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Sample records for cement bonded dental

  1. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theoretical predictions match experimental data suggesting that both resin bridging and shrinkage plays an important role and need to be considered for accurate prognostics to occur. PMID:18670583

  2. Push-out bond strengths of different dental cements used to cement glass fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Lins do Valle, Accácio; Ghizoni, Janaina Salomon; Lorenzoni, Fábio César; Ramos, Marcelo Barbosa; Barbosa, Marcelo Ramos; Dos Reis Só, Marcus Vinícius

    2013-08-01

    Since the introduction of glass fiber posts, irreversible vertical root fractures have become a rare occurrence; however, adhesive failure has become the primary failure mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts cemented with different luting agents on 3 segments of the root. Eighty human maxillary canines with similar root lengths were randomly divided into 8 groups (n=10) according to the cement assessed (Rely X luting, Luting and Lining, Ketac Cem, Rely X ARC, Biscem, Duo-link, Rely X U100, and Variolink II). After standardized post space preparation, the root dentin was pretreated for dual-polymerizing resin cements and untreated for the other cements. The mixed luting cement paste was inserted into post spaces with a spiral file and applied to the post surface that was seated into the canal. After 7 days, the teeth were sectioned perpendicular to their long axis into 1-mm-thick sections. The push-out test was performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until extrusion of the post occurred. The results were evaluated by 2-way ANOVA and the all pairwise multiple comparison procedures (Tukey test) (α=.05). ANOVA showed that the type of interaction between cement and root location significantly influenced the push-out strength (Plower bond strength. Significant differences among root segments were found only for Duo-link cement. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bonding quality of contemporary dental cements to sandblasted esthetic crown copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Khalid M; Al-Qahtani, Nasser M; Al-Shehri, Abdulrahman S; Abdelmoneam, Adel M

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength of current luting cements to sandblasted crown-coping substrates. Specimens of nickel-chromium, pressable glass ceramic, and zirconia crown-coping substrates were sandblasted in three groups (n = 30 each) with 50 (group 1), 110 (group 2), and 250 μm (group 3) alumina particles at a pressure of 250 kPa. Cylinders of glass ionomer, universal resin, and self-adhesive resin cements were then built up on the sandblasted substrate surfaces of each group (n = 10). All bonded specimens were stressed to evaluate the cement-substrate shear bond strength. Both the mode and incidence of bond failure were also considered. No difference was noticed between all test groups in terms of cement-substrate bond strength. In comparison to self-adhesive type, the universal resin cement provided lower bond strengths to both metal and glass-ceramic substrates in group 1. The self-adhesive resin cement provided the highest bond strengths to the zirconia substrates in groups 2 and 3. The adhesive type of bond failure was common in the metal and zirconia substrates in all groups. Cement-substrate bonding quality is not affected by the size of sandblasting particles. Resin cements bond better to different coping substrates. Self-adhesive resin cement is the best choice to bond zirconia-based substrates. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Piezoelectric and bonding properties of a cement-based composite for dental application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Liu, Jinsong; Zhu, Jianguo; Ye, Yongmei; Li, Xiang; Chen, Zhiqing

    2008-11-01

    A cement-based piezoelectric composite was introduced as real-time health monitoring systems to dentin. Lithium sodium potassium niobate and zinc polycarboxylate cement were mixed and made piezoelectric under different poling conditions. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope confirmed the component and microstructure of the cement. The bonding force of the composites was compared to that of pure cement by analysis of variance. The optimum poling method was determined and the influencing factors of piezoelectric coefficient were discussed.

  5. Piezoelectric and bonding properties of a cement-based composite for dental application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qi [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Stomatology Hospital, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Liu Jinsong [School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Zhu Jianguo [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Ye Yongmei [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Stomatology Hospital, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Li Xiang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Chen Zhiqing [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Stomatology Hospital, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)], E-mail: liuy365@163.com

    2008-11-15

    A cement-based piezoelectric composite was introduced as real-time health monitoring systems to dentin. Lithium sodium potassium niobate and zinc polycarboxylate cement were mixed and made piezoelectric under different poling conditions. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope confirmed the component and microstructure of the cement. The bonding force of the composites was compared to that of pure cement by analysis of variance. The optimum poling method was determined and the influencing factors of piezoelectric coefficient were discussed.

  6. Piezoelectric and bonding properties of a cement-based composite for dental application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qi; Liu Jinsong; Zhu Jianguo; Ye Yongmei; Li Xiang; Chen Zhiqing

    2008-01-01

    A cement-based piezoelectric composite was introduced as real-time health monitoring systems to dentin. Lithium sodium potassium niobate and zinc polycarboxylate cement were mixed and made piezoelectric under different poling conditions. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope confirmed the component and microstructure of the cement. The bonding force of the composites was compared to that of pure cement by analysis of variance. The optimum poling method was determined and the influencing factors of piezoelectric coefficient were discussed

  7. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared shear bond strength (SBS of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA, Maxcem Elite (MAX, Clearfil SA Luting (CSL, PermaCem 2.0 (PM2, Rely-X U200 (RXU, Smartcem 2 (SC2 were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000× and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL retained better bonds than other cements.

  8. Resistance to bond degradation between dual-cure resin cements and pre-treated sintered CAD-CAM dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Raquel; Castillo-de Oyagüe, Raquel; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Estrella; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the bond stability of resin cements when luted to glass-reinforced alumina and zirconia CAD/CAM dental ceramics. Eighteen glass-infiltrated alumina and eighteen densely sintered zirconia blocks were randomly conditioned as follows: Group 1: No treatment; Group 2: Sandblasting (125 µm Al₂O₃-particles); and Group 3: Silica-coating (50 µm silica-modified Al₂O₃-particles). Composite samples were randomly bonded to the pretreated ceramic surfaces using different resin cements: Subgroup 1: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); Subgroup 2: RelyX Unicem (RXU); and Subgroup 3: Calibra (CAL). After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.1 mm² sticks. One-half of the beams were tested for microtensile bond strength (MTBS). The remaining one-half was immersed in 10 % NaOCl aqueous solution (NaOClaq) for 5 h before testing. The fracture pattern and morphology of the debonded surfaces were assessed with a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). A multiple ANOVA was conducted to analyze the contributions of ceramic composition, surface treatment, resin cement type, and chemical challenging to MTBS. The Tukey test was run for multiple comparisons (p Resin-ceramic interfacial longevity depended on cement selection rather than on surface pre-treatments. The MDP-containing and the self-adhesive resin cements were both suitable for luting CAD/CAM ceramics. Despite both cements being prone to degradation, RXU luted to zirconia or untreated or sandblasted alumina showed the most stable interfaces. CAL experimented spontaneous debonding in all tested groups.

  9. Bond strength of a dental leucite-based glass ceramic to a resin cement using different silane coupling agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Keshvad, Alireza; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Zamani, Fereshteh

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of different types of novel silane coupling agents with two concentrations on the micro-tensile bond strength of a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystals to a dual-cured resin cement using an optimized method of silane application. Leucite-reinforced feldspathic ceramic blocks were fabricated, wet ground and cleansed. The bonding ceramic surfaces were treated with different organosilane solutions as follows: Control silane: Monobond S; methacryloxypropyltrimethoxy silane and experimental silanes with two concentrations (1.0 and 2.5 vol%): amino, isocyanate, styryl, and acrylate silanes. The silane application method consisted of brush application, hot air drying followed by rinsing with hot water and drying. Then a thin layer of an unfilled resin and a dual-cured resin cement was light-cured on the ceramic surfaces. The resin-ceramic blocks were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and sectioned to produce beam specimens (n=17) with a 1.0 mm(2) cross-sectional area. Specimens were then subjected to thermocycling and tested in a micro-tensile tester device. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tamhane post-hoc test. The mean micro-tensile bond strength value for the styryl silane was significantly higher (P0.05). The micro-tensile bond strength of the leucite-based dental glass ceramic to a resin cement was affected by the type of silane coupling agent and not by the concentration of silane solutions. The best bond strength overall was achieved by methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane and experimental styryl silane solutions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carolina Nemesio de Barros; Buono, Vicente Tadeu Lopes; Mota, Joao Mauricio Lima de Figueiredo

    2010-01-01

    To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Eighteen blocks (6 mm Chi 14 mm Chi 14 mm) of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B) to composite resin (InTen-S) blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok). Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydrofluoric acid plus silane Monobond-S dried at room temperature, HFS); the other four groups comprised different evaporation patterns (silane rinsed and dried at room temperature, SRT; silane rinsed in boiling water and dried as before, SBRT; silane rinsed with boiling water and heat dried at 50 degrees C, SBH; silane dried at 50 +/- 5 degrees C, rinsed in boiling water and dried at room temperature, SHBRT). The cemented blocks were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile test 7 days after cementation and were stored in water for 30 days prior to testing. Fracture patterns were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Statistics and All blocks of NT debonded during sectioning. One way ANOVA tests showed higher bond strengths for HFS than for the other groups. SBRT and SBH were statistically similar, with higher bond strengths than SRT and SHBRT. Failures were 100% adhesive in SRT and SHBRT. Cohesive failures within the "adhesive zone" were detected in HFS (30%), SBRT (24%) and SBH (40%). Silane treatment enhanced bond strength in all conditions evaluated, showing best results with HF etching.

  11. Effect of sandblasting, silica coating, and laser treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Heidari, Solmaz; Khoshro, Kimia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation as well as other surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to the two types of resin cements. Zirconia ceramic blocks (ICE Zirkon) were sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in resin composites. The ceramic specimens were divided into four groups according to the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control), sandblasting with alumina, silica coating plus silanization, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The specimens were divided equally and then bonded with Panavia F2.0 (self-etching resin cement) and Clearfil SA Luting (self-adhesive resin cement) to the composite blocks. The bonded ceramic-composite blocks were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 72 h, cut to prepare bar-shaped specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm(2), and thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5 and 55 °C, and the microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. The results showed that the self-adhesive resin cement used in this study did not improve the microtensile bond strength when the zirconia surface was sandblasted by alumina. The use of the Nd:YAG laser did not enhance the bond strength between the zirconia and both types of resin cements. In addition, silica coating of the zirconia surfaces plus silane application significantly improved the bond strength regardless of the type of resin cement utilized.

  12. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Dentin Using New Universal Bonding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    bonding agents on the bond strength of dual-cure resin cements to dentin. One hundred forty extracted human third molars were mounted in dental stone...Force Postgraduate Dental School (AFPDS) 4. Phone: 210-671-9822 5. Type of clearance: _x_Paper _Article _ Book _Poster _Presentation _Other 6. Title...34Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Dentin Using New Universal Bonding Agents" Materials Repaired with Composite Resin" 7. Intended publication

  13. Influence of different power outputs of intraoral Nd:YAG laser on shear bond strength of a resin cement to nickel-chromium dental alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    sadat Madani, Azam; Astaneh, Pedram Ansari; Shahabi, Sima; Nakhaei, Mohammad Reza; Bagheri, Hossein G; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Up to now, there is no any experience about the application of dental lasers to bond resin composites to metal surfaces in dentistry. The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate if the laser irradiation of ceramic-covered alloy surface would improve the bond strength of resin to metal, and if different parameters of laser output may influence the strength of this bond. Fifty three cylinders (thickness of 5 mm and diameter of 10 mm) were made up of a commercially available nickel-chromium alloy by lost-wax technique. Forty prepared specimens were divided into four groups. Five specimens in each group were covered by slurry of dental opaque porcelain and irradiated by Nd:YAG laser using different output parameters for each group. Other five specimens in each group were treated using the same laser parameters without porcelain covering. Five sandblasted specimen served as control group. Panavia F2.0 was bonded on the metal surfaces using polyethylene tubes. In ceramic-coated specimens, silane was applied to achieve chemical bond between silica particles and resin cement. All specimens were thermocycled and subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) test (50 kgf at 0.5 mm/min). Two specimens of each ceramic-coated laser-treated groups were studied using scanning electron microscopy and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy which showed stabilization of silica particles on the metal surface. ANOVA procedure showed that although shear bond strength was significantly higher in porcelain-covered laser treated samples, but the effect of power output of laser irradiation was not significant (P = 0.917). There were no statistically significant difference between SBS in control samples and laser treated specimens without porcelain covering. It can be concluded that Nd:YAG laser surface treatment may improve the silica coating of alloy surface to achieve better resin-metal bond.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  15. All-ceramic crowns: bonding or cementing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Despite the wide variety of all-ceramic systems available today, the majority of dental practitioners hesitate to recommend and insert all-ceramic crowns. This article regards the nature of the ceramic materials, the principles of bonding and adhesion, and the clinical problems of the acid-etch technique for crowns. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed, and the influences of different factors on the strength of all-ceramic crowns are presented. Finally, the conclusion is drawn that conventional cementing of all-ceramic crowns is possible when the specific properties of the ceramics are taken into consideration.

  16. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    OpenAIRE

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA; Mário Fernando de GÓES; Marcelo GIANNINI

    2008-01-01

    Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15) according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC...

  17. Shear bond strength of a self‑etched resin cement to an indirect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... however there were not statistical difference among the tested surface treatment methods. Conclusion: In Shear bond strength of resin, cement was independent of the surface conditioning methods applied on tested indirect resin composite. Key words: Composite resins, dental bonding, resin cements, surface properties ...

  18. The influence of temporary cements on dental adhesive systems for luting cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, José C V; Coelho, Paulo G; Janal, Malvin N; Silva, Nelson R F A; Monteiro, André J; Fernandes, Carlos A O

    2011-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that bond strength of total- and self-etching adhesive systems to dentine is not affected by the presence of remnants from either eugenol-containing (EC) or eugenol-free (EF) temporary cements after standardized cleaning procedures. Thirty non-carious human third molars were polished flat to expose dentine surfaces. Provisional acrylic plates were fabricated and cemented either with EC, EF or no temporary cements. All specimens were incubated for 7 days in water at 37°C. The restorations were then taken out and the remnants of temporary cements were mechanically removed with a dental instrument. The dentine surfaces were cleaned with pumice and treated with either total-etching (TE) or self-etching (SE) dental adhesive systems. Atomic force microscopy was used to examine the presence of remnants of temporary cements before and after dentine cleaning procedures. Composite resin build-ups were fabricated and cemented to the bonded dentine surfaces with a resin luting cement. The specimens were then sectioned to obtain 0.9mm(2) beams for microtensile bond strength testing. Fractographic analysis was performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. ANOVA showed lower mean microtensile bond strength in groups of specimens treated with EC temporary cement than in groups treated with either no cement or an EF cement (p<0.05). Mean microtensile bond strength was lower in groups employing the SE rather than the TE adhesive system (p<0.001). SE samples were also more likely to fail during initial processing of the samples. There was no evidence of interaction between cement and adhesive system effects on tensile strength. Fractographic analysis indicated different primary failure modes for SE and TE bonding systems, at the dentine-adhesive interface and at the resin cement-resin composite interface, respectively. The use of eugenol-containing temporary cements prior to indirect bonding restorations reduce, to a statistically similar

  19. A Comparison of Tensile Bond Strength Between Low Translucency and High Translucency Lithium Disilicate Ceramics Using Two Different Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Computer animated design of a veneered dental restoration 2 Figure 2: Computer animated design of a cementable dental implant restoration using a...Hill, E. E. (2007). Dental cements for definitive luting: a review and practical clinical considerations. Dental Clinics of North America, 51(3), 643-58...A COMPARISON OF TENSILE BOND STRENGTH BETWEEN LOW TRANSLUCENCY AND HIGH TRANSLUCENCY LITHIUM DISILICATE CERAMICS USING TWO DIFFERENT RESIN CEMENTS

  20. Effect of interim cement application on bond strength between resin cements and dentin: Immediate and delayed dentin sealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigagão, Vinícius C; Barreto, Luis F D; Gonçalves, Kellem A S; Amaral, Marina; Vitti, Rafael P; Neves, Ana C C; Silva-Concílio, Laís R

    2017-06-01

    Despite the advances in materials and techniques, adhesion to dentin is challenging because of the complex composition of dentin's mineral, organic, and fluid phases. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of 2 different resin cements (conventional and self-adhesive) with or without previous dentin sealing and the effect of interim cement. Forty-five molars were embedded into acrylic resin blocks and a flat dentin surface was exposed. Twenty teeth (n=5 per group) were treated with the conventional resin cement associated with etch-and-rinse or self-etch adhesive approaches, applied before (immediate dentin sealing) or after (delayed dentin sealing) the application/removal of interim cement. Another 25 teeth (n=5, per group) were treated with self-adhesive resin cement with (self-etch mode [immediate dentin sealing or delayed dentin sealing]) or without adhesive application. Furthermore, in the self-adhesive resin cement group, the application of polyacrylic acid for dentin etching before cementation was evaluated. Composite resin blocks were cemented onto flat, treated dentin surfaces, and the assemblies were sectioned into bar-shaped specimens for microtensile bond strength testing. The data were subjected to 1-way ANOVA followed by the post-hoc Tukey test (α=.05). The failure patterns were classified as cohesive, adhesive, or mixed. The application of adhesive before interim cement (immediate dental sealing) promoted the highest values of bond strength for both resin cements (Presin cement, polyacrylic acid-enhanced bond strength after the application of interim cement. The application of dental adhesive immediately after tooth preparation (immediate dentin sealing) and before the use of an interim cement promoted the highest values of bond strength to dentin with the resin cements tested. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of provisional cements on shear bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each tooth. Restorations were fixed with one of three different provisional cements: eugenol-free provisional cement (Cavex), calcium hydroxide (Dycal), and light-cured provisional cement (Tempond Clear). Provisional restorations were removed with either a dental explorer and air-water spray, or a cleaning bur (Opticlean). In the control group, provisional restorations were not used on the surfaces of specimens. IPS Empress 2 ceramic discs were luted with a dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F). Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey's HSD and Dunnett tests. Surfaces were examined by scanning electronic microscopy. Significant differences were found between the control group and both the light-cured provisional cement groups and the eugenol-free provisional cement-cleaning bur group (Pprovisional cement showed the lowest bond strength values. Selection of the provisional cement is an important factor in the ultimate bond strength of the final restoration. Calcium hydroxide provisional cement and cleaning with a dental explorer are advisable.

  2. Initial acidity of dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, D; Evje, D M

    1984-04-01

    The acidity in aqueous solutions following release of acid components from glass ionomer, silicate, zinc phosphate and zinc polycarboxylate cements has been registered by pH measurements. One brand of each type was studied. Initial setting was accomplished at two different temperatures; 23 degrees C and in the interval from 23 degrees C to about 60 degrees C. In the latter case external heat was transferred to the samples by infrared radiation for a period of 2 min. The highest acidity was associated with the silicate specimen, while the lowest acidity was recorded for the zinc polycarboxylate specimen. Exposure to infrared radiation resulted in a reduced acidity for all types of cements. The effect of infrared exposure was most pronounced for the silicate specimens, resulting in a reduction of acid release by a factor of about 10 compared to the nontreated samples. The resistance to acid release was found to be improved by a factor of about 5 for the glass ionomer and about 3 for the zinc phosphate cement treated in a similar way. Clinically, it seems possible considerably to reduce the risk of pulpal injuries associated with the insertion of silicate restorations by using a moderate infrared radiation treatment. Furthermore, the susceptibility of glass ionomer cements to a high initial erosion should be reduced by the use of such a technique. After exposure of the glass ionomer and silicate specimens to infrared radiation at the temperature interval applied, the samples had a more glossy, tooth-like appearance compared to the nonexposed samples, improving the aesthetic properties.

  3. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of luting cement to ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Özcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA based luting cement to six commercial dental ceramics. Methods. Six disc shaped ceramic specimens (glass ceramics, glass infiltrated alumina, glass infiltrated zirconium

  4. Cement selection for cement-retained crown technique with dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, James L; Wilcox, Charles; Wilwerding, Terry

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the retentive nature of common dental cements that have been adapted for use in the implant abutment cement-retained crown (CRC) technique with those specifically formulated for this purpose. Ten regular diameter implant analogs were embedded in stainless steel disks. Unmodified CRC abutments were attached and torqued to 30 Ncm. Test crowns were waxed and cast with base metal alloy. Castings were fitted, cleaned with aluminum oxide, and steam cleaned prior to application of the cement. The cements used were: (1) Temp Bond, (2) UltraTemp, regular, (3) UltraTemp firm, (4) ImProv with petroleum jelly coating of crown, (5) ImProv without petroleum jelly, (6) Premier Implant with KY Jelly coating of abutment, (7) Premier Implant without KY jelly, (8) TR-2, (9) Fleck's, (10) Ketac Cem Aplicap, and (11) Fuji Plus Capsule. After cementation, assemblies were stored for 24 hours. Each sample was subjected to a pull-out test using an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5.0 mm/min. Loads required to remove the crowns were recorded, and mean values for each group determined. A one-way ANOVA and a post hoc least square difference (LSD) test were done for pairwise comparison at a confidence interval of 95%. The mean values (+/-SD) of loads at failure (n = 10) for various cements were as follows (N): Ultratemp, regular 358.6 (+/-38.2) (Group A), ImProv without petroleum jelly 172.4 (+/-59.6) (Group B), Fleck's 171.8 (+/-62.2) (Group B), Ketac Cem 167.8 (+/-69.1) (Group B), UltraTemp firm 158.8 (+/-62.7) (Group BC), Fuji Plus 147.5 (+/-69.7) (Group BC), Premier without KY jelly 131.6 (+/-31.8) (Group BC), ImProv using petroleum jelly 130.8 (+/-42.5) (Group BC), Temp Bond 117.8 (+/-48.3) (Group C), TR-2 41.2 (+/-16.6) (Group D), and Premier with KY jelly 31.6 (+/-24.8) (Group D). Groups with the same letter were not significantly different. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it is not suggested

  5. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and...

  6. Mechanical Properties and Decay Resistance of Hornbeam Cement Bonded Particleboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios N. Papadopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement bonded particleboards were manufactured from hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L. wood particles. Hydration tests were carried out to determine the inhibitory index in order to characterise wood-cement compatibility. The results revealed that the mixture of hornbeam-cement can be classified as moderate inhibition. Two wood: cement ratios were applied in this study, namely, 1 : 3 and 1 : 4, for the board manufacture. It was found that an increase of cement-wood ratio resulted in an improvement in all properties examined, except MOR. All properties of the boards made from 1 : 4 wood: cement ratio surpassed the minimum requirements set forth by the building type HZ code. Boards were exposed to brown and white rot fungi, Coniophora puteana, and Trametes versicolor, respectively. Overall, both fungi failed to attack the cement-bonded boards.

  7. A study on provisional cements, cementation techniques, and their effects on bonding of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, G; Soorya Poduval, T; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P

    2014-03-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restoration. Determine the presence of cement debris on prepared tooth surface subsequent to the removal of provisional restoration. Determine the cement with the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Determine the effect of smear layer on the amount of residual luting cement. Eighty-four extracted natural anterior teeth were prepared for porcelain laminate veneers. For half of the teeth, the smear layer was removed before luting provisional restorations. Veneer provisional restorations were fabricated and luted to teeth with six bonding methods: varnish combined with glass ionomer cement (GIC), varnish combined with resin modified GIC, varnish, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement, adhesive combined with GIC, adhesive combined with resin modified GIC, and adhesive, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement. After removal of provisional restorations 1 week later, the tooth surface was examined for residual luting material with SEM. Traces of cement debris were found on all the prepared teeth surfaces for all six groups which were cemented with different methods. Cement debris was seen on teeth subsequent to the removal of provisional's. Dual-cure cement had the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Presence of smear layer had no statistical significance in comparison with cement residue. With the use of adhesive the cement debris was always found to be more than with the use of varnish. GIC showed maximum residual cement followed by dual-cure.

  8. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Resende NOVAIS

    Full Text Available Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer. The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst and light-activation mode (base paste only. For degree of conversion (DC (n=5, a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick.

  10. Porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for enhanced bone bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang He

    Full Text Available Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth.The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant-bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests.The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony defect.Our findings suggested a new bioactive

  11. Evaluation Of The Shear Bond Strength Between Dentin And Dental Luting Cement Following Dentin Surface Treatment By 980 Nm Diode Laser And Desensitizing Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, T.; Gheith, M.

    2011-09-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is described clinically as an exaggerated response to non-noxious sensory stimuli. Current treatment is concentrating on two approaches; to occlude the dentinal tubules or to block neural transmission. This is achieved through using dentin desensitizers and low power lasers. Forty eight freshly extracted human molar teeth were used in this study and divided equally into three groups. Group 1) control group, group 2) laser treated dentin surface group, and group 3) desensitizing agent dentin surface group. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of laser treated group showed melted globules, no carbonization, recrystalization and crystal growth of the apatite in some areas. In diode laser dentin surface treated group showed the highest shear bond strength mean value.

  12. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and randomly assigned to four groups of dentin cleaning protocols (n = 9). Group 1 (control): Provisional cements were mechanically removed with a dental explorer. Group 2: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning brush with pumice Group 3: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning bur. Group 4: The provisional cements were removed by an Er:YAG laser. Self-adhesive luting cement was used to bond ceramic discs to dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.05 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed using a Kolmogorov Smirnov, One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests to perform multiple comparisons (α=0.05). RESULTS The dentin cleaning methods did not significantly affect the SBS of ceramic discs to dentin as follows: dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, and Er:YAG laser. CONCLUSION The use of different cleaning protocols did not affect the SBS between dentin and ceramic surfaces. PMID:23236570

  13. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and randomly assigned to four groups of dentin cleaning protocols (n = 9). Group 1 (control): Provisional cements were mechanically removed with a dental explorer. Group 2: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning brush with pumice Group 3: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning bur. Group 4: The provisional cements were removed by an Er:YAG laser. Self-adhesive luting cement was used to bond ceramic discs to dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.05 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed using a Kolmogorov Smirnov, One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests to perform multiple comparisons (α=0.05). THE DENTIN CLEANING METHODS DID NOT SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT THE SBS OF CERAMIC DISCS TO DENTIN AS FOLLOWS: dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, and Er:YAG laser. The use of different cleaning protocols did not affect the SBS between dentin and ceramic surfaces.

  14. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: huanzhou@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement.

  15. Effects of cement thickness and bonding on the failure loads of CAD/CAM ceramic crowns: multi-physics FEA modeling and monotonic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Liliana G; Kelly, J Robert; Bottino, Marco A; Hill, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    To determine the influence of cement thickness and ceramic/cement bonding on stresses and failure of CAD/CAM crowns, using both multi-physics finite element analysis and monotonic testing. Axially symmetric FEA models were created for stress analysis of a stylized monolithic crown having resin cement thicknesses from 50 to 500 μm under occlusal loading. Ceramic-cement interface was modeled as bonded or not-bonded (cement-dentin as bonded). Cement polymerization shrinkage was simulated as a thermal contraction. Loads necessary to reach stresses for radial cracking from the intaglio surface were calculated by FEA. Experimentally, feldspathic CAD/CAM crowns based on the FEA model were machined having different occlusal cementation spaces, etched and cemented to dentin analogs. Non-bonding of etched ceramic was achieved using a thin layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane). Crowns were loaded to failure at 5 N/s, with radial cracks detected acoustically. Failure loads depended on the bonding condition and the cement thickness for both FEA and physical testing. Average fracture loads for bonded crowns were: 673.5 N at 50 μm cement and 300.6N at 500 μm. FEA stresses due to polymerization shrinkage increased with the cement thickness overwhelming the protective effect of bonding, as was also seen experimentally. At 50 μm cement thickness, bonded crowns withstood at least twice the load before failure than non-bonded crowns. Occlusal "fit" can have structural implications for CAD/CAM crowns; pre-cementation spaces around 50-100 μm being recommended from this study. Bonding benefits were lost at thickness approaching 450-500 μm due to polymerization shrinkage stresses. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Traction test of temporary dental cements

    OpenAIRE

    Román Rodríguez, Juan Luis; Millan Martínez, Diego; Fons Font, Antonio; Agustín Panadero, Rubén; Fernández Estevan, Lucía

    2017-01-01

    Background Classic self-curing temporary cements obstruct the translucence of provisional restorations. New dual-cure esthetic temporary cements need investigation and comparison with classic cements to ensure that they are equally retentive and provide adequate translucence. The objective is to analyze by means of traction testing in a in vitro study the retention of five temporary cements. Material and Methods Ten molars were prepared and ten provisional resin restorations were fabricated u...

  17. Effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation on bonding property of zirconia ceramics to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yihua; Song, Xiaomeng; Chen, Yaming; Zhu, Qingping; Zhang, Wei

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether or not an erbium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser could improve the bonding property of zirconia ceramics to resin cement. Surface treatments can improve the bonding properties of dental ceramics. However, little is known about the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiated on zirconia ceramics. Specimens of zirconia ceramic pieces were made, and randomly divided into 11 groups according to surface treatments, including one control group (no treatment), one air abrasion group, and nine Er:YAG laser groups. The laser groups were subdivided by applying different energy intensities (100, 200, or 300 mJ) and irradiation times (5, 10, or 15 sec). After surface treatments, ceramic pieces had their surface morphology observed, and their surface roughness was measured. All specimens were bonded to resin cement. Shear bond strength was measured after the bonded specimens were stored in water for 24 h, and additionally aged by thermocycling. Statistical analyses were performed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test for shear bond strength, and Dunnett's t test for surface roughness, with α=0.05. Er:YAG laser irradiation changed the morphological characteristics of zirconia ceramics. Higher energy intensities (200, 300 mJ) could roughen the ceramics, but also caused surface cracks. There were no significant differences in the bond strength between the control group and the laser groups treated with different energy intensities or irradiation times. Air abrasion with alumina particles induced highest surface roughness and shear bond strength. Er:YAG laser irradiation cannot improve the bonding property of zirconia ceramics to resin cement. Enhancing irradiation intensities and extending irradiation time have no benefit on the bond of the ceramics, and might cause material defect.

  18. A Study on Provisional Cements, Cementation Techniques, and Their Effects on Bonding of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Vinod Kumar, G.; Soorya Poduval, T.; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P.

    2013-01-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restorati...

  19. In vivo characterization of polymer based dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiyanti P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In vivo studies investigating the characterization of dental cements have been demonstrated. As few in vitro studies on this cement system have been performed. Previous researches in dental material has been standardized dental cement which fulfilled the physical and mechanical characteristic such as shear strength but were on in vitro condition, the animal model and clinical study of dental cement from laboratory has not been done yet. This research examined physical and mechanical characteristic in vivo using rabbit by making the caries (class III in anterior teeth especially in mesial or distal incisive, fulfilled the cavity by dental cement and analyzed the compressive strength, tensile strength, and microstructure using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Purpose: This study is aimed to describe the in vivo characterization of dental cements based on polymer (zinc phosphate cement, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer cement and zinc oxide eugenol. Methods: First, preparation was done on animal model’s teeth (6 rabbits, male, 5 months old. The cavity was made which involved the dentin. Then the cavity was filled with dental cement. After the filling procedure, the animal model should be kept until 21 days and than the compressive test, tensile test and microstructure was characterized. Compressive test and tensile test was analyzed using samples from extracted tooth and was measured with autograph. The microstructure test was measured using SEM. Results: The best compressive strength value was belongs to zinc phosphate cement which was 101.888 Mpa and the best tensile strength value was belongs to glass ionomer cement which was 6.555 Mpa. Conclusion: In conclusion, comparing with 3 others type of dental cements which are zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate and glass ionomer cement, zinc oxide eugenol cement has the worst for both physical and mechanical properties.Latar belakang: Studi in vivo meneliti karakterisasi secara in vivo dari

  20. Bond behaviour of GFRP reinforced geopolymer cement concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailu Tekle Biruk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bond plays a key role in the performance of reinforced concrete structures. Glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP reinforcing bar and Geopolymer cement (GPC concrete are promising alternative construction materials for steel bars and Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC concrete respectively. In this study, the bond behaviour between these two materials is investigated by using beam-end specimen tests. The bond behaviour of 15.9 mm diameter sand-coated GFRP bar was investigated. An embedment length of six and nine times the bar diameter were used. The free end and the loaded end bond-slip-relationships, the bond failure mode and the average bond stress were used to analyse each of the specimens. Additionally, the distribution of tensile and bond stress along the embedment length was investigated by installing strain gauges along the embedment length in some of the specimens. Test results indicate that a significant difference exists between the free end and loaded end bond-slip curves, which is due to the lower elastic modulus of the GFRP bars. Furthermore, it was found that the tensile and bond stress distribution along the embedment length is nonlinear and the nonlinearity changes with the load.

  1. Microleakage of different amalgams bonded with dual cure resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, R; du Preez, I C; Oberholzer, T G

    2007-03-01

    To reduce microleakage in high-copper amalgam restorations, bonding of amalgam was introduced. This study compared the microleakage of admixed and spherical amalgams when bonded with different bonding intermediates under thermo- and non-thermocycling conditions. Class II butt-joint cavities were prepared in 200 extracted human molar teeth, and randomly divided into 5 groups. Calibra, Duo Cement Plus, RelyX ARC and Amalgambond Plus were applied to 4 of these groups. The fifth group was left untreated. The groups were further divided and restored with either Dispersalloy or Oralloy Magicap S. Ten specimens of each group were thermocycled between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, placed in basic fuchsin for 8 hours, sectioned and evaluated for dye penetration under 40X magnification. The mean microleakage scores were analysed using the chi-squared test at a confidence level of 95%. Microleakage of the non-bonded amalgams was significantly higher (p amalgams (thermocycled and non-thermocycled). The microleakage of the different intermediates bonded to Dispersalloy (thermocycled and non-thermocycled) was not significantly different (p > 0.05). The microleakage of the different intermediates was not significant different except for Duo Cement compared to Calibra (p amalgams was not significantly increased by thermocycling (p > 0.05). The microleakage of the two amalgams when bonded with the same resin cements (thermocycled and non-thermocycled) was not significantly different except for Duo Cement (thermocycled) (p = 0.0051) and RelyX (non-thermocycled) (p = 0.0356). Bonding amalgam restorations to tooth structure in butt-joint cavities will reduce microleakage of both admixed and spherical amalgam restorations. Thermal stress does not affect the bond adversely.

  2. Effect of Imaging Powders on the Bond Strength of Resin Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-19

    particular cement .5-25 A review of clinical studies found that the longevity of posterior dental restorations was dependent upon many different...performance as other dental cements , but clinical studies are 6 lacking, so long-term conclusions are not possible.34 Self-adhesive cements have a...Strength of Resin Cement " is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond brief excerpts, is with the permission of the copyright owner. #lIZ Christopher R

  3. Bonding effectiveness to different chemically pre-treated dental zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, Masanao; Poitevin, André; De Munck, Jan; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different chemical pre-treatments on the bond durability to dental zirconia. Fully sintered IPS e.max ZirCAD (Ivoclar Vivadent) blocks were subjected to tribochemical silica sandblasting (CoJet, 3M ESPE). The zirconia samples were additionally pre-treated using one of four zirconia primers/adhesives (Clearfil Ceramic Primer, Kuraray Noritake; Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent; Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE; Z-PRIME Plus, Bisco). Finally, two identically pre-treated zirconia blocks were bonded together using composite cement (RelyX Ultimate, 3M ESPE). The specimens were trimmed at the interface to a cylindrical hourglass and stored in distilled water (7 days, 37 °C), after which they were randomly tested as is or subjected to mechanical ageing involving cyclic tensile stress (10 N, 10 Hz, 10,000 cycles). Subsequently, the micro-tensile bond strength was determined, and SEM fractographic analysis performed. Weibull analysis revealed the highest Weibull scale and shape parameters for the 'Clearfil Ceramic Primer/mechanical ageing' combination. Chemical pre-treatment of CoJet (3M ESPE) sandblasted zirconia using Clearfil Ceramic Primer (Kuraray Noritake) and Monobond Plus (Ivoclar Vivadent) revealed a significantly higher bond strength than when Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE) and Z-PRIME Plus (Bisco) were used. After ageing, Clearfil Ceramic Primer (Kuraray Noritake) revealed the most stable bond durability. Combined mechanical/chemical pre-treatment, the latter with either Clearfil Ceramic Primer (Kuraray Noritake) or Monobond Plus (Ivoclar Vivadent), resulted in the most durable bond to zirconia. As a standard procedure to durably bond zirconia to tooth tissue, the application of a combined 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate/silane ceramic primer to zirconia is clinically highly recommended.

  4. Bond strength between zirconium ceramic and dual resinous cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Galan Junior

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the influence of different surface treatments on the bond strength between the resinous cement Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and the structure of In-Ceram YZ (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany. Methods: Fifteen ceramic blocks were assessed: Group 1, finishing with abrasive paper; Group 2, finishing, airborne Al2O3 particle abrasion and silanization; Group 3, finishing, airborne particle abrasion, silicatization and silanization. After treatment, the blocks received cementation of resin composite cylinders with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and were submitted to the shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Results: The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and multiple comparison Student-Newman-Keuls test: Group 1 (9.66 ± 1.67 MPa < Group 2 (16.61 ± 3.38 MPa = Group 3 (19.23 ± 5.69 MPa, with p = 0.007. Conclusion: The structures of the In-Ceram YZ system (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany associated with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan require previous etching to achieve greater bond strength between the ceramic and cement, and this treatment may be performed with airborne particle abrasion I or traditional silicatization, both followed by silanization.

  5. Influence of Bovine Dentin Site on the Bond Strength of Resin Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Tohru, HAYAKAWA; Hiroyuki, MISHIMA; Shuichi, YAMAKAWA; Mikiko, MASUDA; Masahiro, AIDA; Kimiya, NEMOTO; Yukishige, KOZAWA; Department of Dental Materials, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon Univerity School of Dentistry at Matsudo; Department of Anatomy, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo; Department of Crown and Bridge Prosthodontics, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo; Department of Crown and Bridge Prosthodontics, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo; Department of Crown and Bridge Prosthodontics, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo; Department of Dental Materials, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon Univerity School of Dentistry at Matsudo; Department of Anatomy, Research Institute of Oral Science, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of types of resin cements and dentin site(crown and root part)on the adhesion of resin cement to dentin. Three types of resin cements; Super-Bond C&B, Bistite II and Scotchbond Resin Cement were used. The tensile bond strength of each resin cement to crown and root dentin of bovine incisors was measured after 24 hours immersion in water at 37℃. Super-Bond C&B showed no significant difference in bond strength between crown and root den...

  6. Antibacterial Activity of Dental Cements Containing Quaternary Ammonium Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyth, N.; Weiss, E.I.; Pilo, R.

    2012-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are commonly used for cementing full cast crown restorations. Regrettably, although the dental cements fill the gap between the tooth and the crown, bacterial micro leakage may occur, resulting in secondary caries. As micro leakage cannot be completely prevented, GCS possessing antibacterial properties are in demand. In the present study the antibacterial activity of insoluble, cross-linked quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (Qp) nanoparticles incorporated at 1% w/w in two clinically available GCS were studied. The antibacterial activity was tested against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei using the direct contact test (Dct) and the agar diffusion test (Ad). Using the direct contact test, antibacterial activity (P<0.05) was found in both tested GICs with incorporated QPEI nanoparticles, the effect lasting for at least one month. However, the ADT showed no inhibition halo in the test bacteria, indicating that the antimicrobial nanoparticles do not diffuse into the agar. The results show that the incorporation of QPEI nanoparticles in glass ionomer cements has a long-lasting antibacterial effect against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei. Changing the antibacterial properties of glass ionomer cements by incorporating QPEI antibacterial nanoparticles may prolong the clinical performance of dental crowns.

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Dental Cements Containing Quaternary Ammonium Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Beyth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs are commonly used for cementing full cast crown restorations. Regrettably, although the dental cements fill the gap between the tooth and the crown, bacterial microleakage may occur, resulting in secondary caries. As microleakage cannot be completely prevented, GICs possessing antibacterial properties are in demand. In the present study the antibacterial activity of insoluble, cross-linked quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI nanoparticles incorporated at 1% w/w in two clinically available GICs were studied. The antibacterial activity was tested against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei using the direct contact test (DCT and the agar diffusion test (ADT. Using the direct contact test, antibacterial activity (<0.05 was found in both tested GICs with incorporated QPEI nanoparticles, the effect lasting for at least one month. However, the ADT showed no inhibition halo in the test bacteria, indicating that the antimicrobial nanoparticles do not diffuse into the agar. The results show that the incorporation of QPEI nanoparticles in glass ionomer cements has a long-lasting antibacterial effect against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei. Changing the antibacterial properties of glass ionomer cements by incorporating QPEI antibacterial nanoparticles may prolong the clinical performance of dental crowns.

  8. Radiopacity of dental restorative materials and cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Byung Chul; Yang, Hong So; Chung, Hyun Ju; Oh, Won Mann

    1994-01-01

    The radiopacity of six composite resins, three resin luting cements and ten filling materials were studied. The purpose was to obtain an indication of radiopacity value of different brands within each of these groups of materials and to show differences in radiopacities of filling materials and natural tooth structures. On radiographs, the optimal densities of standardized samples were determined by computer imaging system and radiopacity values of the materials were expressed in millimeter equivalent aluminum. Within to groups of materials studied, there was considerable variation in radiopacity. The composite resins of P-50, Zl00 and prisma AP. H displayed much higher radiopacities than aluminum. Panavia resin cement was shown to be similarly radiopaque to aluminum. Generally, the radiopacity of base and filling materials appeared to combined applications for restorative treatment of teeth, lower radiopacity can interfere with the diagnosis and detection of gaps near the restoration.

  9. Bond strength of different resin cement and ceramic shades bonded to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Júnior, Gildo Coelho; Rizkalla, Amin S

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of ceramic cemented to dentin varying the resin cement and ceramic shades. Two VITA VM7 ceramic shades (Base Dentine 0M1 and Base Dentine 5M3) were used. A spectrophotometer was used to determine the percentage translucency of ceramic (thickness: 2.5 mm). For the MTBS test, 80 molar dentin surfaces were etched and an adhesive was applied. Forty blocks (7.2 x 7.2 x 2.5 mm) of each ceramic shade were produced and the ceramic surface was etched (10% hydrofluoric acid) for 60 s, followed by the application of silane and resin cement (A3 yellow and transparent). The blocks were cemented to dentin using either A3 or transparent cement. Specimens were photoactivated for 20 s or 40 s, stored in distilled water (37°C/24 h), and sectioned. Eight experimental groups were obtained (n = 10). Specimens were tested for MTSB using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α ceramics were 10.06 (± 0.25)% and 1.34 (± 0.02)%, respectively. The lowest MTBS was observed for the ceramic shade 5M3. For the 0M1 ceramic, the A3 yellow cement that was photocured for 20 s exhibited the lowest MTBS, while the transparent cement that was photocured for 40 s presented the highest MTBS. For the 2.5-mm-thick 5M3 ceramic restorations, the MTBS of ceramic cemented to dentin significantly increased. The dual-curing cement Variolink II photocured for 40 s is not recommended for cementing the Base Dentine 5M3 feldspathic ceramic to dentin.

  10. Comparative study of digital radiopacity of dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhamid Alhavaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiopacity is a necessary property for luting cements . The aim of this study was to investigate the radiopacity of some luting dental cements used in prosthetic dentistry. Methods: Five disclike samples of each material (6 x 1 mm were prepared from panavia F2.0(Pa, Chioce2 (Ch.2, Glass ionomer GC (GI GC, zinc phosphate Hoffmann’s (ZP hof, zinc polycarboxylate Hoffmann’s (ZPC hof, Glass ionomer ariadent( GI ari, zinc phosphate ariadent(ZP ari and zinc polycarboxylate ariadent (ZPC ari. The radiopacity of each material along with aluminium step wedge were measured from radiographic images using a digital radiography. The average measured radiopacities from five areas were taken into account, which were measured by Digora for windows (DFW software using a PSP digital sensor. Results: There was a significant difference between radiopacity value of all luting materials (P≤0.001. ZP ari had the highest radiopacity with 7.7±0.55 mm aluminium. The Glass ionomer ariadent ari dent showed the lowest radiopacity value with 0.82±0.31 mm aluminium. Conclusion: All dental cements showed radiopacity values equivalent to or greater than the ISO 4049:2000(Estandard except ariadent Glass ionomer and this could be considered suitable for use in restoration cementation.

  11. Influence of provisional cements on ultimate bond strength of indirect composite restorations to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, RB; Martins, LRM; Quagliatto, PS; Soares, CJ

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cements on the adhesion of resin bonded indirect restorations and determine the best method for avoiding adverse Materials and Methods: Forty-five bovine incisors were selected, and the enamel removed with a 600-grit SiC abrasive disk to expose superficial dentin. Provisional restorations of acrylic, resin were cemented with three different provisional cements: calcium hydroxide cement, Dycal (HC); cement containing zinc...

  12. Comparison of Shear Bond Strengths of Conventional Resin Cement and Self-adhesive Resin Cement bonded to Lithium Disilicate: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anip K; Mohan, Dennis; Sunith, M; Mandokar, Rashmi B; Suprasidh, S; Rajan, Soumya

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the shear bond strengths of conventional resin cement and self-adhesive resin cement bonded to lithium disilicate. A total of 40 extracted human molar teeth were mounted in self-cure acrylic resin. Teeth were prepared to obtain flat occlusal surface. About 40 lithium disilicate specimens of dimension-10 mm in diameter and thickness of 2 mm-were fabricated using lost wax technique. The samples were divided into four groups: Groups I, II, III, and IV (n = 10). The specimens were surface treated with Monobond S silane coupling agent. Self-etching primer and bonding agent were applied on the bonding surface of the teeth in groups I and III. The specimens were bonded to the primed teeth with the Multilink N resin cement and subjected to the universal testing machine. The specimens were light-cured. Specimens in groups II and IV were luted to teeth using self-adhesive cement RelyX U100. The same force was applied over the specimen as mentioned above. Excess cement was removed, and light curing was done. The specimens in groups III and IV were subjected to thermocycling for 10,000 cycles at temperatures altering between 5°C and 55°C. The shear bond strengths of conventional resin cement and self-adhesive resin cement with lithium disilicate were tested before and after thermocycling. Results indicated that thermocycling has no significant effect on the bond strengths of conventional or self-adhesive resin cement. However, from the study, it is seen that conventional resin cement had a higher shear bond strength value than the self-adhesive resin cement. There was a significant difference between the average shear bond strength values of conventional resin cement (Multilink N) and self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100) when bonded to lithium disilicate disks, and thermocycling had no significant effect on the bond strength of conventional or self-adhesive resin cements. Among all-ceramic systems available, lithium disilicate materials

  13. Microscopic evaluation of the human dental pulp after full crown cementation with resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Luiz C.; Pegoraro, Luiz F.; Consolaro, Alberto; Valle, Accácio L. do; Bonfante, Gerson

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated microscopically the dental pulp reactions in human premolars prepared for metaloceramic crowns cemented with different luting agents and also measured the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) of the prepared teeth. Twenty-five teeth were selected from patients that needed exodontia for orthodontic reasons and were randomly divided in three groups: group 1- five teeth were not prepared to serve as a positive control group; groups - 2, and 3 the teeth were prepared for metaloce...

  14. Strengthening of Concrete Structures with cement based bonded composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Due to demands on higher loads, degradation, re-construction etc. there is a constant need for repair or strengthening of existing concrete structures. Many varying methods exist to strengthen concrete structures, one such commonly used technique utilizes surface epoxy bonded FRPs (Fibre Reinforced...... with improved working environment and better compatibility to the base concrete structure. This study gives an overview of different cement based systems, all with very promising results for structural upgrading. Studied parameters are structural retrofit for bending, shear and confinement. It is concluded...

  15. Association of different primers and resin cements for adhesive bonding to zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Fernando Akio; Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Miranda Junior, Walter Gomes; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) to zirconia ceramics using different associations of primers and resin cements. Two blocks of LAVA zirconia (3Y-TZP) were randomly submitted to an application of three different commercially available primers: Alloy Primer (AP), Z-Prime Plus (ZP), and Signum Zirconia Bond (SZB). Nonprimed specimens were considered controls. After treatment, the 80 specimens (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were randomly cemented with one of the resin cements: Panavia F, Multilink, seT, and NX3. For cementation, cylinders of resin cement were built on the ceramic surfaces using the SDI SBS apparatus. The specimens were submitted to the SBS test. Fractured surfaces were observed under stereomicroscopy to determine the failure mode, and mean bond strength values were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α = 0.05). Signum Zirconia Bond had the highest SBS compared to all other primers and the control group, regardless of the resin cement used. The highest values were obtained when associating Panavia F with Signum Zirconia Bond. Alloy Primer increased bonding values when associated with seT cement only. When no primer was used, no statistical difference was observed among resin cements. All specimens fractured due to adhesive failure. Signum Zirconia Bond is capable of increasing bonding values of resin cements to zirconia ceramics. Its association with Panavia F shows enhanced results when considering short-term adhesion to zirconia.

  16. Effect of mode of polymerization of bonding agent on shear bond strength of autocured resin composite luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Cecilia C S; McComb, Dorothy; Anderson, James D; Tam, Laura E

    2003-04-01

    There have been anecdotal reports of low bond strength with autocured resin composite materials, particularly when light-cured bonding agents that combine primer and adhesive in a 1-bottle preparation are used. The objective of this study was to determine if the mode of polymerization of the bonding agent influences the strength of the attachment of autocured resin composite luting cements to dentin. The shear bond strength of 2 resin luting cements, Calibra and RelyX ARC, polymerized by autocuring, in combination with 4 different bonding agents, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus, Prime & Bond NT, IntegraBond and Single Bond, polymerized to bovine dentin by light-curing, autocuring or dual-curing, was determined. The pH of each bonding agent and its components was measured. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test the effect of cement and adhesive on shear bond strength. For each bonding agent, the adhesive variable combined the factors product brand and mode of polymerization. With significant interaction among the above variables, the least square means of the 16 combinations of resin cement and adhesive were compared. There was no consistent relationship between shear bond strength and mode of polymerization of the bonding agent. Significant differences in bond strength were specific to the proprietary brand of bonding agent. The pH of the bonding agent depends on the manufacturer's formulation, and low pH may contribute to low bond strength. The low in vitro bond strength occurring with some combinations of bonding agent and resin cement could be clinically significant.

  17. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, X F [Department of Prosthodontics, The Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yoshida, K [Division of Applied Prosthodontics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Gu, N, E-mail: mengsoar@nju.edu.c [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R{sub a} and R{sub y} values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane

  18. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, X F; Yoshida, K; Gu, N

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R a and R y values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane coupler

  19. Effect of adhesive resin cements on bond strength of ceramic core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, M; Aladag, L I

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements on the shear bond strength of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin. Extracted, caries-free, human central maxillary incisor teeth were selected, and the vestibule surfaces were cut flat to obtain dentin surfaces. Ceramic core materials (IPS e.max Press and Prettau Zirconia) were luted to the dentin surfaces using three self-etch adhesive systems (Duo-Link, Panavia F 2.0, and RelyX Ultimate Clicker) and two self-adhesive resin systems (RelyX U200 Automix and Maxcem Elite). A shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope, and bonding interfaces between the adhesive resin cements and the teeth were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The type of adhesive resin cement significantly affected the shear bond strengths of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin (P materials when the specimens were luted with self-adhesive resin cements (P resin cements exhibited better shear bond strength than the self-adhesive resin cements, except for Panavia cement in the IPS e.max Press group. However, shear bond strengths of the self-adhesive resin cements were dependent on the nature of the ceramic core materials.

  20. The solubility of dental luting cements-a combined in vivo/in vitro investigation-

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PLuim, Laurens Johannes

    1985-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were: 1: to develop and test a method to measure the solubility of dental cements in vitro as a function of time. 2: to develop and test a method to measure the desintegration of dental cements in vivo as a function of time. 3: to find possible correlations between 1

  1. The effects of non-thermal plasma and conventional treatments on the bond strength of fiber posts to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Prado, Maíra; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Marques, Juliana das Neves; Gonzalez, Caroline Brum; Simão, Renata Antoun

    2017-05-01

    This study compared the effect of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and ammonia (NH 3 ) plasmas on the bond strength of resin cement to fiber posts with conventional treatments. Sixty-five fiber posts were divided into 5 groups: Control (no surface treatment); H 2 O 2 (24% hydrogen peroxide for 1 min); Blasting (blasting with aluminum oxide for 30 sec); NH 3 (NH 3 plasma treatment for 3 min); HMDSO (HMDSO plasma treatment for 15 min). After the treatments, the Ambar adhesive (FGM Dental Products) was applied to the post surface ( n = 10). The fiber post was inserted into a silicon matrix that was filled with the conventional resin cement Allcem Core (FGM). Afterwards, the post/cement specimens were cut into discs and subjected to a push-out bond strength (POBS) test. Additionally, 3 posts in each group were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The POBS data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey's honest significant difference post hoc test (α = 0.05). The Blasting and NH 3 groups showed the highest POBS values. The HMDSO group showed intermediate POBS values, whereas the Control and H 2 O 2 groups showed the lowest POBS values. Blasting and NH 3 plasma treatments were associated with stronger bonding of the conventional resin cement Allcem to fiber posts, in a procedure in which the Ambar adhesive was used.

  2. Factors affecting bond cement across casing leak zones in oil and gas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr, Mohamed; Edbeib, Said [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Casing leaks have been a major concern to the oil industry because of their effect on lowering the production rate in many oil and gas wells. The leaks are the result of deterioration of the casing in the well, which is caused by severe corrosion due to the contact of the casing with high salinity foreign fluid. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing the mechanical properties of the hardened cement opposite the casing leak zones. This study is conducted by laboratory measurements of the compressive strength of the hardened cement when the cement slurry was mixed with different percentages of formation water and different concentrations of different cement additives. The results of this study indicate that the compressive strength readings obtained from the cement bond log and the cement evaluation tool against the casing leak zones are lower than those readings recorded in adjacent formations. The low cement compressive strength values observed across casing leak zones are due to the contamination of the cement with saline water present in these formations which, in turn, effects the hardening properties of the cement. The experimental results indicated that the salinity of the formation water when mixed with the cement slurry in the presence of cement additives, decreased the compressive strength of the bond cement and also decreased the thickening time of the cement slurry. It is concluded that casing leaks found in many wells observed in oil fields in Libya were due to the mixing of the cement with high salinity formation water present in the lost circulation zones. The high water salinity in these zones effects the setting time of the cement slurry which, therefore, decreased the hardening properties of the bond cement and caused cracks and channels in the hardened cement across lost circulation zones. (author)

  3. Influence of provisional cements on ultimate bond strength of indirect composite restorations to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Soares, Carlos José

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cements on the adhesion of resin bonded indirect restorations and determine the best method for avoiding adverse effects. Forty-five bovine incisors were selected, and the enamel removed with a 600-grit SiC abrasive disk to expose superficial dentin. Provisional restorations of acrylic resin were cemented with three different provisional cements: calcium hydroxide cement, Dycal (HC); cement containing zinc oxide-eugenol, Provy (ZOE); zinc oxide eugenol-free cement, TempBond NE (ZNE). The specimens were stored at 100% humidity, 37 degrees C. Then provisional restorations were removed with: (1) hand scaler for 10 s; (2) pumice-water slurry for 10 s; (3) aluminum oxide sandblasting for 10 s. The indirect restorations were subsequently cemented with Single Bond and Rely-X ARC. The teeth were sectioned, 4 slices per tooth (n = 16), and each slice trimmed with a diamond bur to obtain an adhesion area of 1 mm2. The microtensile bond strength test was performed with a universal testing machine (Instron-4411) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were analyzed with ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test (p provisional cement and dentin cleaning method; in general, aluminum oxide sandblasting provided the highest values of bond strength and calcium hydroxide the lowest. The type of provisional cement and its method of removal can affect the adhesion of resin-bonded indirect restorations.

  4. The effect of dentin-cleaning agents on resin cement bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Duygu; Bulucu, Bilinc; Saraç, Y Sinasi; Kulunk, Safak

    2008-06-01

    Provisional cement remnants on dentin affect the bond strength of resin cements to dentin. The authors investigated the effects of dentin-cleaning agents and etching systems on the bond strength of adhesive resin cement. The authors removed the provisional cement from the dentin surfaces of the specimens and then cleaned the surfaces with the dentin-cleaning agents Sikko Tim (VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany), Cavity Cleanser (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.) or Consepsis Scrub (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They used adhesive resin cement after applying the different etching adhesive systems. Then they examined the dentin surfaces by using scanning electron microscopy. The authors analyzed data by means of a two-way analysis of variance with Tukey honestly significant difference tests (alpha= .05). They found that specimens cleaned with Sikko Tim and Consepsis Scrub had higher shear bond strength values than did those in the no-treatment control group or the group cleaned with Cavity Cleanser. The specimens treated with the total-etching adhesive system had higher shear bond strength than did those treated with the self-etching adhesive systems. Sikko Tim and Consepsis Scrub were effective in removing provisional cement. Adhesive resin cement showed higher bond strength when used in conjunction with the total-etching adhesive system. The use of an effective dentin cleaner before cementation with resin cement can increase bond strength.

  5. Comparison of two test designs for evaluating the shear bond strength of resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, M; Weiger, R; Fischer, J

    2016-02-01

    To compare a shear bond strength test for resin composite cements developed in order to better consider the shrinkage stress (here termed "Swiss shear test") with the shear test design according to ISO 29022. Four restorative materials (VITA Enamic (VE), VITA Suprinity (VS), Vitablocs Mark II (VM) and VITA YZ T (YZ)) served as substrate. VE, VS and VM were polished or etched. YZ was polished, sandblasted or etched. Specimens were either bonded according to the Swiss or the ISO shear test. RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, Maxcem Elite and PermaFlo DC were used as cements. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. Failure modes (adhesive, cohesive or mixed) were evaluated by means of SEM. Mean SBS values obtained with the Swiss shear test were significantly lower than those obtained with the ISO shear test. VE and VM exhibited similar SBS, values of VS were significantly higher. On etched surfaces VM and VE exhibited primarily cohesive failures, VS primarily adhesive failures. On polished substrates significantly lower bond strength values and exclusively adhesive failures were observed. YZ exhibited solely adhesive failures. Compared to polished YZ, SBS significantly increased after sandblasting and even more after etching. Only for adhesively failed specimens mean SBS values of Swiss and ISO shear test were strongly correlated. Both test designs showed the same ranking of test results. When adhesive failure occurred test results were strongly correlated. When cohesive failure was involved, both test designs did not provide reliable results. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of cement shade and light-curing unit on bond strength of a ceramic cemented to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Humberto Lago; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Zogheib, Lucas Villaça; Bona, Alvaro Della

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of cement shade, light-curing unit, and water storage on tensile bond strength (σ) of a feldspathic ceramic resin bonded to dentin. The dentin surface of 40 molars was exposed and etched with 37% phosphoric acid, then an adhesive system was applied. Forty blocks of feldspathic ceramic (Vita VM7) were produced. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s, followed by the application of a silane agent and a dual-curing resin cement (Variolink II). Ceramic blocks were cemented to the treated dentin using either A3 or transparent (Tr) shade cement that was activated using either halogen or LED light for 40 s. All blocks were stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 h before cutting to obtain non-trimmed bar-shaped specimens (adhesive area = 1 mm2 ± 0.1) for the microtensile bond strength test. The specimens were randomly grouped according to the storage time: no storage or stored for 150 days in 37°C distilled water. Eight experimental groups were obtained (n = 30). The specimens were submitted to the tensile bond strength test using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's posthoc tests (a = 0.05). The mean bond strength values were significantly lower for the corresponding water stored groups, except for the specimens using A3 resin cement activated by halogen light. There was no significance difference in mean bond strength values among all groups after water storage. Water storage had a detrimental effect under most experimental conditions. For both cement shades investigated (Tr and A3) under the same storage condition, the light-curing units (QTH and LED) did not affect the mean microtensile bond strengths of resin-cemented ceramic to dentin.

  7. Comparison of the resin cement bond strength to an indirect composites treated by Er;YAG laser and sandblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansure Mirzaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Indirect composites are designed to overcome the shortcomings of direct composites such as polymerization shrinkage and low degree of conversion. But, good adhesion of resin cements to indirect composites is still difficult. This research was designed to assess the effect of different powers of Er;YAG laser compared with sandblasting. On the micro tensil bond strength of resin cement to indirect composites.   Materials and Methods: Specimens were prepred using dental resin composite (Gradia GC and metallic mold (15×5×5 mm and were cured according to the manufacturer’s instructions. 24 blocks were prepared and randomly divided into 12 groups. G1:no treatment (as control, G 2-6: Er; YAG laser irradiation (2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Watt, G7: sandblast. Two composite blocks were bonded to each other with Panavia F.2. resin cement. The cylindrical sections with dimensions of 1 mm were tested in a microtensile bond strength tester device using 0.5 mm/min speed until fracture points. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and T-test.   Results: Interaction between lasers irradiation and sandblast treatments were significant (P0.05 whether samples were sandblasted or not. Samples which received 300 mJ of laser showed lower bond strength compared with no laser treatment. Other groups showed no significant difference (P>0.05.   Conclusion: It seems that application of sandblast with proper variables, is a good way to improve bond strength.Laser application had no influence in improving the bond strength between the indirect composite and resin cement.

  8. Bone Inflammation, Bone Infection and Dental Implants Failure: Histological and Cytological Aspects Related to Cement Excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatullo, Marco; Marrelli, Massimo; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Gherlone, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dental implant failure can recognize several causes and many of them are quite preventable with the right knowledge of some clinical critical factors. Aim of this paper is to investigate about the histological aspects related to dental implants failure in such cases related to cement excess, how such histological picture can increase the risk of bacterial infections and how the different type of cement can interact with osteoblasts in-vitro. Methods: We randomly selected 5 patients with a diagnosis of dental implant failure requiring to be surgically removed: in all patients was observed an excess of dental cement around the failed implants. Histological investigations were performed of the perimplant bone. Cell culture of purchased human Osteoblasts was performed in order to evaluate cell proliferation and cell morphology at 3 time points among 3 cement types and a control surface. Results: Dental cement has been related to a pathognomonic histological picture with a foreign body reaction and many areas with black particles inside macrophage cells. Finally, cell culture on different dental cements resulted in a lower osteoblasts survival rate. Conclusions: It is appropriate that the dentist puts a small amount of dental cement in the prosthetic crown, so to avoid the clinical alterations related to the excess of cement. PMID:28529868

  9. Push-out bond strength of MTA HP, a new high-plasticity calcium silicate-based cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Emmanuel Jnl; Carvalho, Nancy Kudsi; Zanon, Mayara; Senna, Plínio Mendes; DE-Deus, Gustavo; Zuolo, Mário Luis; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto

    2016-06-14

    This study was designed to investigate the resistance to dislodgment provided by MTA HP, a new high-plasticity calcium silicate-based cement. Biodentine and White MTA Angelus were used as reference materials for comparison. Three discs 1 ± 0.1 mm thick were obtained from the middle third of the roots of 5 maxillary canines. Three 0.8-mm-wide holes were drilled on the axial surface of each root disc. Standardized irrigation was performed. Then the holes were dried with paper points and filled with one of the three tested cements. The filled dental slices were immersed in a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution (pH 7.2) for 7 days before the push-out assessment. The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to assess the effect of each endodontic cement on the push-out bond strength. Mann-Whitney with Bonferroni correction was used to isolate the differences. The alpha-type error was set at 0.05. All specimens had measurable push-out values and no premature failure occurred. There were significant differences among the materials (p <0.05). The Biodentine specimens had the highest push-out bond strength values (p < 0.05). MTA HP had significantly higher bond strength than White MTA (p < 0.05). MTA HP showed better push-out bond strength than its predecessor, White MTA; however, Biodentine had higher dislodgment resistance than both MTA formulations.

  10. [Research on bond durability among different core materials and zirconia ceramic cemented by self-adhesive resin cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinyu, Luo; Xiangfeng, Meng

    2017-02-01

    This research estimated shear bond durability of zirconia and different substrates cemented by two self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting and RelyX U100) before and after aging conditioning. Machined zirconia ceramic discs were cemented with four kinds of core material (cobalt-chromium alloy, flowable composite resin core material, packable composite resin, and dentin) with two self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting and RelyX U100). All specimens were divided into eight test groups, and each test group was divided into two subgroups. Each subgroup was subjected to shear test before and after 10 000 thermal cycles. All factors (core materials, cements, and thermal cycle) significantly influenced bond durability of zirconia ceramic (P0.05); observed shear bond strength was significantly higher than those of other substrates (Presin core material, and packable composite resin than that of RelyX U100 (P0.05). Different core materials and self-adhesive resin cements can significantly affect bond durability of zirconia ceramic. 
.

  11. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Zirconia Ceramic Using Adhesive Primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Ariovaldo; Brito, Rui Barbosa; Kina, Sidney; Andrade, Oswaldo Scopin; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Carvalho, Andreia Assis; Giannini, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the influence of adhesive primers on the microshear bond strength of resin cements to zirconia ceramic. Fifty zirconia plates (12 mm × 5 mm × 1.5 mm thick) of a commercially available zirconium oxide ceramic (ZirCad) were sintered, sandblasted with aluminum oxide particles, and cleaned ultrasonically before bonding. The plates were randomly divided into five groups of 10. Three resin cements were selected (RelyX ARC, Multilink Automix, Clearfil SA Cement self-adhesive resin cement), along with two primers (Metal-Zirconia Primer, Alloy Primer) and one control group. The primers and resin cements were used according to manufacturers' recommendations. The control group comprised the conventional resin cement (RelyX ARC) without adhesive primer. Test cylinders (0.75 mm diameter × 1 mm high) were formed on zirconia surfaces by filling cylindrical Tygon tube molds with resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C, then tested for shear strength on a Shimadzu EZ Test testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Bond strength data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test (5%). The bond strength means in MPa (± s.d.) were: RelyX ARC: 28.1 (6.6); Multilink Automix: 37.6 (4.5); Multilink Automix + Metal-Zirconia Primer: 55.7 (4.0); Clearfil SA Cement: 46.2 (3.3); and Clearfil SA Cement + Alloy Primer: 47.0 (4.1). Metal-Zirconia Primer increased the bond strength of Multilink Automix resin cement to zirconia, but no effect was observed for Alloy Primer using Clearfil SA Cement. RelyX ARC showed the lowest bond strength to zirconia. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Tensile bond strength of ceramic crowns to dentin using resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, James F; de Rijk, Waldemar G; Hill, Jennifer; Hill, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    This study measured the bond strength of the self-adhesive resin cements and a bonded resin cement for crowns bonded to extracted teeth with preparations having a total taper greater than 30 degrees. A crown pull-off test was used with direction of pull along the path of insertion. The CAD/CAM system Cerec was used to create crowns with the pull-off loop as an integral part of the crown structure. One hundred extracted human molars were prepared for all-ceramic crowns with a 1.5-mm shoulder, greater than 30-degree axial wall convergence, a flat occlusal surface and 3 to 5 mm occlusal/ gingival height. All-ceramic crowns were cemented with five different self-adhesive cements (Rely X Unicem, Maxcem Elite, BisCem, SmartCem 2, and G-Cem) and one bonded resin cement (Multilink). Forfour cements (excluding GCem and Multilink) there were 2 groups, one with HF etching and one without ceramic surface treatment. The crowns were then subject to tensile stress until either the crown fractured or the crown was lifted off from the tooth. For several cements, the bond strength exceeded the tensile strength of the all-ceramic crown; thus, the crown fractured, leaving the cemented part of the crown on the tooth. The effect of ceramic surface etching was not statistically significant at p = 0.05; however, for each cement, the treated crowns showed a lower coefficient of variance (COV). For this study, the COV ranged from 24.9 % to 97.9 %. Loads ranged from 41.3 to 190.3 N. Some of the new self-etching resin cements can create bonds to non-retentive crown preparations that are stronger than the strength of a ceramic crown; however, these high bond strengths may not be able to be achieved consistently.

  13. Effect of dentin-cleaning techniques on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting cement to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M J M C; Bapoo, H; Rizkalla, A S; Santos, G C

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the influence of different cleansing techniques on the bond strength of self-adhesive cement to dentin. A total of 33 noncarious human molars were sectioned mesiodistally and embedded in chemically cured resin with the buccal or lingual surfaces facing upward. Superficial dentin was exposed and resin disk provisional restorations were cemented to the dentin surfaces with noneugenol provisional cement and were stored in distilled water at 37°C. After seven days, the provisional restorations were removed and 13 specimens were randomly assigned to each of the five groups (n=13), according to the following cleansing treatments: G1-excavator (control); G2-0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate; G3-40% polyacrylic acid; G4-mixture of flour pumice and water; and G5-sandblasting with 50 μm aluminum oxide particles at a pressure of 87 psi. Resin composite disks (Filtek Supreme Plus, 3M ESPE Dental Products, St Paul, MN, USA) 4.7 (±0.1) mm in diameter and 3.0 (±0.5) mm in height were cemented with self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE), photocured, and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength testing was conducted using a universal test machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-B rank order test. Sandblasting with aluminum oxide (11.32 ± 1.70 MPa) produced significantly higher shear bond strength values compared with any other treatment groups (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between G1-control (7.74 ± 1.72 MPa), G2-chlorhexidine (6.37 ± 1.47 MPa), and G4-pumice (7.33 ± 2.85 MPa) (p<0.05).

  14. In vitro evaluation of microleakage of various types of dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medić, Vesna; Obradović-Djuricić, Kosovka; Dodić, Slobodan; Petrović, Renata

    2010-01-01

    Microleakage is defined as the clinically undetectable seepage of oral fluids containing bacteria and debris between cement layer and tooth restoration. This in vitro study investigated the effect of different dental cements (zinc-phosphate, polycarboxylate, glass-ionomer and resin cement) on microleakage in different ceramic crown systems (metal ceramic crown, metal ceramic crown with a porcelain margin, Empress 2 and in Ceram all-ceramic crowns) fixed on extracted human teeth. One hundred and sixty intact human premolars were randomized to four groups of forty teeth each, according to the different ceramic crown systems. They were prepared in a standardized manner for metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns. Crowns were made following a standard laboratory technique, and each group of crowns were divided into four groups according to the different cement agents and cemented on their respective abutments. The specimens were subjected to thermocycling, placed in methylene blue solutions, embedded in resin blocks and vertically cut in the bucco-oral and meso-distal direction. The microleakage in the area of tooth-cement interface was defined as linear penetration of methylene blue and was determined with a microscope to assign microleakage scores using a five-point scale. A significant association was found between a cement type and degree of microleakage (p = 0.001). No statistically significant differences were found among the different ceramic crown systems luted with the same dental cement. The smallest degree of microleakage was observed in specimens luted with resin cement (X = 1.73), followed by glass-ionomer cement (X=2.45) and polycarboxylate cement (X = 3.20). The greatest degree of microleakage was detected in the crowns fixed with zincphosphate cement (X = 3.33). The investigated dental cements revealed different sealing abilities. The use of resin cement resulted in the percentage of 0 microleakage scores. Due to this feature, the resin cement is to be

  15. Evaluation of the amount of excess cement around the margins of cement-retained dental implant restorations: the effect of the cement application method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Winston W L; Duncan, Jesse; Afshar, Manijeh; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2013-04-01

    Complete removal of excess cement from subgingival margins after cementation of implant-supported restorations has been shown to be unpredictable. Remaining cement has been shown to be associated with periimplant inflammation and bleeding. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the amount of excess cement after cementation with 4 different methods of cement application for cement-retained implant-supported restorations. Ten implant replicas/abutments (3i) were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Forty complete veneer crowns (CVCs) were fabricated by waxing onto the corresponding plastic waxing sleeves. The wax patterns were cast and the crowns were cemented to the implant replicas with either an interim (Temp Bond) or a definitive luting agent (FujiCEM). Four methods of cement application were used for cementation: Group IM-Cement applied on the internal marginal area of the crown only; Group AH-Cement applied on the apical half of the axial walls of the crown; Group AA-Cement applied to all axial walls of the interior surface of the crown, excluding the occlusal surface; and Group PI-Crown filled with cement then seated on a putty index formed to the internal configuration of the restoration (cementation device) (n=10). Cement on the external surfaces was removed before seating the restoration. Cement layers were applied on each crown, after which the crown was seated under constant load (80 N) for 10 minutes. The excess cement from each specimen was collected and measured. One operator performed all the procedures. Results for the groups were compared, with 1 and 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey multiple range test (α=.05). No significant difference in the amount of excess/used cement was observed between the 2 different types of cements (P=.1). Group PI showed the least amount of excess cement in comparison to other test groups (P=.031). No significant difference was found in the amount of excess cement among groups MI, AH, and AA. Group AA showed the

  16. Tensile bond strength of dual curing resin-based cements to commercially pure titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Rafael; de Goes, Mario Fernando; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Chan, Daniel C N

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of dual curing luting resin cements to commercially pure titanium at 10 min and 24h after removal of the oxide layer. One hundred and twenty titanium discs were obtained by casting and polishing with silicon carbide papers. The titanium discs were sandblasted with 50 microm aluminum oxide, ultrasonic cleaned and bonded in pairs with the resin-based cements Panavia F and Rely X ARC at 10 min and 24h after the sandblasting. The tensile test was performed with a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min in an Instron Universal testing machine. The Rely X ARC reached the highest tensile strength value at 24h after sandblasting (18.27 MPa), but there was no statistically significant difference between the two dual curing resin cements for both times tested. All specimens showed a mixture of cohesive fracture in the resin cement and adhesive failure. However, the predominant failure mode for Panavia F was cohesive in resin cement, and the Rely X ARC exhibited a greater proportion of specimens with adhesive failure between the alloy and resin luting cement at 10 min and 24h. Both cements had, statistically, the same tensile bond strength. But in the fracture mode analysis, the adhesive predominant fracture mode of Rely X ARC cement indicates a premature clinical adhesive failure. On the other hand, the cohesive predominant fracture mode of Panavia F indicates a longer clinical adhesive bond with titanium.

  17. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to base metal alloys having different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Shafiei

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Based on the results, sandblasting improves the shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cement to base metal alloys. The best results can be achieved with a combination of sandblasting and metal primers. The performance of resin cement depends on to their chemical composition, not to the type of system.

  18. Evaluation of a thin-bonded Portland cement concrete pavement overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the performance of the Virginia Department of Transportation's first modern rehabilitation project involving a thin-bonded portland cement concrete overlay of an existing jointed concrete pavement. The performance of the rigid o...

  19. Long-term monitoring of microleakage of dental cements by radiochemical diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powis, D.R.; Prosser, H.J.; Wilson, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactive 14 C sucrose was found to be an ideal marker for microleakage because it did not penetrate tooth tissue, dental cement, or mounting resin. The main finding is that the adhesive cements--the glass-ionomer and polycarboxylate--are significantly more effective at preventing microleakage than are the traditional phosphate cements--silicate and zinc phosphate. The differences can be as high as two orders of magnitude. The adhesive cements provide almost perfect and reliable seals. By contrast, the nonadhesive cements are erratic sealants with most of the restorations leaking

  20. Long-term monitoring of microleakage of dental cements by radiochemical diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powis, D.R.; Prosser, H.J.; Wilson, A.D.

    1988-06-01

    Radioactive /sup 14/C sucrose was found to be an ideal marker for microleakage because it did not penetrate tooth tissue, dental cement, or mounting resin. The main finding is that the adhesive cements--the glass-ionomer and polycarboxylate--are significantly more effective at preventing microleakage than are the traditional phosphate cements--silicate and zinc phosphate. The differences can be as high as two orders of magnitude. The adhesive cements provide almost perfect and reliable seals. By contrast, the nonadhesive cements are erratic sealants with most of the restorations leaking.

  1. Influence of atmospheric pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Okawa, Takahisa; Fukumoto, Takahiro; Tsurumi, Akiko; Tatsuta, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Takamasa; Tanaka, Junko; Tanaka, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Zirconia exhibits excellent strength and high biocompatibility in technological applications and it is has therefore been investigated for clinical applications and research. Before setting prostheses, a crown prosthesis inner surface is sandblasted with alumina to remove contaminants and form small cavities. This alumina sandblasting causes stress-induced phase transition of zirconia. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma has been applied in the dental industry, particularly for adhesives, as a surface treatment to activate the surface energy and remove contaminants. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and adhesive resin cement. The surface treatment method was classified into three groups: untreated (Cont group), alumina sandblast treatment (Sb group), and atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment (Ps group). Adhesive resin cement was applied to stainless steel and bonded to zirconia. Shear adhesion tests were performed after complete hardening of the cement. Multiple comparisons were performed using a one-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni method. X-ray diffractometry was used to examine the change in zirconia crystal structure. Statistically significant differences were noted between the control and Sb groups and between the control and Ps groups. In contrast, no statistically significant differences were noted for the Ps and Sb bond strength. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment did not affect the zirconia crystal structure. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment improves the bonding strength of adhesive resin cement as effectively as alumina sandblasting, and does not alter the zirconia crystal structure. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bond strength of a composite resin to glass ionomer cements using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira BECCI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glass ionomer cements are often used as a base or cavity lining prior to restorative material. Objective To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to different glass ionomer cements, when using a two-step conventional and self-etching adhesive systems. Material and method Three glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, Vitremer and Vitrebond, the composite resin Filtek Z350 XT and the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond 2, Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Easy One were used. As negative control, resin was bonded to cement without using an adhesive system. Holes (4 mm diameter, 2 mm deep prepared in acrilic bloks were filled with the glass ionomer cements (n=12/group. On the surface, an area of 1mm in diameter was delimited, the adhesive system was applied, and a specimen of composite resin with 1 mm height was made. After 24 hours storage (37 °C and 100% humidity, the microshear test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test for comparison between groups (α=0.05. Result The adhesive systems significantly improved the bond strenght of composite resin to glass ionomer cements (p≤0.001. There was no significant difference in bond strength when self-etching adhesive systems were compared with the simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, except for Vitrebond where Clearfil SE Bond determined higher bond strength when compared to Adper Single Bond 2 (p=0.003. Conclusion Self-etching adhesive systems are a good option for establishing the bond between the composite resin and the glass ionomer cement.

  3. Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Luting Cements to Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Abo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to compare the bond strengths of the self-adhesive luting cements between ceramics and resin cores and examine their relation to the cement thickness. Three self-adhesive luting cements (Smartcem, Maxcem, and G-CEM and a resin cement (Panavia F 2.0 for control were used in the paper. The thickness of the cements was controlled in approximately 25, 50, 100, or 200 μm. Each 10 specimens were made according to the manufacturers’ instructions and stored in water at 37°C. After 24 hours, microtensile bond strength (μTBS was measured. There were significant differences in cements. Three self-adhesive cements showed significantly lower μTBSs than control that required both etching and priming before cementation (Tukey, <0.05. The cement thickness of 50 or 100 μm tended to induce the highest μTBSs for each self-adhesive luting cements though no difference was found.

  4. Properties of a proline-containing glass ionomer dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sahar; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Roohpour, Nima; Chee, Winston W L; Schricker, Scott R; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2013-11-01

    Proline-containing glass ionomers are promising fast-set dental restorative materials with superior mechanical properties; however, little information is available on other physical properties of this type of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to synthesize and characterize a polyacrylic acid terpolymer containing proline derivative (PD) and to investigate the physical properties of this glass ionomer cement (GIC) and its cytotoxicity in vitro. A terpolymer of AA (acrylic acid), IA (itaconic acid), and proline derivative (MP) with an 8:1:1 molar ratio was synthesized and characterized. Experimental GIC specimens were made from the synthetized terpolymer with Fuji IX (GC America, Alsip, Ill) commercial glass ionomer powder as recommended by the manufacturer. Specimens were mixed and fabricated at room temperature and were conditioned in distilled water at 37°C for 1 day and 1 week. Vickers hardness was determined with a microhardness tester. The water sorption characteristics and fluoride releasing properties of the specimens were investigated. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the experimental glass ionomer was assessed by evaluating the C2C12 cell metabolism with methyltetrazolium (MTT) assay. Commercial Fuji IX was used as a control for comparison. The data obtained for the experimental GIC (PD) were compared with the control group by using 1- and 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey multiple range test at α=.05. Proline-modified GIC (PD) exhibited significantly higher surface hardness values (Vickers hardness number [VHN] 58 ±6.1) in comparison to Fuji IX GIC (VHN 47 ±5.3) after 1 week of maturation. Statistical analysis of data showed that the water sorption properties of the experimental cement (PD) were significantly greater than those of the control group (P.05). An amino acid-containing GIC had better surface hardness properties than commercial Fuji IX GIC. This formulation of fast-set glass ionomer showed increased water sorption without adversely

  5. How mobile are protons in the structure of dental glass ionomer cements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Ana R.; Jacobsen, Johan; Lehnhoff, Benedict; Momsen, Niels C. R.; Okhrimenko, Denis V.; Telling, Mark T. F.; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Strobl, Markus; Seydel, Tilo; Manke, Ingo; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-03-01

    The development of dental materials with improved properties and increased longevity can save costs and minimize discomfort for patients. Due to their good biocompatibility, glass ionomer cements are an interesting restorative option. However, these cements have limited mechanical strength to survive in the challenging oral environment. Therefore, a better understanding of the structure and hydration process of these cements can bring the necessary understanding to further developments. Neutrons and X-rays have been used to investigate the highly complex pore structure, as well as to assess the hydrogen mobility within these cements. Our findings suggest that the lower mechanical strength in glass ionomer cements results not only from the presence of pores, but also from the increased hydrogen mobility within the material. The relationship between microstructure, hydrogen mobility and strength brings insights into the material's durability, also demonstrating the need and opening the possibility for further research in these dental cements.

  6. How mobile are protons in the structure of dental glass ionomer cements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Ana R.; Jacobsen, Johan; Lehnhoff, Benedict; Momsen, Niels C. R.; Okhrimenko, Denis V.; Telling, Mark T. F.; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Strobl, Markus; Seydel, Tilo; Manke, Ingo; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-01-01

    The development of dental materials with improved properties and increased longevity can save costs and minimize discomfort for patients. Due to their good biocompatibility, glass ionomer cements are an interesting restorative option. However, these cements have limited mechanical strength to survive in the challenging oral environment. Therefore, a better understanding of the structure and hydration process of these cements can bring the necessary understanding to further developments. Neutrons and X-rays have been used to investigate the highly complex pore structure, as well as to assess the hydrogen mobility within these cements. Our findings suggest that the lower mechanical strength in glass ionomer cements results not only from the presence of pores, but also from the increased hydrogen mobility within the material. The relationship between microstructure, hydrogen mobility and strength brings insights into the material's durability, also demonstrating the need and opening the possibility for further research in these dental cements. PMID:25754555

  7. Cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of Zirconia (Y-TZP posts with various dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeongsoon Shin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Endodontically treated teeth with insufficient tooth structure are often restored with esthetic restorations. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity and biological effects of yttria partially stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP blocks in combination with several dental cements. Materials and Methods Pairs of zirconia cylinders with medium alone or cemented with three types of dental cement including RelyX U200 (3M ESPE, FujiCEM 2 (GC, and Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray were incubated in medium for 14 days. The cytotoxicity of each supernatant was determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays on L929 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 mRNA were evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and IL-6 protein was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The MTT assays showed that MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were more susceptible to dental cements than L929 fibroblasts. The resin based dental cements increased IL-6 expression in L929 cells, but reduced IL-6 expression in MC3T3-E1 cells. Conclusions Zirconia alone or blocks cemented with dental cement showed acceptable biocompatibilities. The results showed resin-modified glass-ionomer based cement less produced inflammatory cytokines than other self-adhesive resin-based cements. Furthermore, osteoblasts were more susceptible than fibroblasts to the biological effects of dental cement.

  8. Deformation of a dental ceramic following adhesive cementation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-01-01

    Stress-induced changes imparted in a \\'dentin-bonded-crown\\' material during sintering, annealing, pre-cementation surface modification, and resin coating have been visualized by profilometry. The hypothesis tested was that operative techniques modify the stressing pattern throughout the material thickness. We polished the upper surfaces of 10 ceramic discs to remove surface imperfections before using a contact profilometer (40-nm resolution) to measure the \\'flatness\\'. Discs were re-profiled after annealing and after alumina particle air-abrasion and resin-coating of the \\'fit\\' surface. Polished surfaces were convex, with a mean deflection of 8.4 + or - 1.5 microm. Mean deflection was significantly reduced (P = 0.029) following alumina particle air-abrasion and increased (P < 0.001) on resin-coating. Polishing induced a tensile stress state, resulting in surface convexity. Alumina particle air-abrasion reduced the relative tensile stress state of the contralateral polished surface. Resin-polymerization generated compression within the resin-ceramic \\'hybrid layer\\' and tension in the polished surface and is likely to contribute to the strengthening of ceramics by resin-based cements.

  9. Bone Inflammation, Bone Infection and Dental Implants Failure: Histological and Cytological Aspects Related to Cement Excess

    OpenAIRE

    Tatullo, Marco; Marrelli, Massimo; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Gherlone, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dental implant failure can recognize several causes and many of them are quite preventable with the right knowledge of some clinical critical factors. Aim of this paper is to investigate about the histological aspects related to dental implants failure in such cases related to cement excess, how such histological picture can increase the risk of bacterial infections and how the different type of cement can interact with osteoblasts in-vitro. Methods: We randomly selected 5 patient...

  10. How mobile are protons in the structure of dental glass ionomer cements?

    OpenAIRE

    Benetti, Ana R.; Jacobsen, Johan; Lehnhoff, Benedict; Momsen, Niels C. R.; Okhrimenko, Denis V.; Telling, Mark T. F.; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Strobl, Markus; Seydel, Tilo; Manke, Ingo; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-01-01

    The development of dental materials with improved properties and increased longevity can save costs and minimize discomfort for patients. Due to their good biocompatibility, glass ionomer cements are an interesting restorative option. However, these cements have limited mechanical strength to survive in the challenging oral environment. Therefore, a better understanding of the structure and hydration process of these cements can bring the necessary understanding to further developments. Neutr...

  11. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated posts on bonding of resin cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeld, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments of prefabricated posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White) and zirconia (Cerapost) on the bonding of two resin cements: ParaPost Cement and Panavia F by a diametral tensile strength (DTS) test...... the start of mixing the resin cement, the specimen was freed from the mold and stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Following water storage, the specimen was wet-ground to a final length of approximately 3 mm. The DTS of specimens was determined in a Universal Testing Machine. The bonding...

  12. [Bonding interfaces of three kinds of cements and root canal dentin: a scanning electron microscope observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Lei, Hui-yun; Xu, Guo-fu; Liang, Xiao-peng; Li, Ji-jia

    2010-04-01

    To compare the bonding properties of three kinds of cements by observing the bonding inteffaces of cements and root canal dentin. 15 extracted mandibular premolars were divided into 3 groups, and were cemented by Rely X luting, Panavia F and Paracore 5 mL, respectively. Each tooth was sectioned into two parts and the dentin-cement interfaces at the coronal, middle and apical parts of the fiber post were oberved by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The length of hybrid layer was also recorded. Hybrid layer was not clearly found in group one, which could be seen on the dentin-cement interfaces of group two and three. Resin tags and lateral adhesives were also observed in group three. From the apical to the coronal part, microgaps seemed gradually smaller in group one, while the hybrid layer became thicker in both group two and three. The total-etch resin cement bounds tightly with dentin, and owns a more superior bonding property than self-etch resin cement and resin modified glass ionomer cement.

  13. Influence of Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Monolithic Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    To assess the influence of surface treatment on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of resin cements to monolithic zirconia materials. Two types of monolithic zirconia (Zenostar T [ZT] and Prettau Anterior [PA]) were evaluated. The specimens were assigned to three groups based on the surface treatment applied: group 1: control, assintered; group 2: sandblasted with 50-μm Al₂O₃; group 3: tribochemically silica sandblasted. Two types of resin cements (Multilink Speed [MS] and Multilink N [MN]) were applied to each group for evaluating the bond strength using the μTBS test. The fractured specimens were observed with a stereomicroscope and SEM. Surface roughness and topography of monolithic zirconia were examined after treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. A Weibull analysis was performed on the bond strength data. The bond strength was significantly affected by the surface treatment and the type of resin cement (p zirconia (p = 0.387). Surface treatment with tribochemical silica sandblasting revealed significantly higher bond strength (p zirconia was changed due to surface treatments. The surface treatment of monolithic zirconia with tribochemical silica sandblasting enhanced the bond strength between zirconia and resin cements. Resins cements containing adhesive phosphate monomer (APM, MS) provided higher bond strength to monolithic zirconia than non-APM (MN).

  14. Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadjoo, Nisa

    Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (presin cement, Panavia SA, yielded the strongest bond to Y-TZP ceramic when compared to adhesive (RelyX Ultimate) or esthetic (Calibra) resin cements. Air

  15. Effect of sulfuric acid etching of polyetheretherketone on the shear bond strength to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproesser, Oliver; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Uhrenbacher, Julia; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2014-10-01

    To examine the influence of etching duration on the bond strength of PEEK substrate in combination with different resin composite cements. In total, 448 PEEK specimens were fabricated, etched with sulfuric acid for 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 300 s and then luted with two conventional resin cements (RelyX ARC and Variolink II) and one self-adhesive resin cement (Clearfil SA Cement) (n = 18/subgroup). Non-etched specimens served as the control group. Specimens were stored in distilled water for 28 days at 37°C and shear bond strengths were measured. Data were analyzed nonparametrically using Kruskal-Wallis-H (p sulfuric acid seems to be suitable and effective for PEEK surface pre-treatment, further investigations are required to examine the effect of other adhesive systems and cements.

  16. Long-term tensile bond strength of differently cemented nanocomposite CAD/CAM crowns on dentin abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Stich, Nicola; Eichberger, Marlis; Edelhoff, Daniel; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Keul, Christine

    2014-03-01

    To test the tensile bond strength of luted composite computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) crowns after use of different adhesive systems combined with different resin composite cements on dentin abutments. Human molars (n=200) were embedded in acrylic resin, prepared in a standardized manner and divided into 20 groups (n=10). The crowns were treated as follows: (i) Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), (ii) Ambarino P60 (AM), (iii) Visio.link (VL), (iv) VP connect (VP), and (v) non-treated as control groups (CG) and luted with Variolink II (VAR) or Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Tensile bond strength (TBS) was measured initially (24h water, 37°C) and after aging (5000 thermal cycles, 5/55°C). The failure types were evaluated after debonding. TBS values were analyzed using three-way and one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Scheffé-test, and two-sample Student's t-tests. Among VAR and after aging, CG presented significantly higher TBS (p=0.007) than groups treated with MH, AM and VP. Other groups showed no impact of pre-treatment. A decrease of TBS values after thermal aging was observed within CSA: CG (p=0.002), MH (pcemented with VAR showed significantly higher TBS then groups cemented with CSA: non-aged groups: CG (pcrowns should be cemented with VAR. Pre-treatment is not necessary if the tested resin composite cements are used. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bond strength of resin cements to noble and base metal alloys with different surface treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Raeisosadat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen.Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to "Degubond 4" (Au Pd and "Verabond" (Ni Cr alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05.When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021 and Verabond (P< 0.001. No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291 and Verabond (P=0.899. Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003. The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011. The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035.The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2.

  18. Comparison of Micro-Shear Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Root Dentin of Bovine Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Dabili

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays resin cements are commonly used in operative dentistry but the strength of micro- shear bonds of these cements was different in various studies. The aim of this study was to compare the micro-shear bond strength of three resin cements with different mechanisms consisting of maxcem, variolink II and panavia F2.0 to bovine tooth dentin. Methods: Thirty nine longitudinal slices of bovine root dentin were prepared. Specimens were randomly divided into three equal groups. In each group one resin cement was used in cylinders with 1×2mm diameters on each slice. After setting of the cement, micro-shear bond strength was evaluated by a micro-tester device with 0.5mm/min cross head speed. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey and Bonferroni tests. Results: Micro-shear bond strength of Panavia F2.0, Maxcem and Variolink II was 15.07, 7.33 and 4.97Mpa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups. Conclusion: Micro-shear bond strength of total-Etch resin cements was lower than self-Etch ones.

  19. The effect of several dentin desensitizers on shear bond strength of adhesive resin luting cement using self-etching primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jung-Bo; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Chung, Moon-Kyu; Lee, Ho-Yong; Choi, Yong-Geun; Shim, June-Sung

    2008-12-01

    Dentin desensitizers can inhibit the bonding between dentin and resin cements. This study examined the effect of the previous application of desensitizers on the shear bond strength of one resin cement using self-etching primer to dentin. One hundred and twenty-five dentin exposed teeth were randomly assigned to four experimental groups and one control group of 25 teeth each. Four dentin desensitizers were applied to the four experimental groups, respectively. The dentin desensitizers used were SuperSeal (Phoenix Dental, Inc., USA), MS-Coat (Sun Medical Co. Ltd, Japan), Gluma (Heraeus Kulzer, Germany), and Copalite Varnish (Cooley & Cooley Ltd, USA). Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd, Tokyo, Japan) was attached to the top of each experimental and control group teeth using an Ultradent testing jig (Ultradent Product, Inc., Utah, USA), and the shear bond strength was measured using a Universal testing machine (Model 6022, Instron Co., Canton, MA, USA). The tooth surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, JSM-T2000, JEOL, Tokyo, Japan). The control group showed the greatest shear bond strength (14.74 MPa) followed by SuperSeal (12.33 MPa), Gluma (5.28 MPa), MS-Coat (4.44 MPa) and Copalite Varnishtrade mark (3.14 MPa). There was no significant difference in shear bond strength between the control group and the experimental group treated with Superseal. The shear bond strength in the other experimental groups treated with Gluma, Varnish, and MS-Coat was similar to each other but significantly lower than control or Superseal. SEM showed revealed resin tags in most of the dentinal tubules in the experimental group treated with the Superseal. Among the four dentin desensitizers, Superseal was the only one that did not interfere with the process of resin bonding. The other dentin desensitizers that contained a resin ingredient interfered with resin retention.

  20. Deposition of crystalline hydroxyapatite nano-particle on zirconia ceramic: a potential solution for the poor bonding characteristic of zirconia ceramics to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Abbas; Nikzad, Sakineh; Yazdani, Arash; Atri, Faezeh; Fazel Anvari-Yazdi, Abbas

    2017-07-01

    The poor bonding strength of zirconia to different dental substrates is one of the challenging issues in restorative dentistry. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent biocompatible material with fine bonding properties. In this study, it was hypothesized that hydroxyapatite coating on zirconia would improve its bond strength. Forty-five zirconia blocks were prepared and randomly divided into three groups: hydroxyapatite coating, sandblasting, and no preparation (control). The blocks were bonded to cement and the micro-shear bond strength was measured following load application. The bond strength values were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test in 3 groups and paired comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U test. The failure patterns of the specimens were studied by a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope and then analyzed by the chi-square test (significance level = 0.05). Deposition of hydroxyapatite on the zirconia surface significantly improved its bond strength to the resin cement in comparison with the control specimens (p < 0.0001). Also, the bond strength was similar to the sandblasted group (p = 0.34). The sandblasted and control group only showed adhesive failure, but the hydroxyapatite coated group had mixed failures, indicating the better quality of bonding (p < 0.0001). As a final point, hydroxyapatite coating on the zirconia surface improved the bond strength quality and values.

  1. [Study on dental cements. 1. The cored structure of three luting cements obtained by using Cryo-SEM and image analyzer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, H; Yamada, T; Nakajima, M; Perinka, L

    1990-03-01

    The polished surfaces of three set dental cements for luting (zinc phosphate cement, polycarboxylate cement, and glass ionomer cement) were observed by cryo-SEM at a specimen temperature of -160 degrees C to prevent damage of the cement specimens and also the specimens were analyzed by EDX. Furthermore, the SEM composition images of the polished cement surface were transferred to an image analyzer to obtain the core/matrix area ratio of the set cements. 1. The polished surface of set dental cement could be clearly observed by cryo-SEM without damaging the cement specimens. 2. The image analyzer showed that the core/matrix area ratio of the zinc phosphate cement and the glass ionomer cement was approximately 2 to 8, whereas that of the polycarboxylate cement was approximately 3 to 7. 3. The elements detected in the zinc phosphate cement were Ca, Zn, Mg, Al, and P, in the polycarboxylate cement were Ca, Zn, Mg, Si, and Sr, and in the glass ionomer cement were Al and Si.

  2. In vitro shear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qeblawi, Dana M; Campillo-Funollet, Marc; Muñoz, Carlos A

    2015-02-01

    Although the use of anatomic-contour zirconia restorations has expanded in the recent past, disagreement still exists as to reliable cementation techniques and materials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the immediate and artificially aged shear bond strength of 2 commercially available self-adhesive resin cements to zirconia: one with silica coating and silanation as a zirconia surface treatment and the other contained a phosphate monomer, which eliminated the need for a separate primer. Sixty composite resin rods (2.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length) were fabricated from a nano-optimized composite resin by using a polypropylene mold, then light polymerized with a light-emitting diode. zirconia plates (10×10×4mm) were sectioned from an yttrium-stabilized zirconia puck, sintered, and then mounted in autopolymerizing acrylic resin custom tray material. Composite resin rods were cemented to the zirconia plates with 2 different cements. The surface treatment of zirconia followed the manufacturers' instructions for each cement. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength at 3 aging conditions: immediate, after 24 hours of moist storage, and after 30 days of moist storage with 10000 thermocycles. Specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, and the data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA (α=.05). Weibull parameters (modulus and characteristic strength) also were calculated for each group. Two-way ANOVA revealed that only the aging condition significantly affected the bond strength to zirconia. The cement and the interaction of the cement and aging did not significantly affect the shear bond strength to zirconia. The highest bond strength for both cements was achieved at 24 hours, whereas the lowest bond strength values were recorded in the immediate groups. No significant differences in bond strength to zirconia were observed between a cement with a silane priming step and an methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate

  3. Shear bond strength of a self‑etched resin cement to an indirect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-15

    Nov 15, 2014 ... Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of resin cement (Rely X‑U200) bonded to differently conditioned indirect composite samples. Materials and Methods: Sixty‑six composite resin specimens (5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were prepared with an indirect ...

  4. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  5. Detecting Poor Cement Bonding and Zonal Isolation Problems Using Magnetic Cement Slurries

    KAUST Repository

    Nair, Sriramya D.

    2017-10-02

    There has been growing interest in the use of magnetorheological fluids to improve displacement efficiency of fluids (drilling fluids, spacer fluids, cement slurries) in the eccentric casing annuli. When magnetic particles are mixed with the cement slurry for improved displacement, they provide an excellent opportunity for sensing the presence and quality of cement in the annulus. This work focuses on using sophisticated 3D computational electromagnetics to simulate the use of a magnetic cement slurry for well cement monitoring. The main goal is to develop a new tool, which is capable of locating magnetic cement slurry that is placed behind a stainless steel casing. An electromagnetic coil was used to generate a magnetic field inside the borehole. It was found that when a current was passed through the electric coils, magnetic field lines passed through the stainless steel casing, the cement annulus and the rock formation. Three sensors were placed inside the cased borehole and the magnetic field strength variations were observed at these locations. Various factors that have a significant influence on zonal isolation were considered. These include, effect of debonding between casing and cement annulus, effect of changing annuli thickness, influence of a fracture in the rock formation, effect of changing magnetic permeability of cement and finally influence of annuli eccentricity. Based on the results shown in the paper along with the next generation of supersensitive magnetic sensors that are being developed, the magnetic approach appears to be a viable alternative for evaluating the quality of the cement annulus to ensure good zonal isolation.

  6. Micro-tensile bond strength of solely self-cured composite cement onto dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Thais Yumi Umeda; Santos, PH; De Munck, Jan; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate bonding effectiveness of a new experimental composite cement to dentin in terms of microtensile bond strength (μTBS) after 1week (‘immediate’) and 6month (‘aged’) artificial aging. Flat ground dentin of 32 human molars was prepared using 600-grit SiC paper. Selfmade composite blocks (Clearfil AP-X,Kuraray Noritake) were bonded to flat dentin surfaces using 4 composite cements: Exp. HPC100 (Kuraray Noritake), Multilink (Ivoclar Vivadent), RelyX Unicem 2 and RelyX Ultimate ...

  7. Effects of cement-curing mode and light-curing unit on the bond durability of ceramic cemented to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Pestana Passos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light-curing units and resin cement curing types on the bond durability of a feldspathic ceramic bonded to dentin. The crowns of 40 human molars were sectioned, exposing the dentin. Forty ceramic blocks of VITA VM7 were produced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid / 60s and silanized. The dentin was treated with 37% phosphoric acid / 15s, and the adhesive was applied. The ceramic blocks were divided and cemented to dentin according to resin cement / RC curing type (dual- and photo-cured, light-curing unit (halogen light / QTH and LED, and storage conditions (dry and storage / 150 days + 12,000 cycles / thermocycling. All blocks were stored in distilled water (37°C / 24h and sectioned (n = 10: G1 - QTH + RC Photo, G2 - QTH + RC Dual, G3 - LED + RC Photo, G4 - LED + RC Dual. Groups G5, G6, G7, and G8 were obtained exactly as G1 through G4, respectively, and then stored and thermocycled. Microtensile bond strength tests were performed (EMIC, and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%. The bond strength values (MPa were: G1 - 12.95 (6.40ab; G2 - 12.02 (4.59ab; G3 - 13.09 (5.62ab; G4 - 15.96 (6.32a; G5 - 6.22 (5.90c; G6 - 9.48 (5.99bc; G7 - 12.78 (11.30ab; and G8 - 8.34 (5.98bc. The same superscript letters indicate no significant differences. Different light-curing units affected the bond strength between ceramic cemented to dentin when the photo-cured cement was used, and only after aging (LED > QTH. There was no difference between the effects of dual- and photo-cured resin-luting agents on the microtensile bond strength of the cement used in this study.

  8. Effects of cement-curing mode and light-curing unit on the bond durability of ceramic cemented to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção; Michida, Silvia Masae Araújo; Zamboni, Sandra Costa; Oliveira, Simone Helena Gonçalves de

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light-curing units and resin cement curing types on the bond durability of a feldspathic ceramic bonded to dentin. The crowns of 40 human molars were sectioned, exposing the dentin. Forty ceramic blocks of VITA VM7 were produced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid / 60s and silanized. The dentin was treated with 37% phosphoric acid / 15s, and the adhesive was applied. The ceramic blocks were divided and cemented to dentin according to resin cement / RC curing type (dual- and photo-cured), light-curing unit (halogen light / QTH and LED), and storage conditions (dry and storage / 150 days + 12,000 cycles / thermocycling). All blocks were stored in distilled water (37°C / 24h) and sectioned (n = 10): G1 - QTH + RC Photo, G2 - QTH + RC Dual, G3 - LED + RC Photo, G4 - LED + RC Dual. Groups G5, G6, G7, and G8 were obtained exactly as G1 through G4, respectively, and then stored and thermocycled. Microtensile bond strength tests were performed (EMIC), and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The bond strength values (MPa) were: G1 - 12.95 (6.40)ab; G2 - 12.02 (4.59)ab; G3 - 13.09 (5.62)ab; G4 - 15.96 (6.32)a; G5 - 6.22 (5.90)c; G6 - 9.48 (5.99)bc; G7 - 12.78 (11.30)ab; and G8 - 8.34 (5.98)bc. The same superscript letters indicate no significant differences. Different light-curing units affected the bond strength between ceramic cemented to dentin when the photo-cured cement was used, and only after aging (LED > QTH). There was no difference between the effects of dual- and photo-cured resin-luting agents on the microtensile bond strength of the cement used in this study.

  9. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Femtosecond laser etching of dental enamel for bracket bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabas, Ayse Sena; Ersoy, Tansu; Gülsoy, Murat; Akturk, Selcuk

    2013-09-01

    The aim is to investigate femtosecond laser ablation as an alternative method for enamel etching used before bonding orthodontic brackets. A focused laser beam is scanned over enamel within the area of bonding in a saw tooth pattern with a varying number of lines. After patterning, ceramic brackets are bonded and bonding quality of the proposed technique is measured by a universal testing machine. The results are compared to the conventional acid etching method. Results show that bonding strength is a function of laser average power and the density of the ablated lines. Intrapulpal temperature changes are also recorded and observed minimal effects are observed. Enamel surface of the samples is investigated microscopically and no signs of damage or cracking are observed. In conclusion, femtosecond laser exposure on enamel surface yields controllable patterns that provide efficient bonding strength with less removal of dental tissue than conventional acid-etching technique.

  11. Different Strategies to Bond Bis-GMA-based Resin Cement to Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Spohr, Ana Maria; De Souza, Grace M

    To evaluate the effect of different bonding strategies on short- and long-term bis-GMA-based resin cement bond strengths to zirconia. One hundred twenty samples of fully-sintered zirconia (Prettau Zirconia) were sandblasted and randomly distributed into 5 groups (n = 24): UA: Scotchbond Universal Adhesive; SZP: Signum Zirconia Bond I + II; ZPP: Z-Prime Plus; EXP: MZ experimental primer; CO: no primer application (control). After performing these surface treatments, translucent tubes (0.8 mm diameter and 1.0 mm height) were placed on the zirconia specimens, and bis-GMA-based cement (Duo-Link) was injected into them and light cured. Specimens were tested for microshear bond strength either 24 h or 6 months (m) after water storage (37°C) and surfaces were characterized by SEM and EDX. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p zirconia surface. In these groups, EDX demonstrated the presence of phosphorus. Group ZPP resulted in a nonhomogeneous layer, exposing the zirconia substrate underneath. EXP application resulted in an undetectable layer. Water storage did not affect resin cement bond strengths to zirconia irrespective of the surface treatment. Bis-GMA-based resin cement bond strengths to zirconia are affected by specific bonding strategies.

  12. Bond strength of overdenture locator posts cemented with seven luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleisa, Khalil

    2013-07-01

    Post retention is crucial factor in restoration survival. Posts are commonly failed due to loss of retention. It is unknown which luting agents would provide the maximum bond strength for Locator overdenture posts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond retentive strengths of Locator overdenture posts cemented with 7 luting agents. One hundred and five single rooted human teeth were decoronated and randomly assigned to 7 groups (n = 15). Post spaces were prepared with Locator post drills to the depth of 6 mm. The Locator posts were cemented with Variolink II, RelyX ARC, Multilink N, RelyX Unicem, ParaCore, or MultiCore Flow resin luting agents. Zinc phosphate cement was served as control group. Specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours. Each specimen was loaded in tension in an Instron universal testing machine. The maximum force required to dislodge each Locator post was recorded. Means and standard deviations were calculated and data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The highest mean bond strength value for Locator posts was recorded for MultiCore(®) Flow group (mean = 550.1 N), while the lowest mean value was for RelyX Unicem(™) resin cement group (mean = 216.8 N). A statistically significant difference in mean locator overdenture post bond strength was observed between the 7 cement types (p ParaCore(™) and MultiCore(®) Flow groups had significantly higher bond strength than all other groups, but they were not differed from each other. Bond strength of Locator overdenture posts were influenced by the type of luting agents. MultiCore Flow and ParaCore resin cements offered the greatest retention. The type of luting agents had a significant effect on the retention of Locator posts. The use of Core buildup resin cements as luting agent with Locator post demonstrated the greatest retention.

  13. The Influence of Abutment Surface Treatment and the Type of Luting Cement on Shear Bond Strength between Titanium/Cement/Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Śmielak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia cylinders on a modified titanium surface using different luting cement types. Material and Methods. Eighty titanium disks were divided into two groups (n=40, which were treated with either grinding or a combination of sandblasting and grinding. Then, each group was subdivided into 4 groups (n=10 and the disks were bonded to disks of sintered zirconia using one of four cement types (permanent: composite cement; temporary: polycarboxylate cement, zinc-oxide-eugenol cement, and resin cement. Shear bond strength (SBS was measured in a universal testing machine. Fracture pattern and site characteristic were recorded. A fractographic analysis was performed with SEM. The chemical analysis of the composition of the fractures was performed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The results of the experiment were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test. Results. The highest mean values of SBS were achieved when grinding was combined with sandblasting and when composite cement was used (18.18 MPa. In the temporary cement group, the highest mean values of SBS were for polycarboxylate cement after grinding (3.57 MPa. Conclusion. The choice of cement has a crucial influence on the titanium-cement-zirconia interface quality.

  14. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future. PMID:26066349

  15. A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis: A clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Tanoue, Naomi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis, with a composite resin denture tooth as a pontic, a tri-n-butylborane initiated adhesive resin, and screw posts for reinforcement, was still functioning after an observation period of 20 years. The prosthesis was found to be reliable for long-term clinical use when chemically and mechanically reinforced.

  16. Assessment of non-destructive testing of well casing,, cement and cement bond in high temperature wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutson, C K; Boardman, C R

    1979-01-01

    Because of the difficulty in bringing geothermal well blowouts under control, any indication of a casing/cement problem should be expeditiously evaluated and solved. There are currently no high temperature cement bond and casing integrity logging systems for geothermal wells with maximum temperatures in excess of 500/sup 0/F. The market is currently insufficient to warrannt the private investment necessary to develop tools and cables capable of withstanding high temperatures. It is concluded that a DOE-funded development program is required to assure that diagnostic tools are available in the interim until geothermal resource development activities are of sufficient magnitude to support developmental work on high temperature casing/cement logging capabilities by industry. This program should be similar to and complement the current DOE program for development of reservoir evaluation logging capabilities for hot wells. The appendices contain annotated bibliographies on the following: high temperature logging in general, cement integrity testing, cosing integrity testing, casing and cement failures, and special and protective treatment techniques. Also included are composite listing of references in alphabetical order by senior author.

  17. Effect of Provisional Cements on Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. Methods: The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each to...

  18. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    To determine the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of two resin cements (ParaPost Cement and Panavia F) to posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White), and zirconia (Cerapost), and to dentin. After embedding, planar surfaces of posts (n = 9 to 14) and human dentin (n = 10) were obtained by grinding. The posts received one of three surface treatments: 1. roughening (sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid etching), 2. application of primer (Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II, silane), or 3. roughening followed by application of primer (sandblasting or etching followed by primer, Cojet treatment). ParaPost Cement and Panavia F were bonded to the post and dentin specimens, and the bonded specimens were placed in water at 37 degrees C for 7 days. The specimens were debonded in shear. Panavia F had significantly higher bond strength to ground ParaPost XH, Cerapost, and dentin than did ParaPost Cement. Most surface treatments resulted in an improved bond strength of resin cements to the posts. Compared to the ground control, Cojet treatment and sandblasting were the most effective treatments. Etching of Cerapost with hydrofluoric acid with and without silane treatment significantly decreased the bond strength of Panavia F to the post. The bond strength of resin cements to the posts was affected by the material of the post, the surface treatment of the post, and by the type of resin cement. The bond strength of resin cement to dentin was influenced by the type of resin cement.

  19. Evaluation of calcium silicate cement bond strength after using gutta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... control group in WMTA (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Gutta-percha solvents used during retreatment decreased the bond strength of Biodentine and CMTA to root dentin. The bond strength of WMTA was not affected by the use of gutta-percha solvents. Keywords: Biodentine, gutta-percha solvent, MTA, push out bond strength ...

  20. Comparison of shear test methods for evaluating the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chae, Soyeon; Lee, Yunhee; Han, Geum-Jun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-11-01

    This study compared the sensitivity of three shear test methods for measuring the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic and evaluated the effects of surface treatment methods on the bonding. Polished zirconia ceramic (Cercon base, DeguDent) discs were randomly divided into four surface treatment groups: no treatment (C), airborne-particle abrasion (A), conditioning with Alloy primer (Kuraray Medical Co.) (P) and conditioning with Alloy primer after airborne-particle abrasion (AP). The bond strengths of the resin cement (Multilink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) to the zirconia specimens of each surface treatment group were determined by three SBS test methods: the conventional SBS test with direct filling of the mold (Ø 4 mm × 3 mm) with resin cement (Method 1), the conventional SBS test with cementation of composite cylinders (Ø 4 mm × 3 mm) using resin cement (Method 2) and the microshear bond strength (μSBS) test with cementation of composite cylinders (Ø 0.8 mm × 1 mm) using resin cement (Method 3). Both the test method and the surface treatment significantly influenced the SBS values. In Method 3, as the SBS values increased, the coefficients of variation decreased and the Weibull parameters increased. The AP groups showed the highest SBS in all of the test methods. Only in Method 3 did the P group show a higher SBS than the A group. The μSBS test was more sensitive to differentiating the effects of surface treatment methods than the conventional SBS tests. Primer conditioning was a stronger contributing factor for the resin bond to zirconia ceramic than was airborne-particle abrasion.

  1. Influence of the Resin Cement Insertion Protocol on the bond Strength of Glass-Fiber Posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Stein Bassotto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the effect of different techniques for insertion of the resin cement on the bond strength of glass-fiber posts cemented with RelyX U200. Methods: Thirty single-rooted premolars were sectioned at 14 mm from the apex, prepared with ProTaper Universal system and filled by single-cone technique with AH Plus sealer. Root canal filling was partially removed, maintaining 4 mm of gutta-percha at the apical third. Specimens were randomly divided into 3 experimental groups (n=10, according to the strategy used to fiber post cementation, as described: CENTRIX, POST/CEMENT, LENTULO. Exacto N1 glass fiber posts were placed into root canal and cemented with RelyX U200. A cutting machine was used for root’s sectioning providing 3 slices, one for each root third (cervical, medium and apical. Push-out test was performed using a universal testing machine and stereomicroscope was used to analyze the failure mode. Results: CENTRIX (10,05 ± 3,25 Mpa and LENTULO (9,80 ± 3,21 Mpa showed higher means of bond strength values, superior to POST/CEMENT (6,47 ± 3,85 Mpa. Regarding to root third, the cervical third presented the higher bond strength mean (10,62 ± 3,66 Mpa and the apical root third presented the lowest bond strength values (6,58 ± 3,28 Mpa. Conclusion: Bond strength values of glass fiber posts are influenced by the method of insertion of the resin cement RelyX U200. On this sense Centrix and Lentulo systems are recommended.

  2. The effect of air abrasion of metal implant abutments on the tensile bond strength of three luting agents used to cement implant superstructures: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugdev, Jasvinder; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Lynch, Edward

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effect of airborne particle abrasion of metal implant abutments on tensile bond strength (TBS) of TempBond, Retrieve, and Premier implant cements. Specimens were designed to replicate a single metal implant crown cemented to both smooth and airborne particle-abraded Osteo-Ti implant abutments with zero degrees of taper. Twenty castings were fabricated and cemented to either a smooth surface abutment (SSA) or to an airborne particle-abraded abutment (AAA). TBS was measured with a 50-kg load and a crosshead speed of 0.5 cm/min in a universal testing machine. Each cement was tested 10 times on both abutment types. The mean TBS values (standard deviations, 95% confidence intervals) of SSAs for TempBond, Retrieve, and Premier cements were 115.89 N (26.44, 96.98-134.81), 134.43 N (36.95, 108.25-160.60), and 132.51 N (55.10, 93.09-171.93), respectively. The corresponding values for AAAs were 129.69 N (30.39, 107.95-151.43), 298.67 N (80.36, 241.19-356.16), and 361.17 N (133.23, 265.86-456.48), respectively. There was no significant difference in TBS among the dental cements when used with an SSA. Air abrasion of abutments did not increase the TBS of TempBond but significantly increased crown retention with Retrieve and Premier. For SSAs, all failures were adhesive on the abutment surface; for AAAs, mostly cohesive cement failures occurred. The retention of copings cemented with Retrieve or Premier to zero-degree-taper abutments was significantly increased after airborne particle abrasion of the abutments. However, this was not significant when TempBond was used. Airborne particle abrasion of abutments and the use of Retrieve or Premier can be recommended for nonretrievable prostheses. Although TempBond functioned similarly to the two other cements in SSAs, it is advisable to limit its use to provisional prostheses; its long-term performance needs to be assessed clinically.

  3. A comparative study of bonded and non-bonded amalgam restorations in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worskett, P

    2013-04-01

    This study compared the performance of non-bonded and bonded amalgam restorations in a general dental practice. A retrospective cohort study was carried out in a general dental practice of amalgam restorations, placed by a single operator. Non-bonded amalgam restorations were analysed over a ten-year period and bonded amalgam restorations over a five-year period. Survival analysis using the Kaplan-Maier method was carried out and an analysis of postoperative sensitivity and reasons for failure. Each group consisted of 231 restorations in 135 patients. Survival rates of non-bonded amalgam restorations were 72.2% over five years and 51.0% over ten years. The survival rate for bonded amalgam restorations was 85.0% over five years. The difference was significant (p amalgam restorations demonstrated greater longevity over non-bonded amalgam restorations and offer significant benefit to patients. Clinicians may feel confident to offer bonded amalgam restorations for their patients as a better alternative than non-bonded amalgam restorations.

  4. Effect of various surface treatments of tooth – colored posts on bonding strength of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzaei M.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Various studies have shown that reliable bond at the root - post - core interfaces are critical for the clinical success of post - retained restorations. Severe stress concentration at post - cement interface increases post debonding from the root. To form a bonded unit that reduces the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, some post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of tooth - colored posts on the bonding of resin cement. "nMaterials and Methods: In this interventional study, 144 tooth colored posts were used in 18 groups (8 samples in each group. The posts included quartz fiber (Matchpost, glass fiber (Glassix, and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost and the resin cement was Panavia F 2.0. The posts received the following surface treatments: 1- No surface treatment (control group, 2- Etching with HF and silane, 3- Sandblasting with Cojet sand, 4- Sandblasting with Cojet sand and application of silane, 5- Sandblasting with alumina particles, 6- Sandblasting with alumina particles and application of silane. Then, posts were cemented into acrylic molds with Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The specimens were placed in water for 2 days and debonded in pull - out test. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA followed by Tamhane and Tukey HSD. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope (10 . P<0.05 was considered as the significant level. "nResults: Surface treatments (sandblasting with Cojet and alumina particles ,with or without silane resulted in improved bond strength of resin cement to glass fiber post (Glassix and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost [p<0/05], but not to the quartz fiber post (Matchpost. In general, higher bond strengths resulted in a to higher percentage of cohesive failures within the cement. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, sandblasting with cojet and alumina

  5. [Influence of primers ' chemical composition on shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagodzińska, Paulina; Bociong, Kinga; Dejak, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Resin cements establish a strong durable bond between zirconia ceramic and hard tissues of teeth. It is essential to use primers with proper chemical composition before cementation. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of primer's chemical composition on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to resin cements. 132 zirconia specimens were randomly assigned to four groups. There were four resin systems used. They included resin cement and respective primer, dedicated to zirconia: Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F2.0, Monobond Plus/Multilink Automix, AZ - Primer/ResiCem, Z - Prime Plus/Duo-Link. In each group the protocol of cementation was as follows: application of primer to the zirconia surface and application of the respective resin cement in cylindric mold (dimensions: 3.0 mm height and 3.0 mm diameter). Then, the shear bond strength was evaluated and the failure type was assessed in lupes (×2.5 magnification), also random specimens under SEM. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the data, the level of significance was α = 0.05. Finally, the known chemical composition of each primer was analysed in reference to probable chemical bonds, which may occure between primers and zirconia. The mean shear bond strength between resin cements and zirconia was the highest for Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link (8.24 ± 3,21 MPa) and lowest for Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 (4.60 ± 2.21 MPa). The analysis revealed significant difference between all groups, except pair Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem. The failure type in groups of Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem was mainly adhesive, in groups Monobond Plus/ /Multilink Automix and Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link mainly mixed. The chemical composition of primers affects different bond mechanisms between resin cements and zirconia. The highest shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia can be obtained for the primer composed of 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen

  6. Effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Hyun Park,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements. Materials and Methods Pre-surface treated LuxaPost (DMG, Rely-X Fiber Post (3M ESPE and self adhesive resin cement Rely-X Unicem (3M ESPE, conventional resin cement Rely-X ARC (3M ESPE, and Rely-X Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE were used. After completing the surface treatments of the posts, posts and resin cement were placed in clear molds and photo-activation was performed. The specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the FRC-Post into 2 mm-thick segments, and push-out strength were measured. The results of bond strength value were statistically analyzed using independent samples t-test and one-way ANOVA with multiple comparisons using Scheffe's test. Results Silanization of posts affect to the bond strength in LuxaPost, and did not affect in Rely-X Fiber Post. Rely-X ARC showed higher value than Rely-X Unicem. Conclusions Silanization is needed to enhance the bond strength between LuxaPost and resin cements.

  7. Bond strength of selected composite resin-cements to zirconium-oxide ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fons-Font, Antonio; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente; Granell-Ruiz, María; Busquets-Mataix, David; Panadero, Rubén A.; Solá-Ruiz, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strengths of zirconium-oxide (zirconia) ceramic and a selection of different composite resin cements. Study Design: 130 Lava TM cylinders were fabricated. The cylinders were sandblasted with 80 µm aluminium oxide or silica coated with CoJet Sand. Silane, and bonding agent and/or Clearfil Ceramic Primer were applied. One hundred thirty composite cement cylinders, comprising two dual-polymerizing (Variolink II and Panavia F) and two autopolymerizing (Rely X and Multilink) resins were bonded to the ceramic samples. A shear test was conducted, followed by an optical microscopy study to identify the location and type of failure, an electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) and statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test for more than two independent samples and Mann-Whitney for two independent samples. Given the large number of combinations, Bonferroni correction was applied (α=0.001). Results: Dual-polymerizing cements provided better adhesion values (11.7 MPa) than the autopolymerizing (7.47 MPa) (p-value M-Wceramic) was produced at a lesser force than cohesive failure (fracture of cement) (p-value M-Wceramic, creating a more rough and retentive surface, thus providing an improved micromechanical interlocking between the cement and the ceramic. Key words:Shear bond strength, silica coating, surface treatment, zirconia ceramics, phosphate monomer. PMID:22926485

  8. In vitro evaluation of microleakage of various types of dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Vesna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Microleakage is defined as the clinically undetectable seepage of oral fluids containing bacteria and debris between cement layer and tooth restoration. Objective. This in vitro study investigated the effect of different dental cements (zinc-phosphate, polycarboxylate, glass-ionomer and resin cement on microleakage in different ceramic crown systems (metal ceramic crown, metal ceramic crown with a porcelain margin, Empress 2 and In Ceram all-ceramic crowns fixed on extracted human teeth. Methods. One hundred and sixty intact human premolars were randomized to four groups of forty teeth each, according to the different ceramic crown systems. They were prepared in a standardized manner for metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns. Crowns were made following a standard laboratory technique, and each group of crowns were divided into four groups according to the different cement agents and cemented on their respective abutments. The specimens were subjected to thermocycling, placed in methylene blue solutions, embedded in resin blocks and vertically cut in the bucco-oral and meso-distal direction. The microleakage in the area of tooth-cement interface was defined as linear penetration of methylene blue and was determined with a microscope to assign microleakage scores using a five-point scale. Results. A significant association was found between a cement type and degree of microleakage (p=0.001. No statistically significant differences were found among the different ceramic crown systems luted with the same dental cement. The smallest degree of microleakage was observed in specimens luted with resin cement (X=1.73, followed by glass-ionomer cement (X=2.45 and polycarboxylate cement (X=3.20. The greatest degree of microleakage was detected in the crowns fixed with zincphosphate cement (X=3.33. Conclusion. The investigated dental cements revealed different sealing abilities. The use of resin cement resulted in the percentage of 0

  9. In Vitro Evaluation of Cell Compatibility of Dental Cements Used with Titanium Implant Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Jason C; Gallegos, Silvia I; Parsaei, Shaida; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2018-03-09

    To evaluate the biocompatibility of five dental cement compositions after directly exposing human gingival fibroblast (HGF) and MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells to cement alone and cement applied on commercially pure titanium (cpTi) specimens. Nanostructurally integrated bioceramic (NIB), resin (R), resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC), zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), and zinc phosphate (ZP) compositions were prepared according to the respective manufacturer's instructions. Samples were prepared in cylindrical Teflon molds or applied over the entire surface of polished cpTi discs. All samples were cured for 0.5, 1, 12, or 24 hours post-mixing. Direct contact testing was conducted according to ISO 10993 by seeding 6-well plates at 350,000 cells/well. Plates were incubated at 37°C in a humidified atmosphere with 5% CO 2 for 24 hours before individually plating samples and cpTi control discs. Plates were then incubated for an additional 24 hours. Microtetrazolium (MTT) cell viability assays were used to measure sample cytotoxicity. For samples that cured for 24 hours prior to direct contact exposure, only NIB and ZP cements when cemented on cpTi demonstrated cell viability percentages above the minimum biocompatibility requirement (≥70%) for both the investigative cell lines. R, RMGIC, and ZOE cements exhibited moderate to severe cytotoxic effects on both cell lines in direct contact and when cemented on cpTi specimens. For HGF cells, ZOE cemented-cpTi specimens exhibited significantly decreased cytotoxicity, whereas RMGIC cemented-cpTi specimens exhibited significantly increased cytotoxicity. Despite previous studies that showed enhanced cpTi corrosion activity for fluoride-containing compositions (NIB and ZP), there was no significant difference in cytotoxicity between cement alone and cemented-cpTi. In general, the MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells were more sensitive than HGF cells to cement composition. Ultimately, cement composition played a significant role in maintaining

  10. Retention of metal-ceramic crowns with contemporary dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Zhang, Hai; Wataha, John C

    2009-09-01

    New types of crown and bridge cement are in use by practitioners, and independent studies are needed to assess their effectiveness. The authors conducted a study in three parts (study A, study B, and study C) and to determine how well these new cements retain metal-ceramic crowns. The authors prepared teeth with a 20-degree taper and a 4-millimeter length. They cast high-noble metal-ceramic copings, then fitted and cemented them with a force of 196 newtons. The types of cements they used were zinc phosphate, resin-modified glass ionomer, conventional resin and self-adhesive modified resin. They thermally cycled the cemented copings, then removed them. They recorded the removal force and calculated the stress of dislodgment by using the surface area of each preparation. They used a single-factor analysis of variance to analyze the data (alpha = .05). The mean stresses necessary to remove crowns, in megapascals, were 8.0 for RelyX Luting (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), 7.3 for RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE), 5.7 for Panavia F (Kuraray America, New York) and 4.0 for Fuji Plus (GC America, Alsip, Ill.) in study A; 8.1 for RelyX Luting, 2.6 for RelyX Luting Plus (3M ESPE) and 2.8 for Fuji CEM (GC America) in study B; and 4.9 for Maxcem (Kerr, Orange, Calif.), 4.0 for BisCem (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.), 3.7 for RelyX Unicem Clicker (3M ESPE), 2.9 for iCEM (Heraeus Kulzer, Armonk, N.Y.) and 2.3 for Fleck's Zinc Cement (Keystone Industries, Cherry Hill, N.J.) in study C. Powder-liquid versions of new cements were significantly more retentive than were paste-paste versions of the same cements. The mean value of crown removal stress for the new self-adhesive modified-resin cements varied appreciably among the four cements tested. All cements retained castings as well as or better than did zinc phosphate cement. Powder-liquid versions of cements, although less convenient to mix, may be a better clinical choice when crown retention is an issue. All cements tested will retain castings

  11. Effect of antibacterial/adhesive approaches on bonding durability of fiber posts cemented with self-etch resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab; Vafamand, Narges; Mohammadi, Mahsa

    2017-09-01

    Longevity of post-retained restoration is highly depended on bonding stability of fiber post (FP) to root dentin. This study evaluated the effect of different antibacterial/adhesive approaches on bonding durability of FPs luted into root canal with a self-etch cement. Seventy-two human maxillary central incisor roots were divided into six groups after endodontic treatment, based on the antibacterial/adhesive treatments as follows: 1)ED primer II (ED, control); 2) Clearfil Protect Bond (PB); 3) 2% chlorhexidine (CH) pretreatment + ED primer II (CH+ED); 4) CH-incorporated into ED primer II (CH in ED); 5) CH pretreatment + Clearfil SE Bond (CH+SE); and 6)CH-incorporated into SE primer (CH in SE). The FPs were then cemented using PanaviaF2.0. After micro-slicing the bonded root dentin, a push-out bond strength (PBS) test was performed immediately or after two years of water storage. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (α=0.05). The effects of antibacterial/adhesive approach, time and interaction between the main factors were significant ( p =0.01). There was no significant difference between the immediate groups, except between the CH+ED group (the lowest PBS) and PB and CH in SE groups (the highest PBS) ( p ≤0.03). After aging, the same difference was observed ( p ≤0.02); the control group exhibited a significantly lower PBS compared to the other groups ( p ≤0.01), except for CH+ED. Aging significantly decreased PBS of all the groups ( p ≤0.01); the control group exhibited the highest reduction. CH incorporated into self-etch primers or in pretreatment step prior to two-step self-etch adhesive and antibacterial adhesive could improve bond stability of self-etch cemented fiber post. However, none of these was capable of inhibiting bond degradation over time. Key words: Push-out bond strength, Fiber post, Chlorhexidine.

  12. Strength and sorption properties of cement-bonded composites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boards produced with less than 30% wood content exhibited superior strength and dimensional stability properties that can be exploited in ceiling applications where sound absorption is important. Keywords: Eucalyptus, Veneer waste, Cement composite, Strength, dimensional stability. Journal of Applied Science, ...

  13. Cement bonded wood wool boards from podocarpus spp. for low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... sound insulation in walls, ceilings and floors, roofs, sound barriers and thermal insulation. Further research is required to investigate the use of different wood species and different mineral binders. Keywords: podocarpus spp, wood-wool, wood-cement composites. Journal of Civil Engineering Research and Practice Vol.

  14. DESENSITIZING BIOACTIVE AGENTS IMPROVES BOND STRENGTH OF INDIRECT RESIN-CEMENTED RESTORATIONS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires-De-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; de Marco, Fabíola Fiorezi; Casemiro, Luciana Assirati; Panzeri, Heitor

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. Materials and Method: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5): Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply); Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®)+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita); Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer) cylinders (6x10mm) were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dualcure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply). After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37oC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC) with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence). Results: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05). Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05) than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. Conclusion: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems. PMID:19089114

  15. Desensitizing bioactive agents improves bond strength of indirect resin-cemented restorations: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5: Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply; Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita; Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer cylinders (6x10mm were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dual-cure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply. After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37ºC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence. RESULTS: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05. Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05 than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. CONCLUSION: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems.

  16. Interfacial fracture toughness of different resin cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Rostami, Golriz; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Keshvad, Alireza; van Noort, Richard

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of HF acid etching and silane treatment on the interfacial fracture toughness of a self-adhesive and two conventional resin-based cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Lithium disilicate glass ceramic discs were prepared with two different surface preparations consisting of gritblasted with aluminium oxide, and gritblasted and etched with hydrofluoric acid. Ceramic surfaces with a chevron shaped circular hole were treated by an optimized silane treatment followed by an unfilled resin and then three different resin cements (Variolink II, Panavia F2, and Multilink Sprint). Specimens were kept in distilled water at 37°C for 24h and then subjected to thermocycling. The interfacial fracture toughness was measured and mode of failures was also examined. Data were analysed using analysis of variance followed by T-test analysis. No statistically significant difference in the mean fracture toughness values between the gritblasted and gritblasted and etched surfaces for Variolink II resin cement was found (P>0.05). For the gritblasted ceramic surfaces, no significant difference in the mean fracture toughness values between Panavia F2 and Variolink II was observed (P>0.05). For the gritblasted and etched ceramic surfaces, a significantly higher fracture toughness for Panavia F2 than the other cements was found (Pceramic system was affected by the surface treatment and the type of luting agent. Dual-cured resin cements demonstrated a better bonding efficacy to the lithium disilicate glass ceramic compared to the self-adhesive resin cement. The lithium disilicate glass ceramic surfaces should be gritblasted and etched to get the best bond when used with Panavia F2 and Multilink Sprint resin cements, whereas for the Variolink II only gritblasting is required. The best bond overall is achieved with Panavia F2. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Recent Trends in Surface Treatment Methods for Bonding Composite Cement to Zirconia: A Reveiw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aftab Ahmed; Al Kheraif, Abdul Aziz A; Jamaluddin, Syed; Elsharawy, Mohamad; Divakar, Darshan Devang

    To evaluate the in vitro studies conducted in the last six years on new zirconia materials to discover and explore current trends in bonding composite cement to zirconia substrate. An in-depth review of the in vitro studies performed between 2010 and 2016 was conducted, focusing on the current trends in surface conditioning methods for zirconia ceramic. PubMed was used for searching the literature. Resin composite bonding to zirconia, zirconia surface coating, and zirconia surface treatment method were the keywords used. Complete scientific articles were reviewed and evaluated for appropriateness. The literature survey showed a variety of surface treatment techniques comprising grit blasting (laboratory or chairside) with or without silica-coated alumina particles, the use of materials containing phosphate monomers, different silanes and primers, laser irradiation, Si vapor-phase deposition, and selective infiltration etching. The problem of composite cement bonding to zirconia has yet to be definitively solved. Nevertheless, the application of phosphate monomer on tribochemically silica-coated zirconia surfaces is currently the least complicated and most efficaceous means of bonding composite cement to zirconia. Selective infiltration etching seems to be a promising technique for establishing a durable bond between composite cement and zirconia, and should be studied further.

  18. The effect of ceramic primer on shear bond strength of resin composite cement to zirconia: a function of water storage and thermal cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keul, Christine; Liebermann, Anja; Roos, Malgorzata; Uhrenbacher, Julia; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Ing, Dipl

    2013-11-01

    The authors investigated the use of ceramic primers combined with self-adhesive resin composite cements on the shear bond strength (SBS) to zirconia and compared them with one conventional resin composite cement. The authors divided zirconia substrates (N = 550) into three groups: RelyX Unicem Aplicap self-adhesive universal resin composite cement (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.) (group A) (n = 220); G-CEM Capsule self-adhesive resin composite cement (GC Europe, Leuven, Belgium) (group B) (n = 220); and Panavia 21 with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator and Clearfil SE Bond primer (n = 110) (Kuraray Dental, Tokyo) used as a standard comparison (SC). The authors examined the self-adhesive resin composite cements without (0) and with (1) the use of a ceramic primer. They measured SBS initially (37°C for three hours), after water storage (37°C for one, four, nine, 16 or 25 days) and after thermal cycling (5°C and 55°C for 1,500, 6,000, 13,500, 24,000 or 37,500 cycles). The authors analyzed data by using descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney test, the Kruskal-Wallis test and a χ(2) test. Application of a ceramic primer did not result in a negative impact on SBS. Specimens in the A1 group (that is, RelyX Unicem Aplicap with ceramic primer) exhibited significantly higher SBS before and after water storage and thermal cycling compared with specimens that were not treated with a primer. The self-adhesive resin composite cements combined with ceramic primer exhibited similar or higher SBS values compared with those in the SC group at each aging duration (that is, water storage and thermal cycling). With respect to G-CEM Capsule, the authors observed a significantly positive effect of the primer after nine and 16 days' water storage and after one and four days' thermal cycling. They observed predominantly adhesive failures. Ceramic primer in combination with self-adhesive resin composite cement demonstrated a positive effect on SBS to zirconia and should be used for

  19. Biocompatibility Evaluation of Dental Luting Cements Using Cytokine Released from Human Oral Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Sung Kwon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental luting cements are commonly used in dentistry for cementation of prosthetic restoration. Many previous studies focused on the measurement of the cell viability as the method of cytotoxicity evaluation during biocompatibility study for the material. In this study, the biocompatibility of various dental luting cements were evaluated using the new method of cytokine release measurement in order to better simulate inflammatory reactions in animal or clinical model using two different oral cells; immortalized human gingival fibroblast and immortalized human oral keratinocytes. Cells were exposed to extractions of various commercially available dental luting cements for different durations. Cytokines of IL-1α and IL-8 were measured from the supernatants of the cells and the results were then compared to the conventional MTT viability test. The result from the conventional cell viability study showed a relatively simple and straight forward indication that only one of the dental luting cements tested in this study was cytotoxic with increasing duration of exposure for both cells. Meanwhile, the result from the cytokine measurement study was much more complex at the time point they were measured, type of cells used for the study and the type of cytokines measured, all of which influenced the interpretation of the results. Hence, the better understanding of the cytokine release would be required for the application in biocompatibility evaluation.

  20. Recent Advances in Adhesive Bonding - The Role of Biomolecules, Nanocompounds, and Bonding Strategies in Enhancing Resin Bonding to Dental Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münchow, Eliseu A; Bottino, Marco C

    2017-09-01

    To present an overview on the main agents (i.e., biomolecules and nanocompounds) and/or strategies currently available to amplify or stabilize resin-dentin bonding. According to studies retrieved for full text reading (2014-2017), there are currently six major strategies available to overcome resin-dentin bond degradation: (i) use of collagen crosslinking agents, which may form stable covalent bonds with collagen fibrils, thus strengthening the hybrid layer; (ii) use of antioxidants, which may allow further polymerization reactions over time; (iii) use of protease inhibitors, which may inhibit or inactivate metalloproteinases; (iv) modification of the bonding procedure, which may be performed by using the ethanol wet-bonding technique or by applying an additional adhesive (hydrophobic) coating, thereby strengthening the hybrid layer; (v) laser treatment of the substrate prior to bonding, which may cause specific topographic changes in the surface of dental substrates, increasing bonding efficacy; and (vi) reinforcement of the resin matrix with inorganic fillers and/or remineralizing agents, which may positively enhance physico-mechanical properties of the hybrid layer. With the present review, we contributed to the better understanding of adhesion concepts and mechanisms of resin-dentin bond degradation, showing the current prospects available to solve that problematic. Also, adhesively-bonded restorations may be benefited by the use of some biomolecules, nanocompounds or alternative bonding strategies in order to minimize bond strength degradation.

  1. How mobile are protons in the structure of dental glass ionomer cements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Jacobsen, Johan; Lehnhoff, Benedict

    2015-01-01

    The development of dental materials with improved properties and increased longevity can save costs and minimize discomfort for patients. Due to their good biocompatibility, glass ionomer cements are an interesting restorative option. However, these cements have limited mechanical strength...... to survive in the challenging oral environment. Therefore, a better understanding of the structure and hydration process of these cements can bring the necessary understanding to further developments. Neutrons and X-rays have been used to investigate the highly complex pore structure, as well as to assess...... the hydrogen mobility within these cements. Our findings suggest that the lower mechanical strength in glass ionomer cements results not only from the presence of pores, but also from the increased hydrogen mobility within the material. The relationship between microstructure, hydrogen mobility and strength...

  2. Shear bond strength of four resin cements used to lute ceramic core material to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutayhan; Eldeniz, Ayçe Unverdi; Usumez, Aslihan

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of four resin cements on the shear bond strength of a ceramic core material to dentin. One hundred twenty molar teeth were embedded in a self-curing acrylic resin. The occlusal third of the crowns were sectioned under water cooling. All specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth each according to the resin cement used. One hundred twenty cylindrical-shaped, 2.7-mm wide, 3-mm high ceramic core materials were heat-pressed. The core cylinders were then luted with one of the four resin systems to dentin (Super-Bond C&B, Chemiace II, Variolink II, and Panavia F). Half of the specimens (n = 15) were tested after 24 hours; the other half (n = 15) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 day and then thermocycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear bond strength of each specimen was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa, and the results were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the resin cement used (p 0.05). Significant interactions were present between resin cement and thermocycling (p 0.05). The increase in the shear bond strength values in the Panavia F (4.5 +/- 0.7 MPa) and Variolink II (5.5 +/- 2.1 MPa) groups after thermocycling was also not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Variolink II and Panavia F systems showed higher shear bond strength values than Chemiace II and Super-Bond C&B. They can be recommended for luting ceramic cores to dentin surfaces.

  3. Effect of Enamel and Dentin Surface Treatment on the Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushashe, Amanda Mahmmad; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of enamel and dentin surface treatment on the micro-shear bond strength of self-adhesive cement. Seventy-two extracted third molars had their crowns embedded in acrylic resin and worn to obtain a flat enamel or dentin surface. The enamel and dentin specimens were randomly assigned to 8 groups (n=12) that were based on surface treatment (11.5% polyacrylic acid solution or no treatment), substrate condition (wet or dry) and storage period (1 day or 90 days), and treated accordingly. Cylinders (1 × 1 mm) were fabricated using self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200) following the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for either 1 day or 90 days and subjected to micro-shear bond strength test (EMIC DL 2000 at 0.5 mm/min). After this, the failure type of the specimens was determined. Data were subjected to statistical analysis (a=0.05). According to the results, the 11.5% polyacrylic acid application decreased the bond strength in both enamel and dentin samples. The moist groups showed higher bond strength than the dry ones, regardless of the substrate and surface treatment. Storage period did not influence bond strength. In conclusion, surface treatment with 11.5% polyacrylic acid and absence of moisture decreased the bond strength of the resin-cement (RelyU200), regardless of the storage period.

  4. Contact deformation and cracking of zirconia/cement/foundation dental multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Xinrui; Yang Yong; Soboyejo, Wole

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of combined experimental, analytical and computational studies of contact-induced deformation and cracking in zirconia/cement/foundation dental multilayers, where cement and foundation layers are commercially used dental adhesive and restoratives. Hertzian contact tests were performed on the multilayers. A novel technique, dual-beam focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) was used to examine the crack/microstructure interactions in the dental multilayer structures. The FIB/SEM images show sub-surface inter/intragranular cracking modes that have not been reported before. The critical loads corresponding to onset of sub-surface radial cracking were found to exhibit a strong dependence on the monotonic loading rates. A rate-dependent environmentally assisted slow crack growth (RDEASGG) model was used to predict the loading rate dependence of the critical loads. The implications of the results are discussed for the design of durable dental multilayers

  5. Contact deformation and cracking of zirconia/cement/foundation dental multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu Xinrui [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM) and the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: xniu@princeton.edu; Yang Yong; Soboyejo, Wole [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM) and the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2008-06-25

    The paper presents the results of combined experimental, analytical and computational studies of contact-induced deformation and cracking in zirconia/cement/foundation dental multilayers, where cement and foundation layers are commercially used dental adhesive and restoratives. Hertzian contact tests were performed on the multilayers. A novel technique, dual-beam focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) was used to examine the crack/microstructure interactions in the dental multilayer structures. The FIB/SEM images show sub-surface inter/intragranular cracking modes that have not been reported before. The critical loads corresponding to onset of sub-surface radial cracking were found to exhibit a strong dependence on the monotonic loading rates. A rate-dependent environmentally assisted slow crack growth (RDEASGG) model was used to predict the loading rate dependence of the critical loads. The implications of the results are discussed for the design of durable dental multilayers.

  6. Effect of cement types and timing of cementation on the retentive bond strength of fiber posts

    OpenAIRE

    Aleisa, Khalil; Al-Dwairi, Ziad; Alghabban, Rawda; Glickman, Gerald; Hsu, Ming-Lun

    2012-01-01

    Background/purpose: To evaluate the effect of early versus delayed post space preparation and cementation and the types of cement on the retention of fiber posts in canals obturated using an epoxy resin sealer. Materials and methods: Seventy-two extracted single-rooted teeth with straight root canals were decoronated and obturated with gutta-percha and an epoxy resin sealer (AH26). Post spaces were prepared to a depth of 8 mm and 1.5 mm diameter. Parallel-sided, prefabricated fiber posts w...

  7. Tensile bond strength of composite luting cements to metal alloys after various surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denizoglu Saip

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the effects of two different surface treatments and bonding agents on tensile bond strength between a Co-Cr and a Ni-Cr cast alloy and two resin-luting cements. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and forty alloy samples were cast and subjected to surface treatments such as sandblasting, chemical etching, and sandblasting plus chemical etching. Panavia F and CandB cement were used as cementing mediums. The etching qualities were examined by a stereooptic microscope. Failure surfaces were examined throughout scanning electron microscopy. The data were evaluated using statistical methods, namely analysis of variance and multiple comparison test (Tukey HSD. Results: Significant differences were found in the bonding provided by the various cements (P < 0.001 and also type of surface treatments (P < 0.001. For all groups, sandblasted surfaces showed the highest bond strength values. There was no significant difference between the Cr-Co and the Cr-Ni alloys (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Panavia F showed higher tensile strength and the sandblasted samples possessed higher tensile strength.

  8. Comparison of the abrasive wear resistance between amalgams, hybrid composite material and different dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, F J; Espias, A; Sánchez, L A; Planell, J A

    1999-12-01

    This paper reports on the abrasion wear of various restorative dental materials (three amalgams and two dental cements and a hybrid composite material) commonly used in dentistry. The mechanical properties, surface roughness and the volume loss by abrasion were determined for the different materials studied. The results showed a better profile for the amalgams versus the composite materials due to the failure of the polymeric matrix of the latter materials. However, the amalgams exhibited corrosion observed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  9. Factors affecting on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo, V. R. G.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Nadalin, M. R.; Saade, E. G.; Oliveira-Junior, O. B.; Andrade, M. F.

    2009-09-01

    Luting materials provides the retention of endodontic post. However, the failures of endodontic posts predominantly occurred are the losses of retention. Thus, the alternating use to remove the smear layer, open the dentine tubules, and/or etch the inter-tubular dentine can be provided by EDTA. This study was performed to evaluate effect of EDTA on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal. Fifty bovine incisors were selected and the crowns were removed to obtain a remaining 14-mm-height root. The roots were randomly distributed into five groups: GI: RelyX™ ARC/LED; GII: RelyX™ U100/LED; GIII EDTA/RelyX™ U100/LED; GIV: Multilink™; and GV: EDTA/Multlink™. After endodontic treatment, the post space was prepared with the drills designated for the quartz-coated-carbon-fiber post Aestheti-Post®. Before application of resin cements, root canals were irrigated with 17% EDTA (GIII and GV) during 1 min, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The light-cured materials were light-activated with UltraLume LED 5 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah) with power density of 1315 mW/cm2. Specimens were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections and the stubs were performed on Universal Testing Machine. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc tests showed significant statistical different between RelyX™ ARC (GI) and RelyX™ U100 independent of the pre-treatment (GII to GIII) ( P 0.05) to all resin cements between the Cervical to Apical regions (GI to GV). The use of 17% EDTA showed no difference significant between the resin cements evaluated (GII to GIII; GIV to GV). Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the use of EDTA did not provide efficiency on bond strength. The RelyX™ ARC showed higher bond strength values than RelyX™ U100.

  10. Electrochemical study of insulating properties of dental amalgam bonding polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toumelin-Chemla, Florence; Degrange, Michel [Faculte de Chirurgie Dentaire de Paris V, Montrouge (France)

    1998-06-01

    The standard techniques used for amalgam restorations often result in a lack of adhesion to mineralized dental tissues. The bonding of amalgam with polymer has been suggested to improve its adaptation to dental tissues. Moreover the polymer involved in the bonding should inhibit the corrosion and the diffusion of metallic ions. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the capacity of bonded amalgam to prevent ionic diffusion and migration. In this respect, an original method employing electrochemical techniques was used to determine the leakage current of bonded amalgam restorations. The electrochemical behaviour of conventional and bonded amalgam restorations was compared using a potentiostat driven by a computerized system (Voltamaster, Radiometer Analytical) with software for specific applications such as chronoamperometry or cyclic voltammetry. Samples of recently extracted teeth of young patients were first examined, and then the results were checked by other experimental assays using protected and unprotected copper sticks. The measurements obtained with chronoamperometry (E=+300 mV/SCE) in Ringer's solution at 37 deg. C showed that after polarization for 30 h the oxidation current decreased threefold for bonded samples (10 {mu}A cm{sup -2}) as compared with the unprotected samples (35 {mu}A cm{sup -2}). These results, as well as those obtained with the copper wires, demonstrated that even with two layers of adhesive the bonded joint is permeable to ions probably as a result of the hydrophylic properties of HEMA, a component of the adhesive. However, using five layers of adhesive reduced the ionic current by a factor as large as 10{sup 6}. (author)

  11. In vitro evaluation of failure loads of nonmetal cantilevered resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dalen, Andy; Feilzer, Albert J; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate in vitro the influence of fiber reinforcement on the failure loads of resin composite beams, simulating cantilevered two-unit resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses, and compare the results with similarly obtained failure loads of ZrO2 and CoCr beams of a comparable design. Peel tests were performed using resin composite, fiber-reinforced resin composite, and zirconia beams, simulating two-unit cantilevered resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses, luted with Panavia F2.0 onto flat-ground buccal surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors. The recorded failure loads were compared with those of CoCr beams of a similar size and design from earlier research. Finite element analysis revealed the stress concentrations within the cement layers at failure. The failure loads (N) of the peel tests, depending on the beam type and including the type of failure, were statistically analyzed. The highest failure values were obtained with the fiber-reinforced resin composite beams, which were luted with the exposed fibers directly on the bovine enamel. Finite element analysis showed that peak stress locations depend on the beam type and facilitate the explanation of the different failure modes. Fiber-reinforcement of simulated two-unit cantilevered resin composite resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses does not necessarily lead to higher failure loads. This study identified significant differences in peel failure loads between identical specimens, depending on whether or not the fiber reinforcement was exposed on the luting surface. Further research needs to be carried out regarding the combination of resin composite and fiber reinforcement.

  12. Effect of different laser surface treatment on microshear bond strength between zirconia ceramic and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan Zanjani, Vagharaldin; Ahmadi, Hadi; Nateghifard, Afshin; Ghasemi, Amir; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Abdoh Tabrizi, Maryam; Alikhani, Farnaz; Razi, Reza; Nateghifard, Ardalan

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sandblasting, carbon dioxide (CO₂), and erbium,chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers on the microshear bond strength of zirconia to resin cement. Sixty-one sintered yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia blocks (10 × 5 × 2 mm) were prepared and divided into four experimental groups (n = 15); one sample was retained as a control. The samples were treated by aluminium oxide air abrasion, CO₂4W, Er,Cr:YSGG 3W, and Er,Cr:YSGG 2W, respectively. One sample from each group and the control sample were analyzed by scanning electron microscope. Panavia F2.0 resin microcylinders were prepared and placed on treated surfaces, light cured, and incubated for 48 h. Microshear bond strength testing was done by a microtensile tester machine, and the type of bond failures were determined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by one-way anova and Tukey's test at a significance level of P ceramic surfaces to enhance the bonding strength of resin cement to zirconia. CO₂laser at 4W and Er,Cr:YSGG laser at only 3-W output power can be regarded as surface treatment options for roughening the zirconia surface to establish better bond strength with resin cements. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Effect of saliva contamination and artificial aging on different primer/cement systems bonded to zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitta, João; Branco, Teresa C; Portugal, Jaime

    2017-09-27

    Saliva contamination has been shown to decrease bonding to zirconia. Adopting a less contamination-sensitive cement system may be an alternative to decontamination. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the ability of different primer/cement systems to promote a durable bond to zirconia after saliva contamination. Zirconia blocks (Lava Plus) (N=320) were airborne-particle abraded (50 μm Al 2 O 3 ) and divided into 32 experimental groups (n=10) according to the variables in the study: saliva contamination; primer/cement system (Panavia SA [PSA]; RelyX Unicem 2 [RU2]; Bifix SE [BSE]; Panavia F2.0 [PF2]; Scotchbond Universal + RelyX Ultimate [SBU+RXU]; Futurabond M+ + Bifix QM [FBM+BQM]; All-Bond Universal + Duo-link [ABU+DL]; Z-Prime Plus + Duo-link [ZPP+DL]; and aging period (72 hours; 30 days with 10 000 thermal cycles at 5°C to 55°C). After half of the blocks had been contaminated with fresh human saliva for 10 minutes, rinsed with water, and air-dried, each primer/cement was applied. Polymerized composite resin disks were then placed over the cement, and the resin cement was light-polymerized for 20 seconds each at 2 opposite margins. After the aging time, the specimens were tested in shear (1 mm/min). The failure mode was classified as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. Statistical analysis of the shear bond strength (SBS) data was performed with ANOVA followed by Tukey honest significant difference post hoc tests. Chi-square tests were used to analyze the failure mode data (α=.05). The mean SBS ranged between 4.2 and 34.5 MPa. Shear bond strength was influenced (Pcontamination, aging time). SBU+RXU and FBM+BQM showed a higher mean SBS than those of the other experimental groups (Pcontamination (P>.05). Failure was predominantly classified as adhesive. In general, saliva contamination and aging decreased bonding efficacy. Two systems, combining an application of a universal adhesive and a resin cement (SBU+RXU and FBM+BQM) were not affected by

  14. Effect of MDP-Based Silane and Different Surface Conditioner Methods on Bonding of Resin Cements to Zirconium Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Hatice; Yanikoğlu, Nuran; Sağsöz, Nurdan

    2017-07-24

    To determine the shear bond strength (SBS) between zirconium framework and resin cements after different surface conditioner methods and after application of 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) based silane and a bonding agent mix. 128 disc-shaped zirconium-oxide specimens were prepared. Specimens were placed in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The bonding surface of specimens was smoothed consecutively with 600-, 800-, and 1200-grit silicon carbide papers under water cooling. Eight groups were prepared: CJ, Co-Jet; N, Nd-YAG laser; E, Er-YAG laser; NS, Nd-YAG laser + silane; ES, Er-YAG laser + silane; CJB, Co-Jet + bonding agent; NSB, Nd-YAG laser + silane + bonding agent; ESB, Er-YAG laser + silane + bonding agent. SEM analysis was performed under 2000× magnification. Dual- and self-cured resin cements were bonded to specimens, and shear force was applied. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison test (p MDP-based silane and bonding agent mix increased SBS values of each cement belonging to each group. SB values of dual-cure resin cement were higher than those of self-cure resin cements. Different surface conditioner methods exhibit an important effect on the SBS of resin cements to zirconium. The application of MDP-based silane and bonding agent mix enhanced SB values. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Characterization of Dentine to Assess Bond Strength of Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Liaqat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to develop alternating dentine adhesion models that could help in the evaluation of a self-bonding dental composite. For this purpose dentine from human and ivory was characterized chemically and microscopically before and after acid etching using Raman and SEM. Mechanical properties of dentine were determined using 3 point bend test. Composite bonding to dentine, with and without use of acid pre-treatment and/or the adhesive, were assessed using a shear bond test. Furthermore, micro gap formation after restoration of 3 mm diameter cavities in dentine was assessed by SEM. Initial hydroxyapatite level in ivory was half that in human dentine. Surface hydroxyapatites decreased by approximately half with every 23 s of acid etch. The human dentine strength (56 MPa was approximately double that of ivory, while the modulus was almost comparable to that of ivory. With adhesive use, average shear bond strengths were 30 and 26 MPa with and without acid etching. With no adhesive, average bond strength was 6 MPa for conventional composites. This, however, increased to 14 MPa with a commercial flowable “self–bonding” composite or upon addition of low levels of an acidic monomer to the experimental composite. The acidic monomer additionally reduced micro-gap formation with the experimental composite. Improved bonding and mechanical properties should reduce composite failures due to recurrent caries or fracture respectively.

  16. Bond strength of primer/cement systems to zirconia subjected to artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Jian, Yu-Tao; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Creating reliable and durable adhesion to the nonactive zirconia surface is difficult and has limited zirconia use. The introduction of functional monomers such as 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) appears to have enhanced bond strength to zirconia. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the long-term bond strength of several MDP-containing primer/cement systems to zirconia. Zirconia blocks were divided into 6 groups (n=24) according to the 3 primers/cements to be bonded, as follows: Scotchbond Universal/RelyX Ultimate (SU/RU; consisting of MDP-containing primer/MDP-free cement); Clearfil ceramic primer/Panavia F (CCP/PAN; consisting ofMDP-containing/MDP-containing); and Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link (ZP/DUO; consisting ofMDP-containing/MDP-free), which were compared with 3 nonprimed groups, RU, PAN, and DUO. After bonding, each group was further divided into 3 subgroups (n=8) according to the level of aging: 24-hour storage in water at 37°C (24H); 30-day storage at 37°C (30D); and 30-day storage at 37°C followed by 3000 thermal cycles (30D/TC). After aging, a shear bond strength test and failure mode analysis were performed. The data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA (α=.05). After aging, nearly all primer/cement groups presented significantly higher bond strength than the related nonprimed groups for each level of aging (Pzirconia. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dental Glass Ionomer Cements as Permanent Filling Materials? – Properties, Limitations and Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Lohbauer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs are clinically attractive dental materials that have certain unique properties that make them useful as restorative and luting materials. This includes adhesion to moist tooth structures and base metals, anticariogenic properties due to release of fluoride, thermal compatibility with tooth enamel, biocompatibility and low toxicity. The use of GICs in a mechanically loaded situation, however, has been hampered by their low mechanical performance. Poor mechanical properties, such as low fracture strength, toughness and wear, limit their extensive use in dentistry as a filling material in stress-bearing applications. In the posterior dental region, glass ionomer cements are mostly used as a temporary filling material. The requirement to strengthen those cements has lead to an ever increasing research effort into reinforcement or strengthening concepts.

  18. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive cements bonded to lithium disilicate, enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Jennifer; Ali, Mohsin; Belles, Donald

    2015-11-01

    Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive cements bonded to lithium disilicate, enamel and dentin. With several self-adhesive resin cements currently available, there is confusion about which product and technique is optimal for bonding ceramic restorations to teeth. The objective of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of lithium disilicate cemented to enamel and dentin using 5 adhesive cements. 100 lithium disilicate rods were pretreated with 5% hydrofluoric acid, silane, and cemented to 50 enamel and 50 dentin surfaces using five test cements: Variolink II (etch-and-rinse) control group, Clearfil Esthetic (two step self-etch), RelyX Unicem, SpeedCEM, and BifixSE (self-adhesive). All specimens were stored (37 degrees C, 100% humidity) for 24 hours before testing their shear bond strength using a universal testing machine (Instron). Debonded surfaces were observed under a low-power microscope to assess the location and type of failure. The highest bond strength for both enamel and dentin were recorded for Variolink II, 15.1MPa and 20.4MPa respectively, and the lowest were recorded for BifixSE, 0.6MPa and 0.9MPa respectively. Generally, higher bond strengths were found for dentin (7.4MPa) than enamel (5.3MPa). Tukey's post hoc test showed no significant difference between Clearfil Esthetic and SpeedCem (p = 0.059), Unicem and SpeedCem (p = 0.88), and Unicem and BifixSE (p = 0.092). All cements bonded better to lithium disilicate than to enamel or dentin, as all bond failures occurred at the tooth/adhesive interface except for Variolink II. Bond strengths recorded for self-adhesive cements were very low compared to the control "etch and rinse" and self-etch systems. Further improvements are apparently needed in self-adhesive cements for them to replace multistep adhesive systems. The use of conventional etch and rinse cements such as Veriolink II should be preferred for cementing all ceramic restorations over self-adhesive cements

  19. Effect of resin coating on dentin bonding of resin cement in Class II cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shamim; Nikaido, Toru; Matin, Khairul; Ogata, Miwako; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-07-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of resin coating on the regional microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of a resin cement to the dentin walls of Class II cavities. Twenty mesio-occlusal cavities were prepared in human molars. In 10 cavities, a resin coating consisting of a self-etching primer bonding system, Clearfil SE Bond, and a low-viscosity microfilled resin, Protect Liner F, was applied. The other 10 teeth served as a non-coating group. After impression taking and temporization, they were kept in water for one day. Composite inlays were then cemented with a dual-cure resin cement, Panavia F 2.0, and stored in water for one day. Thereafter, MTBSs were measured. Two-way ANOVA (p=0.05) revealed that the MTBS of resin cement to dentin was influenced by resin coating, but not by regional difference. In conclusion, application of a resin coating to the dentin surface significantly improved the MTBS in indirect restorations.

  20. A bioactive dental luting cement--its retentive properties and 3-year clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Steven R; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Appleby, David C; Boston, Daniel; Lööf, Jesper

    2013-02-01

    A clinical validation study was conducted to determine the performance of a new bioactive dental cement (Ceramir C&B, Doxa Dental AB) for permanent cementation. The cement is a new formulation class, which is a hybrid material comprised of calcium aluminate and glass-ionomer components. A total of 38 crowns and bridges were cemented in 17 patients; 31 of the abutment teeth were vital and seven were non-vital. Six restorations were bridges with a total of 14 abutment teeth (12 vital/ two non-vital). One fixed splint comprising two abutment teeth was also included. Preparation parameters were recorded, as well as cement characteristics such as working time, setting time, seating characteristics, and ease of cement removal. Baseline data were recorded for the handling of the cement, gingival inflammation, and pre-cementation sensitivity. Post-cementation parameters included post-cementation sensitivity, gingival tissue reaction, marginal integrity, and discoloration. All patients were seen for recall examinations at 30 days and 6 months. Fifteen of 17 subjects and 13 of 17 patients were also available for subsequent comprehensive 1- and 2-year recall examination, and 13 patients were available for a 3-year recall examination. Restorations available for the 3-year recall examination included 14 single-unit full-coverage crown restorations, four three-unit bridges comprising eight abutments, and one two-unit splint. Three-year recall data yielded no loss of retention, no secondary caries, no marginal discolorations, and no subjective sensitivity. All restorations rated excellent for marginal integrity. Average visual analogue scale (VAS) score for tooth sensitivity decreased from 7.63 mm at baseline to 0.44 mm at 6-month recall, 0.20 mm at 1-year recall, and 0.00 mm at 2- and 3-year recall. Average gingival index (GI) score for gingival inflammation decreased from 0.56 at baseline to 0.11 at 6-month recall, 0.16 at 1-year recall, 0.21 at 2-year recall, and 0.07 at 3

  1. Influence of dentin contamination by temporary cements on the bond strength of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimeri Hebling

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin contaminated by temporary cements with or without eugenol. Method: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained from twenty-four human third molars. With exception of the control group (n=8, the surfaces were covered with Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA or Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and kept in an oven at 37oC for seven days. After removing the cements, the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA or Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan were applied in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and then the crowns were constructed in of resin composite. The teeth were sectioned into specimens with a cross-sectional bond area of 0.81mm2, which were sub mitted to microtensile testing in a mechanical test machine at an actuator speed of 0.5mm/min. The data were analyzed by t- and ANOVA tests, complemented by Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results: For Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, bond strength did not differ statistically (p>0.05 for all the experimental conditions. For Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan, only the Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA Group showed significantly lower bond strength (30.1±13.8 MPa in comparison with the other groups; control (38.9±13.5 MPa and Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA (42.1±11.0 MPa, which showed no significant difference between them.Conclusion: It was concluded that the previous covering of dentin with temporary cement containing eugenol had a deleterious effect on the adhesive performance of the self-etching system only.

  2. Microtensile bond strengths of glass ionomer (polyalkenoate) cements to dentine using four conditioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanumiharja, M; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the microtensile bond strengths of three glass ionomer cements to dentine (Photac-Fil Quick; Fuji II LC; Fuji IX GP) using four different conditioners (Ketac Conditioner; Dentin Conditioner; Cavity Conditioner; and an experimental conditioner, K-930). Superficial occlusal dentine of extracted human third molars was exposed, finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper, and each of the above glass ionomer cements bonded using the four conditioners according to the manufacturers' instructions. After 24h in tap water at 37 degrees C, the teeth were sectioned to obtain 3-4 bar-shaped specimens. Ten specimens were prepared for each group and shaped to an hour-glass form of (1.2+/-0.02)mm diameter. The specimens were mounted in a jig and stressed in tension at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min until failure. The mean bond strengths were calculated and compared using one-way ANOVA and LSD tests, and the fracture modes were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Mean microtensile bond strengths for Photac-Fil Quick were not significantly different from Fuji II LC for each of the conditioners used. However, the bond strengths for Photac-Fil Quick were significantly greater than Fuji II LC when no conditioner was applied. Mean microtensile bond strengths of conditioned specimens of Fuji II LC were significantly greater than non-conditioned specimens. Mean microtensile bond strengths of non-conditioned specimens of Fuji IX GP were not significantly different from conditioned specimens. The fracture mode of all specimens demonstrated mostly cohesive failure within the cement. The use of surface conditioners resulted in improvement in bond strength of Fuji II LC, while Photac-Fil Quick and Fuji IX GP showed no difference.

  3. Effect of endodontic sealers on push-out bond strength of cemented fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dwairi, Ziad Nawaf; Aleisa, Khalil; Lynch, Edward

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of eugenol-based and resin-based endodontic sealers on the push-out bond strengths of prefabricated fiber posts luted with different resin cements. Ninety prefabricated fiber posts were luted into extracted singlerooted teeth with one of three resin cements (Variolink II, ParaCore, or Rely X Unicem). Each group was subdivided into three groups with 10 teeth each. The first two groups were obturated with gutta percha and one of two eugenol-based endodontic sealers (Endofil or TubliSeal) each. The third group was obturated with gutta percha and (AH26) resin-based root canal sealer. Push-out tests were performed in a universal testing machine by applying a load speed at 0.5 mm/min by using a 1-mm-diameter metallic plunger which induced a load in an apical to coronal direction. The maximum value for post dislodgement (in Newtons) was recorded. Data were collected and statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (α = .05). The highest mean bond strength values were recorded for the AH26 sealer group (non-eugenol sealer) luted with Rely X Unicem resin cement (mean ± SD = 326.1 ± 66.1 N), while the lowest mean bond strength values were observed with posts luted with Variolink II resin cement into canals obturated with gutta-percha and Endofil (eugenol-based) sealer (90.3 ± 25.2 N). There was no significant difference between the means of push-out strengths for the Endofil and TubliSeal groups (P = .745). Eugenol-based sealers (Endofil and TubliSeal) significantly reduced the push-out bond strength of prefabricated fiber posts luted with resin cement.

  4. Influence of Er,Cr: YSGG laser on bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coelho Bandéca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength of fiber post previously laser treated root canals. Forty single-rooted bovine teeth were endodontically treated, randomly and equally divided into two main groups according to the type of pretreatment: G1: 2.5% NaOCl (control group; and G2: Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Each group was further subdivided into 2 groups based on the category of adhesive systems/ luting materials used: a: an etch-and-rinse resin cement (Single Bond/RelyX ARC; 3M ESPE, and b: a self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X Unicem; 3M ESPE. Three 1.5 mm thick slabs were obtained per root and the push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement occurred. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Analysis of variance showed no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05 among the groups G1a (25.44 ± 2.35 and G1b (23.62 ± 3.48, G2a (11.77 ± 2.67 and G2b (9.93 ± 3.37. Fractures were observed at the interface between the dentin and the resin in all groups. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation did not influence on the bond strength of the resin cements and the etch-and-rinse resin cement had better results on bond strength than self-adhesive resin cement.

  5. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    of posts (n = 9 to 14) and human dentin (n = 10) were obtained by grinding. The posts received one of three surface treatments: 1. roughening (sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid etching), 2. application of primer (Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II, silane), or 3. roughening followed by application of primer...... with and without silane treatment significantly decreased the bond strength of Panavia F to the post. CONCLUSION: The bond strength of resin cements to the posts was affected by the material of the post, the surface treatment of the post, and by the type of resin cement. The bond strength of resin cement to dentin...

  6. Microleakage of Four Dental Cements in Metal Ceramic Restorations With Open Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Farzaneh, Babak; Azarsina, Mohadese; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima; Afshari, Aisooda; Mahshid, Minu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed prosthodontics is a routine dental treatment and microleakage is a major cause of its failure. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the marginal microleakage of four cements in metal ceramic restorations with adapted and open margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty sound human premolars were selected for this experimental study performed in Tehran, Iran and prepared for full-crown restorations. Wax patterns were formed leaving a 300 µm gap on one of the proximal margins. The crowns were cast and the samples were randomly divided into four groups based on the cement used. Copings were cemented using zinc phosphate cement (Fleck), Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer, Panavia F2.0 resin cement, or G-Cem resin cement, according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution. After 24 hours, dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope and analyzed using the respective software. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, paired t-tests, and Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The least microleakage occurred in the Panavia F2.0 group (closed margin, 0.18 mm; open margin, 0.64 mm) and the maximum was observed in the Fleck group (closed margin, 1.92 mm; open margin, 3.32 mm). The Fleck group displayed significantly more microleakage compared to the Fuji Plus and Panavia F2.0 groups (P cement exhibited better sealing ability in closed and open margins compared to G-Cem and Fleck cements. When using G-Cem and Fleck cements for full metal ceramic restorations, clinicians should try to minimize marginal gaps in order to reduce restoration failure. In situations where there are doubts about perfect marginal adaptation, the use of Fuji Plus cement may be helpful. PMID:26730349

  7. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to glass-ionomer cement using self-etching bonding agents with different pH: In vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Rajan, Karunamoorthy Jeyavel; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Porkodi, Ilango

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the bonding ability of composite to unset glass-ionomer cement (GIC) using different self-etching bonding systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred samples of composite bonded to unset GIC were prepared and were divided into four groups. In Group A, composite was bonded to unset GIC employing a strong (pH 1) self-etch primer was used. In Group B, intermediary strong (pH 1.4) self-etch primer was employed. In Group C and D, mild (pH 2) and (pH 2.2) self-etch primer was employed. Shear bond strength analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: Statistical analysis performed with one way analysis of variance and Tukey's test showed that the bond strength of composite to unset GIC was significantly higher for the mild self-etch primer group. In addition, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis was used to determine the composition of various structural phases identified by FE-SEM along the GIC-bonding agent interfaces. Conclusion: Hence this present study concludes that clinically the use of mild self-etching bonding agent over unset GIC has improved bond strength compared to the use of strong and intermediate self-etching bonding agent. PMID:22368331

  8. Effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tatiana Bahia Junqueira; Jansen, Wellington Corrêa; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Souki, Bernardo Quiroga; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). One hundred premolars, extracted for orthodontic reasons, were divided into five groups (n = 20). Group 1 (control): enamel was etched with 35 per cent phosphoric acid, a thin layer of adhesive was applied, and the brackets were bonded with Transbond XT. Group 2: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC). Group 3: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with conventional GIC. Group 4: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. Group 5: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours before they were submitted to shear testing. The results demonstrated that bond strength values of group 1 (17.08 ± 6.39 MPa) were significantly higher in comparison with the other groups. Groups 2 (3.43 ± 1.94 MPa) and 3 (3.92 ± 1.57 MPa) presented values below the average recommended in the literature. With regard to adhesive remnant index, the groups in which the enamel was treated with NaOCl showed a behaviour similar to that of the resin composite. It is conclude with enamel treatment with NaOCl increased bonding strength of brackets bonded with GIC and RMGIC, but increased bond strength was not statistically significant when compared to the untreated groups.

  9. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novais, Veridiana Resende; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Miranda, Rafael Resende de; Lopes, Camila de Carvalho Almança; Simamoto, Paulo Cézar; Soares, Carlos José

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC) and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer). The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst) and light-activation mode (base paste only). For degree of conversion (DC) (n=5), a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (presin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick.

  10. Bonding of Resin Cement to Zirconia with High Pressure Primer Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-jie; Jiao, Kai; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Li-juan; Fang, Ming; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiang; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-hua

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of air-drying pressure during ceramic primer coating on zirconia/resin bonding and the surface characteristics of the primed zirconia. Methods Two ceramic primers (Clearfil Ceramic Primer, CCP, Kuraray Medical Inc. and Z-Prime Plus, ZPP, Bisco Inc.) were applied on the surface of air-abraded zirconia (Katana zirconia, Noritake) and dried at 4 different air pressures (0.1–0.4 MPa). The primed zirconia ceramic specimens were bonded with a resin-based luting agent (SA Luting Cement, Kuraray). Micro-shear bond strengths of the bonded specimens were tested after 3 days of water storage or 5,000× thermocycling (n = 12). Failure modes of the fractured specimens were examined with scanning electron miscopy. The effects of air pressure on the thickness of the primer layers and the surface roughness (Sa) of primed zirconia were evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry (n = 6), optical profilometry and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) (n = 6), respectively. Results Clearfil Ceramic Primer air-dried at 0.3 and 0.4 MPa, yielding significantly higher µSBS than gentle air-drying subgroups (pzirconia bond strength and durability significantly. Higher air-drying pressure (0.3-0.4 MPa) for CCP and intermediate pressure (0.2 MPa) for ZPP are recommended to produce strong, durable bonds between resin cement and zirconia ceramics. PMID:24992678

  11. Efficacy of microtensile versus microshear bond testing for evaluation of bond strength of dental adhesive systems to enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Zohairy, A.A.; Saber, M.H.; Abdalla, A.I.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of the microtensile bond test (μTBS) and the microshear bond test (μSBS) in ranking four dental adhesives according to bond strength to enamel and identify the modes of failure involved. Materials and methods Forty-four caries-free human

  12. Tensile strength of cementing agents on the CeraOne system of dental prosthesis on implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Alexandre Campos; Machado, Aldir Nascimento; Depes Gouvêa, Cresus Vinicius

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the tensile strength of titanium cylinders cemented on stainless steel abutment mock-ups by the Cerazone system. Four types of cements were used: glass ionomer, Fuji I (GC); zinc phosphate, Cimento LS (Vigodent); zinc oxide without eugenol, Rely x Temp NE (3M ESPE); and resin cement, Rely x ARC (3M ESPE). Four experimental groups were formed, each composed of 5 test specimens. Each test specimen consisted of a set of 1 cylinder and 1 stainless steel abutment mock-up. All cements tested were manipulated in accordance with manufacturers' instructions. A static load of 5 Newtons (N) for 2 minutes was used to standardize the procedure. The tensile tests were performed by a mechanical universal testing machine (EMIC DL500MF) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The highest bonding values resulting from the experiment were obtained by Cimento LS (21.86 MPa mean), followed by the resin cement Rely x ARC (12.95 MPa mean), Fuji I (6.89 MPa mean), and Rely x Temp NE (4.71 MPa mean). The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Student's t test. The cements differed amongst them as regards tensile strength, with the highest bonding levels recorded with zinc phosphate (Cimento LS) and the lowest with the zinc oxide without eugenol (Rely x Temp NE).

  13. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Khalilian-Gourtani, Amirhossein; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-07-01

    Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solutions during root canal preparation, respectively. For each 12 specimens from each group, fiber post #1 was bonded using an etch-and-rinse (Duo-Link) and a self-adhesive (BisCem) resin cement, respectively. After incubation, two specimens were prepared for the push-out test from the middle thirds of the roots. In another 24 teeth, after two 1.5-mm sections were prepared from the middle thirds of the prepared roots, sections of the post were bonded in two subgroups with each of the cements mentioned above and the samples were prepared for the pull-out test. For shear test, the crowns of 48 teeth were cut away, the dentin surfaces were prepared, the two irrigation solutions were used, and the resin cements were bonded. Data collected from the three tests were evaluated by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey and Weibull tests (α=0.05). There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values between the three bond strength tests (Pstrength in all tests (P>0.05). Under the limitations of the present study, the method of the test used had an effect on the recorded bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Cement type and irrigation protocol resulted in similar variations with all the tests. Push-out and shear tests exhibited more coherent results. Bond strength, endodontically treated tooth, fiber post, resin cement, sodium hypochlorite.

  14. Effect of Curing Mode on Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to Composite Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Young Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the disadvantages of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM processed indirect restorations using glass-ceramics and other ceramics, resin nano ceramic, which has high strength and wear resistance with improved polish retention and optical properties, was introduced. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and fracture pattern of indirect CAD/CAM composite blocks cemented with two self-etch adhesive cements with different curing modes. Sand-blasted CAD/CAM composite blocks were cemented using conventional resin cement, Rely X Ultimate Clicker (RXC, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA with Single Bond Universal (SB, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA for the control group or two self-adhesive resin cements: Rely X U200 (RXU, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and G-CEM Cerasmart (GC, GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan. RXU and GC groups included different curing modes (light-curing (L and auto-curing (A. Shear bond strength (SBS analyses were performed on all the specimens. The RXC group revealed the highest SBS and the GC A group revealed the lowest SBS. According to Tukey’s post hoc test, the RXC group showed a significant difference compared to the GC A group (p < 0.05. For the curing mode, RXU A and RXU L did not show any significant difference between groups and GC A and GC L did not show any significant difference either. Most of the groups except RXC and RXU L revealed adhesive failure patterns predominantly. The RXC group showed a predominant cohesive failure pattern in their CAD/CAM composite, LavaTM Ultimate (LU, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA. Within the limitations of this study, no significant difference was found regarding curing modes but more mixed fracture patterns were showed when using the light-curing mode than when using the self-curing mode.

  15. [Aging effect of one bottle-type ceramic primer on bonding efficacy of resin cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Haruhiko

    2008-04-01

    To understand the degradation mechanisms of commercially available one bottle-type ceramic primer, we prepared one bottle-type experimental ceramic primer consisting of gamma-methacryloxy-propyl-trimethoxysilane, gamma-MPTS, and 90% ethanol solution. The effects of aging of the experimental primer on the hydrolysis and condensation behavior of gamma -MPTS and on the bonding efficacy of gamma-MPTS at the interface between cement and ceramic were studied. We used two lamina bond porcelain primers (LB), that had been aged for 20 months and newly purchased. Experimental primer was aged at 20 degrees C. After aging, we measured 29Si NMR spectrum of the gamma-MPTS and the shear bond strength of the cement to silane-treated ceramic by varying aging periods. When the LB was aged for 20 months, the mean bond strength decreased from 26 to 11 MPa. To understand the degradation mechanism in the bond strength, the effects of aging of experimental primer on molecular species of gamma-MPTS were examined. With prolonging its aging period, the methoxy group of the silicone functional portion in the gamma-MPTS hydrolyzed and the hydrolyzed gamma-MPTS species condensed together. The molecular weight of condensed gamma-MPTS species increased. On the other hand, when the dimer species of gamma-MPTS were produced, a maximum mean bond strength of 28 MPa was observed. Thereafter, the bond strength dropped down and leveled off at 16 MPa. When the LB was aged for 20 months, the bond strength dramatically decreased. This decrease in the mean bond strength was probably attributed to ester exchange reaction of the methoxyl group in the gamma-MPTS by the ethanol used as diluent solvent.

  16. Study of a hydraulic calcium phosphate cement for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraj, Siham; Michaïlesco, Pierre; Margerit, Jacques; Bernard, Bruce; Boudeville, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    Calcium phosphate-based cements (CPCs) have attracted much interest because of their good osteoconductivity for bone reconstruction. We obtained CPCs by mixing calcium bis-dihydrogenophosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and calcium oxide with water or sodium phosphate buffers (NaP) as liquid phase. Cement samples with different calcium-to-phosphate ratios (Ca/P), liquid-to-powder ratios (L/P) and liquid phases were analyzed by X-rays diffraction (XRD), pH-metry, extensometry and calorimetry. Antibacterial activity on two bacterial strains (Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus) and a polycontaminated bacterial inoculum was also studied using the agar diffusion method. The best mechanical properties (approximately 25 MPa) corresponded to Ca/P ratios between 1.67 and 2.5, a 1 M sodium phosphate buffer pH 7, as liquid phase and a L/P ratio of 0.6ml g(-1). The final setting time increased with the Ca/P ratio. The setting expansion, around 1-2%, depended on the Ca/P and L/P ratios. The inner temperature of the cements rose to 45 degrees during setting then decreased rapidly. The injectability was 100% up to 3.5 min and then decreased. It increased with increasing the L/P ratio but to the detriment of the compressive strength and setting time. XRD analysis indicated that the setting reaction led to a mixture of calcium hydroxide and calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite even for a Ca/P ratio of 1.67. Consequently, the pH of the surrounding fluids rose to 11.5-12 during their dissolution. Bacterial growth inhibition was only clearly observed for Ca/P>or=2. This bioactive calcium phosphate cement can potentially be employed for pulp capping and cavity lining as classical calcium hydroxide-based cements, but it is not usable, in the present formulation, for root canal filling because of its short setting time.

  17. Adhesively bonded versus non-bonded amalgam restorations for dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotry, Anirudha; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Nasser, Mona

    2016-03-08

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is one of the commonest diseases which afflicts mankind, and has been estimated to affect up to 80% of people in high-income countries. Caries adversely affects and progressively destroys the tissues of the tooth, including the dental pulp (nerve), leaving teeth unsightly, weakened and with impaired function. The treatment of lesions of dental caries, which are progressing through dentine and have caused the formation of a cavity, involves the provision of dental restorations (fillings). This review updates the previous version published in 2009. To assess the effects of adhesive bonding on the in-service performance and longevity of dental amalgam restorations. We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 21 January 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 12), MEDLINE via Ovid (1946 to 21 January 2016) and EMBASE via Ovid (1980 to 21 January 2016). We also searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (http://clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en) (both to 21 January 2016) for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials comparing adhesively bonded versus traditional non-bonded amalgam restorations in conventional preparations utilising deliberate retention, in adults with permanent molar and premolar teeth suitable for Class I and II amalgam restorations only. Two review authors independently screened papers, extracted trial details and assessed the risk of bias in the included study. One trial with 31 patients who received 113 restorations was included. At two years, 50 out of 53 restorations in the non-bonded group survived, and 55 of 60 bonded restorations survived with five unaccounted for at follow-up. Post-insertion sensitivity was not significantly different

  18. The effect of ultrafast fiber laser application on the bond strength of resin cement to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Sabit Melih; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Caglar, Ipek Satıroglu; Duymus, Zeynep Yeşil; Turgut, Sedanur; Bagis, Elif Arslan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrafast fiber laser treatment on the bond strength between titanium and resin cement. A total of 60 pure titanium discs (15 mm × 2 mm) were divided into six test groups (n = 10) according to the surface treatment used: group (1) control, machining; group (2) grinding with a diamond bur; group (3) ultrafast fiber laser application; group (4) resorbable blast media (RBM) application; group (5) electro-erosion with copper; and group (6) sandblasting. After surface treatments, resin cements were applied to the treated titanium surfaces. Shear bond strength testing of the samples was performed with a universal testing machine after storing in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test were used to analyse the data (P titanium.

  19. The strengthening of resin cemented dental ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to advance the understanding of the mechanism of resin-strengthening conferred to dental ceramic materials by resin-based composite materials. The investigation is presented as a series of manuscripts. In the first study (Manuscript 3.1), dental porcelain disc-shaped specimens were resin-coated with three resin-based composite materials with different flexural moduli at discrete resin thicknesses. The discs were loaded to failure in a biaxial flexure t...

  20. Effect of Zirconia and Alumina Fillers on the Microstructure and Mechanical Strength of Dental Glass Ionomer Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Júlio C M; Silva, Joel B; Aladim, Andrea; Carvalho, Oscar; Nascimento, Rubens M; Silva, Filipe S; Martinelli, Antonio E; Henriques, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Glass-ionomer cements perform a protective effect on the dentin-pulp complex considering the F ions release and chemical bonding to the dental structures. On the other hand, those materials have poor physic-mechanical properties in comparison with the restorative resin composite. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of zirconia and/or alumina fillers on the microstructure and strength of a resin modified glass-ionomer cement after thermal cycling. An in vitro experimental study was carried out on 9 groups (n = 10) of cylindrical samples (6 x 4 mm) made from resin modified glass-ionomer (Vitremer, 3M, USA) with different contents of alumina and/or zirconia fillers. A nano-hybrid resin composite was tested as a control group. Samples were mechanically characterized by axial compressive tests and electron scanning microscopy (SEM) coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometry (EDS), before and after thermal cycling. Thermal cycling procedures were performed at 3000, 6000 and 10000 cycles in Fusayama´s artificial saliva at 5 and 60 (o)C. An improvement of compressive strength was noticed on glass-ionomer reinforced with alumina fillers in comparison with the commercial glass ionomer. SEM images revealed the morphology and distribution of alumina or zirconia in the microstructure of glass-ionomers. Also, defects such as cracks and pores were detected on the glass-ionomer cements. The materials tested were not affected by thermal cycling in artificial saliva. Addition of inorganic particles at nano-scale such as alumina can increase the mechanical properties of glass-ionomer cements. However, the presence of cracks and pores present in glass-ionomer can negatively affect the mechanical properties of the material because they are areas of stress concentration.

  1. Effect of relining, cement type, and thermocycling on push-out bond strength of fiber reinforced posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roqaia M.A. Al-Assar

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Relining glass fiber posts with composite resin in order to fit wide flared canals instead of using cement for compensating the discrepancy, improves the push out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root canal dentin. Moreover the use of resin cement with high mechanical properties to lute glass fiber post is highly recommended.

  2. Bond strength of fibre glass and carbon fibre posts to the root canal walls using different resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Ana Paula; Cecchin, Doglas; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Naves, Lucas Zago; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the bond strength of fibre glass and carbon fibre posts in the root canal walls cemented with self-adhesive (RelyX-Unicem) and chemical (Cement-Post) resin cements. Forty maxillary canines were divided into four groups according to the cement and post used and submitted to the push-out test (0.5 mm min(-1)). The data were submitted to statistical analysis (2-way ANOVA, Bonferroni--P<0.05) and fracture analysis by Scanning Electronic Microscopy. Fibre glass presented the best results when cemented with RelyX-Unicem and Cement-Post (P<0.05). RelyX-Unicem presented the highest bond strength values for both posts (P<0.05). Fracture analysis showed predominance of cohesive fracture of post for RelyX-Unicem and adhesive fracture between dentin/cement and mixed for Cement-Post. The bond strength values were significantly affected by the type of post and cement used and the highest values were found for fibre glass posts and RelyX-Unicem. © 2010 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2010 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  3. Evaluation of Surface Treatment Methods on the Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramics Systems, Resin Cements and Tooth Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkuş Emek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effects of airborne-particle abrasion (APA and tribochemical silica coating (TSC surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramics systems, resin cements and tooth surface

  4. Three-dimensional culture of dental pulp stem cells in direct contact to tricalcium silicate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widbiller, M; Lindner, S R; Buchalla, W; Eidt, A; Hiller, K-A; Schmalz, G; Galler, K M

    2016-03-01

    Calcium silicate cements are biocompatible dental materials applicable in contact with vital tissue. The novel tricalcium silicate cement Biodentine™ offers properties superior to commonly used mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Objective of this study was to evaluate its cytocompatibility and ability to induce differentiation and mineralization in three-dimensional cultures of dental pulp stem cells after direct contact with the material. Test materials included a new tricalcium silicate (Biodentine™, Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France), MTA (ProRoot® MTA, DENSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialities, Johnson City, TN, USA), glass ionomer (Ketac™ Molar Aplicap™, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), human dentin disks and polystyrene. Magnetic activated cell sorting for to the surface antigen STRO-1 was performed to gain a fraction enriched with mesenchymal stem cells. Samples were allowed to set and dental pulp stem cells in collagen carriers were placed on top. Scanning electron microscopy of tricalcium silicate cement surfaces with and without cells was conducted. Cell viability was measured for 14 days by MTT assay. Alkaline phosphatase activity was evaluated (days 3, 7, and 14) and expression of mineralization-associated genes (COL1A1, ALP, DSPP, and RUNX2) was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. Nonparametric statistical analysis for cell viability and alkaline phosphatase data was performed to compare different materials as well as time points (Mann-Whitney U test, α = 0.05). Cell viability was highest on tricalcium silicate cement, followed by MTA. Viability on glass ionomer cement and dentin disks was significantly lower. Alkaline phosphatase activity was lower in cells on new tricalcium silicate cement compared to MTA, whereas expression patterns of marker genes were alike. Increased cell viability and similar levels of mineralization-associated gene expression in three-dimensional cell cultures on the novel tricalcium silicate cement and mineral

  5. Bond Strength of Resin Cement and Glass Ionomer to Nd:YAG Laser-Treated Zirconia Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadzadeh, Nafiseh; Ghorbanian, Foojan; Ahrary, Farzaneh; Rajati Haghi, Hamidreza; Karamad, Reza; Yari, Amir; Javan, Abdollah

    2017-09-05

    To investigate the effect of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation on the surface properties and bond strength of zirconia ceramics. Forty-eight zirconia ceramic pieces (4 × 4 × 1 mm 3 ) were divided into four groups according to surface treatment as follows: two control groups (no treatment) for resin bonding (CRC) and glass ionomer (GI) bonding (CGC); two laser treatment groups (Nd:YAG irradiation, 3 W, 200 MJ, 10 Hz, 180 μs) for resin bonding (LRC) and GI bonding (LGC). The ceramics in the control groups and the laser groups were distinguished by the application of different cements (resin cement and GI). Following surface treatments, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement and GI. After bonding, the shear bond strength (SBS) of the ceramic to dentin was measured, and the failure mode of each specimen was analyzed using a stereomicroscope. A one-way ANOVA compared the average bond strength of the four groups. Pairwise comparisons among the groups were performed using the Games-Howell test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. The means (± standard deviation) of SBS values in the CRC, CGC, LRC, and LGC groups were 3.98 ± 1.10, 1.66 ± 0.59, 10.24 ± 2.46, and 2.21 ± 0.38 MPa, respectively. Data showed that the application of the Nd:YAG laser resulted in a significantly greater SBS of the resin cement to the zirconia ceramics (p ceramic via Nd:YAG laser improves the bond strength of the resin cement to the zirconia ceramic. GI cement does not provide sufficient bond strength of zirconia ceramics to dentin. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. PHYSICAL-MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CEMENT-BONDED KENAF BAST FIBRES COMPOSITE BOARDS WITH DIFFERENT DENSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. AHMED AMEL

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to explore the potential of kenaf bast fibres (KBFs for production of cement-bonded kenaf composite boards (CBKCBs. More than 70% of the KBFs were of size >3.35 mm and length of 31±0.4 mm, therefore, they were used for CBKCBs production. The CBKCBs with the dimensions of 450 × 450 × 12 mm were produced using cement (C: KBF with proportion of (2:1 and different board densities (BD namely 1100, 1300 and 1500 kg/m3. The CBKCBs were first cured in a tank saturated with moisture for 7days, and then kept at room temperature for 21 days. Mechanical and physical properties of the CBKCBs were characterized with regards to their modulus of rupture (MOR, modulus of elasticity (MOE, internal bond (IB, water absorption (WA, and thickness swelling (TS. Results of the tested CBKCBs revealed that the MOR increased while the MOE decreased due to uniform distribution of KBFs. It was found that loading of KBFs has a negative influence on the internal bond (IB of the CBKCBs; the IB was reduced as KBFs tend to balling and making unmixed aggregates with the cement. These results showed that the CBKCB is a promising construction material that could potentially be used in different structural applications due to their good mechanical characteristics.

  7. Fracture Resistance of Lithium Disilicate Ceramics Bonded to Enamel or Dentin Using Different Resin Cement Types and Film Thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojpaibool, Thitithorn; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the influence of cement film thickness, cement type, and substrate (enamel or dentin) on ceramic fracture resistance. One hundred extracted human third molars were polished to obtain 50 enamel and 50 dentin specimens. The specimens were cemented to 1-mm-thick lithium disilicate ceramic plates with different cement film thicknesses (100 and 300 μm) using metal strips as spacers. The cements used were etch-and-rinse (RelyX Ultimate) and self-adhesive (RelyX U200) resin cements. Compressive load was applied on the ceramic plates using a universal testing machine, and fracture loads were recorded in Newtons (N). Statistical analysis was performed by multiple regression (p resin cement. Bonding to dentin resulted in lower fracture loads than bonding to enamel. Reduced resin film thickness could reduce lithium disilicate restoration fracture. Etch-and-rinse resin cements are recommended for cementing on either enamel or dentin, compared with self-adhesive resin cement, for improved fracture resistance. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Particle size variations in the glass component of glass-ionomer dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Kefi

    2012-01-01

    Glass polyalkenoate cements (glass ionomer cements) are widely used in restorative dentistry and now a day the material of choice for bone cements. The aim of the study is to examine the variations produced by exposure to acid for dental Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) glass particles of different composition. It also involves the study of the effect of replacing Ca by Sr in glass ionomer glasses on the particle size distribution. This study was carried out in a Malvern Mastersizer/E. This uses LASER-diffraction and was in reverse-Fourier mode (0.1-80 microm). Ultrasound was used to break up any agglomerates. Also, some samples were treated as above but instead of particle size analyser, the slurries were centrifuged and the glass washed and dried to constant weight to determine mass loss. The mass loss for LG26Sr in acid washing was comparatively greater whereas LG26 showed less mass loss. When statistically evaluated LG series and AH2 were found to differ significantly p = 0.008. There was, however, no significant difference between other combinations of glasses in acid was treatment. The pseudo-cement formation in all the glasses suffered significant mass loss p = < 0.008. By changing the different chemical composition of glass ionomer glasses the mass loss was substantially greater during the cement formation process as compare to acid washing.

  9. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Ricardo PEREIRA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05. The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148. The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. CONCLUSIONS: Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values.

  10. Effect of Sandblasting and Type of Cement on the Bond Strength of Molar Bands on Stainless Steel Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawazir, Omar A; Elaraby, Alaa; Alshamrani, Hamed; Salama, Fouad S

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) compare the bond strength of molar bands cemented to stainless steel crowns (SSCs) using glass ionomer cement (GIC), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), or polycarboxylate cement (PXC); and (2) assess the influence of sandblasting molar bands on the mean bond strength between the band and the SSC. Sixty SSCs and 60 molar bands were used. The inner surfaces of 30 molar bands were roughened by sandblasting prior to cementation. The bond strength was measured after dislodging the SSC using a push-out test. In the nonsandblasted group, a significant difference was observed between PXC and RMGIC (P >.04). In the sandblasted group, a significant difference was observed between PXC and RMGIC (P >.02), while there was only a marginal difference between GIC and RMGIC (P >.05). The sandblasted group exhibited superior bond strength overall. However, the only significant improvement was observed for GIC (P >.03). PXC showed the highest bond strength of molar bands to SSCs, while RMGIC showed the lowest. Sandblasting the inner surface of bands enhanced the bond strength of different cements.

  11. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  12. Cement-associated peri-implant mucositis. A 1-year follow-up after excess cement removal on the peri-implant tissue of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsch, Michael; Walther, Winfried; Bartols, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    Methacrylate-based cements seem to promote peri-implant tissue inflammation even in the absence of excess cement. The present study deals with the question of whether the removal of methacrylate cement from the peri-implant sulcus will lead to peri-implant tissues free of inflammation on a 1-year follow-up basis. Implant supported suprastructures that had been in the mouth for at least 3.5 years either cemented with methacrylate (premier implant cement [PIC]) or zinc eugenol (temp bond [TB]) cement were compared. All superstructures in 33 patients with a total of 61 implants (35 with PIC and 26 with TB) were removed and excess cement, bleeding on probing (BOP), suppurationen and probing depth were documented. Excess cement found was removed, and in all cases the suprastructure was recemented with TB. Patients were followed up after 4 weeks (F1) and 1 year (F2). Excess cement was found around 60% of the implants with PIC. No excess cement was found around implants with TB. At the time of revision therapy, BOP was found around 100% of the implants with PIC and excess cement (PIC+), 93% around implants with PIC but no excess cement (PIC-), and around 42% of the TB-cemented implants (Chi-squared P squared P < .01). At the time of both F1 and F2, the inflammation parameters, that is BOP and suppuration, on implant level were significantly reduced in the PIC+ cases (McNemar's test P < .01). For PIC-, BOP was significantly reduced at both points in time (P < .05). For TB no differences were found. Probing depth at F2 had significantly decreased in all groups (t test P < .05). The removal of excess cement and recementation with TB had an anti-inflammatory effect on the peri-implant tissues after 1 year. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Longevity of resin-bonded fixed partial dental prostheses made with metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanoue, Naomi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of resin-bonded fixed partial dental prostheses (RBFPDPs) made with metal alloys. The retention of 311 RBFPDPs from 226 patients fabricated from 1983 to 2013 using an adhesive resin was clinically evaluated. Partial or complete debonding of the RBFPDP or framework fracture was considered a treatment failure. All data were obtained from clinical examinations, and missing data were censored at the date of the last available information. The effect of the following factors on survival rate were investigated: patient gender, location (maxilla/mandible and anterior/posterior), number of missing teeth, number of abutment teeth, framework structure, type of metal alloy, patient age at the point of cementation, cement type, and distinction of the treating dentist. Data were analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier survival tests, log-rank tests, and Cox regression analyses (α = 0.05). The Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 41.2 % ± 6.5 % (standard error) at 28.8 years (last outcome event). Significant differences were found for patient age and treating dentist (p < 0.05). The risk of failure in younger patients was 1.7 times greater than that in older patients and that of inexperienced dentists was 2.0 times greater than that of dentist experienced and specialized in adhesive dentistry. When fabricating RBFPDPs for younger patients, mechanical preparation for bonding may be necessary in consideration of the risk for debonding. Experienced dentists may achieve better results. Mastery of skills is necessary to ensure excellent prognoses for RBFPDPs.

  14. Open photoacoustic cell for thermal diffusivity measurements of a fast hardening cement used in dental restoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrath, F. B. G.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C.; Moraes, J. C. S.; Santos, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity and conductivity of dental cements have been studied using open photoacoustic cell (OPC). The samples consisted of fast hardening cement named CER, developed to be a root-end filling material. Thermal characterization was performed in samples with different gel/powder ratio and particle sizes and the results were compared to the ones from commercial cements. Complementary measurements of specific heat and mass density were also performed. The results showed that the thermal diffusivity of CER tends to increase smoothly with gel volume and rapidly against particle size. This behavior was linked to the pores size and their distribution in the samples. The OPC method was shown to be a valuable way in deriving thermal properties of porous material.

  15. The growth of dental pulp stem cells in portland cement micro-environment

    OpenAIRE

    Shih-Min Wang; Chia-Hsuan Lee; Chih-Hung Lin; Gunng-Shinng Chen; Jiang-Chuan Liu; Chung-Hsing Li

    2015-01-01

    Background: Portland cement (PC), the base material of mineral trioxide aggregate has been applied in vivo and in vitro studies, and showed promising physical and mechanical properties on several cell lineages but human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), known as mesenchymal stem cells with their multipotency. Our study aims to evaluate the cytotoxicity of PC mixing with distilled water (Td) or normal saline (Tn) on DPSCs. Materials and Methods: DPSCs were isolated from pulp tissue and identifie...

  16. Dental Glass Ionomer Cements as Permanent Filling Materials? ?Properties, Limitations Future Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are clinically attractive dental materials that have certain unique properties that make them useful as restorative and luting materials. This includes adhesion to moist tooth structures and base metals, anticariogenic properties due to release of fluoride, thermal compatibility with tooth enamel, biocompatibility and low toxicity. The use of GICs in a mechanically loaded situation, however, has been hampered by their low mechanical performance. Poor mechanical pr...

  17. Screw retained vs. cement retained implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittneben, Julia-Gabriela; Joda, Tim; Weber, Hans-Peter; Brägger, Urs

    2017-02-01

    A fixed dental prosthesis can be secured to an endosseous implant via cementation (using a provisional or definitive cement) on an implant abutment that is screw retained to the implant or directly in the implant via screw retention. The clinical decision as to which retention system best suits the individual patient depends on several factors. The aim of this review is to present a detailed overview of the factors potentially influencing whether to choose screw retention or cement retention. These factors include the individual indication, advantages and disadvantages of the different retention mechanisms, the retention provided, retrievability, provisionalization, esthetics and clinical performance, including failures and complications. The results of recently published systematic reviews on this topic are discussed and an overview is provided. A decision tree is presented to facilitate the clinical selection of the retention type. This overview concludes that the choice of retention type (screw retained or cement retained) might not influence the overall survival of the implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis, but may be responsible for the development of certain complications. The decision may depend on technical feasibility and on weighing the pros and cons. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Dentine bonding agents comprising calcium-silicates to support proactive dental care: Origins, development and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profeta, Andrea Corrado

    2014-01-01

    The origin of ion-releasing dentine bonding agents lies in a change in attitude regarding the qualities demanded of a restorative dental material. The objectives of this paper are to review recent studies on novel hybrid adhesives comprising bioactive fillers based on information from original research papers, reviews, and patent literatures. Literature searches of free text and MeSH terms were performed by using MedLine (PubMed), Web of Science, Scopus, Scielo and the Cochrane Library (6th November, 2013). Reference lists of primary research reports and eligible systematic reviews were cross-checked in an attempt to identify additional studies. Experimental methacrylate-based adhesives, either when incorporating calcium/sodium phosphate-phyllosilicates or calcium silicate cements, demonstrated to promote therapeutic/protective effects on the micro-mechanical and ultramorphological properties of resin bonded-dentine interfaces associated with mineral deposition over time. Further randomized control trials are needed in order to confirm these initial results in vivo.

  19. Effect of fluoride-containing desensitizing agents on the bond strength of resin-based cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Saraç

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents containing different amounts of fluoride on the shear bond strength of a dual polymerized resin cement and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred human molars were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and prepared until the dentin surface was exposed. The specimens were treated with one of four desensitizing agents: Bifluorid 12, Fluoridin, Thermoline and PrepEze. The remaining 20 specimens served as untreated controls. All groups were further divided into 2 subgroups in which a dual polymerized resin cement (Bifix QM or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (AVANTO was used. The shear bond strength (MPa was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed statistically with a 2-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and regression analysis (α=0.05. The effect of the desensitizing agents on the dentin surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The fluoride-containing desensitizing agents affected the bond strength of the resin-based cements to dentin (p<0.001. PrepEze showed the highest bond strength values in all groups (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Regression analysis showed a reverse relation between bond strength values of resin cements to dentin and the amount of fluoride in the desensitizing agent (p<0.05.

  20. The Influence of Sonic and Ultrasonic Vibration on the Shear Bond Strength of a Selected Resin Luting Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchan, Shivaughn M; White, Daniel; Smith, William; Dhuru, Virendra

    2015-03-01

    This study determined the effect of sonic and ultrasonic instrumentation on the shear bond strengths of Panavia 21, a popular cement for the luting of resin-bonded restorations. 84 Ni-Cr cylinders were cemented to randomly selected resin composite substrates using Panavia 21 following the manufacturer's instructions. The Ni-Cr-composite specimens were divided into 7 groups of 12 specimens each based upon the procedure used for removing the excess cement. For Group 1 (Co) specimens the excess cement was removed with microbrushes immediately after cementation. Groups 2 through 7 were based on the use of vibrating instrument and the time period after which the excess material was removed. These included the cement, Panavia 21, three vibrating instruments, Sonic with a universal tip (So), Piezoelectric ultrasonic with a USPIS tip (Pu), Magnetorestrive ultrasonic with a FS1-100 tip (Mu) and two different time periods, soon after cementation (9m) and one hour after cementation (1h). Once excess cement REMOVAL WAS COMPLETED, THE SPECIMENS WERE SUBJECTED TO SHEAR TESTING. Mean Shear Bond strengths ranged from 16.03 MPa (Co) to 19.91 MPa (So 1h). Statistical analysis demonstrated that interaction of the main effects were significant (F = 4.27, p = 0.042). Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that the effect of timing was significant in all the instrumented groups. The majority of the tested specimens failed cohesively compared to mainly adhesive failures for the control group. The effect of type of instrumentation immediately following polymerization setting had no effect on the shear bond strengths however a delay of 1 hour for all types of instrumentation had a beneficial effect of improving observed shear bond strengths.

  1. Bracket bond strength and cariostatic potential of an experimental resin adhesive system containing Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masanori; Nakagaki, Susumu; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kohda, Naohisa; Endo, Kazuhiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2012-09-01

    To determine if a new experimental resin-based material containing Portland cement (PC) can help prevent enamel caries while providing adequate shear bond strength (SBS). Brackets were bonded to human premolars with experimental resin-based adhesive pastes composed of three weight rations of resin and PC powder (PC 30, 7:3; PC 50, 5:5; PC 70, 3:7; n  =  7). Self-etching primer (SEP) adhesive (Transbond Plus) and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesive (Fuji Ortho FC Automix) were used for comparison. All of the bonded teeth were subjected to alternating immersion in demineralizing (pH 4.55) and remineralizing (pH 6.8) solutions for 14 days. The SBS for each sample was examined, and the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) score was calculated. The hardness and elastic modulus of the enamel were determined by a nanoindenter at 20 equidistant depths from the external surface at 100 µm from the bracket edge. Data were compared by one-way analysis of variance and a chi-square test. PC 50 and PC 70 showed significantly greater SBS than Fuji Ortho FC Automix, although Transbond Plus showed significantly greater SBS than other bonding systems. No significant difference in the ARI category was observed among the five groups. For specimens bonded with PC 50 and PC 70, the hardness and elastic modulus values in most locations were equivalent to those of Fuji Ortho FC Automix. Experimental resin-based bonding material containing PC provides adequate SBS and a caries-preventive effect equivalent to that of the RMGIC adhesive system.

  2. Cytotoxicities and genotoxicities of cements based on calcium silicate and of dental formocresol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyunjung; Jeong, Youngdan; Kim, Miri

    2017-03-01

    Increasing interest is being paid to the toxicities of dental materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the cytotoxicities and genotoxicities of endodontic compounds to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) reproductive cells. Cultured CHO-K1 cells were treated with dental formocresol, two types of calcium hydroxide paste, and two types of mineral trioxide aggregate cement for 24h. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was performed on each culture, and the micronucleus frequency was determined by performing a micronucleus assay. Alkaline comet assay and γ-H2AX immunofluorescence assay were used to detect DNA damage. Out of the five materials tested, only dental formocresol significantly increased DNA damage. The mineral trioxide aggregate cements based on calcium silicate were not found to be potentially genotoxic. The data suggest that dental formocresol should not be recommended for use in vital pulp therapy on young teeth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of the fatigue behavior of adhesive bonding of the lithium disilicate glass ceramic with three resin cements using rotating fatigue method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassini, E; Mirzaei, M; Alimi, A; Rahaeifard, M

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the fatigue behavior of bonding interface of lithium disilicate ceramic with three different dual cure resin cements. Forty five bar shaped ceramic-resin-ceramic specimens were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n=15) according to the resin cement used (group1: Panavia F2.0, group 2: RelyX Ultimate, group 3: Duo-Link Universal). Three specimens of each group were tested using three point bending test and the fracture strength of the resin-ceramic bond was measured. Other specimens of each group were placed in the rotating fatigue testing machine at stresses equal to 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% of the fracture strength. The cyclic loading was continued until fracture or a maximum of 10,000 cycles. For the specimens which did not fail until 10,000 cycles, the cyclic loading was stopped and the remained fracture strength of the specimens was measured. None of the specimens with cyclic loads of 30% and 40% of the fracture strength, have failed until 10,000 cycles. After 10,000 load cycles, the fracture strength of these specimens was significantly lower than their initial fracture strength. On the other hand, all specimens with cyclic stresses equal to 50% and 60% of the fracture strength have failed before 10,000 cycles so that the numbers of load cycles of RelyX specimens were significantly higher than those of Panavia ones and the numbers of cycles of Panavia specimens were significantly higher than those of Duo-Link specimens. The fatigue resistance of the ceramic-resin interface is significantly lower than its bond strength. Furthermore, RelyX Ultimate showed the highest fatigue resistance and Duo-Link Universal exhibited the weakest fatigue resistance. Since dental restorations are under cyclic loading caused by mastication forces, the results of this research can be used to select fatigue resistant resin cements for bonding of ceramic restorations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Heat transfer properties and thermal cure of glass-ionomer dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavic, Lidia; Gorseta, Kristina; Glavina, Domagoj; Czarnecka, Beata; Nicholson, John W

    2015-10-01

    Under clinical conditions, conventional glass-ionomer dental cements can be cured by application of heat from dental cure lamps, which causes acceleration in the setting. In order for this to be successful, such heat must be able to spread sufficiently through the cement to enhance cure, but not transmit heat so effectively that the underlying dental pulp of the tooth is damaged. The current study was aimed at measuring heat transfer properties of modern restorative glass-ionomers to determine the extent to which they meet these twin requirements. Three commercial glass ionomer cements (Ionofil Molar, Ketac Molar and Equia™ Fill) were used in association with three different light emitting diode cure lamps designed for clinical use. In addition, for each cement, one set of specimens was allowed to cure without application of a lamp. Temperature changes were measured at three different depths (2, 3 and 4 mm) after cure times of 20, 40 and 60 s. The difference among the tested groups was evaluated by ANOVA (P heat irradiation, but much greater temperature increases when exposed to the cure lamp. However, temperature rises did not exceed 12.9 °C. Application of the cure lamp led to the establishment of a temperature gradient throughout each specimen. Differences were typically significant (P heating effect. Because the thermal conductivity of glass-ionomers is low, temperature rises at 4 mm depths were much lower than at 2 mm. At no time did the temperature rise sufficiently to cause concern about potential damage to the pulp.

  5. Effect of Silanization on Microtensile Bond Strength of Different Resin Cements to a Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gré, Cristina Parise; de Ré Silveira, Renan C; Shibata, Shizuma; Lago, Carlo Tr; Vieira, Luiz Cc

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a silane-coupling agent on the bond strength of a self-adhesive cement and a conventional resin cement to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. A total of eight ceramic blocks were fabricated and divided into four groups (n = 2). In groups 1 and 3, ceramic surfaces were etched with hydrofluoric acid 10% for 20 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and air-dried. One layer of a silane agent was applied onto all ceramic specimens and air-dried for 30 seconds. In groups 2 and 4, ceramic surfaces were etched with hydrofluoric acid, rinsed, and air-dried without application of the silane-coupling agent. The ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite with a self-adhesive resin cement or with a conventional resin cement, according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 24 hours in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding interface area to obtain beams with a bonding area of 0.8 mm(2) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and the Games-Howell post hoc test (p = 0.05). Fractured specimens were examined under optical microscopy at 40x magnification. Silanization resulted in higher microtensile bond strength compared to groups without silane. No significant differences were found between the conventional resin cement and the self-adhesive resin cement with silane agent (p = 0.983), and without silane agent (p = 0.877). Silanization appears to be crucial for resin bonding to a lithium disilicate-based ceramic, regardless of the resin cement used. The self-adhesive resin cement performed as well as the conventional resin cement. Applying one layer of a silane-coupling agent after etching the ceramic surface with hydrofluoric acid 10% enhanced the bond strength between resin cements and a glass ceramic.

  6. The physics of water sorption by resin-modified glass-ionomer dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, J W

    1997-11-01

    The water-sorption characteristics of two commercial resin-modified glass-ionomer dental cements (Baseline VLC, ex. Detrey Dentsply, and Vitremer lining cement, ex. 3M Dental Products) have been studied in more detail than previously. Water sorption in both cements proved to be rapid, reaching equilibrium at approximately 48 h for Baseline VLC and at approximately 10 d for Vitremer. Over the first 8 h or so, absorption was shown to follow Fick's law, with a diffusion coefficient of 1.56x10(-7) cm2 s(-1) for Baseline VLC (cured for 20 s) and 5.09x10(-7) cm2 s(-1) for Vitremer (also cured for 20 s). As expected, sorption of water was found to be faster in specimens cured for shorter cure times and slower for those cured for longer times. In the presence of sodium chloride, both at 0.9% and at 1 M, diffusion coefficients were significantly greater than in pure water, but did not vary significantly with sodium chloride concentration, being approximately 3.3x10(-7) cm2 s(-)1 for Baseline VLC and 8.0x10(-7) cm2 s(-1) for Vitremer. This is attributed to conformational changes in hydrophilic segments of the polymer on absorption of aqueous sodium chloride in which the molecules form more compact coils than in the presence of pure water. They thus create a microstructure that is more permeable to water. Sorption in salt solutions became non-Fickian much sooner than in pure water, i.e. at 3-4 h for both cements. This is probably due to concentration changes of salt within the cement, suggesting that these materials possess a degree of permselectivity. Finally, equilibrium water uptakes varied with salt concentration, being least in 1 M NaCl, which reflects the different chemical potentials of water in the various storage media.

  7. Effect of siloxane quantity and ph of silane coupling agents and contact angle of resin bonding agent on bond durability of resin cements to machinable ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangfeng; Yoshida, Keiichi; Taira, Yohsuke; Kamada, Kohji; Luo, Xiaoping

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to measure siloxane quantity, pH value, and resin wettability on ceramics silanized by five silane coupling agents, and to test the correlation of these parameters of silane coupling agents with bond durability between a machinable glass ceramic and resin cements. 1.5-mm-thick ceramic plates (ProCAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) were polished, cleaned, and bonded with ten combinations of five silane coupling agents (Monobond S [Ivoclar Vivadent], Rely X Ceramic Primer [3M], Clearfil Ceramic Primer [Kuraray], GC Ceramic Primer [GC], Porcelain Liner M [Sun Medical]) and two dual-curing resin cements (VariolinkII [VLII, Ivoclar Vivadent], Linkmax HV [LMHV, GC]). Their microshear bond strength was measured after 0, 10,000, and 30,000 thermal cycles. Siloxane quantity, pH value of silane coupling agents and contact angle of Heliobond (Ivoclar Vivadent) to silanized ceramic were measured using a FTIR spectrophotometer, pH-indicator strips, and a contact-angle meter, respectively. Bond strength data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. For each cement, Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to analyze possible correlation between bond strength under different thermocycling conditions and absorbance peak of siloxane, pH value of silane coupling agents, and contact angle of resin to the silanized ceramic surface. The bond strength of ceramic was significantly influenced by the silane coupling agent and thermal cycles, not by resin cement. For both cements, only a negative correlation was found to be significant between the contact angle of resin to silanized ceramic surfaces and bond strength after 30,000 thermal cycles. The better the wettability of resin on different silanized ceramic surfaces could improve their bond durability.

  8. PRODUCTION OF WOOD-CEMENT BONDED PARTICLEBOARDS WITH DIFFERENT CONTENTS OF BARK AND MICROSILICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmar Correia Silva

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This work’s objective was to evaluate the effect of three percentages of addition of microsilica (0, 20 and 30% on the physical and mechanical properties of wood-cement bonded particleboards of Eucalyptus urophylla composed by three wood:bark ratios (100:0, 95:5 and 90:10. Results showed that the most significant effect of the additive on the produced panels was in those containing bark, and that of 20% of additive was more efficient on the physical and mechanical properties.

  9. To what extent does the longevity of fixed dental prostheses depend on the function of the cement? Working Group 4 materials : cementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelhoff, Daniel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    Aims/Background: The objective of this review was to define the impact of cementation mode on the longevity of different types of single tooth restorations and fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Methods: Literature search by PubMed as the major database was used utilizing the terms namely, adhesive

  10. In vitro shear bond strength of Y-TZP ceramics to different core materials with the use of three primer/resin cement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Ayad, Neveen M; Khan, Zahid A; Mahrous, Amr A; Morgano, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Durability of the bond between different core materials and zirconia retainers is an important predictor of the success of a dental prosthesis. Nevertheless, because of its polycrystalline structure, zirconia cannot be etched and bonded to a conventional resin cement. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of 3 metal primer/resin cement systems on the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 core materials bonded to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic retainers. Zirconia ceramic (Cercon) disks (5×3 mm) were airborne-particle abraded, rinsed, and air-dried. Disk-shaped core specimens (7×7 mm) that were prepared of composite resin, Ni-Cr, and zirconia were bonded to the zirconia ceramic disks by using one of 3 metal primer/cement systems: (Z-Prime Plus/BisCem, Zirconia Primer/Multilink Automix, or Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil SA). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopy was used to evaluate the failure mode of debonded specimens. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis using the Scheffe procedure (α=.05). Clearfil SA/Clearfil Ceramic Primer system with an Ni-Cr core yielded the highest SBS value (19.03 MPa), whereas the lowest SBS value was obtained when Multilink Automix/Zirconia Primer system was used with the zirconia core group (4.09 MPa). Differences in mean SBS values among the cement/primer groups were statistically significant, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem with both composite resin and zirconia cores. Differences in mean SBS values among the core subgroups were not statistically significant, except for zirconia core with BisCem, Multilink, and Clearfil SA. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem luting agents with composite resin cores, which displayed cohesive failure, and Multilink Automix with a composite resin, core as well as Clearfil SA with Ni-Cr cores, where the debonded specimens of each group displayed a mixed

  11. Optical fiber sensors and their application in monitoring stress build-up in dental resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Fernandez Fernandez, A.; Berghmans, F.; Thienpont, H.

    2005-09-01

    The field of optical fiber sensing is highly diverse and this diversity is perceived as a great advantage over more conventional sensors in that an optical sensor can be tailored to measure any of a myriad of physical parameters. In this paper we present a niche application for optical fiber sensors in the domain of biophotonics, namely the monitoring of stress build-up during the curing process of dental resin cements. We discuss the origin of this stress build-up and the problems it can cause when treating patients. Optical fiber sensors aim at excelling in two kind of applications: firstly to perform quality control on batch produced dental cements and measure their total material shrinkage, secondly to monitor the hardening of the cement during in-vivo measurements resulting in the dynamic measurement of the shrinkage and to control the stress in a facing based restoration. We therefore investigated two types of optical fiber sensors as alternatives to conventional measurement techniques; namely polarimetric optical fiber sensors and fiber Bragg gratings written in polarization maintaining fibers. After discussing the results obtained with both optical fiber sensors, we will conclude with a critical assessment of the suitability of the two proposed sensing configurations for multi-parameter stress monitoring.

  12. Bond strength of resin cement to CO2 and Er:YAG laser-treated zirconia ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Kasraei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives It is difficult to achieve adhesion between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using routine surface preparation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CO2 and Er:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods In this in-vitro study 45 zirconia disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were assigned to 3 groups (n = 15. In control group (CNT no laser treatment was used. In groups COL and EYL, CO2 and Er:YAG lasers were used for pretreatment of zirconia surface, respectively. Composite resin disks were cemented on zirconia disk using dual-curing resin cement. Shear bond strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min after 24 hr distilled water storage. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's HSD tests. Results The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength values in the EYL, COL and CNT groups were 8.65 ± 1.75, 12.12 ± 3.02, and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Data showed that application of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers resulted in a significant higher shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics (p < 0.0001. The highest bond strength was recorded in the COL group (p < 0.0001. In the CNT group all the failures were adhesive. However, in the laser groups, 80% of the failures were of the adhesive type. Conclusions Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via CO2 and Er:YAG laser improves the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, with higher bond strength values in the CO2 laser treated samples.

  13. Tensile bond strength of an adhesive resin cement to different alloys having various surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Amara; Loza, Maria A; Elias, Augusto; Mukhopadhyay, Siuli; Looney, Stephen; Rueggeberg, Frederick A

    2009-02-01

    The ability of a resin cement to bond to a restorative alloy is critical for maximal crown retention to nonideal preparations. Surface treatment and metal type may have an important role in optimizing resin-to-metal strength. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of surface pretreatment on the tensile strength of base and noble metals bonded using a conventional resin cement. Cylindrical plastic rods (9.5 mm in diameter), cast in base (Rexillium NBF) or noble metal (IPS d.SIGN 53), were divided into rods 10 mm in length (n=10-12). Specimens were heated in a porcelain furnace to create an oxide layer. Test specimens were further subjected to airborne-particle abrasion (50-microm Al(2)O(3) particles) alone or with the application of a metal primer (Alloy Primer). Similarly treated rod ends were joined using resin cement (RelyX ARC), thermocycled (x500, 5 degrees -55 degrees C) and stored (24 hours, 37 degrees C) before debonding using a universal testing machine. Debond strength and failure site were recorded. Rank-based ANOVA for unbalanced designs was used to test for significant interaction (alpha=.050). Each pair of treatments was compared separately for each metal (Bonferroni-adjusted significance level of .0083, overall error rate for comparisons, .05). The 2 metals were compared separately for each of the 3 treatments using an adjusted significance level of .017, maintaining an overall error rate of .05. A multinomial logit model was used to describe the effect of metal type and surface pretreatment on failure site location (alpha=.05). Interaction between metal type and surface pretreatment was significant for stress values (P=.019). Metal type did not significantly affect tensile bond strength for any of the compared surface pretreatments. Metal primer significantly improved tensile bond strength for each metal type. Most failures tended to occur as either adhesive or mixed in nature. Metal primer application significantly enhanced tensile bond

  14. Mechanical, antibacterial and bond strength properties of nano-titanium-enriched glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene GARCIA-CONTRERAS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of nanoparticles (NPs has become a significant area of research in Dentistry. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the physical, antibacterial activity and bond strength properties of conventional base, core build and restorative of glass ionomer cement (GIC compared to GIC supplemented with titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanopowder at 3% and 5% (w/w. Material and Methods Vickers microhardness was estimated with diamond indenter. Compressive and flexural strengths were analyzed in a universal testing machine. Specimens were bonded to enamel and dentine, and tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Specimens were incubated with S. mutans suspension for evaluating antibacterial activity. Surface analysis of restorative conventional and modified GIC was performed with SEM and EDS. The analyses were carried out with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA (post-hoc, Tukey test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney. Results Conventional GIC and GIC modified with TiO2 nanopowder for the base/liner cement and core build showed no differences for mechanical, antibacterial, and shear bond properties (p>0.05. In contrast, the supplementation of TiO2 NPs to restorative GIC significantly improved Vickers microhardness (p<0.05, flexural and compressive strength (p<0.05, and antibacterial activity (p<0.001, without interfering with adhesion to enamel and dentin. Conclusion GIC supplemented with TiO2 NPs (FX-II is a promising material for restoration because of its potential antibacterial activity and durable restoration to withstand the mastication force.

  15. The bond of different post materials to a resin composite cement and a resin composite core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, D; Shortall, A; Marquis, P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bond of endodontic post materials, with and without grit blasting, to a resin composite cement and a core material using push-out bond strength tests. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts containing carbon (C) or glass (A) fiber and a steel (S) post were cemented into cylinders of polymerized restorative composite without surface treatment (as controls) and after grit blasting for 8, 16, and 32 seconds. Additional steel post samples were sputter-coated with gold before cementation to prevent chemical interaction with the cement. Cylindrical composite cores were bonded to other samples. After sectioning into discs, bond strengths were determined using push-out testing. Profilometry and electron microscopy were used to assess the effect of grit blasting on surface topography. Mean (standard deviation) bond strength values (MPa) for untreated posts to resin cement were 8.41 (2.80) for C, 9.61(1.88) for A, and 19.90 (3.61) for S. Prolonged grit blasting increased bond strength for FRC posts but produced only a minimal increase for S. After 32 seconds, mean values were 20.65 (4.91) for C, 20.41 (2.93) for A, and 22.97 (2.87) for S. Gold-coated steel samples produced the lowest bond strength value, 7.84 (1.40). Mean bond strengths for untreated posts bonded to composite cores were 6.19 (0.95) for C, 13.22 (1.61) for A, and 8.82 (1.18) for S, and after 32 seconds of grit blasting the values were 17.30 (2.02) for C, 26.47 (3.09) for A, and 20.61 (2.67) for S. FRC materials recorded higher roughness values before and after grit blasting than S. With prolonged grit blasting, roughness increased for A and C, but not for S. There was no evidence of significant bonding to untreated FRC posts, but significant bonding occurred between untreated steel posts and the resin cement. Increases in the roughness of FRC samples were material dependent and roughening significantly increased bond strength values (ptested FRC posts is required for effective bonding.

  16. Characterization of cement calcium phosphate for use dental

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, C.M.B.; Oliveira, S.V.; Silva, M.C.; Marques, J.B.; Fook, M.V.L.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium phosphates are interesting biological and medical attention due to its occurrence in different animal species and humans. Ceramics based on calcium phosphate in the form of implants or porous particulate materials, have proven to be suitable replacements for bone tissue when they are only subjected to small mechanical stresses. Was obtained research laboratory DEMA/UFCG a calcium phosphate phase. The goal is to characterize the material by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to analyze what the phases and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to identify the absorption bands of the bonding characteristic. Was identified by XRD phase present in the sample is hydroxyapatite Ca/P 1.67. In infrared spectroscopy has absorption bands characteristic of the phosphate group at 1032 cm1 region. (author)

  17. Laser treatment of dental ceramic/cement layers: transmitted energy, temperature effects and surface characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pich, Olena; Franzen, René; Gutknecht, Norbert; Wolfart, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the behaviour of different dental materials under laser irradiation. We have used e.max Ceram, e.max ZirCAD, and e.max Press dental ceramics and glass ionomer cement Ketac Cem in the present study. The dental ceramics were prepared in the form of samples with thickness of 0.5-2 mm. We used two lasers [solid-state laser (Er:YAG, Fidelis III+, Fotona) and an 810- nm diode laser (FOX, A.R.C)] for the transillumination of ceramic samples. It has been shown that the laser energy transmitted through the ceramic material decreases to 30-40% of the original values along with an increase in the thickness of the irradiated sample. Pigmented ceramic samples show more laser energy loss compared to the samples containing no pigment. We investigated the temperature evolution in composite sandwiched ceramic/cement samples under laser treatment. The increase in the irradiation time and laser power led to a temperature increase of up to 80 °C. The surfaces of irradiated ceramic samples were examined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to evaluate changes in chemical composition, such as a decrease in the C signal, accompanied by a strong increase in the Zr peak for the Er:YAG laser, while the 810-nm diode laser showed no change in the ratio of elements on the surface.

  18. Effect of Surface Treatment with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser on Bond Strength between Cement Resin and Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Atefat, Mohammad; Beheshti, Maryam; Safavi, Nassimeh; Mojtahedi, Maryam; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman

    2014-01-01

    Since it is not possible to form an adequate micromechanical bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using common surface treatment techniques, laser pretreatment has been suggested for zirconia ceramic surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser treatment on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. In this in vitro study thirty discs of zirconia with a diameter of 6 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into two groups of 15. In the test group the zirconia disc surfaces were irradiated by CO2 laser with an output power of 3 W and energy density of 265.39 j/cm(2). Composite resin discs were fabricated by plastic molds, measuring 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness and were cemented on zirconia disk surfaces with Panavia F2.0 resin cement (Kuraray Co. Ltd, Osaka, Japan). Shear bond strength was measured by a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The fracture type was assessed under a stereomicroscope at ×40. Surface morphologies of two specimens of the test group were evaluated under SEM before and after laser pretreatment. Data was analyzed by paired t-test (p value resin cement and zirconia ceramic (p value = 0.001). Under the limitations of this study, surface treatment with CO2 laser increased the SBS between resin cement and the zirconia ceramic.

  19. Influence of infected root dentin on the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement

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    Débora Delai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the bond strength (BS of a self-adhesive resin cement to the contaminated root dentin. Materials and Methods: The crown and apical third of twenty single-rooted teeth were removed. The root canals were flared and 1-mm-thick root sections were obtained. The sections were rinsed, dried, and sterilized. The control group (n=20 was composed of one section of each third, which remained immersed in sterile trypticase soy broth (TSB for 2 months. The other sections comprised the experimental group (n = 40 and were immersed in a suspension of Enterococcus faecalis. The culture medium was changed at every 4 days for 2 months. The sections were rinsed with distilled water, dried, and the root canal space was fi lled with the self-adhesive resin cement RelyX™ U200. After 24 h, the push-out test was performed and the types of interface failure were observed on a stereo microscope. Statistical Analysis: Data were statistically analyzed by the nonparametric Mann–Whitney test (α=5%. Results: A significant reduction was observed in the BS of resin cement to the contaminated dentin compared to the healthy dentin, for both thirds analyzed (P < 0.05. The BS was signifi cantly greater at the cervical third compared to the middle third for specimens in the experimental group (P < 0.05. Adhesive and mixed failures were observed more frequently in specimens contaminated with E. faecalis. Conclusion: Bacterial contamination negatively infl uenced the BS of the self-adhesive resin cement to the root dentin, and there was a predominance of adhesive and mixed failures.

  20. Effect of ultrasonic instrumentation on the bond strength of crowns cemented with zinc phosphate cement to natural teeth. An in vitro study

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    Antonio Braulino de Melo Filho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported the benefits of sonic and/or ultrasonic instrumentation for root debridement, with most of them focusing on changes in periodontal clinical parameters. The present study investigated possible alterations in the tensile bond strength of crowns cemented with zinc phosphate cement to natural teeth after ultrasonic instrumentation. Forty recently extracted intact human third molars were selected, cleaned and stored in physiologic serum at 4°C. They received standard preparations, at a 16º convergence angle, and AgPd alloy crowns. The crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate cement and then divided into four groups of 10 teeth each. Each group was then subdivided into two subgroups, with one of the subgroups being submitted to 5,000 thermal cycles ranging from 55 ± 2 to 5 ± 2°C, while the other was not. Each group was submitted to ultrasonic instrumentation for different periods of time: group 1 - 0 min (control, group 2 - 5 min, group 3 - 10 min, and group 4 - 15 min. Tensile bond strength tests were performed with an Instron testing machine (model 4310. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test at the 5% level of significance. A significant reduction in the tensile bond strength of crowns cemented with zinc phosphate and submitted to thermal cycles was observed at 15 min (196.75 N versus 0 min = 452.01 N, 5 min = 444.23 N and 10 min = 470.85 N. Thermal cycling and ultrasonic instrumentation for 15 min caused a significant reduction in tensile bond strength (p < .05.

  1. The Effect of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Thickness and Translucency on Shear Bond Strength of Light-cured Resin Cement

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    Mohammad Javad Moghaddas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To achieve acceptable clinical performance, a ceramic veneer must be bonded to enamel by well-polymerized resin cement. Among different factors, thickness and translucency of the ceramic may affect the resin cement polymerization. Thus, the current study evaluated the effect of the thickness and translucency of lithium disilicate ceramic on light-cured resin cement bond strength to enamel. Methods: In this laboratory study, 208 sound bovine incisors were equally divided into 16 groups (n = 13. The lithium disilicate ceramic cubes in four thicknesses (0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1 mm with four translucencies (high and medium opaque, high and low translucent were fabricated and bonded to prepared enamel surfaces using a light-cured translucent resin cement according to manufacturer recommendations. After 5000 cycles of thermocycling, the bonded specimens were placed in a universal testing machine and loaded to the point of fracture. To determine the mode of failure, each sample was observed under a stereomicroscope. Data were recorded and analyzed by Shapiro-Wilk test and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: The ceramic thickness and translucency could not significantly affect shear bond strength (SBS of resin cement to enamel (p = 0.17 and p = 0.097, respectively.  The Adhesive and ceramic cohesive failures were reported as the maximum and minimum mode of failure, respectively. Conclusion: The SBS of the light-cured resin cement bonding to enamel and lithium disilicate ceramic was not affected by the translucency of ceramics having a thickness of less than 1 mm.

  2. Effect of Endodontic Retreatment on Push-out Bond Strength and Quality of Fiber Postbonding Interface of Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrine, Rina Andréa; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Kato, Augusto Shoji; Fontana, Carlos Eduardo; Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; De Martin, Alexandre Sigrist; Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of endodontic retreatment on push-out bond strength and dentin interface of two resin cements used for fiber postcementation during endodontic retreatment. The root canals of 40 extracted human canines were prepared, obturated and divided into four groups (n = 10). Gutta-percha was partially removed and fiber posts were immediately cemented in groups 1 and 2 using Panavia F with ED Primer and RelyX™ U200, respectively. In groups 3 and 4, the root canal access was sealed with temporary restorative cement, specimens were stored for 30 days, endodontically retreated, and fiber posts were cemented using the resin cements applied to groups 1 and 2, respectively. Push-out tests and scanning electron microscopy analyses of different areas were performed. Data from push-out bond strengths were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests. Higher bond strength values were detected in the apical third for group 1 than group 3 (p 0.05). Comparisons between different thirds in the same group revealed a higher bond strength in the apical third for group 1. Scanning electron microscopy showed formation of hybrid layer and extensive resin tags in group 1. No hybrid layer was observed in groups 2 and 4. Endodontic retreatment had adverse effects on the push-out bond strength and dentinal interface of Panavia F with ED Primer when used for fiber postcementation specifically in the apical third, but not on RelyX™ U200. A significant interaction was detected between endodontic retreatment and resin cement, which indicated that endodontic retreatment might adversely affect the push-out bond strength and dentinal interface of Panavia F with ED Primer when used for fiber postcementation specifically in the apical third.

  3. Influence of silane heat treatment on bond strength of resin cement to a feldspathic ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Rodrigo Furtado; Martins, Maria Elizabeth Marques Nogueira; de Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti; Leite, Fabíola Pessoa Pereira; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of heat treatment (HT) of the silane on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a feldspathic ceramic. Ceramic (VITA VM7) and composite blocks (N=32) were divided into four groups (n=6 for bond test, n=2 for SEM) at random and subject to following sequence of conditioning: G1: HF 9.6%+Silane+Panavia F2.0, G2: HF 9.6%+Silane+HT+Panavia F2.0, G3: Silane+HT+Panavia F2.0, and G4: Silane+Panavia F2.0. HT was performed in an oven (100°C, 2 minutes). G1 (17.6±2.3 MPa) and G2 (19±3.2 MPa) showed significantly higher mean bond strength than those of G3 (9.1±2.8 MPa) and G4 (10.9±1.8 MPa). SEM analysis showed exclusively mixed failures. Silane HT did not increase the bond strength.

  4. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001). All eight experimental means (MPa) were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05) and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus/C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3); Tyrian-One Step Plus/Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6); Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9); Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5); Tyrian-One Step Plus/C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8) Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2); Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5); Xeno III/Variolink II/ 90 d (33.0±8.9). Conclusions: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  5. Bond strength durability of self-etching adhesives and resin cements to dentin

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    Carolina de Andrade Lima Chaves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar within a short (24 h and long period of evaluation (90 days. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y, producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm² cross-sectional area, which were subjected to µTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The µTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. RESULTS: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001. All eight experimental means (MPa were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05 and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3; Tyrian-One Step Plus /Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6; Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9; Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5; Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8 Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2; Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5; Xeno III/Variolink II/90 d (33.0±8.9. CONCLUSIONS: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water.

  6. Summary of: a comparative study of bonded and non-bonded amalgam restorations in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, R G

    2013-04-01

    This study compared the performance of non-bonded and bonded amalgam restorations in a general dental practice. A retrospective cohort study was carried out in a general dental practice of amalgam restorations, placed by a single operator. Non-bonded amalgam restorations were analysed over a ten-year period and bonded amalgam restorations over a five-year period. Survival analysis using the Kaplan-Maier method was carried out and an analysis of postoperative sensitivity and reasons for failure. Each group consisted of 231 restorations in 135 patients. Survival rates of non-bonded amalgam restorations were 72.2% over five years and 51.0% over ten years. The survival rate for bonded amalgam restorations was 85.0% over five years. The difference was significant (p amalgam restorations demonstrated greater longevity over non-bonded amalgam restorations and offer significant benefit to patients. Clinicians may feel confident to offer bonded amalgam restorations for their patients as a better alternative than non-bonded amalgam restorations.

  7. Dental plaque microcosm response to bonding agents containing quaternary ammonium methacrylates with different chain lengths and charge densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Han; Li, Fang; Weir, Michael D; Xu, Hockin H K

    2013-11-01

    Antibacterial bonding agents are promising to combat bacteria and caries at tooth-restoration margins. The objectives of this study were to incorporate new quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs) to bonding agent and determine the effects of alkyl chain length (CL) and quaternary amine charge density on dental plaque microcosm bacteria response for the first time. Six QAMs were synthesized with CL=3, 6, 9, 12, 16, 18. Each QAM was incorporated into Scotchbond multi-purpose (SBMP). To determine the charge density effect, dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM, CL=16) was mixed into SBMP at mass fraction=0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%. Charge density was measured using a fluorescein dye method. Dental plaque microcosm using saliva from ten donors was tested. Bacteria were inoculated on resins. Early-attachment was tested at 4h. Biofilm colony-forming units (CFU) were measured at 2 days. Incorporating QAMs into SBMP reduced bacteria early-attachment. Microcosm biofilm CFU for CL=16 was 4 log lower than SBMP control. Charge density of bonding agent increased with DMAHDM content. Bacteria early-attachment decreased with increasing charge density. Biofilm CFU at 10% DMAHDM was reduced by 4 log. The killing effect was similarly-strong against total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci. Increasing alkyl chain length and charge density of bonding agent was shown for the first time to decrease microcosm bacteria attachment and reduce biofilm CFU by 4 orders of magnitude. Novel antibacterial resins with tailored chain length and charge density are promising for wide applications in bonding, cements, sealants and composites to inhibit biofilms and caries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dental plaque microcosm response to bonding agents containing quaternary ammonium methacrylates with different chain lengths and charge densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Han; Li, Fang; Weir, Michael D.; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Antibacterial bonding agents are promising to combat bacteria and caries at tooth-restoration margins. The objectives of this study were to incorporate new quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs) to bonding agent and determine the effects of alkyl chain length (CL) and quaternary amine charge density on dental plaque microcosm bacteria response for the first time. Methods Six QAMs were synthesized with CL = 3, 6, 9, 12, 16, 18. Each QAM was incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-purpose (SBMP). To determine the charge density effect, dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM, CL = 16) was mixed into SBMP at mass fraction = 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%. Charge density was measured using a fluorescein dye method. Dental plaque microcosm using saliva from ten donors was tested. Bacteria were inoculated on resins. Early-attachment was tested at 4 hours. Biofilm colony-forming units (CFU) were measured at 2 days. Results Incorporating QAMs into SBMP reduced bacteria early-attachment. Microcosm biofilm CFU for CL = 16 was 4 log lower than SBMP control. Charge density of bonding agent increased with DMAHDM content. Bacteria early-attachment decreased with increasing charge density. Biofilm CFU at 10% DMAHDM was reduced by 4 log. The killing effect was similarly-strong against total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci. Conclusions Increasing alkyl chain length and charge density of bonding agent was shown for the first time to decrease microcosm bacteria attachment and reduce biofilm CFU by 4 orders of magnitude. Novel antibacterial resins with tailored chain length and charge density are promising for wide applications in bonding, cements, sealants and composites to inhibit biofilms and caries. PMID:23948394

  9. Dental glass ionomer cement reinforced by cellulose microfibers and cellulose nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rafael M. [Departamento de Odontologia, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Centro Avançado de Avaliação e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais, BioMat, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Pereira, Fabiano V., E-mail: fabianovp@ufmg.br [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, UFMG, Belo Horizonte CEP: 31270-901, MG (Brazil); Mota, Felipe A.P. [Centro Avançado de Avaliação e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais, BioMat, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Watanabe, Evandro [Departamento de Odontologia Restauradora, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, USP, Ribeirão Preto CEP: 14040-904, SP (Brazil); Soares, Suelleng M.C.S. [Departamento de Odontologia, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Santos, Maria Helena [Departamento de Odontologia, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Centro Avançado de Avaliação e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais, BioMat, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil)

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate if the addition of cellulose microfibers (CmF) or cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) would improve the mechanical properties of a commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). Different amounts of CmF and CNC were previously prepared and then added to reinforce the GIC matrix while it was being manipulated. Test specimens with various concentrations of CmF or CNC in their total masses were fabricated and submitted to mechanical tests (to evaluate their compressive and diametral tensile strength, modulus, surface microhardness and wear resistance) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The incorporation of CmF in the GIC matrix did not greatly improve the mechanical properties of GIC. However, the addition of a small amount of CNC in the GIC led to significant improvements in all of the mechanical properties evaluated: compressive strength (increased up to 110% compared with the control group), elastic modulus increased by 161%, diametral tensile strength increased by 53%, and the mass loss decreased from 10.95 to 3.87%. Because the composites presented a considerable increase in mechanical properties, the modification of the conventional GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material. - Highlights: • Cellulose microfibers (CmF) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) were prepared. • The CmF and CNC were incorporated in commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). • Small amount of CNC improved significantly all the mechanical properties evaluated. • Modified GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material.

  10. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

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    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  11. Effect of Self-Adhesive and Separate Etch Adhesive Dual Cure Resin Cements on the Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Dentin at Different Parts of the Root

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    Ehsan Mohamadian Amiri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bonding of fiber posts to intracanal dentin is challenging in the clinical setting. This study aimed to compare the effect of self-adhesive and separate etch adhesive dual cure resin cements on the bond strength of fiber post to dentin at different parts of the root.Materials and Methods: This in-vitro experimental study was conducted on 20 single-rooted premolars. The teeth were decoronated at 1mm coronal to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ, and the roots underwent root canal treatment. Post space was prepared in the roots. Afterwards, the samples were randomly divided into two groups. In group 1, the fiber posts were cemented using Rely X Unicem cement, while in group 2, the fiber posts were cemented using Duo-Link cement, according to the manufacturer's instructions. The intracanal post in each root was sectioned into three segments of coronal, middle, and apical, and each cross-section was subjected to push-out bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 1mm/minute until failure. Push-out bond strength data were analyzed using independent t-test and repeated measures ANOVA.Results: The bond strength at the middle and coronal segments in separate etch adhesive cement group was higher than that in self-adhesive cement group. However, the bond strength at the apical segment was higher in self-adhesive cement group compared to that in the other group. Overall, the bond strength in separate etch adhesive cement group was significantly higher than that in self-adhesive cement group (P<0.001.Conclusions: Bond strength of fiber post to intracanal dentin is higher after the use of separate etch adhesive cement compared to self-adhesive cement.

  12. Potential synergistic effects of a mixture of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cement and Bacillus subtilis in dental caries treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Shunya

    2018-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is nonpathogenic in humans and produces a number of useful substances and, therefore, this bacterium is used in probiotic therapy. There have been trials of B. subtilis for patients with periodontitis, but not for patients with caries. Similarly, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cement has been widely used for endodontic treatment, but there are few reports of its use for caries. Therefore, examinations were performed regarding the benefits of addition of B. subtilis to MTA cement for treatment of dental caries. Indirect pulp capping with a mixture of MTA cement and B. subtilis spore powder is effective for avoiding pulpectomy or tooth extraction in such cases (personal communication). This study was planned to examine the scientific basis of this clinical finding, with examination of possible synergistic effects of MTA cement and B. subtilis. From these experiments, the following five results were obtained: (1) B. subtilis did not proliferate in liquid-culture media at pH ≥10. (2) B. subtilis proliferated when mixed with MTA cement. (3) There was no significant difference in proliferation of B. subtilis under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. (4) B. subtilis exhibited antibacterial effects on Staphylococcus aureus and Lactobacillus casei. (5) MTA cement exhibited antibacterial effects on S. aureus and Streptococcus mutans, but not on B. subtilis. These results support the hypothesis that a combination of B subtilis and MTA cement is likely to be clinically useful for treatment of dental caries.

  13. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis properties of dental pulp cell on novel injectable tricalcium phosphate cement by silica doped

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Ying-Fang; Lin, Chi-Chang; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Yung; Yang, Jaw-Ji; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-01-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material in clinical. In this study, we have doped silica (Si) into β-TCP and enhanced its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of Si-doped with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of the diametral tensile strength, ions released and weight loss of cements was considered after immersion. In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on Si-doped β-TCP cements. The results showed that setting time and injectability of the Si-doped β-TCP cements were decreased as the Si content was increased. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 30.1%, 36.9%, 48.1%, and 55.3% were observed for the cement doping 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% Si into β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the Si-rich cements promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the Si-doped in the cement is more than 20%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by Si released from Si-doped β-TCP cements. The degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of Si gives a strong reason to believe that these Si-doped β-TCP cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • The higher the Si in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • Si20-doped in TCP improved cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. • The Si ion stimulated collagen secreted from cells. • The Si released from substrate can promote osteogenic and angiogenic

  14. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis properties of dental pulp cell on novel injectable tricalcium phosphate cement by silica doped

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ying-Fang [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang, E-mail: chichang31@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Yung [Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yang, Jaw-Ji, E-mail: jjyang@csmu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material in clinical. In this study, we have doped silica (Si) into β-TCP and enhanced its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of Si-doped with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of the diametral tensile strength, ions released and weight loss of cements was considered after immersion. In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on Si-doped β-TCP cements. The results showed that setting time and injectability of the Si-doped β-TCP cements were decreased as the Si content was increased. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 30.1%, 36.9%, 48.1%, and 55.3% were observed for the cement doping 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% Si into β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the Si-rich cements promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the Si-doped in the cement is more than 20%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by Si released from Si-doped β-TCP cements. The degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of Si gives a strong reason to believe that these Si-doped β-TCP cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • The higher the Si in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • Si20-doped in TCP improved cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. • The Si ion stimulated collagen secreted from cells. • The Si released from substrate can promote osteogenic and angiogenic.

  15. Compatibility improvement method of empty fruit bunch fibre as a replacement material in cement bonded boards: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullah, Hayana; Abidin Akasah, Zainal; Zaini Nik Soh, Nik Mohd; Mangi, Sajjad Ali

    2017-11-01

    The utilization of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre on bio-composite product has been introduced to replace current material mainly wood fibre. OPEFB is widely available as palm oil is one of the major agricultural crops in Malaysia. EFB fibre are lignocellulosic materials that could replace other natural fibre product especially cement bonded board. However, the contains of residual oil and sugar in EFB fibre has been detected to be the reason for incompatibility issue between EFB fibre and cement mixtures. Regarding on the issue, a study has been conducted widely on finding the suitable pre-treatment method for EFB fibre to remove carbohydrate contained in the said fibre that are known to inhibit cement hydration. Aside from that, cement accelerator was introduced to enhance the hydration of cement when it was mixed with natural fibre. Hence, this paper will summaries the previous findings and in-depth study on the use of EFB fibre as a replacement material in cement bonded fibre boards.

  16. Shear Bond Strength of a Resin Cement to Different Alloys Subjected to Various Surface Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Ezoji

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Micromechanical retention of resin cements to alloys is an important factor affecting the longevity of metal base restorations. This study aimed to compare the bond strength and etching pattern of a newly introduced experimental etchant gel namely Nano Met Etch with those of conventional surface treatment techniques for nickel-chrome (Ni-Cr and high noble alloys. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 discs (8×10×15 mm were cast with Ni-Cr (n=20, high noble BegoStar (n=50 and gold coin alloys (n=50. Their Surfaces were ground with abrasive papers. Ni-Cr specimens received sandblasting and etching. High noble alloy specimens (begoStar and gold coin received sandblasting, sandblasting-alloy primer, etching, etch-alloy primer and alloy primer alone. Cylindrical specimens of Panavia were bonded to surfaces using Tygon tubes. Specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength testing after storing at 37°C for 24 hours.Results: In gold coin group, the highest bond strength was achieved after sandblasting (25.82±1.37MPa, P<0.001 and etching+alloy primer (26.60 ± 5.47 MPa, P<0.01. The lowest bond strength belonged to sandblasting+alloy primer (17.79±2.96MPa, P<0.01. In BegoStar group, the highest bond strength was obtained in the sandblasted group (38.40±3.29MPa, P<0.001 while the lowest bond strength was detected in the sandblast+ alloy primer group (15.38±2.92MPa, P<0.001. For the Ni-Cr alloy, bond strength in the etched group (20.79±2.01MPa was higher than that in the sandblasted group (18.25±1.82MPa (P<0.01.Conclusions: For the Ni-Cr alloy, etching was more efficient than sandblasting but for the high noble alloys, higher Au content increased the efficacy of etching.

  17. Effect of Steam Autoclaving on the Tensile Strength of Resin Cements Used for Bonding Two-Piece Zirconia Abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadanelli, Marcos Alexandre; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho do; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of steam autoclave sterilization on the tensile strength of two types of resin cements used to bond customized CAD/CAM zirconia abutments onto titanium bases. Forty sets of zirconia abutments cemented to screwed titanium bases of implants analogs were divided into 4 groups (n = 10). Two groups were treated with a conventional chemically activated resin cement (ML, Multilink Ivoclar Vivadent) and the other two groups with a self-adhesive dual resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). One group from each cement was submitted to steam autoclaving. The autoclave sterilization cycle was performed after 72 hours of cementation for 15 minutes at 121°C and 2.1 Kgf/cm 2 . The samples were subjected to tensile strength testing in a universal testing machine (200 Kgf, 0.5 mm/min), from which the means and standard deviations were obtained in Newtons. Results showed (via ANOVA and Tukey's test; α = 0.05) that in the absence of steam autoclaving, no difference was observed in tensile strength between the cements tested: ML: 344.87 (93.79) and U200: 280 (92.42) (P = .314). Steam autoclaving, however, significantly increased tensile strength for the ML: 465.42 (87.87) compared to U200: 289.10 (49.02) (P 0.05). The authors concluded that steam autoclaving increases the mean tensile strength of the chemically activated cement compared to the dual-cure self-adhesive cement. The performance of both cements evaluated was similar if the sterilization step was disconsidered.

  18. Nanohydroxyapatite Silicate-Based Cement Improves the Primary Stability of Dental Implants: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Khorshidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Insufficient cortical bone volume when placing implants can lead to lack of primary stability. The use of cement as a bone fill material in bone defects around dental implant could result in better clinical outcome. HA has shown excellent biological properties in implant dentistry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of nanohydroxyapatite powder (Nano-HA in combination with accelerated Portland cement (APC on implant primary stability in surgically created circumferential bone defects in a bovine rib in vitro model. Materials and Methods. Sixteen bovine rib bones and thirty-six implants of same type and size (4 mm × 10 mm were used. Implants were divided into six groups: no circumferential bone defect, defect and no grafting, bone chips grafting, Nano-HA grafting, APC grafting, and Nano-HA mixed to APC grafting (Nano-HA-APC. Circumferential defects around the implants were prepared. The implant stability quotient (ISQ values were measured before and after the grafting. Results. APC exhibited the highest ISQ values. A significant increase of ISQ values following the grafting of Nano-HA-APC (18.08±5.82 and APC alone (9.50±4.12 was achieved. Increase of ISQ values after 72 hours was 24.16±5.01 and 17.58±4.89, respectively. Nano-HA grafting alone exhibited the least rise in ISQ values. Conclusions. Nanohydroxyapatite silicate-based cement could improve the primary stability of dental implants in circumferential bone defect around implants.

  19. Synthesis of partial stabilized cement-gypsum as new dental retrograde filling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadhasivam, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jung-Chih [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Medical Device Innovation Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan,Taiwan (China); Savitha, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Ming-Xiang; Hsu, Chung-King [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Pin [School of Dentistry and Graduate Institute of Clinical Dentistry, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University and National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Feng-Huei, E-mail: double@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-01

    The study describes the sol-gel synthesis of a new dental retrograde filling material partial stabilized cement (PSC)-gypsum by adding different weight percentage of gypsum (25% PSC + 75% gypsum, 50% PSC + 50% gypsum and 75% PSC + 25% gypsum) to the PSC. The crystalline phase and hydration products of PSC-gypsum were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The handling properties such as setting time, viscosity, tensile strength, porosity and pH, were also studied. The XRD and microstructure analysis demonstrated the formation of hydroxyapatite and removal of calcium dihydrate during its immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on day 10 for 75% PSC + 25% gypsum. The developed PSC-gypsum not only improved the setting time but also greatly reduced the viscosity, which is very essential for endodontic surgery. The cytotoxic and cell proliferation studies indicated that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible. The increased alkaline pH of the PSC-gypsum also had a remarkable antibacterial activity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new dental retrograde filling material PSC-gypsum was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PSC-gypsum cement has shown excellent initial and final setting time as 15-35 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It not only improved the setting time but also retain the viscosity, 2 Pa{center_dot}s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High alkaline pH of the cement had a remarkable antibacterial activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible.

  20. Effect of three endodontic sealers on the bond strength of prefabricated fiber posts luted with three resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleisa, Khalil; Alghabban, Rawda; Alwazzan, Khalid; Morgano, Steven M

    2012-05-01

    There is limited information in the literature regarding the effect of eugenol-based sealers on the bond strength of resin-bonded endodontic posts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 1 resin-based and 2 different eugenol-based endodontic sealers on the bond strength of prefabricated fiber posts luted with 3 different resin cements. One hundred thirty-five prefabricated fiber posts were luted into extracted single-rooted teeth with 1 of 3 composite resin cements (Rely X Unicem, Paracore, and Variolink II). Specimens were divided into 3 groups with 45 teeth each. The first 2 groups were obturated with gutta percha and 1 of 2 eugenol-based endodontic sealers (Endofil, Tubli-Seal). The third group was obturated with a resin-based root canal sealer (AH26). The forces required for dislodgment of posts from their prepared post spaces were recorded by using a universal testing machine. Data were collected and a 2-way ANOVA was applied to the mean retentive strengths of various combinations of sealer and cement. A Tukey multiple comparison test was performed to determine which groups were significantly different (α=.05). Endofil and Tubli-Seal (eugenol-based sealers) groups had significantly lower bond strengths for the posts than the AH26 group (PParacore and Variolink II resin cements when a eugenol sealer was used. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R; Ozcan, M; Bottino, MA; Valandro, LF

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  2. Arsenic Encapsulation Using Portland Cement With Ferrous Sulfate/Lime And Terra-BondTM Technologies - Microcharacterization And Leaching Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work reports the results of an investigation on the treatment and encapsulation of arsenic-containing materials by Portland cement with ferrous sulfate and lime (PFL) and Terra-BondTM, a commercially available patented technology. The arsenic materials treated we...

  3. Effect of the cross-linking silane concentration in a novel silane system on bonding resin-composite cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo; Kalk, Warner; Vallittu, Pekka

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Four experimental blends of an organo-functional silane monomer with a non-functional cross-linking silane monomer (a novel silane system) were evaluated as adhesion promoters in an experiment in which a resin-composite cement was bonded to silica-coated titanium. Material and Methods.

  4. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.A.; Valandro, L.F.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  5. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valandro, L.F.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.C.; Bottino, M.A.; Scotti, R.; Della Bona, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (in-Ceram Zirconia)

  6. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felipe Valandro, Luiz; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Cicero; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Scotti, Roberto; Della Bona, Alvaro

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (in-Ceram Zirconia)

  7. Standard Test Method for Bond Strength of Ceramic Tile to Portland Cement Paste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the ability of glazed ceramic wall tile, ceramic mosaic tile, quarry tile, and pavers to be bonded to portland cement paste. This test method includes both face-mounted and back-mounted tile. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  8. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of nano-hydroxyapatite incorporated glass ionomer cement and conventional glass ionomer cement on dense synthetic hydroxyapatite disk: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Kanupriya; Nandlal, Bhojraj

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of nano-hydroxyapatite (Nano-HAp) incorporated and conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC). Nano-HAp GIC was prepared by replacing 8 wt% of GIC powder with nano-HAp powder. Twenty-six HAp disks were used as substrate for bonding and divided into two equal groups. Before bonding the HAp disk was prepared by silicon carbide (no. 2500) followed by 10% polyacrylic acid conditioning. The standardized samples were prepared using split teflon mold on customized bonding jig so as to adhere testing materials to pretreated HAp disk. These samples were stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37°C before bond strength testing. The descriptive statistical analysis and independent samples t-test were used. The nano-HAp incorporated and conventional GIC had the mean shear bond strength of 3.28 ± 0.89 MPa and 5.25 ± 0.88 MPa, respectively. Nano-HAp incorporated GIC had lower shear bond strength with very high level of significance (P particles on the micro-size particles of GIC for the bonding mechanism and the ratio and proportions of nano-HAp to the GIC needs further elucidation.

  9. Resin cements formulated with thio-urethanes can strengthen porcelain and increase bond strength to ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Atais; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro; de Oliveira, Gabriel Rodrigues; Pfeifer, Carmem; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2018-04-06

    The use of thio-urethane oligomers has been shown to significantly improve the mechanical properties of resin cements (RCs). The aim of this study was to use thio-urethane-modified RC to potentially reinforce the porcelain-RC structure and to improve the bond strength to zirconia and lithium disilicate. Six oligomers were synthesized by combining thiols - pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP, P) or trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP, T) - with di-functional isocyanates - 1,6-Hexanediol-diissocyante (HDDI) (aliphatic, AL) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (BDI) (aromatic, AR) or Dicyclohexylmethane 4,4'-Diisocyanate (HMDI) (cyclic, CC). Thio-urethanes (20 wt%) were added to a BisGMA/UDMA/TEGDMA organic matrix. Filler was introduced at 60 wt%. The microshear bond strength (μSBS), Weibull modulus (m), and failure pattern of RCs bonded to zirconia (ZR) and lithium disilicate (LD) ceramics was evaluated. Biaxial flexural test and fractographic analysis of porcelain discs bonded to RCs were also performed. The biaxial flexural strength (σ bf ) and m were calculated in the tensile surfaces of porcelain and RC structures (Z = 0 and Z = -t 2 , respectively). The μSBS was improved with RCs formulated with oligomers P_AL or T_AL bonded to LD and P_AL, P_AR or T_CC bonded to zirconia in comparison to controls. Mixed failures predominated in all groups. σ bf had superior values at Z = 0 with RCs formulated with oligomers P_AL, P_AR, T_AL, or T_CC in comparison to control; σ bf increased with all RCs composed by thio-urethanes at Z = -t 2 . Fractographic analysis revealed all fracture origins at Z = 0. The use of specific thio-urethane oligomers as components of RCs increased both the biaxial flexural strength of the porcelain-RC structure and the μSBS to LD and ZR. The current investigation suggests that it is possible to reinforce the porcelain-RC pair and obtain higher bond strength to LD and ZR with RCs

  10. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  11. [Effect of a chemical primer on the bond strength of a zirconia ceramic with self-adhesive resin cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Jing, Ye; Nie, Rongrong; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the bond strength and durability of a self-adhesive resin cement with a zirconia ceramic pretreated by a zirconia primer. Zirconia ceramic (Vita Inceram YZ) plates with a thickness of 2.5 mm were fired, polished, and then cleaned. Half of the polished ceramic plates were sandblasted with 50 μm alumina particles at 0.3 MPa for 20 s. The surface compound weight ratios were measured via X-ray fluorescence microscopy. The polished and sandblasted ceramic plates were directly bonded with self-adhesive resin cement (Biscem) or were pretreated by a zirconia primer (Z Primer Plus) before bonding with Biscem. The specimens of each test group were divided into two subgroups (n=10) and subjected to the shear test after 0 and 10,000 thermal cycles. The data were analyzed via three-way ANOVA. After air abrasion, 8.27% weight ratio of alumina attached to the zirconia surface. Compared with air abrasion, primer treatment more significantly improved the primary resin bond strength of the zirconia ceramic. The primary resin bond strength of the zirconia ceramic with no primer treatment was not affected by thermocycling (P>0.05). However, the primary resin bond strength of the zirconia ceramic with primer treatment was significantly decreased by thermocycling (Presin bond strengths of zirconia ceramics. However, the bond interface of the primer is not stable and rapidly degraded during thermocycling.

  12. Evaluation of bond strength of self-adhesive cements to dentin with or without application of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Silva, Melissa Aline; Rangel, Patrícia Maria; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Fava, Marcelo

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin using self-adhesive cements with and without the application of adhesive systems. Seventy-two bovine incisors were used, in which the buccal surfaces were ground down to expose an area of dentin measuring a minimum of 4 x 4 mm. The indirect resin composite Resilab was used to make 72 blocks, which were cemented onto the dentin surface of the teeth and divided into 4 groups (n = 18): group 1: self-adhesive resin cement BiFix SE, applied according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 2: self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem, used according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 3: etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system + BiFix SE; group 4: etch-and-rinse Single Bond 2 adhesive system + RelyX Unicem. The specimens were sectioned into sticks and subjected to microtensile testing in a universal testing machine (EMIC DL- 200 MF). Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). The mean values (± standard deviation) obtained for the groups were: group 1: 15.28 (± 8.17)a, group 2: 14.60 (± 5.21)a, group 3: 39.20 (± 9.98)c, group 4: 27.59 (± 6.57)b. Different letters indicate significant differences (ANOVA; p = 0.0000). The application of adhesive systems before self-adhesive cements significantly increased the bond strength to dentin. In group 2, RelyX Unicem associated with the adhesive system Single Bond 2 showed significantly lower mean tensile bond strengths than group 3 (BiFix SE associated with the etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system).

  13. Physical Properties, Film Thickness, and Bond Strengths of Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements According to Their Delivery Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Taiseer A; Abdulmajeed, Awab A; Altitinchi, Ali; Ahmed, Sumitha N; Donovan, Terence E

    2018-03-05

    To determine the effect of changing the dispensing or mixing method of resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cements on their water sorption, solubility, film thickness, and shear bond strength. Disc-shaped specimens of RMGI cements (RelyX: Luting [handmix], Luting Plus [clicker-handmix], Luting Plus [automix], GC: Fuji PLUS [capsule-automix], FujiCEM 2 [automix], [n = 10]) were prepared according to ISO standard 4049 for water sorption and solubility tests. Furthermore, the percentage of mass change, percentage of solubility, and percentage of water absorbed was also determined. Film thickness was measured according to ISO standard 9917-2; the mean of 5 measurements for each cement was calculated. Shear bond strength for each cement was determined according to ISO standard 29022 before and after thermocycling at 20,000 cycles, temperatures 5 to 55°C with a 15-second dwell time (n = 10/subgroup). Two- and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze data for statistical significance (p 0.05). RelyX Luting Plus (clicker-handmix) displayed lower solubility than its handmix and automix counterparts (p < 0.05). Film thickness of RelyX cements was significantly different (p < 0.05). RelyX Luting Plus (automix) had the lowest film thickness (19 μm) compared to its handmix (48 μm) and clicker-handmix (117 μm) counterparts (p < 0.05). GC Fuji PLUS (capsule-automix, 22 μm) was significantly lower than the automix version (GC FujiCEM 2, 127 μm) (p < 0.05). Shear bond strength of RelyX Luting Plus (automix) was significantly lower than its handmix and clicker-handmix versions (p < 0.05). GC Fuji PLUS (capsule-automix) was significantly higher than GC FujiCEM 2 (automix) (p < 0.05). The binary interaction of the two independent variables (dispensing/mixing method and thermocycling) was significant for the shear bond strengths of the GC cements only (p < 0.05). Change in the dispensing/mixing method of RMGI cement from the same brand may have an effect on its physical properties

  14. Kekuatan perlekatan geser semen ionomer kaca terhadap dentin dan NiCr alloy (Shear bond strenght of glass ionomer cement in dentin and NiCr alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Leonita

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements were used broadly in restorative dentistry. That’s why researchers always try to invent new form of glass ionomer cement. The newest invention was the paste-paste formulation. Shear bond strenght of powder-liquid glass ionomer cement and paste-paste glass ionomer cement in dentin and NiCr alloy was tested to 4 groups of samples. Each group consisted contain 6 samples that were shaped into cylinder with 4 mm of diameter and 5 mm of height. Group A was dentin with powder-liquid glass ionomer cement, group B was dentin with paste-paste glass ionomer cement, group C was alloy with powder-liquid glass ionomer cement, and group D was alloy with paste-paste glass ionomer cement. Each sample in each group was tested with Autograph. The datas were analyzed statistically using T-test with level of signficance 0.05. The result showed that powder-liquid glass ionomer cement shear bond strenght was 211 N and paste-paste glass ionomer cement was 166.92 N. That showed that powder-liquid glass ionomer cement had a better shear bond strenght.

  15. In vivo evaluation of the effects of hydraulic calcium silicate dental cements on plasma and liver aluminium levels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkaya, Kadriye; Can Demirdöğen, Birsen; Öncel Torun, Zeynep; Erdem, Onur; Çetinkaya, Serdar; Akay, Cemal

    2016-02-01

    Our aim was to test whether the presence of three hydraulic calcium silicate dental cements--MTA Angelus, MTA Fillapex, and Theracal LC--in the dental extraction socket of an in vivo model, would affect the levels of aluminium (Al) in the plasma and liver. Following anesthesia, the right upper incisor of each male Wistar albino rat was extracted and polyethylene tubes filled with MTA Angelus, MTA Fillapex, or Theracal LC were inserted into the depth of the extraction socket and gingival tissue was sutured. The rats were killed 7, 30, or 60 d after the operation. Blood and liver samples were obtained from the rats before they were killed, and the levels of Al were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Plasma Al levels were higher in the rats in which the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cements were implanted, especially MTA Angelus and MTA Fillapex, compared with control rats. In liver samples, however, the differences in Al level were not statistically significant. Our results show that Al might have been released into the circulation from the three dental cements tested, especially MTA Angelus and MTA Fillapex. Further research should be carried out on the possible biological effects of Al liberated from dental cements. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  16. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem KiLiC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p0.05. Conclusions Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination.

  17. Where and how are Brazilian dental students using Glass lonomer Cement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sousa Azevedo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Glass Ionomer Cements (GICs have a wide range of uses in Dentistry, and the manipulation technique used can influence the results obtained. This study aimed at assessing the knowledge held by Dental School students from a city in Southern Brazil regarding the use of GIC, and the clinical technique chosen for its use and its applications. A structured questionnaire was applied to 60 advanced dental students. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the quantitative data. All students had already used the material. Regarding the purpose for which the material was used, all students (100% had used it as a dental cavity liner, 83.3% had used it as a temporary restorative material after endodontic treatment, and 73.3% had used it as a permanent restoration in primary teeth. Regarding the clinical technique used, 86.7% said that they insert the material while it still has a shiny surface, 33% said that they finish and polish the restoration in a following session, and only 28.3% said that they apply a surface protection immediately after the restoration is placed. Although students generally seem to be acquainted with the fundamental knowledge and main techniques involved in GIC use, they occasionally fail to follow all the technical steps required during clinical application, which may affect treatment outcome. Therefore, professors should stress that all the clinical procedures required during GIC application must be followed strictly to improve the performance of this material.

  18. An in vitro evaluation of the zirconia surface treatment by mesoporous zirconia coating on its bonding to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Sun, Ting; Liu, Ruoyu; Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Shao, Longquan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of zirconia surface treatment by mesoporous zirconia coating on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) between zirconia and resin cement was investigated in this work. 160 zirconia specimens were prepared and divided into four groups according to surface treatments: (1) airborne-particle-abrasion treatment (APA); (2) glass infiltration and hydrofluoric acid treatment (GI+HF); (3) mesoporous zirconia coating (MZ); and (4) no treatment (C). The as-prepared zirconia specimens were bonded using Panavia F2.0 and RelyX Unicem. The MTBS values were tested using a universal testing machine, and data were analyzed using ANOVA and SNK methods (a=0.05). The MTBS values obtained after GI+HF and MZ treatments were significantly higher than those obtained after APA and C treatments (Psurface treatments using GI+HF and MZ yield higher bond strength than those using APA or C, regardless of the resin cements.

  19. Evaluation of the Bond Strength of Resin Cements Used to Lute Ceramics on Laser-Etched Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzdar, Lale; Oksuz, Mustafa; Tanboga, Ilknur

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two different adhesive resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin. Background data: Erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin, but results to date have been controversial, and its compatibility with existing adhesive resin cements has not been conclusively determined. Materials and methods: Two adhesive cements, one “etch-and-rinse” [Variolink II (V)] and one “self-etch” [Clearfil Esthetic Cement (C)] luting cement, were used to lute ceramic blocks (Vita Celay Blanks, Vita) onto dentin surfaces. In total, 80 dentin specimens were distributed randomly into eight experimental groups according to the dentin surface-etching technique used Er,Cr:YSGG laser and Er:YAG laser: (1) 37% orthophosphoric acid+V (control group), (2) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V, (3) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+acid+V, (4) Er:YAG laser+V, (5) Er:YAG laser+acid+V, (6) C, (7) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C, and (8) Er:YAG laser+C. Following these applications, the ceramic discs were bonded to prepared surfaces and were shear loaded in a universal testing machine until fracture. SBS was recorded for each group in MPa. Shear test values were evaluated statistically using the Mann–Whitney U test. Results: No statistically significant differences were evident between the control group and the other groups (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+A+V group demonstrated significantly higher SBS than did the Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V group (p=0.034). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C and Er:YAG laser+C groups demonstrated significantly lower SBS than did the C group (pceramic bond strengths, depending upon the adhesive cement used. PMID:24992276

  20. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength, between IPS-Empress2 ceramics and three dual-cured resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajimiragha H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Cementation is one of the most critical steps of the porcelain restoration technique. However, limited information is available concerning the bond strength of current ceramic bonding systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of three dual-cure resin cements to IPS-Empress2 ceramics. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 pairs of IPS-Empress 2 ceramic discs were fabricated with 10 and 8 mm diameters and 2.5 mm thickness. After sandblasting and ultrasonic cleaning, the surfaces of all specimens were etched with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 60 seconds. Then, the three groups of 10 bonded specimens were prepared ceramic bonding resin systems including Panavia F2, Variolink II and Rely X ARC. After storage in 37±1c water for 24 hours and thermocycling in 5c and 55c water for 500 cycles with 1-minute dwell time, the shear bond strengths were determined using Instron machine at speed of 0.5mm/min. Data were analyzed by One Way ANOVA test. For multiple paired comparisons, the Tukey HSD method was used. The mode of failure was evaluated by scanning electro microscope (SEM. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Result: Significant differences were found between different cement types (P<0.05. Variolink II provided the highest bonding values with IPS-Empress2. A combination of different modes of failure was observed. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, according to the highest mode of cohesive failure, Variolink II seems to have the strongest bond with IPS-Empress2 ceramics.

  1. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of zirconia restorations cleansed various cleansing protocols bonded with two different resin cements: An In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Sankar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Yttria partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline restorations have gained widespread use because of its enhanced strength and esthetics. During the try-in process, zirconia is likely to be contaminated with saliva. This contamination leads to a clear weakening of the bond between restorative material and cement. For this reason, zirconia surface should be cleaned before cementation. Hence, the purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of zirconia restorations cleansed with various surface cleansing protocols bonded with two different resin cements. Materials and Methods: Eighty samples of zirconia discs were prepared in the dimensions 2.5 mm diameter and 4.5 mm thickness. They were divided into two groups of each forty samples based on luting cement used. Each group was further subdivided into four subgroups of each (n = 10: Group 1: uncontaminated zirconia blocks, Group 2: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks and cleaned only with distilled water, Group 3: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks treated with Ivoclean, and Group 4: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks were air abraded. Eighty human maxillary premolars were then sectioned to expose dentin and were mounted on an acrylic block. A jig was fabricated to bond zirconia with the tooth using two self-adhesive resin cements. The samples were subjected to shear bond strength testing. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significance difference test with a level of significance set at p < 0.05. Results: The mean shear bond strength values of Group 1 and 2 - subgroup B are 10.3 ± 0.4 and 9.80 ± 0.7 (saliva-contaminated zirconia, cleansed with distilled water only, respectively, were lowest among all test subgroups and were significantly less than mean values of subgroup C, Group 1 - 20.45 ± 0.6 and Group 2 - 20.75 ± 0.4 (Ivoclean group and subgroup D, Group 1 - 20.90 ± 0.3 and Group 2 - 20.60 ± 0.5 (air

  2. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of two resin cements (ParaPost Cement and Panavia F) to posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White), and zirconia (Cerapost), and to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After embedding, planar surfaces...... of posts (n = 9 to 14) and human dentin (n = 10) were obtained by grinding. The posts received one of three surface treatments: 1. roughening (sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid etching), 2. application of primer (Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II, silane), or 3. roughening followed by application of primer...

  3. The marginal leakage of some dental cements in humans: a PIXE-microbeam approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadro, A.; Passi, P.; Cavalleri, G.; Galassini, S.; Moschini, G.; Rossi, P.

    1999-01-01

    The marginal leakage and water absorption of dental cements and restorative materials has been investigated by many authors with several techniques, some of which led to valid results. However, no technique could give, by itself, information both on leakage and water absorption, as these measurements usually need different investigations. PIXE micro beam offers the possibility of investigating these two aspects at the same time, since it is possible to map a proper marker element. In the present study, cavities were made on 50 extracted human molars, then filled with five different temporary cements (IRM, Cavit W, Kalsogen, Fermit N, SuperEBA). The filled teeth were placed into a 5% silver nitrate solution, and after three days, one, two, three and four weeks were examined. The samples for microPIXE were prepared after embedding the teeth in epoxy resin, and sectioning and grinding them down to a thickness of about 1 mm. The sections were placed on metal holders, and examined with a scanning proton μbeam, in Legnaro (Italy) at the AN2000 LAB of INFN National Laboratories. The beam consisted of 2.4 MeV protons, it had a cross section of 1.5 micron in diameter and typical currents of the order of some μA were used. The maps were obtained by an ''ad hoc'' software with a McIntosh personal computer. Mapping of silver allowed to evaluate both the marginal leakage and the water absorption for each cement. The samples filled with Cavit W showed a great infiltration, as the tracing element was found in the cement bulk, along the margins and inside the cavity, while those filled with IRM and Kalsogen presented only a deposition of the tracing solution on the cement surface. SuperEBA showed a poor resistance against microleakage, because the marker element was only detected along the cavity margins. Fermit N showed the best marginal integrity, and on its surface no traces of siver were found. In this case the better resistance may be due to the resin present in the

  4. Microtensile bond strength between indirect composite resin inlays and dentin: effect of cementation strategy and mechanical aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, Emília Pithan; Amaral, Marina; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; Silva, Tatiana Bernardon; Saavedra, Guilherme; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composite inlays to dentin using two cementation strategies, before and after mechanical aging. Standardized inlay cavities (bucco-lingual width: 3 mm; depth: 4 mm) were prepared in 32 human premolars. The teeth were embedded in self-curing acrylic resin up to 3 mm from the cementoenamel junction, impressions were made using a polyvinyl siloxane material, master dies were obtained using type 4 stone, and inlay composite resin restorations were fabricated (Sinfony, 3M ESPE). The teeth were randomly allocated into 4 groups according to the cementation strategy (conventional [C] and simplified [S]) and aging (mechanical cycling [MC] and not aged): C[G1]: Adper SingleBond + RelyX ARC without aging; CMC[G2]: conventional cementation + mechanical cycling (106 cycles, 88 N, 4 Hz, ± 37°C); S[G3]: self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U-100) without aging; SMC[G4] self-adhesive cementation + mechanical cycling. Intaglio surfaces of composite inlays were treated by tribochemical silica coating in G1 and G2, while G3 and G4 received no surface treatment. Non-aged specimens were stored in a moist environment at ca 37°C for the same period as MC (3 days). Non-trimmed beam specimens (bonding area = 1 mm²) were produced by serial cutting, and microtensile testing was performed (0.5 mm/min). Two-way ANOVA showed that the microtensile bond strength was affected only by cementation strategy (p < 0.0001). Tukey's test showed that groups G1 (35.1 ± 9.1) and G2 (32.7 ± 10.7) presented significantly higher bond strength values than G3 (8.7 ± 6.3) and G4 (5.2 ± 4.6). The use of a conventional adhesive technique and tribochemical silica coating resulted in higher μTBS than the one-step simplified cementation, even after mechanical cycling.

  5. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantekin, Kenan; Avci, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. The highest (17.7 ± 6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8 ± 3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7 ± 6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9 ± 5.7) (p Biodentine® = 8.0 ± 3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA = 5.8 ± 3.2; GIC and Biodentine = 6.7 ± 2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p = 0.73 and p = 0.38, respectively). The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  6. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan CANTEK?N

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB composites, silorane-based (SB composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Material and Methods: Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results: The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2 than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7 (p<0.001, the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6 and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6 showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively. Conclusions: The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  7. Evaluation of bond strength between leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based ceramics to dentin after cementation with conventional and self-adhesive resin agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigolin, Fernando J; Miranda, Milton E; Flório, Flávia M; Basting, Roberta T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two heat-pressed ceramics (leucite-based--IPS Empress Esthetic/Ivoclar Vivadent, and lithium disilicate-based --IPS e.max Press/Ivoclar Vivadent) to dentin with the use of conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. The occlusal surface of 60 intact human molars was removed and the dentin was exposed. Ceramic blocks were cemented randomly with regard to the cementation systems (n = 10): conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II/Ivoclar Vivadent), conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink/Ivoclar Vivadent), and dual self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100/3M ESPE). The dual cementation systems were photoactivated with a LED light device (Radii Cal, SDI) for 40 seconds. The specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of approximately 1 mm2 for microtensile tests on a universal testing machine (EMIC). The type of fracture was analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05) showed that there was no difference between types of ceramic. Average microtensile bond strength was higher for the conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and the self-adhesive dual resin cement (RelyX U100), despite greater prevalence of premature loss of the sticks with the latter. Average bond strength was lower when the conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink) was used. Leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based cements present similar bond strength to the dentin with conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and a dual self-adhesive cement (RelyX U100).

  8. Durability of resin cement bond to aluminium oxide and zirconia ceramics after air abrasion and laser treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxton, Richard M; Cavalcanti, Andrea N; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Pilecki, Peter; Sherriff, Martyn; Melo, Luciana; Watson, Timothy F

    2011-02-01

    The erbium laser has been introduced for cutting enamel and dentin and may have an application in the surface modification of high-strength aluminum oxide and zirconia ceramics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the durability of the bond of conventional dual-cured resin cements to Procera Al(2)O(3) and zirconium oxide ceramics after surface treatment with air abrasion and erbium laser. One hundred twenty Al(2)O(3) and 120 zirconia specimens measuring 3 × 3 × 0.7 mm(3) were divided equally into three groups, and their surfaces treated as follows: either untreated (controls), air abraded with Al(2)O(3) particles, or erbium-laser-treated at a power setting of 200 mJ. The surface of each specimen was then primed and bonded with one of two dual-cured resin cements (either SCP-100 Ceramic Primer and NAC-100 or Monobond S and Variolink II) using a 1-mm thick Tygon tube mold with a 0.75-mm internal bore diameter. After 24 hours and 6 months of water storage at 37°C, a microshear bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Surface morphology was examined using a confocal microscope, and failure modes were observed using an optical microscope. The data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier nonparametric survival analysis. In the case of zirconia, air abrasion and Erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser treatment of the ceramic surface resulted in a significant reduction in the bond strengths of both resin cements after 6 months water storage; however, when the zirconia surface was left untreated, the SCP-100/NAC-100 group did not significantly reduce in bond strength. In the case of alumina, no treatment, air abrasion and Er:YAG laser treatment of the surface led to no significant reduction in the bond strengths of the three SCP-100/NAC-100 groups after 6 months water storage, whereas all three Monobond S/Variolink II groups showed a significant reduction. Er:YAG laser treatment of the zirconia surface did not result in a durable resin

  9. The effects of dentin and intaglio indirect ceramic optimized polymer restoration surface treatment on the shear bond strength of resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitarini, A.; Suprastiwi, E.; Usman, M.

    2017-08-01

    Ceramic optimized polymer (ceromer) bonds to the tooth substrate through resin cements. The bond strength between dentin, resin cement, and ceromer depends on the applied surface treatment. To analyze the effects of dentin and intaglio ceromer surface treatment on the shear bond strength self-adhesive resin cement. Forty-five dentin premolar and ceromer specimens were bonded with resin cement and divided into three groups as follows: in group 1, no treatment was applied; in group 2, dentin surface treatment was carried out with acid etching and a bonding agent; and in group 3, dentin surface treatment was carried out with acid etching, a bonding agent, and intaglio ceromer surface treatment with etching and silane. All specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours, and the shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Group 3 showed the highest shear bond strength, followed by group 2. The surface treatment of dentin and intaglio ceromer showed significantly improved shear bond strength in the group comparison. Dentin and intaglio ceromer surface treatment can improved the shear bond strength self-adhesive resin cement.

  10. Effect of radiopaque Portland cement on mineralization in human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyung-San; Lee, Sang-Im; Lee, Yoon; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiopaque Portland cement (RPC) facilitates the mineralization process in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) compared with pure Portland cement (PC). Under a scanning electron microscope (SEM), cellular morphology was evaluated. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was analyzed, and nodule formation was assessed by performing Alizarin Red S staining. In addition, the mRNA expressions of mineralization-related proteins were evaluated by performing a real-time polymerase chain reaction. On SEM evaluation, healthy HDPCs were found adhering to the surfaces of PC and RPC. The ALP activity increased in the PC and RPC groups compared with the control group at 1 day. Alizarin Red stain increased in the PC and RPC groups compared with the control group at 2 and 3 weeks. The mRNA expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein increased at 14 days in the PC and RPC groups. These results show that PC and RPC have similar effects in terms of mineralization and suggest that RPC also has the potential to be used as a clinically suitable pulp-capping material.

  11. Effect of silane type and air-drying temperature on bonding fiber post to composite core and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Novais, Veridiana Resende; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of silane type and temperature of silane application on push-out bond strength between fiberglass posts with composite resin core and resin cement. One hundred and sixty fiberglass posts (Exacto, Angelus) had the surface treated with hydrogen peroxide 24%. Posts were divided in 8 groups according to two study factors: air-drying temperature after silane application (room temperature and 60 ºC) and silane type: three pre-hydrolyzed--Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE) and one two-component silane--Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply). The posts (n=10) for testing the bond strength between post and composite core were centered on a cylindrical plastic matrix and composite resin (Filtek Z250 XT, 3M ESPE) that was incrementally inserted and photoactivated. Eighty bovine incisor roots (n=10) were prepared for testing the bond strength between post and resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE) and received the fiberglass posts. Push-out test was used to measure the bond strength. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed that temperature and silane had no influence on bond strength between composite core and post. However, for bond strength between post and resin cement, the temperature increase resulted in a better performance for Silane Coupling Agent, Silano and RelyX Ceramic Primer. At room temperature Silane Coupling Agent showed the lowest bond strength. Effect of the warm air-drying is dependent on the silane composition. In conclusion, the use of silane is influenced by wettability of resinous materials and pre-hydrolyzed silanes are more stable compared with the two-bottle silane.

  12. Effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG Lasers on Shear Bond Strength of Resin Cement to Zirconia Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Yarmohamadi, Ebrahim; Shabani, Amanj

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Because of poor bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics, laser surface treatments have been suggested to improve adhesion. The present study evaluated the effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers on the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. Materials and Methods: Ninety zirconia disks (6×2 mm) were randomly divided into six groups of 15. In the control group, no surface treatment was used. In the test groups, laser surface treatment was accomplished using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, respectively (groups two and three). Composite resin disks (3×2 mm) were fabricated and cemented to zirconia disks with self-etch resin cement and stored in distilled water for 24 hours. In the test groups four-six, the samples were prepared as in groups one-three and then thermocycled and stored in distilled water for six months. The SBS tests were performed (strain rate of 0.5 mm/min). The fracture modes were observed via stereomicroscopy. Data were analyzed with one and two-way ANOVA, independent t and Tukey’s tests. Results: The SBS values of Nd:YAG group (18.95±3.46MPa) was significantly higher than that of the CO2 group (14.00±1.96MPa), but lower than that of controls (23.35±3.12MPa). After thermocycling and six months of water storage, the SBS of the untreated group (1.80±1.23 MPa) was significantly lower than that of the laser groups. In groups stored for 24 hours, 60% of the failures were adhesive; however, after thermocycling and six months of water storage, 100% of failures were adhesive. Conclusion: Bonding durability of resin cement to zirconia improved with CO2 and Nd:YAG laser surface treatment of zirconia ceramic. PMID:27148380

  13. Designing Multiagent Dental Materials for Enhanced Resistance to Biofilm Damage at the Bonded Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary Anne; Orrego, Santiago; Weir, Michael D; Xu, Huakun H K; Arola, Dwayne D

    2016-05-11

    The oral environment is considered to be an asperous environment for restored tooth structure. Recurrent dental caries is a common cause of failure of tooth-colored restorations. Bacterial acids, microleakage, and cyclic stresses can lead to deterioration of the polymeric resin-tooth bonded interface. Research on the incorporation of cutting-edge anticaries agents for the design of new, long-lasting, bioactive resin-based dental materials is demanding and provoking work. Released antibacterial agents such as silver nanoparticles (NAg), nonreleased antibacterial macromolecules (DMAHDM, dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate), and released acid neutralizer amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (NACP) have shown potential as individual and dual anticaries approaches. In this study, these agents were synthesized, and a prospective combination was incorporated into all the dental materials required to perform a composite restoration: dental primer, adhesive, and composite. We focused on combining different dental materials loaded with multiagents to improve the durability of the complex dental bonding interface. A combined effect of bacterial acid attack and fatigue on the bonding interface simulated the harsh oral environment. Human saliva-derived oral biofilm was grown on each sample prior to the cyclic loading. The oral biofilm viability during the fatigue performance was monitored by the live-dead assay. Damage of the samples that developed during the test was quantified from the fatigue life distributions. Results indicate that the resultant multiagent dental composite materials were able to reduce the acidic impact of the oral biofilm, thereby improving the strength and resistance to fatigue failure of the dentin-resin bonded interface. In summary, this study shows that dental restorative materials containing multiple therapeutic agents of different chemical characteristics can be beneficial toward improving resistance to mechanical and acidic challenges in oral

  14. The effect of transmitted Er:YAG laser energy through a dental ceramic on different types of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Onjen; Sari, Tugrul; Arslan Malkoç, Meral; Altintas, Subutayhan; Usumez, Aslihan; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2015-07-06

    The laser debonding procedure of adhesively luted all-ceramic restorations is based on the ablation of resin cement due to the transmitted laser energy through the ceramic. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation transmitted through a dental ceramic on five different resin cements. Five different resin cements were evaluated in this study: G-Cem LinkAce, Multilink Automix, Variolink II, Panavia F, and Rely X Unicem U100. Disc shaped resin cement specimens (n = 10) were fabricated for each group. A ceramic disc was placed between the resin cement discs and the tip of the handpiece of Er:YAG laser device. The resin cement discs were irradiated through the ceramic and the volume of the resin cement discs were measured using a micro-CT system before and after Er:YAG laser irradiation. The volume loss of the resin cement discs was calculated and analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD tests. The highest volume loss was determined in G-Cem (1.1 ± 0.6 mm 3 ) and Multilink (1.3 ± 0.1 mm 3 ) (P < 0.05) groups, and the lowest volume loss was determined in Rely X (0.3 ± 0.07 mm 3 ), Variolink (0.4 ± 0.2 mm 3 ), and Panavia (0.6 ± 0.2 mm 3 ) groups (P < 0.05). All resin cements were affected by the laser irradiation resulting in the volume loss of the cement; however, there are significant differences among different resin cements. All the resin cements tested in this study were effected by the Er:YAG laser irradiation and there were significant differences among the resin cements with regard to ablation volume. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dental glass ionomer cement reinforced by cellulose microfibers and cellulose nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rafael M; Pereira, Fabiano V; Mota, Felipe A P; Watanabe, Evandro; Soares, Suelleng M C S; Santos, Maria Helena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate if the addition of cellulose microfibers (CmF) or cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) would improve the mechanical properties of a commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). Different amounts of CmF and CNC were previously prepared and then added to reinforce the GIC matrix while it was being manipulated. Test specimens with various concentrations of CmF or CNC in their total masses were fabricated and submitted to mechanical tests (to evaluate their compressive and diametral tensile strength,modulus, surface microhardness and wear resistance) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The incorporation of CmF in the GIC matrix did not greatly improve the mechanical properties of GIC. However, the addition of a small amount of CNC in the GIC led to significant improvements in all of the mechanical properties evaluated: compressive strength (increased up to 110% compared with the control group), elastic modulus increased by 161%, diametral tensile strength increased by 53%, and the mass loss decreased from 10.95 to 3.87%. Because the composites presented a considerable increase in mechanical properties, the modification of the conventional GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material.

  16. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength between resin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenisey, Murat; Dede, Doğu Ömür; Rona, Nergiz

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of surface treatments on bond strength between resin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics. 220 zirconium-oxide ceramic (Ceramill ZI) specimens were prepared, sintered in two different period (Short=Ss, Long=Ls) and divided into ten treatment groups as: GC, no treatment; GSil, silanized (ESPE-Sil); GSilPen, silane flame treatment (Silano-Pen); GSb, sandblasted; GSbSil, sandblasted+silanized; GSbCoSil, sandblasted+silica coated (CoJet)+silanized; GSbRoSil, sandblasted+silica coated (Rocatech-Plus)+silanized; GSbDSil, sandblasted+diamond particle abraded (Micron MDA)+silanized; GSbSilPen, sandblasted+silane flame treatment+silanized; GSbLSil, sandblasted+Er:Yag (Asclepion-MCL30) laser treated+silanized. The composite resin (Filtek Z-250) cylinders were cemented to the treated ceramic surfaces with a resin cement (Panavia F2.0). Shear bond strength test was performed after specimens were stored in water for 24h and thermo-cycled for 6000 cycles (5-55 °C). Data were statistically analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tamhane's multiple comparison test (α=0.05). According to the ANOVA, sintering time, surface treatments and their interaction were statistically significant (presin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of long-term bond strength and selected properties of self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carianne Mendes de ALMEIDA

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the shear bond strength (SBS of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs to dentin and their physical-chemical properties. Five commercial SARCs were evaluated [SmartCem®2 – DENTSPLY (SC2; BisCem® – Bisco (BC; SeT PP® − SDI (SeT; Relyx U100® – 3M ESPE (U100 and YCEM® SA - Yller (YCEM]. The SARCs were evaluated for SBS to dentin (n = 10 after 24 h, 6 months, and 12 months. The dentin demineralization caused by acidic monomers was observed by SEM, and pH-neutralization of eluate was observed for 24 h. Degree of conversion (DC, rate of polymerization (Rp, flexural strength (FS, and elastic modulus (E were evaluated. Immediate SBS of SC2, SET, U100, and YCEM were statistically higher than that of BC (p < 0.001. After 12 months, all SARCs showed reduced SBS values and U100 showed values similar to those of SET and YCEM, and higher than those of BC and SC2 (p = 0.001. Demineralization pattern of SARCs was similar. At 24h, all SARCs showed no differences in the pH-value, except BC and U100 (p < 0.001. YCEM showed the highest Rp. U100, YCEM, and SC2 showed statistically higher FS (p<0.001 and E (p < 0.001 when compared with SET and BC. U100 and YCEM showed the best long-term bonding irrespective of the storage period. A significant reduction in SBS was found for all groups after 12 months. SBS was not shown to be correlated with physical-chemical properties, and appeared to be material-dependent. The polymerization profile suggested that an increased time of light activation, longer than that recommended by manufacturers, would be necessary to optimize DC of SARCs.

  18. The effect of curing conditions on the dentin bond strength of two dual-cure resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Atsuko; Takahashi, Rena; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the curing condition (i.e., the curing mode and restoration thickness) on the tensile bond strength of a dual-cure resin cement applied to dentin. Indirect composite resin disks (1, 2, and 3mm in thickness) were prepared. The irradiance of a halogen light curing unit through each disk was measured by a curing radiometer. A measurement was also taken for the condition with no disk. Following this, two dual-cure resin cements, Panavia F2.0 and Panavia V5, were polymerized in either dual-cure mode or self-cure mode to bond the composite resin disk to the flat dentin surface. The specimens were sectioned and subjected to a microtensile bond strength (μTBS) test after 24h of water storage. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed with multiple comparisons by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05). The irradiance values [mW/cm 2 ] measured through indirect composite resin disks were 600 (0mm), 200 (1mm), 90 (2mm), and not detected (3mm). Two-way ANOVA indicated that both the curing condition and the type of resin cement affected the μTBS (pPanavia V5 bonded to dentin were significantly higher than those of Panavia F2.0 bonded to dentin (pPanavia V5, showed higher dentin bonding than Panavia F2.0 in both dual- and self-cure modes. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of different surface-treatment methods on the bond strengths of resin cements to full-ceramic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Kansu

    2011-09-01

    Conclusions: The in vitro findings from this study indicate that surface-treatment procedures applied to the IPS Empress and the IPS Empress 2 full-ceramic systems are important when cement types are considered. In contrast, cement types and surface-treatment methods had no effect on changing the bond strength of the In-Ceram ceramic system.

  20. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bond strength of fiber post: Evaluation of surface characteristic and bonded area of fiber post with resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Fazal; Ibrahim, Nur Sukainah

    2015-01-01

    Fiber post is cemented to a root canal to restore coronal tooth structure. This research aims to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on bond strength of fiber post with resin cement. A total of 40 of the two types of fiber posts, namely, FRC Prostec (FRC) and Fiber KOR (KOR), were used for the experiment. UV irradiation was applied on top of the fiber post surface for 0, 15, 20, and 30 min. The irradiated surface of the fiber posts (n = 5) were immediately bonded with resin cement (Rely X U200) after UV irradiation. Shear bond strength (SBS) MPa was measured, and the dislodged area of post surfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopes. Changes in surface roughness (Ra) of the FRC group after UV irradiation were observed (n = 3) using atomic force microscopy. Data of SBS were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, followed by multiple comparisons (P < 0.05). SBS was significantly higher for 20 min of UV irradiation of the FRC group while significantly higher SBS was observed with 15 min of UV irradiation of the KOR group. Resin cement was more evident (cohesive failure) on the dislodged post surface of the UV treated groups compared with the control. The surface roughness of the FRC post was Ra = 175.1 nm and Ra = 929.2 nm for the control and the 20 min group, respectively. Higher surface roughness of the UV irradiated group indicated formation of mechanical retention on the fiber post surface. Evidence of cohesive failure was observed which indicated higher SBS of fiber post with the UV irradiated group.

  1. Effect of chlorhexidine disinfectant on bond strength of glass ionomer cement to dentin using atraumatic restorative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadenya, Rose; Menon, Sandhya; Mante, Francis

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) disinfectant on bond strength (BS) of high-density glass ionomer cement (HDGIC) to dentin following atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) and conventional preparations. Specimens were divided into four groups: Group 1--ART (control); Group 2--ART with CHX disinfection; Group 3--Conventional (control); Group 4--Conventional with CHX disinfection. HDGIC was packed in cylindrical molds placed over flat dentin surfaces; BS was measured after seven days. ART-prepared dentin surfaces disinfected with CHX provided bonding to HDGIC that was comparable to untreated dentin and to conventionally prepared dentin.

  2. Preparation and evaluation of a high-strength biocompatible glass-ionomer cement for improved dental restoratives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, D; Zhao, J; Park, J; Chu, T M; Yang, Y; Zhang, J T

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a high-strength light-cured glass-ionomer cement (LCGIC). The polymer in the cement was composed of the 6-arm star-shape poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), which was synthesized using atom-transfer radical polymerization. The polymer was used to formulate with water and Fuji II LC filler to form LCGIC. Compressive strength (CS) was used as a screening tool for evaluation. Commercial glass-ionomer cement Fuji II LC was used as control. The results show that the 6-arm PAA polymer exhibited a lower viscosity in water as compared to its linear counterpart that was synthesized via conventional free-radical polymerization. This new LCGIC system was 48% in CS, 77% in diametral tensile strength, 95% in flexural strength and 59% in fracture toughness higher but 93.6% in shrinkage lower than Fuji II LC. An increasing polymer content significantly increased CS, whereas an increasing glass filler content increased neither yield strength nor ultimate CS except for modulus. During aging, the experimental cement showed a significant and continuous increase in yield strength, modulus and ultimate CS, but Fuji II LC only showed a significant increase in strength within 24 h. The experimental cement was very biocompatible in vivo to bone and showed little in vitro cytotoxicity. It appears that this novel LCGIC cement will be a better dental restorative because it demonstrated significantly improved mechanical strengths and better in vitro and in vivo biocompatibilities as compared to the current commercial LCGIC system

  3. Preparation and evaluation of a high-strength biocompatible glass-ionomer cement for improved dental restoratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, D; Zhao, J; Park, J; Chu, T M [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Yang, Y; Zhang, J T [Department of Phamacology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)], E-mail: dxie@iupui.edu

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a high-strength light-cured glass-ionomer cement (LCGIC). The polymer in the cement was composed of the 6-arm star-shape poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), which was synthesized using atom-transfer radical polymerization. The polymer was used to formulate with water and Fuji II LC filler to form LCGIC. Compressive strength (CS) was used as a screening tool for evaluation. Commercial glass-ionomer cement Fuji II LC was used as control. The results show that the 6-arm PAA polymer exhibited a lower viscosity in water as compared to its linear counterpart that was synthesized via conventional free-radical polymerization. This new LCGIC system was 48% in CS, 77% in diametral tensile strength, 95% in flexural strength and 59% in fracture toughness higher but 93.6% in shrinkage lower than Fuji II LC. An increasing polymer content significantly increased CS, whereas an increasing glass filler content increased neither yield strength nor ultimate CS except for modulus. During aging, the experimental cement showed a significant and continuous increase in yield strength, modulus and ultimate CS, but Fuji II LC only showed a significant increase in strength within 24 h. The experimental cement was very biocompatible in vivo to bone and showed little in vitro cytotoxicity. It appears that this novel LCGIC cement will be a better dental restorative because it demonstrated significantly improved mechanical strengths and better in vitro and in vivo biocompatibilities as compared to the current commercial LCGIC system.

  4. Expression of the inflammatory marker cyclooxygenase-2 in dental pulp cells cultured with mineral trioxide aggregate or calcium silicate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Lin; Kao, Chia-Tze; Ding, Shinn-Jyh; Shie, Ming-You; Huang, Tsui-Hsien

    2010-03-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium silicate (CS) cements exhibit acceptable physical and chemical properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of MTA and CS cements on inflammatory reactions in primary cultured human dental pulp cells. The mitochondrial colorimetric assay was used to evaluate pulp cell survival rates. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry was used to observe focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) distributions in the cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to assess COX-2 expression. The results showed that MTA and CS are biocompatible with pulp cells (P>.05). FAK was well-distributed in pulp cells in contact with both cements. Both MTA and CS cements induced pulp cell inflammation as evidenced by increased COX-2 expression. The present study demonstrated that MTA and CS cements are biocompatible with primary cultured pulp cells. Both cements can induce inflammatory COX-2 expression in the pulp cells. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of exposed surface area, volume and environmental pH on the calcium ion release of three commercially available tricalcium silicate based dental cements

    OpenAIRE

    Rajasekharan, Sivaprakash; Vercruysse, Chris; Martens, Luc; Verbeeck, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    Tricalcium silicate cements (TSC) are used in dental traumatology and endodontics for their bioactivity which is mostly attributed to formation of calcium hydroxide during TSC hydration and its subsequent release of calcium and hydroxide ions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of volume (Vol), exposed surface area (ESA) and pH of surrounding medium on calcium ion release. Three commercially available hydraulic alkaline dental cements were mixed and condensed into cylindrical t...

  6. Influence of HEMA content on the mechanical and bonding properties of experimental HEMA-added glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Nam Lim

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of incrementally added uncured HEMA in experimental HEMA-added glass ionomer cement (HAGICs on the mechanical and shear bond strength (SBS of these materials. Increasing contents of uncured HEMA (10-50 wt.% were added to a commercial glass ionomer cement liquid (Fuji II, GC, Japan, and the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of the resulting HAGICs were measured. The SBS to non-precious alloy, precious alloy, enamel and dentin was also determined after these surfaces were subjected to either airborne-particle abrasion (Aa or SiC abrasive paper grinding (Sp. Both strength properties of the HAGICs first increased and then decreased as the HEMA content increased, with a maximum value obtained when the HEMA content was 20% for the compressive strength and 40% for the tensile strength. The SBS was influenced by the HEMA content, the surface treatment, and the type of bonding surface (p<0.05. These results suggest that addition of an appropriate amount of HEMA to glass ionomer cement would increase diametral tensile strength as well as bond strength to alloys and teeth. These results also confirm that the optimal HEMA content ranged from 20 to 40% within the limitations of this experimental condition.

  7. Effect of activation mode of dual-cured resin cements and low-viscosity composite liners on bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rubens Nazareno; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the activation mode of dual-cured resin cements and application of low-viscosity composite liners over self-primed dentin on bond strength (BS) of dentin-bonding agents (DBA). Three DBA (Single Bond; Prompt L-Pop and Clearfil SE Bond), their respective resin cements (RelyX ARC and Panavia F) and two low-viscosity composites (Filtek Flow and Protect Liner F) were tested. After removing the buccal enamel surfaces of 25 bovine incisors, each flat dentin surface was sectioned longitudinally and divided into two similar parts. The dentin surfaces were wet-abraded with 600-grit SiC paper and randomly divided into 10 groups. Experimental groups comprised the use of DBA and their respective dual-cured resin cements, with or without light-activation of resin cements. The low-viscosity resin was used only for the self-etching systems, Prompt L-Pop and Clearfil SE Bond. Three resin cement cylinders (0.5mm high and 0.75mm diameter) were built on each bonded dentin surface, using a tygon tubing mold. After water storage for 24h, specimens were subjected to micro-shear testing. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Light-activation of resin cements resulted in significantly higher BS for all DBA versus groups in which the resin cements were allowed to self-cure. The low-viscosity composite application increased the BS only for Prompt L-Pop. The bond strength of resin cements to dentin is reduced if light-activation is not employed. The use of a low-viscosity composite liner resulted in improved bond strength only for the single-step self-etching adhesive.

  8. Microstructural characterization of dental zinc phosphate cements using combined small angle neutron scattering and microfocus X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Alberto; Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Kumpová, Ivana; Mancini, Lucia; Appavou, Marie-Sousai

    2017-04-01

    To characterize the microstructure of two zinc phosphate cement formulations in order to investigate the role of liquid/solid ratio and composition of powder component, on the developed porosity and, consequently, on compressive strength. X-ray powder diffraction with the Rietveld method was used to study the phase composition of zinc oxide powder and cements. Powder component and cement microstructure were investigated with scanning electron microscopy. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and microfocus X-ray computed tomography (XmCT) were together employed to characterize porosity and microstructure of dental cements. Compressive strength tests were performed to evaluate their mechanical performance. The beneficial effects obtained by the addition of Al, Mg and B to modulate powder reactivity were mitigated by the crystallization of a Zn aluminate phase not involved in the cement setting reaction. Both cements showed spherical pores with a bimodal distribution at the micro/nano-scale. Pores, containing a low density gel-like phase, developed through segregation of liquid during setting. Increasing liquid/solid ratio from 0.378 to 0.571, increased both SANS and XmCT-derived specific surface area (by 56% and 22%, respectively), porosity (XmCT-derived porosity increased from 3.8% to 5.2%), the relative fraction of large pores ≥50μm, decreased compressive strength from 50±3MPa to 39±3MPa, and favored microstructural and compositional inhomogeneities. Explain aspects of powder design affecting the setting reaction and, in turn, cement performance, to help in optimizing cement formulation. The mechanism behind development of porosity and specific surface area explains mechanical performance, and processes such as erosion and fluoride release/uptake. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of different power outputs of carbon dioxide laser on bonding between zirconia ceramic surface and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, CaĞri; KalyoncuoĞlu, Elif; Balkaya, Veysel

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different power outputs of a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser on shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconium dioxide-based ceramic. Fifty zirconium dioxide core specimens (10 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness) were produced and they were embedded in the centers of auto-polymerizing acrylic resin blocks. Ten specimens served as control and no surface treatment was applied. Subsequently specimens were randomly divided into four groups, each containing 10 specimens for surface treatment with CO2 laser with different output power; laser treated with 2 W (Group 2 W), 3 W (Group 3 W), 4 W (Group 4 W) and finally 5 W (Group 5 W). Fifty composite resin discs were fabricated and cemented with adhesive resin cement to the specimen surfaces. A universal test machine was used for shear bond strength test at a crosshead speed 1 mm/min. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) with Post-Hoc Tukey tests (α = 0.05). It was found that the shear bond strength values were affected by power outputs of laser (p < 0.05). Highest shear bond strength values were obtained with group 2 W (21.0 ± 2.7). Lowest values were obtained with group 5 W (14.4 ± 1.6). The current study revealed that there was a relationship between laser output power and shear bond strength for zirconium dioxide ceramics. However, output power of the laser and the energy level is a critical factor on micromechanical retention.

  10. Gene Expression Profiling and Molecular Signaling of Dental Pulp Cells in Response to Tricalcium Silicate Cements: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinam, Elanagai; Rajasekharan, Sivaprakash; Chitturi, Ravi Teja; Martens, Luc; De Coster, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Signaling molecules and responding dental pulp stem cells are the 2 main control keys of dentin regeneration/dentinogenesis. The aim of this study was to present a systematic review investigating the gene expression of various dental pulp cells in response to different variants of tricalcium silicate cements. A systematic search of the literature was performed by 2 independent reviewers followed by article selection and data extraction. Studies analyzing all sorts of dental pulp cells (DPCs) and any variant of tricalcium silicate cement either as the experimental or as the control group were included. A total of 39 articles were included in the review. Among the included studies, ProRoot MTA (Dentsply, Tulsa Dental, OK) was the most commonly used tricalcium silicate cement variant. The extracellular signal regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway was the most commonly activated pathway to be identified, and similarly, dentin sialophosphoprotein osteocalcin dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1, alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, type I collagen, and Runx2 were the most commonly expressed genes in that order of frequency. Biodentine (Septodont Ltd, Saint Maur des Faussés, France), Bioaggregate (Innovative Bioceramix, Vancouver, BC, Canada), and mineral trioxide aggregate stimulate the osteogenic/odontogenic capacity of DPCs by proliferation, angiogenesis, and biomineralization through the activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase ½, nuclear factor E2 related factor 2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase, p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, and fibroblast growth factor receptor pathways. When DPCs are placed into direct contact with tricalcium silicate cements, they show higher levels of gene activation, which in turn could translate into more effective pulpal repair and faster and more predictable formation of reparative dentin. Copyright © 2015 American

  11. The Effect of Novel Mercapto Silane Systems on Resin Bond Strength to Dental Noble Metal Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yangho; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kim, Young Kyung; Son, Jun Sik; Lee, Eunkyung; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2015-07-01

    Self-assembled monolayers of thiols (RSH), which are key elements in nanoscience and nanotechnology, have been used to link a range of materials to planar gold surfaces or gold nanoparticles. In this study, the adhesive performance of mercapto silane systems to dental noble metal alloys was evaluated in vitro and compared with that of commercial dental primers. Dental gold-palladium-platinum (Au-Pd-Pt), gold-palladium-silver (Au-Pd-Ag), and palladium-silver (Pd-Ag) alloys were used as the bonding substrates after air-abrasion (sandblasting). One of the following primers was applied to each alloy: (1) no primer treatment (control), (2) three commer- cial primers: V-Primer, Metal Primer II, and M.L. Primer, and (3) two experimental silane primer systems: 2-step application with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (SPS) (1.0 wt%) and then 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) (1.0 wt%), and a silane blend consisting of SPS and MPS (both 1.0 wt%). Composite resin cylinders with a diameter of 2.38 mm were bonded to the surfaces and irradiated for 40 sec using a curing light. After storage in water at 37 °C for 24 h, all the bonded specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before the shear bond strength test. Regardless of the alloy type, the mercapto silane systems (both the 2-step and blend systems) consistently showed superior bonding performance than the commercial primers. Contact angle analysis of the primed surfaces indicated that higher resin bond strengths were produced on more hydrophilic alloy surfaces. These novel mercapto silane systems are a promising alternative for improving resin bonding to dental noble metal alloys.

  12. In vitro evaluation of failure loads of nonmetal cantilevered resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, A.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in vitro the influence of fiber reinforcement on the failure loads of resin composite beams, simulating cantilevered two-unit resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses, and compare the results with similarly obtained failure loads of ZrO2 and CoCr beams of a comparable design.

  13. Mechanical performance of cement- and screw-retained all-ceramic single crowns on dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeier, Matthias; Ristow, Oliver; Erdelt, Kurt; Beuer, Florian

    2018-03-01

    This in-vitro study was performed to compare the contact wear, fracture strength and failure mode of implant-supported all-ceramic single crowns manufactured with various fabrication and fixation concepts. Fifty dental implants (Conelog Ø 4,3mm/L11mm, Camlog Biotechnologies AG) were embedded and treated with all-ceramic molar single-crowns. Three groups received hand-layered zirconia crowns (IPS e.max Ceram/ IPS e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar Vivadent AG): CZL (cement-retained zirconia-based layered) group crowns were cemented conventionally, SZL (screw-retained zirconia-based layered) group crowns were screw-retained, MZL (modified zirconia-based layered) group crowns showed a different coping design with screw retention. The specimens of SST (screw-retained sintering-technique) and SFL (screw-retained full-contour lithium-disilicate) group were CAD/CAM (Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing) fabricated in the sintering technique (IPS e.max ZirCAD/IPS e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent AG) and full-contour of lithium disilicate (IPS e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent AG) respectively and screw-retained. All specimens underwent artificial aging, load until failure and a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The received data were statistically compared (one-way ANOVA; Student-Newman-Keuls test; Mann-Whitney U-test) at a significance level of 5%. Mouth-motion fatigue testing caused two abutment fractures (SST group and SZL group) and two chipping events (CZL group). Specimens of MZL group showed statistically significant less contact wear compared to the other groups (pCAD/CAM fabricated specimens towards manually veneered components. The mode of retention did not influence the fracture resistance but the failure patterns of the specimens. CAD/CAM milled lithium-disilicate crowns seemed to be a preserving factor for dental implants. The mode of retention and veneering influences the mechanical performance of implant-supported single crowns.

  14. Adhesive dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlu, N.

    2005-01-01

    Two main classes of material are involved, the glass-ionomer cements and the composite resins. This investigation describes the way they are bonded to the tooth and highlights their differences. Glass ionomers develop a zone of interaction with the tooth as they age which ultimately gives an extremely strong bond, and results in excellent retention rates. By contrast, bonding of composite resins is more complicated and possibly less effective, though these materials have better wear resistance and better aesthetics than glass ionomers. Assessment of bond durability is difficult. This is because a dental restorative can fail by a number of mechanisms apart from de bonding: for example, through wear or fracture

  15. Micro-shear bond strength of different resin cements to ceramic/glass-polymer CAD-CAM block materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Ergun, Gulfem; Egilmez, Ferhan; Vallittu, Pekka Kalevi; Lassila, Lippo Veli Juhana

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid treatment on bond strength of resin cements to three different types of ceramic/glass containing CAD-CAM block composite materials. CAD-CAM block materials of polymer infiltrated (Vita Enamic), resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate) and nanoceramic (Cerasmart) with a thickness of 1.5mm were randomly divided into two groups according to the surface treatment performed. In Group 1, specimens were wet-ground with silicon carbide abrasive papers up to no. 1000. In Group 2, 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel was applied to ceramics. Three different resin cements (RelyX, Variolink Esthetic and G-CEM LinkAce) were applied to the tubes in 1.2-mm thick increments and light-cured for 40s using LED light curing unit. Half of the specimens (n=10) were submitted to thermal cycling (5000 cycles, 5-55°C). The strength measurements were accomplished with a universal testing machine (Lloyd Instruments) at a cross-head speed of 0.5mm/min until the failure occurs. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed with multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc tests (α=0.05). There were significant differences between ceramics and resin cements (pceramics (pceramic/glass-polymer materials might promote the bonding capacity of these systems. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement: the effect of surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement. Two types of CAD/CAM restorative materials (Vita Enamic [VE] and Lava Ultimate [LU]) were used. The specimens were divided into five groups in each test according to the surface treatment performed; Gr 1 (control; no treatment), Gr 2 (sandblasted [SB]), Gr 3 (SB+silane [S]), Gr 4 (hydrofluoric acid [HF]), and Gr 5 (HF+S). A dual-curing self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE [BF]) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion after 24 h of storage in distilled water or after 30 days using the μTBS test. Following fracture testing, specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope and SEM. Surface roughness and morphology of the CAD/CAM restorative materials were characterized after treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment, type of CAD/CAM restorative material, and water storage periods showed a significant effect on the μTBS (p0.05). On the other hand, for the VE/BF system, surface treatment with HF+S showed higher bond strength values compared with SB and HF surface treatments (pmaterials was modified after treatments. The effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement is material dependent. The VE/BF CAD/CAM material provided higher bond strength values compared with the LU/BF CAD/CAM material.

  17. Influence of alloy microstructure on the microshear bond strength of basic alloys to a resin luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, José; Costa, José Ferreira; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Souza, Douglas Nesadal de; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of microstructure and composition of basic alloys on their microshear bond strength (µSBS) to resin luting cement. The alloys used were: Supreme Cast-V (SC), Tilite Star (TS), Wiron 99 (W9), VeraBond II (VBII), VeraBond (VB), Remanium (RM) and IPS d.SIGN 30 (IPS). Five wax patterns (13 mm in diameter and 4mm height) were invested, and cast in a centrifugal casting machine for each basic alloy. The specimens were embedded in resin, polished with a SiC paper and sandblasted. After cleaning the metal surfaces, six tygon tubes (0.5 mm height and 0.75 mm in diameter) were placed on each alloy surface, the resin cement (Panavia F) was inserted, and the excess was removed before light-curing. After storage (24 h/37°C), the specimens were subjected to µSBS testing (0.5 mm/min). The data were subjected to a one-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Turkey's test (α=0.05). After polishing, their microstructures were revealed with specific conditioners. The highest µSBS (mean/standard deviation in MPa) were observed in the alloys with dendritic structure, eutectic formation or precipitation: VB (30.6/1.7), TS (29.8/0.9), SC (30.6/1.7), with the exception of IPS (31.1/0.9) which showed high µSBS but no eutectic formation. The W9 (28.1/1.5), VBII (25.9/2.0) and RM (25.9/0.9) showed the lowest µSBS and no eutectic formation. It seems that alloys with eutectic formation provide the highest µSBS values when bonded to a light-cured resin luting cement.

  18. Retention of cast crown copings cemented to implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, J E; Richards, L C; Abbott, J R

    2008-12-01

    The cementation of crowns to dental implant abutments is an accepted form of crown retention that requires consideration of the properties of available cements within the applied clinical context. Dental luting agents are exposed to a number of stressors that may reduce crown retention in vivo, not the least of which is occlusal loading. This study investigated the influence of compressive cyclic loading on the physical retention of cast crown copings cemented to implant abutments. Cast crown copings were cemented to Straumann synOcta titanium implant abutments with three different readily used and available cements. Specimens were placed in a humidifier, thermocycled and subjected to one of four quantities of compressive cyclic loading. The uniaxial tensile force required to remove the cast crown copings was then recorded. The mean retention values for crown copings cemented with Panavia-F cement were statistically significantly greater than both KetacCem and TempBond non-eugenol cements at each compressive cyclic loading quantity. KetacCem and TempBond non-eugenol cements produced relatively low mean retention values that were not statistically significantly different at each quantity of compressive cyclic loading. Compressive cyclic loading had a statistically significant effect on Panavia-F specimens alone, but increased loading quantities produced no further statistically significant difference in mean retention. Within the limitations of the current in vitro conditions employed in this study, the retention of cast crown copings cemented to Straumann synOcta implant abutments with a resin, glass ionomer and temporary cement was significantly affected by cement type but not compressive cyclic loading. Resin cement is the cement of choice for the definitive non-retrievable cementation of cast crown copings to Straumann synOcta implant abutments out of the three cements tested.

  19. Longevity of conventional and bonded (sealed) amalgam restorations in a private general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsor, S J; Chadwick, R G

    2009-01-24

    To compare and contrast the longevity of conventionally placed dental amalgam restorations with those placed using bonding techniques. Retrospective survival analysis (Kaplan Meier) of dental amalgam restorations placed by a single operator in a private general dental practice. The records relating to dental amalgam restorations placed between 1 August 1996 and 31 July 2006 were sourced. The details of these were placed into a database that permitted flexible interrogation. Survival data on conventionally placed amalgams (C) and those bonded with either Panavia Ex (PE) or Rely X ARC (RX) were exported into a statistical package to permit survival analysis by the method of Kaplan and Meier.Results The number of restorations available for analysis were C = 3,854, PE = 51 and RX = 1,797. Percentage survival at one year was C = 96.29, PE = 95.65, and RX = 97.58. Percentage survival at five years was C = 86.21, PE = 76.35 and RX = 82.59. A Log Rank test demonstrated no statistically significant difference (p >0.05) in survival between the restoration types. Amalgam restorations bonded with PE or RX exhibited an acceleration of failure rate around 1,000 days post-placement. Further survival analyses of the method of restoration versus type of restored teeth (molar/premolar) and cavity preparation (Class I/II) showed no significant difference in the survival curves in respect of type of restored tooth. In the comparison of Class I and II cavities, the survival curves for the restorations differed significantly (p p = 0.2634). This was also the case for the Class II restorations (p = 0.2260). Within the limitations of the study, bonding amalgams, compared to placing them conventionally, afforded no significant benefit upon restoration longevity. This, coupled with the emerging trend of an accelerating decline in longevity of bonded amalgams from 1,000 days onwards and with the greater cost, challenges the justification for routine bonding of amalgams.

  20. Deposition of SiOx thin films on Y-TZP by reactive magnetron sputtering: influence of plasma parameters on the adhesion properties between Y-TZP and resin cement for application in dental prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Renato Calvacanti de Queiroz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper SiOx thin films were deposited on Y-TZP ceramics by reactive magnetron sputtering technique in order to improve the adhesion properties between Y-TZP and resin cement for applications in dental prosthesis. For fixed cathode voltage, target current, working pressure and target-to-substrate distance, SiOx thin films were deposited at different oxygen concentrations in the Ar+O2 plasma forming gas. After deposition processes, SiOx thin films were characterized by profilometry, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Adhesion properties between Y-TZP and resin cement were evaluated by shear testing. Results indicate that films deposited at 20%O2 increased the bond strength to (32.8 ± 5.4 MPa. This value has not been achieved by traditional methods.

  1. Gold nanoparticles in injectable calcium phosphate cement enhance osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yang; Chen, Huimin; Zhang, Feimin; Bao, Chongyun; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Ma, Junqing; Gu, Ning; Xu, Hockin H K

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a novel calcium phosphate cement containing gold nanoparticles (GNP-CPC) was developed. Its osteogenic induction ability on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) was investigated for the first time. The incorporation of GNPs improved hDPSCs behavior on CPC, including better cell adhesion (about 2-fold increase in cell spreading) and proliferation, and enhanced osteogenic differentiation (about 2-3-fold increase at 14 days). GNPs endow CPC with micro-nano-structure, thus improving surface properties for cell adhesion and subsequent behaviors. In addition, GNPs released from GNP-CPC were internalized by hDPSCs, as verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thus enhancing cell functions. The culture media containing GNPs enhanced the cellular activities of hDPSCs. This result was consistent with and supported the osteogenic induction results of GNP-CPC. In conclusion, GNP-CPC significantly enhanced the osteogenic functions of hDPSCs. GNPs are promising to modify CPC with nanotopography and work as bioactive additives thus enhance bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of metal primers and tarnish treatment on bonding between dental alloys and veneer resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Seung-Sik; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Cho, Lee-Ra; Park, Chan-Jin

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metal primers on the bonding of dental alloys and veneer resin. Polyvinylpyrrolidone solution's tarnish effect on bonding strength was also investigated. Disk-shape metal specimens (diameter 8 mm, thickness 1.5 mm) were made from 3 kinds of alloy (Co-Cr, Ti and Au-Ag-Pd alloy) and divided into 4 groups per each alloy. Half specimens (n=12 per group) in tarnished group were immersed into polyvinylpyrrolidone solution for 24 hours. In Co-Cr and Ti-alloy, Alloy Primer (MDP + VBATDT) and MAC-Bond II (MAC-10) were applied, while Alloy Primer and V-Primer (VBATDT) were applied to Au-Ag-Pd alloys. After surface treatment, veneering composite resin were applied and shear bond strength test were conducted. Alloy Primer showed higher shear bond strength than MAC-Bond II in Co-Cr alloys and Au-Ag-Pd alloy (PAg-Pd alloy surfaces presented significantly decreased shear bond strength. Combined use of MDP and VBATDT were effective in bonding of the resin to Co-Cr and Au-Ag-Pd alloy. Tarnish using polyvinylpyrrolidone solution negatively affected on the bonding of veneer resin to Co-Cr and Au-Ag-Pd alloys.

  3. Bonding of resin-based luting cements to zirconia with and without the use of ceramic priming agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nakayama, Daisuke; Komine, Futoshi; Blatz, Markus B; Matsumura, Hideo

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated and compared bonding characteristics of resin-based luting agents and special ceramic primers to zirconia. Disk specimens (n = 242) were fabricated from zirconium dioxide ceramics (Katana) and bonded with four resin-based luting agents without priming. In addition, zirconia was bonded with 7 bondingsystem combinations of three priming agents and three resin-based luting agents. Two of the resin-based luting agents and two ceramic priming agents contain an identical adhesive monomer, 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), either in the material itself or in the priming agent. Shear bond strength was determined after 20,000 cycles of thermocycling. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed for both pre- and post-thermocycling groups to evaluate the difference among primer and luting agent variations. On the basis of the Kruskal-Wallis test, Steel-Dwass multiple comparisons were further performed to compare the difference among four luting agents and seven conbinations of three primers and three luting agents for both pre- and post-thermocycling conditions. Within the four unprimed groups, Clearfil SA Cement (5.8 MPa) and Panavia F 2.0 (6.7 MPa) showed statistically higher post-thermocycling bond strength than the other materials (0.1 MPa) (p primed with Monobond Plus (4.0-4.6 MPa) (p priming agents containing the adhesive monomer MDP provide better bond strength to zirconia than do other systems.

  4. Influence of resin cement polymerization shrinkage on stresses in porcelain crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Liliana G; Kelly, J Robert

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of polymerization shrinkage of the cement layer on stresses within feldspathic ceramic crowns, using experimentally validated FEA models for (1) increasing occlusal cement thickness; and, (2) bonded versus non-bonded ceramic-cement interfaces. 2-D axial symmetric models simulated stylized feldspathic crowns (1.5mm occlusal thickness) cemented with resin-cement layers of 50-500μm on dentin preparations, being loaded (500N) or not. Ceramic-cement interface was either bonded or not. Cement was bonded to the dentin in all models. Maximum axial shrinkage of 0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 4.65% were simulated. The first principal stresses developing in the cementation surface at the center and at the occluso-axial line-angle of the crown were registered. Polymerization shrinkage of the cement increased tensile stresses in the ceramic, especially in loaded non-bonded crowns for thicker cement layers. Stresses in loaded non-bonded crowns increased as much as 87% when cement shrinkage increased from 0% to 4.65% (100-187MPa), for a 500μm-thick cement. Increasing polymerization shrinkage strain raised the tensile stresses, especially at the internal occlusal-axial line-angle, for bonded crowns. Changes in the polymerization shrinkage strain (from 0% to 4.65%) have little effect on the tensile stresses generated at the cementation surface of the ceramic crowns, when the occlusal cement thickness is thin (approx. 50μm for bonded crowns). However, as the cement becomes thicker stresses within the ceramic become significant. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bonding material containing ashes after domestic waste incineration for cementation of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, S.A.; Varlakov, A.P.; Gorbunova, O.A.; Arustamov, A.E.; Barinov, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that cement minerals hydration is accompanied with heat emission. Heat of hardening influences formation of a cement compound structure and its properties. It is important to reduce the heat quantity at continuous cementation of waste and filling of compartments of a repository or containers by a cement grout. For reduction of heating, it is necessary to use cement of mineral additives (fuel ashes, slag and hydraulic silica). Properties of ashes after domestic waste incineration can be similar to ones of fly fuel ashes. However, ash after domestic waste incineration is toxic industrial waste as it contains toxic elements (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb, Zn). Utilization of secondary waste (slag and ash) of combustion plants is an important environmental approach to solving cities' issues. Results of the research have shown that ashes of combustion plants can be used for radioactive waste conditioning. Co-processing of toxic and radioactive waste is ecologically and economically effective. At SIA 'Radon', experimental batches of cement compositions are used for cementation of oil containing waste. (authors)

  6. [Preliminary study of bonding strength between diatomite-based dental ceramic and veneering porcelains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-li; Gao, Mei-qin; Cheng, Yu-ye; Zhang, Fei-min

    2015-04-01

    In order to choose the best veneering porcelain for diatomite-based dental ceramic substrate, the bonding strength between diatomite-based dental ceramics and veneering porcelains was measured, and the microstructure and elements distribution of interface were analyzed. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of diatomite-based dental ceramics was detected by dilatometry. Three veneering porcelain materials were selected with the best CTE matching including alumina veneering porcelain (group A), titanium porcelain veneering porcelain (group B), and E-max veneering porcelain (group C). Shear bonding strength was detected. SEM and EDS were used to observe the interface microstructure and element distribution. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 17.0 software package. The CTE of diatomite-based dental ceramics at 25-500 degrees centigrade was 8.85×10-6K-1. The diatomite-based substrate ceramics combined best with group C. Shear bonding strength between group A and C and group B and C both showed significant differences(Pveneer.

  7. Effect of surface modifications on the bond strength of zirconia ceramic with resin cement resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Lubica; Ulmer, Peter; Lehmann, Frank; Wille, Sebastian; Polonskyi, Oleksander; Johannes, Martina; Köbel, Stefan; Trottenberg, Thomas; Bornholdt, Sven; Haase, Fabian; Kersten, Holger; Kern, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    particles were 96.7% cohesive. Treatment of zirconia ceramic surfaces with abrasive zirconia particles is a promising method to increase the tensile bond strength without significant damage of the ceramic surface itself. An alternative promising method is slip casting. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Anterior Cantilever Resin-Bonded Fixed Dental Prostheses: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourshed, Bilal; Samran, Abdulaziz; Alfagih, Amal; Samran, Ahalm; Abdulrab, Saleem; Kern, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    This review evaluated the survival rate of single retainer anterior resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs) to determine whether the choice of material affects their clinical outcome. An electronic search of the English peer-reviewed dental literature in PubMed was conducted to identify all publications reporting on cantilever RBFDPs until May 2016. Study information extraction and methodological quality assessments were accomplished by two reviewers independently. The searched keywords were as follows: "resin-bonded, single retainer, all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs), all-ceramic RBFDPs, cantilever resin, RBFDPs, cantilever resin-bonded bridge, two units cantilevered, two-unit cantilevered, metal-ceramic cantilever, and metal-ceramic." Furthermore, the ''Related Articles'' feature of PubMed was used to identify further references of interest within the primary search. The bibliographies of the obtained references were used to identify pertinent secondary references. Review articles were also used to identify relevant articles. After the application of exclusion criteria, the definitive list of articles was screened to extract the qualitative data, and the results were analyzed. Overall 2588 articles were dedicated at the first review phase; however, only 311 studies were left after the elimination of duplicates and unrelated studies. Seventeen studies passed the second review phase. Five studies were excluded because they were follow-up studies of the same study cohort. Twelve studies were finally selected. The use of cantilever RBFDPs showed promising results and high survival rates. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Effects of Hot Chemical Etching and 10-Metacryloxydecyl Dihydrogen Phosphate (MDP) Monomer on the Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramics to Resin-Based Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Canan; Çakırbay Tanış, Merve; Şen, Murat

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the hot chemical etching method on the shear bond strength between zirconia and two resin cements. Sixty zirconia specimens (13 × 7.5 × 2.5 mm 3 ) were prepared and treated as follows: (1) airborne-particle abrasion with 50 μm Al 2 O 3 particles; (2) hot chemical etching for 10 minutes; (3) hot chemical etching for 30 minutes. Sixty composite cylinders of 3 mm diameter and height were prepared and bonded to zirconia specimens, which were divided into subgroups A and B. Group A: cemented with conventional resin cement (Variolink II); group B: cemented with 10-metacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) monomer containing resin cement (Panavia SA) after the application of surface treatments. Next, the specimens were stored in 37ºC distilled water for 24 hours. Following water storage, shear bond strength test was performed at a 1 mm/min crosshead speed in a universal testing machine. The statistical analyses were performed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. p MDP monomer-containing resin cement, Panavia SA, improved the resin bonding of zirconia ceramics when combined with airborne-particle abrasion. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. A new concept and finite-element study on dental bond strength tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao-Zhuang; Homaei, Ehsan; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Tsoi, James Kit Hon

    2016-10-01

    Numerous bond strength tests have been performed on dental adhesion experiments. Yet, the validity of these bond strength tests is controversial due to the name (e.g., "shear" or "tensile") may not reflect to the true and complete stress situation, i.e., assumed uniform shear or uniaxial tensile conditions. Thus, the aim of this study was to simulate and compare the stress distribution of and between shear bond strength (SBS), tensile bond strength (TBS), mold-enclosed shear bond strength (ME-SBS) and de novo lever-induced mold-enclosed shear bond strength (LIME-SBS) tests. 3-Dimensional finite element method (FEM) was used on the dental resin-bonded surfaces (i.e., titanium alloy, dentine and porcelain) interphased with adhesive layer (thickness 5μm) to simulate the mechanical tests. For ME-SBS, both polycarbonate and stainless steel molds were used. For LIME-SBS, stainless steel levers and molds with lengths of 3mm, 6mm, 12mm, 15mm and 18mm were used. The applied loads on these models were 50N, 100N and 200N. De novo LIME-SBS test was the most optimal configuration to evaluate "shear" bond strength of adhesive in regards to providing significantly high and uniform shear stress as well as eliminating tensile stress at the interface. The conventional SBS test created very high tensile stress at the load area, whereas the TBS created optimal tensile stress but shear stress indeed co-exist. The ME-SBS test could also eliminate some of the tensile stress. Similar stress distributions pattern appeared on the Ti-adhesive models, the dentine-adhesive models and porcelain-adhesive models. None of the bond strength tests could give purely "shear" or "tensile" bond strength, but LIME-SBS seems to be the best model to evaluate the bond strength under true "shear" mode. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cemental tear: To know what we have neglected in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Yuan Jeng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cemental tear is a special kind of root surface fracture, contributing to periodontal and periapical breakdown. However, it is a challenge for doctors to diagnose, resulting in delayed or improper treatment. We reviewed the predisposing factors, location, radiographic/clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatments of cemental tears. From the literature, patients with cemental tear were mainly males, over 60 year-old. Possible predisposing factors include gender, age, tooth type, traumatic occlusal force and vital teeth. Cemental tears were common in upper and lower anterior teeth, single or multiple, and can be present in cervical, middle and apical third of roots. Morphology of cemental tears can be either piece-shaped or U-shaped. Clinically, cemental tear shows a unitary periodontal pocket and signs/symptoms mimicking localized periodontitis, apical periodontitis and vertical root fractures. Treatment of cemental tears include scaling, root planning, root canal treatment, periodontal/periapical surgery, guided tissue regeneration, bone grafting, and intentional replantation. Recurrence of cemental tear is possible especially when the fracture involves root apex. Extraction is recommended for teeth with poor prognosis. In conclusion, cemental tears can involve both periodontal and periapical area. Dentists should understand the predisposing factors and clinical features of cemental tears for early diagnosis/treatment to prevent bone loss/tooth extraction. Keywords: Cemental tear, Clinical characteristics, Surface root fracture, Periodontal/periapical breakdown, Recurrence, Predisposing factors

  12. Consequences of enamel preparation with sodium hypochlorite, polyacrylic and phosphoric acids for the bonding of brackets with resin-modified glass ionomer cements

    OpenAIRE

    Trindade, Alessandra Marques; Pereira, Tatiana Bahia Junqueira; Smith Neto, Perrin; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Akaki, Emílio; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of deproteinization with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) prior to enamel conditioning with 10% polyacrylic acid (PAA) and 35% phosphoric acid (PA) on the bond strength (BS) of brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). One hundred human premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were divided into 5 groups (n = 20 in each group): G1 (control), enamel conditioning with PA, application of adhesive and bonding of brackets...

  13. Kinetics of fluoride ion release from dental restorative glass ionomer cements: the influence of ultrasound, radiant heat and glass composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanjal, N K; Billington, R W; Shahid, S; Luo, J; Hill, R G; Pearson, G J

    2010-02-01

    To compare the effect of ultrasonic setting with self curing on fluoride release from conventional and experimental dental glass ionomer cements. To compare hand mixed and capsule mixing and the effect of replacing some of the reactive glass with zirconia. In a novel material which advocated using radiant heat to cure it, to compare the effect of this with ultrasound. To evaluate the effect of ultrasound on a glass ionomer with fluoride in the water but not in the glass. 10 samples of each cement were ultrasonically set for 55 s; 10 controls self cured for 6 min. Each was placed in 10 ml of deionised water which was changed at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 days. The solution fluoride content was measured using a selective ion electrode. All ultrasound samples released more fluoride than the controls. Release patterns were similar; after a few days, cumulative fluoride was linear with respect to t(1/2). Slope and intercept of linear regression plots increased with ultrasound. With radiant heat the cement released less fluoride than controls. The effect of ultrasound on cement with F in water increased only slope not intercept. Zirconia addition enhances fluoride release although the cement fluorine content is reduced. Comparison of capsule and hand mixing showed no consistent effect on fluoride release. Ultrasound enhances fluoride release from GICs. As heat has an opposite effect the heat from ultrasound is not its only action. The lesser effect on cement with fluoride only in the water indicates that of ultrasound enhances fluoride release from glass.

  14. Shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA, glass ionomer cement and composite resin on human dentine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaup, Markus; Dammann, Christoph Heinrich; Schäfer, Edgar; Dammaschke, Till

    2015-04-19

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA (MTA), glass ionomer cement (GIC) and composite resin (CR) on dentine. 120 extracted human third molars were embedded in cold-cured-resin and grinned down to the dentine. For each material 30 specimens were produced in standardised height and width and the materials were applied according to manufacturers´ instructions on the dentine samples. Only in the CR group a self-etching dentine-adhesive was used. In all other groups the dentine was not pre-treated. All specimens were stored at 37.5 °C and 100% humidity for 2d, 7d and 14d. With a testing device the shear bond strength was determined (separation of the specimens from the dentine surface). The statistical evaluation was performed using ANOVA and Tukey-test (p Biodentine increased significantly compared to the 2d investigation period (p Biodentine showed a significantly higher shear bond strength than MTA (p Biodentine and GIC was not significant (p > 0.05). After 7d Biodentine showed comparable shear bond values than GIC, whereas the shear bond values for MTA were significantly lower even after 14d. The adhesion of Biodentine to dentine surface seams to be superior compared to that of MTA.

  15. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30 × magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. - Highlights: • Understanding the dominant mechanism of bonding

  16. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan [Department of Electrochemistry, Universität Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet [Department of Optoelectonics, Universität Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari [School of Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahbar, Nima, E-mail: nrahbar@wpi.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30 × magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. - Highlights: • Understanding the dominant mechanism of bonding

  17. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Khosravanifard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on compositeto-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods. Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI. Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25. All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC. The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min. The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was scored under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05. Results. The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test. SBS of both control (P=0.014 and experimental (P=0.000 groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion. Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments, which deserves further studies.

  18. Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Laser Etching on the Shear Bond Strength of Crowns Cemented with Two Different Luting Agents: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Ankur; Gandhi, Paresh; Baba, Nadim Z

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of crowns cemented on natural teeth after surface treatment of the enamel with an erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Crown preparation was done for 40 full-metal crowns, and wax patterns with loops were cast in a cobalt-chromium alloy. The Er:YAG laser was used for surface treatment of some teeth, and teeth without surface treatment acted as the control. Glass-ionomer and self-adhesive resin luting cements were used for cementation. Shear bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine, and statistical analysis was done using paired t test. Scanning electron microscopy analysis was also carried out to study alterations of the enamel and dentin surfaces. Significant increase in shear strength was noted after laser etching the teeth with Er:YAG laser for both types of cement (P crowns.

  19. Mineralogenic characteristics of osteogenic lineage-committed human dental pulp stem cells following their exposure to a discoloration-free calcium aluminosilicate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-Na; Pei, Dan-Dan; Morris, Matthew; Jiao, Kai; Huang, Xue-Qing; Primus, Carolyn M; Susin, Lisiane F; Bergeron, Brian E; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2016-10-01

    An experimental discoloration-free calcium aluminosilicate cement has been developed with the intention of maximizing the beneficial attributes of tricalcium silicate cements and calcium aluminate cements. The present study examined the effects of this experimental cement (Quick-Set2) on the mineralogenic characteristics of osteogenic lineage-committed human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), by comparing the cellular responses with a commercially available tricalcium silicate cement (white mineral trioxide aggregate (ProRoot(®) MTA); WMTA). The osteogenic potential of hDPSCs exposed to the cements was examined using qRT-PCR for osteogenic gene expressions, Western blot for osteogenic-related protein expressions, alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity, Alizarin red S staining, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy of extracellular calcium deposits. Results of the six assays indicated that osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs was significantly enhanced after exposure to the tricalcium silicate cement or the experimental calcium aluminosilicate cement, with the former demonstrating better mineralogenic stimulation capacity. The better osteogenic stimulating effect of the tricalcium silicate cement on hDPSCs may be due to its relatively higher silicate content, or higher OH(-) and Ca(2+) release. Further investigations with the use of in vivo animal models are required to validate the potential augmenting osteogenic effects of the experimental discoloration-free calcium aluminosilicate cement. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Tulga, Ayça

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) ( P CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials.

  1. Evaluation of the physicochemical properties and push-out bond strength of MTA-based root canal cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Andrade, Gisselle Moraima; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Leonardo, Renato de Toledo; Keine, Katia Cristina; Sant'Anna-Junior, Arnaldo; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated the flowability, setting time, pH, calcium release and bond strength of a MTA-based cement (MTA Fillapex(®)) compared to AH Plus and Sealapex. For the flowability test, the ISO 6876:2001 specification was utilized and for the setting time test, the ASTM C266-03 specification was utilized. For the pH and calcium release measurements, 10 samples were prepared for each group and analyzed for several different periods. For the push-out test, dentin disks were distributed into three groups, according to the cement utilized and into three subgroups, according to the root third (n = 10). After obturation, the specimens underwent push-out testing. The data were compared statistically using a significance level of 5%. The flowability of all materials was found to be similar (p > 0.05). The setting times were different among the groups tested (MTA Fillapex pH values (p 0.05). AH Plus presented the lowest pH and calcium release values (p root canal cement, in order to use this scaler in root canal fillings. MTA Fillapex showed satisfactory properties for clinical use.

  2. The effect of phosphoric and phosphonic acid primers on bone cement bond strength to total hip stem alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowitz, Eike; Liehn, Louisa; Jahnke, Alexander; Wöstmann, Bernd; Rickert, Markus; Niem, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Aseptic loosening at alloy-cement interfaces constitutes a main failure mechanism of cemented total hip replacements (THR). As a potential solution we investigated the effect of metal primers containing phosphoric and phosphonic acid on shear bond strength (SBS) of bone cement to THR alloys (CoCrMo, TiAlNb) and pure tin (Sn) substrates (20×8×3 mm). Metal surfaces were modified by polishing or Al 2 O 3 blasting and primer application. Substrates without primer treatment served as references. Cylindrical cement pins (Ø 5mm) were polymerised onto substrate surfaces and aging (1, 5, 14 and 150 days) was simulated in aqueous NaCl solution (0.9%) before SBS determination and failure mode evaluation. Regardless of surface roughness and aging time, SBS for THR alloys and Sn was always significantly higher with primer treatment. Compared to untreated reference specimens (≤0.2MPa) SBS values increased even up to 350 fold (TiAlNb, 14 days) or 400 fold (CoCrMo, 5 days). In general, the phosphoric acid containing primer revealed significant higher SBS values on THR alloys compared to the phosphonic acid containing one. Al 2 O 3 blasted specimens showed generally higher SBS values than polished ones with the exception of Sn which showed high SBS values in general. With primer treatment on polished Sn a significant reduction of SBS could not be detected even up to 150 days, whereas THR alloys showed only an SBS improvement in the short term (≤14 days). A NaCl-pitting corrosion probably led to an increasing and durable SBS on polished Sn surfaces over time. Compared to modern THR in clinical practice that shows survival rates of 10, 15, 20 or more years, the receivable bond strength enhancements described in this study appeared to be very short. The improved SBS on THR alloys lasted only a few days before it was lost again. In contrast, the phosphoric acid primer treatment of polished Sn appeared to be very promising and may play a key role in further investigations dealing

  3. Cemented Single Crown Retention on Dental Implants: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rues, Stefan; Fugina, Melissa; Rammelsberg, Peter; Kappel, Stefanie

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of selected cements, abutment heights, and aging on the retention of zirconia crowns on zirconia abutments. Zirconia crowns and abutments (height: 4.0 or 5.5 mm) were sandblasted and retained using five different cements. Axial pull-off tests were performed after thermocycling or 3 days of water storage. An increase in abutment height was associated with an increase in decementation force when permanent cementation was tested. The aging protocol showed that temporarily cemented crowns showed a significant retention decrease, while use of a permanent cement led to a moderate increase. Only use of permanent cements ensures clinically adequate decementation forces.

  4. [Water absorption of five dental resins used in bonded restorations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, D; Dupuis, V

    2002-12-01

    The actual restorative dentistry need to bond material which are under the constraint of saliva likely, as all liquid, to enter inside the product with time and to modify its characteristics. In this study, we compare the behaviour of five materials opposite water absorption, in vitro, until one year: two composite resins (Tetric et Pertac II), two ceromer (ceromer (Tetric ceram et Tetric flow) and one compomer (Hytac(r)). Each pastille weight is expressed in percentage of initial weight. All materials loose weight in the first hours except Tetric ceram which stay stable. At 48 h, all materials except Pertac II get back their initial weight. At long-term, all the materials are stable with a profit of 1% for Hytac, 0.5% for Tetric, Tetric ceram et Tetric flow and a loss of à 0.3% for Pertac II. As a result of this study, we understand why the clinical used of Hytac must be done following strict conditions.

  5. BiOBr@SiO2 flower-like nanospheres chemically-bonded on cement-based materials for photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Hou, Pengkun; Yang, Ping; Cheng, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Endowment of photocatalytic property on the surface of concrete structure can contribute to the self-cleaning of the structure and purification of the polluted environment. We developed a nano-structured BiOBr@SiO2 photocatalyst and innovatively used for surface-treatment of cement-based materials with the hope of attaining the photocatalytic property in visible-light region and surface modification/densification performances. The SiO2 layer on the flower-like BiOBr@SiO2 helps to maintain a stable distribution of the photocatalyst, as well as achieving a chemical bonding between the coating and the cement matrix. Results showed that the color fading rate of during the degradation of Rhodamine B dye of the BiOBr-cem sample is 2 times higher compared with the commonly studied C, N-TiO2-cem sample. The photo-degradation rates of samples BiOBr-cem and BiOBr@SiO2-cem are 93 and 81% within 150 min, respectively, while sample BiOBr@SiO2-cem reveals a denser and smoother surface after curing for 28 days and pore-filling effect at size within 0.01-0.2 μm when compared with untreated samples. Moreover, additional C-S-H gel can be formed due to the pozzolanic reaction between BiOBr@SiO2 and the hardened cement matrix. Both advantages of the BiOBr@SiO2 favor its application for surface-treatment of hardened cement-based material to acquire an improved surface quality, as well as durable photocatalytic functionality.

  6. The effect of resin cements and primer on retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Mi; Yoon, Ji-Young; Lee, Myung-Hyun; Oh, Nam-Sik

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of resin cements and primer on the retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention. Zirconia blocks (Lava, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were obtained and forty sets of zirconia abutments and copings were fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. They were grouped into 4 categories as follows, depending on the types of resin cements used, and whether the primer is applied or not:Panavia F2.0 (P), Panavia F2.0 using Primer (PRIME Plus, Bisco Inc, Schaumburg, IL, USA) (PZ), Superbond C&B (S), and Superbond C&B using Primer (SZ). For each of the groups, the cementation was conducted. The specimens were kept in sterilized water (37℃) for 24 hours. Retentive forces were tested and measured, and a statistical analysis was carried out. The nature of failure was recorded. The means and standard deviations of retentive force in Newton for each group were 265.15 ± 35.04 N (P), 318.21 ± 22.24 N (PZ), 445.13 ± 78.54 N (S) and 508.21 ± 79.48 N (SZ). Superbond C&B groups (S & SZ) showed significantly higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0 groups (P & PZ). In Panavia F2.0 groups, the use of primer was found to contribute to the increase of retentive force. On the other hand, in Superbond C&B groups, the use of primer did not influence the retention forces. Adhesive failure was observed in all groups. This study suggests that cementation of the zirconia abutments and zirconia copings with Superbond C&B have a higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0. When using Panavia F2.0, the use of primer increases the retentive force.

  7. The effects of calcium silicate cement/fibroblast growth factor-2 composite on osteogenesis accelerator in human dental pulp cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Buor-Chang; Youn, Su-Chung; Kao, Chia-Tze; Huang, Shu-Ching; Hung, Chi-Jr; Chou, Ming-Yung; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-01-01

    Background/purpose: To examine the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)/calcium silicate (CS) cement on material characters and in vitro primary human dental pulp cell (hDPC) behavior. Materials and methods: Setting time and diametral tensile strength (DTS) of CS and CS/FGF-2 composite were measured. PrestoBlue assay was used for evaluating primary hDPC proliferation. Alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expression in HDPCs cultured on the specimens were determined by enzyme-linke...

  8. Stability of the bond between two resin cements and an yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic after six months of aging in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Eduardo M; Miragaya, Luciana; Sabrosa, Carlos Eduardo; Maia, Lucianne C

    2014-09-01

    The behavior of the luting cement and the cementation protocol are essential in the clinical success of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond stability of 2 resin cements and a yttria-stabilized tetragonal polycrystalline zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic submitted to 2 surface treatments. Sixty plates of a Y-TZP ceramic were assigned to 3 groups according to the surface treatments: control, as sintered surface; methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), coated with an MDP-based primer, and tribochemical silica-coating (TSC), coated with tribochemical silica. The plates of each group were further divided into 2 subgroups according to the resin cement as follows: RelyX adhesive resin cement (conventional) and RelyX Unicem (self-adhesive). Cylinders of resin cements (∅=0.75 mm × 0.5 mm in height) were built up on the ceramic surfaces, and the plates stored in distilled water at 37°C for either 24 hours or 6 months before being submitted to a microshear bond strength test. The data were submitted to 3-way ANOVA and the Tukey honestly significant difference test (α=.05). Three-way ANOVA showed statistical significance for the 3 independent factors: resin cement, surface treatment, and period of water immersion (Presin cement applied on ceramic surfaces treated with TSC, the microshear bond strength of all the other groups decreased after 6 months of aging in water. The microshear bond strength decreased most in the control groups (-81.5% for ARC and -93.1% for Unicem). In the group treated with TSC, the microshear bond strength for Unicem decreased by 54.8% and in that treated with MDP-based primer by -42.5%. In the group treated with MDP-based primer, the microshear bond strength for RelyX ARC decreased by -52.8%. Irrespective of surface treatments, self-adhesive resin cement was not able to maintain the bond to Y-TZP ceramic after 6 months of aging in water. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic

  9. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC TM (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine TM (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into th...

  10. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=40), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=696) and 'water aging' (p<0.001, F=71). The PV5 group exhibited higher µTBS values than the PSA group. Although cleaning after sandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks.

  11. Influence of previous provisional cementation on the bond strength between two definitive resin-based luting and dentin bonding agents and human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkut, Selim; Küçükesmen, Hakki Cenker; Eminkahyagil, Neslihan; Imirzalioglu, Pervin; Karabulut, Erdem

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of two different types of provisional luting agents (RelyX Temp E, eugenol-based; RelyX Temp NE, eugenol-free) on the shear bond strengths between human dentin and two different resin-based luting systems (RelyXARC-Single Bond and Duo Link-One Step) after cementation with two different techniques (dual bonding and conventional technique). One hundred human molars were trimmed parallel to the original long axis, to expose flat dentin surfaces, and were divided into three groups. After related surface treatments for each specimen, the resin-based luting agent was applied in a silicone cylindrical mold (3.5 x 4 mm), placed on the bonding-agent-treated dentin surfaces and polymerized. In the control group (n = 20), the specimens were further divided into two groups (n = 10), and two different resin-based luting systems were immediately applied following the manufacturer's protocols: RelyX ARC-Single Bond (Group I C) and Duo Link-One Step (Group II C). In the provisionalization group (n = 40), the specimens were further divided into four subgroups of 10 specimens each (Group I N, I E and Group II N, II E). In Groups I N and II N, eugenol-free (RelyX NE), and in groups I E and II E, eugenol-based (RelyX E) provisional luting agents (PLA), were applied on the dentin surface. The dentin surfaces were cleaned with a flour-free pumice, and the resin-based luting systems RelyX ARC (Group I N and E) and Duo Link (Group II N and E) were applied. In the Dual bonding groups (n = 40), the specimens were divided into four subgroups of 10 specimens each (Group I ND, ED and Group II ND, ED). The specimens were treated with Single Bond (Groups I ND and ED) or One Step (Groups II ND and ED). After the dentin bonding agent treatment, RelyX Temp NE was applied to Groups I ND and II ND, and RelyX Temp E was applied to Groups I ED and II ED. The dentin surfaces were then cleaned as described in the provisionalization group, and the resin-based luting systems

  12. Can surface preparation with CVD diamond tip influence on bonding to dental tissues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparecido Kawaguchi, Fernando; Brossi Botta, Sergio; Nilo Vieira, Samuel; Steagall Júnior, Washington; Bona Matos, Adriana

    2008-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) tips surface treatments of enamel and dentin on bonding resistance of two adhesive systems. Thirty embedded samples were divided in 12 groups ( n = 10), according to factors: substrate (enamel and dentin), adhesive system [etch-and-rinse (SB) and self-etch]; and the surface treatments (paper discs, impact CVD tips and tangential CVD tip). When CVD tip was used in the impact mode the tip was applied perpendicular to dental surface, while at tangential mode, the tip worked parallel to dental surface. Specimens were tested in tension after 24 h at 0.5 mm/min of cross-head speed. ANOVA results, in MPa showed that in enamel, only adhesive system factor was statistically significant ( p = 0.015) under tested conditions, with higher bond strength observed for SB groups. However, in dentin the best bonding performance was obtained in SE groups ( p = 0.00). In both tested substrates, results did not show statistically significant difference for factors treatment and its interactions. ConclusionsIt may be concluded that CVD-tip surface treatment, in both tested modes, did not influence on adhesion to enamel and dentin. But, it is important to choose adhesive system according to the tissue available to bonding.

  13. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Andreza Talaveira da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. OBJECTIVE: this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds of the root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group: group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37°C for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. RESULTS: Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05. Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3% than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%, ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0% and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3% (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity.

  14. Use of infrared and magnetic nuclear resonance techniques in the characterization of the acid-base reaction of an experimental dental cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolini, Marcio Jose; Zaghete, Maria Aparecida; Gimenes, Rossano

    2009-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are products of the acid-base setting reaction between an finely fluoro-alumino silicate glass powder and poly(acrylic acid) in aqueous solution. The sol gel method is an adequate route of preparation of the glasses used to obtain the GICs. The objective of this paper was to compare two powders: a commercial and an experimental and to investigate the structural changes during hardening of the cements by FTIR and Al MAS NMR. These analyses showed that the experimental glass powder reacted with organic acid to form the GICs and it is a promising material to manufacture dental cements. (author)

  15. Effect of post space treatment with adhesives on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Can Okay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of fiber posts used in the restoration of endodontically-treated teeth with extreme material loss, luted with two different self-adhesive resin cements alone or with the combination of an adhesive. Materials and Method: The post spaces of 80 extracted mandibular first premolar roots were prepared and divided into 4 experimental groups according to fiber post (RelyX Fiber Post luting material. Group 1 was luted with RelyX Unicem, Group 2 was luted with RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One, Group 3 was luted with Clearfil SA Cement, and Group 4 was luted with Clearfil SA Cement + S3 Bond. After 24 h and 1 month, horizontal sections of 1 mm thickness were made from the coronal, middle and apical root parts of the fiber posts, and push-out tests were performed. Groups were compared by using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc tests and storage periods were compared by using independent samples t-test (α=0.05. Results: For both evaluation time periods, RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One showed the highest bond strength. Regarding the 24 h period, the lowest bond strength values were found for the apical sections followed by middle and coronal sections. One month results revealed similar bond strength values for the middle and apical sections (p>0.05 which were significantly lower than the values found for the coronal sections (p<0.05. RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One exhibited greater push-out bonding strength compared to other groups in the middle and apical sections (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to the results of this in vitro study it can be concluded that, using an adhesive system in combination with a self-adhesive resin cement during post cementation may improve the bond strength.

  16. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3, silanization after hydrogen peroxide etching; group 4, silanization with warm drying at 80℃ after hydrogen peroxide etching. After storage of the specimens in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours, the shear bond strength (in MPa) between the fiber post and resin cement was measured using a universal testing machine. The fractured surface of the fiber post was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis with Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). Silanization of the fiber post (Group 2) significantly increased the bond strength in comparison with the non treated control (Group 1) (Psilanization also significantly increased the bond strength (Group 3 and 4) (Psilane agent (Group 2 and 3) (P>.05). Fiber post silanization and subsequent heat treatment (80℃) with warm air blower can be beneficial in clinical post cementation. However, hydrogen peroxide etching prior to silanization was not effective in this study.

  17. Three-dimensional biofilm properties on dental bonding agent with varying quaternary ammonium charge densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Han; Liu, Huaibing; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-10-01

    Tooth-restoration interfaces are the weak link with secondary caries causing restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop an antimicrobial bonding agent with dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM), and investigate the effects of quaternary amine charge density on three-dimensional (3D) biofilms on dental resin for the first time. DMAHDM was synthesized and incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose bonding agent at mass fractions of 0% (control), 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%. Streptococcus mutans bacteria were inoculated on the polymerized resin and cultured for two days to form biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to measure biofilm thickness, live and dead biofilm volumes, and live bacteria percentage in 3D biofilm vs. distance from resin surface. Charge density of the resin had a significant effect on the antibacterial efficacy (pBiofilms on control resin had the greatest thicknesses. Biofilm thickness and live biofilm volume decreased with increasing surface charge density (pbiofilm thickness (pbiofilm was dead and the percentage of live bacteria was nearly 0% throughout the biofilm thickness. Adding new antibacterial monomer DMAHDM into dental bonding agent yielded a strong antimicrobial activity, substantially decreasing the 3D biofilm thickness, live biofilm volume, and percentage of live bacteria on cross-sections through the biofilm thickness. Novel DMAHDM-containing bonding agent with capability of inhibiting 3D biofilms is promising for a wide range of dental restorative and preventive applications to inhibit biofilms at the tooth-restoration margins and prevent secondary caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effect of Accelerated Aging on the Colour Stability of Composite Resin Luting Cements using Different Bonding Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Alfaifi, Mohammed; Almuaddi, Abdulmajeed; Al-Yazeedi, Mazen; Al-Ahmari, Abdulmajeed

    2017-04-01

    The main criterion of successful aesthetic restoration is to match the colour of the adjacent teeth. Porcelain laminate veneer is widely practiced indirect restoration in the contemporary aesthetic dentistry. The underlying luting cement colour influences the final outcome of the thin, translucent veneer shade. Hence, colour stability of luting cement is important criteria during their selection. The objective of the study was to assess the colour stability of the different dentin bonding techniques in composite resin luting cements. A total of forty intact, non carious teeth were prepared to receive Porcelain Laminate Veneers (PLV). The lithium disilicate PLV were fabricated, and fitting surface was conditioned with 5% hydrofluoric acid and silane application. According to the bonding technique employed for the cementation of the PLV, the teeth samples were randomly divided into the four groups of ten each. The Group I and Group II samples were conditioned with etch and wash; the polymerization of resin was accomplished with the dual cure for Group I and light cure for Group II. The Group III and Group IV samples were conditioned with self-etch and self-adhesive technique correspondingly. The teeth shade was recorded in similar locations with a spectrophotometer before and after subjecting them to the accelerated ageing process. The ageing process included the thermocycling process in water between 5°C and 55°C for 5000 cycles followed by 100 hours xenon light exposure. The data were analysed with SPSS 19.0 by ANOVA and LSD post-hoc comparison. The higher mean colour change was observed in Group I sample (etch washdual cure) with a ∆E value of 2.491. The ∆E value for Group II (etch wash-light cure) and Group III (selfetch) was 1.110 and 2.357 respectively. The lowest mean colour change was observed in Group IV (self-adhesive) with ∆E at 0.614. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between Group IV and Group I; Group IV and Group III with

  19. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30× magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. © 2013.

  20. Change in pH during setting of polyelectrolyte dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, E A; Nicholson, J W

    1993-04-01

    The change in pH during setting has been studied for five different glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cements and for two different zinc polycarboxylate cements using a flat-headed combination electrode on both the fresh cement and on a slurry of the set cement. The results show that the pH of the glass ionomers was slightly lower in the early stages of setting than was the pH of the zinc polycarboxylates and also that the pH of glass ionomers rises more slowly. For anhydrous cements (i.e. those formulated from dried polymer) pH was found to rise quicker than for hydrous cements (i.e. those prepared from aqueous solutions of polymer). Previous workers have assumed that anhydrous cements undergo slower rises in pH than hydrous ones. Our results clearly refute this assumption, and also suggest that the reported pulpal irritation associated with the use of anhydrous glass ionomers may be due to something other than low pH.

  1. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Mi-ae; Kim, Ah-hyeon; Shim, Youn-soo; An, So-youn

    2013-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent tee...

  2. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-ae Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent teeth are. Case Presentation. We report a case of three pediatric patients with early childhood caries, in whom caries was removed by using Carigel to avoid the risk of pulpal exposure associated with high-speed handpieces. Subsequently, aesthetic restoration was performed using strip crown with RelyX Unicem self-adhesive resin cement. Conclusion. RelyX Unicem has the following advantages: (1 not requiring have any special skills for the dentist for performing the procedure, (2 decreased occurrence of bubbles during injection of the cement, and (3 overall short duration of the procedure. Thus, it is appropriate for the treatment of pediatric patients whose behavior is difficult to manage. However, further studies are required in order to establish the use of RelyX Unicem as a stable restorative material in early childhood caries.

  3. Effects of tree species and wood particle size on the properties of cement-bonded particleboard manufacturing from tree prunings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Ramadan A; Al-Mefarrej, H A; Abdel-Aal, M A; Alshahrani, T S

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the possibility of using the prunings of six locally grown tree species in Saudi Arabia for cement-bonded particleboard (CBP) production. Panels were made using four different wood particle sizes and a constant wood/cement ratio (1/3 by weight) and target density (1200 kg/m3). The mechanical properties and dimensional stability of the produced panels were determined. The interfacial area and distribution of the wood particles in cement matrix were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed that the panels produced from these pruning materials at a target density of 1200 kg m(-3) meet the strength and dimensional stability requirements of the commercial CBP panels. The mean moduli of rupture and elasticity (MOR and MOE) ranged from 9.68 to 11.78 N mm2 and from 3952 to 5667 N mm2, respectively. The mean percent water absorption for twenty four hours (WA24) ranged from 12.93% to 23.39%. Thickness swelling values ranged from 0.62% to 1.53%. For CBP panels with high mechanical properties and good dimensional stability, mixed-size or coarse particles should be used. Using the tree prunings for CBPs production may help to solve the problem of getting rid of these residues by reducing their negative effects on environment, which are caused by poor disposal of such materials through direct combustion process and appearance of black cloud and then the impact on human health or the random accumulation and its indirect effects on the environment.

  4. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. MATERIALS AND METHODS The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. RESULTS The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) (P<.001). For LDC, AS surface treatment showed the highest FPBS results (100.31 ± 10.7 MPa) and the lowest values were obtained in RNC (23.63 ± 9.0 MPa) for control group. SEM analyses showed that the surface topography of CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. CONCLUSION The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials. PMID:29279763

  5. Influence of light transmission through fiber posts: Quantitative analysis, microhardness, and on bond strength of a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Fernando Dos Santos Alves Morgan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Light transmission (LT into deeper areas of the dentin root is limited. Aim: The aim of this study is to perform a quantitative investigation of the radial transmission of light (LT through different fiber posts and its influence on the Knoop hardness number (KHN and bond strength (BS of a dual-cure self-adhesive resin cement at 3 different depths. Materials and Methods: Four types of fiber posts (2 translucent and 2 conventional were used. LT and KHN analyses were performed in a specially designed matrix, which allowed measurements at 3 different depths. LT was measured using a volt-ampere meter while KHN tests were performed in a microhardness tester. For BS analysis, endodontically treated bovine roots were divided into 4 groups, each group receiving one type of post. After cementation, cross sections of the root were tested for resistance to displacement using a universal testing machine. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed by using this ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results: For LT, translucent posts showed significantly higher values at all depths compared to the conventional ones. For all posts, LT decreased at the deeper depths. The KHN results showed no statistical differences among the different posts, regardless of depth. For BS, a translucent post showed the highest values, and comparative analyses between the different depths of posts also showed statistically significant differences while comparisons among the different depths of the same post showed no differences. Conclusions: LT depended on the type of post and on depth. The type of post did not significantly influence the cement KHN. A translucent post showed higher BS in pooled data.

  6. Microshear Bond Strength of Tri-Calcium Silicate-based Cements to Different Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Esra; Ulusoy, Nuran

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength of tri-calcium silicate-based materials to different restorative materials. Thirty-five disks of TheraCal LC and Biodentine were fabricated using teflon molds according to manufacturers' instructions. Then the specimens were randomly divided into 7 groups according to the materials applied: Fuji IX, Fuji II, Equia Fil, Vertise Flow, Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior Restorative, Filtek Z250 with Prime&Bond NT and with Clearfil SE Bond. All restorative materials were placed onto the disks using tygon tubes. Following a storage period, the specimens underwent microshear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine, and fracture modes were analyzed. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. For all restorative materials, TheraCal LC showed significantly higher μSBS values compared to Biodentine. GIC based materials showed the lowest μSBS for TheraCal and Biodentine. For Biodentine, Filtek Z250 applied with Prime&Bond NT and Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior Restorative applied with Scotchbond Universal Adhesive exhibited the highest μSBS, while Filtek Z250 applied with Clearfil SE Bond revealed the highest bond strength to TheraCal LC. For all restorative materials tested in this study, TheraCal LC showed higher μSBS compared to Biodentine. For both TheraCal LC and Biodentine, the placement of GIC-based materials prior to composite resin restorations might decrease the bond strength. Composite resins applied with self-etching adhesives increased the bond strength of TheraCal LC; however, for Biodentine, application of etch-and-rinse adhesives may improve the adhesion of composite resins.

  7. Fracture and shear bond strength analyses of different dental veneering ceramics to zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diniz, Alexandre C. [School of Dentistry (DOD), Division of Prosthodontics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte -UFRN, 59056-000, Natal (Brazil); Nascimento, Rubens M. [Materials Engineering Department, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte - UFRN, Natal (Brazil); Souza, Julio C.M. [Centre for Mechanics and Materials Technologies - CT2M, Department of Mechanical Engineering (DEM), Universidade do Minho, Campus Azurém, 4800-058, Guimarães (Portugal); Henriques, Bruno B. [Materials Engineering Department, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte - UFRN, Natal (Brazil); Centre for Mechanics and Materials Technologies - CT2M, Department of Mechanical Engineering (DEM), Universidade do Minho, Campus Azurém, 4800-058, Guimarães (Portugal); Carreiro, Adriana F.P., E-mail: adrianadafonte@hotmail.com [School of Dentistry (DOD), Division of Prosthodontics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte -UFRN, 59056-000, Natal (Brazil)

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the interaction of different layering porcelains with zirconia via shear bond strength test and microscopy. Four different groups of dental veneering porcelains (VM9, Zirkonzanh, Ceramco, IPS) were fused onto forty zirconia-based cylindrical substrates (8 mm in diameter and 12 mm in height) (n = 10), according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Additionally, layered dental porcelain (D-sign, Ivoclar) was fired on ten Ni–Cr cylindrical substrates Shear bond strength tests of the veneering porcelain to zirconia or Ni–Cr were carried out at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. After the shear bond tests, the interfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fracture type exhibited by the different systems was also assessed. The results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA at a significant level of p < .05. The shear bond strength values of the porcelain-to-NiCr interfaces (25.3 ± 7.1 MPa) were significantly higher than those recorded for the following porcelain-to-zirconia systems: Zirkonzanh (18.8 ± 1 MPa), Ceramco (18.2 ± 4.7 MPa), and IPS (16 ± 4.5 MPa). However, no significant differences were found in the shear bond strength values between the porcelain-to-NiCr and porcelain (VM9)-to-zirconia (23.2 ± 5.1 MPa) groups (p > .05). All-ceramic interfaces revealed mixed failure type, cohesive in the porcelain and adhesive at the interface. This study demonstrated that all-ceramic systems do not attain yet the same bond strength standards equivalent to metal–ceramic systems. Therefore, despite the esthetic appeal of all-ceramic restorations, the adhesion between the porcelain and zirconia framework is still an issue considering the long term success of the restoration. - Highlights: • This study assessed the shear bond strength of different porcelains to zirconia. • The porcelain Vita VM9 showed a high shear bond strength to zirconia. • The fracture surface of all-ceramic systems revealed

  8. Fracture and shear bond strength analyses of different dental veneering ceramics to zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diniz, Alexandre C.; Nascimento, Rubens M.; Souza, Julio C.M.; Henriques, Bruno B.; Carreiro, Adriana F.P.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the interaction of different layering porcelains with zirconia via shear bond strength test and microscopy. Four different groups of dental veneering porcelains (VM9, Zirkonzanh, Ceramco, IPS) were fused onto forty zirconia-based cylindrical substrates (8 mm in diameter and 12 mm in height) (n = 10), according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Additionally, layered dental porcelain (D-sign, Ivoclar) was fired on ten Ni–Cr cylindrical substrates Shear bond strength tests of the veneering porcelain to zirconia or Ni–Cr were carried out at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. After the shear bond tests, the interfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fracture type exhibited by the different systems was also assessed. The results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA at a significant level of p < .05. The shear bond strength values of the porcelain-to-NiCr interfaces (25.3 ± 7.1 MPa) were significantly higher than those recorded for the following porcelain-to-zirconia systems: Zirkonzanh (18.8 ± 1 MPa), Ceramco (18.2 ± 4.7 MPa), and IPS (16 ± 4.5 MPa). However, no significant differences were found in the shear bond strength values between the porcelain-to-NiCr and porcelain (VM9)-to-zirconia (23.2 ± 5.1 MPa) groups (p > .05). All-ceramic interfaces revealed mixed failure type, cohesive in the porcelain and adhesive at the interface. This study demonstrated that all-ceramic systems do not attain yet the same bond strength standards equivalent to metal–ceramic systems. Therefore, despite the esthetic appeal of all-ceramic restorations, the adhesion between the porcelain and zirconia framework is still an issue considering the long term success of the restoration. - Highlights: • This study assessed the shear bond strength of different porcelains to zirconia. • The porcelain Vita VM9 showed a high shear bond strength to zirconia. • The fracture surface of all-ceramic systems revealed

  9. Characterization of dental cement obtained from a glass prepared by the polymeric precursor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolini, Marcio Jose; Zaghete, Maria Aparecida; Gimenes, Rossano; Paiva-Santos, Carlos de Oliveira; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2005-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements are glass and polymer composite materials. These materials currently find use in dentistry. The purpose of this work is to obtain glass powders based on the composition 4.5SiO 2 - 3Al 2 O 3 - 2CaO to be used in dentistry. The powders were prepared by a chemical route at 700 deg C. The properties of glass ionomer cements obtained from powders prepared at 700 deg C were studied. Diametral tensile strength and microhardness were evaluated for the experimental glass ionomer cements and a commercial material. It was concluded that the properties of experimental cements were similar to those of the commercial ones. (author)

  10. Effect of conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of phosphate monomer-based cement on zirconia ceramic in dry and aged conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Balducci, Ivan; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the durability of bond strength between a resin cement and aluminous ceramic submitted to various surface conditioning methods. Twenty-four blocks (5 X 5 X 4 mm 3) of a glass-in filtrated zirconia-alumina ceramic (inCeram Zirconia Classic) were randomly

  11. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to silica-coated and silanized in-ceram zirconia before and after aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Ozcan, Mutlu; Amaral, Regina; Pereira Leite, Fabiola Pessoa; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the microtensile bond strength of resin-based cement (Panavia F) to silica-coated, silanized, glass-infiltrated high-alumina zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) ceramic in dry conditions and after various aging regimens. Materials and Methods: The specimens were placed in 1 of

  12. Evaluation of stresses developed in different bracket-cement-enamel systems using finite element analysis with in vitro bond strength tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E; Hammad, Shaza M; Ibrahim, Noha F

    2014-04-16

    The purpose of this study was to determine the bond strength of different orthodontic bracket materials (ceramic, stainless steel, and titanium) as well as stresses developed in bracket-cement-enamel systems using finite element (FE) analysis. One hundred and thirty-five extracted human caries-free upper central incisors were divided into three groups (n = 45/group) according to the type of orthodontic bracket materials (stainless steel, ceramic, and titanium). Each group was further subdivided into three subgroups (n = 15/group) according to the bond strength test loading mode (shear short side, shear long side, and tensile). After debonding, the fractured specimen was examined, and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was determined. FE analysis models analyzed the stress distribution within the cement and enamel. Bond strengths were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test, and the ARI scores were analyzed using chi-square (χ2) test. Shear loading at the short side of the bracket resulted in the highest bond strength and lowest maximum principal stress both on cement and enamel compared with the other loading modes (P strength and lower maximum principal stress than metallic brackets (P strength and stresses developed both on cement and enamel.

  13. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to feldpathic ceramic after different etching and silanization regimens in dry and aged conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brentel, Aline Scalone; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Alarca, Lilian Guimaraes; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the durability of bond strength between resin cement and a feldspathic ceramic submitted to different etching regimens with and without silane coupling agent application. Methods. Thirty-two blocks (6.4 mm x 6.4 mm x 4.8 mm) were fabricated using a microparticulate

  14. Studying the effects of coarse pore expanded clay concrete on a permanent formwork made of cement bonded particle boards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigalov Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests using a formwork system based on cement bonded particle boards (CBPB filled with coarse pore expanded clay concrete in order to improve the technical efficiency of the building envelope. Such a structure is made of lightweight or honeycomb concrete units, has a thickness equal to that of heavyweight concrete blocks and provides increased resistance to heat, better fire resistance and longer durability. The relatively modest price of the suggested option is seen as a notable advantage. The effects of coarse pore expanded clay concrete have been shown as being similar to the effects of heavyweight concrete, with the nature of the effects demonstrated on a hydrostatic pressure curve. The author has substantiated the geometric parameters for the suggested heat-efficient envelope design: a 800×800×370 mm block of CBPB filled with coarse-pore expanded clay concrete γ= 500kg/m3.

  15. Water Sorption and Solubility of Different Luting and Restorative Dental Cements

    OpenAIRE

    KEYF, Filiz; TUNA, S. Hakan; ŞEN, Murat; SAFRANY, Agnes

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the water sorption and solubility of four provisional, three permanent luting cements and five restorative cements. Methods: A split ring mould was fabricated for the preparation of specimen discs which were 15.0 mm in diameter and 1.5 mm thick. All specimens were manipulated according to the manufacturer's instructions and then subjected to water sorption and solubility tests. Data were analysed with Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test. Scannin...

  16. Influence of a bonding agent on the bond strength between a dental Co-Cr alloy and nine different veneering porcelains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bakkar, Hassan; Spintzyk, Sebastian; Schille, Christine; Schweizer, Ernst; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen; Rupp, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Adequate bonding between dental veneering porcelains and non-precious metal alloys is a main factor for the long-term functionality of porcelain fused to metal restorations. Although a huge number of veneering porcelains are on the market, only few studies have reported about the role of bonding agents for the bond strength at their respective interface to cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr). The aim of this study was to compare the influence of a metal-ceramic bonding agent for Co-Cr alloys on the bond strength of metal-ceramic systems. The bond strength test was done according to ISO 9693 with additional detection of the first acoustic crack initiated signal while testing. The bonding agent had only minor effects on the bond strength of the different Co-Cr/ceramic systems. Only three of the nine studied systems showed statistically significant differences (pveneered with porcelains with and without a bonding agent exceeded the minimum bond strength of 25 MPa required according to ISO 9693. However, if bond strength values based on acoustic signals were calculated, values below the threshold of 25 MPa could be observed. Such findings are important for failures caused by the occurrence of early cracks.

  17. The incorporation of nanoparticles into conventional glass-ionomer dental restorative cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Nicholson, John W; Coleman, Nichola J; Slipper, Ian J; Booth, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    Conventional glass-ionomer cements (GICs) are popular restorative materials, but their use is limited by their relatively low mechanical strength. This paper reports an attempt to improve these materials by incorporation of 10 wt% of three different types of nanoparticles, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, and titanium dioxide, into two commercial GICs (ChemFil® Rock and EQUIA™ Fil). The results indicate that the nanoparticles readily dispersed into the cement matrix by hand mixing and reduced the porosity of set cements by filling the empty spaces between the glass particles. Both cements showed no significant difference in compressive strength with added alumina, and ChemFil® Rock also showed no significant difference with zirconia. By contrast, ChemFil® Rock showed significantly higher compressive strength with added titania, and EQUIA™ Fil showed significantly higher compressive strength with both zirconia and titania. Fewer air voids were observed in all nanoparticle-containing cements and this, in turn, reduced the development of cracks within the matrix of the cements. These changes in microstructure provide a likely reason for the observed increases in compressive strength, and overall the addition of nanoparticles appears to be a promising strategy for improving the physical properties of GICs.

  18. Effect of dental bleaching after bracket bonding and debonding using three different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucianna de Oliveira Gomes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets on dental in-home bleaching, taking into account three different adhesive systems. METHODS: Forty-four bovine incisors were divided into four groups according to the primer system used for orthodontic bracket bonding. Following the debonding of orthodontic brackets, the teeth were stored in staining solution for 96 hours. Then, teeth were whitened using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks at a 6-hour-a-day regime. Standardized digital photographs were taken at the following intervals: T0 (initial; T1 (after debonding; T2 (after pigmentation; T3, T4 and T5 representing 1, 7, and 14 days of bleaching. Repeatability and stability tests were carried out to check the method accuracy. Images were analyzed using Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software considering (L*a*b*color coordinate values and a modified color difference total (Δ;E'. RESULTS: The results of this study (ANOVA and Tukey; p < 0.01 demonstrated that after 7 days of bleaching, experimental groups showed significantly less teeth whitening compared to the control group. However, there were no significant color differences between the groups after 14 days, according to values of lightness (L*. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of the adhesive primer system applied, bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets alters the outcome of tooth whitening in the first 7 days of bleaching, however it has no influence on the whitening of the dental structure after 14 days of in-home dental bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide.

  19. Evaluation of Effect of Zirconia Surface Treatment, Using Plasma of Argon and Silane, on the Shear Bond Strength of Two Composite Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimal, Aswathy; Ramdev, Poojya; Shruthi, C S

    2017-08-01

    Yttria stabilised tetragonal zirconia opens new vistas for all ceramic restoration by the mechanism of transformation toughening, making it much stronger compared to all other ceramic materials. Currently, it is the most recent core material for all ceramic fixed partial dentures due to its ability to withstand high simulated masticatory loads. Problems which have been reported with zirconia restorations involve the core cement interface leading to loss of retention of the prosthesis. Different reasons which have been reported for the same include the lack of adhesion between zirconia and commonly used cements due to absence of silica phase which makes zirconia not etchable. In addition, the hydrophobic nature of zirconia causes low wettability of zirconia surface by the adhesive cements which are commonly used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare and evaluate the effect of two pre-treatments of zirconia, using plasma of argon and silane, on the shear bond strength values of two composite resin cements to zirconia and to evaluate the failure pattern of the debonded areas using stereomicroscopic analysis. Sixty zirconia discs (10 mm×2 mm) were randomly divided into three groups (n=20), following surface treatment, with airborne particle abrasion, using 110 µm Al2O3: Group I (control), Group II (plasma of argon cleaning), and Group III (application of silane primer). Each group had two subgroups based on the type of resin cement used for bonding: subgroup A; Rely X Ultimate (3M ESPE) and subgroup B; Panavia F (Kuraray). In subgroup A, Rely X universal silane primer and in subgroup B Clearfil ceramic primer was used. Shear bond strengths were determined after water storage for one day and thermocycling for 5000 cycles. Data (megapascal) were analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni test. Specimens were subjected to stereomicroscopic analysis, for evaluation of failure pattern. Group III produced the highest shear bond strength followed by Group II and Group

  20. Push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement used as endodontic sealer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Diogo Gurgel-Filho

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the bond strength of RelyX Unicem (3M to root canal dentin when used as an endodontic sealer. Materials and Methods Samples of 24 single-rooted teeth were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and K3 files. After that, the roots were randomly assigned to three experimental groups (n = 8 according to the filling material, (1 AH Plus (Dentsply De Trey GmbH/Gutta-Percha cone; (2 Epiphany SE (Pentron/Resilon cone; (3 RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha cone. All roots were filled using a single cone technique associated to vertical condensation. After the filling procedures, each tooth was prepared for a push-out bond strenght test by cutting 1 mm-thick root slices. Loading was performed on a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey test for multiple comparisons were used to compare the results among the experimental groups. Results Epiphany SE/Resilon showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than both AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p 0.05. Conclusions Under the present in vitro conditions, bond strength to root dentin promoted by RelyX Unicem was similar to AH Plus. Epiphany SE/Resilon resulted in lower bond strength values when compared to both materials.

  1. Effects of metal primers on bonding of adhesive resin cement to noble alloys for porcelain fusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuya, Nobuhiro; Minami, Hiroyuki; Kurashige, Hisanori; Murahara, Sadaaki; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2010-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of metal primers on the bonding of adhesive resin to four pure metals (Au, Pd, Ag, Cu) and two noble alloys for porcelain fusing (high-gold and high-palladium content alloys). Bonding surface was polished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and primed with one of the three metal primers (V-Primer, Metaltite, and M.L. Primer). Bonded specimens were fabricated by applying adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B) on the primed surface. Shear bond strength (SBS) was determined both before and after thermocycling (4-60 degrees C for 2,000 cycles). The highest SBS values to each pure metal after thermocycling were 33.5 MPa for Au by M.L. Primer, 35.0 MPa for Ag by V-Primer, and 34.4 MPa for Cu by Metaltite. SBS to high-gold content alloy after thermocycling was 33.3 MPa by M.L. Primer. None of the primers was effective for pure Pd and high-palladium content alloy after thermocycling.

  2. A study on the irradiation effect of 60Co gamma ray on dental polymethylmethacrylate bonded parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    In this paper we describe an experimental study on the irradiation effect of 60 Co gamma ray on dental polymethylmethacrylate (P.M.M.A.) welding part, hot and cold polymerizing adhesion part. It was found that from the result of tension test, no remarkable change of mechanical property is found with any of the bonded parts by the irradiation dose up to 10 7 r., and no deterioration by irradiation is observed. And then, according to the results of bending test, it is found that, although the three different bonded parts have different features, the strength of the welded part and of the part adhered by hot polymerizing adhesive becomes lower by irradiation, and bending strength of the three parts converges on 6 kg/mm 2 after irradiation within a range of 10 6 - 10 7 r.. Joint efficiency (= bonded part strength/base material strength) of 65 - 75% in tension and 50 - 62% in bending can be adopted. Fracture of the base material and of the Welded part are similar, and prove high bonding strength. (author)

  3. Effect of dentin surface modification using carbon nanotubes on dental bonding and antibacterial ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Lai; Li, Zhongjie; Luo, Feng; Chen, Junyu; Jia, Lingling; Wang, Tong; Pei, Xibo; Wan, Qianbing

    2017-11-03

    This study developed carbon nanotube coatings for the dentin surface and investigated the bonding strength and the in vitro antibacterial properties of carbon nanotube-coated dentin. Single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes were first modified and then characterized using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. Second, dentin samples were coated using either single-walled carbon nanotubes or multi-walled carbon nanotubes and observed under a scanning electron microscope. Then, the shear bonding strength and antibacterial properties of the dentin samples were tested. The results showed that both modified single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes formed a stable coating on the dentin surface without affecting the shear bonding strength. Moreover, the antibacterial properties of the single-walled carbon nanotube-coated samples was obviously superior to those of the multi-walled carbon nanotubecoated samples. Consequently, single-walled carbon nanotube coating may be an antibacterial agent for potential application in the dental bonding field.

  4. Evaluation in vivo of biocompatibility of differents resin-modified cements for bonding orthodontic bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANAINA A. MESQUITA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The focus of this study was to test the hypothesis that there would be no difference between the biocompatibility of resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Sixty male Wistar rats were selected and divided into four groups: Control Group; Crosslink Group; RMO Group and Transbond Group. The materials were inserted into rat subcutaneous tissue. After time intervals of 7, 15 and 30 days morphological analyses were performed. The histological parameters assessed were: inflammatory infiltrate intensity; reaction of multinucleated giant cells; edema; necrosis; granulation reaction; young fibroblasts and collagenization. The results obtained were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test (P<0.05. After 7 days, Groups RMO and Transbond showed intense inflammatory infiltrate (P=0.004, only Group RMO presented greater expression of multinucleated giant cell reaction (P=0.003 compared with the control group. After the time intervals of 15 and 30 days, there was evidence of light/moderate inflammatory infiltrate, lower level of multinucleated giant cell reaction and thicker areas of young fibroblasts in all the groups. The hypothesis was rejected. The Crosslink cement provided good tissue response, since it demonstrated a lower level of inflammatory infiltrate and higher degree of collagenization, while RMO demonstrated the lowest level of biocompatibility.

  5. Effect of microthread presence and restoration design (screw versus cemented) in dental implant reliability and failure modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Erika O; Freitas Júnior, Amilcar C; Bonfante, Estevam A; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Silva, Nelson R F A; Coelho, Paulo G

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the reliability and failure modes of implants with a microthreaded or smooth design at the crestal region, restored with screwed or cemented crowns. The postulated null hypothesis was that the presence of microthreads in the implant cervical region would not result in different reliability and strength to failure than smooth design, regardless of fixation method, when subjected to step-stress accelerated life-testing (SSALT) in water. Eighty four dental implants (3.3 × 10 mm) were divided into four groups (n = 21) according to implant macrogeometric design at the crestal region and crown fixation method: Microthreads Screwed (MS); Smooth Screwed (SS); Microthreads Cemented (MC), and Smooth Cemented (SC). The abutments were torqued to the implants and standardized maxillary central incisor metallic crowns were cemented (MC, SC) or screwed (MS, SS) and subjected to SSALT in water. The probability of failure versus cycles (90% two-sided confidence intervals) was calculated and plotted using a power law relationship for damage accumulation. Reliability for a mission of 50,000 cycles at 150 N (90% 2-sided confidence intervals) was calculated. Differences between final failure loads during fatigue for each group were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis along with Benferroni's post hoc tests. Polarized-light and scanning electron microscopes were used for failure analyses. The Beta (β) value (confidence interval range) derived from use level probability Weibull calculation of 1.30 (0.76-2.22), 1.17 (0.70-1.96), 1.12 (0.71-1.76), and 0.52 (0.30-0.89) for groups MC, SC, MS, and SS respectively, indicated that fatigue was an accelerating factor for all groups, except for SS. The calculated reliability was higher for SC (99%) compared to MC (87%). No difference was observed between screwed restorations (MS - 29%, SS - 43%). Failure involved abutment screw fracture for all groups. The cemented groups (MC, SC) presented more abutment and implant fractures

  6. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 1: Effects of sandblasting and silanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Mami; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of sandblasting and silanization on resin cement bond strengths to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Twenty four blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK) were divided into two resin cement groups (PANAVIA V5 [PV5] and PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX [PSA]), and further divided into four subgroups representing different surface treatment methods: no treatment (Ctl), silanization (Si), sandblasting (Sb), and Sb+Si. After resin application, microtensile bond strengths (μTBSs) were measured immediately, 1, 3 and 6 months after water storage. In addition, surfaces resulting from each of the treatment methods were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three-way analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=370), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=103, PSAbond strength was achieved with Sb+Si treatment. SEM revealed that sandblasting roughened surfaces.

  7. Effect of glass and polyacid preparations on the strength of glass ionomer cements for dental applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruporn Monmaturapoj

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs, widely used as restorative materials in dentistry, are principally composed of fluoroaluminosilicateglass powder combined with a water-soluble polyacid. The investigation of new glass compositions and polyacid components are very important to improve the mechanical properties of these cements. The objective of this work was to prepare glass ionomers and polyacids for the use as GICs. The effects of spherical bodies, Al2O3:SiO2 ratios, replacing CaO by SrO, and ZrO2 adding in glass powder in combination with the variation of acidic copolymer concentration on the compressive strength were investigated and discussed.

  8. Variations in powder/liquid ratio of a restorative and luting glass ionomer cement in dental clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Kefi; Islam, Sana Adeba; Ahmad, Iqbal; Asmat, Maria; Aminuddin, Mohammad

    2009-07-01

    A survey was conducted to ascertain the variations practiced in powder/liquid (P/L) ratio of Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) used as restorative and luting material in dental clinics of Karachi. It has been observed that in the use of GIC brands, 33% (Fuji 2) and 36% (Gold Label 2) of the dentists, did not follow the recommended P/L ratios for restorative purposes. Similarly, 67% (Fuji 1) and 29% (Gold Label 1) did not follow the recommended ratios for luting purposes. The wide variations practiced in P/L mixing ratios against the recommended ratio for restorative purpose (approximately 1:2) and that for luting purpose (~1:1 to 2:1) may affect the performance characteristics of the material.

  9. How to Bond Zirconia: The APC Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatz, Markus B; Alvarez, Marcela; Sawyer, Kimiyo; Brindis, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Zirconia has become one of the most popular materials in dentistry. New high-translucent zirconia ceramics have favorable optical properties and can be applied as monolithic full-contour restorations in various clinical indications for posterior and anterior teeth. However, having reliable cementation protocols is fundamental for clinical success of indirect ceramic dental restorations, including those made from zirconia materials. Resin bonding supports ceramic restorations and is necessary for onlays, laminate veneers, and resinbonded fixed dental prostheses. The APC zirconia-bonding concept is based on decades of research on how to achieve high and long-term durable bond strengths to high-strength ceramics. It includes three practical steps: (A) airparticle abrasion, (P) zirconia primer, and (C) adhesive composite resin. This article discusses the history and development of high-translucent zirconia and explains the necessity for proper cementation. The rationale and science behind a simplified zirconia-bonding concept is explained and illustrated with a clinical case presentation.

  10. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brajkovic, Denis; Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar; Kisic, Danilo; Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija; Rakocevic, Zlatko

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  11. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brajkovic, Denis [Clinic for Dentistry, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Svetozara Markovica 69, 34000 Kragujevac (Serbia); Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Kisic, Danilo [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Rakocevic, Zlatko, E-mail: zlatkora@vinca.rs [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  12. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  13. Shear Bond Strength of MDP-Containing Self-Adhesive Resin Cement and Y-TZP Ceramics: Effect of Phosphate Monomer-Containing Primers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Lee, Yoon; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different phosphate monomer-containing primers on the shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods. Y-TZP ceramic surfaces were ground flat with #600-grit SiC paper and divided into six groups (n = 10). They were treated as follows: untreated (control), Metal/Zirconia Primer, Z-PRIME Plus, air abrasion, Metal/Zirconia Primer with air abrasion, and Z-PRIME Plus with air abrasion. MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement was applied to the surface-treated Y-TZP specimens. After thermocycling, a shear bond strength test was performed. The surfaces of the Y-TZP specimens were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength values were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Student–Newman–Keuls multiple comparison test (P Zirconia Primer combined with air abrasion, air abrasion alone, and, lastly, Metal/Zirconia Primer application. The control group yielded the lowest results (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The application of MDP-containing primer resulted in increased bond strength between Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:26539485

  14. Shear Bond Strength of MDP-Containing Self-Adhesive Resin Cement and Y-TZP Ceramics: Effect of Phosphate Monomer-Containing Primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Lee, Yoon; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different phosphate monomer-containing primers on the shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement. Y-TZP ceramic surfaces were ground flat with #600-grit SiC paper and divided into six groups (n = 10). They were treated as follows: untreated (control), Metal/Zirconia Primer, Z-PRIME Plus, air abrasion, Metal/Zirconia Primer with air abrasion, and Z-PRIME Plus with air abrasion. MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement was applied to the surface-treated Y-TZP specimens. After thermocycling, a shear bond strength test was performed. The surfaces of the Y-TZP specimens were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength values were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (P MDP-containing primer resulted in increased bond strength between Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cements.

  15. Short- and Long-Term Bond Strength Between Resin Cement and Glass-Ceramic Using a Silane-Containing Universal Adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Gómez, F; Rueggeberg, F A; De Goes, M F

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of various silane-containing solutions on bonding between resin cement and glass ceramic after 24 hours and after six months of water storage. Glass-ceramic plaques (IPS e.max CAD) were sandblasted with aluminum oxide, etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid (HF), and divided into five "silane treatment" groups: RelyX Ceramic Primer (RCP), RelyX Ceramic Primer and Single Bond Plus (RCP+SB), Scotchbond Universal (SBU), Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CP), and no solution (HF-only control). Each group was divided into two "storage time" subgroups: 24 hours or six months in 37°C water. Eighteen resin cement cylinders (RelyX Ultimate) were bonded to each treatment group substrate (n=18) and then subjected to microshear testing. Failure mode was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Debond data were analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc test (α=0.05) as well as Weibull distributions. The factors "silane treatment," "storage time," (psilane and adhesive system improved short and long-term ceramic/resin cement bond strength.

  16. Effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on surface characteristics of CAD/CAM composite materials and the bond strength of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARAO Nobuaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The study aimed to evaluate effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on bond strengths of resin cements to CAD/CAM composite materials. Material and Methods CAD/CAM composite block materials [Cerasmart (CS and Block HC (BHC] were pretreated as follows: (a no treatment (None, (b application of a ceramic primer (CP, (c alumina-blasting at 0.2 MPa (AB, (d AB followed by CP (AB+CP, and (e glass-beads blasting at 0.4 MPa (GBB followed by CP (GBB+CP. The composite specimens were bonded to resin composite disks using resin cements [G-CEM Cerasmart (GCCS and ResiCem (RC]. The bond strengths after 24 h (TC 0 and after thermal cycling (TC 10,000 at 4–60°C were measured by shear tests. Three-way ANOVA and the Tukey compromise post hoc tests were used to analyze statistically significant differences between groups (α=0.05. Results For both CAD/CAM composite materials, the None group exhibited a significant decrease in bond strength after TC 10,000 (p0.05. The AB+CP group showed a significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than did the AB group for RC (p<0.05, but not for GCCS. The GBB+CP group showed the highest bond strength for both thermal cyclings (p<0.05. Conclusions Air abrasion with glass beads was more effective in increasing bond durability between the resin cements and CAD/CAM composite materials than was using an alumina powder and a CP.

  17. Dental Hygiene and Orthodontics: Effect of Ultrasonic Instrumentation on Bonding Efficacy of Different Lingual Orthodontic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Scribante

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental hygienists are often faced with patients wearing lingual orthodontic therapy, as ultrasonic instrumentation (UI is crucial for oral health. As the application of external forces can lead to premature bonding failure, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of UI on shear bond strength (SBS and on adhesive remnant index (ARI of different lingual orthodontic brackets. 200 bovine incisors were divided into 10 groups. Four different lingual (STB, Ormco; TTR, Rocky Mountain Orthodontics; Idea, Leone; 2D, Forestadent and vestibular control (Victory, 3M brackets were bonded. UI was performed in half of specimens, whereas the other half did not receive any treatment. All groups were tested with a universal testing machine. SBS and ARI values were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed (significance: P=0.05. TTR, Idea, and 2D lingual brackets significantly lowered SBS after UI, whereas for other braces no effect was recorded. Appliances with lower mesh area significantly reduced their adhesion capacity after UI. Moreover groups subjected to UI showed higher ARI scores than controls. UI lowered SBS of lingual appliances of small dimensions so particular care should be posed avoiding prolonged instrumentation around bracket base during plaque removal. Moreover, UI influenced also ARI scores.

  18. An Investigation of Dental Luting Cement Solubility as a Function of the Marginal Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    were suspended from these stainless steel rods by hooks which were fashioned from orthodontic wire . (Plate 8) The test samples were completely immersed...samples were attached to the cross-bars with hooks fabricated from orthodontic wire . Additionally, the test samples were secured to 48 f- I’ Plate 11...dissolution. The author also attempted to evaluate cement A -A 11 dissolution as it related to size of a marginal gap. He placed a 100 micron wire

  19. Stickiness of dental resin composite materials to steel, dentin and bonded dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Kathrin; Graf, Alexandra; Watts, David; Schedle, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Stickiness is a vital rheological parameter for the clinical handling behavior of unset resin composite restoratives. The aim of this study was to investigate the stickiness of three different resin composites at 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C tested on steel, dentin and dentin covered with different bonding agents. The stickiness instrument, used in this study consists of a vertical cylindrical stainless steel rod, with a flat circular end, and a platform with a cylindrical mold (diameter: 6.1mm, depth: 2.2mm). The test-material surface temperature and the speed of the rod can be modified. It moves slowly into the prepared mold which is filled with unset composite materials. The degree of stickiness is deducted from the height of the "elevation" the material forms when the plunger is withdrawn from the mold until the steelhead detaches itself from the composite. In this study, stickiness was tested directly to the steel plunger and to dentin slices (uncovered or covered with two different bonding agents) fixed to the plunger rod with a clamp. The coefficients of variation (CVs) were generally less than 0.10, indicating that the stickiness instrument offers an adequately reproducible way of testing stickiness. The tested composite materials varied significantly in stickiness. For all investigated materials a decrease of peak heights with increasing speed was found (for all three materials: psteel and least on bonded dentin. The order of stickiness of composites was not affected by testing the stickiness on the different materials. This method allows the characterization of composite resin materials stickiness to steel, as equivalent to dental steel instruments, and to bonded dentin as equivalent to the tooth cavity after preparation. An ideal material should have a sufficient difference between stickiness on steel and dentin so that it remains in the cavity and is not pulled back by the steel instrument.

  20. Effect of chlorhexidine on the adhesion of dental cements in dentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvajal Villalobos, Marco Vinicio; Torres Montoya, Jeimy; Vindas Ramirez, Cinthya Carolina

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with 0.2% chlorhexidine was evaluated in the adhesion strength in the dentin shear of three self-adhesive cements after one week of storage. 48 healthy teeth (premolars and molars) extracted were used. The occlusal surface was removed, exposing the dentin. Self-adhesive cements RelyX U100 (3M ESPE), SpeedCEM (Ivoclar) and BisCem (Bisco) were placed in an Ultradent cylindrical abutment (2mm diameter) in dentin pretreated with 0.2% chlorhexidine for 60 seconds and in dentin without treatment for 40 seconds. Removed the cylinder all the samples were photocured an additional 40 seconds. After one week, the adhesion force was in eight groups on a universal test machine at 0.01 cm/min. The ANOVA tests were used to analyze the data. The use of chlorhexidine at 0.2% did not affect the average strength of adhesion in shear, while the type of cement if the affection [es

  1. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Padmaja; Valiathan, Ashima; Arora, Ankit; Agarwal, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs), due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL) on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel) and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min) of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1) Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2) Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3) Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4) Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC. PMID:24014999

  2. Bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement to primary dentin after cutting with different bur types and dentin conditioning

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    Rebeca Di Nicoló

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12. In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5% and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence.

  3. Pull-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to NaOCl-treated root dentin: effect of antioxidizing agents

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    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three antioxidizing agents on pull-out bond strengths of dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods Root canals of 75 single-rooted human teeth were prepared. Fifteen teeth were irrigated with normal saline for a negative control group, and the remaining 60 teeth (groups 2 - 5 with 2.5% NaOCl. The teeth in group 2 served as a positive control. Prior to post cementation, the root canals in groups 3 - 5 were irrigated with three antioxidizing agents including 10% rosmarinic acid (RA, Baridge essence, 10% hesperidin (HPN, Sigma, and 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel (SA, AppliChem. Seventy-five spreaders (#55, taper .02, Produits Dentaires S.A were coated with silica and silanized with the Rocatec system and ceramic bond. All the prepared spreaders were cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE, Voco Gmbh in the prepared canals. After storage in distilled water (24 h/37℃, the spreaders were pulled out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Pull-out strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α = 0.05. Results There were significant differences between study groups (p = 0.016. The highest pull-out strength was related to the SA group. The lowest strength was obtained in the positive control group. Conclusions Irrigation with NaOCl during canal preparation decreased bond strength of resin cement to root dentin. Amongst the antioxidants tested, SA had superior results in reversing the diminishing effect of NaOCl irrigation on the bond strength to root dentin.

  4. Dental preparation with sonic vs high-speed finishing: analysis of microleakage in bonded veneer restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faus-Matoses, Ignacio; Solá-Ruiz, Fernanda

    2014-02-01

    To compare marginal microleakage in porcelain veneer restorations following dental finishing using two types of instruments to test the hypothesis that microleakage will be less when teeth are prepared with sonic oscillating burs than when prepared with high-speed rotating burs. Fifty-six extracted human maxillary central incisors were selected and divided randomly into two groups. Group 1 samples underwent dental finishing using high-speed rotating diamond burs, while group 2 used sonic oscillating diamond burs. Buccal chamfer preparation was carried out for both groups. Forty eight of the samples (24 per group) were restored using IPS Empress ceramic veneers. 2% methylene blue was used to evaluate microleakage at the tooth/composite veneer interface. Teeth were sectioned lengthwise into three parts and microleakage was measured at two points - cervical and incisal - on each section. Before bonding, four teeth per group underwent SEM examination. Evaluation of microleakage at the cervical dentin margin showed a value of 10.5% in group 1 and 6.6% in group 2, which was statistically significantly different (p microleakage was 1.3% for group 1 and 1.2% for group 2, which was not significantly different. SEM revealed different patterns of surface texture in both areas according to the instrument used. Group 1 exhibited parallel horizontal abrasion grooves with a milled effect and thick smear layers; group 2 showed abrasive erosion, discontinuous perpendicular depressions, and thin smear layers. Tooth preparations finished with sonic burs produced significantly less microleakage in the cervical dentin area of bonded veneer restorations. No differences were found in the incisal enamel area.

  5. Effect of additive metals, Sn, Ga, and In in Ag-Pd-Au-Cu alloys on initial bond strength of 4-META adhesive cement to these alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shin-ichi; Churnjitapirom, Pornkiat; Miyagawa, Yukio; Ogura, Hideo

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of three additives, Sn, Ga, and In, as well as the main constituents, Pd and Cu, of Ag-Pd-Au-Cu alloys on the initial bond strength of 4-META adhesive cement to these alloys. The Ag-Pd-Au-Cu alloys consisted of 20%, 30% or 40% Pd, and 10%, 15% or 20% Cu, 20% Au, and Ag as balance. Besides, additive metals (Sn, Ga, and In) of 2% and 4% were added to these compositions. The addition of three additives, in general, increased the initial bond strength of the cement in comparison to the mother compositions (0% additives), although the degrees of effectiveness of the three additives were different and varied with their contents. Among these additives, a remarkable increase in bond strength was observed with the addition of In. The increase in Cu content, in many cases, resulted in an increase in bond strength at high Pd contents (30% and 40%), but a decrease at low Pd content (20%) in some cases. The positive effects of the three additives and Cu could be due to the formation of a suitable oxide layer for strong bonding with 4-META.

  6. Optimization of properties of cement-bonded particleboard manufactured from cotton stalk and sawdust containing calcium chloride CaCl2 as an additive

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    morteza nazerian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was investigation of hydration behavior and mechanical properties of cement-bonded particleboard manufactured from different ratio of cotton stalk to poplar wood particle, sawdust content and CaCl2 as additive at different weight ratios. At the first, curing time of cement paste containing different amount of additive (CaCl2 and wood and cotton fines was determined. Besides, the effect of additive (CaCl2 content, weight ratio of cotton to poplar wood particles and percentage of sawdust on modulus of rupture (MOR, modulus of elasticity (MOE and internal bonding (IB of cement-bonded particleboard was evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM. In order to optimize the properties of panels, a mathematical model equation (second order plan was done by a computer simulation program. According to results, there is a good coincidence between predicted values and actual values (R2 for MOR, MOE and IB was 0.93, 0.90 and 0.95, respectively. This study showed that the response surface methodology (RSM can be effectively used for modeling of panel properties. Results showed that using weight ratio of cotton to poplar particle 43:57 the MOR, MOE and IB of panels can be reached to maximum values (12.5, 2545 and 0.35 MPa, respectively. Simultaneously, application of 4.5% additive and 9% sawdust at had a positive effect on the properties of the panels.

  7. Role of the P38 pathway in calcium silicate cement-induced cell viability and angiogenesis-related proteins of human dental pulp cell in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Yung; Kao, Chia-Tze; Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Huang, Shu-Ching; Shie, Ming-You; Wu, Buor-Chang

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated that calcium silicate (CS) cement may influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) via mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, in particular p38. We have addressed that Si ion released from CS cement can influence osmolarity in the medium, which may stimulate hDPC viability and induce angiogenesis-related proteins through stimulation of the nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide secretion. The hDPCs was cultured with CS cement to angiogenesis. Then, cell viability, ion concentration, osmolality, nitric oxide secretion, the von Willebrand factor, and angiopoietin-1 protein expression were examined. CS cement elicited a significant (P calcium and phosphate ions and released more Si ions in medium. The CS significantly (P < .05) increased the osmolality to 303.52 ± 3.07, 315.03 ± 5.80, and 319.95 ± 4.68 mOsm/kg for 1, 3, and 5 days, respectively. P38 was activated through phosphorylation; the phosphorylation kinase was investigated in our cell system after culture with CS cement. Moreover, expression levels for angiopoietin-1 and von Willebrand factor in hDPCs on CS cement were higher than those of the CS + p38 inhibitor (SB203580) group (P < .05) at all of the analyzed time points. This study showed that CS cement was able to activate the p38 pathway in hDPCs cultured in vitro. Moreover, Si was shown to increase osmolality required to facilitate the angiogenic differentiation of hDPCs via the p38 signaling pathway. When the p38 pathway was blocked by SB203580, the angiogenic-dependent protein secretion was decreased. These findings verified that the p38 pathway plays a key role in regulating the angiogenic behavior of hDPCs cultured on CS cement. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of the bond strength of laser-sintered and cast base metal dental alloys to porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akova, Tolga; Ucar, Yurdanur; Tukay, Alper; Balkaya, Mehmet Cudi; Brantley, William A

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strengths of cast Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys and the laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy to dental porcelain. Dental porcelain was applied on two cast and one laser-sintered base metal alloy. Ten specimens were prepared for each group for bond strength comparison. ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD multiple comparison test (alpha=0.05) was used for statistical analysis. Fractured specimens were observed with a stereomicroscope to classify the type of failure after shear bond testing. While the mean shear bond strength was highest for the cast Ni-Cr metal-ceramic specimens (81.6+/-14.6 MPa), the bond strength was not significantly different (P>0.05) from that for the cast Co-Cr metal-ceramic specimens (72.9+/-14.3 MPa) and the laser-sintered Co-Cr metal-ceramic specimens (67.0+/-14.9 MPa). All metal-ceramic specimens prepared from cast Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys exhibit a mixed mode of cohesive and adhesive failure, whereas five of the metal-ceramic specimens prepared from the laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy exhibited the mixed failure mode and five specimens exhibited adhesive failure in the porcelain. The new laser-sintering technique for Co-Cr alloy appears promising for dental applications, but additional studies of properties of the laser-sintered alloy and fit of castings prepared by this new technique are needed before its acceptance into dental laboratory practice. Laser sintering of Co-Cr alloy seems to be an alternative technique to conventional casting of dental alloys for porcelain fused to metal restorations.

  9. Influence of Immediate Dentin Sealing on the Shear Bond Strength of Pressed Ceramic Luted to Dentin with Self-Etch Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dalby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS, with dentin bonding agents (DBAs applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go! that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent using RXU following the manufacturer’s instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (0.05 in the SBS between the test groups (A–D or the control (group E. Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (>0.05 affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  10. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive.

  11. POLYMERIZATION EFFICIENCY OF TWO DUAL-CURE CEMENTS THROUGH DENTAL CERAMICS

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    Volkan Turp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of thickness of zirconia on curing efficiency of resin cements. Materials and Methods: 4 discs with 4.0 mm in diameter were prepared from non-HIP translucent zirconia blocks using a CAD/CAM system and feldspathic ceramic was layered onto discs. Thus, 4 ceramic disc samples were fabricated: (G 0.5 mm zirconia- as a control group, (G1 0.5 mm zirconia and 0.5 mm feldspathic, (G2 1.0 mm zirconia and 0.5 mm feldspathic and (G3 2.0 mm zirconia and 0.5 mm feldspathic ceramic layer. 2 different dual cure cements were polymerized using a LED curing unit. Degree of conversion was evaluated using Vickers Hardness Test and depths of cure of samples were measured. Data were analyzed statistically using One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test (p2.0 mm, an extended period of light curing or a light unit with a high irradiance should be used.

  12. Peri-Implantitis Associated with Type of Cement: A Retrospective Analysis of Different Types of Cement and Their Clinical Correlation to the Peri-Implant Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsch, Michael; Walther, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    The cementation of fixed implant-supported dental restorations involves the risk of leaving excess cement in the mouth which can promote biofilm formation in the peri-implant sulcus. As a result, an inflammation may develop. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical effect of two different luting cements on the peri-implant tissue. Within the scope of a retrospective clinical follow-up study, the prosthetic structures of 22 patients with 45 implants were revised. In all cases, a methacrylate cement (Premier Implant Cement [PIC], Premier® Dental Products Company, Plymouth Meeting, PA, USA) had been used for cementation. In 16 additional patients with 28 implants, the suprastructures were retained with a zinc oxide-eugenol cement (Temp Bond [TB], Kerr Sybron Dental Specialities, Glendora, CA, USA). These patients were evaluated in the course of routine treatment. In both populations, the retention time of the suprastructures was similar (TB 3.77 years, PIC 4.07 years). In the PIC cases, 62% of all implants had excess cement. In the TB cases, excess cement was not detectable on any of the implants. Bleeding on probing was significantly more frequent on implants cemented with PIC (100% with and 94% without excess cement) than on implants cemented with TB (46%). Pocket suppuration was observed on 89% of the PIC-cemented implants with excess cement (PIC without excess cement 24%), whereas implants with TB were not affected by it at all. The peri-implant bone loss was significantly greater in the PIC patients (with excess cement 1.37 mm, without excess cement 0.41 mm) than it was in the TB patients (0.07 mm). The frequency of undetected excess cement depends essentially on the type of cement used. Cements that tend to leave more undetected excess have a higher prevalence for peri-implant inflammation and cause a more severe peri-implant bone loss. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. An evaluation of the inflammatory response of lipopolysaccharide-treated primary dental pulp cells with regard to calcium silicate-based cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Yun; Kao, Chia-Tze; Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-06-01

    This study compared the biological changes of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated dental pulp (DP) cells directly cultured on mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium silicate (CS) cements. DP cells were treated with LPS for 24 h. Then, the LPS-treated DP cells were cultured on MTA or CS cements. Cell viability, cell death mechanism and interleukin (IL)-1β expressions were analysed. A one-way analysis of variance was used to evaluate the significance of the differences between the means. A significantly higher IL-1β expression (2.9-fold) was found for LPS-treated cells (P<0.05) compared with DP cells without LPS treatment at 24 h. Absorbance values of LPS-treated cells cultured on CS cement were higher than a tissue culture plate. A significant difference (P<0.05) in cell viability was observed between cells on CS and MTA cements 24 h after seeding. At 48 h, a high concentration of Si (5 mM) was released from MTA, which induced LPS-treated DP cell apoptosis. The present study demonstrates that CS cement is biocompatible with cultured LPS-treated DP cells. MTA stimulates inflammation in LPS-treated DP cells, which leads to greater IL-1β expression and apoptosis.

  14. Effect of a New Surface Treatment Solution on the Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    a lubricated highspeed handpiece. In addition to handpiece lubricant, contaminants such as saliva, blood, dental cements , and imaging powder could...HEALTH SCIENCES AIR FORCE POSTGRADUATE DENTAL SCHOOL 2450 Pepperrell Street Lackland AFB Texas, 78236-5345 http://www.usuhs.ml1 "The author hereby...Solution on the Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel ABSTRACT Clean & Boost (Apex Dental Materials) is a novel surface treatment solution

  15. Hard tissue deposition in dental pulp canal by {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Toda, T. [Osaka Dental Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Endodontics; Mandai, Y. [Bio-Chemical Lab. of Nitta Gelatin Inc., Yao (Japan); Oonishi, H. [Osaka Minami National Hospital, Kawachi (Japan). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Canal closure by hard tissue proliferation in the pulp canal and/or apical foramen is the most ideal healing after pulp removal. Generally, Ca(OH){sub 2} may induce secondary dentine or dentine-bridge on the amputated pulp surface. However, Ca(OH){sub 2} shows strong alkalinity and may cause severe inflammatory responses in the residual pulp. Moreover, completely formed dentine-bridge at the orifice will disturb further treatment of residual pulp because of the difficulty in localizing the pathway. The purpose of this study was to see hard tissue induction using newly developed {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate cement and to recognize the morphological difference of hard tissue from that of Ca(OH){sub 2}. (orig.)

  16. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Choobineh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-03-01

    In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm) in 4 groups (n=10) were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2), B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4), C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1), and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2). The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were used to analyze the data (pself-etch) was significantly different from group D (total-etch) (pself-etch) with D (p= 0.024). The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive.

  17. Effect of Dental Chair Light on Enamel Bonding of Orthodontic Brackets Using Light Cure Based Adhesive System: An In-Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Anil; Shyagali, Tarulatha; Kohli, Sarvraj; Joshi, Rishi; Gupta, Abhishek; Tiwari, Rana

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of the Dental chair light on the bond strength of light cured composite resin. Sixty therapeutically extracted human premolar teeth were randomly allocated to two groups of 30 specimens each. In both groups light cured composite resin (Transbond XT) and MBT premolar metal brackets (3M Unitek) was used to bond brackets. In group I and II light curing was done using Light-emitting diode light curing units without and with the dental chair light respectively. After bonding, all samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours and subsequently tested for shear bond strength and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) scores. Data was subjected to Mann Whitney U statistical test. Results indicated that there was significantly higher shear bond strength (7.71 ± 1.90) for the Group II (composite cured with LED and dental chair light) compared with Group I (composite cured with LED LCU only) (5.74 ± 1.13).the obtained difference was statistically significant. There was no statistical significant difference between ARI scores in between the groups. light cure bonding with dental chair light switched on will produce greater bond strength than the conventional bonding. However, the ARI score were similar to both the groups. It is advised that the inexperienced orthodontist should always switch off the dental chair light while bonding for enough working time during the bracket placement.

  18. Use of Cement Kiln Dust, Blast Furnace Slag and Marble Sludge in the Manufacture of Sustainable Artificial Aggregates by Means of Cold Bonding Pelletization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, three different samples of solid industrial wastes cement kiln dust (CKD, granulated blast furnace slag and marble sludge were employed in a cold bonding pelletization process for the sustainable production of artificial aggregates. The activating action of CKD components on the hydraulic behavior of the slag was explored by evaluating the neo-formed phases present in several hydrated pastes. Particularly, the influence of free CaO and sulfates amount in the two CKD samples on slag reactivity was evaluated. Cold bonded artificial aggregates were characterized by determining physical and mechanical properties of two selected size fractions of the granules for each studied mixture. Eighteen types of granules were employed in C28/35 concrete manufacture where coarser natural aggregate were substituted with the artificial ones. Finally, lightweight concretes were obtained, proving the suitability of the cold bonding pelletization process in artificial aggregate sustainable production.

  19. Push-out Bond Strength of Fast-setting Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Pozzolan-based Cements: ENDOCEM MTA and ENDOCEM Zr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Carvalho, Nancy Kudsi; Guberman, Marta Reis da Costa Labanca; Prado, Marina; Senna, Plinio Mendes; Souza, Erick M; De-Deus, Gustavo

    2017-05-01

    The present study investigated the root canal dentin bond strength of 2 newly developed fast-setting mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and pozzolan-based cements: ENDOCEM MTA (Maruchi, Wonju, Korea) and ENDOCEM Zr (Maruchi). White MTA (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil) was used as the reference material for comparison. Root slices (1 mm ± 0.1 mm) were obtained from the middle third of 15 maxillary incisors previously selected. Three canal-like holes (0.8 diameter) were drilled perpendicularly on the axial surface of each root slice. A standardized irrigation protocol was applied for all samples, and after drying, each hole was filled with 1 of 3 test repair materials. Finally, slices were stored in contact with phosphate-buffered saline solution (pH = 7.2) for 7 days at 37°C before the push-out assay. Data were nonparametrically evaluated at α = 5%. The Friedman test was unable to confirm a significant dissimilarity in push-out ranks among the tested cements (P = .220). The new fast-setting MTA and pozzolan-based cements ENDOCEM MTA and ENDOCEM Zr present suitable bond strength performance, which is comparable with white MTA. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Microshear Bond Strength on Leucite-Reinforced Glass-Ceramic with/without Pure Silane Primer or Universal Adhesive Surface Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Woo, Jung-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of self-adhesive resin (SA) cement on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic using silane or universal adhesive. Ceramic blocks were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid and divided into three groups (n = 16): (1) negative control (NC) without treatment; (2) Single Bond Universal (SBU); (3) RelyX Ceramic Primer as positive control (PC). RelyX Unicem resin cement was light-cured, and μSBS was evaluated with/without thermocycling. The μSBS was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The fractured surfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Without thermocycling, μSBS was highest for PC (30.50 MPa ± 3.40), followed by SBU (27.33 MPa ± 2.81) and NC (20.18 MPa ± 2.01) (P 0.05). PC and NC predominantly fractured by cohesive failure within the ceramic and mixed failure, respectively. SBU treatment improves μSBS between SA cement and glass ceramics, but to a lower value than PC, and the improvement is eradicated by thermocycling. NC exhibited the lowest μSBS, which remained unchanged after thermocycling.

  1. The effect of sandblasting and different primers on shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal ceramic and a self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Y-A; Ahn, J-S; Park, Y-J; Jun, S-H; Lee, I-B; Cho, B-H; Son, H-H; Seo, D-G

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of zirconia primers, air-abrasion, and tribochemical surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramic and self-adhesive resin cement. Y-TZP ceramic surfaces were ground flat with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and then divided into seven groups of 10 and treated as follows: untreated (control), Monobond Plus, Z-PRIME Plus, ESPE Sil with CoJet, air-abrasion, Monobond Plus with air-abrasion, and Z-PRIME Plus with air-abrasion. Self-adhesive resin cement was placed onto the treated Y-TZP specimens for each group. All specimens were thermocycled and subjected to a shear bond strength test. Scanning electron microscope images of the fractured areas and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the surface-treated Y-TZP specimens were performed. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (pceramic and self-adhesive resin cement.

  2. Microtensile bond strength and scanning electron microscopic evaluation of zirconia bonded to dentin using two self-adhesive resin cements; effect of airborne abrasion and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Gamal

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Airborne abrasion-surface treatment of zirconia significantly enhanced the μTBS of both cements adhered to dentin while aging had an adverse effect. MS showed higher insignificant μTBS.

  3. Influence of retainer design on two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses: an in vitro and finite element analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulemans, Filip; De Jager, Niek; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Four retainer designs were tested: a proximal box, a step-box, a dual wing, and a step-box-wing. Of each design on 8 human mandibular molars, FRC-FDPs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin impregnated unidirectional glass fibers (Estenia C&B EG Fiber, Kuraray) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Estenia C&B, Kuraray). Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FDPs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test were used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FDPs (proximal box: 300 +/- 65 N; step-box: 309 +/- 37 N) compared to wing-retained FDPs (p optimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FDPs.

  4. Evaluation of metal-ceramic bond characteristics of three dental Co-Cr alloys prepared with different fabrication techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongmei; Feng, Qing; Li, Ning; Xu, Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Limited information is available regarding the metal-ceramic bond strength of dental Co-Cr alloys fabricated by casting (CAST), computer numerical control (CNC) milling, and selective laser melting (SLM). The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond characteristics of 3 dental Co-Cr alloys fabricated by casting, computer numerical control milling, and selective laser melting techniques using the 3-point bend test (International Organization for Standardization [ISO] standard 9693). Forty-five specimens (25×3×0.5 mm) made of dental Co-Cr alloys were prepared by CAST, CNC milling, and SLM techniques. The morphology of the oxidation surface of metal specimens was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After porcelain application, the interfacial characterization was evaluated by SEM equipped with energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis, and the metal-ceramic bond strength was assessed with the 3-point bend test. Failure type and elemental composition on the debonding interface were assessed by SEM/EDS. The bond strength was statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and Tukey honest significant difference test (α=.05). The oxidation surfaces of the CAST, CNC, and SLM groups were different. They were porous in the CAST group but compact and irregular in the CNC and SLM groups. The metal-ceramic interfaces of the SLM and CNC groups showed excellent combination compared with those of the CAST group. The bond strength was 37.7 ±6.5 MPa for CAST, 43.3 ±9.2 MPa for CNC, and 46.8 ±5.1 MPa for the SLM group. Statistically significant differences were found among the 3 groups tested (P=.028). The debonding surfaces of all specimens exhibited cohesive failure mode. The oxidation surface morphologies and thicknesses of dental Co-Cr alloys are dependent on the different fabrication techniques used. The bond strength of all 3 groups exceed the minimum acceptable value of 25 MPa recommended by ISO 9693; hence, dental Co-Cr alloy

  5. Microtensile Bond Strength of CAD/CAM Resin Blocks to Dual-Cure Adhesive Cement: The Effect of Different Sandblasting Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekçe, Neslihan; Tuncer, Safa; Demirci, Mustafa; Kara, Dilan; Baydemir, Canan

    2018-02-11

    To investigate the effect of sandblasting powder particles on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of dual-cure adhesive cement to CAD/CAM blocks. CAD/CAM blocks (Cerasmart, VITA, and LAVA) were cut in slabs and divided into groups: group 1, no sandblasting; group 2, sandblasted with 27-μm Al 2 O 3 ; group 3, sandblasted with 30-μm CoJet; group 4, sandblasted with 50-μm Al 2 O 3 . After sandblasting, all specimens were silanized and luted using dual-cure adhesive cement (G-CEM LinkForce). After 24 hours, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.2 mm 2 sticks, and μTBS values were obtained (N = 30). Additionally, 132 CAD/CAM block sections were prepared for surface roughness testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluations. Results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis One-way ANOVA and Dunn's Post Hoc Test (p 0.05). For LAVA, μTBS values of specimens that were sandblasted with 50-μm Al 2 O 3 powder were significantly higher than 30-μm-SiO 2 and 27-μm Al 2 O 3 (p CAD/CAM blocks for Cerasmart and VITA, although the results changed significantly for LAVA. The ideal bond protocol for CAD/CAM blocks is specific to the material used. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Effect of light-activation with different light-curing units and time intervals on resin cement bond strength to intraradicular dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel-Almeida, Maria Eleonora; Azevedo, Mario Lucio da Costa; Rached-Júnior, Fuad Abi; Oliveira, Camila Favero; Silva, Ricardo Gariba; Messias, Danielle Cristine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of a resin cement to intraradicular dentin varying the light-curing unit and the moment at which the light was applied. Post spaces of endodontically treated canines were prepared. The roots were distributed into 6 groups (n=10) according to the light-curing unit and the moment of light exposure: I) Quartz tungsten halogen-600 mW/cm² (QTH) + immediate light activation (t0); II) QTH + light activation after 10 min (t10); III) Light-emitting diodes (LED)-800 mW/cm² (LED-800)+ t0; IV) LED-800 + t10; V) LED-1,500 mW/cm² (LED-1500)+ t0; VI) LED-1500 + t10. After post cementation, slices from coronal, middle and apical post/root regions were submitted to the push-out test and failure evaluation. It was verified that LED-800 (4.40 ± 3.00 MPa) and LED-1500 (4.67 ± 3.04 MPa) provided bond strength statistically superior to QTH (3.13 ± 1.76 MPa) (p0.05). There was no significant difference between t0 and t10 (p>0.05). Coronal post/root region (4.75 ± 3.10 MPa) presented significantly higher bond strength than the apical (3.32 ± 2.30 MPa) (plight-activation, regardless of the moment of light exposure.

  7. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of nano-hydroxyapatite incorporated glass ionomer cement and conventional glass ionomer cement on dense synthetic hydroxyapatite disk: An in vitro study

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    Kanupriya Choudhary

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The lower shear bond strength of nano-HAp incorporate GIC revealed that the addition of nano-HAp interfered with the bonding ability of GIC to the substrate interface, but the mixed type of failure in nano-HAp incorporated GIC suggests that it increases the strength of the matrix. However, the role of nano-size particles on the micro-size particles of GIC for the bonding mechanism and the ratio and proportions of nano-HAp to the GIC needs further elucidation.

  8. Effect of quaternary ammonium and silver nanoparticle-containing adhesives on dentin bond strength and dental plaque microcosm biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Melo, Mary Anne S.; Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Antibacterial bonding agents are promising to hinder the residual and invading bacteria at the tooth-restoration interfaces. The objectives of this study were to develop an antibacterial bonding agent by incorporation of quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM) and nanoparticles of silver (NAg), and to investigate the effect of QADM-NAg adhesive and primer on dentin bond strength and plaque microcosm biofilm response for the first time. Methods Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive and primer were used as control. Experimental adhesive and primer were made by adding QADM and NAg into control adhesive and primer. Human dentin shear bond strengths were measured (n = 10). A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate biofilm metabolic activity, colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, lactic acid production, and live/dead staining assay (n = 6). Results Adding QADM and NAg into adhesive and primer did not compromise the dentin shear bond strength which ranged from 30 to 35 MPa (p > 0.1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations revealed numerous resin tags, which were similar for the control and the QADM and NAg groups. Adding QADM or NAg markedly reduced the biofilm viability, compared to adhesive control. QADM and NAg together in the adhesive had a much stronger antibacterial effect than using each agent alone (p control. Significance Without compromising dentin bond strength and resin tag formation, the QADM and NAg containing adhesive and primer achieved strong antibacterial effects against microcosm biofilms for the first time. QADM-NAg adhesive and primer are promising to combat residual bacteria in tooth cavity and invading bacteria at the margins, thereby to inhibit secondary caries. QADM and NAg incorporation may have a wide applicability to other dental bonding systems. PMID:22592165

  9. Effects of ethanol concentrations of acrylate-based dental adhesives on microtensile composite-dentin bond strength and hybrid layer structure of a 10 wt% polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-incorporated bonding agent

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    Seyed Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Incorporation of 31% ethanol as solvent into a 10 wt% POSS-incorporated experimental dental adhesive might increase the bond strength of composite to dentin and improve the quality and morphology of the hybrid layer. However, higher concentrations of the solvent might not improve the bond strength or quality of the hybrid layer.

  10. Microstructure of titanium-cement-lithium disilicate interface in CAD-CAM dental implant crowns: a three-dimensional profilometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresti, Stefano; Itri, Angelo; Rebaudi, Alberto; Diaspro, Alberto; Salerno, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an infection of the implant surface caused by adhesion of bacteria that generate bone resorption and sometimes even consequent implant loss. Both screw-retained and cemented fixed implants are affected. The purpose of this study is to investigate the morphological defects at the cemented interface between titanium abutment and ceramic crown, comparing different adhesive cements used to fill the marginal gap. Twelve computer-aided design-computer-aided manufacturing dental crowns were cemented to titanium abutments using three different resin composite cements. Sealed margins were polished using grommets with descending diamond particle size. Three groups of four crowns each were made according to the cement used, namely RelyX Unicem (3 M ESPE), Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray), and NX3 (Nexus Kerr). Samples were analyzed using optical inspection, three-dimensional profilometry, and image analysis, including analysis of variance. Although RelyX showed significantly lower root mean square surface roughness (4.4 ± 1.5 μm) than that of NX3 (7.0 ± 2.9 μm), it showed no significant difference with Panavia (3.7 ± 1.5 μm). The marginal gap was significantly wider in Panavia (149 ± 108 μm) as compared with NX3 (71 ± 45 μm) and Relyx (64 ± 34 μm). For all groups, homogeneous heights of both metal-cement and ceramic-cement gaps were observed. Moreover, all samples showed homogeneity of the margins and absence of instrumental bias, thus validating both procedure and materials. When using the chosen polishing method, RelyX Unicem showed both low roughness and marginal width, and thus the smoothest and more continuous abutment-crown interlayer, promising a low probability of occurrence of peri-implantitis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The effect of surface treatment with a fractional carbon dioxide laser on shear bond strength of resin cement to a lithium disilicate-based ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Boruziniat, Alireza; Mohammadipour, Hamideh Sadat; Alirezaei, Mehrnoosh

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of different surface treatments, including fractional carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) laser on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to lithium disilicate ceramic. In this in vitro study, 72 blocks of IPS e.max CAD ceramic were randomly divided into six groups in terms of treatment ( n = 12). Group 1 underwent etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric (HF) acid, whereas group 2 was subjected to air abrasion with aluminum oxide particles. Groups 3 and 4 were treated with a fractional CO 2 laser for 10 s using 10 W/14 mJ (group 3) or 20 W/10 mJ (group 4). In groups 5 and 6, the CO 2 laser was applied similar to that in groups 3 and 4, respectively; then, the specimens were etched by HF acid. After silane application, luting cement was bonded to the specimens. The SBS was assessed with a universal testing machine, and the type of bond failure was determined. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Duncan, and Fisher's exact tests. Surface conditioning with fractional CO 2 laser alone resulted in significantly lower SBS than HF acid treatment ( P < 0.05). Bond strengths of the specimens treated with a combination of laser irradiation and acid etching were significantly greater than all the other groups ( P < 0.05). No significant difference was found in the distribution of failure modes among the groups ( P = 0.337). The combination of fractional CO 2 laser irradiation and HF acid etching could be recommended when extra retention is required for lithium disilicate-based restorations, whereas laser treatment alone cannot produce sufficient SBS.

  12. The Effect of Simplified Bonding Agents on the Bond Strength to Dentin of Self-Activated Dual-Cure Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    One-step, self-etch (simplified) Mix the liquids in the red and yellow blister, brush the mixture onto tooth surface (15s) Gently air dry (5s...mounted specimens were divided into four groups of forty teeth based on dentin treatment with four dental adhesives: two simplified adhesives, Prime and...extraction. The teeth were mounted in dental stone in PVC pipes with the crown exposed and accessible (Figure 4). A diamond saw (Isomet, Buehler

  13. A comparison of finite element analysis with in vitro bond strength tests of the bracket-cement-enamel system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Algera, T.J.; Feilzer, A.J.; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro shear bond strength (SBS) and tensile bond strength (TBS) of 45 metal brackets bonded with Transbond XT to bovine enamel. The SBS was determined by loading the short and the long sides of the bracket base. Testing took place after storage of the

  14. Chapa aglomerada de cimento-madeira de Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg. Cement-bonded particleboard of Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.

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    Esmeralda Yoshico Arakaki Okino

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Chapas de partículas de cimento-madeira foram confeccionadas com a madeira de quatro clones de Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg. (seringueira: IAN 717, IAN 873, GT 711 e AVROS 1301. Confeccionaram-se as chapas na proporção de 1:4:1 (madeira:cimento:água por peso e nas dimensões de 450 x 450 x 13 mm e densidade nominal de 1,4 g/cm³, com a adição de 4% de cloreto de cálcio di-hidratado (CaCl2.2H2O como acelerador. Foram testadas partículas fervidas e não-fervidas dos quatro clones, totalizando oito tratamentos, sendo em cada um destes, com quatro repetições, avaliadas as propriedades mecânicas e físicas das chapas, segundo a norma ASTM D 1037 - 96a. De forma geral, os melhores resultados de propriedades físicas e mecânicas foram obtidos nas chapas com partículas do clone AVROS 1301. No teste de hidratação do cimento, a madeira de seringueira in natura foi classificada como de "inibição extrema", porém com a adição de CaCl2 o foi como de "baixa inibição". Essa madeira se mostrou tecnicamente viável à produção de chapas de cimento-madeira, independentemente do clone.Cement-bonded particleboards of rubberwood were manufactured with four clones of Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg. (rubberwood: IAN 717, IAN 873, GT 711 and AVROS 1301. Boards of 450 x 450 x 13 mm were manufactured in a ratio of 1:4:1 (wood/cement/water, weight basis, with 1.4 g/cm³ density and 4% calcium chloride dihydrated - CaCl2.2H2O as accelerator. The particles of four clones were tested in treated and untreated conditions, totaling eight treatments. In each treatment with four replicates, the physical and mechanical properties were evaluated according to ASTM D 1037 - 96a standard. Overall, the best mechanical and physical results were obtained with the cement-bonded particleboard made with particles from clone AVROS 1301. Rubberwood has shown to be "highly inhibitory" in the hydration test, however when CaCl2 was added the inhibition index decreased and

  15. Retention of long-term interim restorations with sodium fluoride enriched interim cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strash, Carolyn

    Purpose: Interim fixed dental prostheses, or "provisional restorations", are fabricated to restore teeth when definitive prostheses are made indirectly. Patients undergoing extensive prosthodontic treatment frequently require provisionalization for several months or years. The ideal interim cement would retain the restoration for as long as needed and still allow for ease of removal. It would also avoid recurrent caries by preventing demineralization of tooth structure. This study aims to determine if adding sodium fluoride varnish to interim cement may assist in the retention of interim restorations. Materials and methods: stainless steel dies representing a crown preparation were fabricated. Provisional crowns were milled for the dies using CAD/CAM technology. Crowns were provisionally cemented onto the dies using TempBond NE and NexTemp provisional cements as well as a mixture of TempBond NE and Duraphat fluoride varnish. Samples were stored for 24h then tested or thermocycled for 2500 or 5000 cycles before being tested. Retentive strength of each cement was recorded using a universal testing machine. Results: TempBond NE and NexTemp cements performed similarly when tested after 24h. The addition of Duraphat significantly decreased the retention when added to TempBond NE. NexTemp cement had high variability in retention over all tested time periods. Thermocycling for 2500 and 5000 cycles significantly decreased the retention of all cements. Conclusions: The addition of Duraphat fluoride varnish significantly decreased the retention of TempBond NE and is therefore not recommended for clinical use. Thermocycling significantly reduced the retention of TempBond NE and NexTemp. This may suggest that use of these cements for three months, as simulated in this study, is not recommended.

  16. Evaluation of the mechanical properties and porcelain bond strength of cobalt-chromium dental alloy fabricated by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Zhu, Haiting; Gai, Xiuying; Wang, Yanyan

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding the microstructure and mechanical properties of dental alloy fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of a cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) dental alloy fabricated by SLM and to determine the correlation between its microstructure and mechanical properties and its porcelain bond strength. Five metal specimens and 10 metal ceramic specimens were fabricated to evaluate the mechanical properties of SLM Co-Cr dental alloy (SLM alloy) with a tensile test and its porcelain bond strength with a 3-point bending test. The relevant properties of the SLM alloy were compared with those of the currently used Co-Cr dental alloy fabricated with conventional cast technology (cast alloy). The Student t test was used to compare the results of the SLM alloy and the cast alloy (α=.05). The microstructure of the SLM alloy was analyzed with a metallographic microscope; the metal ceramic interface of the SLM porcelain bonded alloy was studied with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and an electron probe microanalyzer. Both the mean (standard deviation) yield strength (884.37 ± 8.96 MPa) and tensile strength (1307.50 ±10.65 MPa) of the SLM alloy were notably higher than yield strength (568.10 ± 30.94 MPa) and tensile strength (758.73 ± 25.85 MPa) of the currently used cast alloy, and the differences were significant (P.05). Microstructure analysis suggested that the SLM alloy had a dense and obviously orientated microstructure, which led to excellent mechanical properties. Analysis from scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and the electron probe microanalyzer indicated that the SLM alloy had an intermediate layer with elemental interpenetration between the alloy and the porcelain, which resulted in an improved bonding interface. Compared with the currently used cast alloy, SLM alloy possessed improved mechanical

  17. A technique for the management of screw access opening in cement-retained implant restorations

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    Hamid Kermanshah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abutment screw loosening has been considered as a common complication of implant-supported dental prostheses. This problem is more important in cement-retained implant restorations due to their invisible position of the screw access opening. Case Report: This report describes a modified retrievability method for cement-retained implant restorations in the event of abutment screw loosening. The screw access opening was marked with ceramic stain and its porcelain surface was treated using hydrofluoric acid (HF, silane, and adhesive to bond to composite resin. Discussion: The present modified technique facilitates screw access opening and improves the bond between the porcelain and composite resin.

  18. In vitro comparison of the bond strength to the enamel of conventional and self-etching dental fissure sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellini, E; De Francesco, M; Avventi, M; Gracco, A; Berengo, M; Simionato, F; Mazzoleni, S

    2013-12-01

    Dental caries in pits and fissures of molars is still very common in young people, despite a gradual reduction in their incidence and prevalence. Prevention with the aid of dental fissure sealants can help to reduce the onset of decay. In vitro tests were conducted to compare the bond strength to enamel of self-etching sealants versus those applied using the conventional procedure. The lingual surface of 40 extracted, caries-free, mandibular third molars was milled to make them flat. The prepared teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 20 teeth each: those in Group A were treated with Clinpro (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA); those in Group B with Quick Seal (BJM Laboratories Ltd, Or-Yehuda, Israel). Cylinders of sealant were attached to the enamel of the flat surfaces of the samples using a polymerisation process treating the surfaces involved according to the type of material. All samples underwent load testing by means of a universal test machine. The results of the load testing, measured in MPa, were analysed using the Student's t-test for independent samples and the differences proved significant, indicating that the traditionally- applied sealant (mean strength 21.06 MPa) assured a significantly stronger bond (p sealant (mean strength 10.43 MPa) under our experimental conditions. CONCLUSION Conventional sealants generally provide a considerably higher bond strength than self-etching sealants.

  19. Survival of anterior cantilevered all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses made from zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Martin; Kern, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated the clinical outcome of all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs) with a cantilevered single-retainer design made from zirconia ceramic. Forty-two anterior RBFDPs with a cantilevered single-retainer design were made from yttrium oxide-stabilized zirconium oxide ceramic. RBFDPs were inserted using Panavia 21 TC as luting agent after air-abrasion of the ceramic bonding surface. During a mean observation time of 61.8 months two debondings occurred. Both RBFDPs were rebonded using Panavia 21 TC and are still in function. A caries lesion was detected at one abutment tooth during recall and was treated with a composite filling. Therefore, the overall six-year failure-free rate according to Kaplan-Meier was 91.1%. If only debonding was defined as failure the survival rate increased to 95.2%. Since all RBFDPs are still in function the overall survival rate was 100% after six years. Cantilevered zirconia ceramic RBFDPs showed promising results within the observation period. Single-retainer resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses made from zirconia ceramic show very good mid-term clinical survival rates. They should therefore be considered as a viable treatment alternative for the replacement of single missing anterior teeth especially as compared to an implant therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength and microleakage of conventional glass ionomer cement, resin modified glass ionomer cement and compomer: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, C Vishnu; Varma, Balagopal; Jayanthi

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the tensile bond strength and microleakage of Fuji IX GP, Fuji II LC, and compoglass and to compare bond strength with degree of microleakage exhibited by the same materials. Occlusal surfaces of 96 noncarious primary teeth were ground perpendicular to long axis of the tooth. Preparations were distributed into three groups consisting of Fuji IX GP, Fuji II LC and Compoglass. Specimens were tested for tensile bond strength by mounting them on Instron Universal Testing Machine. Ninety-six primary molars were treated with Fuji IX GP, Fuji II LC, and compoglass on box-only prepared proximal surface. Samples were thermocycled, stained with dye, sectioned, and scored for microleakage under stereomicroscope. ANOVA and Bonferrani correction test were done for comparisons. Pearson Chi-square test and regression analysis were done to assess the association between the parameters. Compoglass showed highest tensile strength and Fuji II LC showed least microleakage. There was a significant difference between the three groups in tensile strength and microleakage levels. The correlation between tensile strength and microleakage level in each group showed that there was a significant negative correlation only in Group 3. Fuji II LC and compoglass can be advocated in primary teeth because of their superior physical properties when compared with Fuji IX GP.

  1. Effect of Exposed Surface Area, Volume and Environmental pH on the Calcium Ion Release of Three Commercially Available Tricalcium Silicate Based Dental Cements

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    Sivaprakash Rajasekharan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tricalcium silicate cements (TSC are used in dental traumatology and endodontics for their bioactivity which is mostly attributed to formation of calcium hydroxide during TSC hydration and its subsequent release of calcium and hydroxide ions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of volume (Vol, exposed surface area (ESA and pH of surrounding medium on calcium ion release. Three commercially available hydraulic alkaline dental cements were mixed and condensed into cylindrical tubes of varying length and diameter (n = 6/group. For the effect of ESA and Vol, tubes were immersed in 10 mL of deionized water. To analyze the effect of environmental pH, the tubes were randomly immersed in 10 mL of buffer solutions with varying pH (10.4, 7.4 or 4.4. The solutions were collected and renewed at various time intervals. pH and/or calcium ion release was measured using a pH glass electrode and atomic absorption spectrophotometer respectively. The change of pH, short-term calcium ion release and rate at which calcium ion release reaches maximum were dependent on ESA (p < 0.05 while maximum calcium ion release was dependent on Vol of TSC (p < 0.05. Maximum calcium ion release was significantly higher in acidic solution followed by neutral and alkaline solution (p < 0.05.

  2. An in vitro investigation of the mechanical-chemical and biological properties of calcium phosphate/calcium silicate/bismutite cement for dental pulp capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qingyi; Sun, Jiao; Wu, Jie; Liu, Changsheng; Chen, Fangping

    2010-07-01

    The properties of new calcium phosphate/calcium silicate/bismutite (CPCSBi) cement were compared with those of calcium hydroxide (CH) and Dycal cements in dental pulp-capping applications. CPCSBi is composed of hydroxyapatite, tetracalcium phosphate, bismutite, and calcium silicate, which was analyzed by SEM, FTIR, and XRD. The results of ion release from CPCSBi showed that the concentrations of Bi(3+), Ca(2+), PO4(2-), and Si(4+) increased with time in deionized water solutions. The setting time of CPCSBi and Dycal was 13 min 50 s and 2 min 25 s, respectively. There were no statistical differences in compressive strength and solubility between CPCSBi and Dycal (p > 0.05). The pH of CPCSBi (10.9) was lower than that of CH (11.6) and Dycal (12.5) after immersion for 24 h. Only slight cytotoxicity appeared for CPCSBi, whereas both CH and Dycal produced moderate discoloration and lysis. In antimicrobial tests against Sm, Av, La, and Sa, the antimicrobial potency of the CPCSBi was approximately 5-10 times greater than that of Dycal and CH groups. The dissoluble dentin matrix components (DDMCs) extracted from CPCSBi exposed to dentin powder demonstrated increased expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and soteocalcin (OCN) dramatically in human pulp cells by RT-PCR. These results suggest that CPCSBi will be a good candidate for use as a dental pulp-capping agent in future. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effect of Exposed Surface Area, Volume and Environmental pH on the Calcium Ion Release of Three Commercially Available Tricalcium Silicate Based Dental Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekharan, Sivaprakash; Vercruysse, Chris; Martens, Luc; Verbeeck, Ronald

    2018-01-13

    Tricalcium silicate cements (TSC) are used in dental traumatology and endodontics for their bioactivity which is mostly attributed to formation of calcium hydroxide during TSC hydration and its subsequent release of calcium and hydroxide ions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of volume (Vol), exposed surface area (ESA) and pH of surrounding medium on calcium ion release. Three commercially available hydraulic alkaline dental cements were mixed and condensed into cylindrical tubes of varying length and diameter ( n = 6/group). For the effect of ESA and Vol, tubes were immersed in 10 mL of deionized water. To analyze the effect of environmental pH, the tubes were randomly immersed in 10 mL of buffer solutions with varying pH (10.4, 7.4 or 4.4). The solutions were collected and renewed at various time intervals. pH and/or calcium ion release was measured using a pH glass electrode and atomic absorption spectrophotometer respectively. The change of pH, short-term calcium ion release and rate at which calcium ion release reaches maximum were dependent on ESA ( p < 0.05) while maximum calcium ion release was dependent on Vol of TSC ( p < 0.05). Maximum calcium ion release was significantly higher in acidic solution followed by neutral and alkaline solution ( p < 0.05).

  4. Marginal fit of cemented and screw-retained crowns incorporated on the Straumann (ITI) Dental Implant System: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosches, N A; Brägger, U; Lang, N P

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the marginal fit of crowns on the Straumann (ITI) Dental Implant System with special consideration of different casting dental materials. Sixty porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns were fabricated: 18 crowns on standard cone abutments with an impression cylinder, partially prefabricated analogs, no coping and screw-retained (A); 18 crowns on solid abutments without an impression device, no analogs, no coping and cemented (B); and 18 crowns on solid abutments using an impression transfer cap, an analog with a shoulder, no coping and cemented (C). In each group, six crowns were made on epoxy mastercasts (Bluestar), six on synthetic plaster (Moldasynt) and six on super hard stone (Fujirock). Six additional crowns were fabricated with the transversal screw retention system onto the Octa system with impression transfer caps, metal analogs, gold copings and screw-retained (D). Impregum was used as impression material. Crowns of B and C were cemented with KetacCem. Crowns of A and D were fixed with an occlusal screw torqued at 15 N cm. Crowns were embedded, cut and polished. Under a light microscope using a magnification of x 100, the distance between the crown margin (CM) and the shoulder (marginal gap, MG) and the distance between the CM and the end of the shoulder (crown length, CL) was measured. MGs were 15.4+/-13.2 microm (A), 21.2+/-23.1 microm (B), 11+/-12.1 microm (C) and 10.4+/-9.3 microm (D). No statistically significantly differences using either of the casting materials were observed. CLs were -21.3+/-24.8 microm (A), 3+/-28.9 microm (B), 0.5+/-22 microm (C) and 0.1+/-15.8 microm (D). Crowns were shorter on synthetic casting materials compared with stone casts (Pcemented and screw-retained versions as well as when using no, partial or full analogs.

  5. Streptococcus mutans counts in plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement or resin-based composite

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    Solange Machado Mota

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU (colony forming units in the saliva and plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with a glass ionomer cement - GIC (Fuji Ortho or a resin-based composite - RC (Concise. Twenty male and female patients, aged 12 to 20 years, participated in the study. Saliva was collected before and after placement of appliances. Plaque was collected from areas adjacent to brackets and saliva was again collected on the 15th, 30th, and 45th day after placement. On the 30th day, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was applied for 4 minutes. No significant modification in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU in saliva was observed after placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances. On the 15th day, the percentage of Streptococcus mutans CFU in plaque was statistically lower in sites adjacent to GIC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.365 than in those adjacent to RC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.935. No evidence was found of a contribution of GIC to the reduction of CFU in plaque after the 15th day. Topical application of stannous fluoride gel on the 30th day reduced the number of CFU in saliva, but not in plaque. This study suggests that the antimicrobial activity of GIC occurs only in the initial phase and is not responsible for a long-term anticariogenic property.

  6. Bonding of Glass Ceramic and Indirect Composite to Non-aged and Aged Resin Composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Ozcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged

  7. Dilemmas in zirconia bonding: A review

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    Obradović-Đuričić Kosovka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a literature review on the resin bond to zirconia ceramic. Modern esthetic dentistry has highly recognized zirconia, among other ceramic materials. Biocompatibility of zirconia, chemical and dimensional stability, excellent mechanical properties, all together could guarantee optimal therapeutical results in complex prosthodontic reconstruction. On the other hand, low thermal degradation, aging of zirconia as well as problematic bonding of zirconia framework to dental luting cements and tooth structures, opened the room for discussion concerning their clinical durability. The well known methods of mechanical and chemical bonding used on glass-ceramics are not applicable for use with zirconia. Therefore, under critical clinical situations, selection of the bonding mechanism should be focused on two important points: high initial bond strength value and long term bond strength between zirconia-resin interface. Also, this paper emphases the use of phosphate monomer luting cements on freshly air-abraded zirconia as the simplest and most effective way for zirconia cementation procedure today.

  8. Effects of metal primers on the bonding of an adhesive resin cement to noble metal ceramic alloys after thermal cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hiroyuki; Murahara, Sadaaki; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2011-12-01

    Although the effectiveness of primers for resin bonding to noble alloys has been demonstrated, no effective clinical technique for bonding to noble metal ceramic alloys has been established. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of metal primers on the shear bond strength of an adhesive resin to noble metal ceramic alloys after thermal cycling. Sixty-three disk-shaped specimens (10 × 2.5 mm) were cast from high-gold-content alloys (Super Metal W-85: W85 or IFK88 GR: IFK88), a high-palladium-content alloy (Super Metal N-40: N40), and an Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy (Castwell M.C.12: MC12). Smaller-sized disk-shaped specimens (8 × 2.5 mm) were fabricated with MC12. Bonding surfaces were finished with 600-grit SiC-paper and airborne-particle abraded with 50-μm alumina. Pairs of disks were primed (V-Primer: VP; ML Primer: ML; or Metaltite: MT) and bonded with an adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B). The bond strengths were determined before and after 20,000 and 50,000 thermal cycles (n=7). Data were analyzed by using a 3-way ANOVA and the Bonferroni test (α=.05). Failure modes were determined by optical microscope and SEM observation. Bond strengths to high-gold-content alloys with VP and MT significantly decreased after the thermal cycling (Palloys were not degraded up to 50,000 thermal cycles when primed with ML. None of the primers evaluated was effective for high-palladium-content alloy. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Microstructural characterization of dental zinc phosphate cements using combined small angle neutron scattering and microfocus X-ray computed tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viani, Alberto; Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Kumpová, Ivana; Mancini, L.; Appavou, M.-S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2017), s. 402-417 ISSN 0109-5641 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : zinc phosphate cements * small angle neutron scattering * X-ray micro-computed tomography * X-ray powder diffraction * zinc oxide * acid-base cements Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 4.070, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0109564116305127

  10. THE EFFECT OF KAVINER ON THE FIXED DENTURES BONDING STRENGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebojša Krunić

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A layer of agents used to protect polished teeth is applied to a stump prior to the final cementation of the fixed denture for the purpose of alleviating postoperative sensibility. The objective of this paper was to establish, under the in vitro conditions, whether application of one layer of the agent (Kaviner intended to isolate polished teeth decreases the fixed denture bonding strength. Used as a material were 40 intact human premolars extracted for orthodox reasons, polished by a high capacity machine using a cold water spray cooling. Experimental crowns were made by a standard method from NiCrMo alloy and cemented by zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements on the corresponding stumps (20 in each group. After seven days, the bond strength between the polished teeth and crowns was mechanically tested, first without and then after application of Kaviner. The results obtained have shown a decrease in the bonding strength with both cements used, higher decrease in the retention force being observed with the glass ionomer cement. However, the retention force values obtained after the application of Kaviner for both observed dental cements are still clinically acceptable.

  11. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sheen Juneja; Arora, Aman; Upadhyaya, Viram; Jain, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    Background or Statement of Problem: As, the longevity of provisional restorations is related to, a perfect adaptation and a strong, long-term union between restoration and teeth structures, therefore, evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional restorative materials luted with cements using the standardized procedures is essential. Aims and Objectives: To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from Autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and bisphenol A-glycidyl dimethacrylate (BIS-GMA) resin crowns. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and BIS-GMA resin crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin (SC-10) crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from BIS-GMA resin crowns (Protemp 4) cemented with different temporary luting cements. Methodology: Freshly extracted 60 maxillary premolars of approximately similar dimensions were mounted in dental plaster. Tooth reduction with shoulder margin was planned to use a customized handpiece-holding jig. Provisional crowns were prepared using the wax pattern fabricated from computer aided designing/computer aided manufacturing milling machine following the tooth preparation. Sixty provisional crowns were made, thirty each of SC-10 and Protemp 4 and were then cemented with three different luting cements. Specimens were thermocycled, submerged in a 2% methylene blue solution, then sectioned and observed under a stereomicroscope for the evaluation of marginal microleakage. A five-level scale was used to score dye penetration in the tooth/cement interface and the results of this study was analyzed using the Chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test, Kruskal–Wallis H-test and the results were statistically significant P crowns

  12. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sheen Juneja; Arora, Aman; Upadhyaya, Viram; Jain, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    As, the longevity of provisional restorations is related to, a perfect adaptation and a strong, long-term union between restoration and teeth structures, therefore, evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional restorative materials luted with cements using the standardized procedures is essential. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from Autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and bisphenol A-glycidyl dimethacrylate (BIS-GMA) resin crowns. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and BIS-GMA resin crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin (SC-10) crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from BIS-GMA resin crowns (Protemp 4) cemented with different temporary luting cements. Freshly extracted 60 maxillary premolars of approximately similar dimensions were mounted in dental plaster. Tooth reduction with shoulder margin was planned to use a customized handpiece-holding jig. Provisional crowns were prepared using the wax pattern fabricated from computer aided designing/computer aided manufacturing milling machine following the tooth preparation. Sixty provisional crowns were made, thirty each of SC-10 and Protemp 4 and were then cemented with three different luting cements. Specimens were thermocycled, submerged in a 2% methylene blue solution, then sectioned and observed under a stereomicroscope for the evaluation of marginal microleakage. A five-level scale was used to score dye penetration in the tooth/cement interface and the results of this study was analyzed using the Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis H-test and the results were statistically significant P provisional crowns cemented with three different luting cements along the axial walls of

  13. THERMO-CURED GLASS IONOMER CEMENTS IN RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY

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    Kristina GORSETA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous positive properties of glass ionomer cements including biocompatibility, bioactivity, releasing of fluoride and good adhesion to hard dental tissue even under wet conditions and easy of handling are reasons for their wide use in paediatric and restorative dentistry. Their biggest drawbacks are the weaker mechanical properties. An important step forward in improving GIC’s features is thermo-curing with the dental polymerization unit during setting of the material. Due to their slow setting characteristics the GIC is vulnerable to early exposure to moisture. After thermo curing, cements retain all the benefits of GIC with developed better mechanical properties, improved marginal adaptation, increased microhardness and shear bond strength. Adding external energy through thermocuring or ultrasound during the setting of conventional GIC is crucial to achieve faster and better initial mechanical properties. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  14. Thermo-cured glass ionomer cements in restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorseta, Kristina; Glavina, Domagoj

    2017-01-01

    Numerous positive properties of glass ionomer cements including biocompatibility, bioactivity, releasing of fluoride and good adhesion to hard dental tissue even under wet conditions and easy of handling are reasons for their wide use in paediatric and restorative dentistry. Their biggest drawbacks are the weaker mechanical properties. An important step forward in improving GIC's features is thermo-curing with the dental polymerization unit during setting of the material. Due to their slow setting characteristics the GIC is vulnerable to early exposure to moisture. After thermo curing, cements retain all the benefits of GIC with developed better mechanical properties, improved marginal adaptation, increased microhardness and shear bond strength. Adding external energy through thermocuring or ultrasound during the setting of conventional GIC is crucial to achieve faster and better initial mechanical properties. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  15. Vital tooth cleaning for cementation of indirect restorations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Edward E; Rubel, Barry

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews factors that must be considered to select the best technique for cleaning a vital tooth prior to cementation of a definitive restoration. The dental literature offers many suggestions with supporting rationales. In cases where provisional cement has been present or contrast powder has been used, some mechanical cleaning (with fine pumice or prophy paste) appears to be justified. The value of soaps or other chemicals is questionable except perhaps as topical disinfectants. Dentists should be aware that a cleansing agent may have a negative or positive effect on bond strength, depending on the adhesive system chosen. It may be necessary to tailor the particular method of tooth cleaning to the cement that is to be used.

  16. The role of integrin αv in proliferation and differentiation of human dental pulp cell response to calcium silicate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chi-Jr; Hsu, Hsin-I; Lin, Chi-Chang; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Wu, Buor-Chang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-11-01

    It has been proved that integrin αv activity is related to cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and organ development. However, the biological functions of integrin αv in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on silicate-based materials have not been explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of integrin αv in the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs cultured with the effect of calcium silicate (CS) cement and β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) cement. In this study, hDPCs were cultured on CS and TCP materials, and we evaluated fibronectin (FN) secretion and integrin αv expression during the cell attachment stage. After small interfering RNA transfection targeting integrin αv, the proliferation and odontogenesis differentiation behavior of hDPCs were analyzed. The results indicate that CS releases Si ion-increased FN secretion and adsorption, which promote cell attachment more effectively than TCP. The CS cement facilitates FN and αv subintegrin expression. However, the FN adsorption and integrin expression of TCP are similar to that observed in the control dish. Integrin αv small interfering RNA inhibited odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs with the decreased formation of mineralized nodules on CS. It also down-regulated the protein expression of multiple markers of odontogenesis and the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein protein. These results establish composition-dependent differences in integrin binding and its effectiveness as a mechanism regulating cellular responses to biomaterial surface. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of simvastain and enamel matrix derivative on Portland cement with bismuth oxide-induced growth and odontoblastic differentiation in human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Youn; Min, Kyung-San; Choi, Gi-Woon; Park, Jae-Hong; Park, Sang-Hyuk; Lee, Sang-Im; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2012-03-01

    We previously reported that bismuth oxide containing Portland cement (BPC) showed similar biocompatibility to Portland cement (PC) in periodontal ligament cells. However, the bioactivity of simvastatin and Emdogain (Biora AB, Malmö, Sweden) on BPC was not reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of simvastatin and Emdogain on BPC compared with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). Cell growth was determined by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium-bromide (MTT) assay. Differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, alizarin red staining, and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The cell growth of HDPCs exposed to Emdogain and simvastatin plus BPC was superior to those administered BPC alone and similar to those that received MTA for 14 days. The simvastatin and Emdogain groups increased the odontogenic potential of the BPC group with respect to ALP activity, mineralization nodules, messenger RNA expression of ALP, osteopontin, osteocalcin, Runx2, and osterix. These results suggest that simvastatin and Emdogain improved cell growth and the differentiation of the BPC group in HDPCs and may be useful ingredients in BPC as pulp-capping material. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Simplified cementation of lithium disilicate crowns: Retention with various adhesive resin cement combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Patterson, Amanda; Schäfer, Oliver

    2017-09-27

    A composite resin cement and matching self-etch adhesive was developed to simplify the dependable retention of lithium disilicate crowns. The efficacy of this new system is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether lithium disilicate crowns cemented with a new composite resin and adhesive system and 2 other popular systems provide clinically acceptable crown retention after long-term aging with monthly thermocycling. Extracted human molars were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20-degree convergence, and 4 mm axial length. The axio-occlusal line angle was slightly rounded. The preparation surface area was determined by optical scanning and the analysis of the standard tessellation language (STL) files. The specimens were distributed into 3 cement groups (n=12) to obtain equal mean surface areas. Lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max Press) were fabricated for each preparation, etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid for 15 seconds, and cleaned. Cement systems were RelyX Ultimate with Scotch Bond Universal (3M Dental Products); Monobond S, Multilink Automix with Multilink Primer A and B (Ivoclar Vivadent AG); and NX3 Nexus with OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corp). Each adhesive provided self-etching of the dentin. Before cementation, the prepared specimens were stored in 35°C water. A force of 196 N was used to cement the crowns, and the specimens were polymerized in a 35°C oven at 100% humidity. After 24 hours of storage at 100% humidity, the cemented crowns were thermocycled (5°C to 55°C) for 5000 cycles each month for 6 months. The crowns were removed axially at 0.5 mm/min. The removal force was recorded and the dislodgement stress calculated using the preparation surface area. The type of cement failure was recorded, and the data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and the chi-square test (α=.05) after the equality of variances had been assessed with the Levene test. The Levene test was nonsignificant (P=.936). The ANOVA revealed the mean removal

  19. Influence of Acoustic and Electromagnetic Actions on the Properties of Aqueous Nanoparticle Dispersions Used as Tempering Liquids for Dental Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Belous, N. Kh.; Rodtsevich, S. P.; Goncharik, S. V.; Chubrik, N. N.; Koshevar, V. D.; Lopat‧ko, K. G.; Aftandilyants, E. G.; Veklich, A. N.; Boretskii, V. F.; Orlovich, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The authors have studied the physicochemical properties of aqueous dispersions containing carbon, silver, and iron nanoparticles which were produced by elastic-spark synthesis under the conditions of subaqueous spark discharge, and also the influence of preliminary acoustic and high-frequency electromagnetic action on them and the change in the functional indices of the glass-ionomer cement tempered by these dispersions.

  20. Effect of tightening torque on the marginal adaptation of cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ghanbarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the marginal misfit of cement-retained FDPs incre