality estimations, as porosity is lost during burial because of mechanical compaction and quartz cementation. In this report, cementation of quartzose sandstones is modelled assuming that the main source of silica is quartz dissolved at stylolites. The cementation process is shown to operate in one of two different regimes depending on the Damkohler number for diffusion. The regime, where diffusion of silica from the stylolites is a faster process than precipitation, is characterized by a nearly constant supersaturation between the stylolites. This regime, which spans the depth interval of quartz cementation for close stylolites, allows approximate analytical expressions for the porosity evolution as a function of time and temperature. An expression is derived for the temperature where half the initial porosity is lost during constant burial along constant thermal gradient. This expression is used to study the sensitivity of all parameters which enter the cementation process. The cementation process is shown to be particularly sensitive to the activation energy for quartz dissolution. The expression for the porosity decrease under constant burial is generalized to any piecewise linear burial and temperature history. The influence of the burial histories on the cementation process is studied. 32 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Three big Cs: climate, cement and China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordqvist, Joakim [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Boyd, Christopher [Lafarge (France); Klee, Howard [World Business Council for Sustainable Development (Switzerland)

    2003-09-30

    Cement is a low-cost construction material whose manufacture generates significant carbon dioxide emissions. As these emissions enter a carbon-constrained world, they may ultimately have a significant impact on the industry's financial performance. Consequently, the cement industry is developing a response to climate change management and the connected political process. Ten of the world's leading cement-producing corporations, representing more than one-third of global cement production, published a joint Agenda for Action in 2002 to address sustainability issues for the industry, including climate change. Other issues identified are emissions reduction, use of fuels and raw materials, employee health and safety, local impacts on land and communities, and internal business processes. Examining the rationale for, and the effects of, proactive climate initiatives in the cement sector, this paper elaborates on the conditions for the spread of cement-related climate action to China, where more than one-third of global cement production occurs, 80% of which involves inefficient kilns using outdated, highly polluting technology. (Author)

  18. Effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Mouhat, Mathieu; Nergård, John Magnus; Lægreid, Solveig Jenssen; Kanno, Taro; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The present study investigated the effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns in relation to their compressive strength. Materials and methods Four different cements were tested: zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), self-adhesive resin-based cement (SRC) and resin-based cement (RC). RC was used in both dual cure mode (RC-D) and chemical cure mode (RC-C). First, the compressive strength of each cement was tested according to a...

  19. Laboratory studies on the longevity of cement grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes laboratory studies of the longevity of cement-based grouts being carried out as part of the International Stripa Project Phase III. The longevity properties determined for a reference grout (90% Sulphate Resistant Portland Cement, 10% silica fume, 0.4< water/cement<0.6 and superplasticizer) are compared with those of a slag cement grout. Laboratory tests have been carried out to determine the following: the mechanistic function of superplasticizer in fresh cement pastes; the leachability of the sorbed superplasticizer and its location in the structure of hardened cement paste; and the general leaching properties of selected cement-based grouts

  20. Geochemical modelling of long-term cement degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to investigate geochemical reactions related to long-term cement degradation caused by interaction with groundwater using a geochemical model. The results from modelling showed changes in chemical composition of pore water and cement compounds resulted from cement hydration and degradation. In this study, the volume of each cement compound was also calculated using a geochemical model. The porosity of cement caused by degradation was estimated using the change in volume of each cement compound. The results from this study provide important information to evaluate long-term durability of cement in groundwater system, which is closely related to the safety of radioactive waste disposal repository

  1. Fracture model for cemented aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Zubelewicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanisms-based fracture model applicable to a broad class of cemented aggregates and, among them, plastic-bonded explosive (PBX composites, is presented. The model is calibrated for PBX 9502 using the available experimental data under uniaxial compression and tension gathered at various strain rates and temperatures. We show that the model correctly captures inelastic stress-strain responses prior to the load peak and it predicts the post-critical macro-fracture processes, which result from the growth and coalescence of micro-cracks. In our approach, the fracture zone is embedded into elastic matrix and effectively weakens the material's strength along the plane of the dominant fracture.

  2. Thermal behavior of asphalt cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asphalt cements are highly complex mixtures of hydrocarbon molecules whose thermal behavior is of prime importance for petroleum and road industry. From DSC, the determination of several thermal properties of asphalts is given, e.g. glass-transition temperature and crystallized fraction content.The dissolution of a pure n-paraffin CnH2n+2 in an asphalt, as seen by DSC, should be a single peak. For 20g of these glasses change with time and temperature. The formation of the crystallized phases is superposed to the enthalpic relaxation of the glasses, making a kinetic study very difficult. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Silica Transport and Cementation in Quartz Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebble, C.; Farver, J.; Onasch, C.; Winslow, D.

    2008-12-01

    Silica transport and cementation in quartz aggregates have been experimentally investigated. Starting materials include a natural quartz arenite (Pocono sandstone), sized clasts of synthetic quartz, and sized grains of disaggregated natural sandstones. Experimental charges consisted of amorphous silica powder (~25 mg), AlCl3 powder (~3 mg), 25 wt% NaCl brine solution (~20 mg), and the starting material (~150 mg). The charges were weld-sealed in gold capsules and run in cold-seal pressure vessels at 300°C to 600°C at 150 MPa confining pressure for up to 4 weeks. Detailed calibrations of the furnaces indicate the maximum temperature variation across the length of the sample charges (3-7mm) was vacuum impregnated with epoxy containing a blue dye and sawn in half along the long axis of the sample charge. The nature and amount of silica transport and cementation in the samples was determined by a combination of Cathodoluminescence (CL), Light Microscopy (LM), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Photomosaics of the samples were collected and the amount of cement, porosity, and average grain sizes were determined by point-counting. The cement was easily recognized from the quartz grains by the difference in luminescence. The experiments indicate that the presence of amorphous silica results in rapid silica cementation in quartz aggregates (e.g., up to 12% cement by volume in 4 weeks at 450°C). The amount of cementation is a function of substrate type, time, temperature, and ionic strength of the brine. The rate of silica transport through the length of the experimental charge appears to be limited by the silica solubility and its rapid depletion by cementation. Although most of the cement was derived from the amorphous silica, evidence for local dissolution-precipitation was observed. The experiments demonstrate that the mobility of silica, and consequent precipitation of cement, does not require a temperature or pressure gradient as is commonly assumed. Rather

  4. INFLUENCE OF GLASS CULLET IN CEMENT PASTES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Karamberi; E.Chaniotakis; D.Papageorgiou; A.Moutsatsou

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigates glass and cement compatibility with a view to use glass as a cement replacement. Amber, flint and green glasses were chosen due to their prevalence in the Greek market as packaging materials. The factors under investigation were the pozzolanicity of the glass cullet, the hydration rate and the mechanical strength development of the cement pastes, as well as the expansion of the specimens due to alkali-silica reaction.Moreover, the potential enhancement of glass pozzolanic activity was examined. The results of the study were encouraging to show the potentiality of utilising glass cullet in cementitious products.

  5. Shrinkage Properties of Cement Stabilized Gravel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    shrinkage properties of cement stabilized gravel have been documented under various temperature and relative humidity conditions. Two cement contents corresponding to a 28-days compressive strength of 6.2 MPa and 12.3 MPa have been tested and compared. It is found that the coefficient of linear expansion...... for the two cement contents is 9.9 × 10-6 ⁰C-1 and 11.3 × 10-6 ⁰C-1, respectively. Furthermore, it is found that reflecting cracking can mainly be explained by temperature dependent shrinkage rather than moisture dependent shrinkage....

  6. Operating experience with KRAFTWERK UNION cementation line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A facility is described designed for fixation in a cement matrix of the radioactive concentrate produced by thickening waste water from the Bohunice nuclear power plant. The cementation line output is 0.6 m3 concentrate/h. The concentrate is put in 200 l drums. The individual operating units, cement management, air conditioning, dosimetric monitoring and the building part are described. The requirements for the operators and the assessment of the quality of raw materials and the product are discussed. (M.D.). 3 figs., 4 refs

  7. Reinforcement of osteosynthesis screws with brushite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landuyt, P; Peter, B; Beluze, L; Lemaître, J

    1999-08-01

    The fixation of osteosynthesis screws remains a severe problem for fracture repair among osteoporotic patients. Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) is routinely used to improve screw fixation, but this material has well-known drawbacks such as monomer toxicity, exothermic polymerization, and nonresorbability. Calcium phosphate cements have been developed for several years. Among these new bone substitution materials, brushite cements have the advantage of being injectable and resorbable. The aim of this study is to assess the reinforcement of osteosynthesis screws with brushite cement. Polyurethane foams, whose density is close to that of cancellous bone, were used as bone model. A hole was tapped in a foam sample, then brushite cement was injected. Trabecular osteosynthesis screws were inserted. After 24 h of aging in water, the stripping force was measured by a pull-out test. Screws (4.0 and 6.5 mm diameter) and two foam densities (0.14 and 0.28 g/cm3) were compared. Cements with varying solid/liquid ratios and xanthan contents were used in order to obtain the best screw reinforcement. During the pull-out test, the stripping force first increases to a maximum, then drops to a steady-state value until complete screw extraction. Both maximum force and plateau value increase drastically in the presence of cement. The highest stripping force is observed for 6.5-mm screws reinforced with cement in low-density foams. In this case, the stripping force is multiplied by 3.3 in the presence of cement. In a second experiment, cements with solid/liquid ratio ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 g/mL were used with 6.5-mm diameter screws. In some compositions, xanthan was added to improve injectability. The best results were obtained with 2.5 g/mL cement containing xanthan and with 3.0 g/mL cements without xanthan. A 0.9-kN maximal stripping force was observed with nonreinforced screws, while 1.9 kN was reached with reinforced screws. These first results are very promising regarding screw

  8. Effect of cementing technique and cement type on thermal necrosis in hip resurfacing arthroplasty - a numerical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, D.; Srinivasan, P.; Scheerlinck, T.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Femoral fractures within resurfacing implants have been associated with bone necrosis, possibly resulting from heat generated by cement polymerization. The amount of heat generated depends on cement mantle volume and type of cement. Using finite element analysis, the effect of cement type and volume

  9. Foamed cement for squeeze cementing low-pressure, highly permeable reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four different cement squeezing techniques have been used on wells producing from the Keg River formation in the Rainbow Lake area of Alberta, Canada. This paper evaluates 151 cement squeeze treatments performed at 96 wellsites and compares the use of foam cement vs. conventional squeeze treatments and techniques. Discussion includes key aspects, such as candidate selection, slurry design, treatment design, economic evaluation, and operational considerations

  10. Voids/Cement Ratio Controlling Tensile Strength of Cement-Treated Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Nilo Cesar Consoli; Antonio Viana da Fonseca; Rodrigo Caberlon Cruz; Sara Rios Silva

    2011-01-01

    The improvement of locally available soils with cement can provide great advantages, including avoiding the need to borrow volumes of appropriate material and disposing of the local soil in deposits. This research aims to quantify the influence of the amount of cement, the porosity, and the voids/cement ratio in the assessment of splitting tensile strength (q(t)), also known as indirect diametrical tensile (IDT) strength, of three distinct soils from Brazil and Portugal. From Brazil, clayey s...

  11. Effect of Abutment Modification and Cement Type on Retention of Cement-Retained Implant Supported Crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra Farzin; Kianoosh Torabi; Ahmad Hasan Ahangari; Reza Derafshi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations. Materials and Method: Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an ac...

  12. ANALYSIS OF UNCERTAINTIES IN CEMENT INDUSTRY IN TURKEY

    OpenAIRE

    Kemal Yildirim; Omer Arioz

    2013-01-01

    Cement industry having 4,5 billion Dollars revenue and 1 billion Dollar export volume plays very important role in Turkey’s economy. Turkish cement industry is very sensitive to economic crisis and involves many uncertainties. In this study, price uncertainties, technological uncertainties, and price-technological uncertainties in Turkish cement industry were analyzed. The cement demand is mostly affected by demand to ready mixed concrete. Demand to cement is also related to the picture of co...

  13. Composite cements containing natural pozzolan and granulated blast furnace slag

    OpenAIRE

    Irassar, E. F.; Rahhal, V.F.; Donza, H. A.; Menéndez, G.; Bonavetti, V. L.

    2006-01-01

    For reasons of market demand and Portland cement production,the manufacture of cements with two or more separately ground additions to produce customized cements is becoming common practice.When pozzolan or slag content in this type of cements is high, however, the initial strength of the resulting product may be adversely impacted. This problem can be minimized by activating one or both of the replacement materials. The present study analyzes the effect of Portland cement additions such as p...

  14. Preliminary study using pulsating water jet for bone cement demolition

    OpenAIRE

    S. Hloch; Kloc, J.; Foldyna, J.; Pude, F.; Smolko, I.; M. Zeleňák; Sitek, L. (Libor); Hvizdoš, P.; Monka, P.; Monková, K.; Kozak, D.; A. Stoić; A. Sedmak; Milosevic, M; Lehocká, D.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the study of using the selective property of ultrasonic pulsating water jet for the disintegration of bone cement which creates the interface between femoral stem and trabecular bone tissue. For investigation, commercial bone cements were used. Bone cements were tested by nanoindentation in order to review their mechanical properties. A representative sample Palacos R+G was selected for disintegration of bone cement. Bone cements samples fixed between two plexiglass...

  15. Enamel fluoride levels after orthodontic band cementation with glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkaya, S; Uner, O; Alaçam, A; Değim, T

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this investigation was to examine the fluoride uptake by enamel after application of glass ionomer cement for orthodontic band cementation compared with zinc phosphate cement. The study was conducted on 21 children whose mean age was 14 years. All the children were reared in the Middle Anatolian cities where the water fluoride concentration was below the level of 0.50 ppm. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups. The first experimental group, had seven subjects whose teeth were topically fluoridated with 2 per cent NaF solution, before orthodontic band cementation with zinc phosphate cement. The second experimental group also had seven subjects whose orthodontic bands were cemented with glass ionomer cement. The third group, consisted of seven control subjects and no dental procedures were performed in this group. All the participants were followed for 3 months and at the end of this period maxillary first premolars, which were in the ninth developmental stage according to Nolla (1960), were extracted for orthodontic purposes. The enamel fluoride concentrations were determined on the left maxillary first premolars at three successive etch depths by means of a fluor ion electrode, whereas the calcium concentrations were determined with an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results of this investigation showed that in both cementation groups enamel fluoride concentrations at three successive etch depths were highly increased compared with the control group. However, the difference between the cementation groups was not statistically significant. PMID:8746180

  16. Exposure to cement dust at a Portland cement factory and the risk of cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Vestbo, J; Knudsen, K.M.; Raffn, E; Korsgaard, B; Rasmussen, F V

    1991-01-01

    The relation between exposure to cement dust and cancer was examined in a population of 546 cement workers and a reference population of 858 randomly sampled men of similar age and area of residence. In 1974 all men gave lifelong occupational and smoking histories; information on incidence of cancer in the period 1974-85 was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. No increased risk of overall cancer was found among cement workers. Among men with more than 20 years exposure to cement dust, 1...

  17. INFLUENCE OF WINE ACID ON RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF WELL BORE CEMENT SLURRIES AND HARDENED CEMENT PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation of commercial types of domestic cements for use in cementing the deep wells is a process by which Yugoslav oil industry tends to solve problems of completion of those wells independently. In order to design a domestic, cheep and effective retarder, tests of applicability of wine acid on cement slurries have been carried out. Besides examining the necessary wine acid content to achieve desirable Theological properties, the influence of this additive on properties of hardened cement samples has been tested too (the paper is published in Croatian.

  18. Cementation of radioactive liquid scintillator waste simulate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid scintillation counting is an important analytical tool with extensive applications in medicine and basic applied research and used in quantification of □ -particles, weak □ and x-rays. The generated spent liquid scintillator radioactive waste should be limited and controlled to protect man and his environment. In this study, the radioactive spent liquid scintillator waste simulate (SLS) was immobilized in cement matrix using a surfactant in order to facilitate and increase the amount of SLS incorporated into the cementitious materials. Mechanical properties of the final cement waste form were acceptable for blocks containing up to 20% SLS in presence of surfactant. X-ray diffraction, IR analysis and scanning electron microscope proved that the hydration of cement materials is not significantly affected by organic scintillator waste. Therefore, the cement matrix could be recommended for solidification of SLS for the acceptable mechanical, physical and chemical characterizations reached.

  19. Calcium phosphate cements properties with polymers addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPC) have attracted great interest to use in orthopedics and dentistry as replacements for damaged parts of the skeletal system, showing good biocompatibility and osseointegration, allowing its use as bone graft. Several studies have shown that the addition of polymer additives have a strong influence on the cement properties. The low mechanical strength is the main obstacle to greater use of CPC as an implant material. The objective of this study was to evaluate properties of a cement based on α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP), added polymers. PVA (10%, 8%, 6%), sodium alginate (2%) and polyacrylate ammonia (3%), all in weight, were added to the synthesized α-TCP powder. The samples were molded and evaluated for density, porosity in vitro test (Simulated Body Fluid), crystalline phases and mechanical strength. The results show increased the mechanical properties of the cement when added these polymers

  20. Improvement of Cement Strength by Induction Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li-yuan; LIN Zong-shou

    2004-01-01

    The induction method of improving the strength of Portland cement by adding fine slag powder,high aluminate component and hydrated paste was investigated through determining the physical properties,hydration heat and pore size distribution,and its mechanism was discussed.The experimental results reveal that a certain content of high aluminate component,fine slag powder and hydrated paste can improve remarkably the strength of Portland cement.

  1. Study and Characterization of Expansive Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Guerra Menéndez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to characterize commercial expansive cement for subsequent development of national formulation, with consequent economic effect and independence of the international market. On the other hand the results contribute to the development of scientific and technological potential. Expansive cement is a product that enables non-explosive demolition, rock and concrete demolition. To characterize the composition of these products, techniques used infrared spectroscopy with Fourier Transforms and Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  2. Study and Characterization of Expansive Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Guerra Menéndez; Eduardo Peón Avés; Julio E. Lanza Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize commercial expansive cement for subsequent development of national formulation, with consequent economic effect and independence of the international market. On the other hand the results contribute to the development of scientific and technological potential. Expansive cement is a product that enables non-explosive demolition, rock and concrete demolition. To characterize the composition of these products, techniques used infrared spectroscopy w...

  3. Radiological changes in asbestos cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsson, K; Strömberg, U; Albin, M; Welinder, H; Hagmar, L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To explore associations between exposure to asbestos cement dust and radiographic findings in lung parenchyma and pleura. METHODS--Radiographs from 174 blue collar workers and 29 white collar workers from an asbestos cement plant formed one part of the study. Progression of small opacities was further studied in those 124 blue collar workers, for whom two radiographs taken after the end of employment were available. The median readings from five readers who used the full ILO 1980 c...

  4. Dynamic properties of composite cemented clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡袁强; 梁旭

    2004-01-01

    In this work,the dynamic properties of composite cemented clay under a wide range of strains were studied considering the effect of different mixing ratio and the change of confining pressures through dynamic triaxial test. A simple and practical method to estimate the dynamic elastic modulus and damping ratio is proposed in this paper and a related empirical normalized formula is also presented. The results provide useful guidelines for preliminary estimation of cement requirements to improve the dynamic properties of clays.

  5. Influence of polysaccharides on cement hydration

    OpenAIRE

    Peschard, Arnaud; Govin, Alexandre; Fredon, Emmanuel; Grosseau, Philippe; Fantozzi, Gilles

    2004-01-01

    This paper is about the influence of polysaccharides on cement hydration. Three polysaccharides were studied: a cellulose ether (CE), a starch ether (SE) and a dextrin (YD). In a concentrated media as well as in a dilute media, admixture CE only revealed a slight effect on cement hydration. Portlandite and ettringite formation and gypsum consumption were slowed down by SE adjunction. Admixture YD induced an acceleration of ettringite formation as well as gypsum consumption whereas portiandite...

  6. Microstructure Analysis of Heated Portland Cement Paste

    OpenAIRE

    Q. Zhang; Ye, G.

    2011-01-01

    When a concrete structure is exposed to high temperature, the mechanical damage and chemical transformation take place simultaneously, which will change the microstructure of material. On the other hand, the mechanical properties and transport properties depend on the development of microstructure of cement paste. In order to study the microstructure changes at high temperature, in this contribution the cement paste samples were firstly heated to varied temperatures from 100 °C to 1000 °C wit...

  7. Acrylic Bone Cements Modified with Starch

    OpenAIRE

    Krilova, V; Vītiņš, V

    2010-01-01

    The successful result of restorative and replacement surgical operation depends significantly on properties of used bone cement. Acrylic bone cements are usually based on methylmethacrylate polymer, while monomer polymerization begins after mixing of components in mixing device and terminates in living tissue. Polymerization of methylmethacrylate is exothermic process, and temperature increase might cause tissue necrosis with concomitant implant aseptic loosening. Developed non-ionogenic and ...

  8. Estimating the chloride transport in cement paste

    OpenAIRE

    Princigallo, A.

    2012-01-01

    A method was developed to measure the diffusion coefficient of chloride ions in cement paste based on an analytical solution to Fick’s 2nd law in a cylindrical coordinate system. This natural method yielded diffusivity results within as little as a month. Testing time was reduced by exploiting the three-dimensional inward flux in the specimen. In an attempt to determine the saturation concentration, dense portland cement pastes were exposed to a concentrated chloride solution. The method prov...

  9. Topics in Cement and Concrete Research

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper addresses several topics in regard to the sustainable design and use of concrete. First, major features concerning the sustainable aspects of the material concrete are summarised. Then the major constituent, from an environmental point of view, cement is discussed in detail, particularly the hydration and application of slag cement. The intelligent combining of mineral oxides, which are found in clinker, slag, fly ashes etc., is designated as mineral oxide engineering. It re...

  10. Influence of Cellulose Ethers on Hydration Products of Portland Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Baoguo; OU Zhihua; JIAN Shouwei; XU Rulin

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose ethers are widely used to mortar formulations, and it is significant to understand the interaction between cellulose ethers and cement pastes. FT-IR spectra, thermal analysis and SEM are used to investigate hydration products in the cement pastes modified by HEMC and HPMC in this article. The results show that the hydration products in modified cement pastes were finally identical with those in the unmodified cement paste, but the major hydration products, such as CH (calcium hydroxide), ettringite and C-S-H, appeared later in the modified cement pastes than in the unmodified cement paste. The cellulose ethers decrease the outer products and increase inner products of C-S-H gels. Compared to unmodified cement pastes, no new products are found in the modified cement pastes in the present experiment. The HEMC and HPMC investigation shows almost the same influence on the hydration products of Portland cement.

  11. Investigation of Possible Wellbore Cement Failures During Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George

    2014-11-01

    We model and assess the possibility of shear failure, using the Mohr-Coulomb model ? along the vertical well by employing a rigorous coupled flow-geomechanic analysis. To this end, we vary the values of cohesion between the well casing and the surrounding cement to representing different quality levels of the cementing operation (low cohesion corresponds to low-quality cement and/or incomplete cementing). The simulation results show that there is very little fracturing when the cement is of high quality.. Conversely, incomplete cementing and/or weak cement can causes significant shear failure and the evolution of long fractures/cracks along the vertical well. Specifically, low cohesion between the well and cemented areas can cause significant shear failure along the well, but the same cohesion as the cemented zone does not cause shear failure. When the hydraulic fracturing pressure is high, low cohesion of the cement can causes fast propagation of shear failure and of the resulting fracture/crack, but a high-quality cement with no weak zones exhibits limited shear failure that is concentrated near the bottom of the vertical part of the well. Thus, high-quality cement and complete cementing along the vertical well appears to be the strongest protection against shear failure of the wellbore cement and, consequently, against contamination hazards to drinking water aquifers during hydraulic fracturing operations.

  12. Characterization of cement minerals, cements and their reaction products at the atomic and nano scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen; Hall, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances and highlights in characterization methods are reviewed for cement minerals, cements and their reaction products. The emphasis is on X-ray and neutron diffraction, and on nuclear magnetic resonance methods, although X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopies are discussed briefly...

  13. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... review. Background The Commission instituted this review on May 2, 2011 (76 FR 24519) and determined on August 5, 2011 that it would conduct an expedited review (76 FR 50252, August 12, 2011). The Commission... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record...

  14. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; ; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted

  15. Cement for oil well developed from ordinary cement: characterization physical, chemical and mineralogical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to characterize a new type of cement produced from the mixture of ordinary Portland cement, which can be used as an option in the cementing of oil wells. To enable this work we used the method of lineal programming for the new cement composition, then conducted tests to characterize through particle size analysis by laser diffraction, chemical analysis by EDX, TGA, X-ray diffraction, time grip, resistance to compression. The overall result showed that the new cement had made low-C3A, takes more time to the CPP, thermal stability up to 500 ° C, the kinetics of hydration and low levels of major components consistent with the specifications of ABNT. (author)

  16. Chromium content in human skin after in vitro application of ordinary cement and ferrous-sulphate-reduced cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fullerton, A; Gammelgaard, Bente; Avnstorp, C;

    1993-01-01

    and unexposed skin was observed, despite a more permeable skin barrier at the alkaline pH of the cement suspensions, i.e., pH 12.5. Increased chromium levels in epidermis and dermis were seen when ordinary Portland cement was applied as a suspension with added sodium sulphate (20%) on the skin surface......The amount of chromium found in human skin after in vitro application of cement suspensions on full-thickness human skin in diffusion cells was investigated. Cement suspensions made from ordinary Portland cement or Portland cement with the chromate reduced with added ferrous sulphate were used. The...... cement suspensions were either applied on the skin surface under occlusion for 48 h or applied repeatedly every 24 h for 96 h. No statistically significant difference in chromium content of skin layers between skin exposed to ordinary Portland cement, skin exposed to cement with added ferrous sulphate...

  17. Carbonation Resistance of Sulphoaluminate Cement-based High Performance Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Decheng; XU Dongyu; CHENG Xin; CHEN Wen

    2009-01-01

    The influences of water/cement ratio and admixtures on carbonation resistance of sulphoaluminate cement-based high performance concrete(HPC)were investigated.The experimental results show that with the decreasing water/cement ratio,the carbonation depth of sulphoaluminate cement-based HPC is decreased remarkably,and the carbonation resistance capability is also improved with the adding admixtures.The morphologies and structure characteristics of sulphoaluminate cement hydration products before and after carbonation were analyzed using SEM and XRD.The analysis results reveal that the main hydration product of sulphoaluminate cement,that is ettringite(AFt),de-composes after carbonation.

  18. Development and field use of fiber-containing cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vliet, J.P.M. van; Kleef, R.P.A.R. van [Shell Research Rijswijk (Netherlands); Smith, T.R. [Shell Canada Ltd., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Plompen, A.P.; Kuijvenhoven, C.A.T.; Quaresma, V.; Raiturkar, A.; Schoenmakers, J.M.; Arentz, B.

    1995-12-31

    Fiber-containing cement was initially developed as a high-strength material that could be used to line a borehole. During the development work several relatively simple and cheap spin-off applications of fiber cement were identified, such as the use of fiber cement in cement plugs for borehole stabilization and as a lost circulation material. A number of Shell`s operating companies are already applying fiber cement for these purposes in the field. This paper presents the development of the borehole-lining technique and also describes the other field applications of fiber cement.

  19. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and theoretical studies of hydrated cement systems are described. The behaviour of slag-based cement is described with a view to predicting their long term pH, Esub(n) and mineralogical balance. Modelling studies which enable the prediction at long ages of cement composites are advanced and a base model of the CaO-SiO2-H2O system presented. The behaviour of U and I in cements is explored. The tolerance of cement systems for a wide range of miscellaneous waste stream components and environmental hazards is described. The redox potential in cements is effectively lowered by irradiation. (author)

  20. A Blended Cement Containing Blast Furnace Slag and Phosphorous Slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Blended cement containing blast furnace slag(BFS) and phosphorous slag(PS) is a new kind of cement.The total content of blended materials could increase if two additives were used. Using the same admixtures, the properties of the blended cement with 70% additives could reach the standard of 525-grade slag cement according to GB.The strength of cement with 80% additives could reach the standard of 425-grade slag cement.The tests of strength, pore structure,hydration products,inhibiting alkali-aggregate reaction, resistance to sulfate corrosion of BFS-PSC were performed.

  1. Quality control of cemented waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slate, L.J.

    1994-12-31

    To insure that cemented radwaste remains immobilized after disposal, certain standards have been set in Europe by the Commission of the European Communities. One such standard is compressive strength. If the compressive strength can be predicted during the early curing stages, time and money can be saved and the quality of the final waste form guaranteed. It was determined that the 7- and 28-day compressive strength from radwaste cementation can be predicted during the mixing and early curing stages by at least three methods. The three that were studied were maturity, rheology, and impedance. Maturity is a temperature-to-time measurement, rheology is a shear stress-to-shear rate measurement, and impedance is the opposition offered to the flow of alternating current. These three methods were employed on five different cemented radwaste concentrations with three different water-to-cement ratios; thus, a total of 15 different mix designs were considered. The results showed that the impedance was the easiest to employ for an on-line process. The results of the impedance method showed a very good relationship between impedance and water-to-cement ratio; therefore, an accurate prediction of compressive strength of cemented radwaste can be drawn from this method. The results of the theology method were very good. The method showed that concrete conforms to the Bingham plastic rheologic model, and the theology method can be used to predict the compressive strength of cemented radwaste, but may be too cumbersome. The results of the maturity method were shown to be limited in accuracy for determining compressive strength.

  2. Assessment of Natural Radioactivity Levels of Cements and Cement Composites in the Slovak Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Eštoková

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The radionuclide activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and radiological parameters (radium equivalent activity, gamma and alpha indices, the absorbed gamma dose rate and external and internal hazard indices of cements and cement composites commonly used in the Slovak Republic have been studied in this paper. The cement samples of 8 types of cements from Slovak cement plants and five types of composites made from cement type CEM I were analyzed in the experiment. The radionuclide activities in the cements ranged from 8.58–19.1 Bq·kg−1, 9.78–26.3 Bq·kg−1 and 156.5–489.4 Bq·kg−1 for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. The radiological parameters in cement samples were calculated as follows: mean radium equivalent activity Raeq = 67.87 Bq·kg−1, gamma index Iγ = 0.256, alpha index Iα = 0.067, the absorbed gamma dose rate D = 60.76 nGy·h−1, external hazard index Hex = 0.182 and internal hazard index Hin was 0.218. The radionuclide activity in composites ranged from 6.84–10.8 Bq·kg−1 for 226Ra, 13.1–20.5 Bq·kg−1 for 232Th and 250.4–494.4 Bq·kg−1 for 40K. The calculated radiological parameters of cements were lower than calculated radiological parameters of cement composites.

  3. Colorectal cancer and non-malignant respiratory disease in asbestos cement and cement workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiologically visible parenchymal changes (small opacities >= 1/0;ILO 1980 classification) were present in 20% of a sample of workers (N=174), employed for 20 years (median) in an asbestos cement plant. Exposure-response relationships were found, after controlling for age and smoking habits. In a sample of asbestos cement workers with symptoms and signs suggestive of pulmonary disease (N=33), increased lung density measured by x-ray computed tomography, and reduced static lung volumes and lung compliance was found. In a cohort of asbestos cement workers (N=1.929) with an estimated median exposure of 1.2 fibres/ml, the mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease was increased in comparison to a regional reference cohort (N=1.233). A two-to three-fold increase of non-malignant respiratory mortality was noted among workers employed for more than a decade in the asbestos cement plant, compared to cement workers (N=1.526), who in their turn did not experience and increased risk compared to the general population. In the cohorts of asbestos cement and cement workers, there was a tow-to three-fold increased incidence of cancer in the right part of the colon, compared to the general population as well as to external reference cohorts of other industrial workers (N=3.965) and fishermen (N=8.092). A causal relation with the exposure to mineral dust and fibres was supported by the findings of higher risk estimated in subgroups with high cumulated asbestos doses or longer duration of cement work. The incidence of cancer in the left part of the colon was not increased. Morbidity data, but not mortality data, disclosed the subsite-specific risk pattern. Both asbestos cement workers and cement workers has an increased incidence of rectal cancer, compared with the general population, and with the fishermen. The risk was, however, of the same magnitude among the other industrial workers. 181 refs

  4. Post cementation sensitivity evaluation of glass Ionomer, zinc phosphate and resin modified glass Ionomer luting cements under class II inlays: An in vivo comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekhar, V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to compare the patient-perceived post-cementation sensitivity of class II metal restorations preoperatively, immediately after cementation, one week after cementation and one month after cementation with (1) Glass Ionomer luting cement (2) Zinc Phosphate cement and (3) Resin-modified Glass Ionomer luting cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients, irrespective of sex, in the age group of 15-50 years were selected and the teeth were randomly divided into t...

  5. Analysis of system and methods for improved cementing of oil- and gas wells

    OpenAIRE

    Stensrud, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Cement is a crucial part of well construction. If a good cement bond between the casing and well bore wall cannot be achieved in the primary cementing, expensive remedial cementing jobs or possible loss of the well bore can occur.When cementing casings and liners in deep waters or pressure depleted reservoirs there is often a small pressure margin between pore pressure and fracture pressure, this makes cement operations more complex. New cementing techniques and cements are being developed to...

  6. Pulmonary Artery Cement Embolism after a Vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Nooh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Context. Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure most commonly used for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures. Although it is relatively safe, complications have been reported over time. Among those complications, massive cement pulmonary embolism is considered a rare complication. Here we report a case of massive diffuse cement pulmonary embolism following percutaneous vertebroplasty for a vertebral compression fracture. Study Design. Case report. Methods. This is a 70-year-old female who underwent vertebroplasty for T11 and T12 vertebral compression fracture. Results. CT-scan revealed an incidental finding of cement embolism in the pulmonary trunk and both pulmonary arteries. Since the patient was asymptomatic, she was monitored closely and she did not need any intervention. Conclusion. Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure used for treatment of vertebral compression fracture. Despite the low rate of complications, a pulmonary cement embolism can occur. The consequences of cement embolism range widely from being asymptomatic to embolism that can cause paralysis, radiculopathy, or a fatal pulmonary embolism.

  7. Stimuli-responsive cement-reinforced rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Simone; Robisson, Agathe; Maheshwar, Sudeep; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2014-05-14

    In this work, we report the successful development of a cement-rubber reactive composite with reversible mechanical properties. Initially, the composite behaves like rubber containing inert filler, but when exposed to water, it increases in volume and reaches a stiffness that is intermediate between that of hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) and hydrated cement, while maintaining a relatively large ductility characteristic of rubber. After drying, the modulus increases even further up to 400 MPa. Wet/drying cycles prove that the elastic modulus can reversibly change between 150 and 400 MPa. Utilizing attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), we demonstrate that the high pH produced by the hydration of cement triggers the hydrolysis of the rubber nitrile groups into carboxylate anions. Thus, the salt bridges, generated between the carboxylate anions of the elastomer and the cations of the filler, are responsible for the reversible variations in volume and elastic modulus of the composite as a consequence of environmental moisture exposure. These results reveal that cement nanoparticles can successfully be used to accomplish a twofold task: (a) achieve an original postpolymerization modification that allows one to work with carboxylate HNBR (HXNBR) not obtained by direct copolymerization of carboxylate monomers with butadiene, and (b) synthesize a stimuli-responsive polymeric composite. This new type of material, having an ideal behavior for sealing application, could be used as an alternative to cement for oil field zonal isolation applications. PMID:24734968

  8. Microbial-influenced cement degradation: Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. Because of apparent ease of use and normal structural integrity, cement has been widely used as a binder to solidify LLW. However, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. This report reviews literature which addresses the effect of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. Groups of microorganisms are identified, which are capable of metabolically converting organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with concrete and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Mechanisms inherent in microbial-influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this report. This report provides sufficient evidence of the potential for microbial-influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW to justify the enumeration of the conditions necessary to support the microbiological growth and population expansion, as well as the development of appropriate tests necessary to determine the resistance of cement-solidified LLW to microbiological-induced degradation that could impact the stability of the waste form

  9. Possibilities of special cements in ceramic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 25 years ago, the only way to have confinement material for high temperature applications was to prepare a ceramic by sintering or fusion at high temperature. A new technology came, with the production of Low Cement Castables. This new product was obtained by a careful choice of the granulometry of the aggregates, an optimization of the defloculation of fine particles, including the cement (Calcium Aluminate Cement) and the addition of silica fume. Silica fume brought two improvements: a) a fluidifying effect, due partly to the low sensitivity of viscosity to pH, and partly to the geometric effect of the nicely spherical particle, b) a chemical effect, brought by the reaction of silica and Calcium Aluminate Cement to give a coherent zeolithic structure, through which water could escape during the first firing. From a ceramist point of view, it is interesting to understand how this components, nearly colloidal system mixed in water can be heated up to ceramization without any noticeable change in mechanical characteristics and shrinkage. From a more practical point of view, it is also interesting to realize that some characteristics, usually attributed only to ceramics, also apply with low cement castables technology: high compressive strength, flexural strength, corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance, impact resistance. (orig.)

  10. Reinforcing of Cement Composites by Estabragh Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merati, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of Estabragh fibres has been studied to improve the performance characteristics of the reinforced cement composites. The concrete shrinkage was evaluated by counting the number of cracks and measuring the width of cracks on the surface of concrete specimens. Although, the Estabragh fibres lose their strength in an alkali environment of cement composites, but, the ability of Estabragh fibres to bridge on the micro cracks in the concrete matrix causes to decrease the width of the cracks on the surface of the concrete samples in comparison with the plain concrete. However, considering the mechanical properties of specimens such as bending strength and impact resistance, the specimens with 0.25 % of Estabragh fibre performed better in all respects compared to the physical and mechanical properties of reinforced cement composite of concrete. Consequently, by adding 0.25 % of Estabragh fibres to the cement composite of concrete, a remarkable improvement in physical and mechanical properties of fibre-containing cement composite is achieved.

  11. The importance of a thick cement mantle depends on stem geometry and stem-cement interfacial bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruana, J; Janssen, D; Verdonschot, N; Blunn, G W

    2009-04-01

    The thickness of the cement mantle around the femoral component of total hip replacements is a contributing factor to aseptic loosening and revision. Nevertheless, various designs of stems and surgical tooling lead to cement mantles of different thicknesses. Opinion is divided on whether a thick mantle enhances implant longevity. This study investigates the effect of cement mantle thickness on accumulated damage in the cement, and how this is influenced by the presence or absence of a proximal collar and on whether the stem-cement interface remains bonded. Three-dimensional finite element simulations incorporating creep and non-linear damage accumulation were performed to investigate cracking in the cement mantles around Stanmore Hips under physiologically informed stair-climbing and gait loads. Cement mantle thickness, stem-cement interfacial bonding, and collar design were varied to assess the interactive effects of these parameters. In all cases, damage levels were three to six times higher when the stem-cement interface remained bonded. Cement mantle thickness had little effect on cement damage accumulation around debonded collared stems but was critical in both bonded and collarless cases, where a thicker mantle reduced cement cracking. Damage around a smooth debonded stem with a collar is thus much less sensitive to cement thickness than around bonded or collarless stems. PMID:19405437

  12. Present Situation and Perspective of Chinese Cement Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Changming

    2003-01-01

    @@ Totally, there are 12 types of cement kiln pro-duction lines in China and running with a quite differenttechnical- economical levels. The cement productionof different types product lines in 1997 ~ 2002 is shownin Table 1.

  13. 21 CFR 888.4220 - Cement monomer vapor evacuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4220 Cement monomer vapor evacuator. (a) Identification. A cement monomer vapor evacuator is a device intended for use during surgery to contain or...

  14. Portland cement conditioning of the oil radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementation is a widely used method to immobilize radioactive wastes generated during the operation of nuclear power plants. The oily radioactive wastes resulting during the normal service of Nuclear Power Plant at Cernavoda, Romania, can be conditioned in Portland cement as emulsions. In this way the interaction with cement water is not blocked. For this purpose, four compositions for conditioning were studied, namely: i) cement-emulsion; ii) cement-emulsion-sodium silicate; iii) cement-emulsion-sodium silicate-lime; iv) cement-emulsion-sand. The apparent density of hardened binding mixtures, setting time, compressive strength of hardened samples, leaching rate of tritium were determined. The results have shown that the oily wastes can be conditioned in a good manner when using Portland cement, emulsion conditioners, sodium silicate and lime. (authors)

  15. Effect of aluminium phosphate as admixture on oxychloride cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M P S Chandrawat; R N Yadav

    2000-02-01

    The effect of admixing of aluminium phosphate on oxychloride cement in the matrix has been investigated. It is shown that aluminium phosphate retards the setting process of the cement and improves water-tightness.

  16. Magnesia-Based Cements: A Journey of 150 Years, and Cements for the Future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Sam A; Provis, John L

    2016-04-13

    This review examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 150 years of work worldwide on magnesium-based inorganic cements, with a focus on both scientific and patent literature. Magnesium carbonate, phosphate, silicate-hydrate, and oxysalt (both chloride and sulfate) cements are all assessed. Many such cements are ideally suited to specialist applications in precast construction, road repair, and other fields including nuclear waste immobilization. The majority of MgO-based cements are more costly to produce than Portland cement because of the relatively high cost of reactive sources of MgO and do not have a sufficiently high internal pH to passivate mild steel reinforcing bars. This precludes MgO-based cements from providing a large-scale replacement for Portland cement in the production of steel-reinforced concretes for civil engineering applications, despite the potential for CO2 emissions reductions offered by some such systems. Nonetheless, in uses that do not require steel reinforcement, and in locations where the MgO can be sourced at a competitive price, a detailed understanding of these systems enables their specification, design, and selection as advanced engineering materials with a strongly defined chemical basis. PMID:27002788

  17. Coupled effect of cement hydration and temperature on hydraulic behavior of cemented tailings backfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Di; CAI Si-jing

    2015-01-01

    Cemented tailings backfill (CTB) is made by mixing cement, tailings and water together, thus cement hydration and water seepage flow are the two crucial factors affecting the quality of CTB. Cement hydration process can release significant amount of heat to raise the temperature of CTB and in turn increase the rate of cement hydration. Meanwhile, the progress of cement hydration consumes water and produces hydration products to change the pore structures within CTB, which further influences the hydraulic behavior of CTB. In order to understand the hydraulic behavior of CTB, a numerical model was developed by coupling the hydraulic, thermal and hydration equations. This model was then implemented into COMSOL Multiphysics to simulate the evolutions of temperature and water seepage flow within CTB versus curing time. The predicted outcomes were compared with correspondent experimental results, proving the validity and availability of this model. By taking advantage of the validated model, effects of various initial CTB and curing temperatures, cement content, and CTB's geometric shapes on the hydraulic behavior of CTB were demonstrated numerically. The presented conclusions can contribute to preparing more environmentally friendly CTB structures.

  18. Applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy in cement studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last two decades Moessbauer spectrometer has been employed to investigate cement and its clinker. In this work some of these investigations are exhibited briefly hoping that this would facilitate further investigations. It has already been seen that Moessbauer spectroscopy gives good information about some vague points which were present before using this technique as a tool in cement studies such as clinker formation, iron solubility, the iron states in the different phases of clinker as well as the effect of hydration at different times on the states of iron cement pastes, methods for the quality control of the manufactured clinker, the evaluation of the degree of hydration and the compressive strength have been assessed. A concept about the Moessbauer spectroscopy is presented. (author)

  19. Performance of cemented coal gangue backfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qin-li; WANG Xin-min

    2007-01-01

    Possibility of cemented gangue backfill was studied with gangue of Suncun Coal Mine, Xinwen Coal Group, Shandong,and fly ash of nearby thermal power plant, in order to treat enormous coal gangue on a large scale and to recovery safety coal pillars.The results indicate that coal gangue is not an ideal aggregate for pipeline gravity flow backfill, but such disadvantages of gangue as bad fluidity and serious pipe wear can be overcome by addition of fly ash. It is approved that quality indexes such as strength and dewatering ratio and piping feature of slurry can satisfy requirement of cemented backfill if mass ratio of cement to fly ash to gangue higher middle and long term comprehensive strength.

  20. Micromotion of cemented and uncemented femoral components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, D W; O'Connor, D O; Zalenski, E B; Jasty, M; Harris, W H

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the initial stability of cemented and uncemented femoral components within the femoral canals of cadaver femurs during simulated single limb stance and stair climbing. Both types were very stable in simulated single limb stance (maximum micromotion of 42 microns for cemented and 30 microns for uncemented components). However, in simulated stair climbing, the cemented components were much more stable than the uncemented components (76 microns as against 280 microns). There was also greater variation in the stability of uncemented components in simulated stair climbing, with two of the seven components moving 200 microns or more. Future implant designs should aim to improve the initial stability of cementless femoral components under torsional loads; this should improve the chances of bony ingrowth. PMID:1991771

  1. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last seven years, Low Oxidation State Metal Ion reagents (LOMI) have been used to decontaminate the 100 MW(e) Steam Generating Heavy Water Ractor (SGHWR) at Winfrith. The use of these reagents has resulted in a dilute ionic solution containing activation products which are produced by corrosion of metallic components in the reactor. It has been demonstrated that the amount of activity in the solution can be reduced using organic ion exchanger resins. These resins consist of a cross linked polystyrene with sulphonic acid or quaternary ammonium function groups and can be successfully immobilised in blended cement systems. The formulation which has been developed is produced from a 9 to 1 blend of ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) containing 28% ion exchange resin in the water saturated form. If 6% Microsilica is added to the blended cement the waste loading can be increased to 36 w/o. (author)

  2. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  3. A thermodynamic model for blended cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical thermodynamic model has been developed for blended cements, called CEMCHEM. Given the chemical compositions of the blend materials, CEMCHEM calculates the equilibrium phase distribution, achieved at 25oC. It is based on a portion of the CaO-Al2O3- SiO2- SO3- H2O system, whose phase relations have been determined from the results of 'compatibility experiments'. Solubility models have been developed for the cement hydrate phases used in CEMCHEM, for use with the computer codes MINEQL, PHREEQE and EQ3/6. Validation of the overall approach is provided by the agreement between observed and calculated aqueous compositions for the compatibility experiments. Thus CEMCHEM, with the cement hydrate solubility models, can be used as the basis for modelling near field chemistry in cementitious radwaste repositories. (author)

  4. Spatial analysis of cement production and consumption in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Beygo, Cem; Cakmak, Goksenin

    1998-01-01

    After 1950?s, the rapid urbanization of Turkey stimulated the production and consumption of cement and the number of cement factories increased since then. In addition, construction of highways, bridges, dams and industrialization also contribute to the consumption of cement. Construction industry became a locomotif of the economy of the country and cement industry is the most element of the construction industry. This study analyzes the growth of population and urbanization according to new ...

  5. Respiratory tract mortality in cement workers: a proportionate mortality study

    OpenAIRE

    Rachiotis George; Drivas Spyros; Kostikas Konstantinos; Makropoulos Vasilios; Hadjichristodoulou Christos

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The evidence regarding the association between lung cancer and occupational exposure to cement is controversial. This study investigated causes of deaths from cancer of respiratory tract among cement workers. Methods The deaths of the Greek Cement Workers Compensation Scheme were analyzed covering the period 1969-1998. All respiratory, lung, laryngeal and urinary bladder cancer proportionate mortality were calculated for cement production, maintenance, and office workers i...

  6. A new geopolymeric binder from hydrated-carbonated cement

    OpenAIRE

    Paya Bernabeu, Jorge Juan; Borrachero Rosado, María Victoria; Monzó Balbuena, José Mª; Soriano Martinez, Lourdes; Mitsuuchi Tashima, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of hydrated Portland cement as the raw material in the production of geopolymers. The silicon and aluminium oxides needed for the geopolymerization process were produced by the carbonation of hydrated Portland cement, which transforms CSH and CAH (Portland cement hydrates) into silica and alumina gels. Hydrated-carbonated Portland cement was alkali activated with a NaOH/waterglass solution. Pastes and mortars were prepared, and micro-structural and mechanical prop...

  7. Application of glass ionomer cements in restorative dentistry.

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh P; Kamath M

    1999-01-01

    Dentistry was marked with radical changes in clinical restorative procedures. If the inherent characteristic of the ionomer cement was examined, it becomes very clear to the researcher as well as the dentist, that no other material has had an impact as comparable to glass ionomer cements on restorative dentistry. This scientific paper highlights the clinical applications of the cement in restorative dentistry. Glass ionomer cements are bioactive, by forming permanent adhesive bonds to dentin ...

  8. Survival in cohorts of asbestos cement workers and controls.

    OpenAIRE

    Albin, M; Horstmann, V; Jakobsson, K; Welinder, H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To measure the impact on survival of being exposed to asbestos cement dust. METHODS: Survival of 866 asbestos cement workers and 755 controls was studied with Cox's proportional hazards regression models with age as the basic time variable. The effect of cumulative exposure up to the age of 40 was investigated in an internal analysis of 635 asbestos cement workers who had dose estimates. RESULTS: The death risk was higher for the asbestos cement workers than for the controls with ...

  9. Compressibility Behavior of Tropical Peat Reinforced with Cement Columns

    OpenAIRE

    Youventharan Duraisamy; Bujang B.K. Huat; Azlan A. Aziz

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the compressibility of tropical peat reinforced with cylindrical cement columns. When a cement column is installed vertically in peat, its com-pressibility is reduced because of the hardened skeleton matrix formed by cement parti-cles bonding with adjacent soil particles in the presence of pore water. The effects of the cement column diameter on the compressibility have been investigated in this study. The results indicated that compressibility index Cc and Cα decreas...

  10. Stability evaluation for cement package containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to provide stable cement packages, ettringite formation, a major cause of cement deterioration, was studied theoretically and experimentally. A computer program was developed to calculate the chemical equilibrium compositions of a complex cement system. Higher curing temperature and the addition of NaOH were identified as effective methods to avoid ettringite formation. These findings were confirmed by measuring the amount of ettringite in solidified cement by an X-ray diffraction method

  11. Injectable citrate-modified Portland cement for use in vertebroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Wynn-Jones, Gareth; Shelton, Richard M.; Hofmann, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    The injectability of Portland cement (PC) with several citrate additives was investigated for use in clinical applications such as vertebroplasty (stabilization of a fractured vertebra with bone cement) using a syringe. A 2-wt % addition of sodium or potassium citrate with PC significantly improved cement injectability, decreased cement setting times from over 2 h to below 25 min, while increasing the compressive strength to a maximum of 125 MPa. Zeta-potential measurements indicated that the...

  12. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Lad, Pritam P; Kamath, Maya; Tarale, Kavita; Kusugal, Preethi B

    2014-01-01

    The longevity of fixed partial denture depends on the type of luting cement used with tooth preparation. The clinician’s understating of various cements, their advantages and disadvantages is of utmost importance. In recent years, many luting agents cements have been introduced claiming clinically better performance than existing materials due to improved characteristics. Both conventional and contemporary dental luting cements are discussed here. The various agents discussed are: Zinc pho...

  13. The aggressiveness of pig slurry to cement mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Massana Guitart, Jordi; Guerrero Bustos, Ana; Antón Fuentes, Rebeca; Garcimartin Molina, Miguel Angel; Sanchez Espinosa, Elvira

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to measure the behaviour of various mortars employed in livestock media in central Spain and to analyse the aggressiveness of pig slurry to cement blended with fly ash mortars. To achieve this, mortar specimens were immersed in ponds storing pig slurry. Mortar specimens, of 40 ? 40 ? 160 mm, were made from four types of cement commonly used and recommended for rural areas. The types were a sulphate-resistant Portland cement and three cements blended in different proportions with ...

  14. Rietveld quantitative phase analysis of Yeelimite-containing cements

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez-Pinazo, Gema; Cuesta, Ana; García-Maté, Marta; Santacruz, Isabel; Losilla, Enrique R.; De la Torre, Ángeles G.; León-Reina, Laura; Aranda, Miguel A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Yeelimite-containing cements are attracting attention for their tailored properties. Calcium sulfoaluminate, CSA, cements have high contents of Yeelimite and they are used for special applications. Belite calcium sulfoaluminate, BCSA or sulfobelite, cements have high contents of belite and intermediate contents of Yeelimite, and they may become an alternative to OPC. Here, we report Rietveld quantitative phase analyses for three commercially available CSA clinkers, one CSA cement,...

  15. Expansion control for cementation of incinerated ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method, in which incinerated ash is solidified with a cement material, has been developed to dispose of radioactive incinerated ash waste. A small amount of metallic Al, which was not oxidized in the incineration, existed in the ash. When such ash was mixed with a cement material and water, alkaline components in the ash and the cement were dissolved in the mixing water and then metallic Al reaction with the alkaline compounds resulted in generation of H2. Because the H2 generation began immediately just after the mixing, H2 bubbles pushed up the mixed grout material and an expanded solidified form was obtained. The expansion leads to lowering the strength of the solidified form and making harmful void. In this study, we tried to control H2 generation from the reaction of metallic Al in the cementation by means of following two methods, one was a method to let metallic Al react prior to the cementation and the other was a method to add an expansion inhibitor that made an oxide film on the surface of metallic Al. In the pre-treatment, the ash was soaked in water in order to let metallic Al react with it, and then the ash with the immersion solution was dried at 105 Celsius degrees. The pre-treated ash was mixed with an ordinary portland cement and water. The inhibitor of lithium nitrite, sodium nitrite, phosphoric acid, or potassium dihydrogen phosphate was added at the mixing process. The solidified forms prepared using the pre-treated ash and lithium nitrite were not expanded. Phosphoric acid and sodium nitrite were effective for expansion control, but potassium dihydrogen phosphate did not work. (authors)

  16. Fabrication of Phosphate Cement with High Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the development of industrial society has accelerated, hazardous wastes are generated as well. According to the 1986 statistics of U.S.A, each person made 40 tons of waste in America that year. Treatment of radioactive waste is one of the most important and serious problems related to waste treatments, because its radioactivity and decaying heat have harmful effects to human and environment for a long time. Nuclear developed countries have used conventional method of treatment such as vitrification or cementation in order to stabilize and solidify radioactive waste. Although the former guarantees the formation of high leaching resistant and durable waste form, it requires several hundred (or even more than one thousand) temperature to melt glass frit. This process generates secondary waste volatilized, as well as being non-economical. Cement technology played a role of immobilizing low and middle class wastes. It has advantages of low temperature setting, low cost, easy process, etc. The alkalinity of ordinary cement, however, constrains the utility of cement to the solidification of alkaline waste. In addition, leachability and mechanical strength of cements are not quite appropriate for the stabilization of high level waste. In this regard, chemically bonded phosphate cement(CBPC), which sets by an acid-base reaction, is a potentially expectable material for immobilization of radioactive waste. CBPC not only sets at room temperature, but also encapsulates various isotopes chemically. The performance of CBPC can be enhanced by the addition of fly ash, sand, wollastonite, etc. This study aims at fabricating the CBPC containing fly ash with high integrity. Morphology, microstructure, and compressive strength are evaluated using SEM, and digital compressing machine

  17. Fabrication of Phosphate Cement with High Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Lee, Chang Hwa; Heo, Cheol Min; Jeon, Min Ku; Kang, Kweon Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    As the development of industrial society has accelerated, hazardous wastes are generated as well. According to the 1986 statistics of U.S.A, each person made 40 tons of waste in America that year. Treatment of radioactive waste is one of the most important and serious problems related to waste treatments, because its radioactivity and decaying heat have harmful effects to human and environment for a long time. Nuclear developed countries have used conventional method of treatment such as vitrification or cementation in order to stabilize and solidify radioactive waste. Although the former guarantees the formation of high leaching resistant and durable waste form, it requires several hundred (or even more than one thousand) temperature to melt glass frit. This process generates secondary waste volatilized, as well as being non-economical. Cement technology played a role of immobilizing low and middle class wastes. It has advantages of low temperature setting, low cost, easy process, etc. The alkalinity of ordinary cement, however, constrains the utility of cement to the solidification of alkaline waste. In addition, leachability and mechanical strength of cements are not quite appropriate for the stabilization of high level waste. In this regard, chemically bonded phosphate cement(CBPC), which sets by an acid-base reaction, is a potentially expectable material for immobilization of radioactive waste. CBPC not only sets at room temperature, but also encapsulates various isotopes chemically. The performance of CBPC can be enhanced by the addition of fly ash, sand, wollastonite, etc. This study aims at fabricating the CBPC containing fly ash with high integrity. Morphology, microstructure, and compressive strength are evaluated using SEM, and digital compressing machine

  18. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness

  19. Porosity and liquid absorption of cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krus, M.; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Kunzel, H. M.

    1997-01-01

    slowing-down effect which is related to water because the absorption of organic liquids, such as hexane, is quite normal. Measurements of the porosity of hardened cement paste determined by helium pycnometry and water saturation show that water molecules can enter spaces in the microstructure which are...... not accessible to the smaller helium atoms. Considering the results of dilatation tests both before and after water and hexane saturation, it seems possible that a contraction of capillary pores due to moisture-related swelling of the cement gel leads to the non-linear water absorption over the square...

  20. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, N. C.; Milestone, N. B.; Gordon, L. E.; Ko, S.-C.

    2014-09-01

    Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste.

  1. Cement Formation:A Success Story in a Black Box: High Temperature Phase Formation of Portland Cement Clinker

    OpenAIRE

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledgeabout the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in ...

  2. Correlation of pull-out strength of cement-augmented pedicle screws with CT-volumetric measurement of cement.

    OpenAIRE

    Fölsch, Christian; Goost, Hans; Figiel, Jens; Paletta, Jürgen R. J.; Schultz, Wolfgang; Lakemeier, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cement augmentation of pedicle screws increases fixation strength in an osteoporotic spine. This study was designed to determine the cement distribution and the correlation between the pull-out strength of the augmented screw and the cement volume within polyurethane (PU) foam. METHODS: Twenty-eight cannulated pedicle screws (6×45 mm) (Peter Brehm, Erlangen, Germany) with four holes at the distal end of the screw were augmented with the acrylic Stabilit ER Bone Cement Vertebr...

  3. The performance of three vacuum-mixing cement guns – a comparison of the fatigue properties of Simplex P cement

    OpenAIRE

    Yau, W.; Ng, T.; Chiu, K.; Poon, K.; Ho, W.; Luk, D.

    2001-01-01

    We tested three commercially available cement-mixing systems (Howmedica, Summit and Stryker). After mixing the cement was allowed to cure in metal moulds under standard conditions. Sixty-nine cement blocks were produced. The fatigue behavior of the blocks was tested until failure. A wide scattering of results was observed in all the three systems. Uneven mixing of the polymer and monomer was observed in the Howmedica system. A significantly stronger cement (P=0.018) was produced with the Stry...

  4. Advanced cement solidification technique for spent resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past 40 years, the nuclear facilities of China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) produced an amount of radioactive organic resins, a kind of problematic stream in nuclear industry. As these facilities were stepping into decommissioning, the treatment of the spent organic resins was put on the agenda. The various routes for spent resin treatment such as incineration, advanced oxidation, cement immobilization, etc, were considered. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages when applied in the treatment of spent resins. Since the quantities of the spent organic resins were relatively small and an experience with variety of cementation processes existed in CIAE, predominately for immobilization of the evaporated concentrates, the option of direct encapsulation of the spent organic resins into cementitious materials was adopted in 2003, as a preferred method from the point of view of saving the on the cost of the disposal. In order to realize the end goal, the main work consisted of: the survey of the source terms; cementitious material formula investigation; and the process development. This work, which was undertaken in the following years, is addressed as follows. Source terms of the spent resins in CIAE were to be made clear firstly. The results showed that a total of 24-29 m3 of spent resins was generated and accumulated in the past 40 years. Spent resin arose from two research reactors (heavy water reactor and light water reactor), and from the waste management plant. The amount of the spent resins from the heavy water reactor was 1m3 or so, but its radioactive concentration was high to ∼108-∼109Bq/m3. Two kinds of cements, ASC and OPC cement were selected next, as the solidifying matrix to be investigated. A mixture surface response approach was employed to design experiment and interpret data. In comparison, ASC was superior to OPC cement and it displayed preferable performances to encapsulate spent resins. The optimum formulation is:1) resin

  5. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  6. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, N.C., E-mail: nick.collier@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Milestone, N.B. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Callaghan Innovation, 69 Gracefield Road, PO Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); Gordon, L.E. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Geopolymer and Minerals Processing Group, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ko, S.-C. [Holcim Technology Ltd, Hagenholzstrasse 85, CH-8050 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste.

  7. Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabits, George [Trabits Group, LLC, Wasilla, AK (United States)

    2015-04-20

    After an oil, gas, or geothermal production well has been drilled, the well must be stabilized with a casing (sections of steel pipe that are joined together) in order to prevent the walls of the well from collapsing. The gap between the casing and the walls of the well is filled with cement, which locks the casing into place. The casing and cementing of geothermal wells is complicated by the harsh conditions of high temperature, high pressure, and a chemical environment (brines with high concentrations of carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid) that degrades conventional Portland cement. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provided support for the development of fly-ash-modified calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) cement, which offers improved resistance to degradation compared with conventional cement. However, the use of CaP cements involves some operational constraints that can increase the cost and complexity of well cementing. In some cases, CaP cements are incompatible with chemical additives that are commonly used to adjust cement setting time. Care must also be taken to ensure that CaP cements do not become contaminated with leftover conventional cement in pumping equipment used in conventional well cementing. With assistance from GTO, Trabits Group, LLC has developed a zeolite-containing cement that performs well in harsh geothermal conditions (thermal stability at temperatures of up to 300°C and resistance to carbonation) and is easy to use (can be easily adjusted with additives and eliminates the need to “sterilize” pumping equipment as with CaP cements). This combination of properties reduces the complexity/cost of well cementing, which will help enable the widespread development of geothermal energy in the United States.

  8. Design of Fit-for-Purpose Cement to Restore Cement-Caprock Seal Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, R.

    2015-12-01

    This project aims to study critical research needs in the area of rock-cement interfaces, with a special focus on crosscutting applications in the Wellbore Integrity Pillar of the SubTER initiative. This study will focus on design and test fit-for-purpose cement formulations. The goals of this project are as follows: 1) perform preliminary study of dispersing nanomaterial admixtures in Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) mixes, 2) characterize the cement-rock interface, and 3) identify potential high-performance cement additives that can improve sorption behavior, chemical durability, bond strength, and interfacial fracture toughness, as appropriate to specific subsurface operational needs. The work presented here focuses on a study of cement-shale interfaces to better understand failure mechanisms, with particular attention to measuring bond strength at the cement-shale interface. Both experimental testing and computational modeling were conducted to determine the mechanical behavior at the interface representing the interaction of cement and shale of a typical wellbore environment. Cohesive zone elements are used in the finite element method to computationally simulate the interface of the cement and rock materials with varying properties. Understanding the bond strength and mechanical performance of the cement-formation interface is critical to wellbore applications such as sequestration, oil and gas production and exploration and nuclear waste disposal. Improved shear bond strength is an indication of the capability of the interface to ensure zonal isolation and prevent zonal communication, two crucial goals in preserving wellbore integrity. Understanding shear bond strength development and interface mechanics will provide an idea as to how the cement-formation interface can be altered under environmental changes (temperature, pressure, chemical degradation, etc.) so that the previously described objectives can be achieved. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi

  9. The influence of cement mantle thickness and stem geometry on fatigue damage in two different cemented hip femoral prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, A; Simões, J A

    2009-11-13

    Experimental models can be used for pre-clinical testing of cemented and other type of hip replacements. Total hip replacement (THR) failure scenarios include, among others, cement damage accumulation and the assessment of accurate stress and strain magnitudes at the cement mantle interfaces (stem-cement and cement-bone) can be used to predict mechanical failure. The aseptic loosening scenario in cemented hip replacements is currently not fully understood, and methods of evaluating medical devices must be developed to improve clinical performance. Different results and conclusions concerning the cement micro-cracking mechanism have been reported. The aim of this study was to verify the in vitro behavior of two cemented femoral stems with respect to fatigue crack formation. Fatigue crack damage was assessed at the medial, lateral, anterior and posterior sides of the Lubinus SPII and Charnley stems. All stems were loaded and tested in stair climbing fatigue loading during one million cycles at 2 Hz. After the experiments each implanted synthetic femur was sectioned and analyzed. We observed more damage (cracks per area) for the Lubinus SPII stem, mainly on the proximal part of the cement mantle. The micro-cracking formation initiated in the stem-cement interface and grew towards the direction of cortical bone of the femur. Overall, the cement-bone interface seems to be crucial for the success of the hip replacement. The Charnley stem provoked more damage on the cement-bone interface. A failure index (maximum length of crack/maximum thickness of cement) considered was higher for the cement-stem interface of the Lubinus SPII stem. For a cement mantle thickness higher than 5 mm, cracking initiated at the cement-bone interface and depended on the opening canal process (reaming procedure and instrumentation). The analysis also showed that fatigue-induced damage on the cement mantle, increasing proximally, and depended on the axial position of the stem. The cement

  10. Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these ''problem'' wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above it's melting point (120 degree C), combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Microscopic evaluation regarding time behavior of orthodontic cements used for disjunctor cementing

    OpenAIRE

    Ruxandra Bartok; Dimitriu B.; Varlan C.; Stanciu R; Sanziana Scarlatescu; Loredana Mitran; Mitran M.; Irina Gheorghiu; Ioana Suciu; Iliescu D.M.

    2015-01-01

    In order to fulfill their function, orthodontic devices must be cemented on teeth using orthodontic rings. The retention of the orthodontic ring is influenced mainly by the type of dental-ring adhesion. This study was initiated to determine possible microleakage events while using zinc phosphate cement Adhesor (Spofa Dental), conventional glass ionomer Ketac Cem (3M ESPE) and Fuji Ortho (GC) and a compomer Transbond Plus (3M Unitek). The results of the study are consistent with those reported...

  12. A Study on Provisional Cements, Cementation Techniques, and Their Effects on Bonding of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Vinod Kumar, G.; Soorya Poduval, T.; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P.

    2013-01-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restorati...

  13. Development of Clinical Cement of Nanoapatite and Polyamide Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new type of inorganicorganic biomimetic bone cement consisting of nanohydroxyapatite and polyamide 66 composite was investigated. This cement can be handled as paste and easily shaped into any contour. Nanoapatite and polyamide composite cement has a reasonable setting time, excellent washout resistance, high mechanical strength and bioactivity, and it is easily handled and shaped, which can be developed as a clinical cement. It can be predicted that nanoapatite/polymer composite cement would be a new trend of biomedical material, showing a promising prospect.

  14. CEMENT BONDED COMPOSITES – A MECHANICAL REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Frybort

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years promising cement bonded wood composites for structural purposes have evolved. Durability, toughness, high dimen-sional stability, resistance against environmental influences such as biodegradation or weathering but also availability of the raw material as well as economic factors are features which can make cement-bonded composites superior to conventionally bonded composites. This paper reviews the relationship of diverse parameters, including density and particle size on mechanical and physical properties of cement bonded composites, based on published sources from the last 60 years. For general and recent information about bonding mechanisms, compatibility and setting problems, determination and improvement of compatibility, the used raw materials as well as accelerators are discussed. The main part deals with failure mechanisms in connection with several production parameters. Furthermore, the influence of particle size and geometry, orientation of the particles, cement-wood ratio and the effect of accelerators and treatment of the particles on modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture as well as thickness swelling are discussed.

  15. Formulation of an injectable phosphocalcium cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, S. [CIRIMAT Equipe de Physico-Chimie des Phosphates ENSCT INP, Toulouse (France); TEKNIMED, Vic en Bigorre (France); Brouchet, A.; Delisle, B. [CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France). Service d' Anatomie Pathologie; Freche, M.; Lacout, J.L. [CIRIMAT Equipe de Physico-Chimie des Phosphates ENSCT INP, Toulouse (France); Rodriguez, F. [Lab. de Galenique, Chmin des Maraichers, Toulouse (France)

    2001-07-01

    In orthopedic surgery, the loss or the reinforcement of osseous substance often requires filling of the defective part. In order to make the surgical operations easier we sought to make an injectable form. This study examined the effect of silicone and polyglycol on the injectability, setting time and mechanical properties of the cement. The basic solid phase was composed of a mixture of tetracalcium phosphate (Ca{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}O), {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate (Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}) and sodium glycerophosphate. The basic liquid phase was made up of lime, orthophosphoric acid and water. Silicone was previously dissolved in cyclohexane and introduced in the solid phase. Polyglycol is a water-soluble compound so it is introduced in the liquid phase. For the mechanical properties, the strong increase in the percentage of additives decreased the compressive strength. Silicone and polyglycol made it possible to improve viscosity without modifying the basic setting time. The rate of evolution was different with the two different additives. From the data it was possible to optimize the formulation of cements to give predicted properties. Testing the in vivo implantation of the cement has already started. Preliminary results show the perfect osteointegration of the new cements without reactions to the foreign body in spite of the presence of silicone. (orig.)

  16. The functional performance of orthopaedic bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prendergast, P.J. [Trinity Coll., Dublin (Ireland). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents a summary of our work on the functional behavior of polymethylmethacrylate as a fixation material for load-bearing implants. Experimental tests on models of hip reconstructions have shown that damage accumulation, in the form of growth of numerous microcracks, occurs in cement-fixated orthopaedic implants. To predict failure due to damage accumulation, fatigue tests of hand-mixed and vacuum-mixed cement are used to determine a relationship between the probability-of-failure, stress, and porosity of the cement. This relationship is then applied to the comparative analysis of orthopaedic implants using finite element analysis. Two implant systems are considered: femoral hip prostheses and glenoid replacement prostheses. It is shown how the complex and intricate stress patterns in the polymethylmethacrylate cement 'mantles' can be analyzed in terms of the probability-of-failure. This allows comparison of implants for pre-clinical testing purposes. The results complement those obtained from clinical studies where subsidence of the implant correlates with implant loosening [Karrholm et al. J. Bone Jt. Surg. Vol. 76B (1994) 912-916]. If subsidence is due to creep, then a correlation between damage accumulation and creep should exist. A basis for such a correlation in polymethylmetacrylate is proposed that links clinical findings of subsidence with our results with regard to damage accumulation. (orig.)

  17. PULSED LASER ABLATION OF CEMENT AND CONCRETE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser ablation was investigated as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete from nuclear facilities. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam...

  18. Macro-defect-free (MDF) cements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mojumdar, S.C.; Mazanec, Karel; Drábik, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 1 (2006), s. 135-139. ISSN 1388-6150 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : MDF cements * moisture resistance * TG-DTA Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.438, year: 2006

  19. Absorption Characteristics of Cement Combination Concrete Containing Portland Cement, fly ash, and Metakaolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folagbade S.O.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The resistance to water penetration of cement combination concretes containing Portland cement (PC, fly ash (FA, and metakaolin (MK have been investigated at different water/cement (w/c ratios, 28-day strengths, and depths of water penetration using their material costs and embodied carbon-dioxide (eCO2 contents. Results revealed that, at equal w/c ratio, eCO2 content reduced with increasing content of FA and MK. MK contributed to the 28-day strengths more than FA. Compared with PC, FA reduced cost and increased the depth of water penetration, MK increased cost and reduced the depth of water penetration, and their ternary combinations become beneficial. At equal strengths and levels of resistance to water penetration, most of the cement combination concretes are more environmentally compatible and costlier than PC concrete. Only MK binary cement concretes with 10%MK content or more and ternary cement concretes at a total replacement level of 55% with 10%MK content or more have higher resistance to water penetration than PC concrete.

  20. Retention of overdenture posts cemented with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Mohamed Ezzat; El-Mowafy, Omar; Fenton, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two self-adhesive resin cements on the retention of overdenture anchor posts after 30 days of aging in water. Forty caries-free human canines were randomly assigned to four test groups. Uni-Anchor posts were cemented to specimens in groups A and B with Breeze and Maxcem self-adhesive resin cements, respectively. In groups C and D, Fuji glass-ionomer cement and Fleck's zinc phosphate cement were used, respectively. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 30 days. Each specimen was loaded in tension in an Instron universal testing machine. The maximum force required to dislodge each post was recorded. Means and standard deviations (SDs) were calculated and data were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA). Means and SDs were 706.5 +/- 204.6 N for Breeze, 585.1 +/- 213.5 N for Maxcem, 449.2 +/- 181.1 N for Fuji, and 330.4 +/- 120.6 N for Fleck's. ANOVA revealed significant differences among the means (P Breeze cement (group A) resulted in the highest retention force and most frequent cohesive failure and thus would be expected to clinically perform in a superior manner. PMID:19548412

  1. Reactive-Transport Model of Buffer Cementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Randy; Wei Zhou [Monitor Scientific LLC, Denver, CO (United States)

    2005-10-15

    Thermal gradients during the early, non-isothermal period of near-field evolution in a KBS-3 repository for spent nuclear fuel could alter the mineralogy of the bentonite buffer and cause the constituent clay particles to become cemented together by mineral precipitates. Cementation is a potential concern because it could alter the ductility, mechanical strength and swelling pressure of the buffer, thereby possibly adversely affecting the primary performance function of this key barrier to provide a stable diffusional transport pathway between the canister and rock. The present study uses the TOUGHREACT computer program to simulate reactive-transport processes that are thought to control buffer cementation. TOUGHREACT is generally applicable to problems involving non-isothermal, multiphase reactive transport in variably saturated media. For cementation problems, the modeling approach must account specifically for the temperature dependence of equilibrium and kinetic constraints on dissolution/precipitation reactions involving the primary smectite clays and accessory phases in bentonite, and for diffusive transport of aqueous reactants and products along concentration gradients that are aligned with, or in opposition to, the direction of decreasing temperatures across the near field. The modeling approach was evaluated in two stages. A conceptual model of buffer cementation was first calibrated using observations from field tests carried out at the Stripa mine and Aespoe HRL (LOT pilot experiments). The calibrated model was then used to simulate the geochemical evolution of the KBS-3 buffer during the non-isothermal period of repository evolution. This model accounts for the imbibition of groundwater from a granitic host rock into initially unsaturated buffer materials under capillary and hydraulic pressure gradients, and uses realistic time-temperature constraints on the thermal evolution of the near-field. Preliminary results suggest that the total extent of

  2. Reactive-Transport Model of Buffer Cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal gradients during the early, non-isothermal period of near-field evolution in a KBS-3 repository for spent nuclear fuel could alter the mineralogy of the bentonite buffer and cause the constituent clay particles to become cemented together by mineral precipitates. Cementation is a potential concern because it could alter the ductility, mechanical strength and swelling pressure of the buffer, thereby possibly adversely affecting the primary performance function of this key barrier to provide a stable diffusional transport pathway between the canister and rock. The present study uses the TOUGHREACT computer program to simulate reactive-transport processes that are thought to control buffer cementation. TOUGHREACT is generally applicable to problems involving non-isothermal, multiphase reactive transport in variably saturated media. For cementation problems, the modeling approach must account specifically for the temperature dependence of equilibrium and kinetic constraints on dissolution/precipitation reactions involving the primary smectite clays and accessory phases in bentonite, and for diffusive transport of aqueous reactants and products along concentration gradients that are aligned with, or in opposition to, the direction of decreasing temperatures across the near field. The modeling approach was evaluated in two stages. A conceptual model of buffer cementation was first calibrated using observations from field tests carried out at the Stripa mine and Aespoe HRL (LOT pilot experiments). The calibrated model was then used to simulate the geochemical evolution of the KBS-3 buffer during the non-isothermal period of repository evolution. This model accounts for the imbibition of groundwater from a granitic host rock into initially unsaturated buffer materials under capillary and hydraulic pressure gradients, and uses realistic time-temperature constraints on the thermal evolution of the near-field. Preliminary results suggest that the total extent of

  3. Assessment of cement durability in repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present research aimed at investigating the durability of cement paste under nuclear waste repository conditions using accelerated tests. Cement paste samples are examined after being exposed to the environmental conditions that are expected to prevail in the repository environment and the results are compared with those obtained with unexposed specimens or specimens exposed to reference conditions. The following exposure conditions were selected: a) Immersion in salt solution, distilled water, or kept in dry storage; b) Room temperature (20 C. degrees) or high temperature (60 C. degrees); c) Immersion time of 30 days or 60 days (not for dry storage); d) Irradiation to a dose of (400 kGy) or background radiation (0 kGy). After exposure to the stressing conditions, the effects of each factor on the cement paste samples were observed by changes in their characteristics. Compressive strength tests were performed on all samples and some of them were investigated in terms of changes in mineralogy by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). With the results obtained so far it was possible to point out the following conclusions. First, after a period of immersion in water, cement paste samples further hydrated and presented higher mechanical resistance, as expected. Secondly, dry storage did not allow a complete hydration as a consequence of pore water evaporation. High temperatures intensified this process and led to the ettringite decomposition to meta-ettringite. Thirdly, higher temperature accelerated hydration kinetics and promoted higher mechanical resistance in samples kept under immersion. Fourthly, the irradiation dose applied was unable to change the mineralogy of cement paste samples and fifthly, no statistically significant differences were observed between 30 or 60 days exposure time, for the test conditions

  4. Densified ultra-light cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro

    2015-01-01

    production comprehends one of the relevant carbon emission footprints in the world. The substitution of cement by supplementary cementitious additions encompasses several other health hazards, risks and also technical difficulties such as limited or incoherent pozzolanic activity. Superabsorbent polymers can...... be used as a “clean technology” in the production of cement-based materials for structural applications with a low carbon footprint. This paper describes the principles of this concept coupled with experimental results on the basic properties of this enhanced type of cement-based materials with......Densified cement systems were developed in the early 1980s, about three decades past. The research led to historical developments in cement and concrete research, forming the baseline for the design of modern cement systems, the socalled high-performance and ultra-high performance concrete. Cement...

  5. Optical evaluation on the setting of cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the construction area, one of the most widely used cement is the CPC 30R, it is a hydraulic binder consisting of CaO, SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3, when mixed with water forms cement pastes and its four crystallographic phases start to hydrate. The diffuse reflection on cement paste can give an indication of the behaviour on optical properties on the hydration of the cement and early formation products. In this study, Portland cement (CPC) pastes were prepared with 0.45 a water to cement ratio (w/c). This work is aimed to evaluate the optical properties of cement pastes on the hydration reaction during the first 24 hours by measuring the intensity of diffuse reflection changes

  6. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Pritam P; Kamath, Maya; Tarale, Kavita; Kusugal, Preethi B

    2014-02-01

    The longevity of fixed partial denture depends on the type of luting cement used with tooth preparation. The clinician's understating of various cements, their advantages and disadvantages is of utmost importance. In recent years, many luting agents cements have been introduced claiming clinically better performance than existing materials due to improved characteristics. Both conventional and contemporary dental luting cements are discussed here. The various agents discussed are: Zinc phosphate, Zinc polycarboxylate, Zinc oxide-eugenol, Glass-ionomer, Resin modified GIC, Compomers and Resin cement. The purpose of this article is to provide a discussion that provides a clinical perspective of luting cements currently available to help the general practitioner make smarter and appropriate choices. How to cite the article: Lad PP, Kamath M, Tarale K, Kusugal PB. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):116-20. PMID:24653615

  7. Mechanical Properties and Decay Resistance of Hornbeam Cement Bonded Particleboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios N. Papadopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement bonded particleboards were manufactured from hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L. wood particles. Hydration tests were carried out to determine the inhibitory index in order to characterise wood-cement compatibility. The results revealed that the mixture of hornbeam-cement can be classified as moderate inhibition. Two wood: cement ratios were applied in this study, namely, 1 : 3 and 1 : 4, for the board manufacture. It was found that an increase of cement-wood ratio resulted in an improvement in all properties examined, except MOR. All properties of the boards made from 1 : 4 wood: cement ratio surpassed the minimum requirements set forth by the building type HZ code. Boards were exposed to brown and white rot fungi, Coniophora puteana, and Trametes versicolor, respectively. Overall, both fungi failed to attack the cement-bonded boards.

  8. In vitro tensile strength of luting cements on metallic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Iara A; Varoli, Fernando K; Pieroni, Carlos H P; Ferreira, Marly C C G; Borie, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the tensile strength of crowns cemented on metallic substrate with four different types of luting agents. Twenty human maxillary molars with similar diameters were selected and prepared to receive metallic core castings (Cu-Al). After cementation and preparation the cores were measured and the area of crown's portion was calculated. The teeth were divided into four groups based on the luting agent used to cement the crowns: zinc phosphate cement; glass ionomer cement; resin cement Rely X; and resin cement Panavia F. The teeth with the crowns cemented were subjected to thermocycling and later to the tensile strength test using universal testing machine with a load cell of 200 kgf and a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The load required to dislodge the crowns was recorded and converted to MPa/mm(2). Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis analysis with a significance level of 1%. Panavia F showed significantly higher retention in core casts (3.067 MPa/mm(2)), when compared with the other cements. Rely X showed a mean retention value of 1.877 MPa/mm(2) and the zinc phosphate cement with 1.155 MPa/mm(2). Glass ionomer cement (0.884 MPa/mm(2)) exhibited the lowest tensile strength value. Crowns cemented with Panavia F on cast metallic posts and cores presented higher tensile strength. The glass ionomer cement showed the lowest tensile strength among all the cements studied. PMID:25140718

  9. Stiffness and strength of composite acrylic bone cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Knets

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Different acrylic bone cements based upon PMMA-MMA system are applicable for implant fixation inbone tissue. The aim of present study is the optimisation of the structure of some new bone acrylic cements madeon the basis of PMMA-ethylmethacrylate-triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate and bone cements having additives (HAand radio pacifier, and the finding of the effect of these modifications on the flexural strength and stiffness.Design/methodology/approach: Different new bone cements on the basis of PMMA-EMA-TEGDMA system(ABC were developed experimentally. The stiffness and strength of the samples of these modified cements weredetermined in the special three point bending equipment.Findings: A comparison of the flexural properties of new PMMA-EMA-TEGDMA cements and commercialavailable PMMA-MMA cement showed that commercial bone cement had larger values of ultimate strengthand modulus of elasticity, but the difference is not very important. As concerns the polymerisation peaktemperature, then there is a significant difference between commercial PMMA-MMA cement (~ 800C andPMMA-EMA-TEGDMA modified cements (50 – 600C. The introduction of 10% and 18% of HA into solidphase does not influence essentially strength and modulus of elasticity of the PMMA-EMA-TEGDMA bonecements. The introduction of radio pacifier BaSO4 into bone cement leads to flexural strength diminishing.Low polymerisation peak temperature and appropriate mechanical properties of bone cements developed allowsregarding new 3-D structure acrylic bone cements as promising biomaterials.Research limitations/implications: It is supposed to carry out animal testing to learn more about reaction ofmodified implanted material on the biological environment.Practical implications: The new materials could be efficiently used as bone cements because they will notdamage surrounding biological tissue during curing.Originality/value: Paper is providing the new information about possibilities to

  10. Injectable citrate-modified Portland cement for use in vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn-Jones, Gareth; Shelton, Richard M; Hofmann, Michael P

    2014-11-01

    The injectability of Portland cement (PC) with several citrate additives was investigated for use in clinical applications such as vertebroplasty (stabilization of a fractured vertebra with bone cement) using a syringe. A 2-wt % addition of sodium or potassium citrate with PC significantly improved cement injectability, decreased cement setting times from over 2 h to below 25 min, while increasing the compressive strength to a maximum of 125 MPa. Zeta-potential measurements indicated that the citrate anion was binding to one or more of the positively charged species causing charged repulsion between cement particles which dispersed aggregates and caused the liquefying effect of the anion. Analysis of the hydrating phases of PC indicated that the early strength producing PC phase (ettringite) developed within the first 2 h of setting following addition of the citrate anion, while this did not occur in the control cement (PC only). Within 24 h ettringite developed in PC as well as calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the major setting phase of PC, whereas cements containing citrate did not develop this phase. The evidence suggested that in the presence of citrate the cements limited water supply appeared to be utilized for ettringite formation, producing the early strength of the citrate cements. The present study has demonstrated that it is possible to modify PC with citrate to both improve the injectability and crucially reduce the setting times of PC while improving the strength of the cement. PMID:24711245

  11. Contamination effects of drilling fluid additives on cement slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youzhi Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During the cementation of deep wells, contamination at the contact surface between cement slurry and drilling fluid will present a technical challenge, which may threaten operation safety. To deal with the problem, lab tests and analysis were performed specifically on the compatibility of fluids during cementation in Sichuan and Chongqing gas fields. Impacts of commonly used additives for drilling fluids were determined on fluidity and thickening time of conventional cement slurry. Through the infrared spectrum analysis, SEM and XRD, infrared spectrum data of kalium polyacrylamide (KPAM and bio-viscosifier were obtained, together with infrared spectrum, SEM and XRD data of cement slurry with additives. Contamination mechanisms of the cement slurry by conventional additives for drilling fluid were reviewed. Test results show that both KPAM and bio-viscosifier are such high-molecular materials that the long chains in these materials may easily absorb cement particles in the slurry to form mixed network structures; as a result, cement particles were prone to agglomeration and eventually lost their pumpability. Finally, assessment of and testing methods for the contamination effects of drilling fluid additives on cement slurry were further improved to form standards and codes that may help solve the said problems. This study will provide technological supports for the preparation of drilling fluids with desirable properties prior to cementation, the selection of optimal drilling fluids additives, and the development of innovative drilling fluids additives.

  12. Cement clinker structure during plasma-chemical synthesis and its influence on cement properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, N.; Skripnikova, N.; Lucenko, A.; Novikova, L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the degree of influence of cement clinker cooling modes, synthesized in a low-temperature plasma, its structure and physico-mechanical properties. The raw mixture consisting of marble, sand, ash from thermal power plants and py- rite cinders were used, which are characterized by saturation factor (1,045); silicate (2,35) and alumina (1,22) modules. It was found that the use of different cooling rates of fused cement clinker entails changes associated with the mineralogical composition (increase of alite of 8.719,2 %), morphology (variation of the mineral alite aspect ratio of 6,7-17,5), density of the structure (change in distance between the minerals from 1 to 7,5 microns), grindability, specific surface area (2600-3650 cm2/g) and, in consequence, the activity of cement (56,973,2 MPa). Disorientation of alite mineral blocks against each other, a significant amount of microcracks, affect the increase in cement specific surface area of 14,3-21,6 %, which leads to activity growth of the system. Along with this, with the rapid cooling of the samples, alite 54CaO- 16SiO2-Al2O3 MgO is formed, with single units of the structure, more deformed relatively to C3S, which has a positive effect on the hydraulic cement activity.

  13. 30 CFR 250.422 - When may I resume drilling after cementing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cementing surface, intermediate, or production casing (or liners), you may resume drilling after the cement... cement has been held under pressure for 8 hours. One acceptable method of holding cement under pressure is to use float valves to hold the cement in place. (b) If you plan to nipple down your diverter...

  14. Scrap tire ashes in portland cement production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Adriana Trezza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrap tires are not considered harmful waste, but their stocking and disposal are a potential health and environmental risk. Properly controlled calcinations at high temperatures make tire combustion an interesting alternative due to its high calorific power, comparable to that of fuel-oil. Consequently, using them as an alternative combustible material in cement kilns makes it possible to give it a valuable use. However, it remains to be assured whether the impurities added to the clinker through these fuels do not affect its structure or properties.This paper shows the studies carried out on different clinkers under laboratory conditions with different levels of addition of scrap tire ashes, added by partially replacing traditional fuel in cement kilns.

  15. Grouting Rock Fractures with Cement Grout

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tani, Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    The radial flow rate of a cement grout in a rock fracture is obtained from Bingham's relation and the fact that the power expended by the injection mechanism is the energy dissipated by viscous effects. The energy balance reveals that the advance ratio is of fundamental importance in the grouting process and is inherently related to the rest and advance phases of a cement grout. This allows giving a precise definition of the zero flow path that divides the energy diagram into two distinct domains for advancing and non-advancing grout. The advance ratio and the zero flow path are used to explore the grouting of one or more fractures, analyze the GIN model in the context of the SL dispute, draw a terminal sequence considering the energy interval alternative, and reformulate the refusal criterion of the North American grouting method. Secondary grouting effects are also investigated.

  16. DESIGN OF CEMENT COMPOSITES WITH INCREASED IMPERMEABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedyuk Roman Sergeevich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the development of composite binders for producing concrete with improved characteristics of gas, water and vapor permeability. The authors investigate the processes of composite materials formation in order of decreasing scale levels from macro to nanostructures. The criteria for optimization of the volume of dispersed additives in concrete are offered. The authors theoretically studied the technological features of the formation of hydrated cement stone structure. A positive effect of nanodispersed additives on the structure and physico-mechanical properties of cement composite materials are predicted. Thanks to its improved features, such as good ratio of strength and body density, high density and lifetime, the modified concrete may be used when solving various practical tasks of the construction branch.

  17. Pore structure in blended cement pastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canut, Mariana Moreira Cavalcanti

    Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), such as slag and fly ash, are increasingly used as a substitute for Portland cement in the interests of improvement of engineering properties and sustainability of concrete. According to studies improvement of engineering properties can be explained by a...... valuable knowledge of SCMs, which is relevant for performance based design of concrete structures. In addition, the thesis provides guidelines for porosity investigations with focus on the applicability of the methods and sources of error. Pore structure was here determined by several methods, mercury...... supplement each other. Cement pastes (w/b=0.4) with and without slag and fly ash cured at two moisture (sealed and saturated) and temperature (20 and 55ºC) conditions were used to investigate the combined impact of SCMs addition and curing on the pore structure of pastes cured up to two years. Also, the...

  18. Radiopacity of dental restorative materials and cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiopacity of six composite resins, three resin luting cements and ten filling materials were studied. The purpose was to obtain an indication of radiopacity value of different brands within each of these groups of materials and to show differences in radiopacities of filling materials and natural tooth structures. On radiographs, the optimal densities of standardized samples were determined by computer imaging system and radiopacity values of the materials were expressed in millimeter equivalent aluminum. Within to groups of materials studied, there was considerable variation in radiopacity. The composite resins of P-50, Zl00 and prisma AP. H displayed much higher radiopacities than aluminum. Panavia resin cement was shown to be similarly radiopaque to aluminum. Generally, the radiopacity of base and filling materials appeared to combined applications for restorative treatment of teeth, lower radiopacity can interfere with the diagnosis and detection of gaps near the restoration.

  19. Evaluation of solidified cement waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A part of the program of the treatment of low and intermediate-level liquid wastes, is presented. The concrete has been suggested as a encapsulation or overpack material for long-term storage of radioactive waste from the nuclear fuel cycle, particularly in conjunction with the disposal of lowand intermediate-level waste. The influence of sodium nitrates, as a possible integrating component of waste, on some properties of national Portland cement, was investigated. The waste form properties, discussed in terms of their dependency on waste type and amount, include water/cement ratio, setting times, compressive strength and homogeneity. Criteria to be applied in the assessment of the final solidified waste are proposed. (Author)

  20. Characterisation of cement plant emissions in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekinci, E.; Munlafalioglu, I.; Tiris, M.; Pekin, A.V. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    1998-08-01

    In cement plants in Turkey CO, NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions were measured using standard measurement techniques and equipment. Emission factors are calculated by dividing the emission rates by capacity of production at the time of measurements for each plant. The results of this study show that the dominant emissions from cement production in Turkey is CO followed by NO{sub 2}, dust and SO{sub 2} in decreasing order. National averages for the emission factors are calculated and compared to international emission factors. On average the Turkish dust emission factor is higher than the German factor, however NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} emission factors are lower in Turkey. 7 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Understanding acoustic methods for cement bond logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Tao, Guo; Shang, Xuefeng

    2016-05-01

    Well cementation is important for oil/gas production, underground gas storage, and CO2 storage, since it isolates the reservoir layers from aquifers to increase well integrity and reduce environmental footprint. This paper analyzes wave modes of different sonic/ultrasonic methods for cement bonding evaluation. A Two dimensional finite difference method is then used to simulate the wavefield for the ultrasonic methods in the cased-hole models. Waveforms of pulse-echo method from different interfaces in a good bonded well are analyzed. Wavefield of the pitch-catch method for free casing, partial or full bonded models with ultra-low density cement are studied. Based on the studies, the modes in different methods are considered as follows: the zero-order symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (S0) for sonic method, the first-order symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (S1) for the pulse-echo method, and the zero-order anti-symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (A0) for the pitch-catch method. For the sonic method, a directional transmitter in both the azimuth and axial directions can generate energy with a large incidence angle and azimuth resolution, which can effectively generate S0 and break out the azimuth limitation of the conventional sonic method. Although combination of pulse-echo and pitch-catch methods can determine the bonding condition of the third interface for the ultra-low density cement case, the pitch-catch cannot tell the fluid annulus thickness behind casing for the partial bonded cased-hole. PMID:27250137

  2. Cement paste-epoxy adhesive interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Djouani, Fatma; CONNAN, Carole; Delamar, Michel; CHEHIMI, Mohamed M; BENZARTI, Karim

    2011-01-01

    In the field of civil engineering, the durability of concrete assemblies using adhesives is widely conditioned by the properties of the interface between the resin and the mineral support (concrete). In this context we studied first the molecular interactions at the interface between an epoxy resin and cement pastes by several approaches based on XPS and IR spectroscopies, DSC, and inverse gas chromatography (IGC). XPS showed evidence of crosslinking of the polymer at the surface of hardened ...

  3. Scrap tire ashes in portland cement production

    OpenAIRE

    Mónica Adriana Trezza; Alberto Néstor Scian

    2009-01-01

    Scrap tires are not considered harmful waste, but their stocking and disposal are a potential health and environmental risk. Properly controlled calcinations at high temperatures make tire combustion an interesting alternative due to its high calorific power, comparable to that of fuel-oil. Consequently, using them as an alternative combustible material in cement kilns makes it possible to give it a valuable use. However, it remains to be assured whether the impurities added to the clinker th...

  4. Estimating the chloride transport in cement paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Princigallo, A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A method was developed to measure the diffusion coefficient of chloride ions in cement paste based on an analytical solution to Fick’s 2nd law in a cylindrical coordinate system. This natural method yielded diffusivity results within as little as a month. Testing time was reduced by exploiting the three-dimensional inward flux in the specimen. In an attempt to determine the saturation concentration, dense portland cement pastes were exposed to a concentrated chloride solution. The method proved to be useful for exploring cement hydration-induced changes in the diffusion coefficient of cement paste.

    Se ha desarrollado un método para medir el coeficiente de difusión de los iones cloruro en la pasta de cemento, partiendo de una aplicación analítica de la segunda ley de Fick en un sistema de coordinadas cilíndrico. Este método, que es natural, demostró ser capaz de producir resultados de difusividad en tan solo un mes. Se consiguió reducir el tiempo de ensayo mediante el aprovechamiento de la tridimensionalidad del flujo desde el exterior al interior de la probeta. A fin de determinar la concentración de saturación, se sometieron las pastas de cemento Portland a una disolución de cloruros concentrada. Este método resultó ser útil en el estudio de los cambios del coeficiente de difusión de la pasta de cemento provocados por las reacciones de hidratación que tienen lugar en esta.

  5. Conventional and Contemporary Luting Cements: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Ladha, Komal; Verma, Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    Long-term clinical success of fixed prosthodontic restorations is influenced by many factors, one important factor being the selection of an appropriate luting agent. No single luting agent is capable of meeting all the stringent requirements, which is one reason why there is such a wide choice of luting agents currently available from conventional water-based to contemporary adhesive resin cements. Introduction of adhesive resin systems has completely changed the face of fixed prosthodontic ...

  6. Application of Magnetic Force Generator in Cementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The paper introduces a new behavior of the heat treatment technique that is cementation with magnetic force generator (MFHS). The result shows that due to the strong magnetic field action of MFHS on seep means, the energy and activity of active atom are increased, which accelerates interface activating and atoms diffusing, forms action of speed-up seeping. This technique features are Iow in energy consuming, and high in seeping efficiency.

  7. Carbonation of ternary building cementing materials

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Carrasco, Lucía; Torrens Martín, David; Martínez Ramírez, Sagrario

    2012-01-01

    The carbonation processes of ettringite and calcium aluminate hydrates phases developed by hydration of calcium aluminate cement, fly ash and calcium sulphate ternary mixtures have been studied. The hydrated samples were submitted to 4% of CO2 in a carbonation chamber, and were analysed, previous carbonation and after 14 and 90 days of carbonation time, by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction; the developed morphology was performed with the 14 days carbonated samples. The results evide...

  8. Autogenous Phenomena in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2005-01-01

    , som styrer deformationsforløbet. I forbindelse med denne afhandling er disse to fænomener blevet studeret gennem flere år. Den gennemgående tilgang har været at variere en lang række systemparametre – bl.a. temperatur, mikrosilicatilsætning, cementtype og vand/cement-forhold – og via en efterfølgende...

  9. MTA versus Portland cement: review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Naiana Viana Viola; Mário Tanomaru Filho; Paulo Sérgio Cerri

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Both Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement (PC) have been highlighted because of their favorable biological properties, with extensive applications in Endodontics, including the possibility of using into root canal filling. Objective: This article reviews literature related to MTA and PC comparing their physical, chemical and biological properties, as well as their indications. Literature review: Literature reports studies revealing the similarities between these ...

  10. Biological effects: asbestos-cement manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill, H

    1994-08-01

    Fourteen cohorts of asbestos-cement workers have been studied. These studies have demonstrated exposure-response relationships for lung cancer, mesothelioma and asbestosis. For lung cancer, relatively consistent results have been observed, with risk two-fold or less in 13 of the 14 cohorts. Among New Orleans workers, excess risk was restricted to those with X-ray evidence of asbestosis. Workers employed at least 21 years but without X-ray abnormalities, experienced no elevated risk, while those with small opacities (1/0 or higher) had substantially elevated risk (SMR > 400). Exposures in these two groups had been similar. These results suggest that asbestosis may be a necessary precursor for asbestos-induced lung cancer; if so, then the no-threshold model for lung cancer risk is inappropriate since there is general agreement that very low exposures will not result in radiologically detectable lung fibrosis. Further data on this potential link are needed. As in other industries, mesothelioma risk was strongly related to amphibole exposure, especially to crocidolite in asbestos-cement pipe manufacture. A cluster of cases has recently been reported in a family amosite-cement business. Among New Orleans workers, risk of asbestosis was related to cumulative exposure but there was little evidence of risk below 30 f ml-1-years. Progression of asbestosis in these workers was slow, related to past cumulative exposure and not related to lung function decline. Asbestosis risk is therefore not likely to develop in workers under current controlled exposure conditions. PMID:7978975

  11. Leaching tests of cemented organic radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radioisotopes in research, medical and industrial activities generates organic liquid radioactive wastes. At Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) are produced organic liquid wastes from different sources, one of these are the solvent extraction activities, whose the waste volume is the largest one. Therefore a research was carried out to treat them. Several techniques to treat organic liquid radioactive wastes have been evaluated, among them incineration, oxidation processes, alkaline hydrolysis, distillation, absorption and cementation. Laboratory experiments were accomplished to establish the most adequate process in order to obtain qualified products for storage and disposal. Absorption followed by cementation was the procedure used in this study, i.e. absorbent substances were added to the organic liquid wastes before mixing with the cement. Initially were defined the absorbers, and evaluated the formulation in relation to the compressive strength of its products. Bentonite from different suppliers (B and G) and vermiculite in two granulometries (M - medium and F - small) were tested. In order to assess the product quality the specimens were submitted to the leaching test according the Standard ISO 6961 and its results were evaluated. Then they were compared with the values established by Standard CNEN NN 6.09 Acceptance criteria for waste products to be disposed, to verify if they meet the requirements for safely storage and disposal. Through this study the best formulations to treat the organic wastes were established. (author)

  12. Cement encapsulation of uranyl nitrate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During decontamination of the former nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at West Valley, New York, low-level radioactive waste streams are being identified which require disposal in an environmentally acceptable manner. One such waste stream, consisting essentially of uranyl nitrate, has been located in one of the processing cells. A study was conducted on this waste stream to determine if it could be stably encapsulated in cement. First, a recipe was developed for cement-encapsulating this highly acidic waste. Samples were then made to perform waste qualification testing as described in the NRC Branch Technical Position-Waste Form to determine the stability of this waste form. The testing showed that the waste form had a compressive strength much greater than the 345 kPA (50 psi) minimum guideline after room-temperature cure, irradiation, thermal cycling, immersion, and biodegradation. In addition, the encapsulated waste had uranium and cerium leachability index values greater than six, which is the minimum recommended by the NRC position paper. The cement-encapsulated uranyl nitrate waste thus met the NRC stability guidelines for the disposal of Class B and Class C radioactive wastes

  13. A novel cement-based hybrid material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are known to possess exceptional tensile strength, elastic modulus and electrical and thermal conductivity. They are promising candidates for the next-generation high-performance structural and multi-functional composite materials. However, one of the largest obstacles to creating strong, electrically or thermally conductive CNT/CNF composites is the difficulty of getting a good dispersion of the carbon nanomaterials in a matrix. Typically, time-consuming steps of purification and functionalization of the carbon nanomaterial are required. We propose a new approach to grow CNTs/CNFs directly on the surface of matrix particles. As the matrix we selected cement, the most important construction material. We synthesized in a simple one-step process a novel cement hybrid material (CHM), wherein CNTs and CNFs are attached to the cement particles. The CHM has been proven to increase 2 times the compressive strength and 40 times the electrical conductivity of the hardened paste, i.e. concrete without sand.

  14. Tunisian gypsums: Characteristics and use in cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Salah; Bennour, Ali; Chalwati, Youssef; Souidi, Khouloud; Thabet, Manel; Srasra, Ezzedine; Zargouni, Fouad

    2016-09-01

    Gypsum materials of hundred meters thickness and interbedded with marine claystones and limestones from different paleogeographic sectors in the Tunisian territory are studied to assess their suitability for cement production. For this reason, thirty representative samples are analysed by chemical, physical and geotechnical tests. The obtained results for the studied gypsum materials are compared to Tunisian and European norms and with the local cements, currently marketed and which obey international norms. Indeed, for all samples hydraulic modulus HM, silica modulus SM and alumina modulus AM vary from (2.37-2.44), (2.48-2.68) and (1.45-2.5), respectively; whereas the required values for these modulus are (1.5-2.5), (2-3) and (1.5-2.5). The same behavior is observed for mineralogical analyses of C3S, C2S, C3A and C4AF and compressive strength at different ages. Briefly, Tunisia contains important reserves of gypsum scattered and spread over the Tunisian territory and can be used for cement production.

  15. Photon attenuation characteristics of barium enriched cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear radiations are widely used in several applications of nuclear sciences, medicine and industry. In the design and construction of installations housing high intensity radioactive sources and other radiation generating equipment, a variety of shielding materials are used to minimise the exposure to the individuals. Among the materials used, lead is best known for radiation shielding due to its high density and atomic number. However, in construction of radiation facilities, lead in the form of bricks or slabs cannot be substituted for cement as building material. As an alternative, barium enriched cement, which apart from better compressive strength, smoother surface finish and high abrasive resistance, offers adequate shielding to gamma radiations. In the present work, attenuation properties of commercial as well as barium enriched cements have been studied and compared with that of lead for photons of 662 and 1250 keV emitted from 137Cs and 60Co, respectively. Although photon attenuation data can be obtained by mixture rule theoretically, it is necessary to determine this data experimentally before use

  16. Shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudyakov, A. I.; Steshenko, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of research of dispersion-reinforced cement foam concrete with chrysotile asbestos fibers. The goal was to study the patterns of influence of chrysotile asbestos fibers on drying shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete of natural hardening. The chrysotile asbestos fiber contains cylindrical fiber shaped particles with a diameter of 0.55 micron to 8 microns, which are composed of nanostructures of the same form with diameters up to 55 nm and length up to 22 microns. Taking into account the wall thickness, effective reinforcement can be achieved only by microtube foam materials, the so- called carbon nanotubes, the dimensions of which are of power less that the wall pore diameter. The presence of not reinforced foam concrete pores with perforated walls causes a decrease in its strength, decreases the mechanical properties of the investigated material and increases its shrinkage. The microstructure investigation results have shown that introduction of chrysotile asbestos fibers in an amount of 2 % by weight of cement provides the finely porous foam concrete structure with more uniform size closed pores, which are uniformly distributed over the volume. This reduces the shrinkage deformation of foam concrete by 50%.

  17. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement-based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobermorite and xonotlite, two synthetic calcium silicate hydrates, improve the Cs retention of cement matrices for Cs, when incorporated at the 6 to 10% level. A kinetic and mechanistic scheme is presented for the reaction of fine grained, Cs-loaded clinoptilolite with cement. The Magnox waste form reacts quickly with cement, leading to an exchange of carbonate between waste form and cement components. Carbonation of cements leads to a marked improvement in their physical properties of Cs retentivity. Diffusion models are presented for cement systems whose variable parameters can readily be derived from experimental measurements. Predictions about scaled-up behaviour of large immobilized masses are applied to extrapolation of laboratory scale results to full-size masses. (author)

  18. Test on Sensor Effect of Cement Matrix Piezoelectric Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiaoming; LI Zhongxian; DING Yang; LI Zongjin

    2005-01-01

    A novel cement matrix smart piezoelectric composite and its application as sensing element are presented.A cement matrix smart piezoelectric composite piece encapsulated in a cement mortar formed a practical sensor, and it was tested on material test system with cyclic loading.According to the theoretical analysis, the function of the cement matrix piezoelectric sensor output voltage was expressed in terms of the magnitude of the input cyclic loading amplitude and frequency.The curve fitting of gain function that is defined as sensor′s gain factor under different frequencies of input loading was carried out. From the results of curve fitting, it is found that the cement matrix smart piezoelectric composite has a simple relationship between input loading and output voltage.Therefore the cement matrix piezoelectric composite sensor is suitable to be applied in structural health monitoring.

  19. Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2011-11-01

    Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron

  20. EQUIVALENT MODEL OF EXPANSION OF CEMENT MORTAR UNDER SULPHATE EROSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jue Zhu; Minqiang Jiaug; Jiankang Chen

    2008-01-01

    The expansion property of cement mortar under the attack of sulfate ions is studied by experimental and theoretical methods.First,cement mortars are fabricated with the ratio of water to cement of 0.4,0.6,and 0.8.Secondly,the expansion of specimen immerged in sulphate solution is measured at different times.Thirdly,a theoretical model of expansion of cement mortar under sulphate erosion is suggested by virtue of represent volume element method.In this model, the damage evolution due to the interaction between delayed ettringite and cement mortar is taken into account.Finally,the numerical calculation is performed.The numerical and experimental results indicate that the model perfectly describes the expansion of the cement mortar.

  1. Chemical and physical properties of bone cement for vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Liang Lai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral compression fracture is the most common complication of osteoporosis. It may result in persistent severe pain and limited mobility, and significantly impacts the quality of life. Vertebroplasty involves a percutaneous injection of bone cement into the collapsed vertebrae by fluorescent guide. The most commonly used bone cement in percutaneous vertebroplasty is based on the polymerization of methylmethacrylate monomers to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA polymers. However, information on the properties of bone cement is mostly published in the biomaterial sciences literature, a source with which the clinical community is generally unfamiliar. This review focuses on the chemistry of bone cement polymerization and the physical properties of PMMA. The effects of altering the portions and contents of monomer liquid and polymer powders on the setting time, polymerization temperature, and compressive strength of the cement are also discussed. This information will allow spine surgeons to manipulate bone cement characteristics for specific clinical applications and improve safety.

  2. Cement-Based Materials for Nuclear Waste Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Cau-di-Coumes, Céline; Frizon, Fabien; Lorente, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    As the re-emergence of nuclear power as an acceptable energy source on an international basis continues, the need for safe and reliable ways to dispose of radioactive waste becomes ever more critical. The ultimate goal for designing a predisposal waste-management system depends on producing waste containers suitable for storage, transportation and permanent disposal. Cement-Based Materials for Nuclear-Waste Storage provides a roadmap for the use of cementation as an applied technique for the treatment of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes.Coverage includes, but is not limited to, a comparison of cementation with other solidification techniques, advantages of calcium-silicate cements over other materials and a discussion of the long-term suitability and safety of waste packages as well as cement barriers. This book also: Discusses the formulation and production of cement waste forms for storing radioactive material Assesses the potential of emerging binders to improve the conditioning of problemati...

  3. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of reaction between cement and clinoptilolite are elucidated and rate equations containing temperature dependent constants derived for this reaction. Variations in clinoptilolite particle size and their consequences to reactivity are assessed. The presence of pozzolanic agents more reactive than clinoptilolite provides sacrificial agents which are partially effective in lowering the clinoptilolite reactivity. Blast furnace slag-cements have been evaluated and the background literature summarized. Experimental studies of the pore fluid in matured slag-cements show that they provide significantly more immobilization for Cs than Portland cement. The distribution of Sr in cemented waste forms has been examined, and it is shown that most of the chemical immobilization potential in the short term is likely to be associated with the aluminate phases. The chemical and structural nature of these are described. Carbonation studies on real cements are summarized. (author)

  4. The Pore Structure and Hydration Performance of Sulphoaluminate MDF Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Cong-yun; YUAN Run-zhang; LONG Shi-zong

    2004-01-01

    The hydration and pore structure of sulphoaluminate MDF cement were studied by X-ray diffractometer ( XRD ), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimeter ( MIP ) etc. The ex-perimental results indicate that hydration products of the materials are entringites ( Aft ), aluminium hydroxide andCSH (Ⅰ) gel etc. Due to its very low water-cement ratio, hydration function is only confined to the surfaces of ce-ment grains, and there is a lot of sulphoaluminate cement in the hardenite which is unhydrated yet. Hydration re-action was rapidly carried under the condition of the heat-pressing. Therefore cement hydrates Aft, CSH (Ⅰ) andaluminium hydroxide gel fill in pores. The expansibility of Aft makes the porosity of MDF cement lower ( less than1 percent ) and the size of pore smaller (80 percent pore was less than 250A), and enhances its strength.

  5. Settlement Control of Soft Ground using Cement-Ricehusk Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtar M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement is widely used for improvement of soft soils, but financial and environmental concerns are causing genuine concerns to all parties, leading to the quest for alternative and effective stabilizers. Ricehusk is an agricultural waste in Malaysia, commonly disposed of by open burning or dumping in landfills. Considering that the ashes derived from ricehusk are pozzolanic in nature, there is a possibility that a cement-ricehusk mixture could effectively improve soft soils with reduced cement dosage. This study examines the mixture’s effectiveness by monitoring the settlement reduction in a clay soil. Standard oedometer tests were carried out on a soft marine clay sample admixed with cement-ricehusk. Test specimens contained 0-10% cement and 0-5% of ricehusk respectively, and were left to cure for either seven or 28 days. The stabilized specimens were observed to undergo significant reduction in compressibility, verifying the potential of cement-ricehusk as an alternative soft soil stabilizer.

  6. Solidification of Spent Ion Exchange Resin Using ASC Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周耀中; 云桂春; 叶裕才

    2002-01-01

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) have been widely used in nuclear facilities. However, the spent radioactive IERs result in major quantities of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. This article describes a laboratory experimental study on solidification processing of IERs using a new type of cement named ASC cement. The strength of the cementation matrix is in the range of 18-20 MPa (28 d); the loading of the spent IER in the cement-resin matrix is over 45% and leaching rates of 137Cs, 90Sr and 60Co are 7.92×10-5, 5.7×10-6, and 1.19×10-8 cm/d. The results show that ASC cement can be a preferable cementation material for immobilization of radioactive spent IER.

  7. Injectable bioactive calcium-magnesium phosphate cement for bone regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel injectable and degradable calcium-magnesium phosphate cement (CMPC) with rapid-setting characteristic was developed by the introduction of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) into calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The calcium-magnesium phosphate cement prepared under the optimum P/L ratio exhibited good injectability and desired workability. It could set within 10 min at 37 0C in 100% relative humidity and the compressive strength could reach 47 MPa after setting for 48 h, indicating that the prepared cement has relatively high initial mechanical strength. The results of in vitro degradation experiments demonstrated the good degradability of the injectable CMPC, and its degradation rate occurred significantly faster than that of pure CPC in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. It can be concluded that the novel injectable calcium-magnesium phosphate cement is highly promising for a wide variety of clinical applications, especially for the development of minimally invasive techniques.

  8. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement-based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model studies of the behaviour of cement systems have been advanced by considering the nature of the phases formed during hydration and deriving pH-composition models for the CaO-SiO2-H2O system. Preliminary results of Esub(h) measurements are also reported. Leach tests on Sr from cements are interpreted in terms of Sr retention mechanisms. Present results indicate that the aluminate phases in OPC contribute to the chemical retentivity. Studies on cement-clinoptilolite reactions, made using coarse grained clinoptilolite are reported: ferrierite also reacts chemically with cement. Two critical surveys are presented, together with new data: one on the potential of blended cements, the other on cement durability in CO2-containing environments. (author)

  9. Effect of Cement Type on Autogenous Deformation of Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietro, Lura; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, measurements of non-evaporable water content, chemical shrinkage, autogenous deformation, internal relative humidity (RH), pore solution composition, and early-age elastic modulus are presented and discussed. All experiments were performed on Portland cement and blast-furnace slag ......, taking into account the influence of the dissolved salts in the pore solution, 2) the BFS cement paste studied shows pronounced self-desiccation and self-desiccation shrinkage, mainly caused by its very fine pore structure.......In this paper, measurements of non-evaporable water content, chemical shrinkage, autogenous deformation, internal relative humidity (RH), pore solution composition, and early-age elastic modulus are presented and discussed. All experiments were performed on Portland cement and blast-furnace slag...

  10. Characteristics of Bamboo Leaf Ash Blended Cement Paste and Mortar

    OpenAIRE

    Umoh A.A.; Odesola I.

    2015-01-01

    The use of bamboo leaf ash as cement supplement can contribute to reduction in cost and environmental hazard associated with cement production as well as waste pollution caused by the littered bamboo leaves. Therefore, the characteristics of cement paste and mortar incorporating bamboo leaf ash were investigated. The results of the physical properties of the pastes were within the requirements stipulated by relevant standards while that of the mortar cubes indicated that the compressive stren...

  11. Environmental Efficiency Analysis of Listed Cement Enterprises in China

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Zhang; Hong Fang; Junjie Wu; Damian Ward

    2016-01-01

    China’s cement production has been the highest worldwide for decades and contributes significant environmental pollution. Using a non-radical DEA model with slacks-based measure (SBM), this paper analyzes the environmental efficiency of China’s listed cement companies. The results suggest that the average mean of the environmental efficiency for the listed cement enterprises shows a decreasing trend in 2012 and 2013. There is a significant imbalance in environmental efficiency in these firms ...

  12. Municipal solid waste ash as a cement raw material substitute

    OpenAIRE

    Somnuk Tangtermsirikul; Pichaya Rachdawong; Kritsada Sisomphon

    2000-01-01

    An investigation of using municipal solid waste (MSW) ash as a cement raw material substitute was performed to evaluate the potential use of ash in construction. The use of incineratior ash in cement production would not only get rid of the ash, but also alleviate many environmental problems, for example, reducing raw materials required for cement production, reducing CO2 emission into the atmosphere, and reducing landfill space requirement for the residue ash disposal. The metallic oxide con...

  13. Cancer Mortality and Incidence in Cement Industry Workers in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Kim, Tae-Woo; Jang, Seung Hee; Ryu, Hyang-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Cement contains hexavalent chromium, which is a human carcinogen. However, its effect on cancer seems inconclusive in epidemiologic studies. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to elucidate the association between dust exposure in the cement industry and cancer occurrence. Methods The cohorts consisted of male workers in 6 Portland cement factories in Korea. Study subjects were classified into five groups by job: quarry, production, maintenance, laboratory, and office wo...

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF ORTHOPHOSPHATES ON THE PROPERTIES OF PORTLAND CEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Antanas Kaziliunas

    2014-01-01

    The article continues the research of input reduction of phosphogypsum preparation for the production of building materials. Desiccated apatite (2.18 % P2O5 in gypsum) makes the least changes in the properties of Portland cement: it prolongs the cement setting times and reduces the compressive strength about 10 %. The apatite formation in the pastes of soluble orthophosphate-cement occurs during the formation of X-ray amorphous colloidal calcium orthophosphate hydrate, which prolo...

  15. INTERACTION OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED WATER WITH THE CEMENT BINDING AGENT

    OpenAIRE

    Gujumdzhjan Perch Pogosovich; Vetrenko Tat'jana Grigor'evna; Ladaev Nikolaj Mihajlovich; Zinov'eva Ekaterina Vital'evna

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the procedure of interaction between the water and the particles of the cement binding agent, if subjected to high-speed processing inside an intensive mixing device that represents a hydrodynamic stirrer composed of a rotor and variable section turbines. The proposed method of modification (mechanical activation) of the cement and water suspension makes it possible to reduce the cost of concrete due to reduction of the cement consumption rate. The research of strength-re...

  16. Environmental health survey in asbestos cement sheets manufacturing industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari F; Bihari V; Rastogi S; Ashquin M; Ahmad I

    2007-01-01

    About 673 small-scale asbestos mining and milling facilities and 33 large - scale asbestos manufacturing plants, (17 asbestos-cement product manufacturing plants and 16 other than asbestos-cement product plants) are situated in India. The present study reveals the exposure of commercial asbestos (chrysotile) in the occupational as well as ambient air environment of the asbestos-cement (AC) sheets industry using membrane filter method of Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS). The fibre concentratio...

  17. Econometric Model for Cement demand and supply in Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Melitón Ramirez Mattos

    2005-01-01

    This document introduce the obtained results of the econometric estimation of cement demand and supply in Bolivia considered as a simultaneous equations model, based on two equations, one for the demand and another for the supply. The objective of this study is to quantify the forces that affect the cement market in the period understood among the years 1994 up to 2003. Five models of simultaneous equations were considered, which are based on the respective linear functions of cement demand a...

  18. A positron annihilation study on the hydration of cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy experiments were carried out in various ordinary Portland cement pastes, in an attempt to monitor the porosity of the pastes. It is found that positronium intensity is well correlated to the time evolution of the total porosity and it is influenced by the water-to-cement ratio. This parameter is also sensitive to the delayed hydration process induced by adding methanol to the water-cement mixture

  19. Disintegration of Bone Cement by Continuous and Pulsating Water Jet

    OpenAIRE

    S. Hloch; Foldyna, J.; Sitek, L. (Libor); M. Zeleňák; Hlaváček, P.; Hvizdoš, P.; Kloc, J.; Monka, P.; Monková, K.; Kozak, D.; Magurová, D.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the study of using continuous water jet and ultrasonic pulsating water jet for bone cement disintegration. Bone-cement Pallacos R+G (manually mixed) was disintegrated ex-vivo. Mechanical properties of the bone cement were determined by nano-indentation. Factors employed in evaluation were pressure (40, 80, 120) MPa and traverse speed for continuous water jet, pressure (8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 20) MPa and orifice type (flat, circular) for ultrasonic pulsating water jet. Depth p...

  20. Dry-grinded ultrafine cements hydration. physicochemical and microstructural characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Foteini Kontoleontos; Petros Tsakiridis; Apostolos Marinos; Nikolaos Katsiotis; Vasileios Kaloidas; Margarita Katsioti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present research work was the evaluation of the physicochemical and microstructural properties of two ultrafine cements, produced by dry grinding of a commercial CEM I 42.5N cement. The effect of grinding on particle size distribution was determined by laser scattering analyzer. All cements were tested for initial and final setting times, consistency of standard paste, soundness, flow of normal mortar and compressive strengths after 1, 2, 7 and 28 days. The effect of the finene...

  1. Modifications induced by adding natural zeolitic pozzolans to cement paste

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Varela, M. T.; Martínez-Ramírez, S.; Gener, M.; Vázquez, T.

    2005-01-01

    Volcanic pozzolans owe their pozzolanic activity chiefly to the presence of vitreous or zeolitic material rich in SiO2, and Al20y compounds that react with the portlandite produced during cement hydration to generate amorphous gels with cementitious properties. The present study analyzes the modifications taking place in the composition, structure and micro structure of the hydra ted cement paste when 20% of the cement by we...

  2. Influence of Pore Structure on Compressive Strength of Cement Mortar

    OpenAIRE

    Haitao Zhao; Qi Xiao; Donghui Huang; Shiping Zhang

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement r...

  3. Sandstone cementation and its geomorphic and hydraulic implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamovič, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 44, - (2005), s. 21-24. ISSN 1682-5519. [Sandstone Landscapes in Europe. Past, Present and Future. International Conference on Sandstone Landscapes /2./. Vianden, 25.05.2005-28.05.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3013302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : sandstone * paleohydraulics * geomorphology * siliceous cement * carbonate cement * ferruginous cement * sandstone landsforms Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  4. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents

    OpenAIRE

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cement...

  5. Norm in coal, fly ash and cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal is technologically important materials being used for power generation and its cinder (fly ash) is used in manufacturing of bricks, sheets, cement, land filling etc. 222Rn (radon) and its daughters are the most important radioactive and potentially hazardous elements, which are released in the environment from the naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) present in coal, fly ash and cement. Thus it is very important to carry out radioactivity measurements in coal, fly ash and cement from the health and hygiene point of view. Samples of coal and fly ash from different thermal power stations in northern India and various fly ash using establishments and commercially available cement samples (O.P.C. and P.P.C.) were collected and analyzed for radon concentration and exhalation rates. For the measurements, alpha sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detectors were used. The radon concentration varied from 147 Bq/m3 to 443 Bq/m3, the radium concentration varied from 1.5 to 4.5 Bq/kg and radon exhalation rate varied from 11.8 mBq.kg-1.h-1 to 35.7 mBq.kg-1.h-1 for mass exhalation rate and from 104.5 mBq.m-2.h-1 to 314.8 mBq.m-2.h-1 for surface exhalation rate in coal samples. The radon concentration varied from 214 Bq/m3 to 590 Bq/m3, the radium concentration varied from 1.0 to 2.7 Bq/kg and radon exhalation rate varied from 7.8 mBq.kg-1.h-1 to 21.6 mBq.kg-1.h-1 for mass exhalation rate and from 138 mBq m-2h-1 to 380.6 mBq.m-2.h-1 for surface exhalation rate in fly ash samples. The radon concentration varied from 157.62 Bq/m3 to 1810.48 Bq/m3, the radium concentration varied from 0.76 Bq/kg to 8.73 Bq/kg and radon exhalation rate varied from 6.07 mBq.kg-1.hr-1 to 69.81 mBq.kg-1.hr-1 for mass exhalation rate and from 107.10 mBq.m-2.hr-1 to 1230.21 mBq.m-2.hr-1 for surface exhalation rate in different cement samples. The values were found higher in P.P.C. samples than in O.P.C. samples. (authors)

  6. Influence of relationship water/cement upon the processing of cements with pozzolana in standard mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gener Rizo, M.

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The processing of standard mortar is completed following different methods in accordance with the country, but they exist two fundamental tendecies, the ISO and the ASTM. The cuban norm for mechanic-physic tests is based in ISO, and so they use a constant relationship water/cement in the processing of standard mortar a great problem concerning the cement users when they tested those mixed with puzzolanes, because they don't take care of the bigger water needs of those materials. In this work we present an study of the behaviour of Pozzolanic Portland cements (PP-250 elaborates with a fix and changeable relationship water/cement, obtained starting from the fluidity of the pure Portland cement. (P-350 The results obtained shows that the mechanical resistance decreased in cement mortars PP-250 realised with changeable relationship water/cement. So we recommend the adoption of an optional procedure to elaborate a quality mortar with pozzolana cements.

    La elaboración del mortero normalizado se realiza internacionalmente por diferentes métodos, pero existen dos tendencias fundamentales, la enunciada por ISO y por ASTM. La norma cubana de ensayos físico-mecánicos de cemento se basa en la norma ISO, por lo que para la elaboración del mortero normalizado se utiliza una relación agua/cemento constante. Esto ha provocado discrepancias con los usuarios del cemento, especialmente cuando se ensayan los cementos que contienen puzolanas, ya que se plantea que no se tiene en cuenta la mayor demanda de agua de estos materiales. En el presente trabajo se presenta un estudio del comportamiento de cementos Portland Puzolánicos (PP-250 elaborados con una relación agua/ cemento fija y variable, lograda a partir de la fluidez de la pasta de cemento Portland puro (P-350. Los resultados obtenidos indican que se producen disminuciones en la resistencia mecánica en los morteros de cemento PP-250 elaborados con agua/ cemento variable y recomienda la

  7. The interaction between nuclear waste glass and cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between simulated reference waste glasses SON68 and SM539 and cement has been studied in suspensions of Ordinary Portland Cement and synthetic young cement water with pH 13.5 at 30 C. The cement appears to trigger glass dissolution by consumption of glass matrix components. This leads to fast glass dissolution at a constant rate with formation of a porous gel layer on the glass. This is probably due mostly to the reaction of Si from the glass with portlandite, forming CSH phases. After consumption of the portlandite, the glass alteration rate is expected to decrease. (authors)

  8. Study on the hardening mechanism of cement asphalt binder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The hydration and hardening mechanism of cement asphalt binder(CAB) was studied.The early hydration process,hydration products and paste microstructure of CAB made by Portland cement and anionic asphalt emulsion were investigated by calorimetry,X-ray diffraction,and environmental scanning electron microscopy.The early hydration process of CAB can be characterized as 5 stages similar to those of Portland cement.There is no chemical reaction detected between cement and asphalt,hence no new hydration products other than those of Portland cement are produced.The hardening of CAB begins with the hydration of cement.When the hydration of cement comes into the acceleration period and its exothermic rate comes to the maximum,the coalescence of asphalt particles in asphalt emulsion is triggered.In the hardened system of CAB,it was found that the hydration products of cement form the skeleton and are covered by the continuous asphalt film.They formed an interpenetrating network system.The emulsifiers in the asphalt emulsion may retard the hydration process of cement.

  9. Soft X-ray Microscopy of Green Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, P. J. M.; Mancio, M.; Kirchheim, A. P.; Chae, R.; Ha, J.; Fischer, P.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2011-09-01

    The present status of the cement and concrete industry is not sustainable. The production of Portland cement is responsible for 7% of the CO2 emissions in the world and existing reinforced concrete infrastructure is deteriorating at a fast pace. The change in the existing technology requires new developments in our understanding of the nanostructure of hydration products and the complex deterioration reactions. We have been developing an elaborate research program to advance the existing cement and concrete science by characterizing its nanostructure by synchrotron radiation. A new generation of green cements is being studied using high-resolution soft x-ray microscopy at the nano-level.

  10. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement

  11. Hydration of Portoguese cements, measurement and modelling of chemical shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Geiker, Mette Rica; Figueiras, Joaquim A.

    2008-01-01

    Development of cement hydration was studied by measuring the chemical shrinkage of pastes. Five types of Portuguese Portland cement were used in cement pastes with . Chemical shrinkage was measured by gravimetry and dilatometry. In gravimeters results were recorded automatically during at least...... seven days, dilatometers were manually recorded during at least 56 days. The dispersion model was applied to fit chemical shrinkage results and to estimate the maximum (or ultimate) value for calculation of degree of hydration. Except for a pure Portland cement best fits were obtained by the general...

  12. DEVELOPING A NEW GENERATION OF HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPOSITE CEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper proposed a new generation of high performance composite cement which is designed according to the optimization of composition and structure of cement paste and is manufactured by blending the different components with special composite techniques. Each of these components has its different special property, and should be compatible with each other and match each other, and the properties of them are complementary mutually. At present, such kind of high performance composite cement can be manufactured with high reactivity cement clinker, ground granulated blast-furnace slag, high grade fly ash, silica fume etc.

  13. Development and clinical trial of a novel bioactive bone cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Strontium(Sr)and related compounds have become more attractive in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.Previously,we developed a novel bioactive bone cement which is mainly composed of strontium-containing hydroxyapatite(Sr-HA)filler and bisphenol A diglycidylether dimethacrylate(Bis-GMA)resin.This bone cement is superior to conventional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)bone cement in bioactivity,biocompatibility,and osseointegration.It also has shown sufficient mechanical strength properties for its use in percutaneous vertebroplasty(PVP)and total hip replacement(THR).In this paper,we review the in vitro,in vivo and clinical evidence for the effectiveness of this bioactive bone cement.

  14. Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

    2012-12-01

    The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cement’s curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and –toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS

  15. Magnesia Modification of Alkali-Activated Slag Fly Ash Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Weiguo; WANG Yiheng; ZHANG Tao; ZHOU Mingkai; LI Jiasheng; CUI Xiaoyu

    2011-01-01

    A new type of magnesia modification alkali-activated cement was prepared, the strength, setting time, shrinkage ratio and cracking behavior, as well as the composition and structure of the hydration product were investigated. The results indicate that the setting time of this cement is similar to that of the ordinary commercial cements; its strength reaches the standard of 42.5 degree cement, its cracking resistance has been remarkably improved because of the micro-aggregate effect of fly ash and shrinkage compensating of magnesia.

  16. Soft X-ray Microscopy of Green Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of the cement and concrete industry is not sustainable. The production of Portland cement is responsible for 7% of the CO2 emissions in the world and existing reinforced concrete infrastructure is deteriorating at a fast pace. The change in the existing technology requires new developments in our understanding of the nanostructure of hydration products and the complex deterioration reactions. We have been developing an elaborate research program to advance the existing cement and concrete science by characterizing its nanostructure by synchrotron radiation. A new generation of green cements is being studied using high-resolution soft x-ray microscopy at the nano-level.

  17. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% Ordinary Portland Cement 84% gg Blast Furnace Slag, 6% Microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This information was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  18. Interactions between cement grouts and sulphate bearing ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of mixtures of Ordinary Portland cement and blastfurnace slag or pulverized fuel ash, exposed to a sulphate-bearing ground water at different temperatures and pressures, were investigated in order to assess the long term durability of cements for encapsulating radioactive waste and backfilling a repository. The effect of the ground water on the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the cements is minimal. Calcite and C-S-H are present in all the samples and are durable throughout the test. Dimensional changes in the cements during setting and curing may cause weaknesses in the materials which may increase the effects of a percolating ground water. (author)

  19. Cementing and formation damage; Cimentacao e dano a formacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, David Soares de [PETROBRAS, BA (Brazil). Distrito de Perfuracao da Bahia. Div. de Tecnicas e Operacoes

    1994-07-01

    This work presents a general perspective on cementing and formation damage. Few relative experiments to the damage to the formation, that they involve the casing activity and cementing, consider all the factors that affect these operations. So that she can analyze the contribution of a primary cementing has in the formation damage , it should be considered, also, the contribution of the drilling fluid and of the operation of the perforation. With base in experimental data of several accomplished studies, it can be concluded that a primary cementing has small, or any, contribution in the decrease of the productivity of an oil well.

  20. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: huanzhou@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement.

  1. Analytical method to estimate resin cement diffusion into dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Ferraz, Larissa Cristina; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; de Oliveira, Bruna Medeiros Bertol; Neto, Antonio Medina; Sato, Fracielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the diffusion of two resin luting agents (resin cements) into dentin, with the aim of presenting an analytical method for estimating the thickness of the diffusion zone. Class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars (n=9). Indirect composite inlays were luted into the cavities with either a self-adhesive or a self-etch resin cement. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and the cement-dentin interface was analyzed by using micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy. Evolution of peak intensities of the Raman bands, collected from the functional groups corresponding to the resin monomer (C–O–C, 1113 cm-1) present in the cements, and the mineral content (P–O, 961 cm-1) in dentin were sigmoid shaped functions. A Boltzmann function (BF) was then fitted to the peaks encountered at 1113 cm-1 to estimate the resin cement diffusion into dentin. The BF identified a resin cement-dentin diffusion zone of 1.8±0.4 μm for the self-adhesive cement and 2.5±0.3 μm for the self-etch cement. This analysis allowed the authors to estimate the diffusion of the resin cements into the dentin. Fitting the MRS data to the BF contributed to and is relevant for future studies of the adhesive interface.

  2. Use of residual wood in the cement manufacturing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This PowerPoint presentation discussed the use of wood residuals in the cement manufacturing process. An outline of the cement manufacturing process was presented. Raw materials are combined in exact proportions to create a chemically correct mix, which is then pulverized in a mill. The mix is then burned in a kiln. The end product is cooled to form the pellet sized material known as clinker, which is then milled to form cement. The combustion and destruction characteristics of a cement kiln were presented. Modern cement kilns require approximately 3.2 Gj of energy to produce one tonne of cement. It was noted that wood residuals do not contain halogens, sulfur or other materials detrimental to the cement manufacturing process. Possible injection points for kilns were presented. Various studies have shown that wood residuals can be safely used as a fuel in the manufacture of cement. Environmental benefits derived from using wood included the complete destruction of organic portions, and the fact that residual ash becomes an indistinguishable part of the final product. It was concluded that wood residual materials are a satisfactory alternative fuel for the cement industry. tabs., figs

  3. Symptoms, ventilatory function, and environmental exposures in Portland cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Abrons, H L; Petersen, M R; Sanderson, W T; Engelberg, A L; Harber, P

    1988-01-01

    Data on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function were obtained for 2736 Portland cement plant workers and 755 controls. Personal dust samples contained a geometric mean concentration of 0.57 mg/m3 for respirable dust and 2.90 mg/m3 for total dust. Cement workers and controls had similar prevalences of symptoms, except that 5.4% of the cement workers had dyspnoea compared with 2.7% of the controls. The mean pulmonary function indices were similar for the two groups. Among cement plant worke...

  4. Curing time effect on the fraction of 137Cs from cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite clay composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plećaš Ilija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the safety of disposal of radioactive waste material in cement, curing conditions and time of leaching radionuclides 137Cs have been studied. Leaching tests in cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix, were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. Curing conditions and curing time prior to commencing the leaching test are critically important in leach studies since the extent of hydration of the cement materials determines how much hydration product develops and whether it is available to block the pore network, thereby reducing leaching. Incremental leaching rates Rn[cm/d] of 137Cs from cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix after 240 days were measured. The results presented in this paper are examples of results obtained in a 30-year concrete testing project which will influence the design of the engineer trenches system for future central Serbian radioactive waste storing centre.

  5. Correlation between the cytotoxicity of self-etching resin cements and the degree of conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís FSA Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicate that photopolymerization of dual cure self-etching resin cements decrease toxic effects on cell culture. Adequate photopolymerization should be considered during cementation when using dual polymerization self-etching resin cements.

  6. Influence of Temporary Cements on the Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to the Metal Coronal Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; De Aguiar, Caio Rocha; Jacob, Eduardo Santana; Macedo, Ana Paula; De Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Antunes, Rossana Pereira de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluated the influence of temporary cements (eugenol-containing [EC] or eugenol-free [EF]) on the tensile strength of Ni-Cr copings fixed with self-adhesive resin cement to the metal coronal substrate. Thirty-six temporary crowns were divided into 4 groups (n=9) according to the temporary cements: Provy, Dentsply (eugenol-containing), Temp Cem, Vigodent (eugenol-containing), RelyX Temp NE, 3M ESPE (eugenol-free) and Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corp (eugenol-free). After 24 h of temporary cementation, tensile strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and 1 kN (100 kgf) load cell. Afterwards, the cast metal cores were cleaned by scraping with curettes and air jet. Thirty-six Ni-Cr copings were cemented to the cast metal cores with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Tensile strength tests were performed again. In the temporary cementation, Temp Bond NE (12.91 ± 2.54) and Temp Cem (12.22 ± 2.96) presented the highest values of tensile strength and were statistically similar to each other (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference (pcementation of Ni-Cr copings with self-adhesive resin cement. In addition, Temp Cem (120.68 ± 48.27) and RelyX Temp NE (103.04 ± 26.09) showed intermediate tensile strength values. In conclusion, the Provy eugenol-containing temporary cement was associated with the highest bond strength among the resin cements when Ni-Cr copings were cemented to cast metal cores. However, the eugenol cannot be considered a determining factor in increased bond strength, since the other tested cements (1 eugenol-containing and 2 eugenol-free) were similar. PMID:26963209

  7. A Comparative Evaluation of Microleakage of Glass Ionomer Cement and Chitosan-modified Glass Ionomer Cement: An in vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Deena; Thomas, Abi Mathew; Chopra, Saroj; Koshy, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To do a comparative study of microleakage of glass ionomer cement (GIC) and chitosan modified glass ionomer cement and evaluate which exhibited lesser microleakage. Materials and methods: Sixty freshly extracted sound primary molar teeth were obtained. Two groups of samples were created for the study which comprised of group I (glass ionomer cement—GIC) and group II (Chitosan modified glass ionomer cement). Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces. All the too...

  8. Percutaneous bone cement refixation of aseptically loose hip prostheses: the effect of interface tissue removal on injected cement volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malan, Daniel F. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Intelligent Systems, Delft (Netherlands); Valstar, Edward R. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); Nelissen, Rob G.H.H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    To quantify whether injected cement volumes differed between two groups of patients who underwent experimental minimally invasive percutaneous cement injection procedures to stabilize aseptically loose hip prostheses. One patient group was preoperatively treated using gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy to remove fibrous interface tissue, while the other group received no preoperative treatment. It was hypothesized that cement penetration may have been inhibited by the presence of fibrous interface tissue in periprosthetic lesions. We analyzed 17 patients (14 female, 3 male, ages 72-91, ASA categories 2-4) who were treated at our institution. Osteolytic lesions and injected cement were manually delineated using 3D CT image segmentation, and the deposition of injected cement was quantified. Patients who underwent preoperative gene-directed enzyme therapy to remove fibrous tissue exhibited larger injected cement volumes than those who did not. The observed median increase in injected cement volume was 6.8 ml. Higher cement leakage volumes were also observed for this group. We conclude that prior removal of periprosthetic fibrous interface tissue may enable better cement flow and penetration. This might lead to better refixation of aseptically loosened prostheses. (orig.)

  9. Percutaneous bone cement refixation of aseptically loose hip prostheses: the effect of interface tissue removal on injected cement volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To quantify whether injected cement volumes differed between two groups of patients who underwent experimental minimally invasive percutaneous cement injection procedures to stabilize aseptically loose hip prostheses. One patient group was preoperatively treated using gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy to remove fibrous interface tissue, while the other group received no preoperative treatment. It was hypothesized that cement penetration may have been inhibited by the presence of fibrous interface tissue in periprosthetic lesions. We analyzed 17 patients (14 female, 3 male, ages 72-91, ASA categories 2-4) who were treated at our institution. Osteolytic lesions and injected cement were manually delineated using 3D CT image segmentation, and the deposition of injected cement was quantified. Patients who underwent preoperative gene-directed enzyme therapy to remove fibrous tissue exhibited larger injected cement volumes than those who did not. The observed median increase in injected cement volume was 6.8 ml. Higher cement leakage volumes were also observed for this group. We conclude that prior removal of periprosthetic fibrous interface tissue may enable better cement flow and penetration. This might lead to better refixation of aseptically loosened prostheses. (orig.)

  10. Pullout strength of pedicle screws with cement augmentation in severe osteoporosis: A comparative study between cannulated screws with cement injection and solid screws with cement pre-filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yen-Chen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pedicle screws with PMMA cement augmentation have been shown to significantly improve the fixation strength in a severely osteoporotic spine. However, the efficacy of screw fixation for different cement augmentation techniques, namely solid screws with retrograde cement pre-filling versus cannulated screws with cement injection through perforation, remains unknown. This study aimed to determine the difference in pullout strength between conical and cylindrical screws based on the aforementioned cement augmentation techniques. The potential loss of fixation upon partial screw removal after screw insertion was also examined. Method The Taguchi method with an L8 array was employed to determine the significance of design factors. Conical and cylindrical pedicle screws with solid or cannulated designs were installed using two different screw augmentation techniques: solid screws with retrograde cement pre-filling and cannulated screws with cement injection through perforation. Uniform synthetic bones (test block simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a platform for each screw design and cement augmentation technique. Pedicle screws at full insertion and after a 360-degree back-out from full insertion were then tested for axial pullout failure using a mechanical testing machine. Results The results revealed the following 1 Regardless of the screw outer geometry (conical or cylindrical, solid screws with retrograde cement pre-filling exhibited significantly higher pullout strength than did cannulated screws with cement injection through perforation (p = 0.0129 for conical screws; p = 0.005 for cylindrical screws. 2 For a given cement augmentation technique (screws without cement augmentation, cannulated screws with cement injection or solid screws with cement pre-filling, no significant difference in pullout strength was found between conical and cylindrical screws (p >0.05. 3 Cement infiltration into the open cell of

  11. Radiobiological waste treatment-ashing treatment and immobilization with cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of the study on the treatment of radioactive biological waste in the China Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP). The possibility of radiobiological waste treatment was investigated by using a RAF-3 type rapid ashing apparatus together with the immobilization of the resulted ash. This rapid ashing apparatus, developed by CIRP, is usually used for pretreatment of samples prior to chemical analysis and physical measurements. The results show that it can ash 3 kg of animal carcasses a batch, the ashing time is 5-7 h and the ash content is less than 4 wt%. The ashing temperature not exceeding 450 deg. C was used without any risk of high losses of radionuclides. The ash from the rapid ashing apparatus was demonstrated to be immobilized with ordinary silicate cement. The optimum cement/ash/water formulation of the cemented waste form was 35 ± 5 wt% cement, 29 ± 2 wt% water, and 36 ± 6 wt% ash. The performance of the waste form was in compliance with the technical requirements except for impact resistance. Mixing additives in immobilization formulations can improve the performance of the cemented ash waste form. The additives chosen were DH4A flow promoter as a cement additive and vermiculite or zeolite as a supplement. The recommended formulation, i.e. an improved formulation of the cemented ash waste form is that additives DH4A flow promoter and vermiculite (or zeolite) are added on the ground of optimum cement/ash/water formulation of the cemented waste form, the dosage of water, DH4A and vermiculite (or zeolite) is 70 wt%, 0.5 wt% and ≤ 5 wt% of the cement dosage, respectively. The cemented ash waste forms obtained meet all the requirements for disposal. (author). 12 refs, 7 figs, 13 tabs

  12. Solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in masonry cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portland cements are widely used as solidification agents for low-level radioactive wastes. However, it is known that boric acid wastes, as generated at pressurized water reactors (PWR's) are difficult to solidify using ordinary portland cements. Waste containing as little as 5 wt % boric acid inhibits the curing of the cement. For this purpose, the suitability of masonry cement was investigated. Masonry cement, in the US consists of 50 wt % slaked lime (CaOH2) and 50 wt % of portland type I cement. Addition of boric acid in molar concentrations equal to or less than the molar concentration of the alkali in the cement eliminates any inhibiting effects. Accordingly, 15 wt % boric acid can be satisfactorily incorporated into masonry cement. The suitability of masonry cement for the solidification of sodium sulfate wastes produced at boiling water reactors (BWR's) was also investigated. It was observed that although sodium sulfate - masonry cement waste forms containing as much as 40 wt % Na2SO4 can be prepared, waste forms with more than 7 wt % sodium sulfate undergo catastrophic failure when exposed to an aqueous environment. It was determined by x-ray diffraction that in the presence of water, the sulfate reacts with hydrated calcium aluminate to form calcium aluminum sulfate hydrate (ettringite). This reaction involves a volume increase resulting in failure of the waste form. Formulation data were identified to maximize volumetric efficiency for the solidification of boric acid and sodium sulfate wastes. Measurement of some of the waste form properties relevant to evaluating the potential for the release of radionuclides to the environment included leachability, compression strengths and chemical interactions between the waste components and masonry cement. 15 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs

  13. Thermodynamic modelling of alkali-activated slag cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A thermodynamic modelling analysis of alkali-activated slag cements is presented. • Thermodynamic database describes zeolites, alkali carbonates, C–(N–)A–S–H gel. • Updated thermodynamic model for Mg–Al layered double hydroxides. • Description of phase assemblages in Na2SiO3- and Na2CO3-activated slag cements. • Phase diagrams for NaOH-activated and Na2SiO3-activated slag cements are simulated. - Abstract: This paper presents a thermodynamic modelling analysis of alkali-activated slag-based cements, which are high performance and potentially low-CO2 binders relative to Portland cement. The thermodynamic database used here contains a calcium (alkali) aluminosilicate hydrate ideal solid solution model (CNASH-ss), alkali carbonate and zeolite phases, and an ideal solid solution model for a hydrotalcite-like Mg–Al layered double hydroxide phase. Simulated phase diagrams for NaOH- and Na2SiO3-activated slag-based cements demonstrate the high stability of zeolites and other solid phases in these materials. Thermodynamic modelling provides a good description of the chemical compositions and types of phases formed in Na2SiO3-activated slag cements over the most relevant bulk chemical composition range for these cements, and the simulated volumetric properties of the cement paste are consistent with previously measured and estimated values. Experimentally determined and simulated solid phase assemblages for Na2CO3-activated slag cements were also found to be in good agreement. These results can be used to design the chemistry of alkali-activated slag-based cements, to further promote the uptake of this technology and valorisation of metallurgical slags

  14. Experimental evaluation of cement materials for solidifying sodium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-level liquid waste containing sodium nitrate is planned to be transformed to salt block by evaporation with sodium borate in the Low-level Waste Treatment Facility (LWTF), then salt block will be stored temporally. It should be important to investigate the method how to treat these liquid waste suitable to final disposal criteria that will be settled in future. Cement solidification is one of promising candidates because it has been achieved as the solidification material for the shallow land disposal. The research was conducted to evaluate applicability of various cement materials to solidification of sodium nitrate. The following cements were tested. Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). Portland Blast-furnace Slag Cement; C type (PBFSC). Alkali Activated Slag Cement (AASC, supplied by JGC). The test results are as follows; (1) AASC is characterized by a high sodium nitrate loading (-70 wt%) compared with other types of cement material. High fluidity of the cement paste, high strength after solidification, and minimization of free water on the cement paste are achieved under all test conditions. (2) OOPC and PBFSC produced free water on the cement paste in the early days and delayed the hardening period. 3 or more days are required to harden evan with 30 wt% content of sodium nitrate. (3) Though PBFSC contains blast furnace slag similar to AASC, there is no advantage prior to OPC. To design an ideal cement conditioning system for sodium nitrate liquid waste in the LWTF, the further studies are necessary such as the simulated waste test, Kd test, pilot test, and layout design. (author)

  15. UTILIZATION OF AGARWOOD DISTILLATION WASTE IN OILWELL CEMENT AND ITS EFFECT ON FREE WATER AND POROSITY

    OpenAIRE

    Arina Sauki; Muhammad Hazman Md. Shahid; Ku Halim Ku Hamid; Azlinda Azizi; Siti Khatijah Jamaludin; Tengku Amran Tengku Mohd; Nur Hashimah Alias

    2013-01-01

    The intent of this research is to utilize the waste produced by distillation process of Agarwood oil and convert it into a profitable oilwell cement additive. Common problem during oilwell cementing is free wáter separation. This problem could weaken cement at the top, gas migration problem and non uniform density of cement slurry that are even worst in cementing deviated well. Another concern on cementing design is the porosity of the hardened cement. If the cement is too porous, it can lead...

  16. [Release amount of heavy metals in cement product from co-processing waste in cement kiln].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Fei; Huang, Qi-Fei; Zhang, Xia; Yang, Yu; Wang, Qi

    2009-05-15

    Clinker was produced by Simulating cement calcination test, and concrete samples were also prepared according to national standard GB/T 17671-1999. Long-term cumulative release amount of heavy metals in cement product from co-processing waste in cement kiln was researched through leaching test which refers to EA NEN 7371 and EA NEN 7375, and one-dimensional diffusion model which is on the base of Fick diffusion law. The results show that availabilities of heavy metals are lower than the total amounts in concrete. The diffusion coefficients of heavy metals are different (Cr > As > Ni > Cd). During 30 years service, the cumulative release amounts of Cr, As, Ni and Cd are 4.43 mg/kg, 0.46 mg/kg, 1.50 mg/kg and 0.02 mg/kg, respectively, and the ratios of release which is the division of cumulative release amount and availability are 27.0%, 18.0%, 3.0% and 0.2%, respectively. The most important influence factor of cumulative release amount of heavy metal is the diffusion coefficient, and it is correlative to cumulative release amount. The diffusion coefficient of Cr and As should be controlled exactly in the processing of input the cement-kiln. PMID:19558131

  17. Performance of Fiber Cement Slurry in the Oil and Gas Well Cementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BuYuhuan; WangRuihe; ChengRongchao; LiYuhai

    2005-01-01

    Based on a carbon fiber cement slurry system developed in the previous work, the relationship between the carbon fiber and the performance of the cement slurry was experimentally investigated. Results show that the use of fiber has no effect on the slurry theological mode, but influences its rheological behavior. When the fiber proportion ranges from 0.12% to 0.19% and the fiber length from 400 to 1,400 μm the slurry rheological behavior can be improved. Under the normalpressure, the use of fiber can shorten the thickening time of the cement slurry. When the proportion of the constant-length fiber increases, the water loss of the cement slurry decreases first and then increases, and when the fiber length increases (the fiber proportion being kept constant), the water loss shows the same trend. This indicates that there are optimal values for the fiber length and proportion, which vary under the experimental conditions in the following respective ranges: 0.12%-0.37% and 700-1,400 μm.

  18. A new radionuclide sorption database for benchmark cement accounting for geochemical evolution of cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the data selection strategy and the selected sorption values on cement for twenty-five elements (Ag, Am, Be, C, Ca, Cl, Cs, H, I, Mo, Nb, Ni, Np, Pa, Pb, Pd, Pu, Ra, Sr, Se, Sn, Tc, Th, U, Zr) that need to be considered in safety assessment calculations for the future near-surface disposal facility at Dessel, Belgium. Mainly on the basis of literature data, best estimate sorption values in addition to upper and lower bound values were determined for a so-called benchmark cement - the unperturbed cement without effects of organics, high chloride content or other chemical components that might adversely impact radionuclide sorption. Effects of perturbing components are discussed separately. The geochemical evolution of the cementitious engineered barriers was also addressed to clarify the conditions under which sorption values are applicable. A substantial part of the scientific basis supporting the data selection was established at several meetings of an International Panel of Experts who reviewed and endorsed the data selection. To this end, the sorption data were checked for: reliability, appropriateness for the conditions expected for the Dessel disposal facility, data quality, time frames (i.e. states of cement degradation), heterogeneity (presence of components in conditioned wastes that could affect sorption) and completeness (in terms of mechanisms explaining the sorption processes). (authors)

  19. Characterizing Reactive Flow Paths in Fractured Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenning, Q. C.; Huerta, N. J.; Hesse, M. A.; Bryant, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration can be a viable method for reducing anthropogenic CO2 flux into the atmosphere. However, the technology must be economically feasible and pose acceptable risk to stakeholders. One key risk is CO2 leakage out of the storage reservoir. Potential driving forces for leakage are the overpressure due to CO2 injection and the buoyancy of free phase CO2. Potential hazards of leakage are contamination of Underground Sources of Drinking Water or the atmosphere and would be deemed an unacceptable risk. Wells potentially provide a fast path for leakage from the reservoir. While the well's cement casing is reactive with CO2 and CO2-saturated brine, the low cement matrix permeability and slow diffusion rate make it unlikely that CO2 will escape through a properly constructed wellbore. However, highly permeable fractures with micrometer scale apertures can occur in cement casings. Reactions that occur in the flow in these fractures can either be self-limiting or self-enhancing. Therefore, understanding the reactive flow is critical to understanding of leakage evolution through these fractures. The goal of our work is to characterize the modification of the flow paths in the fracture due to reaction with acidic brine. With this aim we have characterized both the initial flow path of un-reactive flow and the final flow path after introduction of low-pH acid along the same fracture. Class H cement cores 3-6 cm in length and 2.5 cm diameter are created and a single natural and unique fracture is produced in each core using the Brazilian method. Our experimental fluid is injected at a constant rate into the cement core housed in a Hassler Cell under confining pressure. A solution of red dye and deionized water is pumped through the fracture to stain the un-reactive flow paths. Deionized water is then pumped through the core to limit diffusion of the dye into non-flowing portions of the fracture. After staining the initial flow path, low pH water due to

  20. Effect of abutment modification and cement type on retention of cement-retained implant supported crowns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Farzin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations.Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment (control group was left intact without any modifications. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin. In the second abutment, (test group the axial wall was partially removed to form an abutment with 3 walls. Wax models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by Temp Bond luting agent under standardized conditions (n=20. The assemblies were stored in 100% humidity for one day at 37°C prior to testing. The cast crown was removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. Coping/abutment specimens were cleaned after testing, and the testing procedure was repeated for Dycal luting agent (n=20. Data were analyzed with two- way ANOVA (α=0.05.There was no significant difference in the mean transformed retention (Ln-R between intact abutments (4.90±0.37 and the abutments with 3 walls (4.83±0.25 using Dycal luting agent. However, in TempBond group, the mean transformed retention (Ln-R was significantly lower in the intact abutment (3.9±0.23 compared to the abutment with 3 walls (4.13±0.33, P=0.027.The retention of cement-retained implant restoration can be improved by the type of temporary cement used. The retention of cast crowns cemented to implant abutments with TempBond is influenced by the wall removal.

  1. Asbestos cement dust inhalation by hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, A.P.; Dagle, G.E.; Cannon, W.C.; Buschbom, R.L. (Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA (USA))

    1978-12-01

    Two groups of 96 male Syrian golden hamsters were exposed to respirable asbestos cement aerosol at concentrations of approximately 1 and approximately 10 micrograms/liter, respectively, 3 hours/day, 5 days/week. Average fiber counts ranged from 5 to about 120 fibers/cm3. Each group was randomly divided into six subgroups of 16 animals. The first subgroup was sacrificed after 3 months of exposure, the second after 6 months, and the third after 15 months. The fourth subgroup was withdrawn from exposure after 3 months, observed for an additional 3 months, and then sacrificed. The fifth and sixth subgroups were withdrawn after 3 and 6 months of exposure, respectively, and maintained for observation up to the 15-month exposure point of the third subgroup at which time all surviving animals were sacrificed. All other experimental procedures were similar to those delineated in a previous publication describing the development of an animal model, techniques, and an exposure system for asbestos cement dust inhalation. The asbestos cement exposures had no significant effect on body weight and mortality of the animals. Higher aerosol concentration and longer exposure times increased the number of macrophages and ferruginous bodies found in the lungs of the exposed animals. Recovery periods had no effect on the incidence of macrophages and ferruginous bodies. The incidence of very slight to slight fibrosis in the animals sacrificed after 15 months of exposure shows a significant (P less than 0.01) trend when the untreated control group and the 1 and 10 microgram/liter dose level groups are compared, indicating a dose-response relationship. Development of minimal fibrosis continued in animals withdrawn from exposure. No primary carcinomas of the lung and respiratory tract and no mesotheliomas were found.

  2. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

    2008-07-30

    The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per

  3. MTA versus Portland cement: review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiana Viana Viola

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Both Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA and Portland cement (PC have been highlighted because of their favorable biological properties, with extensive applications in Endodontics, including the possibility of using into root canal filling. Objective: This article reviews literature related to MTA and PC comparing their physical, chemical and biological properties, as well as their indications. Literature review: Literature reports studies revealing the similarities between these materials’ properties, including both biocompatibility and bone repair induction. Moreover, there is the need for the development of a root canal sealer based on these materials (MTA and PC. Conclusion: MTA and CP show promissory perspective both in Dentistry and Endodontics.

  4. Specific Examples of Hybrid Alkaline Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Jiménez Ana; García-Lodeiro Inés; Donatello Shane; Maltseva Olga; Palomo Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid alkaline cements are obtained by alkali-activating cementitious blends in the Na2O-CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-H2O system. The present paper discusses the results of activating different cementitious blends containing a low OPC clinker content ( 15MPa a 2 days) different alkaline activators were used (liquid and solid). The reaction products obtained were also characterised by XRD, SEM/EDX and 27Al and 29Si NMRMAS. The results showed that the main reaction product was a mix of cementitious gels C-A...

  5. High temperature cement raw meal flowability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarup, Claus; Hjuler, Klaus; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The flowability of cement raw meal is investigated at temperatures up to 850°C in a specially designed monoaxial shear tester. Consolidation stresses of 0.94, 1.87 and 2.79kPa are applied. The results show that the flowability is reduced as temperature is increased above 550°C, indicated by...... increasing unconfined yield strength and reduced flowability factors. Deviation and reproducibility are acceptable for all temperatures except for 850°C where belite formation and possibly calcination sinter the raw meal....

  6. Cement and Concrete Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taijiro Sato

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Concrete science is a multidisciplinary area of research where nanotechnology potentially offers the opportunity to enhance the understanding of concrete behavior, to engineer its properties and to lower production and ecological cost of construction materials. Recent work at the National Research Council Canada in the area of concrete materials research has shown the potential of improving concrete properties by modifying the structure of cement hydrates, addition of nanoparticles and nanotubes and controlling the delivery of admixtures. This article will focus on a review of these innovative achievements.

  7. A consistent thermodynamic database for cement materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of waste confinement and, more specifically, waste from the nuclear industry, concrete is used both as a confinement and as a building material. Alteration processes in contact with clayey formations are also of interest in the context of deep disposal. The present work aims to propose a collection of thermodynamic properties for geochemical calculation in cementitious media. This selection is extended to zeolites and clay minerals in the context of cement/clay interactions. Finally, because temperature is of importance in such contexts, the temperature dependency of the thermodynamic functions is also considered here. Uncertainties remain concerning especially katoite, and some low temperature zeolites like phillipsite, chabazite or gismondine

  8. Liquid-Oxygen-Compatible Cement for Gaskets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, N. L.; Neale, B. C.

    1984-01-01

    Fluorelastomer and metal bonded reliably by new procedure. To cure fluoroelastomer cement, metal plate/gasket assembly placed in vacuum bag evacuated to minimum vacuum of 27 inches (69 cm) of mercury. Vacuum maintained throughout heating process and until assembly returns to ambient room temperature. Used to seal gaskets and O-rings or used to splice layers of elastomer to form non-standard sized O-rings. Another possible use is to apply protective, liquid-oxygen-compatible coating to metal parts.

  9. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  10. The Effect of Cement Dust on the Lung Function in a Cement Factory, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Ferasati

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at assessing cement dust exposure and its relationship to lung function at a Portland cement factory in Ilam, Iran. Lung function tests were carried out on 112 workers at the cement factory in 2008-09. Simultaneously 85 non exposed workers were used as control. Lung function tests were performed for all subjects. Additionally, total dust level was determined by the gravimetric method. Moreover, X-ray diffraction (XRD technique was performed to determine the SiO2 contents of the bulk samples. The arithmetic means (AM of personal total dust were higher in the crusher (27.49 mg/m3, packing (16.90 mg/m3, kiln (15.60 mg/m3, cement mill (13.07 mg/m3, raw mill (10.31 mg /m3 than in the maintenance (3.14 mg /m3, and administration (1.55 mg/m3. The geometrical mean (GM concentration was 12.12 mg/m3, which were considerably higher than occupational exposure limit (OEL of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH, which is 10 mg/m3. Based on the results, the probability of the long-term mean exposure exceeding to the OEL of 10 mg/m3 for total dust were higher in the kiln (100%, packing (100%, cement mill (90%, crusher (73%, raw mill (60% than in the maintenance (0%, and administration (2.3%. Ventiliatory function evaluation, as measured by the function parameters, showed that 35.7% of the exposed workers had abnormality in lung function compared with 5.7% of those unexposed. Statistical analysis of the data indicated that exposed workers compared to the unexposed groups showed significant reductions in Forced Expiratory Volume in one second percent (FEV1, Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, and FEV1/FVC (p< 0.05.

  11. The influence of clay additives in Portland cement on the compressive strength of the cement stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Gaifullin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of mineral additives to binders, especially to Portland cement, is one of the promising trends for solving the resource and energy saving problems, as well as problems of environmental protection during production and application. Expanding the supplementary cementitious materials resource base can be achieved through the use of natural pozzolans and thermally activated polymineral clays(commonly known as glinites in Russia. One type of glinite is metakaolin, which is obtained by calcination of kaolin clays. Metakaolin is widely and effectively used as a pozzolanic additive due to its beneficial effect on the physical and mechanical properties of Portland cement-based materials. The obstacle to its wide production and use are the limited deposits of pure kaolin clays in many countries, including the Russian Federation. In this respect, the studies of pozzolanic activity of the most common mineral clays and their use in some countries have significantly advanced. Similar studies were widely performed in the 1940s in USSR. It seems reasonable to renew this trend to provide a scientific base for the production of local pozzolans made of clays commonly used in different regions. Comparative studies of the effect of 5 clays differing in mineral and chemical composition, calcination temperature and specific surface area, and high-quality metakaolin, on the strength of hardened Portland cement paste have been performed. It has been established that introducing 5…10 % of composite clays calcined at 400…8000 C° and milled to a specific surface area of 290…800 m2/kg into Portland cement enhanced the strength of the hardened cement paste considerably better than the introduction of metakaolin with a specific surface area of 1200 m2/kg. The findings of the study suggest that many kinds of commonly used polymineral clays have a specific calcination temperature and dispersity, which results in a higher pozzolanic activity compared with

  12. Enhancement of cemented waste forms by supercritical CO{sub 2} carbonation of standard portland cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, J.B.; Carey, J.; Taylor, C.M.V.

    1997-08-01

    We are conducting experiments on an innovative transformation concept, using a traditional immobilization technique, that may significantly reduce the volume of hazardous or radioactive waste requiring transport and long-term storage. The standard practice for the stabilization of radioactive salts and residues is to mix them with cements, which may include additives to enhance immobilization. Many of these wastes do not qualify for underground disposition, however, because they do not meet disposal requirements for free liquids, decay heat, head-space gas analysis, and/or leachability. The treatment method alters the bulk properties of a cemented waste form by greatly accelerating the natural cement-aging reactions, producing a chemically stable form having reduced free liquids, as well as reduced porosity, permeability and pH. These structural and chemical changes should allow for greater actinide loading, as well as the reduced mobility of the anions, cations, and radionuclides in aboveground and underground repositories. Simultaneously, the treatment process removes a majority of the hydrogenous material from the cement. The treatment method allows for on-line process monitoring of leachates and can be transported into the field. We will describe the general features of supercritical fluids, as well as the application of these fluids to the treatment of solid and semi-solid waste forms. some of the issues concerning the economic feasibility of industrial scale-up will be addressed, with particular attention to the engineering requirements for the establishment of on-site processing facilities. Finally, the initial results of physical property measurements made on portland cements before and after supercritical fluid processing will be presented.

  13. Enhancement of cemented waste forms by supercritical CO2 carbonation of standard portland cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are conducting experiments on an innovative transformation concept, using a traditional immobilization technique, that may significantly reduce the volume of hazardous or radioactive waste requiring transport and long-term storage. The standard practice for the stabilization of radioactive salts and residues is to mix them with cements, which may include additives to enhance immobilization. Many of these wastes do not qualify for underground disposition, however, because they do not meet disposal requirements for free liquids, decay heat, head-space gas analysis, and/or leachability. The treatment method alters the bulk properties of a cemented waste form by greatly accelerating the natural cement-aging reactions, producing a chemically stable form having reduced free liquids, as well as reduced porosity, permeability and pH. These structural and chemical changes should allow for greater actinide loading, as well as the reduced mobility of the anions, cations, and radionuclides in aboveground and underground repositories. Simultaneously, the treatment process removes a majority of the hydrogenous material from the cement. The treatment method allows for on-line process monitoring of leachates and can be transported into the field. We will describe the general features of supercritical fluids, as well as the application of these fluids to the treatment of solid and semi-solid waste forms. some of the issues concerning the economic feasibility of industrial scale-up will be addressed, with particular attention to the engineering requirements for the establishment of on-site processing facilities. Finally, the initial results of physical property measurements made on portland cements before and after supercritical fluid processing will be presented

  14. Biocompatibility of alendronate-loaded acrylic cement for vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Calvo-Fernández

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a biological evaluation of a non-resorbable acrylic cement loaded with alendronate for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. The cement formulation was based on polymethyl methacrylate and acrylic monomers; one of these had covalently linked vitamin E residues. The same cement in the absence of alendronate was used as a control. The setting of the charged cement presented a maximum polymerization temperature of 44ºC, a setting time of 24 min, a residual monomer content lower than 3 wt.%, a compressive strength of 99±10 MPa and an elastic modulus of 1.2±0.2 GPa. Cytotoxicity studies using human osteoblast cultures revealed that the leachable substances of the alendronate loaded cement collected between 1 and 7 days decreased cell viability to values lower than 80%. However, morphological changes and cellular damage in cells produced by the extracts decreased with the leak time. Cell adhesion and growth on charged cement was significantly lower than on the control. Implantation of the cement paste in the intra-femoral cavity of rabbits showed that initially the osteogenic activity was evident for the cement charged with alendronate, and the osteosynthesis process took place mainly in the trabeculae and was manifested by the presence of a non-mineralised osseous spicule. The interface between material and adjacent bone tissue was initially characterized by a variable fibrous response that in many cases it appeared reduced to thin connective tissue after a 24-week-period.

  15. Personal exposure to inhalable cement dust among construction workers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, S.M.; Thomassen, Y.; Fechter-Rink, E.; Kromhout, H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective- A case study was carried out to assess cement dust exposure and its determinants among construction workers and for comparison among workers in cement and concrete production.Methods- Full-shift personal exposure measurements were performed and samples were analysed for inhalable dust and

  16. Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cement for orthopedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cements were synthesized, formulated, and evaluated for orthopedic application. The formulation of different amino acid containing glass-ionomer bone cements was optimized, and conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements were compared. Properties of interest included handling characteristics, physical and chemical properties, and mechanical strength of the bone cement. The study was based on the synthesis of different vinyl containing amino acids, different polyelectrolytes containing these amino acid residues, and different resin-modified polyelectrolytes, as well as formulation and evaluation of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements using these polyelectrolytes. Systematic preparation of polyelectrolytes and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cements were essential features of this work, since we anticipated that the mechanical properties of the glass-ionomer bone cements could be strongly affected by the nature of the polyelectrolytes and formulation. Mechanical properties were evaluated in a screw driven mechanical testing machine, and structure-property relationships were determined by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation of the fracture surface of the specimens. How the structure of polyelectrolytes, such as different amino acid residues, molecular weight, different modifying resin, and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cement, affected the mechanical properties was also studied.

  17. Triaxial shear behavior of a cement-treated sandegravel mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Younes Amini; Amir Hamidi

    2014-01-01

    A number of parameters, e.g. cement content, cement type, relative density, and grain size distribution, can influence the mechanical behaviors of cemented soils. In the present study, a series of conventional triaxial compression tests were conducted on a cemented poorly graded sandegravel mixture containing 30%gravel and 70%sand in both consolidated drained and undrained conditions. Portland cement used as the cementing agent was added to the soil at 0%, 1%, 2%, and 3%(dry weight) of sandegravel mixture. Samples were prepared at 70%relative density and tested at confining pressures of 50 kPa, 100 kPa, and 150 kPa. Comparison of the results with other studies on well graded gravely sands indicated more dilation or negative pore pressure in poorly graded samples. Undrained failure envelopes determined using zero Skempton’s pore pressure coefficient ðA ¼ 0Þ criterion were consistent with the drained ones. Energy absorption potential was higher in drained condition than undrained condition, suggesting that more energy was required to induce deformation in cemented soil under drained state. Energy ab-sorption increased with increase in cement content under both drained and undrained conditions.

  18. Modelling the effects of waste components on cement hydration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2001-01-01

    Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) is often used for the solidification/stabilization (S/S) of waste containing heavy metals and salts. These waste components will precipitate in the form of insoluble compounds on to unreacted cement clinker grains preventing further hydration. In this study the long te

  19. Spalling Resistant Bauxite Based Bricks for Cement Kiln

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaohui; Peng Xigao

    2011-01-01

    @@ 1.Scope This standard specifies the term,definition,classification,labeling,technical requirements,test methods,inspection rules,packing,marking,transportation,storage,and quality certificate of spalling resistant bauxite based bricks for cement kiln.This standard is applicable to the spalling resistant bauxite based bricks for cement kiln.

  20. Sulfur Release from Cement Raw Materials during Solid Fuel Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rooma; Larsen, Morten B.; Glarborg, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    During combustion of solid fuels in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns, local reducing conditions can occur and cause decomposition of sulfates from cement raw materials. Decomposition of sulfates is problematic because it increases the gas-phase SO2 concentration, which may cause depo...

  1. Transport Properties of Carbon-Nanotube/Cement Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, B.; Yang, Z.; Shi, X.; Yu, X.

    2012-01-01

    This paper preliminarily investigates the general transport properties (i.e., water sorptivity, water permeability, and gas permeability) of carbon-nanotube/cement composites. Carboxyl multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are dispersed into cement mortar to fabricate the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) rei

  2. Preparation and Mechanical Properties of Graphene Oxide: Cement Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhim Babak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the performance of graphene oxide (GO in improving mechanical properties of cement composites. A polycarboxylate superplasticizer was used to improve the dispersion of GO flakes in the cement. The mechanical strength of graphene-cement nanocomposites containing 0.1–2 wt% GO and 0.5 wt% superplasticizer was measured and compared with that of cement prepared without GO. We found that the tensile strength of the cement mortar increased with GO content, reaching 1.5%, a 48% increase in tensile strength. Ultra high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM used to observe the fracture surface of samples containing 1.5 wt% GO indicated that the nano-GO flakes were well dispersed in the matrix, and no aggregates were observed. FE-SEM observation also revealed good bonding between the GO surfaces and the surrounding cement matrix. In addition, XRD diffraction data showed growth of the calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H gels in GO cement mortar compared with the normal cement mortar.

  3. Experimental study with domestic bone cement in the percutaneous vertebroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the feasibility of injecting domestic bone cement in the process of the percutaneous vertebroplasty. Methods: (1) Various types cement were disposed with domestic PMMA. The concretionary phases of cement were observed according to the stages and holding time. Then the most ideal ratio of the mixed cement was selected and ten cement columns were made with this ratio, which was taken as the trial group. The other ten referring to was taken as the contrast one. The biological mechanics was measured with a load and the data of the results were compared. (2) Twenty thoracic and lumbar adjacent bodies were removed intact from five human corpses. These bodies were divided into two groups, in one group PMMA were injected, the other was severed as the contrast one. Then in these twenty vertebral bodies the biological mechanics was measured and the treatment effect was evaluated. (3) In 12 healthy dogs PVP in lumber was tried so as to observe the operational difficulty during the process of injected this bone cement and CT was used to evaluate the result of PMMA, diffusion and the complications caused by it. Results: The most ideal ratio was 4:2.6:1 (g, ml, ml) between powder, monome and contrast. After injecting this kind of cement, the loading strength of these vertebral bodies was increased remarkably (P<0.01). Conclusion: Injecting domestic bone cement provides the theoretical foundations for the clinical application of PVP. (author)

  4. Salt zone cementing; Cimentacao em zonas de sal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Fernando Jose Parente Neiva; Miranda, Cristiane Richard de; Martins, Andre Leibsohn [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1994-07-01

    This work introduces new concepts in the proposal of NaCl concentrations i cement slurry and operational parameters for cementing halite salt zones. Experiments carried out in the laboratory and in the Surface Hydraulic Simulator using real halite coring allowed the determination of halite dissolution rates in relation to flow, contact time, and initial Na Cl concentration in the cement slurries. An experimental procedure was developed to measure the adherence strength of hardened cement on halite formations. A Computer Simulator was developed with the adjustment of a model representing the physical phenomenon of mass transfer to the experimental results obtained, which enable us to calculate the Na Cl concentration profile on cement slurry after its positioning in the well's annular region, as well as the total mass of dissolved salt. Employment of the methodology developed in this work shall reduce risk of collapsed casing as well as the cost of the slurry. (author)

  5. Effect of supplementary cementing materials on the concrete corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failure of concrete after a period of years, less than the life expected for which it was designed, may be caused by the environment to which it has been exposed or by a variety of internal causes. The incorporation of supplementary materials has at the Portland cement the purpose of improving the concrete microstructure and also of influence the resistance of concrete to environmental attacks. Different mineral by-products as ground granulated blast furnaces slag (GGBS), silica fume (SF), meta kaolin (MK), fly ash (FA) and other products have been used as supplementary cementing materials. This paper is about the behavior of concrete in the presence of mineral additions. Compared to Portland cements, blended cements show lower heat of hydration, lower permeability, greater resistance to sulphates and sea water. These blended cements find the best application when requirements of durability are regarded as a priority specially on high performance concrete: (Author) 11 refs

  6. Lightweight cementing program increases profit from Kansas oil field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that single-stage, lightweight cementing in a Kansas operation improved the cement bond across a permeable oil/water sand. Additionally, pipe movement after pumping helped bond quality by preventing the slurry from beginning its transition time. This delay allowed continued transmission of hydrostatic pressure against the formation. In 1991, OXY USA Inc. completed 12 wells in the Ray field in Kansas. All wells were drilled to the Reagan sand. The sand has a distinct water/oil contact, strong water drive, and good permeability. Because of poor cement bonding across the Reagan, two-stage conventional cementing in the first eight wells did not effectively prevent excessive water production. Some of these wells had to have remedial cement squeezes and be reperforated. This work increased completion costs by about $15,000/well

  7. In vitro bioactivity of a tricalcium silicate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent of Portland cement and the responsible for their mechanical strength at early stages. In order to be used as and additive of conventional calcium phosphate cement (CPC), in vitro bioactivity of a calcium silicate cement (CSC) after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14 days was study. The cement was obtained by mixing Ca3SiO5, obtained by sol-gel process, and a Na2HPO4 solution. The morphological and structural changes of the material before and after soaking were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed the formation of a layer of a Hydroxyapatite (HA) onto the CSC cement after soaking for 1h in SBF that became denser with the increase of soaking time. The study suggests that Ca3SiO5 would be an effective additive to improve the bioactivity and long term strength of conventional CPC. (author)

  8. Influence of pore structure on compressive strength of cement mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui; Zhang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure. PMID:24757414

  9. Influence of Pore Structure on Compressive Strength of Cement Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure.

  10. The Use of Supersulfated Cement(SSCin Mass Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper isfocused on the use of Supersulfated Cement (SSC in mass concrete. The physicalproperties and mechanicalproperty was tested. Contrast with the common cement, this paper studied the temperature rise of hydration and the heat of hydration to obtain the advantage of SSC, which will provide the basis for the use of SSC in mass concrete.The micro properties were tested through Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The test shows that the SSC shows better workingperformance than ordinary cement. The compressive strength of SSC under standard curing condition is higher than that under room curing condition. The compressive strength of SSC is increasing with time and the rate of increasing is decreasing. The temperature rise of hydration of SSC are lower than that of ordinary cement. Different with the ordinary cement, the main hydrated products of SSC areettringite and scalycalcium silicate hydrate.

  11. Studies on the permeability of polyacrylate and phosphate cements by means of 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The permeability of a zinc phosphate cement and of a typical representative of the polyacrylate cements was studied radiometrically and autoradiographically, using 131I. The permeability of the phosphate cement was considerably greater than that of the polyacrylate cement. However, further studies evidenced that the penetrability of the polyacrylate cement increased markedly, which might be due to the contraction of the material. Compared with the findings of previous studies the permeability of a phosphate cement frequently used revealed to be equal to that of EBA cements and polyacrylate cements during the first day of setting. Thus, the EBA cements and the polyacrylate cements are not superior to zinc phosphate cements in this respect. (author)

  12. Porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for enhanced bone bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant-bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests. RESULTS: The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony

  13. Leaching behavior of cement solidified materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An immersion test of mortar was carried out in order to solidify waste with uranium. The sample consists of 2000g cement, 950g ion exchange water, 1600g sound and 1g water reducing agent. The solid sample and ion exchange water (100 of immersion liquid/original sample) was put into polystyrene closed vessel in globe box and kept four weeks, and then it was separated to the immersion liquid and the solid phase. New ion exchange water was added to the solid and kept four weeks and then separated. Its ratio showed 200. The analysis was done at 100, 200 and 300 ratio of immersion liquid/sample. The solid phase was studied by the powder X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo gravimetric analysis and chemical analysis. The liquid phase was determined by pH values and composition analysis. The results showed Ca(OH)2, cement hydrate, was flowed out and it was not found in the solid phase at 200 ratio. (S.Y.)

  14. Qualification of radioactive waste cement conditioning processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleco Qualification Process Laboratory activities are focused on qualification of cement matrix conditioning processes of Low and Intermediate Level Waste produced by the decommissioning of old Nuclear Power Plants and research centres. Radioactive waste management strategies for Second- and Third Category wastes (according to the ENEA Technical Guide n. 26), involve specific processes (treatment and conditioning) aimed at producing a final waste form in which the radionuclides are incorporated into a solid matrix in order to reduce their potential migration or dispersion. The qualification of conditioning processes consists of all those activities demonstrating that the final waste form and waste package have the minimum requirements (mechanical, chemical and physical characteristics) compliant with all the subsequent management phases: long term interim storage, transport and long term disposal of the waste (in accordance with UNI 11193- 2006 standard). First, the paper recalls the classification into 3 categories of radioactive wastes by the Italian authorities. Cementation is one of the most common method for conditioning radioactive wastes into a solid, safe form suitable for long term storage. 3 tables list the qualification tests that are assigned to waste form, containers and final packages, the minimum requirements for second category wastes and the results of qualification tests

  15. Radioactive wastes dispersed in stabilized ash cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, J.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Carey, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    One of the most widely-used methods for the solidification/stabilization of low-level radwaste is by incorporation into Type-I/II ordinary portland cement (OPC). Treating of OPC with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) has been shown to significantly increase the density, while simultaneously decreasing porosity. In addition, the process significantly reduces the hydrogenous content, reducing the likelihood of radiolytic decomposition reactions. This, in turn, permits increased actinide loadings with a concomitant reduction in disposable waste volume. In this article, the authors discuss the combined use of fly-ash-modified OPC and its treatment with SCCO{sub 2} to further enhance immobilization properties. They begin with a brief summary of current cement immobilization technology in order to delineate the areas of concern. Next, supercritical fluids are described, as they relate to these areas of concern. In the subsequent section, they present an outline of results on the application of SCCO{sub 2} to OPC, and its effectiveness in addressing these problem areas. Lastly, in the final section, they proffer their thoughts on why they believe, based on the OPC results, that the incorporation of fly ash into OPC, followed by supercritical fluid treatment, can produce highly efficient wasteforms.

  16. Do cement nanoparticles exist in space ?

    CERN Document Server

    Bilalbegovic, G; Mohacek-Grosev, V

    2014-01-01

    The calcium-silicate-hydrate is used to model properties of cement on Earth. We study cementitious nanoparticles and propose these structures as components of cosmic dust grains. Quantum density functional theory methods are applied for the calculation of infrared spectra of Ca4Si4O14H4, Ca6Si3O13H2, and Ca12Si6O26H4 clusters. We find bands distributed over the near, mid and far-infrared region. A specific calcium-silicate-hydrate spectral feature at 14 microns, together with the bands at 10 and 18 microns which exist for other silicates as well, could be used for a detection of cosmic cement. We compare calculated bands with the 14 microns features in the spectra of HD 45677, HD 44179, and IRC+10420 which were observed by Infrared Space Observatory and classified as remaining. High abundance of oxygen atoms in cementitious nanoparticles could partially explain observed depletion of this element from the interstellar medium into dust grains.

  17. Rheology of cement mixtures with dolomite filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez de la Cuesta, P. J.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This experimental program has studied the behavior of fresh paste made up from cements mixed with dolomite filler. Through prior experiments the starting point is obtained for the designs 22 and 23 factorials. With these designs the governing equations are established that influence the specific surface of the filler, the filler percentage and the ratio water/(cement + filler, used as objective functions: test probe penetration, flow on table and shear stress in viscometer. Also the type of rheological conduct is determined and the influence over initial and final setting is observed.

    Este programa experimental estudia el comportamiento de las pastas frescas fabricadas a partir de cementos mezclados con filler dolomítico. En los experimentos previos se obtiene el punto central para los diseños 22 y 23 factoriales. Con estos diseños se establecen las ecuaciones que rigen la influencia de la superficie específica del filler, el porcentaje de filler y la relación agua/(cemento + filler, utilizando como funciones objetivos la penetración de sonda, la mesa de sacudidas y la tensión de corte en el viscosímetro. También se determina el tipo de conducta reológica y la influencia sobre el principio y fin de fraguado.

  18. Radioactive wastes dispersed in stabilized ash cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most widely-used methods for the solidification/stabilization of low-level radwaste is by incorporation into Type-I/II ordinary portland cement (OPC). Treating of OPC with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO2) has been shown to significantly increase the density, while simultaneously decreasing porosity. In addition, the process significantly reduces the hydrogenous content, reducing the likelihood of radiolytic decomposition reactions. This, in turn, permits increased actinide loadings with a concomitant reduction in disposable waste volume. In this article, the authors discuss the combined use of fly-ash-modified OPC and its treatment with SCCO2 to further enhance immobilization properties. They begin with a brief summary of current cement immobilization technology in order to delineate the areas of concern. Next, supercritical fluids are described, as they relate to these areas of concern. In the subsequent section, they present an outline of results on the application of SCCO2 to OPC, and its effectiveness in addressing these problem areas. Lastly, in the final section, they proffer their thoughts on why they believe, based on the OPC results, that the incorporation of fly ash into OPC, followed by supercritical fluid treatment, can produce highly efficient wasteforms

  19. Wet deposition of mercury within the vicinity of a cement plant before and during cement plant maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Sarah E.; McKee, Lester; Gilbreath, Alicia; Yee, Donald; Connor, Mike; Fu, Xuewu

    2010-03-01

    Hg species (total mercury, methylmercury, reactive mercury) in precipitation were investigated in the vicinity of the Lehigh Hanson Permanente Cement Plant in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA., USA. Precipitation was collected weekly between November 29, 2007 and March 20, 2008, which included the period in February and March 2008 when cement production was minimized during annual plant maintenance. When the cement plant was operational, the volume weighted mean (VWM) and wet depositional flux for total Hg (Hg T) were 6.7 and 5.8 times higher, respectively, compared to a control site located 3.5 km east of the cement plant. In February and March, when cement plant operations were minimized, levels were approximately equal at both sites (the ratio for both parameters was 1.1). Due to the close proximity between the two sites, meteorological conditions (e.g., precipitation levels, wind direction) were similar, and therefore higher VWM Hg T levels and Hg T deposition likely reflected increased Hg emissions from the cement plant. Methylmercury (MeHg) and reactive Hg (Hg(II)) were also measured; compared to the control site, the VWM for MeHg was lower at the cement plant (the ratio = 0.75) and the VWM for Hg(II) was slightly higher (ratio = 1.2), which indicated the cement plant was not likely a significant source of these Hg species to the watershed.

  20. The effect of fly ash and coconut fibre ash as cement replacement materials on cement paste strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuaji, R.; Kurniawan, R. W.; Yasin, A. K.; Fatoni, H. AT; Lutfi, F. M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Concrete is the backbone material in the construction field. The main concept of the concrete material is composed of a binder and filler. Cement, concrete main binder highlighted by environmentalists as one of the industry are not environmentally friendly because of the burning of cement raw materials in the kiln requires energy up to a temperature of 1450° C and the output air waste CO2. On the other hand, the compound content of cement that can be utilized in innovation is Calcium Hydroxide (CaOH), this compound will react with pozzolan material and produces additional strength and durability of concrete, Calcium Silicate Hydrates (CSH). The objective of this research is to explore coconut fibers ash and fly ash. This material was used as cement replacement materials on cement paste. Experimental method was used in this study. SNI-03-1974-1990 is standard used to clarify the compressive strength of cement paste at the age of 7 days. The result of this study that the optimum composition of coconut fiber ash and fly ash to substitute 30% of cement with 25% and 5% for coconut fibers ash and fly ash with similar strength if to be compared normal cement paste.

  1. Effect of Duration of Exposure to Cement Dust on Respiratory Function of Non-Smoking Cement Mill Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Al-Drees, Abdul Majeed; Al Masri, Abeer A.; Al Rouq, Fawzia; Azeem, Muhammad Abdul

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of long term exposure to cement dust on lung function in non-smoking cement mill workers. This is a cross-sectional study of respiratory functions. Spirometry was performed in 100 apparently healthy volunteers; 50 non-smoking cement mill workers and 50 non-smoking un-exposed subjects. Based on the duration of exposure, cement mill workers were divided into three groups, less than 5, 5–10 and greater than 10 years. All subjects were individually matched for age, height, weight, and socioeconomic status. Pulmonary function test was performed by using an electronic spirometer. Significant reduction was observed in the mean values of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1), Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Maximal Voluntary Ventilation in cement mill workers who had been working in the cement industry for more than 10 years compared to their matched un-exposed group. Lung functions in cement mill workers were significantly impaired and results show a long term duration response effect of years of exposure to cement dust on lung functions. PMID:23325026

  2. Effect of Duration of Exposure to Cement Dust on Respiratory Function of Non-Smoking Cement Mill Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia Al Rouq

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of long term exposure to cement dust on lung function in non-smoking cement mill workers. This is a cross-sectional study of respiratory functions. Spirometry was performed in 100 apparently healthy volunteers; 50 non-smoking cement mill workers and 50 non-smoking un-exposed subjects. Based on the duration of exposure, cement mill workers were divided into three groups, less than 5, 5–10 and greater than 10 years. All subjects were individually matched for age, height, weight, and socioeconomic status. Pulmonary function test was performed by using an electronic spirometer. Significant reduction was observed in the mean values of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1, Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF and Maximal Voluntary Ventilation in cement mill workers who had been working in the cement industry for more than 10 years compared to their matched un-exposed group. Lung functions in cement mill workers were significantly impaired and results show a long term duration response effect of years of exposure to cement dust on lung functions.

  3. Influence of grain size variation of rice husk ash and cement water phase on radioactive waste cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research was conducted to determine grain size of rice husk ash (RHA) and cement water phase (CWP) be agreeable, so it would be to get result strength and leach rate maximum. The cementation process has be done by mixing liquid waste simulation ware made of strontium nitrate with concentration 65 ppm, type I Portland cement, filler material, rice husk ash and water. Mixture of cement mortar was casted on cylinder with diameter of 28 mm and height of 56 mm. the addition of cement water phase was varied 20v/o, 30v/o and 40v/o of cement volume. Variation of rice husk ash grain size was -40, -100, and -200 mesh as many as 25v/o from mixing volume total. After being casted, cement mortars were dried naturally for 28 days. Than the cement mortars were tested with compressive strength test by Universal Testing Machine and analysis of strontium concentration using Atomic Absorption Spectrometer to determine the leach rate after 21 days. (author)

  4. The effect of sugar on the microstructure of cement paste and its action/mechanism in cement set retardation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugar is a good cement set retarder and improves the strength when used in a controlled manner. Strength depends upon the basic skeleton developed by cement pastes. The development of this basic skeleton depends upon a number of factors, including the addition of admixtures. This paper presents how microstructures are modified/amended when sugar is incorporated in cement-paste as a retarding admixture. For this purpose, slides of cement pastes containing different sugar-contents were prepared and monitored with a microscope and photographed. This study supports the mechanism of adsorption of sugar on the hydration products and poisoning their growth, which is essential for continued hydration of cement after the end of induction period. Sugar makes the network of fibrils denser and hence increases the strength. (author)

  5. Post cementation sensitivity evaluation of glass Ionomer, zinc phosphate and resin modified glass Ionomer luting cements under class II inlays: An in vivo comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekhar V

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to compare the patient-perceived post-cementation sensitivity of class II metal restorations preoperatively, immediately after cementation, one week after cementation and one month after cementation with (1) Glass Ionomer luting cement (2) Zinc Phosphate cement and (3) Resin-modified Glass Ionomer luting cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients, irrespective of sex, in the age group of 15-50 years were selected and the teeth were randomly divided int...

  6. 40 CFR 427.20 - Applicability; description of the asbestos-cement sheet subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... asbestos-cement sheet subcategory. 427.20 Section 427.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Asbestos-Cement Sheet Subcategory § 427.20 Applicability; description of the asbestos-cement sheet... asbestos, Portland cement, silica, and other ingredients are used in the manufacturing of...

  7. 40 CFR 427.10 - Applicability; description of the asbestos-cement pipe subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... asbestos-cement pipe subcategory. 427.10 Section 427.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Asbestos-Cement Pipe Subcategory § 427.10 Applicability; description of the asbestos-cement pipe... asbestos. Portland cement, silica and other ingredients are used in the manufacturing of...

  8. Isothermal Calorimetry Study of Blended Cements and its Application in Numerical Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiong, X.; Van Breugel, K.

    2001-01-01

    Apparent activation energy (E) is generally used to consider the effect of temperature on the kinetics of cement hydration in the numerical simulation of cement hydration processes. This paper deals with an experimental study on the kinetics of Portland cement and blast furnace slag cement using iso

  9. Potentially Conductive Channels in Fracture Cements of Low Permeability Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E.; Landry, C. J.; Eichhubl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Natural fractures in shale reservoirs are frequently filled with mineral cement that lacks any residual fracture porosity that is visible under the petrographic microscope. These fully cemented fractures are generally interpreted to be impermeable for fluid flow. Scanning electron microscopy of calcite, dolomite, and barite fracture cements from a variety of shale reservoirs, prepared using broad ion beam milling, provides evidence of open to partially healed elongate pores that are on the order of hundreds of nanometers in aperture. In calcite fracture cement, these pores have consistent apertures of about 100 nm. In dolomite and barite, apertures are up to 500 nm. These pores have been previously overlooked because traditional thin sectioning and polishing destroys sub-micron details of the fracture cement pore structure. Ion milling preserves these details with a minimum of sample damage during sample preparation. Electron backscatter diffraction shows that these pores occur along grain boundaries within the blocky or columnar fracture cement. While partially healed, these pores, arranged along grain boundaries, are frequently sufficiently well connected acting as channels for fluid flow along and across fully cemented natural fractures. In shale reservoirs of ultra-low matrix permeability, these grain boundary channels may thus provide fracture permeability significantly contributing to reservoir production where intersected or indirectly reactivated by hydraulic fractures.

  10. Preparation and Fatigue Properties of Functionally Graded Cemented Carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemented carbides with a functionally graded structure have significantly improved mechanical properties and lifetimes in cutting, drilling and molding. In this work, WC-6 wt.% Co cemented carbides with three-layer graded structure (surface layer rich in WC, mid layer rich in Co and the inner part of the average composition) were prepared by carburizing pre-sintered η-phase-containing cemented carbides. The three-point bending fatigue tests based on the total-life approach were conducted on both WC-6wt%Co functionally graded cemented carbides (FGCC) and conventional WC-6wt%Co cemented carbides. The functionally graded cemented carbide shows a slightly higher fatigue limit (∼100 MPa) than the conventional ones under the present testing conditions. However, the fatigue crack nucleation behavior of FGCC is different from that of the conventional ones. The crack nucleates preferentially along the Co-gradient and perpendicular to the tension surface in FGCC, while parallel to the tension surface in conventional cemented carbides

  11. PURIFIED WASTE FCC CATALYST AS A CEMENT REPLACEMENT MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danute Vaiciukyniene

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zeolites are commonly used in the fluid catalytic cracking process. Zeolite polluted with oil products and became waste after some time used. The quantity of this waste inevitably rises by expanding rapidly oil industry. The composition of these catalysts depends on the manufacturer and on the process that is going to be used. The main factors retarding hydration process of cement systems and modifying them strength are organic compounds impurities in the waste FCC catalyst. The present paper shows the results of using purified waste FCC catalyst (pFCC from Lithuania oil refinery, as Portland cement replacement material. For this purpose, the purification of waste FCC catalyst (FCC samples was treated with hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is one of the most powerful oxidizers known. By acting of waste with H2O2 it can eliminate the aforementioned waste deficiency, and the obtained product becomes one of the most promising ingredients, in new advanced building materials. Hardened cement paste samples with FCC or pFCC were formed. It was observed that the pFCC blended cements developed higher strength, after 28 days, compared to the samples with FCC or reference samples. Typical content of Portland cement substituting does not exceed 30 % of mass of Portland cement in samples. Reducing the consumption of Portland cement with utilizing waste materials is preferred for reasons of environmental protection.

  12. Vertebroplasty: Magnetic Resonance Findings Related to Cement Leakage Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Y.H.; Han, D.; Cha, J.H.; Seong, C.K.; Kim, J.; Choi, Y.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Municipal Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Purpose: To find magnetic resonance (MR) findings predicting cement leakage in patients receiving percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) due to osteoporotic compression fractures. Material and Methods: MR was done in 43 patients (age 52-89 years) before PVP (56 vertebrae), which was done via a bipedicular approach with fluoroscopic monitoring. Shortly after the procedure, a non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan was done at the vertebroplasty sites for evaluation of bone cement leakage. The following MR findings of fractured vertebral bodies were retrospectively reviewed for correlation with leakage risk: severity of bone-marrow edema, presence of a T2-weighted low-signal-intensity line, percentage residual vertebral body height, presence of either a vacuum or cystic change within the vertebral body, and presence of a cortical disruption. Results: After PVP, cement leakage was detected in 35 vertebrae (62.5%). Leakage was most frequently observed in the anterior external vertebral venous plexus (46%). Cement leakage rate increased when there was a cortical disruption (P = 0.037), especially at the endplates, while it decreased when there was a vacuum or a cystic change within the fractured vertebra (P 0.019). Other MR findings were not related to the risk of cement leakage. Conclusion: The risk of cement leakage in PVP increases when MR shows cortical disruption in a fractured vertebral body, especially at the endplates. It decreases when MR shows a vacuum or cystic change within the body. Keywords Cement leakage, MR imaging, spine, vertebroplasty.

  13. The FGM Concept in the Development of Fiber Cement Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FGM concept appears promising in improving the mechanical performance and reducing production costs of fiber cement building components. However, it has not yet been broadly applied to fiber cement technology. In this study we analyze the functionally graded fiber cement concept and its potential for industrial application in Hatschek machines. The conventional Hatschek process is summarized as well as the proposed modifications to allow FGM fiber cement production. The feasibility of producing functionally graded fiber cement by grading PVA fiber content was experimentally evaluated. Thermogravimetric (TG) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis were used to evaluate fiber distribution profiles. Four-point bending tests were applied to evaluate the mechanical performance of both conventional and functionally graded composites. The results shows that grading PVA fiber content is an effective way to produce functionally graded fiber cement, allowing the reduction of the total fiber volume without significant reduction on composite MOR. TG tests were found adequate to assess fiber content at different positions in functionally graded fiber cements

  14. Estimated longevity of performance of Portland cement grout seal materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sealing of boreholes, fractures and underground workings of repositories is a common concern for all programs investigating the deep burial of nuclear waste as a disposal mechanism. Two grouting materials, bentonite and portland cement, have been identified by many programs as likely candidate seal materials. The longevity of performance of both of these materials is currently being investigated under the auspices of the Stripa Project. These investigations comprise coordinated laboratory, field and modeling studies to produce fundamental data, practical experience and estimates of long-range performance, respectively. Long-term performance is an especially sensitive issue for cement because the phases that comprise cement are metastable. Accordingly, it may be assumed that cement grout performance will degrade with time. For a simplified cement system, two mechanisms for chemical degradation have been considered: phase change and dissolution. When considering dissolution, both equilibrium (slow flow) and open (fast flow) systems have been analyzed to establish bounds. Granitic terrain groundwaters ranging from fresh to saline have been taken as solvents. To assess the consequences in terms of flow, an empirical relation between cement permeability and porosity has been developed. Predictions of performance changes with time have been produced by making conservative estimates of local hydraulic head conditions for various periods of repository history. For the crystalline rock environments considered, preliminary results indicate that cement grout performance may be acceptable for tens of thousands to millions of years providing its initial hydraulic conductivity is on the order of 10-12 m/s

  15. EVALUATION OF CHEMICALS INCORPORATED WOOD FIBRE CEMENT MATRIX PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MST. SADIA MAHZABIN

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Wood fibre cement (WFC boards are well established commercially and widely used in many developed countries. The combination of the properties of two important materials, i.e., cement, and previously treated fibrous materials like wood or agricultural residues; which made up the board, contributed in the performance of the board as building material. In this work, the WFC matrix (WFCM samples are produced to determine the physical properties of WFCM such as the density and water absorption. The wood fibres are incorporated/treated with three different chemical additives; calcium formate (Ca(HCOO2, sodium silicate (Na2.SiO3 and magnesium chloride (MgCl2 prior to mixing with cement. The mechanical properties of the WFCM, with or without chemicals treatment of fibres, such as the compressive strength and flexural strength are evaluated. Three wood/cement ratios (50:50, 40:60, 30:70 are used and the percentages of water and accelerator were 80% and 3% based on the cement weight, respectively. Three moisture-conditioned samples; accelerated aging, dry and wet conditions are used for flexural test. The results reveal that the wood/cement ratio, chemical additives and moisture content had a marked influence on the physical and mechanical properties of the matrix. Finally, it has been shown that the 40:60 wood/cement ratio samples with prior chemicals treatment of the fibres that undergo accelerated aging conditioning achieve higher strength then dry and wet-conditioned boards.

  16. Cementation of Upper Miocene reefs in western Mediterranean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, M.; Calvet, F.

    1983-03-01

    Coral reefs in the western Mediterranean (southeast Spain, Balearic Island, northern Morocco, Sicily, and Italy) show a wide variety of cement types, ranging from completely tight, well-cemented, to poorly cemented reefs with most of the primary porosity still preserved. Cementation processes in those coral reefs appear to be controlled to a great extent by repeated changes of relative sea levels and regional variations of seawater chemistry. Reef progradation occurred during four to six (or more) important sea level changes, resulting in complicated geometric relationships of reef complexes and their freshwater lenses. Progradation occurred during sea level rises and falls and is reflected in abrupt escarpments in some field localities, generally separated by important terraced erosional surfaces. Various types of aragonitic isopachous cement fringes of marine origin, 0.1 to 1.5 cm (.04 to .6 in.) thick, are well preserved in some localities. This is probably due to subsequent plugging by gypsum cement during the Messinian salinity crises. Another possible effect of salinity fluctuations is the abundance of thick crusts of peletoidal, micrite cement of marine origin, locally forming about three-fourths of the volume of the reef core.

  17. Pore Structure of Cement Pastes Blended with Volcanic Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Lehua; ZHOU Shuangxi; LI Liling

    2016-01-01

    The pore parameters of cement pastes blended with volcanic rock at the curing age of 1, 28 and 90 d were de-termined by a mercury intrusion porosimetry. The pore structure of the pastes was characterized through the analysis of porosity, average pore diameter, the most probable pore aperture, pore size distribution, as well as total pore volume. For the improvement of mechanical property and durability of cement-based material, the correlation of the formed pore structure with hydration time and replacement level of volcanic rock for cement was revealed. The results indicate that volcanic rock can diminish porosity and reduce pore size in cement paste when curing time prolongs, which is particu-larly prominent with replacement level of less than 20% in late period. The more harmful pores (i.e., capillary pore) are gradually transformed into harmless pore (i.e., gel pores or micropore), even fully filled and disappeared when hydration products increase. The pore structure of the cement paste is thus refined. The beneficial effect of volcanic rock on the pore structure of cement paste could enhance the mechanical property and durability of cement-based material.

  18. Chest radiological findings in pakistani cement mill workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest radiological findings in Pakistani cement mill workers Even in the 21st century, in developing countries millions of people work daily in dusty environments. They are exposed to different types of health hazards namely, fumes, gases and dust, which are risk factors for developing occupational diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform chest radiology to determine the occupational hazards of cement dust on the lungs of cement mill workers. This study was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Hamdard University Karachi, Pakistan, during the period June to August 2000. In this study 50, apparently healthy volunteer male cement mill workers were randomly selected with an average of 13 years exposure with age ranging from 20-60 years. They were matched with 50, healthy male control subjects in terms of age, height, weight and socioeconomic status. Both groups met with exclusion criteria as per standard. Radiology was performed by Trophy radiology. Results: The present study demonstrated 12% of cases with interstitial lung disease and 2% of cases with pleural thickening and chronic bronchitis in cement mill workers. Conclusion: Exposure to cement dust causes interstitial lung disease, pleural thickening and chronic bronchitis in cement mill workers. (author)

  19. Leaching Of Strontium From Cement-Based Matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementation is a method used to immobilize radioactive waste in order to protect the environment from radionuclide release. Rice husk ash (RHA) has been used successfully as pozzolanic material for several years. The study was carried out to investigate the ability of RHA (10%, 15% and 25%) accompanied with kaolin (K) (5%, 10% and 15%) and cement at water-cement ratio (w/c) of 45% to improve their leachability resistance from a cement matrix. The study was subjected to the leaching procedure of ANSI (2003) for 120 days. The cumulative fractional release data suggested that there was a substantial decrease in strontium ions leachability from cement formulation containment with increase in its rice husk ash (RHA) at 25% and kaolin at 10% content. The improvement of strontium ions leach rates is mostly due to diffusion phenomena and selected additives which depend essentially on the degree of porosity of the cementitious products. The chemical performance of the matrices is acceptable and the decreased leachability was attributed to the progression in the formation of cement hydrated phases and the pozzolanic reaction between RHA, kaolin and lime in cement matrices. The mathematical analysis of the long term leaching results indicated that strontium leaching was resulted from a combination of first order reaction and diffusion mechanisms

  20. Reaction kinetics of dual setting α-tricalcium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurle, Katrin; Christel, Theresa; Gbureck, Uwe; Moseke, Claus; Neubauer, Juergen; Goetz-Neunhoeffer, Friedlinde

    2016-01-01

    Addition of ductile polymers to calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA)-forming bone cements based on α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) is a promising approach to improve the mechanical performance of α-TCP cements and extend their application to load-bearing defects, which is else impeded by the brittleness of the hardened cement. One suitable polymer is poly-(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (p-HEMA), which forms during cement setting by radical polymerisation of the monomer. In this study the hydration kinetics and the mechanical performance of α-TCP cements modified with addition of different HEMA concentrations (0-50 wt% in the cement liquid) was investigated by quantitative in situ XRD and four-point bending tests. Morphology of CDHA crystals was monitored by scanning electron microscopy. The hydration of α-TCP to CDHA was increasingly impeded and the visible crystal size of CDHA increasingly reduced with increasing HEMA concentration. Modification of the cements by adding 50 wt% HEMA to the cement liquid changed the brittle performance of the hardened cement to a pseudoplastic behaviour, reduced the flexural modulus and increased the work of fracture, while lower HEMA concentrations had no significant effect on these parameters. In such a composite, the extent of CDHA formation was considerably reduced (34.0 ± 1.8 wt% CDHA with 50 % HEMA compared to 54.1 ± 2.4 wt% CDHA in the reference formed after 48 h), while the general reaction kinetics were not changed. In conclusion, while the extent of CDHA formation was decreased, the mechanical properties were noticeably improved by addition of HEMA. Hence, α-TCP/HEMA composites might be suitable for application in some load-bearing defects and have adequate properties for mechanical treatment after implantation, like insertion of screws. PMID:26610924

  1. Utilization from Cement Kiln Dust in Removal of Acid Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E.S.I. Saraya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The growth of industries and day to day changes in human activities has resulted in an increase in the volume and complexity of wastewater to the environment. Textile industry is one of the most water consumers industries of Egypt, thus discharges large amounts of wastewater effluents during processing, especially, in the coloring and washing steps. Cement kiln dust is a solid waste in cement manufacturing. Approximately 2.5-3.0 (6-9% million tons of cement kiln dust is produced annually in Egypt and that cause significant environmental problems. Approach: This study aims to investigate removal of some acid dyes from aqueous solution using cement kiln dust and monitoring the dye in colored cement kiln dust. Solution with 0.4 g L-1 concentration was treated with cement kiln dust until the color of dye disappears. The colored cement kiln residue was separate by filtration and dried. The concentration of dye was measured before and after treatment by UV-Vis spectroscopy as well as after washing of colored residue. Also, the colored residue was investigated with, XRD, IR and DSC techniques as well as the loss on ignition at 450°C. Results: The results found that the cement kiln dust has the power to remove all existing acid dyes and the residue has the same color of dye. When colored residue was washed with water, there was no back diffusion of dye in to water. This may be mainly due to chemical reaction that took place between cement kiln dust and dye. Thus analysis such as IR, XRD and DSC are in agreement with these results. Conclusion: CKD is efficient in the processes of dye removal from aqueous solutions. The interaction between acid dye and CKD is fast (just minutes. So, we suggest using spent CKD for dye removal of waste water.

  2. Use of alternative fuels in the Polish cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokrzycki, Eugeniusz; Uliasz-Bochenczyk, Alicja [Polish Academy of Sciences, Mineral and Energy Economy Research Inst., Krakow (Poland); Sarna, Mieczyslaw [Lafarge Cement Polska S.A., Malogoszcz (Poland)

    2003-02-01

    Alternative fuels are made up of mixtures of different wastes, such as industrial, municipal and hazardous wastes. These fuels need to have an appropriate chemical energy content which depends on the type of components and their organic content. An industry that is particularly well suited to the employment of alternative fuels is the cement industry. There are a number of factors that promote the use of alternative fuels in cement kilns. Of these factors, the most notable are: the high temperatures developed, the appropriate kiln length, the long period of time the fuel stays inside the kiln and the alkaline environment inside the kiln. There are a number of countries that use their own alternative fuels in cement plants. These fuels have different trade names and they differ in the amounts and the quality of the selected municipal and industrial waste fractions used. The fuels used should fall within the extreme values of parameters such as: minimum heating value, maximum humidity content, and maximum content of heavy and toxic metals. Cement plants in Poland also use alternative fuels. Within the Lafarge Group, the cement plants owned by Lafarge Poland Ltd. have initiated activities directed at promoting the wider use of alternative fuels. There are a number of wastes that can be incinerated as fuel in cement plants. Some that can be mentioned are: selected combustible fractions of municipal wastes, liquid crude-oil derived wastes, car tyres, waste products derived from paint and varnish production, expired medicines from the pharmaceutical industry and others. The experience gained by the cement plants of Lafarge Cement Poland Ltd confirms that such activities are economically and ecologically beneficial. The incineration of alternative fuels in cement plants is a safe method for the utilisation of waste that is ecologically friendly and profitable for the industrial plants and society alike. (Author)

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

    2008-01-31

    This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in

  4. Silver-Doped Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements with Antibacterial Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, J. V.; Fosca, M.; Graziani, V.; Egorov, A. A.; Zobkov, Yu. V.; Fedotov, A. Yu.; Ortenzi, M.; Caminiti, R.; Baranchikov, A. E.; Komlev, V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bone cements (CPCs) with antibacterial properties are demanded for clinical applications. In this study, we demonstrated the use of a relatively simple processing route based on preparation of silver-doped CPCs (CPCs-Ag) through the preparation of solid dispersed active powder phase. Real-time monitoring of structural transformations and kinetics of several CPCs-Ag formulations (Ag = 0 wt %, 0.6 wt % and 1.0 wt %) was performed by the Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction technique. The partial conversion of β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) phase into the dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) took place in all the investigated cement systems. In the pristine cement powders, Ag in its metallic form was found, whereas for CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % cements, CaAg(PO3)3 was detected and Ag (met.) was no longer present. The CPC-Ag 0 wt % cement exhibited a compressive strength of 6.5 ± 1.0 MPa, whereas for the doped cements (CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt %) the reduced values of the compressive strength 4.0 ± 1.0 and 1.5 ± 1.0 MPa, respectively, were detected. Silver-ion release from CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % cements, measured by the Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, corresponds to the average values of 25 µg/L and 43 µg/L, respectively, rising a plateau after 15 days. The results of the antibacterial test proved the inhibitory effect towards pathogenic Escherichia coli for both CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % cements, better performances being observed for the cement with a higher Ag-content. PMID:27096874

  5. Applicability of low alkaline cement for construction and alteration of bentonite in the cement. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study consists of accelerating corrosion test of rebar in saline, automogeneous shrinkage test of HFSC, accelerating test for bentonite and rock, and summarizing rock and bentonite alteration. Corrosion of rebars in HFSC: Since sorption capacity of HFSC for Cl ion is slow due to low alkalinity, rate of corrosion of rebar in HFSC is very large. Cracking due to corrosion is generating in 4 years or 20 years, although service period is deferent in OPC amount. Automogenous shrinkage: Automogenous shrinkage of HFSC is larger than OPC in cement paste. It decreases corresponding to rise of fly ash content. The shrinkage in HFSC 226 is quite similar to OPC. The shrinkage in HFSC concrete is smaller than OPC concrete. 720 days alteration test of bentonite by solution of low alkaline cement: Ion exchange to Ca bentonite and calcite are observed in the solid phase. Thin plate of bentonite is disappeared and round shaped secondary mineral is generated. Dissolution of bentonite and generation of secondary minerals are limited in pH 11.0 or less, since pH of bentonite is about 10.0. 720 days alteration test of rock by solution of low alkaline cement: Calcite is generated in very test. Very small evidence is observed as generation of secondary minerals. Etched pits are observed in tuff A due to corrosion. (author)

  6. Use of ancient copper slags in Portland cement and alkali activated cement matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazer, Amin; Payá, Jordi; Borrachero, María Victoria; Monzó, José

    2016-02-01

    Some Chilean copper slag dumps from the nineteenth century still remain, without a proposed use that encourages recycling and reduces environmental impact. In this paper, the copper slag abandoned in landfills is proposed as a new building material. The slags studied were taken from Playa Negra and Púquios dumps, both located in the region of Atacama in northern Chile. Pozzolanic activity in lime and Portland cement systems, as well as the alkali activation in pastes with copper slag cured at different temperatures, was studied. The reactivity of the slag was measured using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electrical conductivity and pH in aqueous suspension and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Furthermore, copper slag-Portland cement mortars with the substitution of 25% (by weight) of cement by copper slag and alkali-activated slag mortars cured at 20 and 65 °C were made, to determine the compressive strength. The results indicate that the ancient copper slags studied have interesting binding properties for the construction sector. PMID:26615227

  7. Stabilization effects of surplus soft clay with cement and GBF slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jiang; Chirdchanin MODMOLTIN; Katsutada ONITSUKA

    2004-01-01

    Utilization of industrial waste and surplus construction soft clay as construction material was recommended, and many attempts at geotechnical waste utilization were undertaken. This study aimed at the application of cement and a kind of industrial wastes, i.e. granulated blast furnace slag, on stabilization of surplus soft clay. The results showed that the cement and slag can successfully stabilize Ariake clays even though this high organic clay fails to be stabilized by lime and cement. Addition of slag in cement for stabilization induces higher strength than cement alone for longer curing time. The application of the cement with slag is more suitable than cement alone for stabilization because of economical consideration.

  8. Crack Formation in Cement-Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprince, A.; Pakrastinsh, L.; Vatin, N.

    2016-04-01

    The cracking properties in cement-based composites widely influences mechanical behavior of construction structures. The challenge of present investigation is to evaluate the crack propagation near the crack tip. During experiments the tension strength and crack mouth opening displacement of several types of concrete compositions was determined. For each composition the Compact Tension (CT) specimens were prepared with dimensions 150×150×12 mm. Specimens were subjected to a tensile load. Deformations and crack mouth opening displacement were measured with extensometers. Cracks initiation and propagation were analyzed using a digital image analysis technique. The formation and propagation of the tensile cracks was traced on the surface of the specimens using a high resolution digital camera with 60 mm focal length. Images were captured during testing with a time interval of one second. The obtained experimental curve shows the stages of crack development.

  9. Specific Examples of Hybrid Alkaline Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Jiménez Ana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid alkaline cements are obtained by alkali-activating cementitious blends in the Na2O-CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-H2O system. The present paper discusses the results of activating different cementitious blends containing a low OPC clinker content ( 15MPa a 2 days different alkaline activators were used (liquid and solid. The reaction products obtained were also characterised by XRD, SEM/EDX and 27Al and 29Si NMRMAS. The results showed that the main reaction product was a mix of cementitious gels C-A-S-H and (N,C-A-S-H, and that their relative proportions were strongly influenced by the calcium content in the initial binder

  10. Carboloy grade 370 (sintered cemented carbide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboloy Grade 370 containing 72.0 WC, 8.0 TiC, 11.5 TaC, 8.5 Co is a tough, wear-resistant grade of cemented carbide for heavy duty roughing cuts of steels, ferrous castings, stainless steels, and some high-temperature alloys. It successfully withstands those high temperatures encountered in heavy duty machining. It is used as the as-sintered condition, without further heat treatment. It cannot be machined, but can be ground to final size by use of SiC and diamonds as abrasives. Carbology 370 is rarely applied where corrosive environments exist. Safety note is given to ensure protection for personnel and equipment from flying fragments and sharp edges when working with these materials, and an adequate ventilation in grinding operation to avoid pulmonary problems. Microstructure and hardness vs. temperature curves for Carboloy 370 are presented and its physical and mechanical properties are tabulated

  11. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  12. Autogenous Phenomena in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    , som styrer deformationsforløbet. I forbindelse med denne afhandling er disse to fænomener blevet studeret gennem flere år. Den gennemgående tilgang har været at variere en lang række systemparametre – bl.a. temperatur, mikrosilicatilsætning, cementtype og vand/cement-forhold – og via en efterfølgende...... meningsfuld, eksperimentel definition af afbinding samt en operationel, teoretisk beskrivelse af sammenhængen mellem autogen deformation og RF-ændring. Specifikt vedrørende den foreslåede løsningsstrategi for autogent svind åbner denne afhandling op for en række nye muligheder. Som et eksempel på dette kan...

  13. Energy optimization and reduction of carbon footprint in cement manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallestey, Eduardo; Crosley, Gabriela; Wilson, Andrew; Maier, Urs; Hoppler, Rolf; Boerrnert, Thomas

    2010-09-15

    Cement producers are large consumers of thermal and electrical energy, which are only available at steadily increasing costs. Efforts to reduce demands by using higher efficiency equipment and substituting -fuels and raw materials to lower production costs have been addressed in recent years. Under the Kyoto Protocol industrialised countries agreed to reduce their collective greenhouse gas emissions. Cement producers as some of the largest emitters of CO2 have been especially challenged to find new and innovative ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This paper summarise some ABB technologies developed to assist the cement industry to meet these goals.

  14. Treating of cement curing with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main curing reactions of a portland cement are the formation of portlandite, Ca(OH)2, and calcium silicate hydrates, CSH. In nature, the cement extracts CO2 from air and convert the calcium hydroxide and CSH to calcium carbonate(CaCO3), calcite. By this process, chemically stable and mechanically enhanced cement is formed. By exposing an OPC to supercritical CO2 (SCCO2), the carbonate reaction was greatly accelerated. XRD analysis of experimental sample showed the acceleration of carbonate reaction and the test of compressive strength showed the mechanical enhancement

  15. Immobilization of 137Cs on cement-zeolite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research has been mainly concerned with the solidification of radioactive waste in cement based matrices to reduce the mobility of cesium in the solid form. Zeolite was fixed in a cement based matrix and exposed to synthetic ground water. The zeolite can replace sand materials that are used in the cement formulations. The influences of different weights of zeolite and sand on the diffusion coefficients for 137Cs were studied using the solid waste form treated in ground water. (author). 3 refs, 3 figs, 8 tabs

  16. Strength degradation of cemented carbides due to thermal shock

    OpenAIRE

    Tarragó Cifre, Jose María; Dorvlo, Selassie; Al-Dawery, Ihsan; Llanes Pitarch, Luis Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recognition of thermal shock and thermal fatigue as common failure modes in cemented carbide applications, the information on the influence of the microstructure on the resistance of hardmetals to abrupt temperature changes is rather scarce. In this paper, the strength behaviour of cemented carbides after severe thermal shock damage is investigated. In doing so, cemented carbides were subjected to thermal shock at two temperature ranges (¿T of 400ºC and 550ºC) and their retained s...

  17. Analysis of cement superplasticizers and grinding aids a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This literature survey reviews the methods for analysis of cement plasticizers and organic grounding aids in cement solutions in preparation of grouts/concrete and methods for determination of plasticizers and grinding aids in groundwater conditions. The survey focuses on three different types of superplasticizers: sulphonated naphthalene condensates, sulphonated melamine condensates and polycarboxylates. There are various organic grinding aids, such as alkanolamines, glycols or phenolic compounds, used in the cement industry. This review is concerned with the following compounds: triethylenetetramine, tetraethylenepentamine, diethanolamine, triethanolamine, triisopropanolamine, ethyleneglycol, diethyleneglycol, aminoethylethanolamine, hydroxyethyl diethylenetriamine and phenol. (orig.)

  18. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement-based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solubility model of the system CaO-SiO2-H2O is developed which takes account of the state of Si polymerization in the solid. Free energies of formations of its bonding hydrogel are tabulated. The internal redox conditions in cements have been measured; in particular, slags lower the Esub(eta) relative to OPC. The fate of Sr and U in cement systems has been determined; Sr is incorporated in the aluminate phases, while U6+ is precipitated as Ca-U-O-H2O phases. Lowering the internal Esub(eta) reduces U solubility. Studies of the carbonation of slag-cement blends are reported. (author)

  19. Occupational radioactive contamination of cement handlers of the civil construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their occupational activities, several classes of workers are exposed to radioactive contamination by materials they handle and that contain traces of uranium and its descendants. This is the case of people that work in the civil construction and that currently handle Portland cement. Among other radioactive elements, cement contains the highly radiotoxic polonium-210 which may promote skin cancer because of its high specific activity and high LET α-particle it emits. Concentrations of polonium-210 are reported for urine, hair and skin smear of workers of the civil construction that usually handle cement. The results are compared to a control group. (author)

  20. Autogenous healing properties of cement-based grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to provide information on the ability of cement-based grouts to self-seal. Autogenous sealing was investigated both on bulk grouts and in thin films of grouts. In both cases, the self-sealing capabilities of the cement-based grouts were investigated with water flowing through the grout. Autogenous sealing was studied through changes in pore structure (decrease in pore radius and volume of pores) and changes in the rate of water flow through the cement-based grouts. (author)

  1. Industrial trial to produce a low clinker, low carbon cement

    OpenAIRE

    Vizcaíno-Andrés, L. M.; Sánchez-Berriel, S.; Damas-Carrera, S.; A. Pérez-Hernández; Scrivener, K. L.; Martirena-Hernández, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of conditions for the industrial manufacture of a new cementitious system based on clinker-calcined clay and limestone, developed by the authors, referred as “low carbon cement” is presented. The new cement enables the substitution of more than 50% of the mass of clinker without compromising performance. The paper presents the follow-up of an industrial trial carried out in Cuba to produce 130 tonnes of the new cement at a cement plant. The new material proved to fulf...

  2. SETTING AND HARDENING OF AGRO/CEMENT COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Amal Hanafy Abdel-Kader; Hassan Hasanin Darweesh

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the use of bagasse fiber (BF) and unbleached bagasse pulp (BP) in a cement matrix, as a raw material, to produce lightweight construction materials is reported. The bagasse was used as partial replacement of cement at different levels: 0% (control cement), 1%, 2% 3%, and 4% by weight. The average size of bagasse fibers was less than 2 mm. Although a reduction in the physical and mechanical strength was observed, the incorporation of either fiber or pulp increased the water of c...

  3. Low porosity portland cement pastes based on furan polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of three different types of Furan polymers on the porosity, mechanical properties, mechanism of hydration and microstructure of Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) pastes was investigated. The results showed that mixing the OPC with Furan polymers, the standard water of consistency of the different cement pastes decreases and therefore the setting times (initial and final) are shortened. The total porosity of the hardened cement pastes decreased, while the mechanical properties improved and enhanced at all curing ages of hydration compared with those of the pure OPC pastes. The hydration process with Furan polymers proceeded according to the following decreasing order: F.ac. > F.ph. > F.alc. > OPC

  4. Utilization from Cement Kiln Dust in Removal of Acid Dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed E.S.I. Saraya; Mahmoud E.S. Aboul-Fetouh

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: The growth of industries and day to day changes in human activities has resulted in an increase in the volume and complexity of wastewater to the environment. Textile industry is one of the most water consumers industries of Egypt, thus discharges large amounts of wastewater effluents during processing, especially, in the coloring and washing steps. Cement kiln dust is a solid waste in cement manufacturing. Approximately 2.5-3.0 (6-9%) million tons of cement kiln dust is pr...

  5. Characterization of cement pastes by inverse gas chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    BENZARTI, K; V. Oliva; CHEHIMI, MM; BAETA NEVES, MI

    2002-01-01

    Two cement pastes, commonly used in concrete formulations, were characterized by IGC at 35-80°C before and after coating with an epoxy resin and a hardener. The cements are mixtures of hydrates in various proportions, such as calcium silicate hydrate (CaO-SiO2-H2O) and calcium hydroxyde Ca(OH)2. Apolar and polar probes were used to determine the cements dispersive and acid-base characteristics. The materials appear as high surface energy materials as judged from the dispersive contribution to...

  6. Evaluation of national cements for the conditioning of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary research studies carried out to implement the liquid radioactive waste conditioning by cementation are described. First of all, different kind of commercial cements in Peru are analyzed. In the first step, the analysis were made without using the radioactive material. The analyzed parameters were density, porosity, setting time and mechanical strength of a cement type called 'Atlas'. Samples of two geometries were used. One of them was a cylindrical sample (48mm diameter and 48mm height) and the another one was a prismatic sample (40x40x160mm). The results of the different kind of analysis are presented in this paper. (authors). 2 refs., 3 tabs

  7. The properties of polymerizable luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, J W; McKenzie, M A

    1999-10-01

    The properties of a polyacid-modified composite resin and two resin-modified luting cements have been studied. The polyacid-modified composite resin had the slowest setting reaction and, in this respect, it did not conform to the current international standard for luting cements. The compressive strength of all of the materials was studied after varying periods of storage from 24 h to 1 year. The polyacid-modified composite resin showed a distinct dip in strength at 1 month in all of the storage media, but otherwise it showed no significant variation with either age or storage medium. The resin-modified glass-ionomers showed variation at 24 h with storage medium (deionized water, 0.9% NaCl or 20 mmol dm(-3) lactic acid), but thereafter they showed little variation, until 1 year, when Vitremer luting showed a significant decline in strength in pure water. However, at 24 h and when stored in water, all of the materials had strengths that easily exceeded the minimum requirement of the current standard (70 MPa). They all took up water on storage, with diffusion coefficients ranging from 1.32 to 17. 19x10(-7) cm2 s(-1). These values were found to depend on whether the specimens were stored in pure water or in physiological saline. However, equilibrium water contents varied only slightly between water and saline. The polyacid-modified composite resin, Dyract-Cem, took up the least water, as well as showing the smallest variation in strength with age. By contrast, it was more difficult to mix than the other materials and the high viscosity of the paste led to the formation of voids and other imperfections in the specimens. PMID:10564431

  8. The Novel Method to Estimate Effect of Cement Slurry Consistency toward Friction Pressure in Oil/Gas Well Cementing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Pattinasarany

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate effect of cement slurry consistency toward friction pressure during oil/gas cementing operation. Completion of an oil/gas well has become more important because the reserve has become harder to find. The oil/gas company cannot afford to lose million dollars they spent when locating, drilling and recovering the oil from the Earth if they failed it. The safety, health and environment also have become more important issue, because any completion problem can lead to prolong operation and creating more hazard and risk. Cementing operation plays a very important role during completion because it creates a secure conduit to bring the precious oil/gas to the surface and a place to install completion jewelry. During cementing operation lost circulation can be one of the serious problems that arise. Circulation is said to be lost when the cement slurry pumped flows into one or more geological formations instead of returning up casing annulus. This is due to sum of hydrostatic pressure and friction pressure is exceeding fracture gradient. Method that commonly used to calculate friction from American Petroleum Institute (API assumed the cement slurry will exhibit time independent nature. Cement slurry consistency was found to have significant effect to friction pressure.

  9. Signal-inducing bone cements for MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty: evaluation of contrast-agent-based polymethylmethacrylate cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate two signal-inducing bone cements for MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty. The bone cements were made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, 5 ml monomeric, 12 g polymeric) and gadoterate meglumine as a contrast agent (CA, 0-40 μl) with either saline solution (NaCl, 2-4 ml) or hydroxyapatite bone substitute (HA, 2-4 ml). The cement's signal was assessed in an open 1-Tesla MR scanner, with T1W TSE and fast interventional T1W TSE pulse sequences, and the ideal amount of each component was determined. The compressive and bending strength for different amounts of NaCl and HA were evaluated. The cement's MRI signal depended on the concentration of CA, the amount of NaCl or HA, and the pulse sequence. The signal peaks were recorded between 1 and 10 μl CA per ml NaCl or HA, and were higher in fast T1W TSE than in T1W TSE images. The NaCl-PMMA-CA cements had a greater MRI signal intensity and compressive strength; the HA-PMMA-CA cements had a superior bending strength. Concerning the MR signal and biomechanical properties, these cements would permit MRI-guided cementoplasty. Due to its higher signal and greater compressive strength, the NaCl-PMMA-CA compound appears to be superior to the HA-PMMA-CA compound. (orig.)

  10. Cross-shift study of acute respiratory effects in cement production workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Omid Aminian; Maryam Aslani; Khosro Sadeghniiat Haghighi

    2014-01-01

    Cement dust exposure is associated with increased respiratory impairment. As the major occupational hazard in the cement production industry is cement particles, our aim was to more thoroughly examine the acute effects of occupational exposure to cement dust on the respiratory system. A cross-shift study was conducted in a cement factory in Iran. 100 high exposed workers from production and packing sections and 100 low exposed from office workers were included. Environmental total dust was me...

  11. Using bio-based polymers for curing cement-based materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zlopasa, J.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Picken, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Curing is the process of controlling the rate and extent of moisture loss from the surface of cement based materials. It is the final stage in the production of cement-based materials and it is the essential part for achieving continuous hydration of cement, while avoiding cracking due to drying shrinkage. Continuous cement hydration also guarantees a strong bond between aggregate, fewer voids, and depercoliation of capillary pores. Thus, a properly cured cement-based material is prepared for...

  12. Characteristics and propierties of oil-well cements additioned with blast furnace slag

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, R.; Palacios, M.; Puertas, F.

    2011-01-01

    The present paper addresses the alkali activation of Portland cements containing blast furnace slag (20 and 30% of the cement by weight) with a view to the possible use of these materials in oil well construction. The hydration studies conducted showed that in cement/slag blends, the sodium silicate activating solution partially inhibited the dissolution of the silicate phases in the Portland cement, retarding cement hydration and reducing the precipitation of reaction products. D...

  13. Experimental in-vitro bone cements disintegration with ultrasonic pulsating water jet for revision arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    S. Hloch; Foldyna, J.; Pude, F.; Kloc, J.; M. Zeleňák; Hvizdoš, P.; Monka, P.; Smolko, I.; Ščučka, J. (Jiří); Kozak, D.; A. Sedmak; Mihalčinová, E.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the study of using the selective property of ultrasonic pulsating water jet for the disintegration of the interface created by bone cement between cemented femoral stem and trabecular bone tissue as a potential technique for revision arthroplasty. Six types of commercial bone cements based on Polymethyl Methacrylate were used for investigation. The cements were mixed using the DePuy - SmartMix® CTS / vacuum mixing bowl. Mechanical properties of hardened bone cements were ...

  14. Logistics Cost Modeling in Strategic Benchmarking Project : cases: CEL Consulting & Cement Group A

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen Cong Minh, Vu

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with logistics cost modeling for a benchmarking project as consulting service from CEL Consulting for Cement Group A. The project aims at providing flows and cost comparison of bagged cement of all cement players to relevant markets in Indonesia. The results of the project yielded strategic elements for Cement Group A in planning their penetration strategy with new investments. Due to the specific needs, Cement Group A requested a flexible costing approach taking into ...

  15. Evaluation of a porosity measurement method for wet calcium phosphate cements

    OpenAIRE

    Ajaxon, Ingrid; Maazouz, Yassine; Ginebra Molins, Maria Pau; Ohman, Caroline; Persson, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The porosity of a calcium phosphate cement is a key parameter as it affects several important properties of the cement. However, a successful, non-destructive porosity measurement method that does not include drying has not yet been reported for calcium phosphate cements. The aim of this study was to evaluate isopropanol solvent exchange as such a method. Two different types of calcium phosphate cements were used, one basic (hydroxyapatite) and one acidic (brushite). The cements were allowed ...

  16. Microhardness of dual-polymerized resin cement around a translucent fiber post in the intraradicular environment

    OpenAIRE

    Özcan, M.; Zamboni, S L; Valandro, F; Bottino, M.A.; Bagis, B

    2011-01-01

    AIM: In this study, we evaluated the effect of photopolymerization on Vickers microhardness of dual-polymerized resin cement at three locations when a translucent quartz fiber post was used. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Single-rooted bovine teeth received quartz fiber post systems (length: 12 mm) using a dual-polymerized resin cement. In Group 1, the posts were cemented but not photopolymerized, and in Group 2, the posts were both cemented and photopolymerized. After cementation, approximately 1.5-...

  17. Rheological Properties of Cemented Tailing Backfill and the Construction of a Prediction Model

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Lang; KI-IL Song; Dezheng Lao; Tae-Hyuk Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Workability is a key performance criterion for mining cemented tailing backfill, which should be defined in terms of rheological parameters such as yield stress and plastic viscosity. Cemented tailing backfill is basically composed of mill tailings, Portland cement, or blended cement with supplementary cement material (fly ash and blast furnace slag) and water, among others, and it is important to characterize relationships between paste components and rheological properties to optimize the w...

  18. Cementation of Radioactive Waste from a PWR with Calcium Sulfoaluminate Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent radioactive ion-exchange resin (SIER) and evaporation concentrates are radioactive wastes that are produced at by pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. Borate, which is used as a retardent for cement, is also present as a moderator in a PWR, therefore, borate will be present in both ion-exchange resins and evaporation concentrates. In this study the use of Calcium sulfoaluminate cements (SAC) as encapsulation medium for these waste streams was investigated. The study involved the manufacturing of different cement test samples with different amounts of SAC cement, waste resins (50% water content) and admixtures. In order to reduce hydration heat during 200 L solidification experiments, different admixtures were investigated. Initial results based on compressive strength tests and hydration temperature studies, indicated that zeolite was the best admixture for the current waste form. Experiments indicated that the addition of resin material into the current cement matrix reduces the hydration heat during curing Experimental results indicated that a combination of SAC (35 wt. %), zeolite (7 wt. %) mix with 42 wt. % resins (50% water content) and 16 wt. % of water forms a optimum cured monolith with low hydration heat. The microstructures of hydrated OPC, SAC and SAC with zeolite addition were studied using a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM results indicated that the SAC matrices consist of a needle type structure that changed gradually into a flake type structure with the addition of zeolite. Additionally, the presence of zeolite material inside the SAC matrix reduced the leaching rates of radionuclides significantly. In a final 200 L grouting test, measured results indicated a hydration temperature below 90oC withno thermal cracks after solidified. The influence of radiation on the compressive strength and possible gas generation (due to radiolysis) on cement waste forms containing different concentrations ion exchange resin was

  19. Laboratory Investigation on the Strength Gaining of Brick Aggregate Concrete Using Ordinary Portland Cement and Portland Composite Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoque M H, Numen E H, Islam N., Mohammed

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the laboratory investigation of strength variation of brick aggregate concrete made with ordinary Portland cement (OPC and Portland composite cement (PCC.The investigation was conducted by testing concrete cylinder specimens at different ages of concrete with concrete mix ratios: 1:1.5:3 and 1:2:4 by volume and with water cement ratios=0.45 and 0.60. The test result reveals that at the early age, concrete composed with OPC attained larger compressive strength than the concrete made of PCC. However, in the later age concrete made with PCC achieved higher strength than OPC.

  20. Encapsulation of ILW raffinate in the Dounreay cementation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dounreay Cementation Plant has been designed and constructed to encapsulate the first cycle liquid raffinate arising from the reprocessing of irradiated Research Reactor fuel into a cementitious matrix. The acidic liquid waste is conditioned with sodium hydroxide prior to mixing with the cement powders (a 9:1 ratio of Blast Furnace Slag / Ordinary Portland Cement with 5% Lime). The complete cement mixing process is performed within the 500-liter drum, which provides the waste package primary containment. The plant has recently been commissioned and has commenced routine operation, processing stocks of existing raffinate that has been stored at Dounreay for up to 30 years. The waste loading per drum has been optimised within the constraints of the chemical composition of the raffinate, with an expected plant throughput of 2.5 m3/week. (author)

  1. Thermal analysis of cement pastes with superabsorbent polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Lukosiute, Irena;

    2013-01-01

    Thermal analysis of cement systems is very helpful in the understanding of many different properties of cementitious compounds, both for the original reacting compounds, and also for the resulting hydration products. Superabsorbent polymers can be added to cement systems with many different reasons......, so it is relevant that fundamental knowledge of this new compound on the development of hydration is well understood [1-3]. This paper reports research on thermal analysis of cement pastes with superabsorbent polymers. We have studied several parameters: the concentration of SAP in the system, the...... effect of particle size distribution, and their influence on the hydration process with focus on cement-silica systems. This is done at different thermodynamic conditions, so the energy of activation in the different systems can be accessed. This paper provides information relevant to hydration modelling...

  2. INTERACTION OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED WATER WITH THE CEMENT BINDING AGENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gujumdzhjan Perch Pogosovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the procedure of interaction between the water and the particles of the cement binding agent, if subjected to high-speed processing inside an intensive mixing device that represents a hydrodynamic stirrer composed of a rotor and variable section turbines. The proposed method of modification (mechanical activation of the cement and water suspension makes it possible to reduce the cost of concrete due to reduction of the cement consumption rate. The research of strength-related properties of the cement stone has proven that high-speed mechanical processing of the binding agent, if mixed with the water, may improve mechanical properties of concrete by 25 to 30 %.

  3. Properties of cemented carbides alloyed by metal melt treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the results of investigations into the influence of alloying elements introduced by metal melt treatment (MMT-process) on properties of WC-Co and WC-Ni cemented carbides. Transition metals of the IV - VIll groups (Ti, Zr, Ta, Cr, Re, Ni) and silicon were used as alloying elements. It is shown that the MMT-process allows cemented carbides to be produced whose physico-mechanical properties (bending strength, fracture toughness, total deformation, total work of deformation and fatigue fracture toughness) are superior to those of cemented carbides produced following a traditional powder metallurgy (PM) process. The main mechanism and peculiarities of the influence of alloying elements added by the MMT-process on properties of cemented carbides have been first established. The effect of alloying elements on structure and substructure of phases has been analyzed. (author)

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF CEMENT-CONCRETE SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper,a life-cycle assessment methodology is used to evaluate the environmental effects of cement-concrete system.The production factors notably affecting environment are obtained and the way improving environmental effects is indicated.

  5. Further investigations of the properties of polymer modified cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report concludes the work done on behalf of the Department of the Environment on polymer modified cement composites. Topics covered include: the influence of cure schedule on flexural properties, observation of the onset and cracking during flexural testing, measurement of water permeability and caesium diffusion rates, and the use of Back Scattered Electron Imaging to identify the polymer phase. The properties of epoxide resin modified cements in the previous report were disappointing. Air entrainment of the mixing stage was a likely cause of the poor performance of these products and procedures to overcome this problem were devised. The range of polymer additives investigated was broadened by the inclusion of modified acrylic latexes and a polymensable acrylate resin additive. Properties for OPC and 9 BFS: 1 OPC cements are compared and the modification of properties achieved by polymer additions to both cement systems is discussed. (author)

  6. Magnet with asbestos-cement insulation of coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problem of creating radiation stable insulation for magnet element coils withstanding radiation loads of above 5X10 Gy appeared in result of growth of accelerator energies and intensities. Magnet structure and technology for coil fabrication with asbestos-cement insulation are described. Results of magnetic measurements are presented. Special bay was constructed for the development of technology for fabricating coils with asbestos-cement insulation. The coil for three meter model magnet, designated for operation in the zone of target stations of hadron channels in experimental base of accelerating and storage facility was fabricated. Principle possibility of fabricating coils with asbestos-cement insulation on the base of domestic cements and asbestos was demonstrated

  7. Replacement of asbestos cement fills in natural draft cooling towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, G.A.; Stackhouse, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes some of the deterioration problems which have been encountered with asbestos cement materials, the environmental and regulatory problems associated with asbestos, and some of the concerns to be addressed replacing fill material in a natural draft tower.

  8. Acoustic monitoring techniques for corrosion degradation in cemented waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work carried out to investigate acoustic emission as a monitor of corrosion and degradation of wasteforms where the waste is potentially reactive metal. Electronic monitoring equipment has been designed, built and tested to allow long-term monitoring of a number of waste packages simultaneously. Acoustic monitoring experiments were made on a range of 1 litre cemented Magnox and aluminium samples cast into canisters comparing the acoustic events with hydrogen gas evolution rates and electrochemical corrosion rates. The attenuation of the acoustic signals by the cement grout under a range of conditions has been studied to determine the volume of wasteform that can be satisfactorily monitored by one transducer. The final phase of the programme monitored the acoustic events from full size (200 litre) cemented, inactive, simulated aluminium swarf wastepackages prepared at the AEA waste cementation plant at Winfrith. (Author)

  9. [Cement augmentation of pedicle screws : Pros and cons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnake, K J; Blattert, T R; Liljenqvist, U

    2016-09-01

    Cement augmentation of pedicle screws biomechanically increases screw purchase in the bone. However, clinical complications may occur. The pros and cons of the technique are discussed from different clinical perspectives. PMID:27514827

  10. Solubility of Three Luting Cements in Dynamic Artificial Saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nikzad

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the solubility of three luting cements in artificial saliva.Materials and Methods: Twenty disks (10×4 mm of polycarboxylate, zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements were prepared according to manufactures’ instructions. After setting, they were desiccated and each ten specimens were immersed in artificial saliva with special pH (3 or 5, circulated with magnetic field for 10 days. Then disks were again desiccated and weighed. Solubility values were deduced from these different measures.Results: For the two pH, solubility were significantly lower in glass ionomer luting ce-ment, and polycarboxylate showed the most weight loss of all the materials tested (P<0.05. The solubility values were more in acidic environment (P<0.05.Conclusion: The pH of the environment strongly affected the solubility of the materials. Cement type also has significant effects on solubility values.

  11. In vivo characterization of polymer based dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiyanti P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In vivo studies investigating the characterization of dental cements have been demonstrated. As few in vitro studies on this cement system have been performed. Previous researches in dental material has been standardized dental cement which fulfilled the physical and mechanical characteristic such as shear strength but were on in vitro condition, the animal model and clinical study of dental cement from laboratory has not been done yet. This research examined physical and mechanical characteristic in vivo using rabbit by making the caries (class III in anterior teeth especially in mesial or distal incisive, fulfilled the cavity by dental cement and analyzed the compressive strength, tensile strength, and microstructure using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Purpose: This study is aimed to describe the in vivo characterization of dental cements based on polymer (zinc phosphate cement, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer cement and zinc oxide eugenol. Methods: First, preparation was done on animal model’s teeth (6 rabbits, male, 5 months old. The cavity was made which involved the dentin. Then the cavity was filled with dental cement. After the filling procedure, the animal model should be kept until 21 days and than the compressive test, tensile test and microstructure was characterized. Compressive test and tensile test was analyzed using samples from extracted tooth and was measured with autograph. The microstructure test was measured using SEM. Results: The best compressive strength value was belongs to zinc phosphate cement which was 101.888 Mpa and the best tensile strength value was belongs to glass ionomer cement which was 6.555 Mpa. Conclusion: In conclusion, comparing with 3 others type of dental cements which are zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate and glass ionomer cement, zinc oxide eugenol cement has the worst for both physical and mechanical properties.Latar belakang: Studi in vivo meneliti karakterisasi secara in vivo dari

  12. Rheological Influence of Synthetic Zeolite on Cement Pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldino, N.; Gabriele, D.; Frontera, P.; Crea, F.; de Cindio, B.

    2008-07-01

    Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) is characterized by specific and particular mechanical properties, often due to the addition of components, able to modify the paste rheology. Concrete properties are strongly affected by characteristics of the fresh cement paste that is the continuous phase dispersing larger aggregates. Therefore, aiming to characterize mechanical properties of final concrete is relevant to know rheological properties of the base cement paste. In this work cement pastes for SCC were prepared by using, as additive, synthetic zeolite 5A in different amounts and they were analyzed by small amplitude oscillations. Experimental results have shown a relationship between dynamic moduli and zeolite content, identifying a proper level of zeolite addition. Moreover samples containing traditional fine additives, such as silica fume and limestone, were prepared and experimental data were compared to those obtained by using zeolite. It was found that zeolite seems to give better properties to cement paste than other additives can do.

  13. Preterm delivery among people living around Portland cement plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun-Yuh; Chang, Chih-Ching; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Ho, Chi-Kung; Wu, Trong-Neng; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2003-05-01

    The Portland cement industry is the main source of particulate air pollution in Kaohsiung city. Data in this study concern outdoor air pollution and the health of individuals living in communities in close proximity to Portland cement plants. The prevalence of delivery of preterm birth infants was significantly higher in mothers living within 0-2 km of a Portland cement plant than in mothers living within 2-4 km. After controlling for several possible confounders (including maternal age, season, marital status, maternal education, and infant sex), the adjusted odds ratio was 1.30 (95% CI=1.09-1.54) for the delivery of preterm infants for mothers living close to the Portland cement plants, chosen at the start to be from 0 to 2 km. These data provide further support for the hypothesis that air pollution can affect the outcome of pregnancy. PMID:12706757

  14. Sawdust-clay-cement-plastic composite prepared by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new material of sawdust-clay-cement-plastic composite has been prepared by impregnation of unsaturated polyester resin with different parts of styrene and methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomers into the void space of completely dried and molded specimens followed by exposure to Co-60 gamma radiation to induce graft copolymerization of the impregnated monomers onto the sawdust-clay-cement matrix. For each monomer mixture, suitable impregnation time and the radiation dose has been determined. High compression strength and bending modulus of specimens show that this material is comparable with high strength concrete. The hydration of sawdust-clay-cement matrix after molding for 1 up to 28 days shows that hydration products which deposited within the pore-spaces, decrease the porosity of the composite. The effect of the polymer loading content, as affected by the porosity, on mechanical properties is more effective than hardening of cement portion after hydration

  15. Preterm delivery among people living around Portland cement plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Portland cement industry is the main source of particulate air pollution in Kaohsiung city. Data in this study concern outdoor air pollution and the health of individuals living in communities in close proximity to Portland cement plants. The prevalence of delivery of preterm birth infants as significantly higher in mothers living within 0-2 km of a Portland cement plant than in mothers living within 2-4 km. After controlling for several possible confounders (including maternal age, season, marital status, maternal education, and infant sex), the adjusted odds ratio was 1.30 (95% I=1.09-1.54) for the delivery of preterm infants for mothers living close to he Portland cement plants, chosen at the start to be from 0 to 2 km. These data provide further support for the hypothesis that air pollution can affect he outcome of pregnancy

  16. Thermal Manifestations and Nanoindentation of Bone Cements for Orthopaedic Surgery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hloch, Sergej; Monka, P.; Hvizdoš, P.; Jakubéczyová, D.; Kozak, D.; Čolič, K.; Kloc, J.; Magurová, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2013), s. 251-258. ISSN 0354-9836 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : bone cement * exothermic behaviour * nanoindentation * porosity * osteonecrosis Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants Impact factor: 0.962, year: 2013

  17. Role of Substrate on Quartz Cementation in Quartz Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farver, J. R.; Winslow, D.; Onasch, C.

    2010-12-01

    Quartz cementation in quartz aggregates has been experimentally investigated. The starting material was disaggregated detrital quartz grains from the well-sorted, mature St. Peter Sandstone. The ‘as-is’ grains have patches of iron oxide coatings and some have euhedral overgrowths that contain iron oxide dust rims. In addition a set of experiments was run using grains that were cleaned by soaking in sodium hydrosulfite and sodium bisulfate solutions to remove exposed iron oxide coatings. Experimental charges consisted of amorphous silica powder (≈30 mg) to provide a source of silica for the quartz cement, AlCl3 powder (≈3 mg) to provide a tracer for Cathodoluminescence (CL) identification of cement formed during the experiment, 25 wt% NaCl brine solution (≈25 mg) to increase the silica solubility and to better mimic oil field brines, and the natural quartz grains (100-130 mg). The charges were weld-sealed in Au capsules and run in cold-seal pressure vessels at 250°C to 450°C at 150 MPa confining pressure for up to 8 weeks. After the experiments, the samples were vacuum impregnated with a low viscosity epoxy containing a blue dye. After curing, the sample charge was sawn in half along its long axis and one half was polished (to 1 micron diamond paste) for analysis. The nature and amount of quartz cement in the samples were determined by a combination of CL, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Photomosaics of the samples were created and the amount of cement, porosity, and average grain sizes were determined by point-counting. The cement formed during the experiment was easily recognized from the quartz grains (and previous overgrowths) by the difference in luminescence. The results indicate the amorphous silica powder provides a ready source for silica for quartz cementation due to its greater solubility than the quartz. The cementation rates are rapid (>14% cement formed in 2 weeks at 450°C and >7% in 8 weeks at 250°C). Compared to

  18. Utilization of Eucalyptus Oil Refineries Waste for Cement Particle Board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudi Setiadji

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of eucalyptus oil refinery waste in the manufacture of building material component of cement particle board is expected to reduce the price of housing units. This research used laboratory experimental methods, eucalyptus oil waste in the form of branches an twigs from eucalyptus tree. The variation of the testing were mixtures composition of the particle : cement, additives as accelerators, cold press load during manufacture of cement particle board. Cold press duration of cement board was 24 hours. The size of particle boards were (40 x 40 cm2 and 13 mm thick. The samples were tested for its density, water content, water absorption, flexural strength, thickness swelling, adhesion strength, and the nails pull out strength.

  19. Evaluation of brazilian bentonites as additive in the radwaste cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of some Brazilian bentonites has been evaluated, concerning to their use as additive in the radwaste cementation. The purpose of the bentonite is to retain the radioelements in the final product in leaching process. Experiments to determine properties such as compressive strenght, viscosity, set time leaching and cesium sorption have been carried out to this evaluation. After one-year test, the results show that the bentonites greatly reduce the cesium release. A literature survey about cementation process and plants and about the cement product characteristics has been made in order to obtain a reliable final product, able to be transported and storaged. Some leaching test methods and mathematical models, that could be applied in the evaluation of cement products with bentonite have been evaluated. (author)

  20. Applications of thermal energy storage in the cement industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, F. A.; Beshore, D. G.; Miller, F. M.; Gartner, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    In the manufacture of cement, literally trillions of Btu's are rejected to the environment each year. The purpose of this feasibility study program was to determine whether thermal energy storage could be used to conserve or allow alternative uses of this rejected energy. This study identifies and quantifies the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, established use of this energy, investigates various storage system concepts, and selects energy conservation systems for further study. Thermal performance and economic analyses are performed on candidate storage systems for four typical cement plants representing various methods of manufacturing cement. Through the use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 10 to the 13th power Btu/year, or an equivalent on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for further development.

  1. Plant Test of Industrial Waste Disposal in a Cement Kiln

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘阳生; 韩杰; 等

    2003-01-01

    Destruction of industrial waste in cement rotary kilins(CRKs) is an alternative technology for the treatment of certain types of industrial waste(IW).In this paper,three typical types of industrial wastes were co-incinerated in the CRK at Beijing Cement Plant to determine the effects of waste disposal(especially solid waste disposal )on the quality of clinker and the concentration of pollutants in air emission.Experimental results show that(1) waste disposal does not affect the quality of clinker and fly ash,and fly ash after the IW disposal can still be used in the cement production,(2) heavy metals from IW are immobilized and stabilized in the clinker and cement,and (3) concentration of pollutants in air emission is far below than the permitted values in the China National Standard-Air Pollutants Emission Standard(GB 16297-1996).

  2. Influence of ferrite phase in alite-calcium sulfoaluminate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvallet, Tristana Yvonne Francoise

    Since the energy crisis in 1970's, research on low energy cements with low CO2- emissions has been increasing. Numerous solutions have been investigated, and the goal of this original research is to create a viable hybrid cement with the components of both Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSAC), by forming a material that contains both alite and calcium sulfoaluminate clinker phases. Furthermore, this research focuses on keeping the cost of this material reasonable by reducing aluminum requirements through its substitution with iron. The aim of this work would produce a cement that can use large amounts of red mud, which is a plentiful waste material, in place of bauxite known as an expensive raw material. Modified Bogue equations were established and tested to formulate this novel cement with different amounts of ferrite, from 5% to 45% by weight. This was followed by the production of cement from reagent chemicals, and from industrial by-products as feedstocks (fly ash, red mud and slag). Hydration processes, as well as the mechanical properties, of these clinker compositions were studied, along with the addition of gypsum and the impact of a ferric iron complexing additive triisopropanolamine (TIPA). To summarize this research, the influence of the addition of 5-45% by weight of ferrite phase, was examined with the goal of introducing as much red mud as possible in the process without negatively attenuate the cement properties. Based on this PhD dissertation, the production of high-iron alite-calcium sulfoaluminateferrite cements was proven possible from the two sources of raw materials. The hydration processes and the mechanical properties seemed negatively affected by the addition of ferrite, as this phase was not hydrated entirely, even after 6 months of curing. The usage of TIPA counteracted this decline in strength by improving the ferrite hydration and increasing the optimum amount of gypsum required in each composition

  3. Clean Development Mechanism: Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material (SCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Zaighum Abbass

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 a major Green House Gas (GHG in the atmosphere, is believed to be largely responsible for global climate change through industrial emissions. The level of CO2 concentration has exponentially increased from about 280 ppm at the start of the industrial revolution to about 380 ppm to date. Although Kyoto protocol has bound industrialized nations to reduce green house gas emissions by 5.2% below 1990 levels around year 2008-2012, but violation continues. The cement industry is one of the major emitter of green house gases, particularly CO2 due to its energy intensive production process. It is estimated that approximately 1 tone of CO2 is released during the manufacturing of each tone of Portland cement. Most of CO2 emissions originate from burning fossil fuels and de-carbonization of limestone in a cement plant. During past several decades, the use of by-product materials in concrete, either as components of blended cements or as admixtures, has increased significantly. In this study, another alternate Supplementary Cementing Material (SCM, Laterite has been used with the objectives: to evaluate the performance of cement containing different percentages of laterite (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 %; to identify the optimum replacement percentage; and to investigate the effects of different concentrations of laterite on various properties of cement. For that purpose, laterite was tested: before blending (for elemental and mineralogical composition by using XRF, SEM and XRD: after blending (Elemental analysis using XRF, fineness test by using Blaine’s air permeability test and for particle size % on 45, 90 and 200 µ sieve, respectively; and after hydration (for mineralogical analysis using SEM. Furthermore, physical tests of manufactured cement, i.e., water consistency, setting time, Le-Chatlier-expansion and compressive strength were also evaluated and compared with limestone and fly-ash cement blends. The results show that with the

  4. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL MODIFICATION OF MONOLITHIC CONCRETE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper is aimed to the development of scientific bases of the technology of modified concrete of new generation for special facilities by managing the processes of structure formation of modified cement system in conditions of hardening. Methodology. For the achievement the goal: 1 the research of rheological characteristics of modified concrete mixes for special facilities purpose and processes of structure formation of modified cement system of natural curing concrete was conducted; 2 there were defined methods of reliable evaluation of concrete strength at the removal time of formwork and transmission of loads to the constructions where the concrete has not reached the designed strength. Findings. The author found that the structure formation process develops in the hydrating modified cement system as a result of interaction of various macroions. In this process its active parts prevail, which considerably exceed its dissipative part compared to normal conditions of hardening. Originality. There were established the regularities of structure formation of modified cement system, reinforced with synthesized, well crystallized helical filamentary crystals, mechanical grip of which is considered as a principal source of strength in combination with an additional coupling achieved due to cross-germination of crystals. Practical value. In the study the increased binding capacity of cement in high strength concretes and the use of modified cement systems in the special conditions of concreting were considered. The organo-mineral modifying complex that provides the dispersed reinforcement of concrete cement matrix which allows modifying the process of cement matrix structure formation by changing the nature of the surface of binder and modifier was developed. The temperature factor has no negative influence on the hardening concrete and complex modifier provides the improved physico-mechanical characteristics of cement matrix and concrete

  5. Clay content of argillites: Influence on cement based mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Habert, Guillaume; CHOUPAY, Nathalie; Escadeillas, Gilles; MONTEL, Jean Marc; Guillaume, D

    2009-01-01

    The pozzolanic activity of four heated powders containing different clays has been tested. Mineral transformations during calcination from 20 to 900 °C have been followed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Compressive strength tests were performed at 1, 7 and 28 days on cement-clay mortars using 30% of pozzolanic material as a replacement by mass for cement. Calcination temperatures corresponded to the stages of potentially high reactivity identified by XR...

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercial...

  7. Investigation of cement based composites made with recycled rubber aggregate

    OpenAIRE

    Jevtić Dragica Lj.; Zakić Dimitrije M.; Savić Aleksandar R.

    2012-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations performed on cement based composites made with addition of recycled rubber as a partial replacement of natural river aggregate are presented in this paper. Different properties of cement based mortar were analyzed, both in fresh and in hardened state. Tested properties in the fresh state included: density, consistency and volume of entrained air. In the hardened state, the following properties were tested: density, mechanical properties (compre...

  8. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL MODIFICATION OF MONOLITHIC CONCRETE CEMENT SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Rudenko, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The paper is aimed to the development of scientific bases of the technology of modified concrete of new generation for special facilities by managing the processes of structure formation of modified cement system in conditions of hardening. Methodology. For the achievement the goal: 1) the research of rheological characteristics of modified concrete mixes for special facilities purpose and processes of structure formation of modified cement system of natural curing concrete was condu...

  9. Natural Radioactivity in Tanzania Cements and their Raw Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Aloyce Isaya Amasi; Kelvin Mark Mtei; Ijumba Jasper Nathan; Pawel Jodłowski; Chau Nguyen Dinh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the study of natural radioactivity in Tanzania Portland cements and their raw materials. Samples collected as raw materials were pozzolan, sandstone, limestone, clay, gypsum and cement as finished products. The natural radioactivity due to the presence of radium 226Ra, thorium 232Th and potassium 40K were measured by means of gamma spectrometer coupled with HPGe detector. The mean measured activity concentrations of 226Ra, thorium 232Th and potassium 40K in the raw materia...

  10. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modelling of cement behaviour at longer ages is reported. Factors studied include composition, pH and Esub(h). The stresses arising from irradiation are evaluated. The behaviour of two elements in cement - U and I has been studied; new experimental data are reported including solubility measurements. Some additional data are given on Sr. Results of desk studies relevant to lifetime predictions are presented. (author)

  11. Rheological Behaviors of Fresh Cement Pastes with Polycarboxylate Superplasticizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yanrong; KONG Xiangming; GAO Liang; WANG Jiaxin

    2016-01-01

    The rheological behaviors of fresh cement paste with polycarboxylate superplasticizer were systematically investigated. Inlfuential factors including superplasticizer to cement ratio (Sp/C), water to cement ratio (w/c), temperature, and time were discussed. Fresh cement pastes with Sp/Cs in the range of 0 to 2.0% and varied W/Cs from 0.25 to 0.5 were prepared and tested at 0, 20 and 40 °C, respectively. Flowability and rheological tests on cement pastes were conducted to characterize the development of the rheological behavior of fresh cement pastes over time. The exprimental results indicate that the initial lfowability and lfowability retention over shelf time increase with the growth in superplasticizer dosage due to the plasticizing effect and retardation effect of superplasticizer. Higher temperature usually leads to a sharper drop in initial lfowability and lfowability retention. However, for the cement paste with high Sp/C orw/c, the lfowability is slightly affected by temperature. Yield stress and plastic viscosity show similar variation trends to the flowability under the abovementioned inlfuential factors at low Sp/C. In the case of high Sp/C, yield stress and plastic viscosity start to decline over shelf time and the decreasing rate descends at elevated temperature. Moreover, two equations to roughly predict yield stress and plastic viscosity of the fresh cement pastes incorporating Sp/C,w/c, temperature and time are developed on the basis of the existing models, in which experimental constants can be extracted from a database created by the rheological test results.

  12. Design of Digital Control System for Cement Raw Material Preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ying; LI Hongsheng

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the design of cement raw material prepared digital control system by PROFIBUS. It uses the digital technology to implement the digital control system for raw material prepared of the cement factory. This system improves the communication between the industrial system and locale instrument devices. It applies digital communication to replace the 4-20 mA or 24VDC signal between locale lever device and controller.

  13. Development of Production Technologies for Universal Hydraulic Cement (UHC)

    OpenAIRE

    Syal, Dr. S K

    2013-01-01

    It is based on our recent approaches of Modern construction materials utilizing existing wastes such as fly ashes slags and to save energies by technological developments.The article is essential in the direction of new materials called Durable Integral polymer-pigmented cement concretes. UHC is calcium aluminate cements with natural properties of durable earth materials. It is a step towards Research for Innovation in Indian Industries

  14. The asbestos cement container and its characterization program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of packing container is designed in France, by SGN, for the reprocessing wastes conditioning: the asbestos cement container (CAC) made by the industrial process for pipes fabrication. Two types of CAC are studied, differing from each other by their wall thickness. The technology of which SGN is in charge is presented. A characterization program is operated by CEA in view of satisfying to regulatory requirements. Emphasis is placed upon the radionuclides migration study, through different asbestos cement samples

  15. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R.; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theor...

  16. Abrasive wear of two glass ionomer cements after simulated toothbrushing

    OpenAIRE

    Márcia Furtado Antunes de Freitas; Leandro Jum Imai; César Antunes de Freitas; Eduardo Carlos Bianchi; Carina Thaís de Almeida; Ismar Eduardo Martins Filho

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and objective: Glass ionomer cement, which was first introduced in Dentistry in 1972, presents good qualities such as aesthetics, fluoride release and adhesion to dental tissues. Because of its preventive characteristics regarding to dental caries, glass ionomer cement has been used for Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART), as reported by Frencken and Holmgren [6], meeting the principles announced by the World Health Organization (WHO) for application to large population groups...

  17. Bleeding and Filtration of Cement-Based Grout

    OpenAIRE

    Draganovic, Almir

    2009-01-01

    Grouting is a common method of sealing rock around tunnels to reduce or stop water inflow. Successful grouting significantly minimizes the maintenance cost and safety of the tunnel. Some questions about bleeding and penetrability of the grouts have to be examined more closely to carry out a successful grouting. Bleeding of cement-based grout is a complex problem. Measuring methods used today originate from the measuring of the bleeding of cement pastes used in ordinary building industry. Whet...

  18. Hydration and dimensional stability of calcium aluminate cement based systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bizzozero, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Calcium aluminate cements (CAC) are often used in combination with calcium sulfate and Portland cement for special applications where rapid setting, rapid drying and shrinkage compensation are required. A growing fraction of the clinker, which has the highest CO2 intensity, is being replaced by supplementary cementitious materials (SCM). These SCM are usually from industrial by-products such as slag, fly ashes or can simply be raw materials such as limestone. This project aims at replacing th...

  19. Impact of pressure on Sintering of Cemented Carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Owais, Tariq Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    In this Master Thesis work, the effect of pressure on sintering of cemented carbides is investigated. Special focus hasbeen given to the residual porosity after sintering. It is well known that sintering shrinkage depends on binder phasecontent, grain size, temperature and pressure. Thus 4 different cemented carbides grades were selected. The gradeswere pressed into standard products and TRS (Tensile Rupture Strength) rods with two different shrinkage factors.These were then sintered at diffe...

  20. Rheological and hydration characterization of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes

    OpenAIRE

    García-Maté, Marta; Santacruz, Isabel; de la Torre, Ángeles G.; León-Reina, Laura; Aranda, Miguel A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements are currently receiving a lot of attention because their manufacture produces less CO2 than ordinary Portland cement (OPC). However, it is essential to understand all parameters which may affect the hydration processes. This work deals with the study of the effect of several parameters, such as superplasticizer (SP), gypsum contents (10, 20 and 30 wt%) and w/c ratio (0.4 and 0.5), on the properties of CSA pastes during early hydration. This characteriza...

  1. Pore Distribution and Water Uptake in a Cenosphere–Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Baroniņš, J; Sētiņa, J; Šahmenko, G; Lagzdiņa, S; Šiškins, A

    2015-01-01

    Alumina silicate cenospheres (CS) is a significant waste material from power plants that use a coal. Use CS as Portland cement replacement material gives opportunity to control physical and mechanical properties and makes a product lighter and more cost-effective. In the frame of this study, Portland cement paste samples were produced by adding CS in the concentration range from 0 to 40 volume %. Water uptake of hardened samples was checked and pore ...

  2. Hydroxyapatite Formation on a Novel Dental Cement in Human Saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Johanna Engstrand; Erik Unosson; Håkan Engqvist

    2012-01-01

    Dental materials have to meet high standards regarding mechanical strength and handling properties. There is however only a limited amount of research that has been devoted to natural formation of hydroxyapatite (HA) in contact with the materials. The objective of the current investigation was to study the surface reactions occurring in human salvia on a novel dental cement. Ceramir Crown & Bridge, a bioceramic luting agent intended for permanent cementation of conventional oral prosthetics, ...

  3. Notes on hydrated cement fractals investigated by SANS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficker, T [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Physics Department, Technical University, Zizkova 17, CZ-602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Len, A [Budapest Neutron Centre, Konkoly Thege 29-33, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Nemec, P [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Physics Department, Technical University, Zizkova 17, CZ-602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-07-07

    Hydrated cement pastes with different water-to-cement ratios have been investigated by the small-angle scattering neutron technique. Special attention has been paid to the fractal nanostructure of the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H solid gel) and its basic building particles, i.e. nanometric globules. The inner stability of these particles has been tested and shown to be sufficiently persistent to withstand all spatial regroupings of the overall nanostructure caused by variations of w/c ratios.

  4. Low-modulus PMMA bone cement modified with castor oil

    OpenAIRE

    López, Alejandro; Hoess, Andreas; Thersleff, Thomas; Ott, Marjam; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Some of the current clinical and biomechanical data suggest that vertebroplasty causes the development of adjacent vertebral fractures shortly after augmentation. These findings have been attributed to high injection volumes as well as high Young’s moduli of PMMA bone cements compared to that of the osteoporotic cancellous bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of castor oil as a plasticizer for PMMA bone cements. The Young’s modulus, yield strength, maximum polymerization temper...

  5. Leaching of Cs+ and Co2+ from cement matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the safety for disposal of radioactive cement-waste matrix, the leaching Cs+ and Co2+, has been studied. This paper also presents results from studies made to determine the influence of bentonite and zeolite in immobilization of these metal ions. Leaching tests were carried out in accordance with a method by Hespe during 98 days. From the leaching data the apparent diffusivity of cobalt and cesium in the cement matrix was measured. (author)

  6. Strength of a granular medium reinforced by cement grouting

    OpenAIRE

    Maalej, Yamen; Dormieux, Luc; Canou, Jean; Dupla, Jean Claude

    2007-01-01

    The present Note describes an experimental study devoted to the strength of a sand reinforced by cement grouting. Through grouting, the granular medium gains a cohesion without significant change of the friction angle. The most significant experimental feature is that the cohesion is proportional to the volume fraction of cement in the grouted material. This result is interpreted within the framework of a periodic homogenization applied to yield design.

  7. Elemental metals for environmental remediation: learning from cementation process.

    OpenAIRE

    Noubactep, C.

    2010-01-01

    The further development of Fe(0)-based remediation technology depends on the profound understanding of the mechanisms involved in the process of aqueous contaminant removal. The view that adsorption and co-precipitation are the fundamental contaminant removal mechanisms is currently facing a harsh scepticism. Results from electrochemical cementation are used to bring new insights in the process of contaminant removal in Fe(0)/H(2)O systems. The common feature of hydrometallurgical cementation...

  8. Microstructural and Mechanical characterization of WC-Co cemented carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Zakia, Rizki

    2013-01-01

    WC-Co cemented carbides are ceramic-metal composite materials made of carbides embedded in a metal phase that acts as a binder. They exhibit an exceptional combination of strength, toughness and wear resistance as a result of the extremely different properties of their two constitutive phases. Consequently, cemented carbides have been positioned as suitable options when selecting materials for tribomechanical applications, and their implementation continues to gain a place in t...

  9. Cement industry control system based on multi agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海东; 邱冠周; 黄圣生

    2004-01-01

    Cement production is characterized by its great capacity, long-time delay, multi variables, difficult measurement and muhi disturbances. According to the distributed intelligent control strategy based on the multi agent, the multi agent control system of cement production is built, which includes integrated optimal control and diagnosis control. The distributed and multiple level structure of multi agent system for the cement control is studied. The optimal agent is in the distributed state, which aims at the partial process of the cement production, and forms the optimal layer. The diagnosis agent located on the diagnosis layer is the diagnosis unit which aims at the whole process of the cement production, and the central management unit of the system. The system cooperation is realized by the communication among optimal agents and diagnosis agent. The architecture of the optimal agent and the diagnosis agent are designed. The detailed functions of the optimal agent and the diagnosis agent are analyzed.At last the realization methods of the agents are given, and the application of the multi agent control system is presented. The multi agent system has been successfully applied to the off-line control of one cement plant with capacity of 5 000 t/d. The results show that the average yield of the clinker increases 9.3% and the coal consumption decreases 7.5 kg/t.

  10. Impacts of cement industries on environment and control measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilization of cement as building material is gaining more importance. Cement industries around the world are contributing in global and as well as local pollution. In Pakistan most of the cement industries are constructed in remote areas without any proper environmental impact assessment. Unawareness of peoples toward sustainable environment and due to lack of job opportunities, dwellers are demanding employment rather than clean environment from title-holder of the industry. Air pollution caused by cement industries is harmful to the human's health, spoils and erodes building surface, corrodes metals, weakens textiles, deteriorates atmospheric visibility, affects plant life and leads to ecological imbalances. To investigate environmental impact of cement industries in Pakistan, environmental conditions around and inside the five cement industries in the vicinity of Taxila city are studied. To inspect the whole scenario, air pollution control devices in these industries were also examined in detail. These industries are using Electrostatic Precipitators and Baghouses to control air pollution (dust particulates). Proper caring of these equipment is necessary for better results. Detailed study shows that emissions from their stacks and dust particulates are causing problems. Health consultants in study area are much worry about the health of workers and environmental degradation in the vicinity of these industries. The comparison of air pollution control devices shows that Baghouses are environmental friendly. Considering the field conditions it is also concluded that involvement of government and environmental pollution control agencies is much more necessary. (author)

  11. Utilizing wood wastes as reinforcement in wood cement composite bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusirat Aderinsola Sadiku

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research work undertaken to study the properties of Wood Cement Composite Bricks (WCCB from different wood wastes and cement / wood content. The WCBBs with nominal density of 1200 kg m-3 were produced from three tropical wood species and at varying cement and wood content of 2:1, 2.5:1 and 3:1 on a weight to weight basis. The properties evaluated were compressive strength, Ultra Pulse Velocity (UPV, water absorption (WA and thickness swelling (TS. The Compressive strength values ranged from 0.25 to 1.13 N mm-2 and UPV values ranged from 18753 to 49992 m s-1. The mean values of WA after 672 hours (28 days of water soaking of the WCCBs ranged from 9.50% to 47.13% where there were no noticeable change in the TS of the bricks. The observed density (OD ranged from 627 to 1159 kg m-3. A. zygia from the three wood/cement content were more dimensionally stable and better in compressive strength than the other two species where T. scleroxylon had the best performance in terms of UPV. All the properties improved with increasing cement content. WCCBs at 3.0:1 cement/wood content are suitable for structural application such as panelling, ceiling and partitioning

  12. Porous and adsorption properties of hydrated cement paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Biljana S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption isotherms of benzene on hydrated cement pastes prepared by cement ground with and without the addition of grinding aids, triethanol amine (TEA and ethylene glycol (EG were investigated. The adsorption isotherms were interpreted by means of the Dubinin-Astakhov (DA and Dubinin-Radushkevich-Stoeckli (DRS equations. The microporous structure of cement gel (C-S-H in the cement pastes, and changes in the Gibbs free energy of adsorption were determined. The mechanical properties of the cement pastes were also measured. It was evident that pastes with additives had different parameters of the DRS and DA equations: the volume and dimensions of the gel pores, the distribution of the dimensions, the characteristic energy of adsorption, and the change in the Gibbs free energy of adsorption. The mechanical properties were also different. The dispersity of the additive-containing ground cements had a favorable effect on the hydration processes. When applying TEA, it was also necessary to analyze its influence on the chemical behavior of hydration in the starting period.

  13. An assessment of gas-side fouling in cement plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    The cement industry is the most energy-intensive industry in the United States in terms of energy cost as a percentage of the total product cost. An assessment of gas-side fouling in cement plants with special emphasis on heat recovery applications is provided. In the present context, fouling is defined as the buildup of scale on a heat-transfer surface which retards the transfer of heat and includes the related problems of erosion and corrosion. Exhaust gases in the cement industry which are suitable for heat recovery range in temperature from about 100 to 1300 K, are generally dusty, may be highly abrasive, and are often heavily laden with alkalies, sulfates, and chlorides. Particulates in the exhaust streams range in size from molecular to about 100 micrometers in diameter and come from both the raw feed as well as the ash in the coal which is the primary fuel used in the cement industry. The major types of heat-transfer equipment used in the cement industry include preheaters, gas-to-air heat exchangers, waste heat boilers, and clinker coolers. At the present time, the trend in this country is toward suspension preheater systems, in which the raw feed is heated by direct contact with the hot kiln exit gases, and away from waste heat boilers as the principal method of heat recovery. The most important gas-side fouling mechanisms in the cement industry are those due to particulate, chemical reaction, and corrosion fouling.

  14. Effects of Ground Conditions on Microbial Cementation in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehyeon Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of ground conditions on microbial cementation in cohesionless soils. Since the method of microbial cementation is still at the experimental stage, for its practical use in the field, a number of laboratory experiments are required for the quantification of microbial cementation under various ground conditions, such as relative densities, relative compactions and particle size distributions. In this study, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of microbial cementation in treated sands and silts, an experiment was performed for different relative densities of silica sands, for different relative compactions of silts and for different particle size distributions of weathered soils sampled from the field. Scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy and mapping analyses were implemented for the quantification of the levels of microbial cementations for sand, silt and weathered soil specimens. Based on the test results, a considerable microbial cementation was estimated depending on the soil conditions; therefore, an implementation of this new type of bio-grouting on a weak foundation may be possible to increase the strength and stiffness of weak ground.

  15. Cytotoxicity of commonly used luting cements -An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpaite-Vanagiene, Rita; Bukelskiene, Virginija; Aleksejuniene, Jolanta; Puriene, Alina; Baltriukiene, Daiva; Rutkunas, Vygandas

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to 1) evaluate the cytotoxicity of luting cements: Hoffmann's Zinc Phosphate (Hoffmann's ZP), GC Fuji Plus Resin Modified Glass Ionomer (Fuji Plus RMGI) and 3M ESPE RelyX Unicem Resin Cement (RelyX Unicem RC) and 2) test if pre-washing reduces the cements' cytotoxicity. In vitro human gingival fibroblast (HGF) culture model was chosen. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT test, the cell viability -by staining the cells with AO/EB dye mixture. The means±SD of Cell Survival Ratio (CSR%) were compared among different cement types under two testing conditions, with or without cement pre-washing. The CSR%s were compared by ANOVA and linear multiple regression (LMR). Hoffmann's ZPC was less cytotoxic, while Fuji Plus RMGIC and RelyX Unicem RC were more cytotoxic (ANOVA, pcement and cement pre-washing jointly explained 90% of cell survival (LMR, pcements such as Hoffmann's ZP, Fuji Plus RMGI and RelyX Unicem RC may have a cytotoxic potential. PMID:25904168

  16. Surface roughness of orthodontic band cements with different compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Hélène van de Sande

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The present study evaluated comparatively the surface roughness of four orthodontic band cements after storage in various solutions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight standardized cylinders were made from 4 materials: zinc phosphate cement (ZP, compomer (C, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC and resin cement (RC. Specimens were stored for 24 h in deionized water and immersed in saline (pH 7.0 or 0.1 M lactic acid solution (pH 4.0 for 15 days. Surface roughness readings were taken with a profilometer (Surfcorder SE1200 before and after the storage period. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (comparison among cements and storage solutions or paired t-test (comparison before and after the storage period at 5% significance level. RESULTS: The values for average surface roughness were statistically different (pRMGIC>C>R (p0.05. Compared to the current threshold (0.2 µm related to biofilm accumulation, both RC and C remained below the threshold, even after acidic challenge by immersion in lactic acid solution. CONCLUSIONS: Storage time and immersion in lactic acid solution increased the surface roughness of the majority of the tested cements. RC presented the smoothest surface and it was not influenced by storage conditions.

  17. A Study of Metal-Cement Composites with Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mironov Victor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of small-sized metal fillers (SMF provides a combination of high bulk density, increased durability and ferromagnetic properties of composite materials on the cement basis. However, the total strength of the composite can be compromised by poor adhesion of metal particles with the cement matrix. The use of versatile additives like microsilica and metakaolin is able to improve the structural integrity and mechanical properties of heavy concretes. The paper considers the results of a study using specimens of heavy concretes with SMF aiming to estimate its strength, structural features and ultrasonic parameters. It was found that the contact of SMF particles with the cement was not perfect, since the voids appeared between them and the cement matrix during the cement hydration process (exothermal reaction. Due to the border porosity, the specimens with the metal fillers have lower compressive strength, lower ultrasound velocity and increased frequency slope of attenuation. Microsilica and metakaolin additives facilitate better contact zone between the cement matrix and metal fillers.

  18. On the development of an apatitic calcium phosphate bone cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Komath; H K Varma; R Sivakumar

    2000-04-01

    Development of an apatitic calcium phosphate bone cement is reported. 100 Particles of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) were mixed in equimolar ratio to form the cement powder. The wetting medium used was distilled water with Na2HPO4 as accelerator to manipulate the setting time. The cement powder, on wetting with the medium, formed a workable putty. The setting times of the putty were measured using a Vicat type apparatus and the compressive strength was determined with a Universal Testing Machine. The nature of the precipitated cement was analyzed through X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and energy dispersive electron microprobe (EDAX). The results showed the phase to be apatitic with a calcium–to–phosphorous ratio close to that of hydroxyapatite. The microstructure analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed hydroxyapatite nanocrystallite growth over particulate matrix surface. The structure has an apparent porosity of ∼ 52%. There were no appreciable dimensional or thermal changes during setting. The cement passed the in vitro toxicological screening (cytotoxicity and haemolysis) tests. Optimization of the cement was done by manipulating the accelerator concentration so that the setting time, hardening time and the compressive strength had clinically relevant values.

  19. Carbon Capture in the Cement Industry: Technologies, Progress, and Retrofitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Thomas; Leeson, Duncan; Florin, Nicholas; Fennell, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Several different carbon-capture technologies have been proposed for use in the cement industry. This paper reviews their attributes, the progress that has been made toward their commercialization, and the major challenges facing their retrofitting to existing cement plants. A technology readiness level (TRL) scale for carbon capture in the cement industry is developed. For application at cement plants, partial oxy-fuel combustion, amine scrubbing, and calcium looping are the most developed (TRL 6 being the pilot system demonstrated in relevant environment), followed by direct capture (TRL 4-5 being the component and system validation at lab-scale in a relevant environment) and full oxy-fuel combustion (TRL 4 being the component and system validation at lab-scale in a lab environment). Our review suggests that advancing to TRL 7 (demonstration in plant environment) seems to be a challenge for the industry, representing a major step up from TRL 6. The important attributes that a cement plant must have to be "carbon-capture ready" for each capture technology selection is evaluated. Common requirements are space around the preheater and precalciner section, access to CO2 transport infrastructure, and a retrofittable preheater tower. Evidence from the electricity generation sector suggests that carbon capture readiness is not always cost-effective. The similar durations of cement-plant renovation and capture-plant construction suggests that synchronizing these two actions may save considerable time and money. PMID:26630247

  20. Non-rotating cementing plug with molded inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes an anti-rotation plug set for use with cementing equipment having an insert seat therein, the anti-rotation plug set and the cementing equipment for use in cementing a string of casing into a well bore. It comprises an upper plug including: a non-metallic body member having a plurality of teeth integrally formed on the lower end thereof and an elastomeric covering thereon having, in turn, wipers which engage the interior of the string of casing; and a lower plug including: a non-metallic body member having a bore therethrough, having teeth integrally formed on the upper end thereof which mate with the teeth integrally formed on the lower end of the nonmetallic body member of the upper plug when the upper plug engages the lower plugs, having teeth integrally formed on the lower end thereof, having an insert member in a portion of the bore through the non-metallic body member, and the cementing equipment comprising: an insert seat having teeth thereon which mate with the integrally formed teeth on the lower end of the non-metallic body member of the lower plug of the anti-rotation plug set when the lower plug of the anti-rotation plug set engages the cementing equipment during the cementing of the string of casing into a well bore

  1. Study of glass alteration mechanisms in cement waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the French deep geological repository concept, intermediate-level vitrified waste packages could be disposed of concrete medium. Chemical composition and pH of the interstitial leaching water are expected to influence the chemical durability of glass. Investigations have thus been carried out to study glass dissolution mechanisms and kinetics in contact with cement waters. Three cement pore waters were studied: the first two correspond to two stages of the Portland cement aging and the third corresponds to equilibrium with a low pH concrete. The S/V ratio (glass-surface-area-to-solution-volume ratio) and the chemistry of cement waters are the two main parameters that control glass alteration mechanisms. If the leaching flow from the glass allows a degree of supersaturation to be reached and maintained which leads to nucleation of secondary phases, then precipitation of these phases drives glass dissolution. At a very low S/V ratio, the calcium uptake into the alteration layer increases its passivating properties. Conversely, at a high S/V ratio, the calcium precipitates as cementitious phases consuming elements which form the alteration layer. The glass dissolution is maintained at a high rate. This study contributes to highlighting the beneficial role of low pH cement in glass alteration, and is a first step towards understanding the mechanisms between the glass and the cement medium. (author)

  2. The status of energy conservation in Taiwan's cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cement industry represents one of the most energy intensive sectors in Taiwan. Energy audits are the direct tools which are employed to help reduce energy consumption. The objectives of energy audits are to establish energy audit systems, provide on-site energy audit service and reduce production cost. This study summarized the energy savings implemented in Taiwan's cement industry; the data were obtained from the on-line Energy Declaration System in 2010. The total implemented energy savings amounted to 68,512 kilo liter of crude oil equivalent (KLOE). The energy audit group audited seven Taiwanese cement plants in 2011 and revealed an energy saving potential of 2571.6 MWh of electricity and 1002.8 KLOE of thermal energy. The total potential energy saving was 1708.5 KL of crude oil equivalent (KLOE), equivalent to a 4560 t reduction in CO2 emissions, representing the annual CO2 absorption capacity of a 122 ha forest plantation. - Highlights: • This study summarizes the energy savings implemented in Taiwan's cement industry from the on-line Energy Declaration System. • The energy audit group audited seven Taiwanese cement plants in 2011 and revealed energy saving potential was 1708.5 KLOE. • This work aims to examine what Taiwan has done and also describes the current status in cement industry. • In addition, some potential energy conservation opportunities or measures are revealed in this paper

  3. Superplastic behavior and cavitation for WC-Co cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, H.; Shimojima, K. [Inst. for Structural and Engineering Materials, National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) (Japan); Kawakami, M.; Terada, O. [Fuji Die Co. Ltd., Hadano, Kanagawa (Japan); Sano, S. [Fuji Die Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Mabuchi, M. [Dept. of Energy Science and Technology, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Superplastic behavior and cavitation were investigated for WC-15 mass% Co cemented carbides with the WC grain sizes of 0.7 {mu}m (A) and 5.2 {mu}m (B), WC-10 mass% Co cemented carbide with the WC grain size of 1.5 {mu}m (C) and WC-5 mass% Co cemented carbides with the WC grain sizes of 0.5 {mu}m (D) and 2.5 {mu}m (E) by tensile tests at 1473 K. WC contiguity were 0.51, 0.31, 0.27, 0.56 and 0.49, respectively. The large elongations about 200% were obtained for the B and the C having smaller values of WC contiguity compared to the other cemented carbides. The values of cavity volume fraction for them were less for the other cemented carbides, furthermore, cavities formed at WC/WC interfaces. Therefore, it is noted that the distribution of the Co phase is important for superplasticity of the cemented carbides. (orig.)

  4. EVALUATION OF CEMENT THIXOTROPY FOR THE CEMENT OF OIL WELLS IN AREAS WITH LOSSES: EFFECT OF PLASTER AND DAIRY OF HIGH FURNACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bouziani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cementing of oil and gas wells can be a very delicate operation. Among the concerns of service companies, during this operation are the nature and conditions of the formations in well. This is the case of cementing operations in southern Algeria, specifically on the fields of In-Amen, where the formations in lost zones are naturally weak and highly permeable. In these areas, drilling fluids (muds and cements pumped will be, completely or partially lost, what we call "lost circulation". Thixotropic cements are useful to overcome lost circulation problems. They are characterized by a special rheological behavior, allowing it to plug lost zones when they are pumped. Our work aims to assess the thixotropy of cements perapred with two types of cement (class G Asland cement and CEM I 42.5 portland cement with the plaster, using a viscometer with coaxial cylinder (couette type. Moreover, the effect of blast furnace slag (LHF on the properties and thixotropic mixtures prepared was also studied. The results show that portland cement (available locally can produce mixes with higher and more stable thixotropy than the class G cement (from importation, which is a practical and economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster.

  5. A comparative evaluation of compressive strength of Portland cement with zinc oxide eugenol and Polymer-reinforced cement: An in vitro analysis

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    S Prakasam

    2014-01-01

    These samples were further subdivided based on time interval and were tested at 1 hour, 24 hours and at 7 th day. After each period of time all the specimens were tested by vertical CVR loaded frame with capacity of 5 tones/0473-10kan National Physical laboratory, New Delhi and the results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Scheffe test. Results: Polymer-reinforced cement with 50% Portland cement, Zinc oxide with 50% Portland cement, Polymer-reinforced cement with 25% Portland cement and Zinc oxide with 25% Portland cement exhibited higher compressive strength when compared to Zinc oxide with 0% Portland cement and Polymer-reinforced cement with 0% Portland cement, at different periods of time. The difference between these two groups were statistically significant (P < 0.05 and it is suggested that mixture of 50% and 25% Portland cement in Zinc oxide eugenol and Polymer-modified zinc oxide cement can be used as core build up material and permanent filling material. Conclusion: It is concluded that 50% and 25% Portland cement in zinc oxide eugenol and polymer-modified zinc oxide eugenol results in higher compressive strength and hence can be used as permanent filling material and core built-up material.

  6. Post cementation sensitivity evaluation of glass Ionomer, zinc phosphate and resin modified glass Ionomer luting cements under class II inlays: An in vivo comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to compare the patient-perceived post-cementation sensitivity of class II metal restorations preoperatively, immediately after cementation, one week after cementation and one month after cementation with (1 Glass Ionomer luting cement (2 Zinc Phosphate cement and (3 Resin-modified Glass Ionomer luting cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients, irrespective of sex, in the age group of 15-50 years were selected and the teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 20 each. Twenty inlay cast restorations were cemented with three different luting cements. The criteria adapted to measure tooth sensitivity in the present study were objective examination for sensitivity.(1 Cold water test (2 Compressed air test and (3 Biting pressure test. Results: The patients with restorations cemented with Resin-modified Glass ionomer demonstrated the least postoperative sensitivity when compared with Glass Ionomer and zinc phosphate cement at all different intervals of time evaluated by different tests. Conclusion: The patients with restorations cemented with resin-modified Glass ionomer demonstrated the least postoperative sensitivity.

  7. Properties and durability of metakaolin blended cements

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    Ezzat, El-Sayed

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the optimal calcination temperature and replacement ratio to ensure high metakaolin (MK pozzolanicity in blended cement. The MK used was prepared by firing two types of local at temperatures ranging from 700 to 850 ºC. Dry blends of ordinary Portland cement (OPC and varying proportions of MK were mixed with the amount of water required to ensure optimal consistency of the resulting pastes. The specimens were cured at 100% RH for 24 h and then immersed in water for 3, 7, 28, 90 or 180 days. At each test time, the degree of hydration and compressive strength of the hardened cement pastes were measured The findings showed that the most suitable calcination temperature to obtain metakaolin is 700 ºC, while the optimal replacement ratio ranges from 25 to 30%. DTA was used to determine the phases comprising the hydration products forming at the ages studied. Pure OPC and OPC-MK specimens were immersed in 3% NaCl and 5% MgSO4 solutions for 30, 90 and 180 days to measure their durability. The OPC-MK pastes immersed in the 3% NaCl solution were observed to be highly resistant to chloride attack.

    El presente trabajo evalúa el comportamiento puzolánico de metacaolín (MK, producto de la calcinación a distintas temperaturas de dos tipos de caolín local de composiciones químicas diferentes, al incorporarse al cemento en diferentes proporciones. Se preparó un cemento adicionado mediante la mezcla en seco de cemento Portland ordinario (OPC y metacaolín (MK, a los que se añadió la cantidad óptima de agua para obtener una pasta de la consistencia deseada. Las probetas se curaron a una HR del 100% durante 24 horas, sumergiéndose posteriormente en agua durante 3, 7, 28, 90 o 180 días. A cada tiempo de ensayo se controló el grado de hidratación de las pastas endurecidas y se comprobó la resistencia a la compresión de las probetas cúbicas a las edades de curado establecidas. Los resultados obtenidos indican que la

  8. Long-term studies on the leachability of cemented and non-cemented iodine-129 loaded sorption material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching tests on the load AC 6120 iodine sorption material (12 wt.% Ag) in water and salt brines were performed over a rather long period of time to allow better judgement of the behavior of radioactive waste disposed of in a salt dome. The utilization of capacity of the loaded iodine sorption material from the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant (WAK) was 95% related to the amount of silver added. The result of the stationary leaching tests has been a leaching rate of the material not embedded in cement of < 0.1%, whereas the leaching rate of the iodine sorption material embedded in cement has been < 0.01% of the total iodine-129 inventory. After addition of carbon steel to the sorption material embedded in cement the same leaching rates were measured as for material not embedded in cement. The addition of stainless steel exerted but little influence on the leaching rate. (orig.)

  9. The Effect of Cement Dust Exposure on Haematological Parameters of Cement Factory workers in Nalagonda, Andhra Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guguloth, Mohan Rao.; Sambanaik, A.; srinivasnaik, L.; Mude, Jagadishnaik.

    2012-10-01

    This study was measured on haematological parameters in workers exposed to cement dust in order to test the the hypothesis and to identify a simple, readily available, cost effective screening test that could help in identifying the presence of disease, its severity, that Cement dust exposure may perturb these functions related to their workplace.Assesment of haematological parameters were performed in 100exposed workers occupationally exposed to cement dust and 50 matched unexposed controls with ages ranging from 20-35, 35-50, 50-65 years. The blood samples were taken from them and percentage of hemoglobin, Lymphocytes / monocytes count were analysed.The hemoglobin percentage of exposed workers were significantly lower(P<0.05).Lymphocytes/Monocytes counts of exposed workers was insignificant (P<0.05).These results suggest that long term occupational exposure to cement dust may perturb haemopoietic function.

  10. Elemental composition of cement Kiln dust, raw material and cement from a coal-fired cement factory using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cement Kiln dust raw material, and cement samples collected from the coal-fired cement factory of Askale at Erzurum in Turkey were characterized with the standard addition method using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence techniques. An annular 100 mCi 241Am radioactive source emitting 59.5 keV photon and annular 50 mCi 55Fe radioactive source emitting 5.96 keV photon were used for excitation. Samples are prepared from powder sifted by a 300-mesh sieve. The characteristic K X-rays of the different elements were detected with a Si (Li) detector. The results are presented and discussed in this paper

  11. On the hydration of water-entrained cement-silica systems: Combined SEM, XRD and thermal analysis in cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → A new model of hydration in SF-modified cement-based systems is presented. → Internal curing in cement-based materials is described by the thermogravimetric technique. → Pozzolanic activity is limited in low water and low porosity systems. → Internal curing by superabsorbent polymers results in enhanced hydration. - Abstract: The work described in this document focuses on the hydration of low water and low porosity SF-modified cement-based materials. The hydration of the clinker compounds was followed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and also by means of the thermo-gravimetric technique (TGA). This study was performed in three systems, each with a different composition namely a plain cement paste, a silica fume (SF)-modified cement paste and a water-entrained SF-modified cement paste with superabsorbent polymers (SAPs). In addition to the previous experiments, the microstructure of the systems was accessed by means of the scanning electron microscopy technique (SEM). This was primarily done with the purpose of supporting some ideas that have emerged when determining the hydration of these complex systems using the former techniques. However, in this manuscript only the results found through the TGA/DTA technique will be shown. Thus, in respect to the quantification of the CH phase developing in the system, the results taken by the TGA/DTA technique enable a more feasible description of the hydration of low water and low porosity SF-modified cement systems, including systems with water-entrainment by superabsorbent polymers. The results show that for cement-based materials with the physical nature of the systems that have been studied in this work, the pozzolanic activity is limited due to lack of water and/or space to accommodate additional hydration products, and as a consequence, a surplus of silica fume is to be found in the mature material. Due to either physical or chemical constraints, the system

  12. Characterization and utilization of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) as partial replacements of Portland cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Om Shervan

    The characteristics of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) and their effects as partial replacement of Portland Cement (PC) were studied in this research program. The cement industry is currently under pressure to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and solid by-products in the form of CKDs. The use of CKDs in concrete has the potential to substantially reduce the environmental impact of their disposal and create significant cost and energy savings to the cement industry. Studies have shown that CKDs can be used as a partial substitute of PC in a range of 5--15%, by mass. Although the use of CKDs is promising, there is very little understanding of their effects in CKD-PC blends. Previous studies provide variable and often conflicting results. The reasons for the inconsistent results are not obvious due to a lack of material characterization data. The characteristics of a CKD must be well-defined in order to understand its potential impact in concrete. The materials used in this study were two different types of PC (normal and moderate sulfate resistant) and seven CKDs. The CKDs used in this study were selected to provide a representation of those available in North America from the three major types of cement manufacturing processes: wet, long-dry, and preheater/precalciner. The CKDs have a wide range of chemical and physical composition based on different raw material sources and technologies. Two fillers (limestone powder and quartz powder) were also used to compare their effects to that of CKDs at an equivalent replacement of PC. The first objective of this study was to conduct a comprehensive composition analysis of CKDs and compare their characteristics to PC. CKDs are unique materials that must be analyzed differently from PC for accurate chemical and physical analysis. The present study identifies the chemical and physical analytical methods that should be used for CKDs. The study also introduced a method to quantify the relative abundance of the different

  13. High belite cement from alternative raw materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorab, H. Y.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three high belite laboratory clinkers were prepared from traditional and alternative raw materials. Reference clinker was obtained from 77% limestone, 11% sandy clays, 11% fatty clays and 1% iron scales. The fatty clays were replaced by red brick powder in the raw meal of the second clinker and were lowered to 2% with the replacement of 10% of the limestone by egg shells in the third clinker. The SEM examination revealed clear presence of crossed striae and twinning in the rounded belite grains of the reference clinker caused by the transformation of the α´-belite to the β polymorph. Striae were weaker in the second and third clinkers indicating a probable stabilization of the α ‘-belite polymorph. Compressive strength of the respective cements were attained first after 28 days and the early strength did not improve with increasing fineness. Higher compressive strength values were found for the cement prepared from second clinker.Se han preparado tres clinkeres de laboratorio con altos contenidos en belita a partir de materias primas tradicionales y alternativas. El clinker de referencia se obtuvo a partir de una mezcla de caliza, arcillas arenosas y grasas y limaduras de hierro. Las arcillas grasas fueron sustituidas por polvo de ladrillo rojo en la preparación del segundo clinker, y en el tercero el contenido de arcilla grasa fue de solo un 2% y parte de la caliza fue sustituida por cascara de huevo. El estudio realizado por SEM muestra superficies estriadas alrededor de los granos de belita que indican una transformación del polimorfo α´ a la forma β-C₂S, durante el enfriamiento. Esas estrías son menos marcadas en el segundo y tercer clinker, indicando, una estabilización del polimorfo α´-C₂S. Los valores de resistencias a compresión de los correspondientes cementos, a 28 días de curado, no se ven incrementados por la finura de dichos cementos. Las mayores resistencias se obtuvieron en el cemento preparado a partir del cl

  14. A digital approach to fabricating an abutment replica to control cement volume in a cement-retained implant prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Hyoung; Park, In-Sook; Sohn, Dong-Seok

    2016-07-01

    If a cement-retained implant prosthesis is placed on an abutment, excess cement should be minimized or removed to prevent periimplant inflammation. Various methods for fabricating an abutment replica have been introduced to maintain tissue health and reduce clean-up time. The purpose of this article is to present an alternative technique for fabricating an abutment replica with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. PMID:26946917

  15. Fracture Resistance of Teeth Restored with Various Post Designs and Cemented with Different Cements: An In-vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gaikwad, Ajay; Pal, Kapil Singh; Ranganath, L M; Jain, Jayesh Kumar; Patil, Prashanth; Babar, Geetika

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies have been carried out on endodontically treated teeth restored with and without ferrule, and influence of the cementing medium, to evaluate their effect on fracture resistance. This study was conducted on 28 freshly extracted maxillary central incisors. Specimens were restored with two types of post designs, and cemented with two different luting agents, and tested for fracture resistance. Materials and Methods: A total of 28 freshly extracted maxillary central incisors we...

  16. Comparison the Effects of Different Root Canal Irrigants on the Retention of Quarts Fiber Posts Cemented by Resin Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Shirinzad; Zahed Mohammadi; Loghman Rezaei-Soufi; Mehdi Rasekh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Root canal irrigants could change the structure of root dentin and affect the posts retention the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of three different endodontic irrigants on the retention of quarts fiber posts cemented by different resin cements. Materials & Methods: In this in-vitro study, 10 mm long post spaces were prepared in root canals of 120 premolars after endodontic therapy and cutting the crowns at the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were randomly div...

  17. In-situ Mechanical Manipulation of Wellbore Cements as a Solution to Leaky Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupresan, D.; Radonjic, M.; Heathman, J.

    2013-12-01

    Wellbore cement provides casing support, zonal isolation, and casing protection from corrosive fluids, which are essential for wellbore integrity. Cements can undergo one or more forms of failure such as debonding at cement/formation and cement/casing interface, fracturing and defects within cement matrix. Failures and defects within cement will ultimately lead to fluids migration, resulting in inter-zonal fluid migration and premature well abandonment. There are over 27,000 abandoned oil and gas wells only in The Gulf of Mexico (some of them dating from the late 1940s) with no gas leakage monitoring. Cement degradation linked with carbon sequestration can potentially lead to contamination of fresh water aquifers with CO2. Gas leaks can particularly be observed in deviated wells used for hydraulic fracking (60% leakage rate as they age) as high pressure fracturing increases the potential for migration pathways. Experimental method utilized in this study enables formation of impermeable seals at interfaces present in a wellbore by mechanically manipulating wellbore cement. Preliminary measurements obtained in bench scale experiments demonstrate that an impermeable cement/formation and cement/casing interface can be obtained. In post-modified cement, nitrogen gas flow-through experiments showed complete zonal isolation and no permeability in samples with pre-engineered microannulus. Material characterization experiments of modified cement revealed altered microstructural properties of cement as well as changes in mineralogical composition. Calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), the dominant mineral in hydrated cement which provides low permeability of cement, was modified as a result of cement pore water displacement, resulting in more dense structures. Calcium hydroxide (CH), which is associated with low resistance of cement to acidic fluids and therefore detrimental in most wellbore cements, was almost completely displaced and/or integrated in CSH as a result of

  18. Investigating Rheological Properties of High Performance Cement System for Oil Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Rehman Memon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of designing cement slurry for extreme and deep environment (HPHT wells is to develop high performance cement system in well bore to achieve zonal isolation. The primary objective of cement slurry is to improve rheological properties and displacement efficiency of cement system. Oil well slurries depend on its homogeneity of additive concentrations, quality and quantity to contribute the placement and success of a well drilling cementing operation. This research study is focused on the laboratory study of the High Performance Cement System (HPCS. This investigation of cement slurry was prepared with Silica Fume (SF and excess amount of water to decrease the slurry density in order to observe the rheological properties above 120C at different concentration of SF. Results indicates that the designed cement rheological properties are directly influenced by the shear rate and shear stress on the pump-ability of the cement with the increase of the SF concentration for the rheological improvement.

  19. Assessment of the tensile strength of hexagonal abutments using different cementing agents

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    Carlos Wahl

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the uniaxial tensile strength after thermal cycling in replicas of CeraOne®abutments (abutment and coping sets, using four types of cements (n = 10. A zinc phosphate cement (Fosfato de Zinco®/ SSW, a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX®luting / 3M-ESPE, a zinc oxide-eugenol cement (ZOE®/ SSW and a zinc oxide cement without eugenol (TempBond NE®/ KERR were used. After cementation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycles (1,000 cycles, 5ºC ± 2º to 55ºC ± 2º for thirty seconds in each bath. Next, the samples were submitted to the tensile test in a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min. The data were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test (p < 0.05, and statistically significant difference was found among the cements. The highest tensile strength mean value found was for zinc phosphate cement (33.6 kgf followed by the resin-modified glass ionomer cement (20.5 kgf, zinc oxide-eugenol cement (8.4 kgf and the temporary cement (3.1 kgf. Therefore, it was found that the permanent cements presented higher tensile strength, and the temporary cement could be used in situations requiring reversibility and the removal of cemented dental implant-supported prostheses.

  20. The behavior of implant-supported dentures and abutments using the cemented cylinder technique with different resinous cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mathias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the behavior of implant-supported dentures and their components, made by cemented cylinder technique, using threetypes of resin cements. Methods: Fifty three patients, of whom 26 were women and 27 men, aged between 25 and 82 years. Results: With partial (54.43% and total (45.57% implant-supported dentures, of the Cone Morse, external and internal hexagon types (Neodent®, Curitiba, Brazil, totaling 237 fixations, were analyzed. The resin cements used were Panavia® (21.94%, EnForce® (58.23% and Rely X® (19.83% and the components were used in accordance with the Laboratory Immediate Loading - Neodent® sequence. The period of time of denture use ranged between 1 and 5 years. The results reported that 5(2.1% cylinders were loosened from metal structure (both belonging to Rely X group, 2(0.48% implants were lost after the first year of use, 16(6.75% denture retention screws wereloosened and 31(13.08% abutment screws were unloosened.Conclusion: The reasons for these failures probably are: metal structure internal retention failure, occlusal pattern, cementation technique and loading conditions. The cemented cylinder technique was effective when used in partial and total implant-supported rehabilitations, keeping prosthetic components stable, despite the resin cement utilized. However, further clinical studies must be conducted.

  1. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  2. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brajkovic, Denis [Clinic for Dentistry, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Svetozara Markovica 69, 34000 Kragujevac (Serbia); Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Kisic, Danilo [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Rakocevic, Zlatko, E-mail: zlatkora@vinca.rs [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  3. Microbial analyses of cement and grouting additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbeck, L.; Jaegevall, S.; Paeaejaervi, A.; Rabe, L.; Edlund, J.; Eriksson, S. [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    During sampling in the ONKALO tunnel in 2006, heavy growth of a slimy material was observed in connection with grouting. It was suggested to be microbial growth on organic additives leaching from the grout. Two sampling campaigns resulted in the isolation of several aerobic bacterial strains. Some of these strains were used in biodegradation studies of three solid cement powders, eight liquid grout additives, and six plastic drainage materials. Degradation was also studied using ONKALO groundwaters as inoculums. The isolated strains were most closely related to hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms. The biodegradation of seven of the products was tested using microorganisms isolated from the ONKALO slime in 2006; none of these strains could degrade the tested products. When ONKALO drillhole groundwaters were used as inoculums in the degradation studies, it was demonstrated that Structuro 111X, Mighty 150, and Super-Parmix supported growth of the groundwater microorganisms. Structuro 111X is a polycarboxylate condensate while Mighty 150 and Super-Parmix are condensates with formaldehyde and naphthalene. Some of the isolated microorganisms belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, many strains of which can degrade organic molecules. None of the plastic drainage materials supported growth during the degradation studies. Microorganisms were present in two of the liquid products when delivered, GroutAid and Super-Parmix. The potential of the organic compounds in grout additives to be degraded by microorganisms, increasing the risk of biofilm formation and complexing compound production, must be considered. Microbial growth will also increase the possibility of hydrogen sulphide formation. (orig.)

  4. Sealing of temporary cements in endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Gomes Ferraz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the coronal leakage of three temporary cements in endodontics: Bioplic® (Biodinâmica, Londrina, Brazil, IRM® (Dentsply, Petrópolis, Brazil and Coltosol® (Vigodent, Bonsucesso, Brazil. Methods: Forty human pre-molars were divided into four groups: I (Bioplic® + adhesive system, II (Bioplic®, Biodinâmica, Londrina, Brasil, III (IRM®, Dentsply, Petrópolis, Brasil, and IV (Coltosol®, Vigodent, Bonsucesso, Brasil. The teeth were immersed in 1% Rodamine and kept at 37°C for 24h. They were then thermal cycled for seven days. Temperatures ranged between 5, 37 and 50°C. After longitudinal sectioning the leakage was measured in mm and statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA and Tukey tests with a level of significance of 5%.Results: In the group in which Bioplic® was used with adhesive, a lower level of leakage was detected (0.37 ± 0.24. There was significant difference (p<0.05 between groups I and III, I and IV, II and III. Conclusion: It was concluded that all the tested material showed coronal leakage and that the use of the (Bioplic® Biodinâmica, Londrina, Brasilplus adhesive system showed the lowest level of leakage.

  5. Durability of Cement Composites Reinforced with Sisal Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianqiang

    This dissertation focuses mainly on investigating the aging mechanisms and degradation kinetics of sisal fiber, as well as the approaches to mitigate its degradation in the matrix of cement composites. In contrast to previous works reported in the literature, a novel approach is proposed in this study to directly determine the fiber's degradation rate by separately studying the composition changes, mechanical and physical properties of the embedded sisal fibers. Cement hydration is presented to be a crucial factor in understanding fiber degradation behavior. The degradation mechanisms of natural fiber consist of mineralization of cell walls, alkali hydrolysis of lignin and hemicellulose, as well as the cellulose decomposition which includes stripping of cellulose microfibrils and alkaline hydrolysis of amorphous regions in cellulose chains. Two mineralization mechanisms, CH-mineralization and self-mineralization, are proposed. The degradation kinetics of sisal fiber in the cement matrix are also analyzed and a model to predict the degradation rate of cellulose for natural fiber embedded in cement is outlined. The results indicate that the time needed to completely degrade the cellulose in the matrix with cement replacement by 30wt.% metakaolin is 13 times longer than that in pure cement. A novel and scientific method is presented to determine accelerated aging conditions, and to evaluating sisal fiber's degradation rate and durability of natural fiber-reinforced cement composites. Among the static aggressive environments, the most effective approach for accelerating the degradation of natural fiber in cement composites is to soak the samples or change the humidity at 70 °C and higher temperature. However, the dynamic wetting and drying cycling treatment has a more accelerating effect on the alkali hydrolysis of fiber's amorphous components evidenced by the highest crystallinity indices, minimum content of holocellulose, and lowest tensile strength. Based on the

  6. Cementation of biodegraded radioactive oils and organic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of the microbiological pre-treatment of the oil-containing organic liquid radioactive waste (LRW) before solidification in the cement matrix has been studied. It is experimentally proved that the oil containing cement compounds during long-term storage are subject to microbiological degradation due to the reaction of biogenic organic acids with the minerals of the cement matrix. We recommend to biodegrade the LRW components before their solidification, which reduces the volume of LRW and prevent the destruction of the inorganic cement matrix during the long term storage. The biodegradation of the oil containing LRW is possible by using the radioresistant microflora which oxidize the organic components of the oil to carbon dioxide and water. Simultaneously there is the bio-sorption of the radionuclides by bacteria and emulsification of oil in cement slurry due to biogenic surface-active substances of glycolipid nature. It was experimentally established that after 7 days of biodegradation of oil-containing liquid radioactive waste the volume of LRW is reduced by the factor from 2 to 10 due to the biodegradation of the organic phase to the non-radioactive gases (CH4, H2O, CO2, N2), which are excluded from the volume of the liquid radioactive waste. At the same time, the microorganisms are able to extract from the LRW up to 80-90% of alpha-radionuclides, up to 50% of 90Sr, up to 20% of 137Cs due to sorption processes at the cellular structures. The radioactive biomass is subject to dehydration and solidification in the matrix. The report presents the following experimental data: type of bacterial flora, the parameters of biodegradation, the cementing parameters, the properties of the final cement compound with oil-containing liquid radioactive waste

  7. Osteoconductivity and mechanical properties of a new bioactive bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinzato, S.; Nakamura, T. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery; Kokubo, T. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Material Chemistry; Kitamura, Y. (Nippon Electric Glass Co. Ltd., Otsu)

    2001-07-01

    Osteoconductivity and mechanical properties of a new bioactive bone cement (designated GBC) consisting of high molecular weight polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as an organic matrix and bioactive glass beads as an inorganic filler have been evaluated. The bioactive beads consisting of MgO-CaO-SiO{sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}CaF{sub 2} glass, have been newly designed and a novel PMMA powder was selected. The aim of the present study is to compare GBC's osteoconductivity and mechanical properties with cements consisting of the same matrix as GBC and either apatite- and wollastonite-containing glass-ceramic (AW-GC) powder (designated AWC) or sintered hydroxyapatite (HA) powder (designated HAC) and to examine effects of the amount of the bioactive glass beads filler added to GBC, and to decide the most suitable amount of the filler content. The bioactive glass beads added to the cements amounted 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 wt%, and AW-GC powder and HA powder added to the cements amounted 70 wt%. Each cement was designated respectively GBC30, 40, 50, 60, 70, AWC70, and HAC70. The bending strength of GBC70 was significantly higher than that of AWC70 and HAC70. The compressive strength and the elastic modulus of bending of GBC increased as the glass beads content increased. The handling property of each GBC was comparable with that of conventional PMMA bone cement. Cements were packed into intramedullar canals of rat tibiae in order to evaluate osteoconductivity determined by an affinity index.

  8. Utilization of gold tailings as an additive in Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ozlem; Elbeyli, Iffet Yakar; Piskin, Sabriye

    2006-06-01

    Mine tailings are formed as an industrial waste during coal and ore mining and processing. In the investigated process, following the extraction of gold from the ore, the remaining tailings are subjected to a two-stage chemical treatment in order to destroy the free cyanide and to stabilize and coagulate heavy metals prior to discharge into the tailings pond. The aim of this study was the investigation of the feasibility of utilization of the tailings as an additive material in Portland cement production. For this purpose, the effects of the tailings on the compressive strength properties of the ordinary Portland cement were investigated. Chemical and physical properties, mineralogical composition, particle size distribution and microstructure of the tailings were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), particle size analyzer (Mastersizer) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Following the characterization of the tailings, cement mortars were prepared by intergrinding Portland cement with dried tailings. Composition of the cement clinkers were adjusted to contain 5, 15, 25% (wt/wt) dried tailings and also silica fume and fly ash samples (C and F type) were added to clinker in different ratios. The mortars produced with different amounts of tailings, silica fume, fly ashes and also mixtures of them were tested for compressive strength values after 2, 7, 28 and 56 days according to the European Standard (EN 196-1). The results indicated that gold tailings up to 25% in clinker could be beneficially used as an additive in Portland cement production. It is suggested that the gold tailings used in the cement are blended with silica fume and C-type fly ash to obtain higher compressive strength values. PMID:16784164

  9. Hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cements - Experimental findings and thermodynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium sulfoaluminate cements (CSA) are a promising low-CO2 alternative to ordinary Portland cements and are as well of interest concerning their use as binder for waste encapsulation. In this study, the hydration of two CSA cements has been investigated experimentally and by thermodynamic modelling between 1 h and 28 days at w/c ratios of 0.72 and 0.80, respectively. The main hydration product of CSA is ettringite, which precipitates together with amorphous Al(OH)3 until the calcium sulfate is consumed after around 1-2 days of hydration. Afterwards, monosulfate is formed. In the presence of belite, straetlingite occurs as an additional hydration product. The pore solution analysis reveals that straetlingite can bind a part of the potassium ions, which are released by the clinker minerals. The microstructure of both cements is quite dense even after 16 h of hydration, with not much pore space available at a sample age of 28 days. The pore solution of both cements is dominated during the first hours of hydration by potassium, sodium, calcium, aluminium and sulfate; the pH is around 10-11. When the calcium sulfate is depleted, the sulfate concentration drops by a factor of 10. This increases pH to around 12.5-12.8. Based on the experimental data, a thermodynamic hydration model for CSA cements based on cement composition, hydration kinetics of clinker phases and calculations of thermodynamic equilibria by geochemical speciation has been established. The modelled phase development with ongoing hydration agrees well with the experimental findings.

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF CO2 ON WELL CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon capture and storage is one way to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Underground gas storage operations and CO2 sequestration in aquifers relay on both the proper wellbore construction and sealing properties of the cap rock. CO2 injection candidates may be new wells or old wells. In both cases, the long-term wellbore integrity (up to 1 000 years is one of the key performance criteria in the geological storage of CO2. The potential leakage paths are the migration CO2 along the wellbore due to poor cementation and flow through the cap rock. The permeability and integrity of the set cement will determine how effective it is in preventing the leakage. The integrity of the cap rock is assured by an adequate fracture gradient and by sufficient set cement around the casing across the cap rock and without a micro-annulus. CO2 storage in underground formations has revived the researc of long term influence of the injected CO2 on Portland cements and methods for improving the long term efficiency of the wellbore sealant. Some researchers predicted that set cement will fail when exposed to CO2 leading to potential leakage to the atmosphere or into underground formations that may contain potable water. Other researchers show set cement samples from 30 to 50 year-old wells (CO2 EOR projects that have maintained sealing integrity and prevented CO2 leakage, in spite of some degree of carbonation. One of reasons for the discrepancy between certain research lab tests and actual field performance measurements is the absence of standard protocol for CO2 resistance-testing devices, conditions, or procedures. This paper presents potential flow paths along the wellbore, CO2 behaviour under reservoir conditions, and geochemical alteration of hydrated Portland cement due to supercritical CO2 injection.

  11. Hydraulic Conductivity of Residual Soil-Cement Mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindasamy, P.; Taha, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    In Malaysia, although there are several researches on engineering properties of residual soils, however study on the hydraulic conductivity properties of metasedimentary residual soils is still lacking. Construction of containment walls like slurry wall techniques can be achieved with hydraulic conductivity of approximately 5 x 10-7cm/sec. The objectives of the study were to determine the physical properties of metasedimentary residual soils and to determine the influence of 1%, 3%, 5% and 10% of cement on hydraulic conductivity parameters. The coefficient of hydraulic conductivity of the soil naturally and soil-cement mixtures were determined by using the falling head test. According to the test, the hydraulic conductivity of the original soil was 4.16 x 10-8 m/s. The value decreases to 3.89 x 10-8 m/s, 2.78 x 10-8 m/s then 6.83 x 10-9 m/s with the addition of 1%, 3% and 5% of cement additives, respectively. During the hydration process, cement hydrates is formed followed by the increase in pH value and Ca(OH)2 which will alter the modification of pores size and distribution. When the quantity of cement increases, the pores size decrease. But, the addition of 10% cement gives an increased hydraulic conductivity value to 2.78 x 10-8 m/s. With 10%, the pore size increase might due to flocculation and agglomeration reaction. The generated hydraulic conductivity values will indirectly become a guide in the preliminary soil cement stabilization to modify the properties of the soil to become more like the properties of a soft rock.1. Introduction

  12. Stabilization/solidification of selenium-impacted soils using Portland cement and cement kiln dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Grubb, Dennis G; Reilly, Trevor L

    2009-09-15

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) processes were utilized to immobilize selenium (Se) as selenite (SeO(3)(2-)) and selenate (SeO(4)(2-)). Artificially contaminated soils were prepared by individually spiking kaolinite, montmorillonite and dredged material (DM; an organic silt) with 1000 mg/kg of each selenium compound. After mellowing for 7 days, the Se-impacted soils were each stabilized with 5, 10 and 15% Type I/II Portland cement (P) and cement kiln dust (C) and then were cured for 7 and 28 days. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the S/S treatments. At 28 days curing, P doses of 10 and 15% produced five out of six TCLP-Se(IV) concentrations below 10mg/L, whereas only the 15% C in DM had a TCLP-Se(IV) concentration ettringite (Ca(6)Al(2)(SeO(4))(3)(OH)(12).26H(2)O), respectively. PMID:19339110

  13. The Influence of Abutment Surface Treatment and the Type of Luting Cement on Shear Bond Strength between Titanium/Cement/Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Śmielak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia cylinders on a modified titanium surface using different luting cement types. Material and Methods. Eighty titanium disks were divided into two groups (n=40, which were treated with either grinding or a combination of sandblasting and grinding. Then, each group was subdivided into 4 groups (n=10 and the disks were bonded to disks of sintered zirconia using one of four cement types (permanent: composite cement; temporary: polycarboxylate cement, zinc-oxide-eugenol cement, and resin cement. Shear bond strength (SBS was measured in a universal testing machine. Fracture pattern and site characteristic were recorded. A fractographic analysis was performed with SEM. The chemical analysis of the composition of the fractures was performed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The results of the experiment were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test. Results. The highest mean values of SBS were achieved when grinding was combined with sandblasting and when composite cement was used (18.18 MPa. In the temporary cement group, the highest mean values of SBS were for polycarboxylate cement after grinding (3.57 MPa. Conclusion. The choice of cement has a crucial influence on the titanium-cement-zirconia interface quality.

  14. Factors affecting bond cement across casing leak zones in oil and gas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr, Mohamed; Edbeib, Said [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Casing leaks have been a major concern to the oil industry because of their effect on lowering the production rate in many oil and gas wells. The leaks are the result of deterioration of the casing in the well, which is caused by severe corrosion due to the contact of the casing with high salinity foreign fluid. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing the mechanical properties of the hardened cement opposite the casing leak zones. This study is conducted by laboratory measurements of the compressive strength of the hardened cement when the cement slurry was mixed with different percentages of formation water and different concentrations of different cement additives. The results of this study indicate that the compressive strength readings obtained from the cement bond log and the cement evaluation tool against the casing leak zones are lower than those readings recorded in adjacent formations. The low cement compressive strength values observed across casing leak zones are due to the contamination of the cement with saline water present in these formations which, in turn, effects the hardening properties of the cement. The experimental results indicated that the salinity of the formation water when mixed with the cement slurry in the presence of cement additives, decreased the compressive strength of the bond cement and also decreased the thickening time of the cement slurry. It is concluded that casing leaks found in many wells observed in oil fields in Libya were due to the mixing of the cement with high salinity formation water present in the lost circulation zones. The high water salinity in these zones effects the setting time of the cement slurry which, therefore, decreased the hardening properties of the bond cement and caused cracks and channels in the hardened cement across lost circulation zones. (author)

  15. Study on evolution of disposal environment due to alteration of cement. Summary report. Commission work report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study shows effects on performance of the engineered and geological barriers due to alteration of cement including low alkalinity cement. Alteration test of bentonite and crystalline rock was carried out by low alkalinity cement pore water. Leaching of super plasticizer was investigated modeled for the latest period of alteration of cement. Planning a experiment for corrosion of re-bar in low alkalinity cement was carried out. Application of the cement for shotcrete was investigated. The results described below are obtained. 1. Almost of montmorillonite was solved in Na-K-Ca mixed solution. No alteration was observed in low alkalinity cement. The similar results were obtained for crystalline rock. 2. It is noted that main part of super plasticizer wasn't leachated even in the latest period of leaching of cement. Increment of leaching of super plasticizer wasn't observed corresponding to leaching of cement hydrates. 3. Accelerating test for corrosion of re-bar in low alkalinity cement was proposed. 4. It was demonstrated that low alkalinity cement was applicable for shotcrete. 5. pH of pore water of cement with highly pozzolanic materials isn't significantly decreased in high temperature. 6. Predictable alteration of barriers due to alteration of cement were pointed out including interaction of bentonite and rock. (author)

  16. Antimicrobial activity of bone cements embedded with organic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perni S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Perni,1,2 Victorien Thenault,1 Pauline Abdo,1 Katrin Margulis,3 Shlomo Magdassi,3 Polina Prokopovich1,2 1School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 2Center for Biomedical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; 3Casali Institute, Institute of Chemistry, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, IsraelAbstract: Infections after orthopedic surgery are a very unwelcome outcome; despite the widespread use of antibiotics, their incidence can be as high as 10%. This risk is likely to increase as antibiotics are gradually losing efficacy as a result of bacterial resistance; therefore, novel antimicrobial approaches are required. Parabens are a class of compounds whose antimicrobial activity is employed in many cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. We developed propylparaben nanoparticles that are hydrophilic, thus expanding the applicability of parabens to aqueous systems. In this paper we assess the possibility of employing paraben nanoparticles as antimicrobial compound in bone cements. The nanoparticles were embedded in various types of bone cement (poly(methyl methacrylate [PMMA], hydroxyapatite, and brushite and the antimicrobial activity was determined against common causes of postorthopedic surgery infections such as: Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Nanoparticles at concentrations as low as 1% w/w in brushite bone cement were capable of preventing pathogens growth, 5% w/w was needed for hydroxyapatite bone cement, while 7% w/w was required for PMMA bone cement. No ­detrimental effect was determined by the addition of paraben nanoparticles on bone cement compression strength and cytocompatibility. Our results demonstrate that paraben nanoparticles can be encapsulated in bone cement, providing concentration-dependent antimicrobial

  17. Mechanism of cement-stabilized soil polluted by magnesium sulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Peng-ju; WANG Shuai; Frank Y. Chen; BAI Xiao-hong

    2015-01-01

    In order to simulate and study the mechanism of cement stabilized soils polluted by different contents of magnesium sulfate (MS), a series of tests were conducted on the cemented soil samples, including unconfined compression strength (UCS) tests of blocks, X-ray diffraction (XRD) phase analysis of powder samples, microstructure by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), element composition by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), and pore distribution analysis by Image Processed Plus 6.0 (IPP 6.0) software. The UCS test results show that UCS of cemented soils reaches the peak value when the MS content is 4.5 g/kg. While, the UCS for Sample MS4 having the MS content of 18.0 g/kg is the lowest among all tested samples. Based on the EDS analysis results, Sample MS4 has the greater contents for the three elements, oxygen (O), magnesium (Mg) and sulfur (S), than Sample MS1. From the XRD phase analysis, C-A-S-H (3CaO·Al2O3·3CaSO4·32H2O and 3CaO·Al2O3·CaSO4·18H2O), M-A-H (MgO·Al2O3·H2O), M-S-H (MgO·SiO2·H2O), Mg(OH)2 and CaSO4phase diffraction peaks are obviously intense due to the chemical action associated with the MS. The pore distribution analysis shows that the hydrated products change the distribution of cemented soil pores and the pores with average diameter (AD) of 2-50μm play a key role in terms of the whole structure of cemented soil. The microscopic structure of the cemented soil with MS exhibits the intertwined and embedded characteristics between the cement and granular soils from the SEM images of cemented soils. The microstructure analysis shows that the magnesium sulfate acts as the additive, which is beneficial to the soil strength when the MS content is low (i.e., Sample MS2). However, higher MS amount involving a chemical action makes samples crystallize and expand, which is adverse to the UCS of cemented soils (i.e., Sample MS4).

  18. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  19. In-vitro study of resin-modified glass ionomer cements for cementation of orthodontic bands. Isolation, surplus removal and humidity as factors influencing the bond strength between enamel, cement and metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebmann, S M; Jost-Brinkmann, P G

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate different light-cured and chemically cured resin-modified glass ionomer cements used for the cementation of orthodontic bands and to analyze various factors influencing the adhesive strength between enamel, cement and stainless steel. Four resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji Ortho LC/GC, Fuji Duet/GC, Unitek Multi-Cure Glass Ionomer Orthodontic Band Cement/3M Unitek, Vitremer/3M) and 1 compomer (Band-Lok/Reliance) were examined. Flattened and polished bovine teeth embedded in polyurethane resin were used as enamel specimens. Before cementation, 50% of the specimens were moistened with the aerosol of an inhalation device, while the rest were dried with compressed air. Stainless steel cylinders (CrNi 18 10) were perpendicularly bonded onto the polished enamel using a custom-made cementation device and immediately topped with a pressure of 0.25 MPa. The cement was isolated with either Ketac Glaze/ESPE, Fuji Coat/GC, Cacao Butter/GC, Dryfoil/Jalenko or Final Varnish/VOCO, or was left uncoated. Eight minutes after the beginning of mixing, either the surplus cement was removed with a scalpel or surplus removal was simulated with ultrasound. After 24 hours storage in a water bath at 37 degrees C and 1,000 thermocycles the shear bond strength was determined. Significant differences with respect to the shear bond strength were found among the following cements, ranking from highest to lowest: Fuji Duet, Unitek cement > Fuji Ortho LC > Vitremer > Band-Lok. The application of a barrier coating significantly increased the shear bond strength of all cements except Fuji Ortho LC. The light-cured resin Ketac Glaze proved to be the most effective barrier coating. A dry enamel surface increased the bond strength of all investigated cements except Unitek cement. The use of ultrasound led to no significant reduction in shear bond strength in comparison with surplus removal with a scalpel. PMID:10546417

  20. Processes and Equipment for the Cementation of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article a short selection of different cement mixer types provided by NUKEM Technologies is given. The variety stems on one hand from historical development, but more especially from specific customer demands to meet their local and technical requirements. The Slant Batch Mixer is successfully installed in several Waste Treatment Centers (WTC). NUKEM Technologies set up these mixers with necessary auxiliary systems to facilitate all the cementation tasks of a WTC. By the slant design of the mixer a homogeneous intermixing and a rapid and comprehensive emptying is achieved. The High Shear Mixer is a batch mixer producing a thixotropic, fast flowing colloidal cement slurry. NUKEM Technologies uses this cement slurry to bubble-free/ empty space-free grouting of pre-packed solid waste items in container. The High Throughput Continuous Mixer is a continuously operating screw mixer that provides a high throughput. One or more dry components are continuously fed to the mixer where liquid waste or water is added. The High Performance In-Drum Mixer is a combination of planetary mixer with double helical mixer. NUKEM Technologies recently has developed a new High Capacity Mixer (HCM) based on a well proven conventional concrete mixer. The HCM is the successor of the slant mixer and will expend NUKEM Technologies' portfolio of cementation units. (A.C.)