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Sample records for cement based grouts

  1. Optimization of cement-based grouts using chemical additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Azadi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Grout injection is used for sealing or strengthening the ground in order to prevent water entrance or any failure after excavation. There are many methods of grouting. Permeation grouting is one of the most common types in which the grout material is injected to the pore spaces of the ground. In grouting operations, the grout quality is important to achieve the best results. There are four main characteristics for a grout mixture including bleeding, setting time, strength, and viscosity. In this paper, we try to build some efficient grouting mixtures with different water to cement ratios considering these characteristics. The ingredients of grout mixtures built in this study are cement, water, bentonite, and some chemical additives such as sodium silicate, sodium carbonate, and triethanolamine (TEA. The grout mixtures are prepared for both of the sealing and strengthening purposes for a structural project. Effect of each above-mentioned ingredient is profoundly investigated. Since each ingredient may have positive or negative aspect, an optimization of appropriate amount of each ingredient is determined. The optimization is based on 200 grout mixture samples with different percentages of ingredients. Finally, some of these grout mixtures are chosen for the introduced project. It should be mentioned that grouting operations depend on various factors such as pressure of injection, ground structure and grain size of soils. However, quality of a grout can be helpful to make an injection easier and reasonable. For example, during the injection, a wrong estimated setting time can destroy the injected grout by washing the grout or setting early which prevents grouting. This paper tries to show some tests in easy way to achieve a desirable sample of grout.

  2. Cement-based grouts in geological disposal of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onofrei, M. [AECL Research, Pinnawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    1996-04-01

    The behavior and performance of a specially developed high-performance cement-based grout has been studied through a combined laboratory and in situ research program conducted under the auspices of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP). A new class of cement-based grouts - high-performance grouts-with the ability to penetrate and seal fine fractures was developed and investigated. These high-performance grouts, which were injected into fractures in the granitic rock at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Canada, are shown to successfully reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass from <10{sup -7} m s{sup -1} to 10{sup -9} m s{sup -1} and to penetrate fissures in the rock with apertures as small as 10 {mu}m. Furthermore, the laboratory studies have shown that this high - performance grout has very low hydraulic conductivity and is highly leach resistant under repository conditions. Microcracks generated in this materials from shrinkage, overstressing or thermal loads are likely to self-seal. The results of these studies suggest that the high-performance grouts can be considered as viable materials in disposal-vault sealing applications. Further work is needed to fully justify extrapolation of the results of the laboratory studies to time scales relevant to performance assessment.

  3. Solidification/stabilization of technetium in cement-based grouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Bostick, W.D.; Spence, R.D.; Shoemaker, J.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, TN (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Mixed low-level radioactive and chemically hazardous process treatment wastes from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are stabilized by solidification in cement-based grouts. Conventional portland cement and fly ash grouts have been shown to be effective for retention of hydrolyzable metals (e.g., lead, cadmium, uranium and nickel) but are marginally acceptable for retention of radioactive Tc-99, which is present in the waste as the highly mobile pertechnate anion. Addition of ground blast furnace slag to the grout is shown to reduce the leachability of technetium by several orders of magnitude. The selective effect of slag is believed to be due to its ability to reduce Tc(VII) to the less soluble Tc(IV) species. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Systematic approach for the design of pumpable cement-based grouts for immobilization of hazardous wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sams, T.L.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    Cement-based grouts have been proven to be an economical and environmentally acceptable means of waste disposal. Costs can be reduced if the grout is pumped to the disposal site. This paper presents a systematic approach to guide the development of pumpable grouts. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  5. In situ grouting of low-level burial trenches with a cement-based grout at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, C.W.; Spence, R.D.; Tamura, T.; Spalding, B.P.

    1993-01-01

    A technology being evaluated for use in the closure of one of the low-level radwaste burial grounds at ORNL is trench stabilization using a cement-based grout. To demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of this technology, two interconnecting trenches in SWSA 6 were selected as candidates for in situ grouting with a particulate grout. The primary objective was to demonstrate the increased trench stability (characterized by trench penetration tests) and the decreased potential for leachate migration (characterized by hydraulic conductivity tests) following in situ injection of a particulate grout into the waste trenches. Stability against trench subsidence is a critical issue. For example, construction of impermeable covers to seal the trenches will be ineffectual unless subsequent trench subsidence is permanently suspended. A grout composed of 39% Type 1 Portland cement, 55.5% Class F fly ash, and 5.5% bentonite mixed at 12.5 lb/gal of water was selected. Before the trenches were grouted, the primary characteristics relating to physical stability, hydraulic conductivity, and void volume of the trenches were determined. Their physical stability was evaluated using soil-penetration tests.

  6. Predicting the Occurrence of Hydraulic Fracture in Grouting Operations Based on the Pressure in the Penetrated Cement Grout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Bakhshandeh Amnieh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cement grouting is an operation often carried out to consolidate and seal the rock mass in dam sites and tunnels. The quality and efficiency of a grouting operation depends on various factors such as water take, grout properties and grouting pressure. One of the parameters which have the highest effect is pressure since the application of excessive pressure causes the hydraulic fracture phenomenon to occur in the rock mass and too little pressure leads to incomplete grouting and failure to seal the site in a perfect manner. Mathematical modeling is used for the first time in this study to predict and determine the optimum pressure. Thus, the joints that exist in the rock mass are simulated using cylindrical shell model. The joint surroundings are also modeled through Pasternak environment. To obtain equations governing the joints and the surroundings, energy method is used accompanied by Hamilton principle. In the end, an analytical solution method is used to obtain the maximum grouting pressure. In order to validate the modeling, the grouting pressure values obtained by the model were used in the sites of Seymareh and Aghbolagh dams and the relative error rates were measured considering the differences between calculated and actual pressures. Modeling in the examined sections of Seymareh dam showed 29.61, 5.57, 21.98, 32.50 and 9.09 percent error rates and in the sections of Aghbolagh dam it rendered the values of 4.32, 5.40 and 2.96 percent. The results indicate that this modeling can be used to estimate the amount of pressure for hydraulic fracture in grouting, to predict it and to prevent it.

  7. Investigation of a Hardened Cement Paste Grout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Sørensen, Eigil Verner

    This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S.......This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S....

  8. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  9. Durability and compressive strength of blast furnace slag-based cement grout for special geotechnical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Special foundations, most prominently micropiles and soil anchors, are frequently used in construction today. In Spain, the grout for these special technical applications is generally prepared with portland cement, although the codes and standards in place stipulate only the minimum compressive strength required, with no mention of cement type. Those texts also establish a range of acceptable water:cement ratios. In the present study, durability and compressive strength in cement grout prepared with blast furnace slag cement at different w/c ratios are characterised and compared to the findings for a reference portland cement grout. The results show that slag grout exhibits greater durability than the portland cement material and complies with the compressive strength requirements laid down in the respective codes.Actualmente es muy frecuente el empleo de cimentaciones especiales, entre las que destacan los micropilotes y los anclajes. En España, las lechadas de cemento para estos trabajos geotécnicos especiales se preparan habitualmente con cemento Portland, aunque las diferentes normativas al respecto no restringen el tipo de cemento a emplear, siempre que se alcance una determinada resistencia a compresión. Respecto a la dosificación de las lechadas, la normativa permite emplear diferentes relaciones agua/cemento dentro de un determinado rango. En vista de ello, en este trabajo se han caracterizado las propiedades de durabilidad y resistencia a compresión de lechadas de cemento preparadas con un cemento con escoria de alto horno y con diferentes relaciones a/c, tomando como referencia de comportamiento lechadas de cemento Portland. El uso de un cemento con escoria conlleva una mejora en la durabilidad de las lechadas, cumpliendo los requisitos de resistencia a compresión establecidos por la normativa.

  10. Task plan to evaluate the effectiveness of in situ grouting of an ORNL waste burial trench with a cement-based grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, C.W.

    1991-11-01

    This task will demonstrate the feasibility of using an in situ grouting technique with a particulate-grout formulation as a closure action to stabilize waste trenches in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6. It also supports technology development for closure of other SWSAs. A particulate grout will be formulated using cement-bentonite and fly ash from a coal-fired power plant. The grout solids will be dry-blended, mixed with water, and injected (using {similar to}5 to 10 lb/in.{sup 2} pressure) into five injection wells per trench. After 28 days for setting, soil penetration resistance and hydraulic conductivity measurements will be repeated for comparison to pregrouting measurements. The primary objective of this task is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the in situ injection of a particulate grout into waste burial trenches. Effectiveness is defined here as increased trenched stability (characterized by trench penetration resistance tests) and decreased potential for leachate migration (characterized by hydraulic conductivity tests).

  11. Task plan to evaluate the effectiveness of in situ grouting of an ORNL waste burial trench with a cement-based grout. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, C.W.

    1991-11-01

    This task will demonstrate the feasibility of using an in situ grouting technique with a particulate-grout formulation as a closure action to stabilize waste trenches in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6. It also supports technology development for closure of other SWSAs. A particulate grout will be formulated using cement-bentonite and fly ash from a coal-fired power plant. The grout solids will be dry-blended, mixed with water, and injected (using {similar_to}5 to 10 lb/in.{sup 2} pressure) into five injection wells per trench. After 28 days for setting, soil penetration resistance and hydraulic conductivity measurements will be repeated for comparison to pregrouting measurements. The primary objective of this task is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the in situ injection of a particulate grout into waste burial trenches. Effectiveness is defined here as increased trenched stability (characterized by trench penetration resistance tests) and decreased potential for leachate migration (characterized by hydraulic conductivity tests).

  12. Development programs in the United States of America for the application of cement-based grouts in radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dole, L.R.; Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25 mm (1 in.) diameter pellets in a glove box to producing 240 m (800 ft.) diameter grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of materials. This paper also discusses the major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is given This paper also discusses future trends in cement-based waste form development and applications. 31 references, 11 figures.

  13. Effect of Nanosilica on the Fresh Properties of Cement-Based Grouting Material in the Portland-Sulphoaluminate Composite System

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    Shengli Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of NS particle size and content on the fresh properties of the grouting material based on the portland-sulphoaluminate composite system was analyzed. The experimental results indicated that air content increased and apparent density decreased, with increased NS content, but the NS particle sizes have minimal effect on the air content and apparent density. The setting time of mortar was significantly shortened, with increased NS content; however, NS particle sizes had little influence on the setting time. The effect of fluidity on the mortars adding NS with particle size of 30 nm is larger than NS with particle sizes of 15 and 50 nm and the fluidity decreased with increased NS content, but the fluidity of mortars with the particle sizes of 15 and 50 nm is almost not affected by the NS content. XRD analysis shows that the formation of ettringite was promoted and the process of hydration reaction of cement was accelerated with the addition of NS. At the microscopic level, the interfacial transition zone (ITZ of the grouting material became denser and the formation of C-S-H gel was promoted after adding NS.

  14. The differences between soil grouting with cement slurry and cement-water glass slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingting; Sui, Haitong; Yang, Honglu

    2018-01-01

    Cement slurry and cement-water glass slurry are the most widely applied for soil grouting reinforcement project. The viscosity change of cement slurry is negligible during grouting period and presumed to be time-independent while the viscosity of cement-water glass slurry increases with time quickly and is presumed to be time-dependent. Due to the significantly rheology differences between them, the grouting quality and the increasing characteristics of grouting parameters may be different, such as grouting pressure, grouting surrounding rock pressure, i.e., the change of surrounding rock pressure deduced by grouting pressure. Those are main factors for grouting design. In this paper, a large-scale 3D grouting simulation device was developed to simulate the surrounding curtain grouting for a tunnel. Two series of surrounding curtain grouting experiments under different geo-stress of 100 kPa, 150 kPa and 200 kPa were performed. The overload test on tunnel was performed to evaluate grouting effect of all surrounding curtain grouting experiments. In the present results, before 240 seconds, the grouting pressure increases slowly for both slurries; after 240 seconds the increase rate of grouting pressure for cement-water glass slurry increases quickly while that for cement slurry remains roughly constant. The increasing trend of grouting pressure for cement-water glass is similar to its viscosity. The setting time of cement-water glass slurry obtained from laboratory test is less than that in practical grouting where grout slurry solidifies in soil. The grouting effect of cement-water glass slurry is better than that of cement slurry and the grouting quality decreases with initial pressure.

  15. Bell Canyon Test (BCT) cement grout development report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulick, C.W. Jr.; Boa, J.A. Jr.; Buck, A.D.

    1980-12-01

    Development of the cement grout for the Bell Canyon Test was accomplished at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES), Vicksburg, Mississippi. Initial development work centered on a saltwater grout with Class H cement, fly ash, and an expansive additive. Testing of the saltwater grout showed suitable properties except for the interface between anhydrite rock and grout in small core samples. Higher than expected permeability occurred at the interface because of space between the grout and the anhydrite; the space was produced as a result of allowing the specimens to dry. A change to freshwater grout and proper care to prevent the specimens from drying alleviated this condition. The BCT-1FF freshwater grout mixture was used in both the plug ONE and ONEX field grouting operations. Testing of the development grout mixtures was also done at Dowell, Pennsylvania State University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Results of the testing and evaluation by the four laboratories are included in the report. Field batching, mixing, and placement of the grout at the plug locations for both plug ONE and ONEX were satisfactory with adequate quality control. The freshwater grout mixture maintained adequate flow characteristics for pumpability for 3 1/2 h during each of the two field operations. Physical property and expansivity data for the field samples through 90 days' age are in general agreement with laboratory development data. A large number of samples were obtained for inclusion in the long-term durability studies and the geochemical programs. The high-density, low water-cement ratio expansive grout (BCT-1FF) is considered to be an excellent candidate for plugging boreholes at most locations (except through halite sections).

  16. Effect of Nanosilica on the Fresh Properties of Cement-Based Grouting Material in the Portland-Sulphoaluminate Composite System

    OpenAIRE

    Shengli Li; Tingting Xu

    2016-01-01

    The effect of NS particle size and content on the fresh properties of the grouting material based on the portland-sulphoaluminate composite system was analyzed. The experimental results indicated that air content increased and apparent density decreased, with increased NS content, but the NS particle sizes have minimal effect on the air content and apparent density. The setting time of mortar was significantly shortened, with increased NS content; however, NS particle sizes had little influen...

  17. Leaching of radioactive nuclides from cement grouts. [Method for measuring rate of leaching of Cs-137 from cement grouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, W.W.; Filiba, R.; Wang, M.

    1974-05-22

    A method for measuring the rate of leaching of /sup 137/Cs from cement grouts was investigated as an alternate to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) method which requires long experimental times. The effects of curing time (10, 20, and 30 days) and the type of leachant (tap and saline water) on the amount of /sup 137/Cs leached were studied. Mathematical models for mass transport phenomena for both finite cylindrical geometry and a semi-infinite medium were developed to analyze the data. It was found that the models for diffusion of /sup 137/Cs with depletion of the species due to curing provided the best correlation of the data. The proposed method was found to give values of the mass transport coefficients within a factor of 2 to 10 of the IAEA test results. Diffusion coefficients were found to be in the range of 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -11/ cm/sup 2//sec and depletion rate constants in the range of 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ sec/sup -1/.

  18. Strength Assessment of Broken Rock Postgrouting Reinforcement Based on Initial Broken Rock Quality and Grouting Quality

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    Hongfa Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate postgrouting rock mass strength growth is important for engineering design. In this paper, using self-developed indoor pressure-grouting devices, 19 groups of test cubic blocks were made of the different water cement ratio grouting into the broken rock of three kinds of particle sizes. The shear strength parameters of each group under different conditions were tested. Then this paper presents a quantitative calculation method for predicting the strength growth of grouted broken rock. Relational equations were developed to investigate the relationship between the growth rates of uniaxial compressive strength (UCS, absolute value of uniaxial tensile strength (AUTS, internal friction angle, and cohesion for post- to pregrouting broken rock based on Mohr-Coulomb strength criterion. From previous test data, the empirical equation between the growth rate of UCS and the ratio of the initial rock mass UCS to the grout concretion UCS has been determined. The equations of the growth rates of the internal friction coefficient and UCS for grouting broken rock with rock mass rating (RMR and its increment have been established. The calculated results are consistent with the experimental results. These observations are important for engineered design of grouting reinforcement for broken rock mass.

  19. Quantitative modelling of the degradation processes of cement grout. Project CEMMOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandia, Fidel; Galindez, Juan-Manuel; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge (Amphos21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-05-15

    Grout cement is planned to be used in the sealing of water-conducting fractures in the deep geological storage of spent nuclear fuel waste. The integrity of such cementitious materials should be ensured in a time framework of decades to a hundred of years as mimum. However, their durability must be quantified since grout degradation may jeopardize the stability of other components in the repository due to the potential release of hyperalkaline plumes. The model prediction of the cement alteration has been challenging in the last years mainly due to the difficulty to reproduce the progressive change in composition of the Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) compounds as the alteration proceeds. In general, the data obtained from laboratory experiments show a rather similar dependence between the pH of pore water and the Ca-Si ratio of the CSH phases. The Ca-Si ratio decreases as the CSH is progressively replaced by Si-enriched phases. An elegant and reasonable approach is the use of solid solution models even keeping in mind that CSH phases are not crystalline solids but gels. An additional obstacle is the uncertainty in the initial composition of the grout to be considered in the calculations because only the recipe of low-pH clinker is commonly provided by the manufacturer. The hydration process leads to the formation of new phases and, importantly, creates porosity. A number of solid solution models have been reported in literature. Most of them assumed a strong non-ideal binary solid solution series to account for the observed changes in the Ca-Si ratios in CSH. However, it results very difficult to reproduce the degradation of the CSH in the whole Ca-Si range of compositions (commonly Ca/Si=0.5-2.5) by considering only two end-members and fixed nonideality parameters. Models with multiple non-ideal end-members with interaction parameters as a function of the solid composition can solve the problem but these can not be managed in the existing codes of reactive

  20. An Investigation on Load Bearing Capacities of Cement and Resin Grouted Rock Bolts Installed in Weak Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu Erguler, Guzide; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2015-04-01

    Rock bolts have been considered one of indispensable support method to improve load bearing capacity of many underground engineering projects, and thus, various types of them have been developed until now for different purposes. Although mechanically anchored rock bolts can be successfully installed to prevent structurally controlled instabilities in hard rocks, in comparison with cement and resin grouted rock bolts, these types of anchors are not so effective in weak rocks characterized by relatively low mechanical properties. In order to investigate the applicability and to measure relative performance of cement and resin grouted rock bolts into weak and heavily jointed rock mass, a research program mainly consisting of pull-out tests was performed in a metal mine in Turkey. The rock materials excavated in this underground mining were described as basalt, tuff, ore dominated volcanic rocks and dacite. To achieve more representative results for rock materials found in this mining and openings excavated in varied dimensions, the pull-out tests were conducted on rock bolts used in many different locations where more convergences were measured and deformation dependent instability was expected to cause greater engineering problems. It is well known that the capacity of rock bolts depends on the length, diameter and density of the bolt pattern, and so considering the thickness of plastic zone in the studied openings, the length and diameter of rock bolts were taken as 2.4 m. and 25 mm., respectively. The spacing between rows changed between 70 and 180 cm. In this study, totally twenty five pull-out tests were performed to have a general understanding about axial load bearing capacity and support reaction curves of cement and resin grouted rock bolts. When pull load-displacement curves belongs to cement and resin grouted rock bolts were compared with each other, it was determined that cement grouted rock bolts carry more load ranging between 115.6 kN and 127.5 kN with

  1. Grout Impregnation of Pre-Placed Recycled Concrete Pavement (RCP) for Rapid Repair of Deteriorated Portland Cement Concrete Airfield Pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    and water, with or without filler (UFGS, 2004). UFC 3-270-07 (Unified Facilitates Criteria, 2002) describes a stone and grout method as a current...Pavemend™ Repair 2 Type III Grout Not to Scale 12.2 m (40 ft) -63- 510-mm- (20-in.-) thick crushed limestone base course and the 90-day...crushed limestone ). 240 mm (9.5 in.) PCC Repair 5 Type III Grout Not to Scale Repair 6 Type III Grout Repair 8 Pavemend™ Repair 7 Pavemend

  2. Long-Term Behaviour of Fly Ash and Slag Cement Grouts for Micropiles Exposed to a Sulphate Aggressive Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcos Ortega

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one of the most popular ways to get a more sustainable cement industry is using additions as cement replacement. However, there are many civil engineering applications in which the use of sustainable cements is not extended yet, such as special foundations, and particularly micropiles, even though the standards do not restrict the cement type to use. These elements are frequently exposed to the sulphates present in soils. The purpose of this research is to study the effects in the very long-term (until 600 days of sulphate attack in the microstructure of micropiles grouts, prepared with ordinary Portland cement, fly ash and slag commercial cements, continuing a previous work, in which these effects were studied in the short-term. The microstructure changes have been analysed with the non-destructive impedance spectroscopy technique, mercury intrusion porosimetry and the “Wenner” resistivity test. The mass variation and the compressive strength have also been studied. The impedance spectroscopy has been the most sensitive technique for following the sulphate attack process. Considering the results obtained, micropiles grouts with slag and fly ash, exposed to an aggressive medium with high content of sulphates, have shown good behaviour in the very long-term (600 days compared to grouts made with OPC.

  3. Long-Term Behaviour of Fly Ash and Slag Cement Grouts for Micropiles Exposed to a Sulphate Aggressive Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, José Marcos; Esteban, María Dolores; Rodríguez, Raúl Rubén; Pastor, José Luis; Ibanco, Francisco José; Sánchez, Isidro; Climent, Miguel Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, one of the most popular ways to get a more sustainable cement industry is using additions as cement replacement. However, there are many civil engineering applications in which the use of sustainable cements is not extended yet, such as special foundations, and particularly micropiles, even though the standards do not restrict the cement type to use. These elements are frequently exposed to the sulphates present in soils. The purpose of this research is to study the effects in the very long-term (until 600 days) of sulphate attack in the microstructure of micropiles grouts, prepared with ordinary Portland cement, fly ash and slag commercial cements, continuing a previous work, in which these effects were studied in the short-term. The microstructure changes have been analysed with the non-destructive impedance spectroscopy technique, mercury intrusion porosimetry and the “Wenner” resistivity test. The mass variation and the compressive strength have also been studied. The impedance spectroscopy has been the most sensitive technique for following the sulphate attack process. Considering the results obtained, micropiles grouts with slag and fly ash, exposed to an aggressive medium with high content of sulphates, have shown good behaviour in the very long-term (600 days) compared to grouts made with OPC. PMID:28772958

  4. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu

    2014-02-01

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

  5. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu [Changzhou Key Laboratory of Sensor Networks and Environmental Sensing, College of IOT, Hohai University Changzhou, Jiangsu, 213022 (China)

    2014-02-18

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

  6. Fatigue Life of High Performance Grout for Wind Turbine Grouted Connection in Wet or Dry Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.; Westhof, Luc; Yde, Elo

    Grouted connections of monopile supported offshore wind turbine structures are subjected to loads leading to very high oscillating service stresses in the grout material. The fatigue capacity of a high performance cement based grout was tested by dynamic compressive loading of cylindrical specimens...... at varying levels of cyclic frequency and load. The fatigue tests were performed in two series: one with the specimens in air and one with the specimens submerged in water during the test. The fatigue life of the grout, in terms of the number of cycles to failure, was found to be significantly shorter when...... tested in water than when tested in air....

  7. Influence of Silica Fume Addition in the Long-Term Performance of Sustainable Cement Grouts for Micropiles Exposed to a Sulphate Aggressive Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcos Ortega

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available At present, sustainability is of major importance in the cement industry, and the use of additions such as silica fume as clinker replacement contributes towards that goal. Special foundations, and particularly micropiles, are one of the most suitable areas for the use of sustainable cements. The aim of this research is to analyse the effects in the very long-term (for 600 days produced by sulphate attack in the microstructure of grouts for micropiles in which OPC (ordinary Portland cement has been replaced by 5% and 10% silica fume. This line of study is building on a previous work, where these effects were studied in slag and fly ash grouts. Grouts made using a commercial sulphate-resisting Portland cement were also studied. The non-destructive impedance spectroscopy technique, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and Wenner resistivity testing were used. Mass variation and the compressive strength have also been analysed. Apparently, impedance spectroscopy is the most suitable technique for studying sulphate attack development. According to the results obtained, grouts for micropiles with a content of silica fume up to 10% and exposed to an aggressive sulphate medium, have a similar or even better behaviour in the very long-term, compared to grouts prepared using sulphate-resisting Portland cement.

  8. Influence of Silica Fume Addition in the Long-Term Performance of Sustainable Cement Grouts for Micropiles Exposed to a Sulphate Aggressive Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, María Dolores; Rodríguez, Raúl Rubén; Ibanco, Francisco José; Sánchez, Isidro

    2017-01-01

    At present, sustainability is of major importance in the cement industry, and the use of additions such as silica fume as clinker replacement contributes towards that goal. Special foundations, and particularly micropiles, are one of the most suitable areas for the use of sustainable cements. The aim of this research is to analyse the effects in the very long-term (for 600 days) produced by sulphate attack in the microstructure of grouts for micropiles in which OPC (ordinary Portland cement) has been replaced by 5% and 10% silica fume. This line of study is building on a previous work, where these effects were studied in slag and fly ash grouts. Grouts made using a commercial sulphate-resisting Portland cement were also studied. The non-destructive impedance spectroscopy technique, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and Wenner resistivity testing were used. Mass variation and the compressive strength have also been analysed. Apparently, impedance spectroscopy is the most suitable technique for studying sulphate attack development. According to the results obtained, grouts for micropiles with a content of silica fume up to 10% and exposed to an aggressive sulphate medium, have a similar or even better behaviour in the very long-term, compared to grouts prepared using sulphate-resisting Portland cement. PMID:28767078

  9. Influence Mechanism of Grouting on Mechanical Characteristics of Rock Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jixun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Grouting technology has been widely used in all fields of geotechnical and civil engineering. Prospective engineering objectives including reinforcement of rock mass and groundwater leakage treatment can be achieved by grouting which will change the mechanical parameters of rock mass such as strength, elastic modulus, and coefficient of permeability. In this paper, rock mass is assumed as a composite material consisting of rock particles and random microcracks initially. Since part or all of the cracks will be filled with cement slurry after grouting, rock mass consists of rock particles, grout condensate, and some or no random microcracks after grouting. The damage constitutional law of the mesoscopic element is established based on the theory of mesoscopic damage mechanics. With the heterogeneity of the components of rock mass considered, the variation of mechanical characteristics of rock mass is studied before and after grouting. And the influence mechanism of grouting on rock mass is investigated at mesoscale level.

  10. Grouting design based on characterization of the fractured rock. Presentation and demonstration of a methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, Aasa (SWECO Environment, Stockholm (Sweden); Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    The design methodology presented in this document is based on an approach that considers the individual fractures. The observations and analyses made during production enable the design to adapt to the encountered conditions. The document is based on previously published material and overview flow charts are used to show the different steps. Parts of or the full methodology has been applied for a number of tunneling experiments and projects. SKB projects in the Aespoe tunnel include a pillar experiment and pre-grouting of a 70 meter long tunnel (TASQ). Further, for Hallandsas railway tunnel (Skaane south Sweden), a field pre-grouting experiment and design and post-grouting of a section of 133 meters have been made. For the Nygard railway tunnel (north of Goeteborg, Sweden), design and grouting of a section of 86 meters (pre-grouting) and 60 meters (post-grouting) have been performed. Finally, grouting work at the Tornskog tunnel (Stockholm, Sweden) included design and grouting along a 100 meter long section of one of the two tunnel tubes. Of importance to consider when doing a design and evaluating the result are: - The identification of the extent of the grouting needed based on inflow requirements and estimates of tunnel inflow before grouting. - The selection of grout and performance of grouting materials including penetration ability and length. The penetration length is important for the fan geometry design. - The ungrouted compared to the grouted and excavated rock mass conditions: estimates of tunnel inflow and (if available) measured inflows after grouting and excavation. Identify if possible explanations for deviations. For the Hallandsas, Nygard and Tornskog tunnel sections, the use of a Pareto distribution and the estimate of tunnel inflow identified a need for sealing small aperture fractures (< 50 - 100 mum) to meet the inflow requirements. The tunneling projects show that using the hydraulic aperture as a basis for selection of grout is a good

  11. Grout to meet physical and chemical requirements for closure at Hanford grout vaults. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-21

    The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) developed a grout based on portland cement, Class F fly ash, and bentonite clay, for the Hanford Grout Vault Program. The purpose of this grout was to fill the void between a wasteform containing 106-AN waste and the vault cover blocks. Following a successful grout development program, heat output, volume change, and compressive strength were monitored with time in simulated repository conditions and in full-depth physical models. This research indicated that the cold-cap grout could achieve and maintain adequate volume stability and other required physical properties in the internal environment of a sealed vault. To determine if contact with 106-AN liquid waste would cause chemical deterioration of the cold-cap grout, cured specimens were immersed in simulated waste. Over a period of 21 days at 150 F, specimens increased in mass without significant changes in volume. X-ray diffraction of reacted specimens revealed crystallization of sodium aluminum silicate hydrate. Scanning electron microscopy used with X-ray fluorescence showed that clusters if this phase had formed in grout pores, increasing grout density and decreasing its effective porosity. Physical and chemical tests collectively indicate a sealing component. However, the Hanford Grout Vault Program was cancelled before completion of this research. This report summarizes close-out Waterways Experiment Station when the Program was cancelled.

  12. Thermal conductivity of cementitious grouts for geothermal heat pumps. Progress report FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Grout is used to seal the annulus between the borehole and heat exchanger loops in vertical geothermal (ground coupled, ground source, GeoExchange) heat pump systems. The grout provides a heat transfer medium between the heat exchanger and surrounding formation, controls groundwater movement and prevents contamination of water supply. Enhanced heat pump coefficient of performance (COP) and reduced up-front loop installation costs can be achieved through optimization of the grout thermal conductivity. The objective of the work reported was to characterize thermal conductivity and other pertinent properties of conventional and filled cementitious grouts. Cost analysis and calculations of the reduction in heat exchanger length that could be achieved with such grouts were performed by the University of Alabama. Two strategies to enhance the thermal conductivity of cementitious grouts were used simultaneously. The first of these was to incorporate high thermal conductivity filler in the grout formulations. Based on previous tests (Allan and Kavanaugh, in preparation), silica sand was selected as a suitable filler. The second strategy was to reduce the water content of the grout mix. By lowering the water/cement ratio, the porosity of the hardened grout is decreased. This results in higher thermal conductivity. Lowering the water/cement ratio also improves such properties as permeability, strength, and durability. The addition of a liquid superplasticizer (high range water reducer) to the grout mixes enabled reduction of water/cement ratio while retaining pumpability. Superplasticizers are commonly used in the concrete and grouting industry to improve rheological properties.

  13. Protection against water or mud inrush in tunnels by grouting: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shucai Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Grouting is a major method used to prevent water and mud inrush in tunnels and underground engineering. In this paper, the current situation of control and prevention of water and mud inrush is summarized and recent advances in relevant theories, grout/equipment, and critical techniques are introduced. The time-variant equations of grout viscosity at different volumetric ratios were obtained based on the constitutive relation of typical fast curing grouts. A large-scale dynamic grouting model testing system (4000 mm × 2000 mm × 5 mm was developed, and the diffusions of cement and fast curing grouts in dynamic water grouting were investigated. The results reveal that the diffusions of cement grouts and fast curing grouts are U-shaped and asymmetric elliptical, respectively. A multi-parameter real-time monitoring system (ϕ = 1.5 m, h = 1.2 m was developed for the grouting process to study the diffusion and reinforcement mechanism of grouting in water-rich faulted zone. A high early strength cream-type reinforcing/plugging grout, a high permeability nano-scale silica gel grout, and a high-expansion filling grout were proposed for the control of water hazards in weak water-rich faulted zone rocks, water inrush in karst passages, and micro-crack water inrush, respectively. Complement technologies and equipment for industrial applications were also proposed. Additionally, a novel full-life periodic dynamic water grouting with the critical grouting borehole as the core was proposed. The key techniques for the control of water inrush in water-rich faulted zone, jointed fissures and karst passages, and micro-crack water inrush were developed.

  14. Use of a Paraffin Based Grout to Stabilize Buried Beryllium and Other Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gretchen Matthern; Duane Hanson; Neal Yancey; Darrell Knudson

    2005-12-01

    The long term durability of WAXFIXi, a paraffin based grout, was evaluated for in situ grouting of activated beryllium wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), a radioactive landfill at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The evaluation considered radiological and biological mechanisms that could degrade the grout using data from an extensive literature search and previous tests of in situ grouting at the INL. Conservative radioactive doses for WAXFIX were calculated from the "hottest" (i.e., highest-activity) Advanced Test Reactor beryllium block in the SDA.. These results indicate that WAXFIX would not experience extensive radiation damage for many hundreds of years. Calculation of radiation induced hydrogen generation in WAXFIX indicated that grout physical performance should not be reduced beyond the effects of radiation dose on the molecular structure. Degradation of a paraffin-based grout by microorganisms in the SDA is possible and perhaps likely, but the rate of degradation will be at a slower rate than found in the literature reviewed. The calculations showed the outer 0.46 m (18 in.) layer of each monolith, which represents the minimum expected distance to the beryllium block, was calculated to require 1,000 to 3,600 years to be consumed. The existing data and estimations of biodegradation and radiolysis rates

  15. Thermally conductive cementitious grout for geothermal heat pump systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Marita

    2001-01-01

    A thermally conductive cement-sand grout for use with a geothermal heat pump system. The cement sand grout contains cement, silica sand, a superplasticizer, water and optionally bentonite. The present invention also includes a method of filling boreholes used for geothermal heat pump systems with the thermally conductive cement-sand grout. The cement-sand grout has improved thermal conductivity over neat cement and bentonite grouts, which allows shallower bore holes to be used to provide an equivalent heat transfer capacity. In addition, the cement-sand grouts of the present invention also provide improved bond strengths and decreased permeabilities. The cement-sand grouts can also contain blast furnace slag, fly ash, a thermoplastic air entraining agent, latex, a shrinkage reducing admixture, calcium oxide and combinations thereof.

  16. Patoka Lake Foundation Report. Book 5. Appendix E. Special Grouting Analysis Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    mortar sand, 3 cu. ft. of water, 3 cu. ft. of cement, and I cu. ft. of flyash . The water content was low ered occasionally. However, inconsistent sand...3-19. Specified water cement ratios for grouting varied from 3:1 to 0.6:1. Provisions were included for mortar grout if neces- sary. Allowable...three holes to the base of the grout curtain and backfill each hole with ready mix mortar . The three ver- tical holes were picked to intersect the three

  17. Fatigue Life of High Performance Grout in Dry and Wet Environment for Wind Turbine Grouted Connections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    2011-01-01

    the fatigue life of a high performance cement based grout was tested by dynamic compressive loading of cylindrical specimens at varying levels of cyclic frequency and load. The fatigue tests were performed in two series, one with the specimens tested in air and one with the specimens submerged in water during...... the test. The fatigue life of the grout, in terms of the number of cycles to failure, was found to be significantly shorter when tested in water than when tested in air, particularly at low frequency....

  18. MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-01-05

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

  19. Performance testing of grout-based waste forms for the solidification of anion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, I.L.; Bostick, W.D.

    1990-10-01

    The solidification of spent ion exchanges resins in a grout matrix as a means of disposing of spent organic resins produced in the nuclear fuel cycle has many advantages in terms of process simplicity and economy, but associated with the process is the potential for water/cement/resins to interact and degrade the integrity of the waste form solidified. Described in this paper is one possible solution to preserving the integrity of these solidified waste forms: the encapsulation of beaded anion exchange resins in grout formulations containing ground granulated blast furnace slag, Type I-II (mixed) portland cement, and additives (clays, amorphous silica, silica fume, and fly ash). The results of the study reported herein show the cured waste form tested has a low leach rate for nitrate ion from the resin (and a low leach rate is inferred for Tc-99) and acceptable durability as assessed by the water immersion and freezing/thawing test protocols. The results also suggest a tested surrogate waste form prepared in vinyl ester styrene binder performs satisfactorily against the wetting/drying criterion, and it should offer additional insight into future work on the solidification of spent organic resins. 26 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Corrosion performance of prestressing strands in contact with dissimilar grouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To improve the corrosion protection provided to prestressing strands, anti-bleed grouts are used to fill voids in post-tensioning : ducts that result from bleeding and shrinkage of older Portland Cement grouts. Environmental differences caused by exp...

  1. ELAWD GROUT HOPPER MOCK-UP TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickenheim, B.; Hansen, E.; Leishear, R.; Marzolf, A.; Reigel, M.

    2011-10-27

    A 10-inch READCO mixer is used for mixing the premix (45 (wt%) fly ash, 45 wt% slag, and 10 wt% portland cement) with salt solution in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The Saltstone grout free falls into the grout hopper which feeds the suction line leading to the Watson SPX 100 duplex hose pump. The Watson SPX 100 pumps the grout through approximately 1500 feet of piping prior to being discharged into the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) vaults. The existing grout hopper has been identified by the Saltstone Enhanced Low Activity Waste Disposal (ELAWD) project for re-design. The current nominal working volume of this hopper is 12 gallons and does not permit handling an inadvertent addition of excess dry feeds. Saltstone Engineering has proposed a new hopper tank that will have a nominal working volume of 300 gallons and is agitated with a mechanical agitator. The larger volume hopper is designed to handle variability in the output of the READCO mixer and process upsets without entering set back during processing. The objectives of this task involve scaling the proposed hopper design and testing the scaled hopper for the following processing issues: (1) The effect of agitation on radar measurement. Formation of a vortex may affect the ability to accurately measure the tank level. The agitator was run at varying speeds and with varying grout viscosities to determine what parameters cause vortex formation and whether measurement accuracy is affected. (2) A dry feeds over addition. Engineering Calculating X-ESR-Z-00017 1 showed that an additional 300 pounds of dry premix added to a 300 gallon working volume would lower the water to premix ratio (W/P) from the nominal 0.60 to 0.53 based on a Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) salt simulant. A grout with a W/P of 0.53 represents the upper bound of grout rheology that could be processed at the facility. A scaled amount of dry feeds will be added into the hopper to verify that this is a recoverable situation

  2. Rock fracture grouting with microbially induced carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minto, James M.; MacLachlan, Erica; El Mountassir, Gráinne; Lunn, Rebecca J.

    2016-11-01

    Microbially induced carbonate precipitation has been proposed for soil stabilization, soil strengthening, and permeability reduction as an alternative to traditional cement and chemical grouts. In this paper, we evaluate the grouting of fine aperture rock fractures with calcium carbonate, precipitated through urea hydrolysis, by the bacteria Sporosarcina pasteurii. Calcium carbonate was precipitated within a small-scale and a near field-scale (3.1 m2) artificial fracture consisting of a rough rock lower surfaces and clear polycarbonate upper surfaces. The spatial distribution of the calcium carbonate precipitation was imaged using time-lapse photography and the influence on flow pathways revealed from tracer transport imaging. In the large-scale experiment, hydraulic aperture was reduced from 276 to 22 μm, corresponding to a transmissivity reduction of 1.71 × 10-5 to 8.75 × 10-9 m2/s, over a period of 12 days under constantly flowing conditions. With a modified injection strategy a similar three orders of magnitude reduction in transmissivity was achieved over a period of 3 days. Calcium carbonate precipitated over the entire artificial fracture with strong adhesion to both upper and lower surfaces and precipitation was controlled to prevent clogging of the injection well by manipulating the injection fluid velocity. These experiments demonstrate that microbially induced carbonate precipitation can successfully be used to grout a fracture under constantly flowing conditions and may be a viable alternative to cement based grouts when a high level of hydraulic sealing is required and chemical grouts when a more durable grout is required.

  3. Test plan for formulation and evaluation of grouted waste forms with shine process wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jerden, J. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this experimental project is to demonstrate that waste streams generated during the production of Mo99 by the SHINE Medical Technologies (SHINE) process can be immobilized in cement-based grouted waste forms having physical, chemical, and radiological stabilities that meet regulatory requirements for handling, storage, transport, and disposal.

  4. Thermal conductivity and other properties of cementitious grouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, M.

    1998-08-01

    The thermal conductivity and other properties cementitious grouts have been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. In addition to thermal conductivity, the cementitious grouts were also tested for bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the results for selected grout mixes. Relatively high thermal conductivities were obtained and this leads to reduction in predicted bore length and installation costs. Improvements in shrinkage resistance and bonding were achieved.

  5. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND OTHER PROPERTIES OF CEMENTITIOUS GROUTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALLAN,M.

    1998-05-01

    The thermal conductivity and other properties cementitious grouts have been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. In addition to thermal conductivity, the cementitious grouts were also tested for bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the results for selected grout mixes. Relatively high thermal conductivities were obtained and this leads to reduction in predicted bore length and installation costs. Improvements in shrinkage resistance and bonding were achieved.

  6. Low-level waste disposal - Grout issue and alternative waste form technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, J.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Westski, J.H. Jr. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-02-01

    Based on the Record of Decision (1) for the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (HDW-EIS) (2), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to dispose of the low-level fraction of double-shell tank (DST) waste by solidifying the liquid waste as a cement-based grout placed in near-surface, reinforced, lined concrete vaults at the Hanford Site. In 1989, the Hanford Grout Disposal Program (HGDP) completed a full-scale demonstration campaign by successfully grouting 3,800 cubic meters (1 million gallons) of low radioactivity, nonhazardous, phosphate/sulfate waste (PSW), mainly decontamination solution from N Reactor. The HGDP is now preparing for restart of the facility to grout a higher level activity, mixed waste double-shell slurry feed (DSSF). This greater radionuclide and hazardous waste content has resulted in a number of issues confronting the disposal system and the program. This paper will present a brief summary of the Grout Treatment Facility`s components and features and will provide a status of the HGDP, concentrating on the major issues and challenges resulting from the higher radionuclide and hazardous content of the waste. The following major issues will be discussed: Formulation (cementitious mix) development; the Performance Assessment (PA) (3) to show compliance of the disposal system to long-term environmental protection objectives; and the impacts of grouting on waste volume projections and tank space needs.

  7. Strength of Experimental Grouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

     The present report describes tests carried out on 5 experimental grouts developed by BASF Construction Materials and designed for use in grouted connections of offshore windmill foundations....... The present report describes tests carried out on 5 experimental grouts developed by BASF Construction Materials and designed for use in grouted connections of offshore windmill foundations....

  8. Evaluation of dry-solids-blend material source for grouts containing 106-AN waste: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Osborne, S.C.; Francis, C.L.; Trotter, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    Stabilization/solidification technology is one of the most widely used techniques for the treatment and ultimate disposal of both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes. Cement-based products, commonly referred to as grouts, are the predominant materials of choice because of their low associated processing costs, compatibility with a wide variety of disposal scenarios, and ability to meet stringent processing and performance requirements. Such technology is being utilized in a Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the disposal of various wastes, including 106-AN wastes, located on the Hanford Reservation. The WHC personnel have developed a grout formula for 106-AN disposal that is designed to meet stringent performance requirements. This formula consists of a dry-solids blend containing 40 wt % limestone, 28 wt % granulated blast furnace slag (BFS), 28 wt % American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Class F fly ash, and 4 wt % Type I-II-LA Portland cement. This blend is mixed with 106-AN at a mix ratio of 9 lb of dry-solids blend per gallon of waste. This report documents the final results of efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of WHC`s Grout Technology Program to assess the effects of the source of the dry-solids-blend materials on the resulting grout formula.

  9. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2010-05-24

    The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS and T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D and D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or Portland cement groupt (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. The R-reactor vessel cotnains significantly less aluminum based on current facility process knowledge, surface observations, and drawings. Therefore, a Portland cement grout may be considered for grouting operations as well as the other grout formulations. For example, if the grout fill rate is less than 1 inch/min and the grout temperature is maintained at 70 C or less, the risk of hydrogen accumulation during fill

  10. Self Cleanable Tile Grout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet CANBAZ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, In this study, self-cleaning tile grout and white cement specimens are produced and the effect of self-cleaning mechanism of TiO2 is tested. Effects of TiO2 amount and TiO2 type are tested and compared. Anatase form and rutile TiO2 additive are used in the study. In addition, effects of silicate additives on the self-cleaning mechanism is determined. Studies are conducted with respect to Italian UNI code. This study presents a method for solving rust between the tiles of ceramic wet floor coverings with photocatalysis method and then removing the dirt with secondary effects such as water, wind etc.

  11. The effectiveness of grouted macadam at intersections. : A life-cycle cost analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsen, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    Intersections often experience severe rutting in the asphalt concrete layers due to slow moving, high loads, acceleration, deceleration and turning. This thesis aims to investigate the effectiveness of grouted macadam, open graded asphalt with its voids filled with cement grout, as a pavement material at intersections. This was done by investigating the properties of grouted macadam through a literature review and performing a life-cycle cost analysis comparing grouted macadam and asphalt con...

  12. CsIX/TRU Grout Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. J. Losinski; C. M. Barnes; B. K. Grover

    1998-11-01

    A settlement agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that liquid waste now stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC - formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, ICPP) will be calcined by the end of year 2012. This study investigates an alternative treatment of the liquid waste that removes undissolved solids (UDS) by filtration and removes cesium by ion exchange followed by cement-based grouting of the remaining liquid into 55-gal drums. Operations are assumed to be from January 2008 through December 2012. The grouted waste will be contact-handled and will be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico for disposal. The small volume of secondary wastes such as the filtered solids and cesium sorbent (resin) would remain in storage at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for treatment and disposal under another project, with an option to dispose of the filtered solids as a r emote-handled waste at WIPP.

  13. In-situ grouting of the low-level radioactive waste disposal silos at ORNL`s Solid Waste Storage Area Six

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, C.W.; Farmer, C.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Stansfield, R.G. [Stansfield (Robert G.), Knoxville, TN (US)

    1993-07-01

    At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), one method of solid low-level radioactive waste disposal has been disposed of in below-grade cylindrical concrete silos. Located in Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6), each silo measures 8 ft in diameter and 20 ft deep. Present day operations involve loading the silos with low-level radioactive waste and grouting the remaining void space with a particulate grout of low viscosity. Initial operations involving the disposal of wastes into the below-grade silos did not include the grouting process. Grouting was stated as a standard practice (in late 1988) after discovering that {approximately}75% of the silos accumulated water in the bottom of the silos in the {approximately}2 years after capping. Silo water (leachate) contained a wide range of types and concentrations of radionuclides. The migration of contaminated leachate out of the silo into adjoining soil and groundwater was considered to be a serious environmental concern. This report describes how a specially designed particulate-base grout was used to grout 54 silos previously filled with low-level radioactive waste. Grouting involved three steps: (1) silo preparation, (2) formulation and preparation of the grout mixture, and (3) injection of the grout into the silos. Thirty-five of the 54 silos grouted were equipped with a 3-in.-diam Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) pipe used to monitor water levels in the silos. A method for rupturing the bottom section of these PVC wells was developed so that grout could be pumped to the bottom of those silos. Holes (2-in. diam) were drilled through the {approximately}18 in. thick concrete to fill the remaining 19 wells without the PVC monitoring wells. The formulation of grout injected into the silos was based on a Portland Type I cement, flyash, sand, and silica fume admixture. Compressive strength of grout delivered to SWSA6 during grouting operations averaged 1,808 lb/in{sup 2} with a bulk density of 3,549 lb/yd{sup 3}.

  14. Tank closure reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-04-18

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

  15. Field application of innovative grouting agents for in situ stabilization of buried waste sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, G.G.; Farnsworth, R.K. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents field applications for two innovative grouting agents that were used to in situ stabilize buried waste sites, via jet grouting. The two grouting agents include paraffin and a proprietary iron oxide based cement grout called TECT. These materials were tested in specially designed cold test pits that simulate buried transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The field demonstrations were performed at the INEL in an area referred to as the Cold Test Pit, which is adjacent to the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). At the RWMC, 56,000 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste is co-mingled with over 170,000 m{sup 3} of soil in shallow land burial. Improving the confinement of this waste is one of the options for final disposition of this waste. Using jet-grouting technology to inject these materials into the pore spaces of buried waste sites results in the creation of buried monolithic waste forms that simultaneously protect the waste from subsidence, while eliminating the migratory potential of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in the waste.

  16. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  17. Pilot-scale grout production test with a simulated low-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fow, C.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Treat, R.L.; Hymas, C.R.

    1987-05-01

    Plans are underway at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to convert the low-level fraction of radioactive liquid wastes to a grout form for permanent disposal. Grout is a mixture of liquid waste and grout formers, including portland cement, fly ash, and clays. In the plan, the grout slurry is pumped to subsurface concrete vaults on the Hanford Site, where the grout will solidify into large monoliths, thereby immobilizing the waste. A similar disposal concept is being planned at the Savannah River Laboratory site. The underground disposal of grout was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1966 and 1984. Design and construction of grout processing and disposal facilities are underway. The Transportable Grout Facility (TGF), operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) for the Department of Energy (DOE), is scheduled to grout Phosphate/Sulfate N Reactor Operations Waste (PSW) in FY 1988. Phosphate/Sulfate Waste is a blend of two low-level waste streams generated at Hanford's N Reactor. Other wastes are scheduled to be grouted in subsequent years. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is verifying that Hanford grouts can be safely and efficiently processed. To meet this objective, pilot-scale grout process equipment was installed. On July 29 and 30, 1986, PNL conducted a pilot-scale grout production test for Rockwell. During the test, 16,000 gallons of simulated nonradioactive PSW were mixed with grout formers to produce 22,000 gallons of PSW grout. The grout was pumped at a nominal rate of 15 gpm (about 25% of the nominal production rate planned for the TGF) to a lined and covered trench with a capacity of 30,000 gallons. Emplacement of grout in the trench will permit subsequent evaluation of homogeneity of grout in a large monolith. 12 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Development of a technical approach for assessing environmental release and migration characteristics of Hanford Grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Treat, R. L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lokken, R. O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    1985-09-01

    A Transportable Grout Facility is being constructed at the Hanford Site to immobilize low-level liquid radioactive waste in grout. This report addresses the grout and sediment testing methodology that is being developed at PNL to support assessments of the long-term performance of the disposed grout. Sediment is the soil that surrounds and underlies the disposed grout. A goal of these efforts is to certify tests for application at Hanford. An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of wastes contained within the grout. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of the sediments to retard the mobility of any wastes released from grout. The effects of aging on the ability of grout to retain waste must also be understood. Aging of grout can reduce or enhance the ability of the grout to contain waste. Credible predictive modeling of the fate of hazardous constituents in disposed grout for periods of up to 10,000 years would best be performed using comprehensive, coupled hydrologic and chemical reaction codes based on knowledge of the mechanisms that control waste release and mobility. It is not clear yet how soon such codes will be available or which types of waste disposal options they will apply to. In the interim we must be content with simpler and separate models that address individual reactions such as leaching and adsorption. One of these models, the Semi-Infinite Solid Diffusion Leach Model, is a popular release model used to describe the leaching of grouts and other cemented waste forms. Because others have found success in describing laboratory leach experiments with cemented waste forms using this leach model and because it appears likely to err on the conservative side for the Hanford application, we currently endorse the use of this model and its supporting experimental methodology for approximations of grout waste release rates. At the present time it is believed that the leachate from

  19. The effects of complex glyoxal based modifiers on properties of cement paste and hardened cement paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakova, A.; Kudyakov, A.; Efremova, V.; Latypov, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research on the effect of organic and glyoxal containing additives on the properties of cement paste and hardened cement paste. Complex modifying additives based on liquid glyoxal increasing the strength of the cement paste by 35-63% were developed. Physico-chemical investigations showed that hardened cement paste modified by polylactic acid with glyoxal has a homogeneous and fine-grained structure. Developed complex modifying additives containing glyoxal are approved for use in production technology of heavy cement concretes with advanced properties.

  20. Autogenous Phenomena in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    This thesis has been written to obtain the Danish doctoral degree in technology, Dr.Techn. It addresses autogenous phenomena in cement-based materials - primarily deformation and change of the relative humidity (RH). In the thesis it is explained how the importance of these phenomena was identified...

  1. Consolidation behavior of cement-based systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Ane Mette

    2007-01-01

    overfladekræfter påvirker partiklernes indbyrdes afstand. Det udførte ph.d.-projekt ”Consolidation behaviour of cement-based systems. Influence of inter-particle forces” har bidraget med en konceptuel model for den kombinerede indflydelse af ydre kræftpåvirkning (konsolidering) og overfladekræfter mellem fine...

  2. Strength of High Performance Grouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report describes tests carried out on 5 experimental grouts developed by BASF Construction Materials and designed for use in grouted connections of offshore windmill foundations.......The present report describes tests carried out on 5 experimental grouts developed by BASF Construction Materials and designed for use in grouted connections of offshore windmill foundations....

  3. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Investigations for Imaging the Grouting Injection in Shallow Subsurface Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway.

  4. Cement-based materials with graphene nanophase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla, P. T.; Tragazikis, I. K.; Exarchos, D. A.; Dassios, K.; Matikas, T. E.

    2017-04-01

    Cement matrix composites with a conductive nano-reinforcement phase, lead to the development of innovative products. A matrix with carbon based nano-inclusions (graphene, carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, carbon black) obtains multi-functional properties like enhanced mechanical, electrical, elastic and thermal properties and, therefore, the advantage of self-sensing in case of an inner defect. This research aims to characterize the nano-modified cement mortars with different concentrations of graphene nanophase. The results will be compared with data obtained from nanomaterials containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Comprehensive characteristics of these cement-based nanocomposites have been determined using destructive and nondestructive laboratory techniques. Flexural and compressive strength were measured. During four point bending tests, acoustic emission monitoring allowed for realtime identification of the damage process in the material. The electrical surface resistivity of graphene-reinforced cement mortars was measured by applying a known DC voltage, and compared to the electrical resistivity of nano-modified mortars with carbon nanotubes.

  5. Review of Consolidation Grouting of Rock Masses and Methods for Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    undesirable as the clay fillings may be less pc ~vious than the cement grout. However, they were grouting for seepage control and were not attempting...34 Memoria No. 364, Laboratorio Nacional De Engenharia Civil, Lisbon. Barton, C. M. 1978 (May). "Analysis of Joint Traces," Proceedings, 19th US Rock

  6. Fate of Contaminants in Contact with West Valley Grouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuhrmann,M.; Gillow, J.

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the work described here is to determine to what extent a variety of contaminants, including fission products, actinides, and RCRA elements are sequestered by the two grout formulations. The conceptual model for this study is as follows: a large mass of grout having been poured into a high-level waste tank is in the process of aging and weathering for thousands of years. The waste remaining in the tank will contain radionuclides and other contaminants, much of which will adhere to tank walls and internal structures. The grout will encapsulate the contaminants. Initially the grout will be well sequestered, but over time rainwater and groundwater will gain access to it. Ultimately, the grout/waste environment will be an open system. In this condition water will move through the grout, exposing it to O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} from the air and HCO{sub 3}{sup -} from the groundwater. Thus we are considering an oxic environment containing HCO{sub 3}{sup -}. Initially the solubility of many contaminants, but not all, will be constrained by chemistry dominated by the grout, primarily by the high pH, around 11.8. This is controlled and buffered by the portland cement and blast furnace slag components of the grout, which by themselves maintain a solution pH of about 12.5. Slowly the pH will diminish as Ca(OH){sub 2} and KOH dissolve, are carried away by water, and CaCO{sub 3} forms. As these conditions develop, the behavior of these elements comes into question. In our conceptual model, although the grout is formulated to provide some reducing capacity, in order to be conservative this mechanism is not considered. In addition to solubility constraints imposed by pH, the various contaminants may be incorporated into a variety of solid phases. Some may be incorporated into newly forming compounds as the grout sets and cures. Others (like soddyite, (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}) are the result of slower reactions but may become important over time

  7. Corrosion performance of prestressing strands in contact with dissimilar grouts : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Inspections of post-tensioned bridges : by the Kansas Department of Transportation : have revealed voids in strand ducts due to : bleeding and shrinkage of older Portland : Cement grouts. The Kansas Department : of Transportation is faced with a deci...

  8. Evaluation of the Performance of Grouting Materials for Saturated Riprap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehyeon Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four types of grout were developed to evaluate the effect of grouting of saturated riprap layers on ground water flow. The developed types of grout are divided into a quick-setting type and a general-type, and also into high and low viscosities. A number of grout tests were performed in a model acrylic chamber, 0.4 m in diameter and 2.0 m in length, for visual observation of injection. To reproduce the field flow condition of the saturated riprap layers (approach flow, the grout tests were carried out at 0 cm/s and 100 cm/s for the flow speed and 10 L/min for the grout injection speed after installing a flow injection opening on the lower part of the chamber. Based on the results of the grout tests, the injection of each grout in the saturated riprap layers was examined to find out the most effective grout.

  9. Epoxy Grout With Silica Thickener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclung, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Grout cures quickly, even in presence of hydraulic oil. Grout is mixture of aggregate particles, finely-divided silica, epoxy resin, and triethylenetetramine curing agent, with mixture containing about 85 percent silica and aggregate particle sand 15 percent resin and curing agent. Silica is thickening agent and keeps grout from sagging.

  10. Effect of Cement Type on Autogenous Deformation of Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietro, Lura; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, measurements of non-evaporable water content, chemical shrinkage, autogenous deformation, internal relative humidity (RH), pore solution composition, and early-age elastic modulus are presented and discussed. All experiments were performed on Portland cement and blast-furnace slag ......, taking into account the influence of the dissolved salts in the pore solution, 2) the BFS cement paste studied shows pronounced self-desiccation and self-desiccation shrinkage, mainly caused by its very fine pore structure....... (BFS) cement pastes. Self-desiccation shrinkage of the BFS cement paste was modeled based on the RH measurements, following the capillary-tension approach. The main findings of this study are: 1) self-desiccation shrinkage can be related to self-desiccation both for Portland and for BFS cement pastes...

  11. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R- AND P-REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2009-12-29

    The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS&T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a significant margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. The R-reactor vessel contains significantly less aluminum and thus a Portland cement grout may be considered as well. For example, if the grout fill rate is less than 1 inch/min and the grout temperature is maintained at 70 C or less, the risk of hydrogen accumulation in the R-reactor vessel is very low for the Portland cement. Alternatively, if the grout fill rate is less than 0.5 inch/min and the grout is maintained

  12. CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

    2012-01-10

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by

  13. Densified ultra-light cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro

    2015-01-01

    be used as a “clean technology” in the production of cement-based materials for structural applications with a low carbon footprint. This paper describes the principles of this concept coupled with experimental results on the basic properties of this enhanced type of cement-based materials with combined...

  14. Cement-Based Materials for Nuclear Waste Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Cau-di-Coumes, Céline; Frizon, Fabien; Lorente, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    As the re-emergence of nuclear power as an acceptable energy source on an international basis continues, the need for safe and reliable ways to dispose of radioactive waste becomes ever more critical. The ultimate goal for designing a predisposal waste-management system depends on producing waste containers suitable for storage, transportation and permanent disposal. Cement-Based Materials for Nuclear-Waste Storage provides a roadmap for the use of cementation as an applied technique for the treatment of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes.Coverage includes, but is not limited to, a comparison of cementation with other solidification techniques, advantages of calcium-silicate cements over other materials and a discussion of the long-term suitability and safety of waste packages as well as cement barriers. This book also: Discusses the formulation and production of cement waste forms for storing radioactive material Assesses the potential of emerging binders to improve the conditioning of problemati...

  15. Microindentation of Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA Based Bone Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zivic

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA based bone cement subjected to cyclical loading using microindentation technique is presented in this paper. Indentation technique represents flexible mechanical testing due to its simplicity, minimal specimen preparation and short time needed for tests. The mechanical response of bone cement samples was studied. Realised microindentation enabled determination of the indentation testing hardness HIT and indentation modulus EIT of the observed bone cement. Analysis of optical photographs of the imprints showed that this technique can be effectively used for characterization of bone cements.

  16. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Dicalcium Silicate Based Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, N.; Chatterjee, A.

    2017-06-01

    It is imperative to develop low energy alternative binders considering the large amounts of energy consumed as well as carbon dioxide emissions involved in the manufacturing of ordinary Portland cement. This study is on the synthesis of a dicalcium silicate based binder using a low temperature hydrothermal route.The process consists of synthesizing an intermediate product consisting of a calcium silicate hydrate phase with a Ca:Si ratio of 2:1 and further thermal treatment to produce the β-Ca2SiO4 (C2S) phase.Effect of various synthesis parameters like water to solid ratio, dwell time and temperature on the formation of the desired calcium silicate hydrate phase is reported along with effect of heating conditions for formation of the β-C2S phase. Around 77.45% of β-C2S phase was synthesized by thermal treatment of the intermediate phase at 820°C.

  17. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.

    2013-04-23

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4

  18. ASSESSMENT OF DEFORMATION AND STRENGTH OF SOILS STRENGTHENED BY CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainov Mihail Petrovich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently there are few studies of deformation and strength properties of loose soils strengthened by cementing. Based on the data of already arranged grout curtains it was determined that in cemented gravel-pebble soil there are 7...9 % of cement, which is less than in concrete. To assess deformation and strength of such soils it is possible to use the data of tests conducted by other authors, where the effect of cement contents on sand-cement mix properties was studied. Analysis of experimental data showed that cemented soil may be identified with concrete only with high content of cement (more than 10 %. At cement content 7...9 % in soil the strength deformation of cemented soil varies to a small extent. Its deformation becomes 2-3 times less. It greatly depends on compression stresses. The formulae are proposed which permit assessing the effect of compression and cement content on deformation of cemented soil. It is shown that strength of cemented soil is less than that even of the weakest concrete. It has a sufficiently high cohesion, but the friction angle is approximately the same as that of the initial soil.

  19. Modification of Grout Properties in Prepacked Aggregate Concrete Incorporating Palm Oil Fuel Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Hodjati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prepacked aggregate concrete (PAC is a type of concrete that is placed in two stages where the coarse aggregates are first placed inside the formworks and then the grout is pumped from underneath through a manual pump. Grout properties including density, grout consistency, bleeding, and compressive strength are of great importance in PAC. Such properties could be improved by application of pozzolanic materials like palm oil fuel ash. This paper is aimed at finding the most optimum percentage of POFA replacement by weight of cement. It was concluded that 30% POFA replacement yielded the most optimum results.

  20. STUDY OF HORIZONTAL SCREEN STRENGTH CREATED BY INJECTION TECHNOLOGY CEMENT BINDER BASED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISOV A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Annotation. Formulation of the problem. An important indicator in the planning of injection works is a particle size distribution of the soil and the very composition of injection. The ideal case is to comply with the injection optimum ratio between the size of particles in solution and injectable medium. This ratio corresponds to complete impregnation of the environment. Today in the field of building technologies known classical methods of grouting with the injection process [9]. This may be a cementation or silicification with different chemical compositions. Due to the fact that we have proposed an innovative technology of impervious curtain device, special attention should be paid to the performance and physical and mechanical properties of the resulting soil-injection. This is due to the fact that the proposed technology provides for lesser known technical solutions, the use of which should ultimately result in impervious screens with desired properties. Goal. The aim of this study is to investigate the properties of the resulting soil-concrete impervious screen. Such structures should have defined a number of physical and mechanical properties. In this paper, it was of interest to study the compressive strength of the resulting soil-concrete structure. Conclusion. As a result of experimentation and implementation of complex obtained experimentally-statistical models that describe the main soil-quality indicators. Based on these data is possible optimal selection of formulation and technological structure for sandy soils with different modules size of its particles.

  1. Research in Foundation Grouting with Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-03-01

    were not obtained, it was the opinion of the reporting engineer that higher strength than that indicated could be realized by allowing for the...overlapping of the piling an- using lar-ger dia-meter than she 4.8-in, cores tested. It was the Coliets opinion that a d-ced-in-place pile wall was a... lideration , and to collect data that might aid in the determination of the grPcthbility of sands and in the selection of suitable gi juts. In order to

  2. Leachability studies of hydrofracture grouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Loflin, J.A.

    1986-11-01

    Leaching studies were performed on simulated hydrofracture grouts containing As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, /sup 90/Sr, and /sup 137/Cs. The grout samples were leached in three solutions: distilled water, shallow groundwater, and a deep brine. The resulting leach data are compared with the NRC and EPA regulatory requirements for the disposal of solid wastes.

  3. TANKS 18 AND 19-F STRUCTURAL FLOWABLE GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix

  4. Electrical Current Flow and Cement Hydration : Implications on Cement-Based Microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Peng, G; Koleva, D.A.; van Breugel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Stray current is an electrical current “leakage” from metal conductors and electrical installations. When it flows through cement-based materials, electrical energy is converted to thermal energy that causes increasing temperature due to Joule heating phenomena. The aim of this paper is to shed

  5. Using bio-based polymers for curing cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlopasa, J.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Picken, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Curing is the process of controlling the rate and extent of moisture loss from the surface of cement based materials. It is the final stage in the production of cement-based materials and it is the essential part for achieving continuous hydration of cement, while avoiding cracking due to drying

  6. Nanotechnology Applications for Sustainable Cement-Based Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raki, L.; Beaudoin, J. J.; Alizadeh, R.

    Concrete is a macro-material strongly influenced by the properties of its components and hydrates at the nanoscale. Progress at this level will engender new opportunities for improvement of strength and durability of concrete materials. This article will focus on recent research work in the field of nanoscience applications to cement and concrete at the NRC-IRC. A particular attention will be given to nanoparticles and cement-based nanocomposites.

  7. Effects of using silica fume and polycarboxylate-type superplasticizer on physical properties of cementitious grout mixtures for semiflexible pavement surfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koting, Suhana; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Mahmud, Hilmi; Mashaan, Nuha S; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herdayati; Husain, Nadiah Md

    2014-01-01

    Semi-flexible pavement surfacing is a composite pavement that utilizes the porous pavement structure of the flexible bituminous pavement, which is subsequently grouted with appropriate cementitious materials. This study aims to investigate the compressive strength, flexural strength, and workability performance of cementitious grout. The grout mixtures are designed to achieve high strength and maintain flow properties in order to allow the cement slurries to infiltrate easily through unfilled compacted skeletons. A paired-sample t-test was carried out to find out whether water/cement ratio, SP percentages, and use of silica fume influence the cementitious grout performance. The findings showed that the replacement of 5% silica fume with an adequate amount of superplasticizer and water/cement ratio was beneficial in improving the properties of the cementitious grout.

  8. Low-pH injection grout for deep repositories. Summary report from a co-operation project between NUMO (Japan), Posiva (Finland) and SKB (Sweden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, Anders [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Sievaenen, Ursula [JP-Suoraplan Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2005-06-01

    The use of standard cementitious material creates pulses of pH in the magnitude of 12-13 in the leachates and release alkalis. Such a high pH is detrimental and also unnecessarily complicates the safety analysis of the repository. As no reliable pH-plume models exist, the use of products giving a pH below 11 in the leachates facilitates the safety analysis. Also, according to current understanding, the use of low-pH cement (pH = 11) will not disturb the functioning of the bentonite, although limiting the amount of low-pH cement is recommended. A result of the project is that there are both low-pH cementitious material for grouting larger fractures (= 100 {mu}m) and non-cementitious material for grouting smaller fractures (< 100 {mu}m) that will, after further optimisation work, be recommended for grouting of deep repositories. This project concentrated on the technical development of properties for the low pH grouts. Long-term safety and environmental aspects and durability of materials were preliminarily considered. Continued evaluations have to be carried out. Five systems, e.g. material combinations, were studied in the project: 1. Ordinary Portland Cement + Silica Fume. 'OPC+SF' denotes a binder system that is based mainly on OPC+SF. SF was used in a few commercial forms. The OPC used in this system was mainly UF16 and in some cases Rheocem 900 or white cement. 2. Blast furnace slag. 'Slag' denotes an OPC activated slag based system. Alkali and water glass activation were not examined, because of long-term safety reasons. OPC used in this system was rapid hardening Portland cement. 3. Super sulphate cement. 'SSC' is a slag-based system activated with gypsum and OPC. The OPC used was rapid hardening Portland cement and the gypsum was a very fine grained slurry product. 4. Low-Alkali Cement 'LAC' was introduced to the project by NUMO as a product, ground to fixed fineness by the producer. Neither the mineral composition nor

  9. Clay-cement suspensions - rheological and functional properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, L.; Izak, P.; Mastalska-Poplawska, J.; Gajek, M.

    2017-01-01

    The piping erosion in soil is highly unexpected in civil engineering. Elimination of such damages is difficult, expensive and time-consuming. One of the possibility is the grouting method. This method is still developed into direction of process automation as well as other useful properties of suspensions. Main way of modernization of the grouting method is connected it with rheology of injection and eventuality of fitting them to specific problems conditions. Very popular and useful became binders based on modified clays (clay-cement suspensions). Important principle of efficiency of the grouting method is using of time-dependent pseudothixotropic properties of the clay-cement suspensions. The pseudo-rheounstability aspect of the suspensions properties should be dedicated and fitted to dynamic changes of soil conditions destructions. Whole process of the modification of the suspension rheology is stimulated by the specific agents. This article contains a description of practical aspects of the rheological parameters managing of the clay-cement suspensions, dedicated to the building damages, hydrotechnic constructions etc.

  10. In vivo characterization of polymer based dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiyanti P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In vivo studies investigating the characterization of dental cements have been demonstrated. As few in vitro studies on this cement system have been performed. Previous researches in dental material has been standardized dental cement which fulfilled the physical and mechanical characteristic such as shear strength but were on in vitro condition, the animal model and clinical study of dental cement from laboratory has not been done yet. This research examined physical and mechanical characteristic in vivo using rabbit by making the caries (class III in anterior teeth especially in mesial or distal incisive, fulfilled the cavity by dental cement and analyzed the compressive strength, tensile strength, and microstructure using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Purpose: This study is aimed to describe the in vivo characterization of dental cements based on polymer (zinc phosphate cement, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer cement and zinc oxide eugenol. Methods: First, preparation was done on animal model’s teeth (6 rabbits, male, 5 months old. The cavity was made which involved the dentin. Then the cavity was filled with dental cement. After the filling procedure, the animal model should be kept until 21 days and than the compressive test, tensile test and microstructure was characterized. Compressive test and tensile test was analyzed using samples from extracted tooth and was measured with autograph. The microstructure test was measured using SEM. Results: The best compressive strength value was belongs to zinc phosphate cement which was 101.888 Mpa and the best tensile strength value was belongs to glass ionomer cement which was 6.555 Mpa. Conclusion: In conclusion, comparing with 3 others type of dental cements which are zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate and glass ionomer cement, zinc oxide eugenol cement has the worst for both physical and mechanical properties.Latar belakang: Studi in vivo meneliti karakterisasi secara in vivo dari

  11. Solidification of Acidic, High Nitrate Nuclear Wastes by Grouting or Absorption on Silica Gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. K. Herbst; S. V. Raman; R. J. Kirkham

    2004-01-01

    The use of grout and silica gel were explored for the solidification of four types of acidic, high nitrate radioactive wastes. Two methods of grouting were tested: direct grouting and pre-neutralization. Two methods of absorption on silica gel were also tested: direct absorption and rotary spray drying. The waste simulant acidity varied between 1 N and 12 N. The waste simulant was neutralized by pre-blending calcium hydroxide with Portland cement and blast furnace slag powders prior to mixing with the simulant for grout solidification. Liquid sodium hydroxide was used to partially neutralize the simulant to a pH above 2 and then it was absorbed for silica gel solidification. Formulations for each of these methods are presented along with waste form characteristics and properties. Compositional variation maps for grout formulations are presented which help determine the optimum "recipe" for a particular waste stream. These maps provide a method to determine the proportions of waste, calcium hydroxide, Portland cement, and blast furnace slag that provide a waste form that meets the disposal acceptance criteria. The maps guide researchers in selecting areas to study and provide an operational envelop that produces acceptable waste forms. The grouts both solidify and stabilize the wastes, while absorption on silica gel produces a solid waste that will not pass standard leaching procedures (TCLP) if required. Silica gel wastes can be made to pass most leach tests if heated to 600ºC.

  12. Synthesis And Characterization Of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles-based Dental Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Nofrizal; Prihantini, Ardini; Nugroho, Dwi Wahyu; R., Tito Prastyo; Ikono, Radyum; W., Wahyu Bambang; Sukarto, Agus; Siswanto; Rochman, Nurul Taufiqu

    2012-01-01

    Dental cement-based mixture of zinc oxide and eugenol is one of the commonly used dental cement. One of the major shortcomings that limit its application is dental cement zinc oxide and eugenol has detrimental mechanical properties. This study aims to carry out the synthesis and characterization of nano-based dental cement of zinc oxide mixed with eugenol with the hypothesis that zinc oxide nanoparticles will provide better mechanical properties. Physical and mechanical properties of cement-b...

  13. A simple approach to the design of pavements incorporating grouted macadams

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Joel; Zoorob, S.; Thom, N.H.; Pereira, Paulo A. A.

    2007-01-01

    Grouted macadams form a semi-flexible class of composites whose behaviour lies somewhere between concrete and conventional asphalt materials, having both excellent rut resistance and a degree of flexibility. This paper presents a series of pavement design computer simulations, based on results obtained from laboratory fatigue and stiffness tests on grouted macadam and conventional asphalt mixtures. The design variables explored include the application of grouted macadams both as surf...

  14. Long-term degradation (or improvement?) of cementitious grout/concrete for waste disposal at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepho, M.G. [Daniel B. Stephens & Associates, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    If grout and/or concrete barriers and containments are considered for long-term (500 yrs to 100,000 ) waste disposal, then long-term degradation of grout/cement materials (and others) need to be studied. Long-term degradations of a cementitious grout monolith (15.4mW x 10.4mH x 37.6mL) and its containment concrete shell and asphalt shell (each 1-m thick) were analyzed. The main degradation process of the concrete shell was believed to be fractures due to construction joints, shrinkage, thermal stress, settlement, and seismic events. A scenario with fractures was modeled (flow and transport model) for long-term risk performance (out to a million yrs). Even though the concrete/grout is expected to fracture, the concrete/grout chemistry, which has high Ph value, is very beneficial in causing calcite deposits from calcium in the water precipitating in the fractures. These calcite deposits will tend to plug the fracture and keep water from entering. The effectiveness of such plugging needs to be studied more. It`s possible that the plugged fractures are more impermeable than the original concrete/grout. The long-term performance of concrete/grout barriers will be determined by its chemistry, not its mechanical properties.

  15. INTENSIFY HEAT-RESISTANT BINDER BASED ON PORTLAND CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Curbanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The article presents the results of a study of heat-resistant binder based on Portland cement with the addition of a local mill ground minerals.Methods. Activation is carried out on a planetary mill "Activator - 4M". Activation of the binder increases the strength of heat-resistant concrete by increasing the reactivity bundles "Portland is the active fine additive" to the mechano-chemical additive.Results. It is determined that the mill ground additives result in the formation of low-melting and thereby reduce the temperature of the use of heat-resistant concrete with Portland cement binder.Conclusion. It is proved that high mechanochemical strength refractory concrete samples on activated binder is caused by the process of increasing the chemical activity of the materials included in a bundle of "Portland cement is the active fine additive" which creates favorable conditions for hardening of heat-resistant concrete.

  16. Rock grouting. Current competence and development for the final repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmelin, Ann (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (SE)); Brantberger, Martin (Ramboell (SE)); Eriksson, Magnus (Vattenfall Power Consultant (SE)); Gustafson, Gunnar (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (SE)); Stille, Haakan (Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (SE))

    2007-06-15

    The report aims at presenting the overall state of grouting competence and development relating to the final repository and at motivating and giving detail to the grouting sections presented in the 2007 version of the overall SKB report 'Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste' that is presented to the government every three years. The report offers suggestions for principles for planning, design and execution of grouting and describes the further work thought to be necessary in order to meet the requirements of the final repository, that are currently given as working premises. This report does not aim to, and cannot, describe the grouting processes in detail. For details of current concepts, experience and development work, a list of references is provided. In Chapter 2, the task of sealing the underground repository is examined and an overall approach presented. Although the requirements related to this task are preliminary, it is made evident that they concern both the actual grouting results and the process leading to the achievement of these results. Chapter 3 is a conceptual description of grouting and the factors that govern the spreading of grout in the rock mass. It is intended as an introduction to Chapters 4-6, which describe the state of grouting competence and the tools available for the sealing of the final repository facility. Both common practice and cutting-edge research are dealt with in these chapters, mainly relying on references where available. Chapters 4 and 5 focus on the system consisting of the fundamental components the rock mass, the grout materials and the grouting technology, and how these system components interact whilst, in Chapter 6, the rock/grout technical system is viewed in a brief organizational context. Based on the requirements on results and the overall grouting process on the one hand and the current competence in grouting theory and

  17. Multiscale Lattice Boltzmann-Finite Element Modelling of Transport Properties in Cement-based Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, M.

    2013-01-01

    Cement-based materials are the most widely used man-made materials in the world. The durability of cement-based materials has been a major concern due to the premature failure and serviceability issues of many reinforced concrete structures. Durability of cement-based materials is to a large content

  18. Chloride binding of cement-based materials subjected to external chloride environment - A review

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Q; Shi, C.; Schutter, G. de; K. Audenaert; Deng, D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the chloride binding of cement-based materials subjected to external chloride environments. Chloride ion exist either in the pore solution, chemically bound to the hydration products, or physically held to the surface of the hydration products. Chloride binding of cement-based material is very complicated and influenced by many factors, such as chloride concentration, cement composition, hydroxyl concentration, cation of chloride salt, temperature, supplementary cementing m...

  19. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2009-10-29

    The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS&T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or portland cement grout (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Conservative calculations estimate that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. Grout temperatures less than 100 C should however, still provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. (2) Minimize the fill rate as much as

  20. Grouting for Pile Foundation Improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Stoel, A.E.C.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the use of grouting methods for pile foundation improvement, a generic term that is used here to define both foundation renovation (increasing the bearing capacity of a pile foundation that has insufficient bearing capacity) and foundation protection

  1. Pullout behavior of steel fibers from cement-based composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shannag, M. Jamal; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Will

    1997-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental program on pullout tests of steel fibers from cement based matrices is described. A specially designed single fiber pullout apparatus was used to provide a quantitative determination of interfacial properties that are relevant to toughening brittle materials through...... fiber reinforcement. The parameters investigated included a specially designed high strength cement based matrix called Densified Small Particles system (DSP), a conventional mortar matrix, fiber embeddment length, and the fiber volume fraction. The mediums from which the fiber was pulled included...... a control mortar mix without fibers, a mortar mix with 3, and 6 percent fibers by volume. The results indicate that: (1) The dense DSP matrix has significantly improved interfacial properties as compared to the conventional mortar matrix. (2) Increasing the fiber embeddment length and the fiber volume...

  2. Investigation of cement based composites made with recycled rubber aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevtić Dragica Lj.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental investigations performed on cement based composites made with addition of recycled rubber as a partial replacement of natural river aggregate are presented in this paper. Different properties of cement based mortar were analyzed, both in fresh and in hardened state. Tested properties in the fresh state included: density, consistency and volume of entrained air. In the hardened state, the following properties were tested: density, mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, adhesion to concrete substrate, water absorption, freeze-thaw resistance and ultrasonic pulse velocity. The obtained results indicate that recycled rubber can be successfully applied as a partial replacement of natural river aggregate in cement based composites, in accordance with the sustainable development concept. The investigation showed that physical-mechanical properties of cementituous composites depend to a great extent on the percentage of replacement of natural river aggregate with recycled rubber, especially when the density, strength, adhesion and freeze-thaw resistance are concerned. The best results were obtained in the freeze-thaw resistance of such composites.

  3. Additives for cement compositions based on modified peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopanitsa, Natalya, E-mail: kopanitsa@mail.ru; Sarkisov, Yurij, E-mail: sarkisov@tsuab.ru; Gorshkova, Aleksandra, E-mail: kasatkina.alexandra@gmail.com; Demyanenko, Olga, E-mail: angel-n@sibmail.com [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya sq., Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    High quality competitive dry building mixes require modifying additives for various purposes to be included in their composition. There is insufficient amount of quality additives having stable properties for controlling the properties of cement compositions produced in Russia. Using of foreign modifying additives leads to significant increasing of the final cost of the product. The cost of imported modifiers in the composition of the dry building mixes can be up to 90% of the material cost, depending on the composition complexity. Thus, the problem of import substitution becomes relevant, especially in recent years, due to difficult economic situation. The article discusses the possibility of using local raw materials as a basis for obtaining dry building mixtures components. The properties of organo-mineral additives for cement compositions based on thermally modified peat raw materials are studied. Studies of the structure and composition of the additives are carried out by physicochemical research methods: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. Results of experimental research showed that the peat additives contribute to improving of cement-sand mortar strength and hydrophysical properties.

  4. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    speciation of silicon at pH 10 has a significant impact upon the solubility of montmorillonite and would thus constitute a logical choice of pH limit for cement-derived pore fluids, but it is unlikely that cement-based grouts could be developed to meet this limit. Control of mass transport by diffusion processes serves as a significant constraint over the amount of bentonite that can be degraded. Computer simulations indicate that porosity reduction is likely at the interface between cement and bentonite. However, it is not clear how the transport properties of bentonite may be modified due to mineral alteration processes. There are considerable uncertainties concerning the precise mechanism of the rate of montmorillonite dissolution at elevated pH. The rate of dissolution may be inhibited by the presence of dissolved Si (and perhaps Al), but this mechanism has yet to be confirmed at high pH. The type of secondary minerals assumed to form from cement-bentonite interaction will also have a significant impact upon the rate of montmorillonite dissolution. Low-pH cement systems have received little attention thus far regarding the development of models for the chemical evolution of pore fluids. Low Ca/Si CSH gels show preferential leaching of Si, which is in marked contrast with gels of greater Ca/Si ratio. Models apparently capable of predicting pore fluid composition coexisting with low Ca/Si CSH gels are a modified Berner model and a solid-solution model proposed by Sugiyama and Fujita. The solubility of silica in pore fluids coexisting with low Ca/Si gels may exceed that of amorphous silica, and may pose problems regarding the stability of montmorillonite in relation to framework silicates such as feldspars. However, the potential rate of conversion of montmorillonite to feldspar under repository conditions is uncertain. It is necessary to use additives such as super plasticiser to improve the workability of low-pH cements. These organic additives have the potential to

  5. Fracture and fatigue strength of grouted macadams

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Joel; Thom, N.H.; Zoorob, S.

    2006-01-01

    Grouted macadams form a class of material which provides significant advantages in comparison to both concrete and conventional asphalt, having both rut resistance and a degree of flexibility. This paper presents a series of laboratory tests on several grouted macadam mixtures, for stiffness, fatigue and low temperature fracture. The variables explored include binder grade and content, aggregate size and gradation, and grout strength. Although the material is found to perform fundamentally as...

  6. Influence of pressurization on flexural strength distributions of PMMA-based bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, Griselda; Vallo, Claudia I

    2002-11-01

    Flexural strength distributions of standard viscosity and low viscosity bone cements based on Polymethylmethacrylate were obtained by testing the materials in four-point bending according to the ISO 5833 protocol. The cement dough was poured into a mold and was allowed to cure at atmospheric pressure. An additional set of specimens of the standard viscosity cement was prepared under pressure while the cement dough was polymerizing in the mold. Following preparation, test specimens were stored in a 37 degrees C water bath for 48 h. The two-parameter Weibull model, which was used to analyze the data, gave a good representation of the fracture loads distribution. Low viscosity cement displayed a higher mean flexural strength and a slightly lower data scatter than standard viscosity cement. The mean flexural strength of the cement increased about 60% when pressure was applied compared with the same material cured at atmospheric pressure. The Weibull modulus, m, characterizes the scattering in the measured values of strength. For the cement prepared at atmospheric pressure the m value was 8.6 while for the cement cured under pressure it was 12.3, which reveals a reduction in the data scatter. The cement tested in four-point bending displayed lower mean flexural strength compared with the cement tested in three-point bending. The influence of the load type upon the mean flexural strength was satisfactory predicted by Weibull model.

  7. Environmental CRIteria for CEMent based products, ECRICEM. Phase I. Ordinary Portland Cements. Phase II. Blended Cements. Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sloot, H.A.; Van Zomeren, A. [ECN Biomass, Coal and Environmetal Research, Petten (Netherlands); Stenger, R. [Holcim Group Support Ltd, Holderbank (Switzerland); Schneider, M.; Spanka, G. [VDZ, Duesseldorf (Germany); Stoltenberg-Hansson, A. [NORCEM, HeidelbergCement Group, Brevik (Norway); Dath, P. [Holcim Belgium, Obourg (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    The protection of the immediate environment of structural works is one of the essential requirements of the European Construction Products Directive (CPD). According to the CPD, construction products can only be put on the market, if the structural works built with them fulfil the relevant requirements for hygiene, and the protection of health and the environment. These essential requirements in the respective standards are specified at the national level by the individual member states. Cement and cementitious materials are considered to fulfil the fundamental requirements of the European Construction Products Directive and the corresponding national regulations. Therefore a technical regulation like the cement standard EN 197 in general does not cover separate requirements for determining compliance of cementitious materials with criteria on hygiene, health and environmental protection. Further regulations are laid down in cases where it appears necessary for constructive applications requiring a particular protection of water, soil and air.

  8. Degree of saturation effect on the grout-soil interface shear strength of soil nailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the grouted soil nailing system, the bonding strength of cement grout-soil interface offers the required resistance to maintain the stability of whole structure. In practice, soil nailing applications are often placed at unsaturated conditions, such as soil slopes, shallow foundations, retaining walls and pavement structures. In these cases, the water content in the soil nail zone may increase or decrease due to rain water or dry weather, and even cannot become saturated during their design service life. In this study, the effect of water content (degree of saturation on the shear strength of interface between cement grout and sand are experimentally investigated by means of direct shear test. Meanwhile the water retention curve was determined and interface microstructure was observed. Experimental results show that the shear strength of interface changes non-monotonously with degree of saturation when the interface was prepared, due to the non-monotonousness of the cohesiveness between soil particles. The less the cohesiveness between sand particles, the more grout was observed been penetrated into the voids, and thus the larger the interface shear stress.

  9. Parameters Optimization of Curtain Grouting Reinforcement Cycle in Yonglian Tunnel and Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For practical purposes, the curtain grouting method is an effective method to treat geological disasters and can be used to improve the strength and permeability resistance of surrounding rock. Selection of the optimal parameters of grouting reinforcement cycle especially reinforcement cycle thickness is one of the most interesting areas of research in curtain grouting designs. Based on the fluid-structure interaction theory and orthogonal analysis method, the influence of reinforcement cycle thickness, elastic modulus, and permeability on water inflow of tunnel after grouting and stability of surrounding rock was analyzed. As to the water inflow of tunnel after grouting used as performance evaluation index of grouting reinforcement cycle, it can be concluded that the permeability was the most important factor followed by reinforcement cycle thickness and elastic modulus. Furthermore, pore water pressure field, stress field, and plastic zone of surrounding rock were calculated by using COMSOL software under different conditions of reinforcement cycle thickness. It also can be concluded that the optimal thickness of reinforcement cycle and permeability can be adopted as 8 m and 1/100 of the surrounding rock permeability in the curtain grouting reinforcement cycle. The engineering case provides a reference for similar engineering.

  10. Corrosion of aluminium metal in OPC- and CAC-based cement matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Hajime, E-mail: h.kinoshita@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Swift, Paul; Utton, Claire [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Carro-Mateo, Beatriz [The Public University of Navarra, C/Esquíroz, 30 trasera, Pamplona 31007 (Spain); Marchand, Geraldine [The National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA) Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Collier, Nick [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Milestone, Neil [Industrial Research Ltd., 69 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt, 5040 (New Zealand)

    2013-08-15

    Corrosion of aluminium metal in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based pastes produces hydrogen gas and expansive reaction products causing problems for the encapsulation of aluminium containing nuclear wastes. Although corrosion of aluminium in cements has been long known, the extent of aluminium corrosion in the cement matrices and effects of such reaction on the cement phases are not well established. The present study investigates the corrosion reaction of aluminium in OPC, OPC-blast furnace slag (BFS) and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) based systems. The total amount of aluminium able to corrode in an OPC and 4:1 BFS:OPC system was determined, and the correlation between the amount of calcium hydroxide in the system and the reaction of aluminium obtained. It was also shown that a CAC-based system could offer a potential matrix to incorporate aluminium metal with a further reduction of pH by introduction of phosphate, producing a calcium phosphate cement.

  11. Clamp and grout systems for structural repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalani, M.

    1984-10-01

    Steel offshore platforms in the North Sea and elsewhere have required repair or strengthening, opening up a new and important aspect of offshore engineering. A clamp and grout system for structured repair is described. Over 150 clamped and grouted repair systems are now in service in the North Sea and elsewhere.

  12. Sisal organosolv pulp as reinforcement for cement based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Joaquim

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes non-conventional sisal (Agave sisalana chemical (organosolv pulp from residues of cordage as reinforcement to cement based materials. Sisal organosolv pulp was produced in a 1:1 ethanol/water mixture and post chemically and physically characterized in order to compare its properties with sisal kraft pulp. Cement based composites reinforced with organosolv or kraft pulps and combined with polypropylene (PP fibres were produced by the slurry de-watering and pressing method as a crude simulation of the Hatschek process. Composites were evaluated at 28 days of age, after exposition to accelerated carbonation and after 100 soak/dry cycles. Composites containing organosolv pulp presented lower mechanical strength, water absorption and apparent porosity than composites reinforced with kraft pulp. The best mechanical performance after ageing was also achieved by samples reinforced with kraft pulp. The addition of PP fibres favoured the maintenance of toughness after ageing. Accelerated carbonation promoted the densification of the composites reinforced with sisal organosolv + PP fibres.

  13. Guidelines for sampling, assessing, and restoring defective grout in prestressed concrete bridge post-tensioning ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    A significant proportion of the U.S. bridge inventory is based on bonded post-tensioned (PT) concrete construction. An : important aspect of maintaining corrosion protection of these PT systems is assuring that tendon ducts are properly grouted : wit...

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a new vertebroplasty cement based on gold-containing PMMA microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Eva; Saralidze, Ketie; Roth, Alex K; de Jong, Joost J A; van den Bergh, Joop P W; Lataster, Arno; Brans, Boudewijn T; Knetsch, Menno L W; Djordjevic, Ivan; Willems, Paul C; Koole, Leo H

    2016-03-01

    There are a number of drawbacks to incorporating large concentrations of barium sulfate (BaSO4) as the radiopacifier in PMMA-based bone cements for percutaneous vertebroplasty. These include adverse effects on injectability, viscosity profile, setting time, mechanical properties of the cement and bone resorption. We have synthesized a novel cement that is designed to address some of these drawbacks. Its powder includes PMMA microspheres in which gold particles are embedded and its monomer is the same as that used in commercial cements for vertebroplasty. In comparison to one such commercial cement brand, VertaPlex™, the new cement has longer doughing time, longer injection time, higher compressive strength, higher compressive modulus, and is superior in terms of cytotoxicity. For augmentation of fractured fresh-frozen cadaveric vertebral bodies (T6-L5) using simulated vertebroplasty, results for compressive strength and compressive stiffness of the construct and the percentage of the volume of the vertebral body filled by the cement were comparable for the two cements although the radiopacity of the new cement was significantly lower than that for VertaPlex™. The present results indicate that the new cement warrants further study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimising the Performance of Cement-Based Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Byrne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a battery using different cement-based electrolytes to provide a low but potentially sustainable source of electricity is described. The current, voltage, and lifespan of batteries produced using different electrolyte additives, copper plate cathodes, and (usually aluminium plate anodes were compared to identify the optimum design, components, and proportions to increase power output and longevity. Parameters examined include water/cement ratio, anode to cathode surface area ratio, electrode material, electrode spacing, and the effect of sand, aggregate, salts, carbon black, silica fume, and sodium silicate on the electrolyte. The results indicate that the greatest and longest lasting power can be achieved using high proportions of water, carbon black, plasticiser, salts, and silica fume in the electrolyte and using a magnesium anode and copper cathode. This cell produced an open-circuit voltage of 1.55 V, a resistor-loaded peak current over 4 mA, maintaining over 1 mA for 4 days, and a quasi steady current of 0.59 mA with a lifespan of over 21 days.

  16. Effects of Ground Conditions on Microbial Cementation in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehyeon Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of ground conditions on microbial cementation in cohesionless soils. Since the method of microbial cementation is still at the experimental stage, for its practical use in the field, a number of laboratory experiments are required for the quantification of microbial cementation under various ground conditions, such as relative densities, relative compactions and particle size distributions. In this study, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of microbial cementation in treated sands and silts, an experiment was performed for different relative densities of silica sands, for different relative compactions of silts and for different particle size distributions of weathered soils sampled from the field. Scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy and mapping analyses were implemented for the quantification of the levels of microbial cementations for sand, silt and weathered soil specimens. Based on the test results, a considerable microbial cementation was estimated depending on the soil conditions; therefore, an implementation of this new type of bio-grouting on a weak foundation may be possible to increase the strength and stiffness of weak ground.

  17. Grout for Closure of the Demonstration Vault at the US DOE Hanford Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Calcined Natural Pozzolan for Use as a Mineral Admixture in Portland Cement Concrete." k. Designation C 939-87. "Standard Test Method for Flow of Grout...ettringite or CACH11 were identified. Calcite and dolomite probably from Lhe palygorskite, were present in the wasteform material. The cold-cap...C2S) - minor Dolomite - minor (C) Material on Contact - Waste Side (D) Interface - Waste Side Quartz Calcite Albite Quartz Calcite Aragonite Hematite

  18. Compensation Grouting in Sand : Experiments, Field Experiences and Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezuijen, A.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis reports on experimental research on compensation grouting in sand. It is investigated in model tests, how the shape of the grout bodies made during injection depends on the grout properties, the density of the sand and the way the tubes are installed. The shape of the grout body affects

  19. Strengthening of Concrete Structures with cement based bonded composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Due to demands on higher loads, degradation, re-construction etc. there is a constant need for repair or strengthening of existing concrete structures. Many varying methods exist to strengthen concrete structures, one such commonly used technique utilizes surface epoxy bonded FRPs (Fibre Reinforced...... with improved working environment and better compatibility to the base concrete structure. This study gives an overview of different cement based systems, all with very promising results for structural upgrading. Studied parameters are structural retrofit for bending, shear and confinement. It is concluded...... that the use of carbon FRPs provides the highest strengthening effect and that the fibres should be imbedded into a matrix for enhanced utilisation of inherent strain capacity...

  20. Mineralization dynamics of metakaolin-based alkali-activated cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaudan, Juan Pablo; Campbell, Kate M.; Kane, Tyler; Shoemaker, Richard K.; Srubar, Wil V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the early-age dynamics of mineral formation in metakaolin-based alkali-activated cements. The effects of silica availability and alkali content on mineral formation were investigated via X-ray diffraction and solid-state 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 2, 7, 14, and 28 days. Silica availability was controlled by using either liquid- (immediate) or solid-based (gradual) sodium silicate supplements. Mineral (zeolitic) and amorphous microstructural characteristics were correlated with observed changes in bulk physical properties, namely shrinkage, density, and porosity. Results demonstrate that, while alkali content controls the mineralization in immediately available silica systems, alkali content controls the silica availability in gradually available silica systems. Immediate silica availability generally leads to a more favorable mineral formation as demonstrated by correlated improvements in bulk physical properties.

  1. Thermal Properties of Cement-Based Composites for Geothermal Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaohua; Memon, Shazim Ali; Yang, Haibin; Dong, Zhijun; Cui, Hongzhi

    2017-04-27

    Geothermal energy piles are a quite recent renewable energy technique where geothermal energy in the foundation of a building is used to transport and store geothermal energy. In this paper, a structural-functional integrated cement-based composite, which can be used for energy piles, was developed using expanded graphite and graphite nanoplatelet-based composite phase change materials (CPCMs). Its mechanical properties, thermal-regulatory performance, and heat of hydration were evaluated. Test results showed that the compressive strength of GNP-Paraffin cement-based composites at 28 days was more than 25 MPa. The flexural strength and density of thermal energy storage cement paste composite decreased with increases in the percentage of CPCM in the cement paste. The infrared thermal image analysis results showed superior thermal control capability of cement based materials with CPCMs. Hence, the carbon-based CPCMs are promising thermal energy storage materials and can be used to improve the durability of energy piles.

  2. GROUT TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN 105-R DISASSEMBLY BASIN D AND E CANAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogle, R.; Collins, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2010-06-03

    The 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin Grout Placement Strategy Report (SRNL-TR-2009-00157) identifies various portions of the facility that will undergo an in-situ decommissioning process. The estimated residual radioactive contamination in the 105-R facility is shown in Figure 1. Cementitious grout formulations developed by SRNL are being used to immobilize and isolate the radioactive contamination in existing below grade portions of the 105-R building as shown by the gray-hatched area in Figure 2. A Zero Bleed flowable fill was formulated for both dry placement and for underwater placement. The first major area in the 105-R Disassembly Basin to undergo the grouting process was the D&E Canal and an underlying void space known as the Chase. Grout temperature data was needed to ensure that the grout mix design was on the correct grout curing trajectory to meet the material compressive strength requirement of 50 pounds per square inch. Initial grout temperature measurements were needed to confirm and optimize grout mix design fresh property characteristics; i.e. material strength, and set time. Grout curing temperature is an integrating fresh property characteristic that is used to estimate cementitious material strength in accordance with the Standard Practice for Estimating Concrete Strength by the Maturity Method, ASTM C 1074. The Maturity Method is used in the construction industry to estimate in-place strength of concrete to allow the start of critical construction activities; e.g. formwork removal, removal of cold weather protection, opening of roadways to traffic, etc. Applying this methodology provides an expeditious means to estimate in-place grout strength based on compressive strength laboratory results. The Maturity Method results define the relationship between strength-time and age-time that may be utilized in the field for estimating strength after a given time of placement. Maturation curves were developed under the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin

  3. The grouting handbook a step-by-step guide for foundation design and machinery installation

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Donald M

    2013-01-01

    Minimize loss of revenue and the downtime of critical assets by avoiding foundation cracking, poor bonds, and initial alignment changes. After their successful introduction as a maintenance material, machinery grouts are now being used for equipment placement in new construction. While certainly suitable for both markets and applications, a successful installation depends on proper grout selection, application, foundation preparation, and forming methods. Therefore, guidelines on their uses and limitations are needed for engineers and maintenance personnel. Based on 45 years of field experi

  4. Innovative grout/retrieval demonstration final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, G.G.; Thompson, D.N.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of an innovative retrieval technique for buried transuranic waste. Application of this retrieval technique was originally designed for full pit retrieval; however, it applies equally to a hot spot retrieval technology. The technique involves grouting the buried soil waste matrix with a jet grouting procedure, applying an expansive demolition grout to the matrix, and retrieving the debris. The grouted matrix provides an agglomeration of fine soil particles and contaminants resulting in an inherent contamination control during the dusty retrieval process. A full-scale field demonstration of this retrieval technique was performed on a simulated waste pit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Details are reported on all phases of this proof-of-concept demonstration including pit construction, jet grouting activities, application of the demolition grout, and actual retrieval of the grouted pit. A quantitative evaluation of aerosolized soils and rare earth tracer spread is given for all phases of the demonstration, and these results are compared to a baseline retrieval activity using conventional retrieval means. 8 refs., 47 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Effects of surface drilling grouting on deformation properties of thin rock stratum above goaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongxiao, Xu

    2017-12-01

    Strata movement of coal mining for surface drilling grouting of overlying loose layers is distinctly different from that of traditional caving mining. In order to calculate strata movement accurately after full-size grouting, based on the shear transfer mechanism along foundation horizontal, a mechanical model of strata movement was established using the theory of Pasternak double-parameter beam on elastic foundation, and the deflection differential equations of rock beam were derived. Then the influence mechanisms of varied grouting parameters were discussed and the results showed that, the maximum deformation change value of roof increase non-obviously with the increasing of elastic modulus ratio, while decrease non-linearly with the grouting thickness. Thus can provide theoretical reference for strata displacement control in the same or similar projects.

  6. Life Cycle Assessment on Cement Treated Recycling Base (CTRB Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarno Sudarno

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available LCA is one of the few environmental management techniques that are used to perform a risk assessment, environmental performance evaluation, environmental auditing, and environmental impact assessment and must be applied to the construction CTRB. The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of energy consumption is used and determine the amount of emissions (CO2 in the implementation of the Foundation Layer Top (base course with the former asphalt pavement aggregate blended cement / Recycling Cement Treated Base (CTRB. This study uses: (i Compilation and data inventory of relevant inputs and outputs of a product system; (ii Evaluating the potential environmental impacts associated with the data input and output; (iii Interpret the results of the inventory analysis and impact assessment in relation to the research objectives. The results showed that Energy consumption in the implementation of recycling pavement (CTRB is 225.46 MJ / km of roads and the resulting GHG emissions 17,43Ton CO2 / km of roads. Previous researchers to calculate the energy consumption of road works on the implementation of conventional (hotmix is 383.46 MJ / km of roads and the resulting GHG emissions 28.24 Ton CO2 / km of roads. If the calculated difference between a job and Hotmix CTRB and then a comparison is made CTRB energy consumption is 158 MJ / km of road, this happens 70.07% savings and GHG emissions resulting difference is 10.81 tons of CO2 / km of road, resulting in a decrease in 62,02%.

  7. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Standard Cement Materials, Epoxy Coating 4553

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Standard Cement Materials, Inc. Standard Epoxy Coating 4553™ (SEC 4553) epoxy coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Ma...

  8. CAD-based intelligent robot system integrated with 3D scanning for shoe roughing and cementing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng-Chang Chiu; Wen-Teng Wang; Wan-Shan Yin

    2017-01-01

    ...-in program, integrated with real-time 3D scanning information to compensate the planned route, and then converted to working trajectory of robot arm to implement roughing and cementing. The proposed 3D CAD-based intelligent robot arm system integrated with 3D scanning for shoe roughing and cementing is realized and proved to be feasible.

  9. Alkali ash material: a novel fly ash-based cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossein Rostami; William Brendley [Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2003-08-01

    The United States generates 110 million t of coal ash annually. Approximately 70 million t of this coal ash is fly ash, of which 27% is recycled and the remaining 73% is landfilled. Disposal of such a huge quantity of ash poses a significant environmental problem. A new cementitious material has been developed, called alkali ash material (AAM), which is used to produce concrete for construction. AAM can be used to create a variety of concrete strengths and could revolutionize the concrete product manufacturing industry due to its economic advantage. AAM contains 40-95% Class F fly ash and is used as cement to bind sand, stone, and fibers creating concrete. AAM concrete has been tested for strength, durability, mechanical properties, and, most importantly, economic viability. AAM concrete is economically and technically viable for many construction applications. Some properties include rapid strength gain (90% of ultimate in 1 d), high ultimate strengths (110 MPa or 16 000 psi in 1 d), excellent acid resistance, and freeze-thaw durability. AAM's resistance to chemical attack, such as sulfuric (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), nitric (HNO{sub 3}), hydrochloric (HCl), and organic acids, is far better than portland cement concrete. AAM is resistant to freeze-thaw attack based on ASTM C-666 specifications. Potential immediate applications of AAM are blocks, pipe, median barriers, sound barriers, and overlaying materials. Eventual markets are high strength construction products, bridge beams, prestressed members, concrete tanks, highway appurtenances, and other concrete products. 28 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Traditional Portland cement and MgO-based cement: a promising combination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Monica; Martini, Francesca; Calucci, Lucia; Geppi, Marco; Borsacchi, Silvia; Ridi, Francesca

    2017-06-01

    MgO/SiO2 cements are materials potentially very useful for radioactive waste disposal, but knowledge about their physico-chemical properties is still lacking. In this paper we investigated the hydration kinetics of cementitious formulations prepared by mixing MgO/SiO2 and Portland cement in different proportions and the structural properties of the hydrated phases formed in the first month of hydration. In particular, the hydration kinetics was investigated by measuring the free water index on pastes by means of differential scanning calorimetry, while the structural characterization was carried out by combining thermal (DTA), diffractometric (XRD), and spectroscopic (FTIR, 29Si solid state NMR) techniques. It was found that calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) and magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gels mainly form as separate phases, their relative amount and structural characteristics depending on the composition of the hydrated mixture. Moreover, the composition of the mixtures strongly affects the kinetics of hydration and the pH of the aqueous phase in contact with the cementitious materials. The results here reported show that suitable mixtures of Portland cement and MgO/SiO2 could be used to modify the properties of hydrated phases with potential application in the storage of nuclear waste in clayey disposal.

  11. Systemic effect of mineral aggregate-based cements: histopathological analysis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas da Fonseca Roberti Garcia

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Several studies reported the local tissue reaction caused by mineral aggregate-based cements. However, few studies have investigated the systemic effects promoted by these cements on liver and kidney when directly applied to connective tissue. The purpose of this in vivo study was to investigate the systemic effect of mineral aggregate-based cements on the livers and kidneys of rats. Material and Methods: Samples of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA and a calcium aluminate-based cement (EndoBinder containing different radiopacifiers were implanted into the dorsum of 40 rats. After 7 and 30 d, samples of subcutaneous, liver and kidney tissues were submitted to histopathological analysis. A score (0-3 was used to grade the inflammatory reaction. Blood samples were collected to evaluate changes in hepatic and renal functions of animals. Results: The moderate inflammatory reaction (2 observed for 7 d in the subcutaneous tissue decreased with time for all cements. The thickness of inflammatory capsules also presented a significant decrease with time (P<.05. Systemically, all cements caused adverse inflammatory reactions in the liver and kidney, being more evident for MTA, persisting until the end of the analysis. Liver functions increased significantly for MTA during 30 d (P<.05. Conclusion: The different cements induced to a locally limited inflammatory reaction. However, from the systemic point of view, the cements promoted significant inflammatory reactions in the liver and kidney. For MTA, the reactions were more accentuated.

  12. Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

    1995-12-01

    A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

  13. Research on stress distribution regularity of cement sheaths of radial well based on ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jihui, Shi; Yuanfang, Cheng; Xiaolong, Li; Wen, Xiao; Menglai, Li

    2017-12-01

    To ensure desirable outcome of hydraulic fracturing based on ultra-short radius radial systems, it is required to investigate the stress distribution regularity and stability of the cement sheath. On the basis of the theoretical model of the cement sheath stress distribution, a reservoir mechanical model was built using the finite element software, ABAQUS, according to the physical property of a certain oil reservoir of the Shengli oilfield. The stress distribution of the casing-cement-sheath-formation system under the practical condition was simulated, based on which analyses were conducted from multiple points of view. Results show that the stress on the internal interface of the cement sheath exceeds that on the external interface, and fluctuates with higher amplitudes, which means that the internal interface is the most failure-prone. The unevenness of the cement sheath stress distribution grows with the increasing horizontal principal stress ratio, and so does the variation magnitude. This indicates that higher horizontal principal stress ratios are unfavourable for the structural stability of the cement sheath. Both the wellbore quantity of the URRS and the physical property of the material can affect the cement sheath distribution. It is suggested to optimize the quantity of the radial wellbore and use cement with a lower elastic modulus and higher Poisson’s ratio. At last, the impact level of the above factor was analysed, with the help of the grey correlation analysis.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of an Injectable and Hydrophilous Expandable Bone Cement Based on Poly(methyl methacrylate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao; Chen, Lei; Hao, Yuxin; Zang, Yuan; Zhao, Xiong; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Yang; Feng, Yafei; Xu, Chao; Wang, Faqi; Wang, Xinli; Wang, Bowen; Liu, Chenxin; Tang, Yufei; Wu, Zixiang; Lei, Wei

    2017-11-22

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), the most common bone cement, has been used as a graft substitute in orthopedic surgeries such as vertebroplasty. However, an undesirable minor crack in the bone-cement interface provoked by shrinkage during polymerization and high elastic modulus of conventional PMMA bone cement dramatically increases the risk of vertebral body refracture postsurgery. Thus, herein, a hydrophilous expandable bone cement was synthesized based on a PMMA commercial cement (Mendec Spine Resin), acrylic acid (AA), and styrene (St). The two synthesized cements (PMMA-PAA, PMMA-PAA-PSt) showed excellent volumetric swelling in vitro and cohesive bone-cement contact in rabbit femur cavity defect. The elastic modulus and compressive strength of the new cements were lower than PMMA. Furthermore, the in vitro analysis indicated that the new cements had lower cytotoxicity than PMMA, including superior proliferation and lower apoptotic rates of Sprague-Dawly rat-derived osteoblasts. Western blotting for protein expression and RT-PCR analysis of osteogenesis-specific genes were conducted on SD rat-derived osteoblasts from both PMMA and new cements films; the results showed that new cements enhanced the expression of osteogenesis-specific genes. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated improved morphology and attachment of osteoblast on new cement discs compared to the PMMA discs. Additionally, the histological morphologies of the bone-cement interface from the rabbit medial femoral condyle cavity defect model revealed direct and cohesive contact with the bone in the new cement groups in contrast to a minor crack in the PMMA cement group. The sign of a new bone growing into the cement has been found in the new cements after 12 weeks, thereby indicating the osteogenic capacity in vivo. In conclusion, the synthesized hydrophilous expandable bone cements based on PMMA and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) are promising candidates for vertebroplasty.

  15. Durability of geothermal grouting materials considering extreme loads

    OpenAIRE

    Indacoechea Vega, Irune; Pascual Muñoz, Pablo; Castro Fresno, Daniel; Zamora-Barraza, D

    2018-01-01

    The concern about the massive use of the non-renewable and very limited fossil fuels together with the well-known effects of the global warming makes it more necessary the efficient use of the current forms of renewable energy generation. Because of the crucial role played by the grouting materials in the Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHP), a proper selection of these elements should be made based on a deep knowledge of their performance. In this paper, thermal conductivity, mechanical strength ...

  16. Numerical Simulations of Settlement of Jet Grouting Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juzwa Anna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the comparison of results of numerical analyses of interaction between group of jet grouting columns and subsoil. The analyses were conducted for single column and groups of three, seven and nine columns. The simulations are based on experimental research in real scale which were carried out by authors. The final goal for the research is an estimation of an influence of interaction between columns working in a group.

  17. Strength of Mock-up Trial Grout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report describes tests carried out on samples taken and cast during the execution of a mock-up trial placement of the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500 on January 21, 2009.......The present report describes tests carried out on samples taken and cast during the execution of a mock-up trial placement of the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500 on January 21, 2009....

  18. How an ROV-placed grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandford, A.J.

    1986-06-01

    A remotely installed grout bag system, developed jointly by Stolt-Nielsen Seaway Technology Ltd., SeaMark Ltd. and Colos Colcrete Ltd., was used to correct and support a free span on Total Oil Marine's Frigg-St. Fergus pipe line system. The author gives details on how the system works and cost advantages over diver-placed grout bag supports.

  19. CAD-based intelligent robot system integrated with 3D scanning for shoe roughing and cementing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Cheng-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Roughing and cementing are very essential to the process of bonding shoe uppers and the corresponding soles; however, for shoes with complicated design, such as sport shoes, roughing and cementing greatly relied on manual operation. Recently, shoe industry is progressing to 3D design, thus 3D model of the shoe upper and sole will be created before launching into mass production. Taking advantage of the 3D model, this study developed a plug-in program on Rhino 3D CAD platform, which realized the complicated roughing and cementing route planning to be performed by the plug-in program, integrated with real-time 3D scanning information to compensate the planned route, and then converted to working trajectory of robot arm to implement roughing and cementing. The proposed 3D CAD-based intelligent robot arm system integrated with 3D scanning for shoe roughing and cementing is realized and proved to be feasible.

  20. Guide to cement-based integrated pavement solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This guide provides a clear, concise, and cohesive presentation of cement-bound materials options for 10 : specific engineering pavement applications: new concrete pavements, concrete overlays, pervious concrete, : precast pavements, roller-compacted...

  1. Properties of cement based composites modified using diatomaceous earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Záleská, Martina; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    Diatomite belongs among natural materials rich on amorphous silica (a-SiO2). When finely milled, it can potentially substitute part of cement binder and positively support formation of more dense composite structure. In this connection, two types of diatomaceous earth applied as a partial substitution of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mass% of Portland cement in the composition of cement paste were studied. In the tested mixtures with cement blends, the amount of batch water remained same, with water/binder ratio 0.5. For fresh paste mixtures, initial and final setting times were measured. First, hardened pastes cured 28 days in water were characterized by their physical properties such as bulk density, matrix density and open porosity. Then, their mechanical and thermophysical parameters were assessed. Obtained results gave clear evidence of setting time shortening for pastes with diatomite what brought negative effect with respect to the impaired workability of fresh mixtures. On the other hand, there was observed strength improvement for mixtures containing diatomite with higher amount of SiO2. Here, the increase in mechanical resistivity was distinct up to 15 mass% of cement replacement. Higher cement substitution by diatomite resulted in an increase in porosity and thus improvement of thermal insulation properties.

  2. Microleakage of Glass Ionomer-based Provisional Cement in CAD/CAM-Fabricated Interim Crowns: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ra'fat I; Al-Harethi, Naji

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the marginal microleakage of glass ionomer-based provisional cement with resin-based provisional cement and zinc oxide non-eugenol (ZONE) provisional cement in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-fabricated interim restorations. Fifteen intact human premolars were prepared in a standardized manner for complete coverage of crown restorations. Interim crowns for the prepared teeth were then fabricated using CAD/CAM, and the specimens were randomized into three groups of provisional cementing agents (n = 5 each): Glass ionomer-based provisional cement (GC Fuji TEMP LT™), bisphenol-A-glycidyldimethacrylate (Bis-GMA)/ triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin-based cement (UltraTemp® REZ), and ZONE cement (TempBond NE). After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were thermocycled and then stored again for 24 hours in distilled water at room temperature. Next, the specimens were placed in freshly prepared 2% aqueous methylene blue dye for 24 hours and then embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks and sectioned in buccolingual and mesiodistal directions to assess dye penetration using a stereomicroscope. The results were statistically analyzed using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Dunn's post hoc test with a Bonferroni correction test was used to compute multiple pairwise comparisons that identified differences among groups; the level of significance was set at p glass ionomer-based provisional cement and the ZONE cement. The provisional cementing agents exhibited different sealing abilities. The Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin-based provisional cement exhibited the most effective favorable sealing properties against dye penetration compared with the glass ionomer-based provisional cement and conventional ZONE cement. Newly introduced glass ionomer-based provisional cement proved to be inferior to resin-based provisional cement as far as marginal microleakage

  3. Preparation and in vivo evaluation of a silicate-based composite bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bing; Huan, Zhiguang; Xu, Chen; Ma, Nan; Zhu, Haibo; Zhong, Jipin; Chang, Jiang

    2017-08-01

    Silicate-based cements have been developed as a class of bioactive and biodegradable bone cements owing to their good in vitro bioactivity and ability to dissolve in a simulated body fluid. Until recently, however, the in vivo evidence of their ability to support bone regeneration is still scarce. In the present study, a pilot in vivo evaluation of a silicate-based composite bone cement (CSC) was carried out in a rabbit femur defect model. The cement was composed of tricalcium silicate, 45S5 bioglass and calcium sulfate, and the self-setting properties of the material were established. The in vivo bone integration and biodegradability of CSC were investigated and compared with those of bioactive glass particulates, and a calcium phosphate cement. The results showed that CSC underwent a relatively slower in vivo degradation as compared with bioactive glass and calcium phosphate cement. Histological observation demonstrated that bone contact area at the interface between the surrounding bone and CSC gradually increased with time proceeding. CSC kept its structural integrity during implantation in vivo because of its acceptable mechanical strength. These results provide evidence of effectiveness in vivo and suggest potential clinical applications of the silicate-based composite bone cements.

  4. MACHINING OF NICKEL BASED ALLOYS USING DIFFERENT CEMENTED CARBIDE TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BASIM A. KHIDHIR

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of experimental work in dry turning of nickel based alloys (Haynes – 276 using Deferent tool geometer of cemented carbide tools. The turning tests were conducted at three different cutting speeds (112, 152, 201and 269 m/min while feed rate and depth of cut were kept constant at 0.2 mm/rev and 1.5 mm, respectively. The tool holders used were SCLCR with insert CCMT-12 and CCLNR – M12-4 with insert CNGN-12. The influence of cutting speed, tool inserts type and workpiece material was investigated on the machined surface roughness. The worn parts of the cutting tools were also examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results showed that cutting speed significantly affected the machined surface finish values in related with the tool insert geometry. Insert type CCMT-12 showed better surface finish for cutting speed to 201 m/min, while insert type CNGN-12 surface roughness increased dramatically with increasing of speed to a limit completely damage of insert geometer beyond 152 m/min.

  5. Low heat cement; Teihatsunetsu cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, K.; Igarashi, H. [Ube Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    This paper summarizes the result of studies on low heat (low hydration heat) cement intended to prevent cracking. Good compositional proportions of alite and belite as components of Portland cement are belite at 63% and alite at 37% when hydration heat, strength, and concrete durability are taken into account. Mixing the blast furnace slag into cement fills the voids at low hydration heat, and raises the strength without increasing the hydration heat. However, the voids remain in a long-term material age. The strength of the belite-based cement is improved when the higher the temperature within a range from 20 to 60{degree}C. In the case of a mixed cement of belite-based cement and blast furnace slag, using the blast furnace slag at 60% maintains the strength and reduces the hydration heat. The strength decreases at a curing temperature of 60{degree}C or higher. Hardened mortar with a material age of three days has its voids disappear at 40{degree}C. More void disappearance cannot be recognized even if the material age gets older. Hydration heat decreases largely in the belite-based cement and flyash mixed cement. The strength also decreases, but it increases conversely when the material age gets as old as one year. Flyash causes the temperature to rise more moderately than blast furnace slag. 21 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Dry mixtures based on aluminate cements for self-leveling floors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaddo Maria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the results of the structure, shrinkage and physical and mechanical properties of concrete obtained from dry mixes on the base of aluminate cements for self-leveling floors are presented. Principle possibility of obtaining unshrinkable concretes with the formation of ettringite using aluminate cement, gypsum and modern superplasticizers. Studies of free shrinkage of mixed binder showed that binder can be attribute to binders with compensated shrinkage. Cracking resistance of the composition is provided by the fact that the vast expansion in the initial stage of curing and shrinkage of the final stage is in 5…10 times lower than these values for gypsum and portland cement.

  7. Lignin-based cement fluid loss control additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, P.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a hydraulic cement slurry composition. It comprises: a hydraulic cement, and the following expressed as parts by weight per 100 parts of the hydraulic cement, water from about 25 to 105 parts, and from abut 0.5 to 2.5 parts of a compound selected from the group consisting of a sulfonated lignin and a sulfomethylated lignin, wherein the lignin has been sequentially crosslinked by reacting the lignin with a member of the group consisting of formaldehyde and epichlorohydrin and alkoxylated with between about 2 to about 6 moles of a compound selected from the group consisting of ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, butylene oxide and a combination thereof per 1000 g of the lignin.

  8. Damping Property of a Cement-Based Material Containing Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wen Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the damping property of a cement-based material with carbon nanotube (CNT. In the study, the cement composites with different contents of CNT (0 wt%, 0.033 wt%, 0.066 wt%, and 0.1 wt% were investigated. Logarithmic Decrement method and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA method were utilized to study the damping property of CNT/cement composite. The influences of CNT on pore size distribution and microstructure of composite were analyzed by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, respectively. The experimental results showed that CNT/cement composite presented higher flexural strength index than that of a pure cement paste. Additional CNT could improve the vibration-reduction capacity of cement paste. Furthermore, the experiments proved that CNT could bridge adjacent hydration products and support load transfer within cement matrix, which contributed to the energy dissipation during the loading process.

  9. Laboratory Testing of Silica Sol Grout in Coal Measure Mudstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dongjiang; Zhang, Nong; Xie, Zhengzheng; Feng, Xiaowei; Kong, Yong

    2016-11-22

    The effectiveness of silica sol grout on mudstones is reported in this paper. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD), the study investigates how the silica sol grout modifies mudstone mineralogy. Micropore sizes and mechanical properties of the mudstone before and after grouting with four different materials were determined with a surface area/porosity analyser and by uniaxial compression. Tests show that, after grouting, up to 50% of the mesopore volumes can be filled with grout, the dominant pore diameter decreases from 100 nm to 10 nm, and the sealing capacity is increased. Uniaxial compression tests of silica sol grouted samples shows that their elastic modulus is 21%-38% and their uniaxial compressive strength is 16%-54% of the non-grouted samples. Peak strain, however, is greater by 150%-270%. After grouting, the sample failure mode changes from brittle to ductile. This paper provides an experimental test of anti-seepage and strengthening properties of silica sol.

  10. Mechanical Properties of High Cementitious Grout (I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

     The present report describes tests carried out on the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500, marked WMG 7145 FP, developed by BASF Construction Materials and designed for use in grouted connections of offshore windmill foundations....

  11. THE USE OF SISAL FIBRE AS REINFORCEMENT IN CEMENT BASED COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romildo Dias Tolêdo Filho

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The inclusion of fibre reinforcement in concrete, mortar and cement paste can enhance many of the engineering properties of the basic materials, such as fracture toughness, flexural strength and resistance to fatigue, impact, thermal shock and spalling. In recent years, a great deal of interest has been created worldwide on the potential applications of natural fibre reinforced, cement based composites. Investigations have been carried out in many countries on various mechanical properties, physical performance and durability of cement based matrices reinforced with naturally occurring fibres including sisal, coconut, jute, bamboo and wood fibres. These fibres have always been considered promising as reinforcement of cement based matrices because of their availability, low cost and low consumption of energy. In this review, the general properties of the composites are described in relation to fibre content, length, strength and stiffness. A chronological development of sisal fibre reinforced, cement based matrices is reported and experimental data are provided to illustrate the performance of sisal fibre reinforced cement composites. A brief description on the use of these composite materials as building products has been included. The influence of sisal fibres on the development of plastic shrinkage in the pre-hardened state, on tensile, compressive and bending strength in the hardened state of mortar mixes is discussed. Creep and drying shrinkage of the composites and the durability of natural fibres in cement based matrices are of particular interest and are also highlighted. The results show that the composites reinforced with sisal fibres are reliable materials to be used in practice for the production of structural elements to be used in rural and civil construction. This material could be a substitute asbestos-cement composite, which is a serious hazard to human and animal health and is prohibited in industrialized countries. The

  12. Retardation effect of different alcohols on the cement coagulation in polycarboxylate- and naphthalene-based cement admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. M.; Zhou, F. L.

    2017-12-01

    Alcohol has great potential to delay the coagulation of cement. The effects of alcohol on paste fluidity and normal consistency coagulation time have been studied for polycarboxylate superplasticizer and naphthene cement admixture. Seven alcohols were combined with polycarboxylate superplasticizer and naphthene at a concentration of 0.01-0.09%, respectively, including n-propanol, methanol, sorbitol, ethylene glycol, glycerol, ethanol, and mannitol. The fluidity and normal consistency coagulation time of each cement admixture were measured. The performance of both polycarboxylate superplasticizer and naphthene cement admixtures were compared to develop cement admixture with delayed coagulation.

  13. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cement particle-size distribution on autogenous strains and stresses in cement pastes of identical water-to-cement ratios is examined for cement powders of four different finenesses. Experimental measurements include chemical shrinkage, to quantify degree of hydration; internal...... controls the initial pore-size distribution of the cement paste, which, in turn, regulates the magnitude of the induced autogenous shrinkage stresses produced by the water/air menisci in the air-filled pores formed throughout the hydration process. The experimental results indicate that a small autogenous...

  14. Mechanical Properties of High Performance Cementitious Grout Masterflow 9200

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report describes tests carried out on the high performance grout Masterflow 9200, developed by BASF Construction Chemicals A/S and designed for use in grouted connections of windmill foundations.......The present report describes tests carried out on the high performance grout Masterflow 9200, developed by BASF Construction Chemicals A/S and designed for use in grouted connections of windmill foundations....

  15. In vitro biocompatibility of a novel Fe2O3 based glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell-Gillingham, K; Reaney, I M; Brook, I; Hatton, P V

    2006-09-01

    Since their invention in the late 1960s, glass ionomer cements (GICs) have been used extensively in dentistry but recently they have also been utilised in ear nose and throat (ENT) surgery. Unfortunately, Al3+, a component of conventional ionomer glasses, has been linked to poor bone mineralisation and neurotoxicity. The aim of the research was to modify a commercial ionomer glass composition by substituting Al2O3 with Fe2O3. Glasses with the following molar compositions were fabricated: 4.5SiO2*3M2O3*XP2O5*3CaO*2CaF2 (M = Al or Fe, X = 0-1.5). The glasses were characterised using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Cements were prepared using a standard ratio of; 1 g of glass powder: 0.2 g of dried polyacrylic acid: 0.3 g of 10% tartaric acid solution. Cement formation was assessed using a Gilmore needle and in vitro biocompatibility was investigated for novel cement formulations. XRF revealed that the Fe2O3-based glasses had Al2O3 contamination from the crucibles and also had undergone substantial F- losses. XRD gave peaks that corresponded to magnetite Fe3O4 (JCPDS # 19-629) in all compositions. Apatite Ca5(PO4)3(OH,F) (JCPDS # 15-876) was identified in P2O5 containing glasses. It was possible to fabricate cements from all of the Fe2O3-based ionomer glasses. Good in vitro biocompatibility was observed for the Fe2O3-based cements. Ionomer glasses may be prepared by entirely replacing Al2O3 with Fe2O3. Cement setting times appeared to be related to P2O5 content. Fe2O3-based cements showed good in vitro biocompatibility.

  16. Mechanical Properties of High Performance Cementitious Grout (II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report is an update of the report “Mechanical Properties of High Performance Cementitious Grout (I)” [1] and describes tests carried out on the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500, marked “WMG 7145 FP”, developed by BASF Construction Chemicals A/S and designed for use in grouted co...... connections of offshore windmill foundations....

  17. Finite Element Analysis of Grouting Compactness Monitoring in a Post-Tensioning Tendon Duct Using Piezoceramic Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyong Jiang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the post-tensioning technique, prestressed concrete structures have been widely used in civil engineering. To ensure the long-term effectiveness of the prestressed tendon, the grouting quality of the tendon duct is one of the important factors. However, it is still a challenge to monitor the grouting quality of post-tensioning tendon ducts, due to the invisibility of the grouting. The authors’ previous work proposed a real-time method that employed a stress wave-based active sensing approach with piezoceramic transducers to monitor the grouting compactness of a Post-Tensioning Tendon Duct (PTTD. To further understand the piezoceramic induced stress wave propagation in the PTTD with different grouting levels, this paper develops a two-dimensional finite element model for monitoring the grouting compactness of the tendon duct with a piezoceramic transducer. A smart aggregate (SA developed to utilize one Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT transducer with marble protection is installed in the center location of the tendon duct as an actuator. Two PZT patches are bonded on the bottom and top surface of the tendon duct as the sensors. The analysis results show that the finite element analysis results are in good agreement with the experimental results, which demonstrates that the finite element analysis is feasible and reliable. For the top half of the specimen, not much stress wave could be detected before the full grouting level, except for negligible signals that may propagate through the walls of the tendon duct. When the tendon duct grouting is at 100%, the stress wave propagates to the top of the specimen, and the displacements are symmetric in both left-right and top-bottom directions before the stress waves reach the boundary. The proposed two-dimensional finite element model has the potential to be implemented to simulate the stress wave propagation principle for monitoring grouting compaction of the post-tensioning tendon

  18. Finite Element Analysis of Grouting Compactness Monitoring in a Post-Tensioning Tendon Duct Using Piezoceramic Transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyong; Zheng, Junbo; Huo, Linsheng; Song, Gangbing

    2017-09-29

    With the development of the post-tensioning technique, prestressed concrete structures have been widely used in civil engineering. To ensure the long-term effectiveness of the prestressed tendon, the grouting quality of the tendon duct is one of the important factors. However, it is still a challenge to monitor the grouting quality of post-tensioning tendon ducts, due to the invisibility of the grouting. The authors' previous work proposed a real-time method that employed a stress wave-based active sensing approach with piezoceramic transducers to monitor the grouting compactness of a Post-Tensioning Tendon Duct (PTTD). To further understand the piezoceramic induced stress wave propagation in the PTTD with different grouting levels, this paper develops a two-dimensional finite element model for monitoring the grouting compactness of the tendon duct with a piezoceramic transducer. A smart aggregate (SA) developed to utilize one Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) transducer with marble protection is installed in the center location of the tendon duct as an actuator. Two PZT patches are bonded on the bottom and top surface of the tendon duct as the sensors. The analysis results show that the finite element analysis results are in good agreement with the experimental results, which demonstrates that the finite element analysis is feasible and reliable. For the top half of the specimen, not much stress wave could be detected before the full grouting level, except for negligible signals that may propagate through the walls of the tendon duct. When the tendon duct grouting is at 100%, the stress wave propagates to the top of the specimen, and the displacements are symmetric in both left-right and top-bottom directions before the stress waves reach the boundary. The proposed two-dimensional finite element model has the potential to be implemented to simulate the stress wave propagation principle for monitoring grouting compaction of the post-tensioning tendon duct.

  19. Development of novel tricalcium silicate-based endodontic cements with sintered radiopacifier phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuereb, M; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D; Camilleri, Josette

    2016-06-01

    All implants, bone and endodontic cements need to be sufficiently radiopaque to be able to be distinguished from neighbouring anatomical structures post-operatively. For this purpose, radiopacifying materials are added to the cements to render them sufficiently radiopaque. Bismuth oxide has been quite a popular choice of radiopacifier in endodontic materials. It has been shown to cause dental discoloration. The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the properties of tricalcium silicate cement with alternative radiopacifiers, which are either inter-ground or sintered to the tricalcium silicate cement. Custom-made endodontic cements based on tricalcium silicate and 20 % barium, calcium or strontium zirconate, which were either inter-ground or sintered at high temperatures, were produced. The set materials stored for 28 days in Hank's balanced salt solution were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Assessment of pH, leaching, interaction with physiological solution, radiopacity, setting time, compressive strength and material porosity were investigated. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) Angelus was used as control. Addition of radiopacifying materials improved the radiopacity of the material. The sintered cements exhibited the formation of calcium zirconate together with the respective radiopacifier phase. All materials produced calcium hydroxide on hydration, which interacted with tissue fluids forming hydroxyapatite on the material surface. The physical properties of the tricalcium silicate-based cements were comparable to MTA Angelus. A novel method of producing radiopaque tricalcium silicate-based cements was demonstrated. The novel materials exhibited properties, which were either comparable or else improved over the control. The novel materials can be used to replace MTA for root-end filling, perforation repair and other clinical applications where MTA is indicated.

  20. Investigation of Hardened Filling Grout Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

     Suzlon Wind Energy A/S requested on August 28, 2007 an investigation of 2 samples of a hardened filling grout to be carried out, comprising drilling and strength determination of 4 test cylinders, and description of the surface characteristics of the samples....... Suzlon Wind Energy A/S requested on August 28, 2007 an investigation of 2 samples of a hardened filling grout to be carried out, comprising drilling and strength determination of 4 test cylinders, and description of the surface characteristics of the samples....

  1. Effects of grouting, shotcreting and concrete leachates on backfill geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Miguel; Arcos, David; Duro, Lara [Enviros Consulting, Valldoreix, Barc elona (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    The use of concrete to seal open fractures (grouting) and to impermeabilise the deposition tunnels (shotcreting) has been envisaged in the construction of a high level nuclear waste (HLNW) repository according to SKB designs. Nevertheless, the geochemical effect of using concrete in the repository is not fully understood. Concrete degradation due to the interaction with groundwater can affect the performance of other repository barriers, such as the backfill material used for sealing the deposition tunnels. One of the main effects of concrete degradation is the generation of alkaline plumes. For this reason, SKB is currently planning to use a type of concrete whose degradation result in lower pH values than those developed with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). In order to assess the long-term geochemical effect of including low-pH concrete elements in a HLNW repository, we performed a 2D reactive-transport model of a backfilled deposition tunnel that intersects a hydraulic conductive fracture which has been partially grouted. An additional case has been modelled where part of the deposition tunnel walls were covered with a shotcrete layer. The modelling results predict the development of a high-alkalinity plume, larger in the case of considering a grouted fracture, accompanied by the precipitation of CSH-phases in the fracture. However, the effect on the backfill material is only significant if concrete is in contact with the backfill (shotcrete case). In order to conduct these models, and considering that at the beginning of the present work there was not a specific composition for such a low-pH concrete, its composition has been assumed in order to meet the expected geochemical evolution of concrete degradation according to SKB expectations. This is a pH of pore water of around 11 and the degradation of CSH phases resulting in a source for Ca and Si into the system. For this reason, jennite and tobermorite have been selected, although it is known that jennite is

  2. Characterization of cement-based materials using a reusable piezoelectric impedance-based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawie, R.; Lee, H. K.

    2011-08-01

    This paper proposes a reusable sensor, which employs a piezoceramic (PZT) plate as an active sensing transducer, for non-destructive monitoring of cement-based materials based on the electromechanical impedance (EMI) sensing technique. The advantage of the sensor design is that the PZT can be easily removed from the set-up and re-used for repetitive tests. The applicability of the sensor was demonstrated for monitoring of the setting of cement mortar. EMI measurements were performed using an impedance analyzer and the transformation of the specimen from the plastic to solid state was monitored by automatically measuring the changes in the PZT conductance spectra with respect to curing time using the root mean square deviation (RMSD) algorithm. In another experiment, drying-induced moisture loss of a hardened mortar specimen at saturated surface dry (SSD) condition was measured, and monitored using the reusable sensor to establish a correlation between the RMSD values and moisture loss rate. The reusable sensor was also demonstrated for detecting progressive damages imparted on a mortar specimen attached with the sensor under several loading levels before allowing it to load to failure. Overall, the reusable sensor is an effective and efficient monitoring device that could possibly be used for field application in characterization of cement-based materials.

  3. Piezoresistivity, mechanisms and model of cement-based materials with CNT/NCB composite fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liqing; Ding, Siqi; Dong, Sufen; Li, Zhen; Ouyang, Jian; Yu, Xun; Han, Baoguo

    2017-12-01

    The use of conductive cement-based materials as sensors has attracted intense interest over past decades. In this paper, carbon nanotube (CNT)/nano carbon black (NCB) composite fillers made by electrostatic self-assembly are used to fabricate conductive cement-based materials. Electrical and piezoresistive properties of the fabricated cement-based materials are investigated. Effect of filler content, load amplitudes and rate on piezoresistive property within elastic regime and piezoresistive behaviors during compressive loading to destruction are explored. Finally, a model describing piezoresistive property of cement-based materials with CNT/NCB composite fillers is established based on the effective conductive path and tunneling effect theory. The research results demonstrate that filler content and load amplitudes have obvious effect on piezoresistive property of the composites materials, while load rate has little influence on piezoresistive property. During compressive loading to destruction, the composites also show sensitive piezoresistive property. Therefore, the cement-based composites can be used to monitor the health state of structures during their whole life. The built model can well describe the piezoresistive property of the composites during compressive loading to destruction. The good match between the model and experiment data indicates that tunneling effect actually contributes to piezoresistive phenomenon.

  4. Durability Index Performance of High Strength Concretes Made Based on Different Standard Portland Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen O. Ekolu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A consortium of three durability index test methods consisting of oxygen permeability, sorptivity and chloride conductivity were used to evaluate the potential influence of four (4 common SANS 10197 cements on strength and durability of concrete. Twenty four (24 concrete mixtures of water-cement ratios (w/c's = 0.4, 0.5, 0.65 were cast using the cement types CEM I 42.5N, CEM II/A-M (V-L 42.5N, CEM IV/B 32.5R and CEM II/A-V 52.5N. The concretes investigated fall in the range of normal strength, medium strength and high strength concretes. It was found that the marked differences in oxygen permeability and sorptivity results observed at normal and medium strengths tended to vanish at high concrete strengths. Also, the durability effects attributed to use of different cement types appear to diminish at high strengths. Cements of low strength and/or that contained no extenders (CEM 32.5R, CEM I 42.5N showed greater sensitivity to sorptivity, relative to other cement types. Results also show that while concrete resistance to chlorides generally improves with increase in strength, adequately high chloride resistance may not be achieved based on high strength alone, and appropriate incorporation of extenders may be necessary.

  5. Thermal Properties of Cement-Based Composites for Geothermal Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Bao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal energy piles are a quite recent renewable energy technique where geothermal energy in the foundation of a building is used to transport and store geothermal energy. In this paper, a structural–functional integrated cement-based composite, which can be used for energy piles, was developed using expanded graphite and graphite nanoplatelet-based composite phase change materials (CPCMs. Its mechanical properties, thermal-regulatory performance, and heat of hydration were evaluated. Test results showed that the compressive strength of GNP-Paraffin cement-based composites at 28 days was more than 25 MPa. The flexural strength and density of thermal energy storage cement paste composite decreased with increases in the percentage of CPCM in the cement paste. The infrared thermal image analysis results showed superior thermal control capability of cement based materials with CPCMs. Hence, the carbon-based CPCMs are promising thermal energy storage materials and can be used to improve the durability of energy piles.

  6. Crack Formation in Grouted Annular Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The objective of the present analysis is to identify the reason for extensive crack formation which occurred during an annulus grouting performance test, to evaluate possible consequences of the cracking, and to recommend measures to be taken in order to avoid similar problems in the future....

  7. Bolt-Grout Interactions in Elastoplastic Rock Mass Using Coupled FEM-FDM Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Deb

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical procedure based on finite element method (FEM and finite difference method (FDM for the analysis of bolt-grout interactions are introduced in this paper. The finite element procedure incorporates elasto-plastic concepts with Hoek and Brown yield criterion and has been applied for rock mass. Bolt-grout interactions are evaluated based on finite difference method and are embedded in the elasto-plastic procedures of FEM. The experimental validation of the proposed FEM-FDM procedures and numerical examples of a bolted tunnel are provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method for practical applications.

  8. Lack of correlation between tubular dentine cement penetration, adhesiveness and leakage in roots filled with gutta percha and an endodontic cement based on epoxy amine resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ricardo; Silva Neto, Ulisses Xavier da; Carneiro, Everdan; Fariniuk, Luiz Fernando; Westphalen, Vânia Portela Ditzel; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches

    2014-01-01

    To analyze possible correlations among tubular dentine cement penetration, adhesiveness and apical leakage in fillings performed with gutta percha and an endodontic cement based on epoxy amine resin. Sixty similar, extracted human mandibular central incisors were irrigated, instrumented and filled following the same protocol. First, apical leakage was quantified by fluid filtration tests. Then, these same specimens were sectioned for analysis of tubular dentine cement penetration and the middle thirds were submitted to push-out tests to analyze the adhesiveness of the fillings. In brief, the means and standard deviations with a confidence interval of 95% were as follows: tubular dentine cement penetration (8.875±4.540), adhesiveness (4.441±2.683) and apical leakage (0.318±0.215). The data were confronted using the Pearson's test (P>0.05), and it was possible to prove that there was no correlation between (1) tubular dentine cement penetration and apical leakage (r2: 0.08276), (2) tubular dentine cement penetration and adhesiveness (r2: -0.2412) and (3) adhesiveness and apical leakage (r2: 0.1340). After analysis of these data, it could be observed that there exists no correlation among the variables analyzed in this study.

  9. An ongoing investigation on modeling the strength properties of water-entrained cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    Water-entrained cement based materials by superabsorbent polymers is a concept that was introduced in the research agenda about a decade ago. However, a recent application in the production of high performance concrete revealed potential weaknesses when the proportioning of this intelligent...... material is not well performed, raising doubts among both academic and industrial society about the usability of superabsorbent polymers in cement-based materials. This work constitutes the baseline tentatively to be used on modeling the compressive strength of SF-modified water-entrained cement......-based materials. Beyond the discussion of whether or not the introduction of superabsorbent polymers leads to a strength reduction, this paper uses both experimental and theoretical background to separate the effect of SAP in both pore structure and internal relative humidity and the effect from the active...

  10. Evolution of cement based materials in a repository for radioactive waste and their chemical barrier function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzler, Bernhard; Metz, Volker; Schlieker, Martina; Bohnert, Elke [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE)

    2015-07-01

    The use of cementitious materials in nuclear waste management is quite widespread. It covers the solidification of low/intermediate-level liquid as well as solid wastes (e.g. laboratory wastes) and serves as shielding. For both high-level and intermediate-low level activity repositories, cement/concrete likewise plays an important role. It is used as construction material for underground and surface disposals, but more importantly it serves as barrier or sealing material. For the requirements of waste conditioning, special cement mixtures have been developed. These include special mixtures for the solidification of evaporator concentrates, borate binding additives and for spilling solid wastes. In recent years, low-pH cements were strongly discussed especially for repository applications, e.g. (Celine CAU DIT COUMES 2008; Garcia-Sineriz, et al. 2008). Examples for relevant systems are Calcium Silicate Cements (ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based) or Calcium Aluminates Cements (CAC). Low-pH pore solutions are achieved by reduction of the portlandite content by partial substitution of OPC by mineral admixtures with high silica content. The blends follow the pozzolanic reaction consuming Ca(OH){sub 2}. Potential admixtures are silica fume (SF) and fly ashes (FA). In these mixtures, super plasticizers are required, consisting of polycarboxilate or naphthalene formaldehyde as well as various accelerating admixtures (Garcia-Sineriz, et al. 2008). The pH regime of concrete/cement materials may stabilize radionuclides in solution. Newly formed alteration products retain or release radionuclides. An important degradation product of celluloses in cement is iso-saccharin acid. According to Glaus 2004 (Glaus and van Loon 2004), it reacts with radionuclides forming dissolved complexes. Apart from potentially impacting radionuclide solubility limitations, concrete additives, radionuclides or other strong complexants compete for surface sites for sorbing onto cement phases. In

  11. Nanomechanical characterization of cement-based pastes enriched with SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zyganitidis, I., E-mail: izyga@auth.gr [Laboratory for Thin Films Nanosystems and Nanometrology, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Stefanidou, M. [Laboratory of Building Materials, Department of Civil Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalfagiannis, N.; Logothetidis, S. [Laboratory for Thin Films Nanosystems and Nanometrology, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: > In this study we examine the relation between microstructural, nanomechanical and surface properties of cement based pastes. > Addition of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles to cement pastes leads to more compact structures with increased calcium crystal size. > Changes in microstructure led to the reduction of the mechanical properties of samples. - Abstract: Microstructural and nanomechanical surface properties of cement based pastes were experimentally investigated. Samples were prepared from CEMI42.5 cement, with water to cement ratio equal to 0.5 and enriched with SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (d = 14 nm), with low concentration ranging from 0% up to 0.5% (by weight of binder). X-rays diffraction (XRD) patterns revealed a linear increase of crystal size of calcium hydrate (CH) products with the addition of nanoparticles, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed a denser microstructure with more defined grains for the higher SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles concentration. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of samples after the grinding/polishing process indicated a strong dependence of surface roughness with the CH crystallite mean size and the materials mechanical properties. Finally, statistical analysis of nanoindentation mapping data revealed a decrease of elastic modulus with the increase of nanoparticles concentration.

  12. Investigation of the physical properties of tricalcium silicate cement-based root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-02-01

    Tricalcium silicate-based cements have been displayed as suitable root-end filling materials. The physical properties of prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Bioaggregate and Biodentine were investigated. Intermediate restorative material was used as a control. The physical properties of a prototype zirconium oxide replaced tricalcium silicate cement and two proprietary cements composed of tricalcium silicate namely Bioaggregate and Biodentine were investigated. Intermediate restorative material (IRM) was used as a control. Radiopacity assessment was undertaken and expressed in thickness of aluminum. In addition the anti-washout resistance was investigated using a novel basket-drop method and the fluid uptake, sorption and solubility were investigated using a gravimetric method. The setting time was assessed using an indentation technique and compressive strength and micro-hardness of the test materials were investigated. All the testing was performed with the test materials immersed in Hank's balanced salt solution. All the materials tested had a radiopacity value higher than 3mm thickness of aluminum. IRM exhibited the highest radiopacity. Biodentine demonstrated a high washout, low fluid uptake and sorption values, low setting time and superior mechanical properties. The fluid uptake and setting time was the highest for Bioaggregate. The addition of admixtures to tricalcium silicate-based cements affects the physical properties of the materials. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. NTERACTION BETWEEN SURFACE CHARGE PHENOMENA AND MULTI-SPECIES DIFFUSION IN CEMENT BASED MATERIALS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2008-01-01

    Measurements strongly indicate that the ‘inner’ surface of the microscopic structure of cement based materials has a fixed negative charge. This charge contributes to the formation of so-called electrical double layers. In the case of cement based materials the ionic species located in such layers...... are typically potassium -, sodium - and calcium ions. Due to the high specific surface area of hydrated cement, a large amount of ions can be located in theses double layers even if the surface charge is relatively low. The attraction force, caused by the fixed surface charge on ions located close to surfaces...... and also including a negatively charged ‘ion’ with an extremely low diffusion constant so as to represent a fixed negative surface charge. The theoretical results from such simulations, using a tailor made finite element technique, indicates a strong influence of surface charges on global diffusion...

  14. Development of rock bolt grout and shotcrete for rock support and corrosion of steel in low-pH cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, Anders (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Vaellingby (Sweden)); Pettersson, Stig (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    It is foreseen that cementitious products will be utilized in the construction of the final repository. The use of conventional cementitious material creates pulses in the magnitude of pH 12.13 in the leachates and release alkalis. Such a high pH is detrimental mainly to impairment of bentonite functioning, but also to possibly enhanced dissolution of spent fuel and alteration of fracture filling materials. It also complicates the safety analysis of the repository, as the effect of a high pH-plume should be considered in the evaluation. As no reliable pH-plume models exist, the use of products giving a pH below 11 in the leachates facilitates the safety analysis, although limiting the amount of low-pH cement is recommended. In earlier studies it was found that shotcreting, standard casting and rock bolting with low-pH cement (pH . 11 in the leachate) should be possible without any major development work. This report summarizes the results of development work done during 2008 and 2009 in the fields of low-pH rock bolt grout, low-pH shotcrete and steel corrosion in low-pH concrete. Development of low-pH rock bolt grout mixes and laboratory testing of the selected grout was followed by installation of twenty rock bolts for rock support at Aspo HRL using the chosen low-pH grout. The operation was successful and the bolts and grout are subject to follow up the next ten years. Low-pH shotcrete for rock support was initially developed within the ESDRED project, which was an Integrated Project within the European Commission sixth framework for research and technological development. ESDRED is an abbreviation for Engineering Studies and Demonstrations of Repository Designs. ESDRED was executed from 1st February 2004 to 31st January 2009. The development of the mix design described in this report was based on the results from ESDRED. After laboratory testing of the chosen mix, it was field tested in niche NASA 0408A at Aspo HRL. Further, some areas in the TASS-tunnel were

  15. Marginal gap, cement thickness, and microleakage of 2 zirconia crown systems luted with glass ionomer and MDP-based cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Isil; Turker, Begum; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the marginal gap, cement thickness, and microleakage of glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and phosphate monomer-containing resin cement (MDP-RC) under 2 zirconia crown systems (Cercon and DC-Zirkon). Forty human premolars were prepared for all-ceramic zirconia crowns with a 1 mm circumferential finish line and a 1.5 mm occlusal reduction. The crowns (n = 10 per group) from each zirconia system were randomly divided into 2 groups and cemented either with GIC (Vivaglass CEM) or MDP-RC (Panavia F 2.0) cement. The cemented crowns were thermocycled 5000 times (5°-55°C). The crowns were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye solution for 24 hours and sectioned buccolingually and mesiodistally. Specimens were examined under optical microscope (100X). Data were analyzed using Student t-test and chi-square tests (α = 0.05). Mean marginal gap values for Cercon (85 ± 11.4 μm) were significantly higher than for DC-Zircon (75.3 ± 13.2 μm) (P = 0.018). The mean cement thickness values of GIC (81.7 ± 13.9 μm) and MDP-RC (78.5 ± 12.5 μm) were not significantly different (P = 0.447). Microleakage scores did not demonstrate significant difference between GIC (P = 0.385) and MDP-RC (P = 0.631) under Cercon or DC-Zircon. Considering the cement thickness values and microleakage scores obtained, both zirconia crown systems could be cemented in combination with either GIC or MDP-RC.

  16. Electrical Properties of Cement-Based Composites with Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene, and Graphite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo-Yeol Yoo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of the carbon-based nanomaterial type on the electrical properties of cement paste. Three different nanomaterials, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, graphite nanofibers (GNFs, and graphene (G, were incorporated into the cement paste at a volume fraction of 1%. The self-sensing capacity of the cement composites was also investigated by comparing the compressive stress/strain behaviors by evaluating the fractional change of resistivity (FCR. The electrical resistivity of the plain cement paste was slightly reduced by adding 1 vol % GNFs and G, whereas a significant decrease of the resistivity was achieved by adding 1 vol % MWCNTs. At an identical volume fraction of 1%, the composites with MWCNTs provided the best self-sensing capacity with insignificant noise, followed by the composites containing GNFs and G. Therefore, the addition of MWCNTs was considered to be the most effective to improve the self-sensing capacity of the cement paste. Finally, the composites with 1 vol % MWCNTs exhibited a gauge factor of 113.2, which is much higher than commercially available strain gauges.

  17. Electrical Properties of Cement-Based Composites with Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene, and Graphite Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Doo-Yeol; You, Ilhwan; Lee, Seung-Jung

    2017-05-08

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of the carbon-based nanomaterial type on the electrical properties of cement paste. Three different nanomaterials, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), graphite nanofibers (GNFs), and graphene (G), were incorporated into the cement paste at a volume fraction of 1%. The self-sensing capacity of the cement composites was also investigated by comparing the compressive stress/strain behaviors by evaluating the fractional change of resistivity (FCR). The electrical resistivity of the plain cement paste was slightly reduced by adding 1 vol % GNFs and G, whereas a significant decrease of the resistivity was achieved by adding 1 vol % MWCNTs. At an identical volume fraction of 1%, the composites with MWCNTs provided the best self-sensing capacity with insignificant noise, followed by the composites containing GNFs and G. Therefore, the addition of MWCNTs was considered to be the most effective to improve the self-sensing capacity of the cement paste. Finally, the composites with 1 vol % MWCNTs exhibited a gauge factor of 113.2, which is much higher than commercially available strain gauges.

  18. Chemical composition influence of cement based mortars on algal biofouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelle, Dalod; Alexandre, Govin; Philippe, Grosseau; Christine, Lors; René, Guyonnet; Denis, Damidot

    2013-04-01

    The main cause of building-facade biodegradation is the growth of microorganisms. This phenomenon depends on several parameters such as the geographical situation, the environmental conditions and the surface state of the substrate. Several researches have been devoted to the study of the effect of porosity and roughness on the biofouling of stones and mortars. However, none of them have addressed the influence of the mortar chemistry on the microorganism growth kinetic. The main objective of this study is to highlight the influence of the mortar chemistry in relationship with its physical properties on biological weathering. Earlier work showed a good resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cements to biodeterioration by acidogenic bacteria (Thiobacillus) and fungi (Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus Niger and Coniosporium uncinatum). In order to characterize the influence of the mortar chemistry on biofouling, two Portland cements and two alumina cements are used. Among micro-organisms able to grow, green algae are most involved in the aesthetic deterioration of facades. Indeed, they can colonize any type of media and can be a source of nutrients for other micro-organisms such as fungi. The green algae Klebsormidium flaccidum is chosen because of its representativeness. It is indeed the species the most frequently identified and isolated from samples taken on sites. The biofouling kinetic is followed on samples exposed outdoor and on samples tested in a laboratory bench which consists in spraying an algae culture on mortar specimens. The results obtained by in situ trials are compared with the results obtained on the laboratory bench. The microorganism growth kinetic is measured by image analysis. To improve the detection of algae on the surface of the cementitious samples, the raw image is converted in the YIQ color space. Y, I and Q correspond respectively to luminance, in-phase, and quadrature. On the Q channel, the areas covered by algae and the areas of clean mortar

  19. Utilization of coal ash for civil engineering materials. Study on a grouting material using fly ash as the main material; Sekitanbai no doboku zairyo eno riyo. Flyash wo shuzai to shita tunnel gurauto zai no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, I. [Hokkaido Electric Power Co. Inc., Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-03-25

    Mixing tests and filling performance experiments were carried out on a slurry material made by mixing cement, water and foam, using fly ash as the main material (air fly ash grouting material). The tests and experiments were intended to discuss its usability as a tunnel grouting material. In change in the properties, the air fly ash grout did not show a large change both in the air amount and the flow, and maintained a good condition, while air mortar had the flow decreased largely. Therefore, in view of assuring the long-time fluidity, the air fly ash grout is more advantageous. As a result of the compression strength test, the air fly ash grout had a strength of 27.6 kgf/cm{sup 2} emerged in atmospheric curing, while the air mortar showed a strength of 12.3 kgf/cm{sup 2}. The strength of the air fly ash grout is more than twice as much as that of the air mortar. The foaming material hardens in largely different rates according to the kinds of fly ash, hence there is a possibility that the air amount decreases as a result of pump-compressed feeding, causing the grout properties to change largely. The utilization of the material requires verification of compatibility of the ash type with the foaming agents, and attention must be paid on controlling the foam. 2 refs., 27 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Cement Materials Based on Cellulosic Fibers for Plasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hospodarova Viola

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents physical and mechanical properties of cementitious composites/plasters containing cellulosic fibers in portion 2.0% and 5.0% of filler replacement after 28 days of hardening. Cellulosic fibers (Greencel originated from bleached wood pulp and unbleached waste paper used in this experimental work were characterized from the point of view cellulose structure. Experimental investigations reveal that adding cellulosic fibers reduces composites density (up to 8.2 % in comparison with composites without any fibers. Moreover, the presence of wood pulp and recycled fibers in composites cause higher values of water absorbability than sample without fibers. Also, the decrease in compressive strength values for tested fiber cement plasters was observed (14.1 - 18.0 MPa in comparison to reference sample (26.6 MPa. But the identified compressive strength values are in accordance with European standard (5 MPa for plasters.

  1. Nano-carrier based drug delivery systems for sustained antimicrobial agent release from orthopaedic cementous material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Thaher, Yazan; Perni, Stefano; Prokopovich, Polina

    2017-11-01

    Total joint replacement (TJR), such as hip and knee replacement, is a popular procedure worldwide. Prosthetic joint infections (PJI) after this procedure have been widely reported, where treatment of such infections is complex with high cost and prolonged hospital stay. In cemented arthroplasties, the use of antibiotic loaded bone cement (ALBC) is a standard practice for the prophylaxis and treatment of PJI. Recently, the development of bacterial resistance by pathogenic microorganisms against most commonly used antibiotics increased the interest in alternative approaches for antimicrobial delivery systems such as nanotechnology. This review summarizes the efforts made to improve the antimicrobial properties of PMMA bone cements using nanotechnology based antibiotic and non-antibiotic delivery systems to overcome drawbacks of ALBC in the prophylaxis and treatment of PJIs after hip and knee replacement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Flow properties of MK-based geopolymer pastes. A comparative study with standard Portland cement pastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Aurélie; Hot, Julie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-02-28

    Geopolymers are presented in many studies as alternatives to ordinary Portland cement. Previous studies have focused on their chemical and mechanical properties, their microstructures and their potential applications, but very few have focussed on their rheological behaviour. Our work highlights the fundamental differences in the flow properties, which exist between geopolymers made from metakaolin and Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). We show that colloidal interactions between metakaolin particles are negligible and that hydrodynamic effects control the rheological behaviour. Metakaolin-based geopolymers can then be described as Newtonian fluids with the viscosity controlled mainly by the high viscosity of the suspending alkaline silicate solution and not by the contribution of direct contacts between metakaolin grains. This fundamental difference between geopolymers and OPC implies that developments made in cement technology to improve rheological behaviour such as plasticizers will not be efficient for geopolymers and that new research directions need to be explored.

  3. Shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to base metal alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattar, Susan; Hatamleh, Muhanad; Khraisat, Ameen; Al-Rabab'ah, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Many self-adhesive cements have been introduced in the past few years, with little or no data regarding their clinical performance. This study investigated the shear bond strength of some recently introduced self-adhesive resin cements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of self-adhesive and conventional resin-based cements to a base metal alloy. Four groups (10-12 each) that comprised 3 self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2; RelyX Unicem; seT SDI) and a conventional resin-based cement (RelyX ARC) were tested. Cylindrical cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were applied to nickel-free base metal alloy (Sheradent) disks with a diameter of 12 mm, and the surface was treated with airborne-particle abrasion of 50 μm aluminum oxide. The metal disks were fixed in brass molds specifically designed for the shear bond test device. Test specimens were incubated at 37°C for 24 hours and then the shear bond was tested with a Zwick Roll testing machine at a 0.8 mm/min cross-head speed. In addition, bond failures were investigated and categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. Shear bond strengths were calculated by dividing the maximum debonding force over the cross-sectional area of each specimen. One-way ANOVA and the Tukey (honestly significant difference) post hoc test were used to test statistical significant differences among the groups (α=.05). Statistical analysis showed significant differences among different resin cements (F=14.34, Padhesive in nature, which occurred at the resin-metal interface. The early bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements varied significantly among the tested materials. SmartCem2 showed the highest bond strength, which was 4 times the strength observed for seT SDI. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tensile fatigue of 4-META cement bonding three base metal alloys to enamel and comparison to other resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givan, D A; Fitchie, J G; Anderson, L; Zardiackas, L D

    1995-04-01

    The tensile median fatigue limits and fracture mode of 4-META cement were evaluated after bonding Ni-Cr, Ni-Cr-Be, and Co-Cr alloys to enamel. Alloy surfaces, 6 mm in diameter, were grit blasted with 50 microns Al2O3 and cemented to etched bovine enamel under a 2 kg load. Samples were cycled in tension to failure or 10(6) cycles at 5 Hz in Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C. Two-point strategy was used to determine median fatigue limits (S50). Fracture modes were evaluated by SEM on samples failing before 10(6) cycles. Results indicated differences between all sample groups where S50 (Ni-Cr-Be) > S50 (Co-Cr) > S50 (Ni-Cr). Failure analysis revealed mixed cohesive fractures near both interfaces with small areas of delamination within the cement. Comparison to reported median fatigue limits of two commercially available cements were discussed.

  5. Cementitious grout for preplaced aggregate concrete: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Muhammad Jafni; Johari, Megat Azmi Megat; Hashim, Syed Fuad Saiyid

    2017-10-01

    Preplaced-Aggregate Concrete (PAC) consists of two main components, namely the cementitious grout mixture and coarse aggregate particles. Coarse aggregates are placed into the formwork, and then a fresh cementitious grout mixture is injected into the formwork to fill the voids created by the coarse aggregates to form a concrete. PAC has been used in many applications, such as underwater construction, casting concrete sections congested with reinforcement and concrete repair. The cementitious grout properties play an important role for this type of concrete to be successfully constructed. The cementitious grout rheology and physical properties should be practically suitable for the intended usage of the PAC. Therefore, the available literature on the effects of mixture proportions of the grout on the PAC properties is reviewed. The effects of water content on the grout fluidity, bleeding and compressive strength of the PAC are emphasized in this paper.

  6. Effect of Thin Cement-Based Renders on the Structural Response of Masonry Wall Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Corradi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available URM (Unreinforced Masonry historic buildings can be generally arranged into three categories: adobe, brick and stone masonry. However, a common feature of URM structures is typically the low mechanical properties of the masonry material, especially in terms of shear strength. URM buildings are not amenable to seismic analysis, and the relatively low strength of stone and brickwork masonry often requires expensive and invasive retrofitting intervention. Hard, intractable stones broke artificially or naturally into random shapes were often used for construction in many parts of Europe and constitute the main material of historic buildings. Thin, cement or lime-based renders are often employed to protect masonry construction, but these are frequently ignored in analysis and design. This paper shows how standard, thin, cement-based renderings can highly enhance the lateral load-capacity and shear stiffness of wall panels. An experimental campaign was carried out on-site to assess the effect of cement-based renders. In detail, compression and shear tests were conducted on twelve full-scale wall panels up to failure, and comparisons are presented to study the effect of cement-based renders on the structural behavior of stone and brickwork masonry panels.

  7. Modelling Inter-Particle Forces and Resulting Agglomerate Sizes in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Ane Mette; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2005-01-01

    The theory of inter-particle forces versus external shear in cement-based materials is reviewed. On this basis, calculations on maximum agglomerate size present after the combined action of superplasticizers and shear are carried out. Qualitative experimental results indicate that external shear...

  8. Petrographic Analysis of Portland Cement Concrete Cores from Pease Air National Guard Base, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Petrographic Analysis of Portland Cement Concrete Cores from Pease Air National Guard Base, New Hampshire E n g in e e r R e s e a rc h a n d...Petrographic Analysis ........................................................................................ 5 3 Results and Discussion...4 3 Preface This study was conducted in support of the Air Force Civil Engineer Center (AFCEC) to assess concrete obtained from Pease

  9. Modelling the effect of electrical current flow on the hydration process of cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.; Koenders, E.A.B.

    2014-01-01

    Stray current is essentially an electrical current “leakage” from metal conductors and electrical installations. When it flows through cement-based systems, electrical energy is converted to thermal energy that causes increasing temperature due to Joule heating phenomena. The aim of this paper is to

  10. Thermophysical properties of cement based composites and their changes after artificial ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šín, Peter; Pavlendová, Gabriela; Lukovičová, Jozefa; Kopčok, Michal

    2017-07-01

    The usage of recycled plastic materials in concrete mix gained increased attention. The behaviour of such environmental friendly material is studied. In this paper an investigation of the thermophysical properties of cement based composites containing plastic waste particles with different percentage is presented. Measurements were carried out using pulse transient method before and after artificial ageing in climatic chamber BINDER MKF (E3).

  11. The Integration of EIS parameters and bulk matrix characterization in studying reinforced cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion in reinforced concrete is a major and costly concern, arising from the higher complexity of involved phenomena on different levels of material science (e.g. electrochemistry, concrete material science) and material properties (macro/micro/ nano). Reinforced cement-based systems (e.g.

  12. The integration of eis parameters and bulk matrix characteristics in studying reinforced cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion in reinforced concrete is a major and costly concern, arising from the higher complexity of involved phenomena on different levels of material science (e.g. electrochemistry, concrete material science) and material properties (macro/micro/ nano). Reinforced cement-based systems (e.g.

  13. Measurement with corrugated tubes of early-age autogenous shrinkage of cement-based material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Qian; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    The use of a special corrugated mould enables transformation of volume strain into horizontal, linear strain measurement in the fluid stage. This allows continuous measurement of the autogenous shrinkage of cement-based materials since casting, and also effectively eliminates unwanted influence...

  14. Tensile capacity of loop connections grouted with concrete or mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild; Hoang, Linh Cao; Olesen, John Forbes

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study of grout failure in symmetric U-bar loop connections loaded in tension, with focus on the performance of two grouting materials – concrete and mortar. The study contains an experimental investigation as well as a rigid-plastic modelling of the tensile capacity. The test...... to allow yielding of the U-bars. The experimental work showed that connections grouted with concrete performed better than the connections grouted with mortar. In the theoretical models, the difference in tested capacity is explained by the difference in the internal angle of friction and in the softening...... behaviour of concrete as compared with mortar....

  15. Terahertz non-destructive imaging of cracks and cracking in structures of cement-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shujie; Li, Tongchun; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Xiaoming; Qi, Huijun; Mu, Zhiyong

    2017-11-01

    Cracks and crack propagation in cement-based materials are key factors leading to failure of structures, affecting safety in construction engineering. This work investigated the application of terahertz (THz) non-destructive imaging to inspections on structures of cement-based materials, so as to explore the potential of THz imaging in crack detection. Two kinds of disk specimens made of plain cement mortar and UHMWPE fiber concrete were prepared respectively. A mechanical expansion load device was deployed to generate cracks and control the whole process of cracking. Experimental tests were carried out on cracked specimens by using a commercial THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) during loading. The results show that crack opening and propagation could be examined by THz clearly and the material factors influence the ability of crack resistance significantly. It was found that the THz imaging of crack initiation and propagation agrees with the practical phenomenon and supplies more information about damage of samples. It is demonstrated that the damage behavior of structures of cement-based materials can be successfully detected by THz imaging.

  16. Different Strategies to Bond Bis-GMA-based Resin Cement to Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Spohr, Ana Maria; De Souza, Grace M

    To evaluate the effect of different bonding strategies on short- and long-term bis-GMA-based resin cement bond strengths to zirconia. One hundred twenty samples of fully-sintered zirconia (Prettau Zirconia) were sandblasted and randomly distributed into 5 groups (n = 24): UA: Scotchbond Universal Adhesive; SZP: Signum Zirconia Bond I + II; ZPP: Z-Prime Plus; EXP: MZ experimental primer; CO: no primer application (control). After performing these surface treatments, translucent tubes (0.8 mm diameter and 1.0 mm height) were placed on the zirconia specimens, and bis-GMA-based cement (Duo-Link) was injected into them and light cured. Specimens were tested for microshear bond strength either 24 h or 6 months (m) after water storage (37°C) and surfaces were characterized by SEM and EDX. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p zirconia surface. In these groups, EDX demonstrated the presence of phosphorus. Group ZPP resulted in a nonhomogeneous layer, exposing the zirconia substrate underneath. EXP application resulted in an undetectable layer. Water storage did not affect resin cement bond strengths to zirconia irrespective of the surface treatment. Bis-GMA-based resin cement bond strengths to zirconia are affected by specific bonding strategies.

  17. A new method to analyze copolymer based superplasticizer traces in cement leachates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérandel, Cyril; Vernex-Loset, Lionel; Krier, Gabriel; De Lanève, Michel; Guillot, Xavier; Pierre, Christian; Muller, Jean François

    2011-03-15

    Enhancing the flowing properties of fresh concrete is a crucial step for cement based materials users. This is done by adding polymeric admixtures. Such additives have enabled to improve final mechanicals properties and the development of new materials like high performance or self compacting concrete. Like this, the superplasticizers are used in almost cement based materials, in particular for concrete structures that can have a potential interaction with drinking water. It is then essential to have suitable detection techniques to assess whether these organic compounds are dissolved in water after a leaching process or not. The main constituent of the last generation superplasticizer is a PolyCarboxylate-Ester copolymer (PCE), in addition this organic admixture contains polyethylene oxide (free PEO) which constitutes a synthesis residue. Numerous analytical methods are available to characterize superplasticizer content. Although these techniques work well, they do not bring suitable detection threshold to analyze superplasticizer traces in solution with high mineral content such as leachates of hardened cement based materials formulated with superplasticizers. Moreover those techniques do not enable to distinguish free PEO from PCE in the superplasticizer. Here we discuss two highly sensitive analytical methods based on mass spectrometry suitable to perform a rapid detection of superplasticizer compounds traces in CEM I cement paste leachates: MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, is used to determine the free PEO content in the leachate. However, industrial copolymers (such as PCE) are characterized by high molecular weight and polymolecular index. These two parameters lead to limitation concerning analysis of copolymers by MALDI-TOFMS. In this study, we demonstrate how pyrolysis and a Thermally assisted Hydrolysis/Methylation coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, provides good results for the detection of PCE copolymer traces in CEM I cement paste

  18. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of calcium silicate-based cements on an osteoblast lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lívia GOMES-CORNÉLIO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several calcium silicate-based biomaterials have been developed in recent years, in addition to Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and apoptosis/necrosis in human osteoblast cells (SAOS-2 of pure calcium silicate-based cements (CSC and modified formulations: modified calcium silicate-based cements (CSCM and three resin-based calcium silicate cements (CSCR1 (CSCR 2 (CSCR3. The following tests were performed after 24 hours of cement extract exposure: methyl-thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT, apoptosis/necrosis assay and comet assay. The negative control (CT- was performed with untreated cells, and the positive control (CT+ used hydrogen peroxide. The data for MTT and apoptosis were submitted to analysis of variance and Bonferroni’s posttest (p < 0.05, and the data for the comet assay analysis, to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p < 0.05. The MTT test showed no significant difference among the materials in 2 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL concentrations. CSCR3 showed lower cell viability at 10 mg/mL. Only CSC showed lower cell viability at 50 mg/mL. CSCR1, CSCR2 and CSCR3 showed a higher percentage of initial apoptosis than the control in the apoptosis test, after 24 hours exposure. The same cements showed no genotoxicity in the concentration of 2 mg/mL, with the comet assay. CSC and CSCR2 were also not genotoxic at 10 mg/mL. All experimental materials showed viability with MTT. CSC and CSCR2 presented a better response to apoptosis and genotoxicity evaluation in the 10 mg/mL concentration, and demonstrated a considerable potential for use as reparative materials.

  19. Effects of TEA·HCl hardening accelerator on the workability of cement-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenhao; Ding, Zhaoyang; Chen, Yanwen

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the test is to research the influence rules of TEA·HCl on the workability of cement paste and concrete. Based on the features of the new hardening accelerator, an experimental analysis system were established through different dosages of hardening accelerator, and the feasibility of such accelerator to satisfy the need of practical engineering was verified. The results show that adding of the hardening accelerator can accelerate the cement hydration, and what’s more, when the dosage was 0.04%, the setting time was the shortest while the initial setting time and final setting time were 130 min and 180 min, respectively. The initial fluidity of cement paste of adding accelerator was roughly equivalent compared with that of blank. After 30 min, fluidity loss would decrease with the dosage increasing, but fluidity may increase. The application of the hardening accelerator can make the early workability of concrete enhance, especially the slump loss of 30 min can improve more significantly. The bleeding rate of concrete significantly decreases after adding TEA·HCl. The conclusion is that the new hardening accelerator can meet the need of the workability of cement-based materials in the optimum dosage range.

  20. Evaluation of bond strength between leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based ceramics to dentin after cementation with conventional and self-adhesive resin agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigolin, Fernando J; Miranda, Milton E; Flório, Flávia M; Basting, Roberta T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two heat-pressed ceramics (leucite-based--IPS Empress Esthetic/Ivoclar Vivadent, and lithium disilicate-based --IPS e.max Press/Ivoclar Vivadent) to dentin with the use of conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. The occlusal surface of 60 intact human molars was removed and the dentin was exposed. Ceramic blocks were cemented randomly with regard to the cementation systems (n = 10): conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II/Ivoclar Vivadent), conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink/Ivoclar Vivadent), and dual self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100/3M ESPE). The dual cementation systems were photoactivated with a LED light device (Radii Cal, SDI) for 40 seconds. The specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of approximately 1 mm2 for microtensile tests on a universal testing machine (EMIC). The type of fracture was analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05) showed that there was no difference between types of ceramic. Average microtensile bond strength was higher for the conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and the self-adhesive dual resin cement (RelyX U100), despite greater prevalence of premature loss of the sticks with the latter. Average bond strength was lower when the conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink) was used. Leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based cements present similar bond strength to the dentin with conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and a dual self-adhesive cement (RelyX U100).

  1. Bonding to glass ionomer cements using resin-based adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Burrow, M F; Palamara, J E A; Thomas, C D L

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the microshear bond strengths (MSBS) of four self-etching adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE [SSE], Clearfil SE Bond [CSE], Clearfil S3 Bond [CS3] and One Coat 7.0 [OC]) and an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Plus [SB]) when bonded to two conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs) (Fuji IX GP EXTRA and Riva Self Cure). The null hypothesis tested was there is no difference in the adhesive ability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive and self-etching adhesives when bonded to GIC for up to 6 months. The GICs were embedded in type III dental stone and wet ground with 1200-grit SiC paper. Twenty specimens were bonded for each adhesive according to manufacturers' instructions with a 1.5-mm bonding diameter. Specimens were stored at 100% humidity for 24 hours, 1 month, or 6 months. Microshear bond strengths were obtained using a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The results were calculated and analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD test. SB had significantly lower MSBS than the four self-etching adhesives for all storage periods. MSBS at 6 months for SB was significantly lower than at 1 month. There were no significant differences in MSBS among the self-etching adhesives. Cohesive failure within GIC was the most common failure mode observed. SB showed a lower bond strength than the self-etching adhesives when bonded to conventional GICs for all storage periods. This might be a result of the phosphoric acid etching. However, cohesive strength of GIC was a limiting factor for the MSBS outcomes.

  2. SOLIDIFICATION TESTING FOR A HIGH ACTIVITY WASTESTREAM FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING GROUT AND GAMMA RADIATION SHEILDING MATERIALS - 10017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, H.

    2009-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating grouts that include gamma radiation shielding materials to solidify surrogates of liquid aqueous radioactive wastes from across the DOE Complex. The Savannah River Site (SRS) identified a High Activity Waste (HAW) that will be treated and solidified at the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for surrogate grout testing. The HAW, which is produced at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), is an acidic aqueous wastestream generated by the alkaline treatment process and the aqueous purification process. The HAW surrogate was solidified using Portland cement with and without the inclusion of different gamma radiation shielding materials to determine the shielding material that is the most effective to attenuate gamma radiation for this application.

  3. Analysis of Metal Contents in Portland Type V and MTA-Based Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati Dorileo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine, by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS, the concentration levels of 11 metals in Type V gray and structural white PC, ProRoot MTA, and MTA Bio. Samples, containing one gram of each tested cement, were prepared and transferred to a 100 mL Teflon tube with a mixture of 7.0 mL of nitric acid and 21 mL of hydrochloric acid. After the reaction, the mixture was filtered and then volumed to 50 mL of distilled water. For each metal, specific patterns were determined from universal standards. Arsenic quantification was performed by hydride generator. The analysis was performed five times and the data were statistically analyzed at 5% level of significance. Only the cadmium presented concentration levels of values lower than the quantification limit of the device. The AAS analysis showed increased levels of calcium, nickel, and zinc in structural white PC. Type V PC presented the greatest concentration levels of arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and manganese (P<0.05. Bismuth was found in all cements, and the lowest concentration levels were observed in Portland cements, while the highest were observed in ProRoot MTA. Both PC and MTA-based cements showed evidence of metals inclusion.

  4. Biomonitoring Study of Heavy Metals in Blood from a Cement Factory Based Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bank M.S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effects of cement factory pollution, emissions, and kiln dust on contaminant exposure in human populations, including school environments, in close proximity to these point sources. In Ravena, New York, USA and vicinity, environmental pollution from a local cement plant is considered significant and substantial according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxic Release Inventory, published in 2006, 2007, and 2010. We hypothesized that cement factory based communities, such as the one in Ravena, NY, may be differentially exposed to heavy metals, including mercury, via dust, soil, and air in addition to any contributions from fish consumption, dental amalgams, smoking habits, and occupational exposures, etc. Here we report measurements of several heavy metals in blood (Pb, Cd, As, Hg, Se and Al and, for comparative purposes, total mercury in hair from a local (six-mile radius population of Caucasian adults and children. We also report and synthesize local atmospheric emissions inventory information and new indoor air data (NYSERDA, 2011 from the local school which is situated directly across the street (within 750 feet from the cement factory and quarry. In addition, to our human and environmental heavy metal results we also discuss scientific outreach coordination, and public health action opportunities that will likely have wide applicability for other community and environmental health studies confronting similar pollution issues.

  5. GIS Based Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis For Cement Plant Site Selection For Cuddalore District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, A.

    2015-12-01

    India's cement industry is a vital part of its economy, providing employment to more than a million people. On the back of growing demands, due to increased construction and infrastructural activities cement market in India is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.96 percent during the period 2014-2019. In this study, GIS-based spatial Multi Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) is used to determine the optimum and alternative sites to setup a cement plant. This technique contains a set of evaluation criteria which are quantifiable indicators of the extent to which decision objectives are realized. In intersection with available GIS (Geographical Information System) and local ancillary data, the outputs of image analysis serves as input for the multi-criteria decision making system. Moreover, the following steps were performed so as to represent the criteria in GIS layers, which underwent the GIS analysis in order to get several potential sites. Satellite imagery from LANDSAT 8 and ASTER DEM were used for the analysis. Cuddalore District in Tamil Nadu was selected as the study site as limestone mining is already being carried out in that region which meets the criteria of raw material for cement production. Several other criteria considered were land use land cover (LULC) classification (built-up area, river, forest cover, wet land, barren land, harvest land and agriculture land), slope, proximity to road, railway and drainage networks.

  6. Simulation of expansion in cement based materials subjected to external sulfate attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Hodhod

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The standard test for length change in hydraulic-cement mortars exposed to sulfate solution, ASTM C1012-95, has been widely used by researchers to study the sulfate resistance of cement based materials. However, there are deficiencies in this test method including lengthy measuring period, insensitivity of the measurement tool to sulfate attack, effect of curing and pH change. So, in this study, a model will be built by artificial neural networks (ANNs to simulate this test and overcome these defects. This model will deal with different types of cement in the presence of blast-furnace slag (GGBFS or fly ash (PFA. From the results of simulations, it is possible to understand the impact of cement chemistry and these two types of additions on resistance of sulfate attack more readily, faster, and accurately. Such an understanding improves the decision making process in every stage of construction and maintenance and will help in better administration of resources.

  7. Fractal Prediction of Grouting Volume for Treating Karst Caverns along a Shield Tunneling Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chieh Cheng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst geology is common in China, and buried karst formations are widely distributed in Guangdong province. In the process of shield tunneling, the abundant water resources present in karst caverns could lead to the potential for high water ingress, and a subsequent in situ stress change-induced stratum collapse. The development and distribution of karst caverns should therefore be identified and investigated prior to shield tunnel construction. Grouting is an efficient measure to stabilize karst caverns. The total volume of karst caverns along the shield tunneling alignment, and its relationship with the required volume of grouts, should be evaluated in the preliminary design phase. Conventionally, the total volume of karst caverns is empirically estimated based on limited geological drilling hole data; however, accurate results are rarely obtained. This study investigates the hydrogeology and engineering geology of Guangzhou, the capital of Guangdong province, and determines the fractal characteristics of the karst caverns along the tunnel section of Guangzhou metro line no. 9. The karst grouting coefficients (VR were found to vary from 0.11 in the case of inadequate drilling holes to 1.1 in the case where adequate drilling holes are provided. A grouting design guideline was furthermore developed in this study for future projects in karst areas.

  8. PHYSICAL PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS OF LABORATORY PREPARED SALTSTONE GROUT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E.; Cozzi, A.; Edwards, T.

    2014-05-05

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) built two new Saltstone Disposal Units (SDU), SDU 3 and SDU 5, in 2013. The variable frequency drive (VFD) for the grout transfer hose pump tripped due to high current demand by the motor during the initial radioactive saltstone transfer to SDU 5B on 12/5/2013. This was not observed during clean cap processing on July 5, 2013 to SDU 3A, which is a slightly longer distance from the SPF than is SDU 5B. Saltstone Design Authority (SDA) is evaluating the grout pump performance and capabilities to transfer the grout processed in SPF to SDU 3/5. To assist in this evaluation, grout physical properties are required. At this time, there are no rheological data from the actual SPF so the properties of laboratory prepared samples using simulated salt solution or Tank 50 salt solution will be measured. The physical properties of grout prepared in the laboratory with de-ionized water (DI) and salt solutions were obtained at 0.60 and 0.59 water to premix (W/P) ratios, respectively. The yield stress of the DI grout was greater than any salt grout. The plastic viscosity of the DI grout was lower than all of the salt grouts (including salt grout with admixture). When these physical data were used to determine the pressure drop and fluid horsepower for steady state conditions, the salt grouts without admixture addition required a higher pressure drop and higher fluid horsepower to transport. When 0.00076 g Daratard 17/g premix was added, both the pressure drop and fluid horsepower were below that of the DI grout. Higher concentrations of Daratard 17 further reduced the pressure drop and fluid horsepower. The uncertainty in the single point Bingham Plastic parameters is + 4% of the reported values and is the bounding uncertainty. Two different mechanical agitator mixing protocols were followed for the simulant salt grout, one having a total mixing time of three minutes and the other having a time of 10 minutes. The Bingham Plastic parameters

  9. Strengthening of concrete structures using carbon fibre reinforced polymers and cement-based adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemi, Siavash

    2017-01-01

    The research project conducted in this study concerns the investigation of the application of cement-based adhesives in CFRP strengthening of reinforced concrete members. The results demonstrate that mineral-based adhesives can provide the desired matrices for CFRP reinforcement. The literature review covers the background of CFRP application with conventional techniques. The bond characteristics of CFRP to concrete substrate, the flexural performance of retrofitted RC beams, and the fa...

  10. 18-year survival of posterior composite resin restorations with and without glass ionomer cement as base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, Françoise H; Rodolpho, Paulo A Da Rosa; Basso, Gabriela R; Patias, Rômulo; da Rosa, Quéren F; Demarco, Flávio F; Opdam, Niek J; Cenci, Maximiliano S

    2015-06-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of using intermediate layers underneath resin-composite restorations have been presented under different perspectives. Yet, few long-term clinical studies evaluated the effect of glass-ionomer bases on restoration survival. The present study investigated the influence of glass-ionomer-cement base in survival of posterior composite restorations, compared to restorations without base. Original datasets of one dental practice were used to retrieve data retrospectively. The presence or absence of an intermediate layer of glass-ionomer-cement was the main factor under analysis, considering survival, annual failure rate and types of failure as outcomes. Other investigated factors were: patient gender, jaw, tooth, number of restored surfaces and composite. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test, Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate Cox-regression. In total 632 restorations in 97 patients were investigated. Annual failure rates percentages up to 18-years were 1.9% and 2.1% for restorations with and without base, respectively. In restorations with glass-ionomer-cement base, fracture was the predominant reason for failure, corresponding to 57.8% of total failures. Failure type distribution was different (p=0.007) comparing restorations with and without base, but no effect in the overall survival of restorations was found (p=0.313). The presence of a glass-ionomer-cement base did not affect the survival of resin-composite restorations in the investigated sample. Acceptable annual failure rates after 18-years can be achieved with both techniques, leading to the perspective that an intermediate layer, placed during an interim treatment, may be maintained without clinical detriment, but no improvement in survival should be expected based on such measure. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanical Properties of High Performance Cementitious Grout Masterflow 9300

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report describes tests carried out on the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9300, developed by BASF Construction Chemicals A/S.......The present report describes tests carried out on the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9300, developed by BASF Construction Chemicals A/S....

  12. Silicate grout curtains behaviour for the protection of coastal aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elektorowicz, M.; Chifrina, R.; Hesnawi, R. [Concordia Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    Tests were performed to evaluate the behaviour of silicate grout with different reagents (ethylacetate - formamide SA and calcium chloride SC) in pure silica sand and natural soils from coastal areas containing organic matter, clayey soil and silica sand. The grouted specimens were tested with simulated fresh and salt water. The setting process during chemical grouting in the soil and sand was studied. The grouting of soil and sand with SA caused a transfer to the environment of some compounds: sodium formate, sodium acetate, ammonia and part of the initial ethylacetate and formamide. This process had a tendency to decrease for approximately 4 months. The stability of specimens was low. The grouting of soil and sand with SC caused no significant contamination of the environment. The increase of pH of environmental water was even less than with SA grouting. Also, the stability of specimens is higher in comparison with SA grouting. Salt water protected the specimens grouted with SA and SC from destruction and prevented contamination.

  13. Adhesion of conventional and simplified resin-based luting cements to superficial and deep dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Mese, Ayse

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the bond strengths of conventional (chemically and dual-polymerized) and simplified resin-based luting cements with their corresponding adhesives to superficial dentin (SD) and deep dentin (DD). Recently extracted third molars (N = 70, n = 10 per group) were obtained and prepared for testing procedures. After using their corresponding etchants, primers, and/or adhesive systems, the conventional and simplified cements (Variolink II [group A, conventional], Bifix QM [group B, conventional], Panavia F2.0 [group C, conventional], Multilink Automix [group D, simplified], Superbond C&B [group E, conventional], Clearfil Esthetic Cement [group F, simplified], Ketac-Fil [group G, conventional]) were adhered incrementally onto the dentin surfaces using polyethylene molds (inner diameter 3.5 mm, height 5 mm) and polymerized accordingly. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) acted as the control material. Shear bond strengths (1 mm/min) were determined after 500 times of thermocycling. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to analyze the data (α = 0.05). Bond strength (MPa) results were significantly affected by the cement types and their corresponding adhesive systems (p ≤ 0.05). The shear bond strengths (MPa ± SD) for groups A-G were 14.6 ± 3.8, 18.9 ± 3.9, 5.5 ± 4.5, 3.1 ± 3.6, 1.1 ± 2.5, 15.5 ± 2.6, 7 ± 4.3 and 7.1 ± 5.8, 15.1 ± 7.8, 8.4 ± 7.3, 7.5 ± 7.3, 4.9 ± 5.1, 12.5 ± 2.1, 6 ± 2.6 for SD and DD, respectively. The level of dentin depth did not decrease the bond strength significantly (p > 0.05) for all cements, except for Variolink II (p dentin compared to conventional resin cements tested.

  14. Bond strength of resin cements to noble and base metal alloys with different surface treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Raeisosadat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen.Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to "Degubond 4" (Au Pd and "Verabond" (Ni Cr alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05.When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021 and Verabond (P< 0.001. No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291 and Verabond (P=0.899. Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003. The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011. The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035.The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2.

  15. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Shuh, David K.; Edelstein,Norman M.

    2003-11-24

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to immobilize high-level nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs due to the high solubility and mobility of pertechnetate, TcO4-, the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively immobilize 99Tc if they contain additives that reduce mobile TcO4- to immobile Tc(IV) species. Leaching of 99Tc from reducing CWFs that contain Tc(IV) is much slower than for CWFs containing TcO4-. Previous X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies showed that the Tc(IV) species were oxidized to TcO4- in reducing grout samples prepared on a laboratory scale. Whether the oxidizer was atmospheric O2 or NO3- in the waste simulant was not determined. In actual CWFs, rapid oxidation of Tc(IV) by NO3- would be a concern, whereas oxidation by atmospheric O2 would be of less concern due to the slow diffusion and reaction of O2 with the reducing CWF. To address this uncertainty, two series of reducing grouts were prepared using TcO4- containing waste simulants with and without NO3-. In the first series of samples, the TcO4- was completely reduced using Na2S, and the samples were placed in containers that permitted O2 diffusion. In these samples, all of the technetium was initially present as aTc(IV) sulfide compound, TcSx, which was characterized using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and is likely Tc2S7. The TcSx initially present in the grout samples was steadily oxidized over 4 years. In the second series of samples, all of the TcO4- was not initially reduced, and the grout samples were placed in airtight containers. In these samples, the remaining TcO4- continued to be reduced as the samples aged, presumably due to the presence of reducing blast furnace slag. When samples in the second series were exposed to atmosphere, the

  16. Statistical Analyses of Optimum Partial Replacement of Cement by Fly Ash Based on Complete Consumption of Calcium Hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouypornprasert Winai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this technical paper were to propose the optimum partial replacement of cement by fly ash based on the complete consumption of calcium hydroxide from hydration reactions of cement and the long-term strength activity index based on equivalent calcium silicate hydrate as well as the propagation of uncertainty due to randomness inherent in main chemical compositions in cement and fly ash. Firstly the hydration- and pozzolanic reactions as well as stoichiometry were reviewed. Then the optimum partial replacement of cement by fly ash was formulated. After that the propagation of uncertainty due to main chemical compositions in cement and fly ash was discussed and the reliability analyses for applying the suitable replacement were reviewed. Finally an applicability of the concepts mentioned above based on statistical data of materials available was demonstrated. The results from analyses were consistent with the testing results by other researchers. The results of this study provided guidelines of suitable utilization of fly ash for partial replacement of cement. It was interesting to note that these concepts could be extended to optimize partial replacement of cement by other types of pozzolan which were described in the other papers of the authors.

  17. The effect of temperature rise on microstructural properties of cement-based materials : Correlation of experimental data and a simulation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the influence of stray current flow on temperature rise in hardening cement-based materials and consequently altered cement hydration. To simulate stray current, different levels of electrical current were applied to cement paste and mortar specimens immediately after casting.

  18. Manufacturing of wollastonite-based glass from cement dust: Physical and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Francis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available By-pass cement dust is considered as a source of environmental pollution. Wollastonite-based glass foams are made by adding glass waste and SiC to the cement dust. XRD on samples indicated that the main crystalline phase after heat treatment at 850–1,000°C is wollastonite. Empirical models were developed to derive conclusion on the impact of SiC and temperature on the physical and mechanical properties of the products. The optimum sintering temperature was found to be at 900°C for 60 min, at which crushing strength was about 15 MPa and was the best uniform. Such wollastonite-based glass foam could be very attractive for thermal and acoustic applications.

  19. Utilization of cement treated recycled concrete aggregates as base or subbase layer in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ebrahim Abu El-Maaty Behiry

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, environmental protection has a great concern in Egypt where recycling of increased demolition debris has become a viable option to be incorporated into roads applications. An extensive laboratory program is conducted to study the feasibility of using recycled concrete aggregate (RCA mixed with traditional limestone aggregate (LSA which is currently being used in base or subbase applications in Egypt. Moreover, the influence of mixture variables on the mechanical properties of cement treated recycled aggregate (CTRA is investigated. Models to predict the compressive and tensile strengths based on mixture parameters are established. The results show that the adding of RCA improves the mechanical properties of the mixture where the unconfined compressive strength (UCS is taken as an important quality indicator. Variables influencing the UCS such as cement content, curing time, dry density play important roles to determine the performance of CTRA.

  20. Evaluation of leaching behavior and immobilization of zinc in cement-based solidified products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krolo Petar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has examined leaching behavior of monolithic stabilized/solidified products contaminated with zinc by performing modified dynamic leaching test. The effectiveness of cement-based stabilization/solidification treatment was evaluated by determining the cumulative release of Zn and diffusion coefficients, De. The experimental results indicated that the cumulative release of Zn decreases as the addition of binder increases. The values of the Zn diffusion coefficients for all samples ranged from 1.210-8 to 1.1610-12 cm2 s-1. The samples with higher amounts of binder had lower De values. The test results showed that cement-based stabilization/solidification treatment was effective in immobilization of electroplating sludge and waste zeolite. A model developed by de Groot and van der Sloot was used to clarify the controlling mechanisms. The controlling leaching mechanism was found to be diffusion for samples with small amounts of waste material, and dissolution for higher waste contents.

  1. Image-based characterization of cement pore structure using Wood`s metal intrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, K.L.; Abell, A.B.; Lange, D.A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1998-12-01

    Mercury intrusion porosimetry is a widely used technique for characterization of the pore size distribution of cement-based materials. However, the technique has several limitations, among which are the ink bottle effect and a cylindrical pore geometry assumption that lead to inaccurate pore size distribution curves. By substituting Wood`s metal for mercury as the intruding liquid, scanning electron microscopy and imaging techniques can be applied to the sample after intrusion. The molten Wood`s metal solidifies within the pore structure of the sample, which allows it to be sectioned and observed in the scanning electron microscopy. From here, the sample can be analyzed both qualitatively, by observing the changes in the appearance of the sample as the intrusion process progresses, and quantitatively, by applying image analysis techniques. This study provides insight for better interpretation of mercury intrusion porosimetry results and the possibility for quantitative characterization of the spatial geometry of pores in cement-based materials.

  2. Process based system models for detecting opportunities and threats : the case of World Cement Production

    OpenAIRE

    Isaksson, Raine

    2016-01-01

    Background Visualising change needs could be complex. One way of sense - making is to use process based system models. G lobal warming require s major changes in many fields and especially for cement manufacturing, which represents a growing portion of manmade carbon emissions . The industry has proposed measures for change , but it is diff icult to assess how good these are and more sense - making is needed to clarify the situation. Purpose The purpose is to visualise opportunities and threa...

  3. Influence of adjuvants on the properties of underwater cast concrete on base of cement (HRS 32.5 N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouis Mohamed Jamel

    2014-04-01

    *The characterization tests of concrete in the hardened state including destructive and non destructive tests performed on specimens made in concrete (based on portland cement, with varying dosages and adjuvants at different times (28d and 90d.

  4. Combined Use of Shrinkage Reducing Admixture and CaO in Cement Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Giosuè, Chiara; Monosi, Saveria

    2017-10-01

    The combined addition of a Shrinkage-Reducing Admixture (SRA) with a CaO-based expansive agent (CaO) has been found to have a synergistic effect to improve the dimensional stability of cement based materials. In this work, aimed to further investigate the effect, mortar and self-compacting concrete specimens were prepared either without admixtures, as reference, or with SRA alone and/or CaO. Their performance was compared in terms of compressive strength and free shrinkage measurements. Results showed that the synergistic effect in reducing shrinkage is confirmed in the specimens manufactured with SRA and CaO. In order to clarify this phenomenon, the effect of SRA on the hydration of CaO as well as cement was evaluated through different techniques. The obtained results show that SRA induces a finer microstructure of the CaO hydration products and a retarding effect on the microstructure development of cement based materials. A more deformable mortar or concrete, due to the delay in microstructure development by SRA, coupled with a finer microstructure of CaO hydration products could allow higher early expansion, which might contribute in contrasting better the successive drying shrinkage.

  5. Effects of Leaching Behavior of Calcium Ions on Compression and Durability of Cement-Based Materials with Mineral Admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, An; Chao, Sao-Jeng; Lin, Wei-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of calcium ions increases the porosity of cement-based materials, consequently resulting in a negative effect on durability since it provides an entry for aggressive harmful ions, causing reinforcing steel corrosion. This study investigates the effects of leaching behavior of calcium ions on the compression and durability of cement-based materials. Since the parameters influencing the leaching behavior of cement-based materials are unclear and diverse, this paper focuses on the influence of added mineral admixtures (fly ash, slag and silica fume) on the leaching behavior of calcium ions regarding compression and durability of cemented-based materials. Ammonium nitrate solution was used to accelerate the leaching process in this study. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis were employed to analyze and compare the cement-based material compositions prior to and after calcium ion leaching. The experimental results show that the mineral admixtures reduce calcium hydroxide quantity and refine pore structure through pozzolanic reaction, thus enhancing the compressive strength and durability of cement-based materials. PMID:28809247

  6. Shear bond strength of novel calcium aluminate-based cement (EndoBinder) to root dentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Rossetto, Hebert Luis; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the shear bond strength of a novel calcium aluminate-based cement, EndoBinder (EB), to dentine in comparison with Grey and White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA). Materials and Methods: Root canal hemi-sections obtained from 30 extracted molar teeth were embedded in self-polymerized acrylic resin and were grounded wet in order to obtain a flat dentine surface. Next, the roots were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 10), according to the cement used, as follows: EB: EndoBinder; WMTA: White MTA and GMTA: Grey MTA. The shear bond strength test was performed using a Universal Testing Machine (0.5 mm/min) and the data were submitted to statistical analysis (1-way ANOVA and Tukey tests, P 0.05). WMTA presented the lowest mean values, which were significant in comparison with EB (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The novel calcium aluminate-based cement presented higher shear bond strength than WMTA, and should be considered as a promising alternative in endodontic therapy. PMID:25512731

  7. Polycarboxylate Based Superplasticizers as Dispersant Agents for Exfoliated Graphene Nanoplatelets Reinforcing Cement Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. S. Metaxa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs are considered one of the most advanced nanomaterials that hold the promise of providing multifunctional characteristics to the cementitious matrix. To effectively employ the GNPs as a nanoreinforcement, their uniform dispersion within the matrix must be achieved. The present study investigates the efficiency of four different polycarboxylate based superplasticizers, which are fully compatible with cement-based materials, to be exploited as GNPs dispersant agents. Exfoliated GNPs were selected that had a quite small diameter/lateral size of ~5 µm. The dispersing efficiency of the superplasticizers was investigated experimentally by measuring the electrical resistivity of the resulting nanocomposites. A discussion explaining the dispersing mechanism of these types of surfactants is provided. The use of a superplasticizer in conjunction with ultrasonic energy application was found to be necessary to properly disperse the GNPs. The results prove that the polycarboxylate based superplasticizers can be employed to promote the GNPs uniform distribution in cementitious materials. The polycarboxylate ester superplasticizer showed poor results, while the polycarboxylate polymer superplasticizers were found to be more effective to uniformly disperse the GNPs.

  8. A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1994-03-01

    The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

  9. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan CANTEK?N

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB composites, silorane-based (SB composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Material and Methods: Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results: The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2 than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7 (p<0.001, the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6 and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6 showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively. Conclusions: The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  10. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantekin, Kenan; Avci, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. The highest (17.7 ± 6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8 ± 3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7 ± 6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9 ± 5.7) (p Biodentine® = 8.0 ± 3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA = 5.8 ± 3.2; GIC and Biodentine = 6.7 ± 2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p = 0.73 and p = 0.38, respectively). The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  11. Influence of fluoride- or triclosan-based desensitizing agents on adhesion of resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Mine; Cal, Ebru; Gökçe, Bülent; Türkün, Murat; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2010-10-01

    Effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of resin cements to dentin was evaluated. Intact premolars (N = 90) were embedded in polymethyl methacrylate; dentin surfaces were exposed, and they were randomly divided into two main groups of cements (Duolink (D), Variolink II (V); n = 45 per group) and then into three desensitizer subgroups (n = 15 per subgroup). Teeth in controls (C) were treated according to cements' adhesion protocols; the other two groups received either fluoride- [Aqua-Prep F (F)] or triclosan-based [Seal&Protect (T)] desensitizers. Ceramic disks (Empress 2) were adhered; specimens were thermocycled (×5,000 cycles, 5-55 ± 1°C, dwell time 30 s) and subjected to shear bond strength test (MPa ± SD) in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). Failure types were classified using scanning electron microscope. For V, application of both desensitizers (29.6 ± 7.8 and 22.8 ± 2.8 for F and T, respectively) did not present significantly different results than that of the VC (21.2 ± 2.3; p > 0.05, one-way ANOVA). In D, F (20.6 ± 2.4) showed significantly higher results (p types.

  12. Bactericidal strontium-releasing injectable bone cements based on bioactive glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Delia S.; Karpukhina, Natalia; Kedia, Gopal; Bhat, Aditya; Law, Robert V.; Radecka, Izabela; Hill, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Strontium-releasing injectable bone cements may have the potential to prevent implant-related infections through the bactericidal action of strontium, while enhancing bone formation in patients suffering from osteoporosis. A melt-derived bioactive glass (BG) series (SiO2–CaO–CaF2–MgO) with 0–50% of calcium substituted with strontium on a molar base were produced. By mixing glass powder, poly(acrylic acid) and water, cements were obtained which can be delivered by injection and set in situ, giving compressive strength of up to 35 MPa. Strontium release was dependent on BG composition with increasing strontium substitution resulting in higher concentrations in the medium. Bactericidal effects were tested on Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis; cell counts were reduced by up to three orders of magnitude over 6 days. Results show that bactericidal action can be increased through BG strontium substitution, allowing for the design of novel antimicrobial and bone enhancing cements for use in vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty for treating osteoporosis-related vertebral compression fractures. PMID:23097502

  13. DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF A CEMENT BASED SOLID WASTE FORM USING SYNTHETIC UP-1 GROUNDWATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COOKE, G.A.; LOCKREM, L.L.

    2006-11-10

    The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site is investigating the conversion of several liquid waste streams from evaporator operations into solid cement-based waste forms. The cement/waste mixture will be poured into plastic-lined mold boxes. After solidification the bags will be removed from the molds and sealed for land disposal at the Hanford Site. The RJ Lee Group, Inc. Center for Laboratory Sciences (CLS) at Columbia Basin College (CBC) was requested to develop and test a cementitious solids (CS) formulation to solidify evaporated groundwater brine, identified as UP-1, from Basin 43. Laboratory testing of cement/simulant mixtures is required to demonstrate the viability of cement formulations that reduce the overall cost, minimize bleed water and expansion, and provide suitable strength and cure temperature. Technical support provided mixing, testing, and reporting of values for a defined composite solid waste form. In this task, formulations utilizing Basin 43 simulant at varying wt% solids were explored. The initial mixing consisted of making small ({approx} 300 g) batches and casting into 500-mL Nalgene{reg_sign} jars. The mixes were cured under adiabatic conditions and checked for bleed water and consistency at recorded time intervals over a 1-week period. After the results from the preliminary mixing, four formulations were selected for further study. The testing documentation included workability, bleed water analysis (volume and pH) after 24 hours, expansivity/shrinkage, compressive strength, and selected Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) leach analytes of the resulting solid waste form.

  14. Limestone and Silica Powder Replacements for Cement: Early-Age Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Dale P; Ferraris, Chiara F; Jones, Scott Z; Lootens, Didier; Zunino, Franco

    2017-04-01

    Developing functional concrete mixtures with less ordinary portland cement (OPC) has been one of the key objectives of the 21 st century sustainability movement. While the supplies of many alternatives to OPC (such as fly ash or slag) may be limited, those of limestone and silica powders produced by crushing rocks seem virtually endless. The present study examines the chemical and physical influences of these powders on the rheology, hydration, and setting of cement-based materials via experiments and three-dimensional microstructural modeling. It is shown that both limestone and silica particle surfaces are active templates (sites) for the nucleation and growth of cement hydration products, while the limestone itself is also somewhat soluble, leading to the formation of carboaluminate hydration products. Because the filler particles are incorporated as active members of the percolated backbone that constitutes initial setting of a cement-based system, replacements of up to 50 % of the OPC by either of these powders on a volumetric basis have minimal impact on the initial setting time, and even a paste with only 5 % OPC and 95 % limestone powder by volume achieves initial set within 24 h. While their influence on setting is similar, the limestone and silica powders produce pastes with quite different rheological properties, when substituted at the same volume level. When proceeding from setting to later age strength development, one must also consider the dilution of the system due to cement removal, along with the solubility/reactivity of the filler. However, for applications where controlled (prompt) setting is more critical than developing high strengths, such as mortar tile adhesives, grouts, and renderings, significant levels of these powder replacements for cement can serve as sustainable, functional alternatives to the oft-employed 100 % OPC products.

  15. Influence of frost damage and sample preconditioning on the porosity characterization of cement based materials using low temperature calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Fridh, Katja; Johannesson, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature calorimetry (LTC) can be used to study the meso-porosity of cement based materials. The influence of frost damage on the meso-porosity determination by LTC was explored on a model material MCM-41 and two cement pastes by conducting repeated cycles of freezing and melting...... the preconditioning has limited influence on the freezing and melting behavior of the pore solution in the studied cement paste samples....... measurements. The results indicate that the pressure generated during freezing and melting measurements has little impact on the pore structure of the powder MCM-41 samples. As for the studied cylinder samples of cement pastes, frost damage probably took place and it changed the pore connectivity while it had...

  16. Prediction of SEM–X-ray images’ data of cement-based materials using artificial neural network algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ragab Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances of computational capabilities have motivated the development of more sophisticated models to simulate cement-based hydration. However, the input parameters for such models, obtained from SEM–X-ray image analyses, are quite complicated and hinder their versatile application. This paper addresses the utilization of the artificial neural networks (ANNs to predict the SEM–X-ray images’ data of cement-based materials (surface area fraction and the cement phases’ correlation functions. ANNs have been used to correlate these data, already obtained for 21 types of cement, to basic cement data (cement compounds and fineness. Two approaches have been proposed; the ANN, and the ANN-regression method. Comparisons have shown that the ANN proves effectiveness in predicting the surface area fraction, while the ANN-regression is more computationally suitable for the correlation functions. Results have shown good agreement between the proposed techniques and the actual data with respect to hydration products, degree of hydration, and simulated images.

  17. Gas permeability of cement based materials; Etude de la permeabilite au gaz des materiaux cimentaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galle, Ch.; Pin, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets (DCC/DESD/SESD), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Daian, J.F. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, (INPG/CNRS/IRD), 38 (France)

    2000-07-01

    The study of the permeability of cement based materials is an important issue for their transport properties, which are good indicators of their durability. Studies were undertaken to acquire experimental data and to model the gas permeability of cement based materials. Among many parameters like cement type, water-cement ratio (w/c), curing, etc, the degree of water saturation and microstructural properties are the two main parameters controlling the ability of such type of materials to transport gas. It is well known that the higher the water saturation, the lower the gas permeability. Under pressure, gas will be also transported through the biggest pore accesses. It must be emphasized that the w/c ratio is the fundamental parameter for cement based materials. This ratio controls the hydration process and hence the material porosity. Gas permeability was calculated with Darcy law as modified by the Hagen-Poiseuille formula (1). Various materials were investigated: pure cement pastes prepared with different types of cement (CEM I-OPC, CEM V-BFS-PFA) and various w/c ratios, and industrial concretes. After curing, the samples were stored under controlled relative humidity conditions using saline solutions to reach a stable hydric state. N{sup 2} gas permeability tests were then performed with a Hassler apparatus. The microstructural properties of CEM I and CEM V materials are given in Figure 2. Examples of experimental results obtained with pure pastes are shown in Figure 3. A comparative example of paste and concrete data is provided in Figure 4. It was experimentally observed that gas permeability is extremely sensitive to material water saturation: up to five orders of magnitude of variation (between 10{sup -16} and 10{sup -21} m{sup 2} on average) for water saturations from a few % to 100%. The higher the w/c ratio, the higher the gas permeability. CEM I pastes are also less permeable than CEM V pastes. The higher total porosity effect of CEM V materials is not

  18. Liquid Secondary Waste Grout Formulation and Waste Form Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, B. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle M. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-05-23

    This report describes the results from liquid secondary waste (LSW) grout formulation and waste form qualification tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate new formulations for preparing a grout waste form with high-sulfate secondary waste simulants and the release of key constituents from these grout monoliths. Specific objectives of the LSW grout formulation and waste form qualification tests described in this report focused on five activities: 1.preparing new formulations for the LSW grout waste form with high-sulfate LSW simulants and solid characterization of the cured LSW grout waste form; 2.conducting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1313 leach test (EPA 2012) on the grout prepared with the new formulations, which solidify sulfate-rich Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) off-gas condensate secondary waste simulant, using deionized water (DIW); 3.conducting the EPA Method 1315 leach tests (EPA 2013) on the grout monoliths made with the new dry blend formulations and three LSW simulants (242-A evaporator condensate, Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) leachate, and WTP off-gas condensate) using two leachants, DIW and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water (VZPW); 4.estimating the 99Tc desorption Kd (distribution coefficient) values for 99Tc transport in oxidizing conditions to support the IDF performance assessment (PA); 5.estimating the solubility of 99Tc(IV)-bearing solid phases for 99Tc transport in reducing conditions to support the IDF PA.

  19. Development of a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement based on magnesium/strontium-silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Ae [Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University Graduate School, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Abo-Mosallam, Hany A. [Glass Research Department, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Lee, Hye-Young [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University Graduate School, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyu-Ri [Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University Graduate School, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae-Won [Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University Graduate School, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hae-Hyoung, E-mail: haelee@dku.edu [Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-01

    The effects of strontium substitution for magnesium in a novel aluminum-free multicomponent glass composition for glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. A series of glass compositions were prepared based on SiO{sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-CaO-ZnO-MgO{sub (1-X)}-SrO{sub X}-CaF{sub 2} (X = 0, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75). The mechanical properties of GICs prepared were characterized by compressive strength, flexural strength, flexural modules, and microhardness. Cell proliferation was evaluated indirectly by CCK-8 assay using various dilutions of the cement and rat mesenchyme stem cells. Incorporation of strontium instead of magnesium in the glasses has a significant influence on setting time of the cements and the properties. All mechanical properties of the GICs with SrO substitution at X = 0.25 were significantly increased, then gradually decreased with further increase of the amount of strontium substitution in the glass. The GIC at X = 0.25, also, showed an improved cell viability at low doses of the cement extracts in comparison with other groups or control without extracts. The results of this study demonstrate that the glass compositions with strontium substitution at low levels can be successfully used to prepare aluminum-free glass ionomer cements for repair and regeneration of hard tissues. - Highlights: • We developed multicomponent glass compositions for a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement (GIC). • The effects of MgO replacement with SrO in the glasses on the mechanical properties and cell proliferation were evaluated. • Substitution of MgO with SrO at low levels led to improvement of mechanical properties and cell viability of the cements. • Microstructural degradations in the cement matrix of the GICs with strontium at high levels were observed after aging.

  20. Incinerated sewage sludge ash as alternative binder in cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejcirikova, Barbora; Goltermann, Per; Hodicky, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Sewage sludge ash is characterized by its pozzolanic properties, as cement is. This predetermines its use in a substitution of cement and cementitious materials. Utilization of sewage sludge ash does not only decrease the consumption of cement, one of the largest cause of CO2 emissions, but also ...

  1. Thermal conductivity coefficient of cement-based mortars as air relative humidity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwińska, A.; Garbalińska, H.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents results of tests and research conducted on three cement-based mortars. At first, moisture sorption was measured at 20°C and six relative humidity levels of the air. The tests were completed with a mathematical description of obtained sorption isotherms. Then, thermal conductivity coefficients λ were measured with stationary and non-stationary techniques on samples of various moisture degree. A linear dependence between coefficient λ and material moisture was determined. Component results of these two stages of research helped determine a mathematical dependence of the thermal conductivity coefficient upon the relative humidity of the tested materials.

  2. Environmental Technology Verification Report: Grouts for Wastewater Collection Systems, Warren Environmental, Inc. 301-04 Epoxy Grout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Municipalities are discovering rapid degradation of infrastructures in wastewater collection and treatment facilities due to infiltration of leaking water from the surrounding environments. Rehabilitation of these facilities by in situ methods, including the use of grouting, is u...

  3. Concrete and cement composites used for radioactive waste deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koťátková, Jaroslava; Zatloukal, Jan; Reiterman, Pavel; Kolář, Karel

    2017-11-01

    This review article presents the current state-of-knowledge of the use of cementitious materials for radioactive waste disposal. An overview of radwaste management processes with respect to the classification of the waste type is given. The application of cementitious materials for waste disposal is divided into two main lines: i) as a matrix for direct immobilization of treated waste form; and ii) as an engineered barrier of secondary protection in the form of concrete or grout. In the first part the immobilization mechanisms of the waste by cement hydration products is briefly described and an up-to date knowledge about the performance of different cementitious materials is given, including both traditional cements and alternative binder systems. The advantages, disadvantages as well as gaps in the base of information in relation to individual materials are stated. The following part of the article is aimed at description of multi-barrier systems for intermediate level waste repositories. It provides examples of proposed concepts by countries with advanced waste management programmes. In the paper summary, the good knowledge of the material durability due to its vast experience from civil engineering is highlighted however with the urge for specific approach during design and construction of a repository in terms of stringent safety requirements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparation of lunar regolith based geopolymer cement under heat and vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gabrielle; Montes, Carlos; Eklund, Sven

    2017-04-01

    Ever since the beginning of the space program, lunar habitation has always been on peoples' minds. Prior researchers have explored habitat building materials - some based on earth-based construction materials, some based on in-situ lunar resources. Geopolymer cement is a cementitious binder made of aluminosilicate materials such as lunar regolith. A cementitious binder made of lunar regolith as the main geopolymer precursor, instead of as an added aggregate, is a solution that has not been deeply explored in prior works. This research explores the curing process of lunar regolith based geopolymer cement in an environment that loosely approximates the lunar environment, using the lunar average daytime temperature and a vacuum. The results did not show much promise for the samples cured under both heat and vacuum as the longest-cured data point did not meet compressive strength standards, but another pathway to lunar habitation may be found in a separate set of samples that cured under heat and ambient atmospheric pressure.

  5. Data report on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Small-Scale Seal Performance Test, Series F grouting experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, E.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dale, T.F.; Van Pelt, R.S. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1996-03-01

    SSSPT-F was designed to evaluate sealing materials at WIPP. It demonstrated: (1) the ability to practically and consistently produce ultrafine cementitious grout at the grouting site, (2) successful, consistent, and efficient injection and permeation of the grout into fractured rock at the repository horizon, (3) ability of the grout to penetrate and seal microfractures, (4) procedures and equipment used to inject the grout. Also techniques to assess the effectiveness of the grout in reducing the gas transmissivity of the fractured rock were evaluated. These included gas-flow/tracer testing, post-grout coring, pre- and post-grout downhole televiewer logging, slab displacement measurements, and increased loading on jacks during grout injection. Pre- and post-grout diamond drill core was obtained for use in ongoing evaluations of grouting effectiveness, degradation, and compatibility. Diamond drill equipment invented for this test successfully prevented drill cuttings from plugging fractures in grout injection holes.

  6. A sorption model for alkalis in cement-based materials - Correlations with solubility and electrokinetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henocq, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    In cement-based materials, radionuclide uptake is mainly controlled by calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). This work presents an approach for defining a unique set of parameters of a surface complexation model describing the sorption behavior of alkali ions on the C-S-H surface. Alkali sorption processes are modeled using the CD-MUSIC function integrated in the Phreeqc V.3.0.6 geochemical code. Parameterization of the model was performed based on (1) retention, (2) zeta potential, and (3) solubility experimental data from the literature. This paper shows an application of this model to sodium ions. It was shown that retention, i.e. surface interactions, and solubility are closely related, and a consistent sorption model for radionuclides in cement-based materials requires a coupled surface interaction/chemical equilibrium model. In case of C-S-H with low calcium-to-silicon ratios, sorption of sodium ions on the C-S-H surface strongly influences the chemical equilibrium of the C-S-H + NaCl system by significantly increasing the aqueous calcium concentration. The close relationship between sorption and chemical equilibrium was successfully illustrated by modeling the effect of the solid-to-liquid ratio on the calcium content in solution in the case of C-S-H + NaCl systems.

  7. A new acrylic-based fluoride-releasing cement as a potential orthodontic bonding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li; Bai, Yuxing; Li, Song; Al-Naimi, Omar T; McCabe, John F

    2010-07-01

    To develop a fluoride-releasing, acrylic-based 'easy on, easy off' bracket cement as a potential orthodontic bonding agent. Three experimental cements were prepared in powder/liquid forms by mixing different ratios of methylmethacrylate (MMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) to form the liquid (L) and sodium fluoride (NaF) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) to form the powder (P). The resultant materials were tested for setting characteristics, fluoride release, hardness, strength, shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index in comparison with resin composite and glass ionomer, which were used as control materials. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. The experimental groups had satisfactory setting characteristics. Fluoride release of the group containing P (10% NaF, 90% PMMA) and L (60% MMA and 40% HEMA) was similar to that of glass ionomer. When experimental materials were stored in water for 7 days, their hardness was reduced and stabilized at a value lower than those for composite and PMMA. Strength was only slightly affected by water storage. The SBSs of the experimental groups were considered clinically acceptable at both 30 min and 1 month. The group containing P (10% NaF, 90% PMMA) and L (90% MMA and 10% HEMA) had a higher mean SBS than the other two experimental groups. At 1 month, there were significantly less adhesive remnants observed on the surface of enamel after debonding for the experimental groups compared with the composite. The new cement could potentially be useful as an orthodontic bonding agent.

  8. Histological analysis of biocompatibility of ionomer cements with an acid-base reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Lacerda dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory and cure events of acid-based reactions using glass ionomer cement used for cementation of crowns, bridges, onlays and orthodontic bands implanted in subcutaneous tissue, at different time intervals. A total of 48 male Wistar rats were used, distributed into 4 groups (n = 12, as follows: Group C (control, polyethylene, Group ME (Meron, Group KC (Ketac Cem and Group PR (Precedent. The animals were sacrificed after time intervals of 7, 15 and 30 days, and their tissues were analyzed under an optical microscope for such events as inflammatory infiltrate, edema, necrosis, granulation tissue, multinucleated giant cells, young fibroblasts and collagen. The results was assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests (p < 0.05. In the initial period, intense inflammatory infiltrate was observed for all the materials with no significant difference among them (p = 0.104. Groups PR and KC showed significant difference in relation to Group C, at 7 days (p = 0.025 and 15 days (p = 0.006. Edema and giant cells were more expressive in Group ME, differing significantly from Groups C (p = 0.023 and KC (p = 0.039, respectively, at 7 days. Group ME showed a statistically significant difference in relation to Groups PR and KC for the presence of young fibroblasts (p = 0.009 and for collagen (p = 0.002, at 7 days. Within the limits of this in vivo study, Precedent and Ketac Cem glass ionomer cements showed better tissue healing with a greater number of fibroblasts and collagen, as compared to Meron.

  9. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan‐based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yeon‐Jee; Baek, Seung‐Ho; Kum, Kee‐Yeon; Shon, Won‐Jun; Woo, Kyung‐Mi

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan‐based (Pz‐) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta‐percha (GP) and Pz‐MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz‐MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin‐material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz‐MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p Mineralized apatite structures (calcium/phosphorous ratio, 1.45–1.89) connecting its way through the dentinal tubules were detected at 350–400 μm from the tubule orifice, and the pre‐crystallization seeds were also observed along the intra‐ and/or inter‐tubular collagen fiber. Intratubular biomineralization depth was significantly enhanced in all PBS pretreated canals (p MTA cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment. SCANNING 38:50–56, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Scanning Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26179659

  10. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan-based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Baek, Seung-Ho; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Shon, Won-Jun; Woo, Kyung-Mi; Lee, WooCheol

    2016-01-01

    The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan-based (Pz-) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta-percha (GP) and Pz-MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz-MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin-material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz-MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p Mineralized apatite structures (calcium/phosphorous ratio, 1.45-1.89) connecting its way through the dentinal tubules were detected at 350-400 μm from the tubule orifice, and the pre-crystallization seeds were also observed along the intra- and/or inter-tubular collagen fiber. Intratubular biomineralization depth was significantly enhanced in all PBS pretreated canals (p MTA cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment. © The Authors. Scanning Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Nanohydroxyapatite Silicate-Based Cement Improves the Primary Stability of Dental Implants: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Khorshidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Insufficient cortical bone volume when placing implants can lead to lack of primary stability. The use of cement as a bone fill material in bone defects around dental implant could result in better clinical outcome. HA has shown excellent biological properties in implant dentistry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of nanohydroxyapatite powder (Nano-HA in combination with accelerated Portland cement (APC on implant primary stability in surgically created circumferential bone defects in a bovine rib in vitro model. Materials and Methods. Sixteen bovine rib bones and thirty-six implants of same type and size (4 mm × 10 mm were used. Implants were divided into six groups: no circumferential bone defect, defect and no grafting, bone chips grafting, Nano-HA grafting, APC grafting, and Nano-HA mixed to APC grafting (Nano-HA-APC. Circumferential defects around the implants were prepared. The implant stability quotient (ISQ values were measured before and after the grafting. Results. APC exhibited the highest ISQ values. A significant increase of ISQ values following the grafting of Nano-HA-APC (18.08±5.82 and APC alone (9.50±4.12 was achieved. Increase of ISQ values after 72 hours was 24.16±5.01 and 17.58±4.89, respectively. Nano-HA grafting alone exhibited the least rise in ISQ values. Conclusions. Nanohydroxyapatite silicate-based cement could improve the primary stability of dental implants in circumferential bone defect around implants.

  12. Mechanical properties of new self-adhesive resin-based cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Kazumichi; Kinuta, Soichiro; Nishida, Hisataka; Miyamae, Morihiro; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the bonding strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, water absorption and the expansion after water storage of new self-adhesive resin cements to commercially available dental cements. Two types (hand-mix and auto-mix) of new self-adhesive resin cements (SAC-H and SAC-A, Kuraray Medical), one conventional resin cement (Panavia F2.0), three self-adhesive resin cements (Relyx Unicem, Maxcem and G-Cem), and two resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (Fuji Luting S and Vitremer) were used. Shear bond strengths, flexural strengths and elastic moduli (ISO 4049), water absorption (ISO 4049), and the expansion rate after water storage were investigated. Both SAC-H and SAC-A provided adhesion to enamel and dentin, and had the same bond strength to gold alloy and zirconia as conventional resin cements. SAC-H and SAC-A had greater flexural strengths (86.4-93.5MPa) than commercial self-adhesive resin cements or glass-ionomer cements. The elastic moduli of self-adhesive and glass-ionomer cements were 5.2-7.4GPa and 2.3-3.4GPa, respectively. The water absorption of SAC-H and SAC-A (26.3-27.7microg/mm(3)) were significantly lower than commercial self-adhesive resin cements. SAC-H and SAC-A showed significantly lower expansion rates (0.17-0.26%) than commercial self-adhesive cements and glass-ionomer cements after 4 weeks water storage. It is suggested that the new self-adhesive resin cements exhibited a favorable bonding capability and mechanical properties.

  13. The comparison of properties and cost of material use of natural rubber and sand in manufacturing cement mortar for construction sub-base layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, R.; Nemmang, M. S.; Hazurina, Nor; Shahidan, S.; Khairul Tajuddin Jemain, Raden; Abdullah, M. E.; Hassan, M. F.

    2017-11-01

    The main issue related to this research was to examine the feasibility of natural rubber SMR 20 in the manufacturing of cement mortar for sub-base layer construction. Subbase layers have certain functions that need to be fulfilled in order to assure strong and adequate permeability of pavement performance. In a pavement structure, sub-base is below the base and serves as the foundation for the overall pavement structure, transmitting traffic loads to the sub-grade and providing drainage. Based on this research, the natural rubber, SMR 20 was with the percentages of 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% to mix with sand in the manufacture of the cement mortar. This research describes some of the properties and cost of the materials for the natural rubber and sand in cement mortar manufacturing by laboratory testing. Effects of the natural rubber replacement on mechanical properties of mortar were investigated by laboratory testing such as compressive strength test and density. This study obtained the 5% of natural rubber replaced in sand can achieved the strength of normal mortar after 7 days and 28 days. The strength of cement mortar depends on the density of cement mortar. According to the cost of both materials, sand shows the lower cost in material for the cement mortar manufacturing than the uses of natural rubber. Thus, the convectional cement mortar which used sand need lower cost than the modified rubber cement mortar and the most economical to apply in industrial. As conclusion, the percentage of 5% natural rubber in the cement mortar would have the same with normal cement mortar in terms of the strength. However, in terms of the cost of the construction, it will increase higher than cost of normal cement mortar production. So that, this modified cement mortar is not economical for the road sub-base construction.

  14. Carbon nanotubes cement composites

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Musso; Jean-Marc Tulliani; Giuseppe Ferro

    2011-01-01

    The present paper reviews the current state of the art of carbon nanotubes cement-based composites and the possible applications. The influence of carbon nanotubes additions onto cement paste mechanical and electrical properties are discussed in detail. Though promising, several challenges have still to be solved before the introduction of these new materials into the public sphere through civil infrastructures.

  15. Prediction of the initial normal stress in piles and anchors constructed using expansive cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberfield, C. M.

    2000-03-01

    Uses for expansive cements and additives have extended well beyond off-setting the shrinkage characteristics of grout and concrete to include enhancement of rock anchor and pile performance, providing an alternative form of connection for tubular members in off-shore structures and as an excavation tool in open-pit mines. In each case, the design rules governing the quantity of expansive additive to be used are based on guesswork or empiricism. This paper presents analytical solutions for estimating the degree of expansion and the level of normal stress developed for a range of different boundary conditions and expansive additive contents. The expansion process is modelled as a thermal expansion and is governed by one parameter that depends on the type of expansive additive and its dosage. Simple laboratory procedures for determining this property are outlined. Predictions from the analytical solutions are compared with laboratory experiments.

  16. Investigating flow properties of partially cemented fractures in Travis Peak Formation using image-based pore-scale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokan-Lawal, Adenike; Prodanović, Maša.; Eichhubl, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Natural fractures can provide preferred flow pathways in otherwise low-permeability reservoirs. In deep subsurface reservoirs including tight oil and gas reservoirs, as well as in hydrothermal systems, fractures are frequently lined or completely filled with mineral cement that reduces or occludes fracture porosity and permeability. Fracture cement linings potentially reduce flow connectivity between the fracture and host rock and increase fracture wall roughness, which constricts flow. We combined image-based fracture space characterization, mercury injection capillary pressure and permeability experiments, and numerical simulations to evaluate the influence of fracture-lining cement on single-phase and multiphase flows along a natural fracture from the Travis Peak Formation, a tight gas reservoir sandstone in East Texas. Using X-ray computed microtomographic image analysis, we characterized fracture geometry and the connectivity and geometric tortuosity of the fracture pore space. Combining level set method-based progressive quasistatic and lattice Boltzmann simulations, we assessed the capillary-dominated displacement properties and the (relative) permeability of a cement-lined fracture. Published empirical correlations between aperture and permeability for barren fractures provide permeability estimates that vary among each other, and differ from our results, vary by several orders of magnitude. Compared to barren fractures, cement increases the geometric tortuosity, aperture variation of the pore space, and capillary pressure while reducing the single-phase permeability by up to 2 orders of magnitude. For multiphase displacement, relative permeability and fluid entrapment geometry resemble those of porous media and differ from those characteristic of barren fractures.

  17. Florida Sinkholes and Grout Injection Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Hunt Griffith II

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Florida has a major problem when it comes to sinkholes. These sinkholes can become very hazardous to people, homes, and to the landscape as a whole. Florida sits on a carbonate platform which is highly indicative of sinkholes. There are three main types of sinkholes which occur in Florida: dissolution, cover subsidence, and cover collapse. I will compare these types of sinkholes to the underlying formation beneath Florida to see if there is a connection between the types of sinkholes that occur. I will also create a 3D model of grout injection stabilization and calculate its volume to compare to the actual volume placed under the house. This information will help inform and bring attention to the problem in Florida and in turn, may help alleviate the problem if we can understand what causes these sinkholes. The 3D model may help engineering companies become more efficient in predicting the projected amount of volume to stabilize a house that may be in danger.

  18. Development of shrinkage and fracture parameters in selected fine-grained cement-based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucharczyková Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes results of a pilot study aimed at the evaluation of an experimental investigation focused on determination of the material characteristics development of selected fine-grained cement-based composites during their ageing. The composition of composites being investigated differed only in a water to cement (w/c ratio and in amount of superplasticizer. Quite extensive experiments were performed with the aim to determine shrinkage, dynamic a static modulus of elasticity and fracture properties on test specimens exposed to free drying during the whole time of its ageing (including the early stage of setting and hardening. The article presents especially results (including their statistical evaluation of shrinkage and fracture parameters development within 90 days of composites’ ageing. Experimental results show the dependence of the investigated characteristics on the value of w/c ratio. The most visible effect was observed in the case of shrinkage development. The curing conditions were reflected especially in high variability of the test results.

  19. Study on Strength and Microstructure of Cement-Based Materials Containing Combination Mineral Admixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meijuan Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The compressive strength of complex binders containing two or three blended mineral admixtures in terms of glass powder (GP, limestone powder (LP, and steel slag powder (SP was determined by a battery solution type compressive testing machine. The morphology and microstructure characteristics of complex binder hydration products were also studied by microscopic analysis methods, such as XRD, TG-DTA, and SEM. The mechanical properties of the cement-based materials were analyzed to reveal the most appropriate mineral admixture type and content. The early sample strength development with GP was very slow, but it rapidly grew at later stages. The micro aggregate effect and pozzolanic reaction mutually occurred in the mineral admixture. In the early stage, the micro aggregate effect reduced paste porosity and the small particles connected with the cement hydration products to enhance its strength. In the later stage, the pozzolanic reaction of some components in the complex powder occurred and consumed part of the calcium hydroxide to form C-S-H gel, thus improving the hydration environment. Also, the produced C-S-H gel made the structure more compact, which improved the structure’s strength.

  20. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Calcium Silicate-Based Endodontic Cement as Root-End Filling Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Küçükkaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of three types of calcium silicate-based endodontic cement after different incubation periods with human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were cultured from extracted third molars and seeded in 96-well plates. MTA, calcium enriched mixture (CEM cement, and Biodentine were prepared and added to culture insert plates which were immediately placed into 96-well plates containing cultured cells. After incubation periods of 24, 48, and 72 hours, cell viability was determined with WST-1 assay. Data were analysed statistically by ANOVA with repeated measures and Bonferroni tests. There was no significant difference in cell viability amongst the test materials after each incubation period (P>0.05. MTA and CEM presented more than 90% cell viability after 24 and 48 hours of incubation and showed statistically significant decrease in cell viability after 72 hours of incubation (P<0.05. Biodentine showed significantly less cell viability (73% after 24 hours of incubation, whereas more than 90% cell viability was seen after 48 and 72 hours of incubation (P<0.05. Despite the significant changes in cell viability over time, materials presented similar cytotoxicity profile. Biodentine and CEM can be considered as alternative materials for root-end surgery procedures.

  1. Development of a novel aluminum-free glass ionomer cement based on magnesium/strontium-silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Ae; Abo-Mosallam, Hany A; Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Gyu-Ri; Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2014-09-01

    The effects of strontium substitution for magnesium in a novel aluminum-free multicomponent glass composition for glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. A series of glass compositions were prepared based on SiO2-P2O5-CaO-ZnO-MgO(1-X)-SrOX-CaF2 (X=0, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75). The mechanical properties of GICs prepared were characterized by compressive strength, flexural strength, flexural modules, and microhardness. Cell proliferation was evaluated indirectly by CCK-8 assay using various dilutions of the cement and rat mesenchyme stem cells. Incorporation of strontium instead of magnesium in the glasses has a significant influence on setting time of the cements and the properties. All mechanical properties of the GICs with SrO substitution at X=0.25 were significantly increased, then gradually decreased with further increase of the amount of strontium substitution in the glass. The GIC at X=0.25, also, showed an improved cell viability at low doses of the cement extracts in comparison with other groups or control without extracts. The results of this study demonstrate that the glass compositions with strontium substitution at low levels can be successfully used to prepare aluminum-free glass ionomer cements for repair and regeneration of hard tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Microstructure-based simulation of time-dependent chloride diffusivity in saturated cement paste

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Mingzhong; Ye, Guang; Van Breugel, K.

    2010-01-01

    For accurately predicting the service life and evaluating the durability of reinforced concrete structure exposed to chloride environments, it is highly desirable to determine the chloride diffusivity in cement paste. Because of continuous cement hydration and chloride binding during the process of chloride diffusion, chloride diffusivity varies with time. In this paper, a computational approacht for predicting the time-depending chloride diffusivity in cement paste is presented. HYMOSTRUC3D,...

  3. Developement of calcium aluminate based systems for sludge cementation from radwaste decontamination

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear industry generated waste including radioactive wastes, which have different forms and origins. The wastes produced by reprocessing of nuclear fuel are characterized by important water content, by high pH and temperature sensitivity. The cementation in ettringite systems might be a promising solution to solidify radioactive wastes. Mixtures of Calcium Aluminate Cement (CAC) and calcium sulfate are planned to be used, instead of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), to form a significant amou...

  4. Recommended method for measurement of absorbency of superabsorbent polymers in cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The application of superabsorbent polymers in concrete technology is now becoming a reality in several places in the world. Independently of the specific technical application involving any of the hydrogels, the design of cement-based materials requires that the knowledge on the absorbency...... of superabsorbent polymers in cementitious environments is well determined. It is vital that a generalized agreement over which method should be utilized with this regard is obtained, so large-scale industrial applications can be developed with sufficient quality and safeguards. There ought to be a standard method...... so that the properties of concrete with superabsorbent polymers can be better controlled in practice. In this paper, a technique that can be potentially used as a standard method is developed. The method is based on a measurement technique validated through an international standard procedure...

  5. MICROSTRUCTURE-BASED PREDICTION MODEL FOR CHLORIDE ION DIFFUSIVITY IN HYDRATED CEMENT PASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Ma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In cement hydration, various hydration products and pores are produced to form a complex microstructure. The quantity of the hydration products and pores heavily influences the macroscopic properties of hydrated cement paste. The chloride ion diffusivity of cement paste is considered to have a close relation to durability. We propose a prediction model of the chloride ion diffusivity of cement paste using homogenization theory to find the relationship between the microstructure and the macroscopic properties. This model considers the percolation phenomenon and the tortuosity of the transport path in the hydrated cement paste microstructure. The chloride ion diffusion coefficient of the cement paste was tested via electricity-accelerated diffusion experiments on cement pastes prepared using three water-cement ratios (0.23, 0.35 and 0.53, respectively. The Jennings-Tennis model was used to calculate the quantity of hydration products in the hydrated cement paste microstructure. With different homogenization theories, the predicted results of the chloride ion diffusion coefficients agree well with the experimental data, which shows the reliability of the presented model.

  6. Pavement structure mechanics response of flexible on semi-flexible overlay that based on the old cement concrete pavement damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Ruinan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The old cement pavement damage status directly affect the design of the paving renovation. Based on the state of the old road investigation, combined with the research data at home and abroad, use the control index that average deflection, deflection value and CBR value to determine the reasonable time to overlay. Draw up the typical pavement structure according to the principle of combination of old cement pavement overlay structure design, and calculated that the tensile stress and shear stress in asphalt layer ,semi-flexible layer and the tensile in the old cement pavement adopting BISA3.0 statics finite element analysis model when modulus in the old road was diminishing. Use the computed result to analyses the influence of old road damage condition the influence of pavement structure.

  7. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  8. Persistence of endodontic methacrylate-based cement residues on dentin adhesive surface treated with different chemical removal protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Milton Carlos; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis; De Campos, Edson Alves; Faria, Gisele; Keine, Kátia Cristina; Dantas, Andrea Abi Rached; Faria, Norberto Batista

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the persistence of methacrylate-based cement residues on the dentin, after dentin surface cleaning with ethanol or acetone, with or without previous application of a dentin adhesive. Forty bovine crown fragments were obtained and the dentin surface was washed with 1.0 mL of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), followed by 0.1 mL of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid application for 3 min, and final irrigation with 2.5% NaOCl. The specimens were air dried and resin-based cement was rubbed onto the dentine surface with a microbrush applicator. In 20 specimens, previously to cement, a dentin adhesive was applied in all surfaces. After 15 min, the surface was scrubbed with a cotton pellet and moistened with ethanol or acetone, compounding the following groups: G1-99.5% ethanol and G2-acetone, without previous use of dentin adhesive; G3-99.5% ethanol and G4-acetone, with previous use of dentin adhesive. The dentin surface was scrubbed until the cement residues could not be visually detected. Sections were then processed for scanning electron microscopy and evaluated at 500× magnification and scores were attributed to each image according to the area covered by residual sealer, and data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis at 5% significance. The lower residue presence was observed in G3 (P = 0.005). All surface presented cement residues when acetone was used as cleaning solution (P = 0.0005). The cleaning solutions were unable to completely remove the cement residues from both surfaces. The ethanol used after previous application of the dentin adhesive promoted the lower presence of residues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Liquid return from gas pressurization of grouted waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, W.J.; Benny, H.L.

    1994-05-01

    The ability to force pore liquids out of a simulated waste grout matrix using air pressure was measured. Specimens cured under various conditions were placed in a permeameter and subjected to increasing air pressure. The pressure was held constant for 24 hours and then stepped up until either liquid was released or 150 psi was reached. One specimen was taken to 190 psi with no liquid release. Permeability to simulated tank waste was then measured. Compressive strength was measured following these tests. This data is to assess the amount of fluid that might be released from grouted waste resulting from the buildup of radiolytically generated hydrogen and other gasses within the waste form matrix. A plot of the unconfined compressive strength versus breakthrough pressures identifies a region of ``good`` grout, which will resist liquid release.

  10. Effect of phase composition of calcium silicate phosphate component on properties of brushite based composite cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopcak, T., E-mail: tsopcak@imr.saske.sk [Institute of Materials Research of SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Medvecky, L.; Giretova, M.; Stulajterova, R.; Durisin, J. [Institute of Materials Research of SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Girman, V. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, P. J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Faberova, M. [Institute of Materials Research of SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2016-07-15

    The composite cement mixtures were prepared by mixing brushite (B) with, the amorphous hydrated calcium silicate phosphate (CSPH) or annealed calcium silicate phosphate (CSP composed of Si-saturated hydroxyapatite, wollastonite and silica) phases and water as liquid component. The contents of the silicate-phosphate phase in composites were 10.30 and 50 wt%. The significant effect of both the Ca/P ratio and different solubility of calcium silicate phosphate component in starting cement systems on setting time and phase composition of the final composite cements was demonstrated. The compressive strength of the set cements increased with the filler addition and the highest value (~ 48 MPa) exhibited the 50CSP/B cement composite. The final setting times of the composite cements decreased with the CSPH addition from about 25 to 17 min in 50CSHP/B and setting time of CSP/B composites was around 30 min. The higher content of silica in cements caused the precipitation of fine hydroxyapatite particles in the form of nanoneedles or thin plates perpendicularly oriented to sample surface. The analysis of in vitro cement cytotoxicity demonstrated the strong reduction in cytotoxicity of 10CSPH/B composite with time of cultivation (a low cytotoxicity after 9 days of culture) contrary to cements with higher calcium silicate-phosphate content. These results were attributed to the different surface topography of composite substrates and possible stimulation of cell proliferation by the slow continuously release of ions from 10CSPH/B cement. - Highlights: • Ca/P ratio and solubility of calcium silicate-phosphate components affect the self-setting properties of cements. • Strong relationship between the composite in vitro cytotoxicity and surface microtopography was demonstrated. • Plate-like morphology of coarser particles allowed cells to better adhere and proliferate as compared with nanoneedles.

  11. Performance of Grouted Splice Sleeve Connector under Tensile Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alias

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The grouted splice sleeve connector system takes advantage of the bond-slip resistance of the grout and the mechanical gripping of reinforcement bars to provide resistance to tensile force. In this system, grout acts as a load-transferring medium and bonding material between the bars and sleeve. This study adopted the end-to-end rebars connection method to investigate the effect of development length and sleeve diameter on the bonding performance of the sleeve connector. The end-to-end method refers to the condition where reinforcement bars are inserted into the sleeve from both ends and meet at the centre before grout is filled. Eight specimens of grouted splice sleeve connector were tested under tensile load to determine their performance. The sleeve connector was designed using 5 mm thick circular hollow section (CHS steel pipe and consisted of one external and two internal sleeves. The tensile test results show that connectors with a smaller external and internal sleeve diameter appear to provide better bonding performance. Three types of failure were observed in this research, which are bar fracture (outside the sleeve, bar pullout, and internal sleeve pullout. With reference to these failure types, the development length of 200 mm is the optimum value due to its bar fracture type, which indicates that the tensile capacity of the connector is higher than the reinforcement bar. It is found that the performance of the grouted splice sleeve connector is influenced by the development length of the reinforcement bar and the diameter of the sleeve.

  12. The regulation of hardening kinetics of building composites based on cement binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamtsevich, Aleksey; Shilova, Liubov

    2017-10-01

    The issue of regulation of hydraulic mineral binders hydration kinetics and development of solutions for stabilization of hydration process due to application of mineral and organic additives are investigated in this research. The article presents results of the theory and practice of hydration hardening building materials production analysis with the use of heat treatment methods, obtained for the developing of set measures for reducing the temperature regime of containing products produced from construction mixtures based on Portland cement, while maintaining high kinetics of the set stripping strength and simultaneous reduction of the binder consumption, and as well as a decrease in the microstructure defect of the final material and energy consumption of the technological process.

  13. Effects of Two Redispersible Polymer Powders on Efflorescence of Portland Cement-based Decorative Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimei ZHU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of redispersible polymer powders of ethylene/Vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA and ethylene/vinyl laurate/vinyl chloride terpolymer (E/VL/VC on the efflorescence of Portland cement-based decorative mortar (PCBDM were studied. The results showed that EVA slightly prolongs the efflorescence duration of fresh PCBDM; and exacerbates efflorescence of hardened PCBDM, because it increases the content of soluble salts such as Ca2+, K+, Na+ ions in hardened PCBDM and promotes their migration. E/VL/VC exacerbates efflorescence of fresh PCBDM due to it easily dissolves in the surface water; but reduces efflorescence of hardened PCBDM, which is attributed to that it decreases the soluble salts content in hardened PCBDM and prohibits salts migration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4053

  14. Applications of solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in studies of Portland cements-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen; Andersen, Morten Daugaard; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy represents an important research tool in the characterization of a range of structural properties for cement-based materials. Different approaches of the technique can be used to obtain information on hydration kinetics, mobile and bound water, porosity, and local...

  15. Recycling red mud from the production of aluminium as a red cement-based mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Jianfeng; Li, Haoxin; Zhao, Piqi; Chen, Qin

    2017-05-01

    Current management for red mud is insufficient and a new method is needed. A series of experiments have been carried out to develop a new approach for effective management of red mud. Mortars without or with 3%, 6% and 9% red mud were prepared and their fresh and hardened properties were measured to access the possibility of recycling the red mud in the production of red cement-based mortar. The mechanisms corresponding to their mechanical performance variations were explored by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the fresh mortars with red mud present an increase of viscosity as compared with the control. However, little difference is found when the content of red mud is altered. It also can be seen that red mud increases flow time and reduces the slump flow of the mortar. Meanwhile, it is found that mortar with red mud is provided with higher air content. Red mud is eligible to adjust the decorative mortar colour. Compressive strength of mortar is improved when less than 6% red mud is added. However, overall it has a slightly negative effect on tensile bond strength. It decreases the Ca(OH) 2 content and densifies the microstructure of hardened paste. The heavy metal concentrations in leachates of mortars with red mud are much lower than the values required in the standard, and it will not do harm to people's health and the environment. These results are important to recycle and effectively manage red mud via the production of red cement-based mortar.

  16. Numerical modelling of porous cement-based materials by superabsorbent polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viejo, Ismael; Esteves, Luis Pedro; Laspalas, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The development of new cementitious materials raises new challenges with regard to structural design. One of the potential applications of superabsorbent polymers (SAP) is to deliver well-defined porosity to cement systems. This is particularly interesting for the development of porous cement...

  17. A computerized pre-clinical test for cemented hip prostheses based on finite element techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Despite the success of cemented total hip replacement (THR), high failure rates are occasionally reported for cemented hip implants that are introduced on the orthopaedic market. Rigorous pre-clinical testing of hip implants could prevent these disasters, by detecting unsafe implant designs at a

  18. Environmental Assessment of Different Cement Manufacturing Processes Based on Emergy and Ecological Footprint Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to its high environmental impact and energy intensive production, the cement industry needs to adopt more energy efficient technologies to reduce its demand for fossil fuels and impact on the environment. Bearing in mind that cement is the most widely used material for housin...

  19. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti; Nogueira Junior, Lafayette; Massi, Marcos; Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0-14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  20. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti, E-mail: joserenatocq@hotmail.com [Potiguar University, Department of Biotechnology, Natal (Brazil); Nogueira Junior, Lafayette [São Paulo State University, Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Materials, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Massi, Marcos [Federal University of São Paulo, Institute of Science and Technology, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio [São Paulo State University, Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Materials, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva [Technological Institute of Aeronautics, Department of Physics, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Özcan, Mutlu [University of Zurich, Dental Materials Unit, Center for Dental and Oral Medicine, Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics and Dental Materials Science, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0–14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  1. Effect of Metakaolin on Strength and Efflorescence Quantity of Cement-Based Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Lung Weng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the basic mechanical and microscopic properties of cement produced with metakaolin and quantified the production of residual white efflorescence. Cement mortar was produced at various replacement ratios of metakaolin (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25% by weight of cement and exposed to various environments. Compressive strength and efflorescence quantify (using Matrix Laboratory image analysis and the curettage method, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis were reported in this study. Specimens with metakaolin as a replacement for Portland cement present higher compressive strength and greater resistance to efflorescence; however, the addition of more than 20% metakaolin has a detrimental effect on strength and efflorescence. This may be explained by the microstructure and hydration products. The quantity of efflorescence determined using MATLAB image analysis is close to the result obtained using the curettage method. The results demonstrate the best effectiveness of replacing Portland cement with metakaolin at a 15% replacement ratio by weight.

  2. Effect of metakaolin on strength and efflorescence quantity of cement-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tsai-Lung; Lin, Wei-Ting; Cheng, An

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the basic mechanical and microscopic properties of cement produced with metakaolin and quantified the production of residual white efflorescence. Cement mortar was produced at various replacement ratios of metakaolin (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25% by weight of cement) and exposed to various environments. Compressive strength and efflorescence quantify (using Matrix Laboratory image analysis and the curettage method), scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis were reported in this study. Specimens with metakaolin as a replacement for Portland cement present higher compressive strength and greater resistance to efflorescence; however, the addition of more than 20% metakaolin has a detrimental effect on strength and efflorescence. This may be explained by the microstructure and hydration products. The quantity of efflorescence determined using MATLAB image analysis is close to the result obtained using the curettage method. The results demonstrate the best effectiveness of replacing Portland cement with metakaolin at a 15% replacement ratio by weight.

  3. Vibrational study on the bioactivity of Portland cement-based materials for endodontic use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, P.; Tinti, A.; Gandolfi, M. G.; Rossi, P. L.; Prati, C.

    2009-04-01

    The bioactivity of a modified Portland cement (wTC) and a phosphate-doped wTC cement (wTC-P) was studied at 37 °C in Dulbecco's Phosphate Buffered Saline (DPBS). The cements, prepared as disks, were analysed at different ageing times (from 1 day to 2 months) by micro-Raman and ATR/FT-IR spectroscopies. The presence of deposits on the surface of the cements and the composition changes as a function of the storage time were investigated. The presence of an apatite deposit on the surface of both cements was already revealed after one day of ageing in DPBS. The trend of the I 965/I 991 Raman intensity ratio indicated the formation of a meanly thicker apatite deposit on the wTC-P cement at all the investigated times. This result was confirmed by the trend of the I 1030/I 945 IR intensity ratio calculated until 14 days of ageing. At 2 months, the thickness of the apatite deposit on wTC and wTC-P was about 200 and 500 μm, respectively, as estimated by micro-Raman spectroscopy, confirming the higher bioactivity of the phosphate-doped cement. Vibrational techniques allowed to gain more insights into the cement transformation and the different hydration rates of the various cement component. The setting of the cement and the formation of the hydrated silicate gel (C-S-H phase) was spectroscopically monitored through the I 830/I 945 IR intensity ratio.

  4. Laboratory evaluation of performance and durability of polymer grouts for subsurface hydraulic/diffusion barriers. Informal report, October 1993--May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, J.H.; Milian, L.W.

    1994-05-01

    Contaminated soils, buried waste and leaking underground storage tanks pose a threat to the environment through contaminant transport. One of the options for control of contaminant migration from buried waste sites is the construction of a subsurface barrier. Subsurface barriers increase the performance of waste disposal sites by providing a low permeability layer that can reduce percolation water migration into the waste site, minimize surface transport of contaminants, and reduce migration of volatile species. Also, a barrier can be constructed to envelop the site or plume completely, there by containing the contaminants and the potential leakage. Portland cement grout curtains have been used for barriers around waste sites. However, large castings of hydraulic cements result invariably in cracking due to shrinkage, thermal stresses induced by the hydration reactions, and wet-dry cycling prevalent at and sites. Therefore, improved, low permeability, high integrity materials are under investigation by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development, Integrated Demonstrations and Programs. The binders chosen for characterization include: an acrylic, a vinylester styrene, bitumen, a polyester styrene, furfuryl alcohol, and sulfur polymer cement. These materials cover broad ranges of chemical and physical durability, performance, viscosity, and cost. This report details the results of laboratory formulation, testing, and characterization of several innovative polymer grouts. An appendix containing a database of the barrier materials is at the end of this report.

  5. Pull-out retentive strength of fiber posts cemented at different times in canals obturated with a eugenol-based sealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleisa, Khalil; Al-Dwairi, Ziad Nawaf; Alsubait, Sara A; Morgano, Steven M

    2016-07-01

    Currently, no standard luting protocol exists for fiber posts. In addition, no agreement has been reached on the time interval between canal obturation and post space preparation and cementation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the retention of fiber posts cemented with 3 different types of cement: Paracore, Variolink II, and RelyX Unicem cement after 24 hours or 2 weeks in root canals obturated with gutta percha and a eugenol-based sealer. Seventy-two caries-free, freshly extracted, single-rooted human mandibular first premolar teeth with straight root canals were prepared and obturated with gutta percha and Endofil sealer. Specimens were divided into 2 groups (n=36): post spaces prepared 24 hours after obturation and post spaces prepared 2 weeks after obturation. Posts in both groups were luted with 1 of 3 different luting agents (n=12), ParaCore, Variolink II, or RelyX Unicem cement. Each tooth specimen was vertically secured in a universal testing machine, and a constant pull-out loading rate of 0.5 mm/min was applied until cement failure occurred. Data were statistically analyzed with 2-way and 1-way ANOVAs and t tests. Two-way ANOVA indicated statistically significant differences in mean post retention among the 3 cement types (Ppost cementation significantly influenced fiber post retention, regardless of the type of resin cement. Fiber posts showed significantly higher retention if cemented after 24 hours of obturation than if cementation occurred after 2 weeks. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bi-layered calcium phosphate cement-based composite scaffold mimicking natural bone structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fupo He and Jiandong Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a core/shell bi-layered calcium phosphate cement (CPC-based composite scaffold with adjustable compressive strength, which mimicked the structure of natural cortical/cancellous bone, was fabricated. The dense tubular CPC shell was prepared by isostatic pressing CPC powder with a specially designed mould. A porous CPC core with unidirectional lamellar pore structure was fabricated inside the cavity of dense tubular CPC shell by unidirectional freeze casting, followed by infiltration of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid and immobilization of collagen. The compressive strength of bi-layered CPC-based composite scaffold can be controlled by varying thickness ratio of dense layer to porous layer. Compared to the scaffold without dense shell, the pore interconnection of bi-layered scaffold was not obviously compromised because of its high unidirectional interconnectivity but poor three dimensional interconnectivity. The in vitro results showed that the rat bone marrow stromal cells attached and proliferated well on the bi-layered CPC-based composite scaffold. This novel bi-layered CPC-based composite scaffold is promising for bone repair.

  7. Fatigue Behaviour of High Performance Cementitious Grout Masterflow 9500

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report describes the fatigue behaviour of the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500 subjected to cyclic loading, in air as well as submerged in water, at various frequencies and levels of maximum stress. Part of the results were also reported in [1] together with other mechanical...

  8. Field testing of jet-grouted piles and drilled shafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A field study of deep foundations supporting high mast lighting and signage was undertaken in typical Florida : soils. Three drilled shafts (48 in x12 ft and two 48 in x18 ft) and two jet-grouted piles (28 in x18 ft) were : constructed in Keystone He...

  9. Fatigue behaviour and ultimate capacity of grouted tubular joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalani, M.; Morahan, D.J.; Foeken, R.J. van; Wardenier, J.

    1996-01-01

    A Joint industry project (JIP) commenced in 1993(1) to develop a design manual for tubular joints which are strengthened or repaired through chord grout-filling. This project has been funded by five oil companies and two regulatory bodies. The project has comprised the conduct of over 150 Stress

  10. Simulation of prepackaged grout bleed under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This report contains a summary of the research performed in the area of reproducing and determining the cause of soft : grout, which has been found in several PT (Post-Tensioned) tubes around the state of Florida. A modified version of the : Euronorm...

  11. Microstructure, characterizations, functionality and compressive strength of cement-based materials using zinc oxide nanoparticles as an additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nochaiya, Thanongsak [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 (Thailand); Sekine, Yoshika [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Choopun, Supab [Applied Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Chaipanich, Arnon, E-mail: arnon.chaipanich@cmu.ac.th [Advanced Cement-Based Materials Research Unit, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-05-05

    Highlights: • Nano zinc oxide was used as an additive material. • Microstructure and phase characterization of pastes were characterized using SEM and XRD. • TGA and FTIR were also used to determine the hydration reaction. • Compressive strength of ZnO mixes was found to increase at 28 days. - Abstract: Zinc oxide nanoparticles as a nanophotocatalyst has great potential for self-cleaning applications in concrete structures, its effects on the cement hydration, setting time and compressive strength are also important when using it in practice. This paper reports the effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles, as an additive material, on properties of cement-based materials. Setting time, compressive strength and porosity of mortars were investigated. Microstructure and morphology of pastes were characterized using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Moreover, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) were also used to determine the hydration reaction. The results show that Portland cement paste with additional ZnO was found to slightly increase the water requirement while the setting time presented prolongation period than the control mix. However, compressive strength of ZnO mixes was found to be higher than that of PC mix up to 15% (at 28 days) via filler effect. Microstructure, XRD and TGA results of ZnO pastes show less hydration products before 28 days but similar at 28 days. In addition, FTIR results confirmed the retardation when ZnO was partially added in Portland cement pastes.

  12. Lightweight combustion residues-based structural materials for use in mines. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugh, Yoginder P.; Zhang, Yuzhuo; Ghosh, A.K.; Palmer, S.R; Peng, Suping, Xiao, Y. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The overall goal of this project is to develop, design and test artificial supports (post and crib members) for use in mines manufactured from coal combustion by-product (CCB) based lightweight structural materials. The lightweight cement-fly ash grout with density ranging from 70 to 110 pcf has been developed incorporating very high volume (50--60 % of whole solid materials) fly ash. Characterization of individual component materials for the CCB-based structural materials has been performed for Class F fly ash, ASTM Type I cement, lime, silica fume, polypropylene fibers, protein-based foam, water-reducing agents, and calcium chloride. During the past quarter, we emphasized on screening mix designs and establishing mixing and curing procedures. We have demonstrated for the first time that cellular cement-fly ash grout can be developed with very low water: cement ratio (0.32--0.45). After forming, all the samples in the molds were moist cured in a chamber for 24-hours, at 90% relatively humidity (RH) and at 72{degrees}F. They were then demolded and transferred to a low pressure steam chamber (150{degrees}F and 100% RH). After steaming for 24 hours the samples were removed to a moist cure chamber prior to testing.

  13. Economical concrete mix design utilizing blended cements, performance-based specifications, and pay factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    This report showcases several new approaches of using materials science and structural mechanics to accomplish : sustainable design of concrete materials. The topics addressed include blended cements, fiber-reinforced concrete : (FRC), internal curin...

  14. Nanotechnology-Based Performance Improvements For Portland Cement Concrete - Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    A fundamental understanding of the nano-structure of Portland cement concrete (PCC) is the key to realizing significant breakthroughs regarding high performance and susta : (MBTC 2095/3004) using molecular dynamics (MD) provided new understanding of ...

  15. Tooth Discoloration Induced by Different Calcium Silicate-based Cements: A Systematic Review of In Vitro Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Możyńska, Joanna; Metlerski, Marcin; Lipski, Mariusz; Nowicka, Alicja

    2017-10-01

    On the basis of many clinical observations, some calcium silicate-based cements have a high potential for staining tooth tissue. This feature greatly limits the use of those cements, particularly for anterior teeth. This review aimed to provide a systematic evaluation of published in vitro studies to determine the effect of different calcium silicate-based cements on dental tissue discoloration. This literature review was developed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. The literature search was based on all publications without a year limit. The last search was performed on October 22, 2016. An electronic search was performed on MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane, and Scopus. The articles were selected to address the following research question: Which materials based on calcium silicate-based cements have hard tissue staining potential? The necessary information was extracted by 2 authors independently using a standardized form. The search resulted in 390 titles from all databases. Twenty-three studies met the inclusion criteria. Most of the studies exhibited a moderate risk of bias. The results indicated that some materials showed a strong potential for staining, including gray and white MTA Angelus (Londrina, PR, Brazil), gray and white ProRoot MTA (Dentsply, Tulsa, OK), and Ortho MTA (BioMTA, Seoul, Korea). Individual study results showed that Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France), Retro MTA (BioMTA), Portland cement, EndoSequence Root Repair Material (Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA), Odontocem (Australian Dental Manufacturing, Brisbane, Australia), MM-MTA (Micro Mega, Besancon Cedex, France), and MTA Ledermix (Riemser Pharma GmbH, Greiswald-Insel Riems, Germany) were materials with the smallest staining potential. This review clearly showed that some calcium silicate-based cements have a high potential for staining hard tissue. On the other hand, some showed only a small change in color, which was

  16. Effect of saliva and blood contamination on the bi-axial flexural strength and setting time of two calcium-silicate based cements: Portland cement and biodentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhodiry, W; Lyons, M F; Chadwick, R G

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of contamination with saliva and blood on the bi-axial flexural strength and setting time of pure gray Portland cement and Biodentine (Septodont, Allington, UK). A one-way ANOVA showed that contamination caused no significant difference between the cements in bi-axial flexural strength (P> 0.05). However there was a significant difference in setting time (PBiodentine, regardless of the contaminant, and contamination with blood increased the setting time of both materials. Biodentine was similar in strength to Portland cement, but had a shorter setting time for both contaminated and non-contaminated samples.

  17. Monkey pulpal response to an MMA-based resin cement as adhesive luting for indirect restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yasushi; Seki, Yuichi; Uzzaman, Mohammed Akhtar; Sattabanasuk, Vanthana; Sasafuchi, Yasutaka; Foxton, Richard M; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pulpal response to a newly-developed MMA resin cement (MultiBond, Tokuyama) when used for adhesively luting composite resin inlays. Cervical cavities were prepared in monkey teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups. In the experimental group, a self-etching primer and a resin cement were applied to the cavities, and then hybrid composite inlays (Estenia, Kuraray) were inserted using freshly mixed resin cement. In the other groups, a zinc oxide/eugenol cement (Eugedain, Showa Yakuhin Kakou) or a glass-ionomer cement (Fuji II, GC) was used to fill the cavity. The teeth were then extracted after 3, 30, and 90 days, fixed in 10% buffered formalin solution, and prepared using routine histological techniques. Five-mum-thick sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, or Brown & Brenn gram stain for bacterial observation. Histopathological reactions in the pulp tissue and bacterial penetration along the cavity walls were assessed using a standardized score. No serious inflammatory reactions in the pulp, such as necrosis or abscess formation, were observed in any of the experimental periods, except for 1 case after 30 days, in which a pulpal exposure was suspected. Disarrangement of the odontoblast layer and deposition of reparative dentin were the major reactions observed in this specimen. No bacterial penetration along the cavity walls was detected. The monkey pulpal response and in vivo sealing ability of the MMA resin cement in combination with the self-etching primer was considered as good as that of the glass-ionomer cement. The new MMA resin cement showed acceptable biological compatibility to the monkey pulp when used to adhesively lute composite resin inlays.

  18. Casestudy of stabilization of structural-unstable soilsusing grouting ОПЫТ ЗАКРЕПЛЕНИЯ СТРУКТУРНО-НЕУСТОЙЧИВЫХ ГРУНТОВ ЦЕМЕНТАЦИЕЙ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golovanov Aleksandr Mikhailovich

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available More than 20 years ago, Rostov-based Promstroyniiproekt Institute (Research and Development Institute for Industrial Engineering, backed by Geotechnika group of companies and other organizations, commenced using cement grouting to stabilize soil as part of foundation soils of buildings. It has turned out that consolidation of water saturated by clay accelerates grouting and assures higher strength than the silicification method. The article describes a new method of grouting and a case study of grouting stabilization of the foundation soil of a five-storey residential house, made by subsiding soils and subjacent fluid-plastic clay loams.The work was complicated by the fact that clay was displaced by the cement-sand mortar injected at the pressure insufficient for formation of discontinuous cavities. In these circumstances, the team of researchers developed and implemented an integrated solution to avoid clay clustering under the influence of the injected grout.The authors consider problems arising in the course of operation of buildings in the above geotechnical environment and describe the sequence of grouting operations. The article includes the work performance pattern and patterns of building control.Описан новый комплексный способ цементации грунтов и опыт его применения для усиления основания существующего пятиэтажного жилого дома, сложенного просадочными грунтами, подстилаемыми текучепластичными суглинками. Рассмотрены некоторые проблемы, возникающие при эксплуатации зданий в данных инженерно-геологических условиях, и описана последовательность работ при цементации.

  19. Advanced Nanoscale Characterization of Cement Based Materials Using X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation: A Review

    KAUST Repository

    Chae, Sejung R.

    2013-05-22

    We report various synchrotron radiation laboratory based techniques used to characterize cement based materials in nanometer scale. High resolution X-ray transmission imaging combined with a rotational axis allows for rendering of samples in three dimensions revealing volumetric details. Scanning transmission X-ray microscope combines high spatial resolution imaging with high spectral resolution of the incident beam to reveal X-ray absorption near edge structure variations in the material nanostructure. Microdiffraction scans the surface of a sample to map its high order reflection or crystallographic variations with a micron-sized incident beam. High pressure X-ray diffraction measures compressibility of pure phase materials. Unique results of studies using the above tools are discussed-a study of pores, connectivity, and morphology of a 2,000 year old concrete using nanotomography; detection of localized and varying silicate chain depolymerization in Al-substituted tobermorite, and quantification of monosulfate distribution in tricalcium aluminate hydration using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy; detection and mapping of hydration products in high volume fly ash paste using microdiffraction; and determination of mechanical properties of various AFm phases using high pressure X-ray diffraction. © 2013 The Author(s).

  20. ALKALI-ACTIVATED CEMENT MORTARS CONTAINING RECYCLED CLAY-BASED CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Puertas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of clay-based waste as an aggregate for concrete production is an amply studied procedure. Nonetheless, research on the use of this recycled aggregate to prepare alkaline cement mortars and concretes has yet to be forthcoming. The present study aimed to determine: the behaviour of this waste as a pozzolan in OPC systems, the mechanical strength in OPC, alkali-activated slag (AAS and fly ash (AAFA mortars and the effect of partial replacement of the slag and ash themselves with ground fractions of the waste. The pozzolanic behaviour of clay-based waste was confirmed. Replacing up to 20 % of siliceous aggregate with waste aggregate in OPC mortars induced a decline in 7 day strength (around 23 wt. %. The behaviour of waste aggregate in AAMs mortars, in turn, was observed to depend on the nature of the aluminosilicate and the replacement ratio used. When 20 % of siliceous aggregate was replaced by waste aggregate in AAS mortars, the 7 day strength values remained the same (40 MPa. In AAFA mortars, waste was found to effectively replace both the fly ash and the aggregate. The highest strength for AAFA mortars was observed when they were prepared with both a 50 % replacement ratio for the ash and a 20 % ratio for the aggregate.

  1. Pack cementation diffusion coatings for Fe-base and refractory alloys. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1998-03-10

    With the aid of computer-assisted calculations of the equilibrium vapor pressures in halide-activated cementation packs, processing conditions have been identified and experimentally verified for the codeposition of two or more alloying elements in a diffusion coating on a variety of steels and refractory metal alloys. A new comprehensive theory to treat the multi-component thermodynamic equilibria in the gas phase for several coexisting solid phases was developed and used. Many different processes to deposit various types of coatings on several types of steels were developed: Cr-Si codeposition for low- or medium-carbon steels, Cr-Al codeposition on low-carbon steels to yield either a Kanthal-type composition (Fe-25Cr-4Al in wt.%) or else a (Fe, Cr){sub 3}Al surface composition. An Fe{sub 3}Al substrate was aluminized to achieve an FeAl surface composition, and boron was also added to ductilize the coating. The developmental Cr-lean ORNL alloys with exceptional creep resistance were Cr-Al coated to achieve excellent oxidation resistance. Alloy wires of Ni-base were aluminized to provide an average composition of Ni{sub 3}Al for use as welding rods. Several different refractory metal alloys based on Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb have been silicided, also with germanium additions, to provide excellent oxidation resistance. A couple of developmental Cr-Zr alloys were similarly coated and tested.

  2. Expected occurrence of the transmissive fractures at the repository level for grouting design purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaittinen, T.; Nummela, J.; Tammisto, E. (Poeyry Environment Oy, Vantaa (Finland))

    2007-11-15

    Posiva Oy has set up a R20-programme to define an acceptable sealing methodology for the disposal tunnels of the spent nuclear fuel. As a sub-task of project Grouting technology expected hydrogeological conditions in the bedrock from the grouting point of view at the planned repository depth have been assessed based on observations of the transmissive fractures in deep drillholes. The processing of the transmissive fractures was performed in two phases. First all transmissive fractures were assessed together and then fractures were divided to belong either to the averagely fractured rock or to fractured zones. The fractured zones were determined after the criteria applied in bedrock model version 2003/1. Furthermore, the fractures were classified by hydraulic aperture, b{sub hydr} below 0.020 mm, b{sub hydr} 0.020-0.050 mm, and b{sub hydr} above 0.050 mm and by dip angle, dip below 30 deg, dip 30-60 deg , and dip above 60 deg . The assessed parameters were transmissivity and derived hydraulic aperture, orientation in terms of dip direction and dip, and spacing. Classification was performed for grouting design purposes. The description of the classified fracture groups is given. Observation of steeply dipping fractures is biased due to the sub-vertical orientation of the deep drillholes. Based on the fracture mapping data from ONKALO access tunnel walls and roof order of magnitude multiplying term, 1.7, was approximated for the occurrence of steeply dipping fractures. To approximate transmissive fracture frequency in horizontal tunnel instead of subvertical drillhole, spacing of fractures was rotated assuming planar continuity for fractures and applying right-angled triangle calculation. Average distances between fractures within each of above mentioned fracture group is given. The distance varied from 112 m (dip below 30 deg and b{sub hydr} below 0.020 mm) to 3350 m (dip 30-60 deg and bhydr above 0.050 mm). For the transmissive fractures within fractured zones

  3. Quantifying the impact of early calcite cementation on the reservoir quality of carbonate rocks: A 3D process-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosa, Aleksandra; Wood, Rachel

    2017-06-01

    The reservoir properties of carbonate rocks are controlled by both deposition and diagenesis. The latter includes the early precipitation of calcite cements, which can exert a strong control on the evolution of subsequent diagenetic pathways. We quantify the impact of early marine cement growth in grainstones on evolving pore space by examining trends in the relationship between cementation and permeability using a 3D process-based model (Calcite3D). The model assumes varying proportions of polycrystalline and monocrystalline grain types, upon which we grow isopachous and syntaxial calcite cement types, respectively. We model two syntaxial cement shapes, compact and elongated, that approximate the geometries of typical rhombohedral calcite forms. Results demonstrate the effect of cement competition: an increasing proportion of monocrystalline grains creates stronger competition and a reduction in the impact of individual grains on final calcite cement volume and porosity. Isopachous cement is effective in closing pore throats and limiting permeability. We also show that the impact of syntaxial cement on porosity occlusion and therefore flow is highly dependent on monocrystalline grain location and the orientation of crystal axes. This demonstrates the importance of diagenetic overprint in controlling the evolution of rock properties, but also that this process can be essentially random. We also show that diagenesis alone can create notable heterogeneity in the permeability of carbonates. While Calcite3D is successful in modelling realistic changes in cement volumes and pore space morphology, modelled permeabilities (0.01 -30D) are above the range reported in reservoir grainstones due to the very high permeability of the initial synthetic sediment deposit (58.9D). Poroperm data generated by Calcite3D, however, exhibits a linear relationship between the logarithms of porosity and permeability with a high coefficient of determination, as observed in natural media.

  4. Static and Dynamic Strain Monitoring of Reinforced Concrete Components through Embedded Carbon Nanotube Cement-Based Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella D’Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on the use of cement-based sensors doped with carbon nanotubes as embedded smart sensors for static and dynamic strain monitoring of reinforced concrete (RC elements. Such novel sensors can be used for the monitoring of civil infrastructures. Because they are fabricated from a structural material and are easy to utilize, these sensors can be integrated into structural elements for monitoring of different types of constructions during their service life. Despite the scientific attention that such sensors have received in recent years, further research is needed to understand (i the repeatability and accuracy of sensors’ behavior over a meaningful number of sensors, (ii testing configurations and calibration methods, and (iii the sensors’ ability to provide static and dynamic strain measurements when actually embedded in RC elements. To address these research needs, this paper presents a preliminary characterization of the self-sensing capabilities and the dynamic properties of a meaningful number of cement-based sensors and studies their application as embedded sensors in a full-scale RC beam. Results from electrical and electromechanical tests conducted on small and full-scale specimens using different electrical measurement methods confirm that smart cement-based sensors show promise for both static and vibration-based structural health monitoring applications of concrete elements but that calibration of each sensor seems to be necessary.

  5. Performances of hydrated cement treated crushed rock base for Western Australian roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphat Chummuneerat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The resilient modulus (RM of hydrated cement treated crushed rock base (HCTCRB affected by amount of hydration periods, compaction and dryback processes was presented using repeated load triaxial tests. The related trends of RM corresponding to the different hydration periods still cannot be concluded. Instead, It is found that the moisture content plays more major influence on the RM performance. Higher additional water during compaction of HCTCRB, even at its optimum moisture content and induced higher dry density, led to the inferior RM performance compared to the sample without water addition. The RM of damper samples can be improved through dryback process and superior to that of the sample without water addition at the same moisture content. However, the samples without water addition during compaction deliver the comparable RM values even its dry density is lower than the other two types. These results indicate the significant influence of moisture content to the performances of HCTCRB with regardless of the dry density. Finally, the experimental results of HCTCRB and parent material are evaluated with the K-θ model and the model recommended by Austroads. These two models provide the excellent fit of the tested results with high degree of determination.

  6. The Effect of Water Repellent Surface Impregnation on Durability of Cement-Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many cases, service life of reinforced concrete structures is severely limited by chloride penetration until the steel reinforcement or by carbonation of the covercrete. Water repellent treatment on the surfaces of cement-based materials has often been considered to protect concrete from these deteriorations. In this paper, three types of water repellent agents have been applied on the surface of concrete specimens. Penetration profiles of silicon resin in treated concrete have been determined by FT-IR spectroscopy. Water capillary suction, chloride penetration, carbonation, and reinforcement corrosion in both surface impregnated and untreated specimens have been measured. Results indicate that surface impregnation reduced the coefficient of capillary suction of concrete substantially. An efficient chloride barrier can be established by deep impregnation. Water repellent surface impregnation by silanes also can make the process of carbonation action slow. In addition, it also has been concluded that surface impregnation can provide effective corrosion protection to reinforcing steel in concrete with migrating chloride. The improvement of durability and extension of service life for reinforced concrete structures, therefore, can be expected through the applications of appropriate water repellent surface impregnation.

  7. Mechanical Properties of High-Performance Lightweight Aggregate Concrete with Inorganic Polymers Cement Based on Multiple Minerals under Uniaxial Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao Ma; Qiuhua Rao

    2012-01-01

    High-performance lightweight aggregate concrete with inorganic polymers cement based on multiple minerals is a very promising new material. The research of mechanical properties of the new material is of great theoretical and practical significance. In this research, the failure behavior, cubic and prism compressive strength, elastic modulus, peak strain of the new material, and the nature of the stress-strain curve are studied. An analytical model is quoted to represent the ascending and des...

  8. [Allergy towards bone cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P; Schuh, A; Summer, B; Mazoochian, F; Thomsen, M

    2006-09-01

    Bone cements based on polymethylmethacrylate are typically used for fixation of artificial joints. Intolerance reactions to endoprostheses not explained by infection or mechanical failure may lead to allergological diagnostics, which mostly focuses on metal allergy. However, also bone cement components may provoke hypersensitivity reactions leading to eczema, implant loosening, or fistula formation. Elicitors of such reactions encompass acrylates and additives such as benzoyl peroxide, N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, hydroquinone, or antibiotics (particularly gentamicin). Upon repeated contact with bone cement components, e.g., acrylate monomers, also in medical personnel occasionally hand eczema or even asthma may develop. Therefore, in the case of suspected hypersensitivity reactions to arthroplasty, the allergological diagnostics should include bone cement components.

  9. Mechanical performance experiments on rock and cement, casing residual stress evaluation in the thermal recovery well based on thermal-structure coupling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Yong; Peng, Xu; Yu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    .... In this paper, mechanical performance experiments on rock and cement are carried out first, and then a finite element mechanical model of thermal recovery wellbore based on thermal-structure coupling is established...

  10. Self-healing phenomena in cement-based materials state-of-the-art report of RILEM Technical Committee 221-SHC Self-Healing Phenomena in Cement-Based Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tittelboom, Kim; Belie, Nele; Schlangen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Self-healing materials are man-made materials which have the built-in capability to repair damage. Failure in materials is often caused by the occurrence of small microcracks throughout the material. In self-healing materials phenomena are triggered to counteract these microcracks. These processes are ideally triggered by the occurrence of damage itself. Thus far, the self-healing capacity of cement-based materials has been considered as something "extra". This could be called passive self-healing, since it was not a designed feature of the material, but an inherent property of it. Centuries-old buildings have been said to have survived these centuries because of the inherent self-healing capacity of the binders used for cementing building blocks together. In this State-of-the-Art Report a closer look is taken at self-healing phenomena in cement-based materials. It is shown what options are available to design for this effect rather than have it occur as a "coincidental extra".

  11. Drip Sealing Grouting of Tunnels in Crystalline Rock: Conceptualisation and Technical Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butron, Christian

    2012-07-01

    A conceptual model of the groundwater hydraulic conditions around the tunnel contour in ancient brittle crystalline rocks has been developed and verified. The general aim has been to reach an understanding of the groundwater conditions in and close to the tunnel roof where dripping takes place and to propose technical and practical strategies for waterproofing. Dripping is accompanied by ice growth and icicle formation in cold regions, creating additional problems such as shotcrete fall-outs, icicle fall-outs, damage to vehicles, damage to trains, etc. The methodology for the development of the conceptual model is based mainly on transmissivity determinations from short-duration hydraulic tests and analyses of the connectivity of the fracture structure by means of semi-variogram analysis. The determination of the dimensionality of the flow in the fractures has also been found to be essential in order to describe the conductive system. This conceptual model describes the fracture systems as a combination of transmissive patches (2D-flow fractures) connected by less pervious channels (1D-flow fractures). It provides an understanding of the heterogeneity and connectivity of the fracture network and thus the groundwater conditions, not only in the roof but also around the tunnel contour. The pre-excavation grouting design process used in the tunnelling projects followed a structured approach and the evaluation showed that the grouting design reduced the inflow and fulfilled the environmental demands. However, dripping remained, making its characterisation very important when proposing a possible solution for its control. It is proposed that the remaining dripping comes from a channelised system that has been left unsealed and which would be extremely difficult to intersect with future boreholes, as well as from some ungrouted fractures with inconvenient orientations. Geomembrane lining and post-excavation grouting are possible solutions, although particular attention

  12. Evaluation of Greek type Portland cement based on Megalopolis fly ash addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivanakis, V.; Papamantellos, D. [University of Patras (Greece). Department of Chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Metallurgy; Galanoulis, E. [Titan Cement Company S.A., Drepano, Achaias (Greece)

    2003-04-01

    Fly-ash is considered as a fine material which is produced during firing of powdered solid fuels in steam generating plants. It is contained in the output exhaust gases and collected in the electrostatic filters. In the lignite fired power plants of Public Power Corporation in the regions of Ptolemais-Amynteon and Megalopolis 65 . 10 t/a of lignite are consumed nowadays with a corresponding fly ash production of about 13 . 10{sup 6} t/a. The utilisation of fly ash generated in Megalopolis plant ({proportional_to} 3.5 . 106 t/a) in cement industry has been investigated by the Laboratory of Metallurgy (METLAB) in collaboration with the cement company Titan and the Greek P.P.C. since 1979. The primary target of this research and development work, was to investigate the addition of Megalopolis fly ash in the manufacturing process of cement, in quantities around 10%, replacing the so-called Volcanic Rock (Santorini's earth), which was used as a pozzolanic material. Megalopolis fly ash was considered to be unsuitable for use as hydraulic powder due to its high SiO{sub 2} content ({proportional_to}50%), in contrast to Ptolemais-Amynteon fly ash, which contains high percentages of CaO (30 - 40%). The first results were very encouraging as they proved that addition of blended fly ash could be added up to 50% without considerable reduction in the compressive strength of cement. Consequently, exploitation of Megalopolis fly ash by Titan cement industry began in 1982, with the production of Greek type Portland cement that contains 15 - 20% of Megalopolis fly ash. The annual consumption of Megalopolis fly ash since 1982 is in the range of 300.000 - 500.000 t/a. In the years following 1983, a systematic investigation of the influence of Megalopolis fly ash addition, up to a content of 80% upon the technological properties of cement and concrete was carried out. The workability, compressive strength (2, 7, 28 days), long-term compressive strength (up to 180 days) and the

  13. Investigation on the Mechanical Properties of a Cement-Based Material Containing Carbon Nanotube under Drying and Freeze-Thaw Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Wen; Ji, Wei-Ming; Wang, Yao-Cheng; Liu, Yi; Shen, Ruo-Xu; Xing, Feng

    2015-12-14

    This paper aimed to explore the mechanical properties of a cement-based material with carbon nanotube (CNT) under drying and freeze-thaw environments. Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to analyze the pore structure and microstructure of CNT/cement composite, respectively. The experimental results showed that multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) could improve to different degrees the mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strengths) and physical performances (shrinkage and water loss) of cement-based materials under drying and freeze-thaw conditions. This paper also demonstrated that MWCNT could interconnect hydration products to enhance the performance of anti-microcracks for cement-based materials, as well as the density of materials due to CNT's filling action.

  14. Investigation on the Mechanical Properties of a Cement-Based Material Containing Carbon Nanotube under Drying and Freeze-Thaw Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wen Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to explore the mechanical properties of a cement-based material with carbon nanotube (CNT under drying and freeze-thaw environments. Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to analyze the pore structure and microstructure of CNT/cement composite, respectively. The experimental results showed that multi-walled CNT (MWCNT could improve to different degrees the mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strengths and physical performances (shrinkage and water loss of cement-based materials under drying and freeze-thaw conditions. This paper also demonstrated that MWCNT could interconnect hydration products to enhance the performance of anti-microcracks for cement-based materials, as well as the density of materials due to CNT’s filling action.

  15. Assessment of Pozzolanic Activity Using Methods Based on the Measurement of Electrical Conductivity of Suspensions of Portland Cement and Pozzolan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Sergio; Monzó, José M; Borrachero, María V; Payá, Jordi

    2014-11-21

    The use of methods based on measuring electrical conductivity to assess pozzolanic activity has recently been used primarily in aqueous suspensions of pozzolan: calcium hydroxide. However, the use of similar methods in suspensions of cement with pozzolans has not been widely studied. This paper proposes a new method for rapid assessment of the pozzolanic activity of mineral admixtures in aqueous cement suspensions. In this study, the conditions for the application of the method were optimized, such as time, temperature, w/c ratio and dosage procedure. Finally, results are presented from the application of this method for characterizing the pozzolanic activity of the spent catalytic cracking catalyst. These results corroborate as previously reported, namely the high reactivity of this pozzolan obtained by other methods, such as thermogravimetry or evolution of the mechanical strength. In addition, the pozzolanic activity of the catalyst was compared with other pozzolans such as metakaolin and silica fume.

  16. Assessment of Pozzolanic Activity Using Methods Based on the Measurement of Electrical Conductivity of Suspensions of Portland Cement and Pozzolan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Sergio; Monzó, José M.; Borrachero, María V.; Payá, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The use of methods based on measuring electrical conductivity to assess pozzolanic activity has recently been used primarily in aqueous suspensions of pozzolan: calcium hydroxide. However, the use of similar methods in suspensions of cement with pozzolans has not been widely studied. This paper proposes a new method for rapid assessment of the pozzolanic activity of mineral admixtures in aqueous cement suspensions. In this study, the conditions for the application of the method were optimized, such as time, temperature, w/c ratio and dosage procedure. Finally, results are presented from the application of this method for characterizing the pozzolanic activity of the spent catalytic cracking catalyst. These results corroborate as previously reported, namely the high reactivity of this pozzolan obtained by other methods, such as thermogravimetry or evolution of the mechanical strength. In addition, the pozzolanic activity of the catalyst was compared with other pozzolans such as metakaolin and silica fume. PMID:28788261

  17. Changes in water absorptivity of slag based cement mortars exposed to sulphur-oxidising A. thiooxidans bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estokova, A.; Smolakova, M.; Luptakova, A.; Strigac, J.

    2017-10-01

    Water absorptivity is heavily influenced by the volume and connectivity of pores in the pore network of cement composites and has been used as an important parameter for quantifying their durability. To improve the durability and permeability of mortars, various mineral admixtures such as furnace slag, silica fume or fly ash are added into the mortar and concrete mixtures. These admixtures provide numerous important advantages such as corrosion control, improvement of mechanical and physical properties and better workability. This study investigated the changes in absorptivity of cement mortars with different amounts of mineral admixture, represented by granulated blast furnace slag, under aggressive bacterial influence. The water absorptivity of mortars specimens exposed to sulphur-oxidising bacteria A. thiooxidans for the period of 3 and 6 months has changed due to bio-corrosion-based degradation process. The differences in water absorptivity in dependence on the mortars composition have been observed.

  18. Assessment of Pozzolanic Activity Using Methods Based on the Measurement of Electrical Conductivity of Suspensions of Portland Cement and Pozzolan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Velázquez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of methods based on measuring electrical conductivity to assess pozzolanic activity has recently been used primarily in aqueous suspensions of pozzolan: calcium hydroxide. However, the use of similar methods in suspensions of cement with pozzolans has not been widely studied. This paper proposes a new method for rapid assessment of the pozzolanic activity of mineral admixtures in aqueous cement suspensions. In this study, the conditions for the application of the method were optimized, such as time, temperature, w/c ratio and dosage procedure. Finally, results are presented from the application of this method for characterizing the pozzolanic activity of the spent catalytic cracking catalyst. These results corroborate as previously reported, namely the high reactivity of this pozzolan obtained by other methods, such as thermogravimetry or evolution of the mechanical strength. In addition, the pozzolanic activity of the catalyst was compared with other pozzolans such as metakaolin and silica fume.

  19. Calcium orthophosphate-based bone cements (CPCs): Applications, antibiotic release and alternatives to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Staden, Anton D; Dicks, Leon M T

    2012-06-26

    Calcium orthophosphate bone cements (CPCs) are widely used in orthopedic surgery. Implants are highly susceptible to infection and often lead to the formation of microbial biofilms. Antibiotics are often incorporated into bone cement to prevent infection. The increase in the number of microorganisms acquiring or developing resistance to antibiotics, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), is a major concern. Bacteriocins (antimicrobial peptides) offer an alternative to antibiotics. Their mode of activity involves permanent destabilization of the plasma membrane of target cells. A number of broad-spectrum bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria and Bacillus spp. have recently been reported. In this REVIEW the major characteristics of calcium phosphate bone cements, prosthetic joint-associated infections, and treatment of these infections is discussed. The role of antimicrobial agents in CPCs is discussed and the possibility of incorporating bacteriocins in prosthetic devices is investigated.

  20. Revised Methodology for Determining Cesium-137 Content of HN-200 Grout Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHELOR, J.L.

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this technical paper is to examine the accuracy of the existing method of determining the Cs-137 content of HN-200 grout containers and compare that accuracy to the accuracy attainable by other methods of measurement. The methods of measurement to be compared include: Contact measurements on a grouted container (existing method); Measurements at 5 feet from the surface of a grouted container; Measurements at 10 feet from a grouted container; Measurements on contact with the surface of an ungrouted container; Measurements at 5 feet from the surface of an ungrouted container; and Measurements at 10 feet from the surface of an ungrouted container. Once the most accurate and useable method is determined, the precepts for an operating procedure will be provided for determining the Cs-137 content of newly generated and future HN-200 grout containers as well as the grouted legacy containers currently stored in B Cell.

  1. Experimental Study on Post Grouting Bearing Capacity of Large Diameter Bored Piles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Duanduan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Post grouting can improve the inherent defects such as the formation of the mud cake at pile side and the sediment at pile end in the process of bored pile construction. Thus post grouting has been widely used in Engineering. The purpose of this paper is to research the influences of post grouting to pile bearing capacity more systematically and intuitively. Combined with the static load test of four test piles in Weihe River Bridge test area of new airport highway in Xi’an, the bearing capacity and settlement of routine piles and post grouting piles are comparatively analyzed. The test results show that under the same geological condition, post grouting can improve the properties of pile tip and pile shaft soil of bored piles significantly, enhance the ultimate resistance, improve the ultimate bearing capacity and reduce the pile tip settlement. Then post grouting can aim to optimize pile foundation.

  2. Chemical Grouting Lost-Circulation Zones with Polyurethane Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansure, A.J.; Westmoreland, J.J.

    1999-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing polyurethane foam as a chemical grout for lost circulation zones. In past work polyurethane foam was tried with limited success in laboratory tests and GDO sponsored field tests. Goals were that the foam expanded significantly and harden to a chillable firmness quickly. Since that earlier work there have been improvements in polyurethane chemistry and the causes of the failures of previous tests have been identified. Recent success in applying pure solution grouts (proper classification of polyurethane--Naudts) in boreholes encourages reevaluating its use to control lost circulation. These successes include conformance control in the oil patch (e.g. Ng) and darn remediation projects (Bruce et al.). In civil engineering, polyurethane is becoming the material of choice for sealing boreholes with large voids and high inflows, conditions associated with the worst lost circulation problems. Demonstration of a delivery mechanism is yet to be done in a geothermal borehole.

  3. Uranium Metal Reaction Behavior in Water, Sludge, and Grout Matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2008-09-25

    This report summarizes information and data on the reaction behavior of uranium metal in water, in water-saturated simulated and genuine K Basin sludge, and in grout matrices. This information and data are used to establish the technical basis for metallic uranium reaction behavior for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP). The specific objective of this report is to consolidate the various sources of information into a concise document to serve as a high-level reference and road map for customers, regulators, and interested parties outside the STP (e.g., external reviewers, other DOE sites) to clearly understand the current basis for the corrosion of uranium metal in water, sludge, and grout.

  4. Uranium Metal Reaction Behavior in Water, Sludge, and Grout Matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2009-05-27

    This report summarizes information and data on the reaction behavior of uranium metal in water, in water-saturated simulated and genuine K Basin sludge, and in grout matrices. This information and data are used to establish the technical basis for metallic uranium reaction behavior for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP). The specific objective of this report is to consolidate the various sources of information into a concise document to serve as a high-level reference and road map for customers, regulators, and interested parties outside the STP (e.g., external reviewers, other DOE sites) to clearly understand the current basis for the corrosion of uranium metal in water, sludge, and grout.

  5. BiOBr@SiO2 flower-like nanospheres chemically-bonded on cement-based materials for photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Hou, Pengkun; Yang, Ping; Cheng, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Endowment of photocatalytic property on the surface of concrete structure can contribute to the self-cleaning of the structure and purification of the polluted environment. We developed a nano-structured BiOBr@SiO2 photocatalyst and innovatively used for surface-treatment of cement-based materials with the hope of attaining the photocatalytic property in visible-light region and surface modification/densification performances. The SiO2 layer on the flower-like BiOBr@SiO2 helps to maintain a stable distribution of the photocatalyst, as well as achieving a chemical bonding between the coating and the cement matrix. Results showed that the color fading rate of during the degradation of Rhodamine B dye of the BiOBr-cem sample is 2 times higher compared with the commonly studied C, N-TiO2-cem sample. The photo-degradation rates of samples BiOBr-cem and BiOBr@SiO2-cem are 93 and 81% within 150 min, respectively, while sample BiOBr@SiO2-cem reveals a denser and smoother surface after curing for 28 days and pore-filling effect at size within 0.01-0.2 μm when compared with untreated samples. Moreover, additional C-S-H gel can be formed due to the pozzolanic reaction between BiOBr@SiO2 and the hardened cement matrix. Both advantages of the BiOBr@SiO2 favor its application for surface-treatment of hardened cement-based material to acquire an improved surface quality, as well as durable photocatalytic functionality.

  6. Laboratory Evaluation of Underwater Grouting of CPP-603 Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Virgil James; Pao, Jenn Hai; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Tripp, Julia Lynn

    2002-02-01

    A project is underway to deactivate a Fuel Storage Basin. The project specifies the requirements and identifies the tasks that will be performed for deactivation of the CPP- 603 building at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Fuel Receiving and Storage Building (CPP- 603) was originally used to receive and store spent nuclear fuel from various facilities. The area to undergo deactivation includes the three spent nuclear fuel storage basins and a transfer canal (1.5 million gallons of water storage). Deactivation operations at the task site include management of the hot storage boxes and generic fuel objects, removal of the fuel storage racks, basin sludge, water evaporation and basin grouting, and interior equipment, tanks, and associated components. This includes a study to develop a grout formulation and placement process for this deactivation project. Water will be allowed to passively evaporate to reduce the spread of contamination from the walls of the basin. The basins will be filled with grout, underwater, as the water evaporates to maintain the basin water at a safe level. The objective of the deactivation project is to eliminate potential exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials and eliminate potential safety hazards associated with the CPP-603 building.

  7. Laboratory Evaluation of Underwater Grouting of CPP-603 Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, V.J.; Pao, J.H.; Demmer, R.L.; Tripp, J.L.

    2002-01-17

    A project is underway to deactivate a Fuel Storage Basin. The project specifies the requirements and identifies the tasks that will be performed for deactivation of the CPP- 603 building at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Fuel Receiving and Storage Building (CPP- 603) was originally used to receive and store spent nuclear fuel from various facilities. The area to undergo deactivation includes the three spent nuclear fuel storage basins and a transfer canal (1.5 million gallons of water storage). Deactivation operations at the task site include management of the hot storage boxes and generic fuel objects, removal of the fuel storage racks, basin sludge, water evaporation and basin grouting, and interior equipment, tanks, and associated components. This includes a study to develop a grout formulation and placement process for this deactivation project. Water will be allowed to passively evaporate to r educe the spread of contamination from the walls of the basin. The basins will be filled with grout, underwater, as the water evaporates to maintain the basin water at a safe level. The objective of the deactivation project is to eliminate potential exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials and eliminate potential safety hazards associated with the CPP-603 building.

  8. Brief overview of the various families of grouts and their aplications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandts, A.

    1989-04-01

    It is difficult to maintain an up-to-date overview of all the grouts presently used on the international market. Better grouts are continuously developed and more formulators are making their appearance. Consequently, it is difficult to clearly define all of the products in the industry. This topic has been the subject of numerous papers and textbooks. Most authors, however, only focus on their fields of interest: applications in geotechnical, or rehabilitation, or seepage control in civil engineering, oil or mining industry. There has been a limited transfer of technology from one field to the other because of the enormous differences in magnitude, site conditions and consequently the application techniques. The tools an engineer has are: his expertise in grouting and engineering background, equipment available or to be designed or modified to carry out a particular job, relevant data available from other sciences, and products with a variety of characteristics. This paper concentrates on product selection. The most suitable product for a particular project requires a good understanding of the general chemical and mechanical characteristics of the grout. The grouts have been classified into four categories for the purpose of this paper. There may be other methods of classification; however, this is only an attempt to help the industry with the selection of the most suitable grout for a given application. The four categories are: suspension grouts, chemical grouts, hot melts, and precipitation grouts. 1 fig.

  9. In vitro cytotoxicity of four calcium silicate-based endodontic cements on human monocytes, a colorimetric MTT assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Khedmat

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study was performed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of four calcium silicate-based endodontic cements at different storage times after mixing. Materials and Methods Capillary tubes were filled with Biodentine (Septodont, Calcium Enriched Mixture (CEM cement, BioniqueDent, Tech Biosealer Endo (Tech Biosealer and ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental. Empty tubes and tubes containing Dycal were used as negative and positive control groups respectively. Filled capillary tubes were kept in 0.2 mL microtubes and incubated at 37℃. Each material was divided into 3 groups for testing at intervals of 24 hr, 7 day and 28 day after mixing. Human monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cocultered with 24 hr, 7 day and 28 day samples of different materials for 24 and 48 hr. Cell viability was evaluated using an MTT assay. Results In all groups, the viability of monocytes significantly improved with increasing storage time regardless of the incubation time (p < 0.001. After 24 hr of incubation, there was no significant difference between the materials regarding monocyte viability. However, at 48 hr of incubation, ProRoot MTA and Biodentine were less cytotoxic than CEM cement and Biosealer (p < 0.01. Conclusions Biodentine and ProRoot MTA had similar biocompatibility. Mixing ProRoot MTA with PBS in place of distilled water had no effect on its biocompatibility. Biosealer and CEM cement after 48 hr of incubation were significantly more cytotoxic to on monocyte cells compared to ProRoot MTA and Biodentine.

  10. Improving adhesion between luting cement and zirconia-based ceramic with an alternative surface treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurealice Rosa Maria MARTINS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of an alternative surface treatment on the microshear bond strength (μsbs of zirconia-based ceramic. Thirty-five zirconia disks were assigned to five groups according to the following treatments: Control (CO, glass and silane were not applied to the zirconia surface; G1, air blasted with 100μm glass beads + glaze + silane; G2, a gel containing 15% (by weight glass beads applied to the ceramic surface + glaze + silane; G3, a gel containing 25% (by weight glass beads applied to the ceramic surface + glaze + silane; and G4, a gel containing 50% (by weight glass beads applied to the ceramic surface + glaze + silane. The specimens were built up using RelyX ARC®, according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, and inserted in an elastomeric mold with an inner diameter of 0.8 mm. The μsbs test was performed using a testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p < 0.05 were applied to the bond strength values (in MPa. CO (15.6 ± 4.1 showed the lowest μsbs value. There were no statistical differences between the G1 (24.9 ± 7.4, G2 (24.9 ± 2.3, G3 (35.0 ± 10.3 and G4 (35.3 ± 6.0 experimental groups. Those groups submitted to surface treatments with higher concentrations of glass showed a lower frequency of adhesive failures. In conclusion, the glass application improved the interaction between the ceramic and the luting cement.

  11. APC fly ashes stabilized with Portland cement for further development of road sub-base aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, J.; Giro-Paloma, J.; Maldonado-Alameda, A.; Huete-Hernández, S.; Chimenos, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    Although waste-to-energy plants allow reducing the mass and volume of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerated, an average around 30 % of the total content remains as bottom ash (BA) and air pollution control (APC) ashes at the end of combustion process. While weathered bottom ash (WBA) is considered a non-hazardous residue that can be revalorized as a secondary aggregate, APC fly ashes generated during the flue gas treatment are classified as hazardous waste and are handled in landfill disposal after stabilization, usually with Portland cement (OPC). However, taking into account the amount of APC residues produced and the disposing cost in landfill, their revalorization is an important issue that could be effectively addressed. As MSW can be incinerated producing bottom ashes (BA) or air pollutant control (APC) residues, the development of a mortar formulated with APC fly ash as secondary building material is a significant risk to the environment for their content of heavy metals. In this way, Design of Experiment (DoE) was used for the improvement of granular material (GM) formulation composed by APC and OPC for further uses as road sub-base aggregate. DoE analysis was successful in the modelling and optimization the formulation as function of the mechanical properties and APC amount. Consequently, an optimal mortar formulation (OMF) of around 50 wt.% APC and 50 wt.% OPC was considered. The OMF leachates and abrasion resistance have been analyzed. These results have demonstrated the viability of OMF as non-hazardous material feasible to be used as secondary aggregate. Moreover, it would be possible to consider the environmental assessment of a GM composed by ≈20 wt.% of OMF and ≈80 wt.% of WBA in order to improve mechanical properties and heavy metals stabilization.

  12. Analytical Study of the Mechanical Behavior of Fully Grouted Bolts in Bedding Rock Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.; Li, Y. Z.

    2017-09-01

    Bolting is widely used as a reinforcement means for rock slopes. The support force of a fully grouted bolt is often provided by the combination of the axial and shear forces acting at the cross section of the bolt, especially for bedding rock slopes. In this paper, load distribution and deformation behavior of the deflecting section of a fully grouted bolt were analyzed, and a structural mechanical model was established. Based on force method equations and deformation compatibility relationships, an analytical approach, describing the contribution of the axial and shear forces acting at the intersection between the bolt and the joint plane to the stability of a rock slope, was developed. Influence of the inclination of the bolt to the joint plane was discussed. Laboratory tests were conducted with different inclinations of the bolt to the joint plane. Comparisons between the proposed approach, the experimental data and a code method were made. The calculation results are in good agreement with the test data. It is shown that transverse shear resistance plays a significant role to the bolting contribution and that the bigger the dip of the bolt to the joint plane, the more significant the dowel effect. It is also shown that the design method suggested in the code overestimates the resistance of the bolt. The proposed model considering dowel effect provides a more precise description on bolting properties of bedding rock slopes than the code method and will be helpful to improve bolting design methods.

  13. Performance assessment on grouted double-shell tank waste at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.H; McNair, G.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Allison, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1989-11-01

    The low-level fraction of liquid waste stored in double-shell tanks at Hanford will be solidified in a cementitious matrix (grout) and disposed in subsurface vaults. This paper discusses activities related to the preparation of a site-specific performance assessment as required by DOE Order 5820.2A. A draft performance assessment has been prepared for the planned grout disposal system at Hanford using site-specific data. The assessment estimates the incremental increase in the dose to future populations who, after loss of institutional control at the site, use groundwater downgradient of the disposal site. Increases in nonradiological species in water from a hypothetical well are also estimated. Two-dimensional transport models were used to estimate contaminant concentrations in groundwater. Based on diffusional release from the waste package, the projected radiological dose to an individual on a hypothetical farm using water from a well at the disposal facility boundary is estimated at less than one percent of the 25 mrem/yr standard in Order 5820.2. Technetium accounted for about 95% of the dose. Nitrate was the principle chemical contaminant at 0.3% to 0.5% of apportioned drinking water standards. Sensitivity studies on various parameters are in progress. This performance assessment will be updated as additional data become available.

  14. Innovations in bonding to zirconia based ceramics: part III. Phosphate monomer resin cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirmohammadi, H.; Aboushelib, M.N.M.; Salameh, Z.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the bond strength values and the ranking order of three phosphate monomer containing resin cements using microtensile (μTBS) and microshear (μSBS) bond strength tests. Materials and methods Zirconia discs (Procera Zirconia) were bonded to resin composite discs (Filtek Z250) using

  15. LOW WATER CEMENTS BASED ON ACTIVE MINERAL ADDITIVES OF VARIOUS ORIGINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Bisultanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problems associated with the development of high-efficient binders. It was found that the mortars and concretes important indicator is the ratio of binding properties of cements with a so-called ”specific consumption of aggregates. ” It was found that the activity of Portland cement in the past decade has increased slightly and is 50-55 MPa; physical and technical characteristics of high-quality graded fine and coarse aggregates remained unchanged. It substantiates the relevance of the development of new types of cements for high-strength and high-quality concrete with active mineral additives and an effective superplasticizers. It is proved that the use of the obtained cements of low water through the use of active mineral additives of different origin, allows to obtain high-quality concrete with strength class from B60 to B100, reduce the need for water-mortar and concrete mixtures of 25-30% for equal mobility.

  16. Performance assessment of cement-based materials blended with micronized sand : Microstructure, durability and sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most important construction materials in the world. However, Portland cement which is one of the constituents of concrete is responsible for about 5-10% of global CO2 emission. From sustainability point of view, therefore, it is important to search for materials which can be

  17. Ductile Cement-Based Composites with Wood Fibres - material design and experimental approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierra-Beltran, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    In order to turn a brittle cement matrix into a ductile composite different types of man-made fibres such as steel, glass and polyvinyl alcohol are currently used as reinforcement, as well as some natural fibres. Compared to synthetic fibres, natural fibres are more easily available worldwide and

  18. Rheological study of self-compacting mortars based on ternary cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhadja Dada

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-compacting concrete (SCC is able to provide the ability to be easily implemented without vibration and to achieve spectacular structures, by its high fluidity and its rheological stability. By against its formulation requires a large volume of cement, which is necessary to allow its flow. The current environmental considerations lead to reduce the production of clinker however, it is essential to use cementitious additions to replace cement, because of their high availability and their moderate price. Furthermore, their use contributes in a simple and economical way to solve the problems related to the environment. The objective of our work is to study the effects of the incorporation of mineral additions such as: blast furnace slag of El-Hadjar (BFS, and marble powder (MP on the rheological parameters of selfcompacting mortars developed in different combinations in ternary system with a substitution rate ranging from 20% to 60%. According to this study, it been found that the substitution of cement by blast furnace slag and marble powder has negatively affected the rheological behavior of the mixtures. In addition, a considerable decrease in the rheological parameters has been achieved with a substitution rate of 20% of slag and 30% of marble powder. As well as an improvement of workability has been proven to self-compacting mortars and this is due to the increase of ternary cement replacement rate by marble powder from 20% to 30%.

  19. Impact of zeolite-based nanomodified additive on the structure and strength of the cement stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, A. D.; Filippova, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Portland cement is the main binder in the building materials industry; its properties strongly influence properties of mortars and concretes. Some regions experience difficulties with delivery and storage of Portland cement, raising the need to develop an effective additive from the available raw materials. Such materials for the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) are zeolite-containing rocks. Studies have shown that introducing of dibutylphthalate to the composition of modified additive during mechanochemical activation leads to achievement of up to 11% of total amount particles with the size of 3-30 nm. After introducing 0.5% of the obtained additives, the compressive strength of cement-sand slurry samples increases up to 28%. Positive effect of additives introduction is also observed at high flow rate of water (W / C = 0.7). Gaining strength reaches 23%, allowing the efficient use of additive for movable mixtures with enhanced strength properties. In general, the proposed supplement allows reducing the water flow in the solution without decreasing its mobility, and increasing strength properties, which makes it possible to obtain a whole class of solutions of modified cement binder. The market value of the developed additives is 18 rubles per 1 kg, making sound competition in the market of modifying additives.

  20. Innovation based on tradition : Blast furnace slag cement for durable concrete structures in Norway?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Nijland, T.; De Rooij, M.; Larsen, C.K.; Pedersen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Blast furnace slag cement (BFSC) has been used to build reinforced concrete structures in marine and road environment in The Netherlands for nearly a century. The experience is good and structures with long service lives can be obtained, as has been shown by several field studies. This is caused by

  1. Predicting cement distribution in geothermal sandstone reservoirs based on estimates of precipitation temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Whitehouse, Martin; Kristensen, Lars; Hjuler, Morten L.; Mathiesen, Anders; Boyce, Adrian J.; Nielsen, Lars H.

    2016-04-01

    Exploitation of geothermal sandstone reservoirs is challenged by pore-cementing minerals since they reduce the fluid flow through the sandstones. Geothermal exploration aims at finding sandstone bodies located at depths that are adequate for sufficiently warm water to be extracted, but without being too cemented for warm water production. The amount of cement is highly variable in the Danish geothermal reservoirs which mainly comprise the Bunter Sandstone, Skagerrak and Gassum formations. The present study involves bulk and in situ stable isotope analyses of calcite, dolomite, ankerite, siderite and quartz in order to estimate at what depth they were formed and enable prediction of where they can be found. The δ18O values measured in the carbonate minerals and quartz overgrowths are related to depth since they are a result of the temperatures of the pore fluid. Thus the values indicate the precipitation temperatures and they fit the relative diagenetic timing identified by petrographical observations. The sandstones deposited during arid climatic conditions contain calcite and dolomite cement that formed during early diagenesis. These carbonate minerals precipitated as a response to different processes, and precipitation of macro-quartz took over at deeper burial. Siderite was the first carbonate mineral that formed in the sandstones that were deposited in a humid climate. Calcite began precipitating at increased burial depth and ankerite formed during deep burial and replaced some of the other phases. Ankerite and quartz formed in the same temperature interval so constrains on the isotopic composition of the pore fluid can be achieved. Differences in δ13C values exist between the sandstones that were deposited in arid versus humid environments, which suggest that different kinds of processes were active. The estimated precipitation temperatures of the different cement types are used to predict which of them are present in geothermal sandstone reservoirs in

  2. Fundamental investigations related to the mitigation of volume changes in cement-based materials at early ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant, Gaurav Niteen

    The increased use of high-performance, low water-to-cement (w/c) ratio concretes has led to increased occurrences of early-age shrinkage cracking in civil engineering structures. To reduce the magnitude of early-age shrinkage and the potential for cracking, mitigation strategies using shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs), saturated lightweight aggregates, expansive cements and extended moist curing durations in construction have been recommended. However, to appropriately utilize these strategies, it is important to have a complete understanding of the driving forces of early-age volume change and how these methods work from a materials perspective to reduce shrinkage. This dissertation uses a first-principles approach to understand the mechanism of shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) to generate an expansion and mitigate shrinkage at early-ages, quantify the influence of a CaO-based expansive additive in reducing unrestrained shrinkage, residual stress development and the cracking potential at early-ages and quantify the influence of shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) and cement hydration (pore structure refinement) on the reduction induced in the fluid transport properties of the material. The effects of shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) are described in terms of inducing autogenous expansions in cement pastes at early ages. An evaluation comprising measurements of autogenous deformation, x-ray diffraction (Rietveld analysis), pore solution and thermogravimetric analysis and electron microscopy is performed to understand the chemical nature and physical effects of the expansion. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the measured liquid-phase compositions indicate the SRA produces elevated Portlandite super-saturations in the pore solution which results in crystallization stress driven expansions. The thermodynamic calculations are supported by deformation measurements performed on cement pastes mixed in solutions saturated with Portlandite or containing

  3. Human tooth germ stem cell response to calcium-silicate based endodontic cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Pamukcu Guven

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the cytotoxic effects of endodontic cements on human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs. MTA Fillapex, a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA-based, salicylate resin containing root canal sealer, was compared with iRoot SP, a bioceramic sealer, and AH Plus Jet, an epoxy resin-based root canal sealer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: To evaluate cytotoxicity, all materials were packed into Teflon rings (4 mmµ3 mm and co-cultured with hTGSCs with the aid of 24-well Transwell permeable supports, which had a pore size of 0.4 µm. Coverslips were coated with MTA Fillapex, iRoot SP and AH Plus Jet and each coverslip was placed onto the bottom of one well of a six-well plate for scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis. Before the cytotoxicity and SEM analysis, all samples were stored at 37ºC and at 95% humidity and 5% CO2 for 24 hours to set. The cellular viability was analyzed using MTS test (3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxy-methoxy-phenyl-2-(4-sulfo-phenyl-2H-tetrazolium. The cytotoxic effects and SEM visualization of the tested materials were analyzed at 24-hour, 72-hour, one-week and two-week periods. RESULTS: On the 1st day, only MTA Fillapex caused cytotoxicity compared to negative control (NC group (p0.05. After 14 days of incubation with the test materials, MTA Fillapex exhibited significantly higher cytotoxicity compared with iRoot SP, AH Plus Jet and the NC group (P<0.008. In the SEM analysis, the highest levels of cell attachment were observed for iRoot SP and the control group. After 24 hours, MTA Fillapex reduced the number of cells attached to the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of this study, sealers exerted different cytotoxic effects on hTGSCs. Although all materials have exerted cellular toxicity, iRoot SP and AH Plus Jet may promote better attachment to hTGSCs.

  4. Human tooth germ stem cell response to calcium-silicate based endodontic cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, Esra Pamukçu; Yalvaç, Mehmet Emir; Kayahan, Mehmet Baybora; Sunay, Hakkı; Şahın, Fikrettin; Bayirli, Gündüz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cytotoxic effects of endodontic cements on human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs). MTA Fillapex, a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-based, salicylate resin containing root canal sealer, was compared with iRoot SP, a bioceramic sealer, and AH Plus Jet, an epoxy resin-based root canal sealer. To evaluate cytotoxicity, all materials were packed into Teflon rings (4 mmµ3 mm) and co-cultured with hTGSCs with the aid of 24-well Transwell permeable supports, which had a pore size of 0.4 µm. Coverslips were coated with MTA Fillapex, iRoot SP and AH Plus Jet and each coverslip was placed onto the bottom of one well of a six-well plate for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Before the cytotoxicity and SEM analysis, all samples were stored at 37ºC and at 95% humidity and 5% CO2 for 24 hours to set. The cellular viability was analyzed using MTS test (3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxy-methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium). The cytotoxic effects and SEM visualization of the tested materials were analyzed at 24-hour, 72-hour, one-week and two-week periods. On the 1st day, only MTA Fillapex caused cytotoxicity compared to negative control (NC) group (p0.05). After 14 days of incubation with the test materials, MTA Fillapex exhibited significantly higher cytotoxicity compared with iRoot SP, AH Plus Jet and the NC group (P<0.008). In the SEM analysis, the highest levels of cell attachment were observed for iRoot SP and the control group. After 24 hours, MTA Fillapex reduced the number of cells attached to the surface. Within the limitations of this study, sealers exerted different cytotoxic effects on hTGSCs. Although all materials have exerted cellular toxicity, iRoot SP and AH Plus Jet may promote better attachment to hTGSCs.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  6. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  7. Critical Review of Cement-Based Stabilisation/Solidification Techniques for the Disposal of Hazardous Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    wollastonite. J. Chem. Tech. Biotechnol., 34A, 367-373 (1984). 34 R. Papachristou. In Flyash for defluoridation . Water and Waste Treatment, 28 (5), 40...porosity of the solidified product (eg. by using an extreme low water /cement ratio or the use of polymer impregnation techniques). It has also been...would finally appear in water as sodium, potassium and calcium sulphate. 6 It should be noted that the characteristics of PFA vary with ;ts source. Even

  8. Sulfate attack of Algerian cement-based material with crushed limestone filler cured at different temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    SENHADJI, Yassine; MOULI, Mohamed; KHELAFI, Hamid

    2010-01-01

    The cement production industry is one of the main consumers of energy and raw materials. Over the last years, a great effort has been made in order to substitute clinker for less energy demanding materials. In many countries, it is popular to use limestone as admixture material to improve the consistency of concrete. Nevertheless, the construction industry needs durable materials with improved properties. Following this objective, this work is a part of an ongoing project developed ...

  9. Mechanical Properties and Biocompatibility of a Biomaterial Based on Deproteinized Hydroxyapatite and Endodentine Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupeks Lauris

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite is used for bone reconstruction, in order to improve its mechanical properties different substances can be added. In our study new biomaterial is created from deproteinised hydroxyaptite and endodentic cement, its mechanical properties were tested. Material was implanted subcutaneous in rats, then histological and biocompatability tests were performed. Results indicate that stuff has good mechanical properties, short setting time and gradual resorption creating porosity and ability to integrate in bone.

  10. ToF-SIMS images and spectra of biomimetic calcium silicate-based cements after storage in solutions simulating the effects of human biological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, A.; Torrisi, V.; Tuccitto, N.; Gandolfi, M. G.; Prati, C.; Licciardello, A.

    2010-01-01

    ToF-SIMS images were obtained from a section of a tooth, obturated by means of a new calcium-silicate based cement (wTCF) after storage for 1 month in a saline solutions (DPBS), in order to simulate the body fluid effects on the obturation. Afterwards, ToF-SIMS spectra were obtained from model samples, prepared by using the same cement paste, after storage for 1 month and 8 months in two different saline solutions (DPBS and HBSS). ToF-SIMS spectra were also obtained from fluorine-free cement (wTC) samples after storage in HBSS for 1 month and 8 months and used for comparison. It was found that the composition of both the saline solution and the cement influenced the composition of the surface of disks and that longer is the storage greater are the differences. Segregation phenomena occur both on the cement obturation of the tooth and on the surface of the disks prepared by using the same cement. Indirect evidences of formation of new crystalline phases are supplied.

  11. Mechanical Properties of High-Performance Lightweight Aggregate Concrete with Inorganic Polymers Cement Based on Multiple Minerals under Uniaxial Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High-performance lightweight aggregate concrete with inorganic polymers cement based on multiple minerals is a very promising new material. The research of mechanical properties of the new material is of great theoretical and practical significance. In this research, the failure behavior, cubic and prism compressive strength, elastic modulus, peak strain of the new material, and the nature of the stress-strain curve are studied. An analytical model is quoted to represent the ascending and descending parts of the stress-strain curve.

  12. Increase of a Roadway Covering Durability by Using the Cement-Concrete Base Fragmented with the Geogrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sannikov Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presents the results of studies of innovative materials in the field of in road construction. The paper presents an alternative method of increasing the cracking resistance of the roads asphalt-concrete pavement, constructed on the cement-concrete base, due to its fragmentation with the volumetric plastic geogrid while constructing. Theoretical, laboratory and field experimental studies of this design were conducted, as well as the effectiveness of the proposed solution was proved. The use of this design can improve the durability of the roadway coverings and reduce the costs for the roads repair and maintenance.

  13. First Steps in Developing Cement-Based Batteries to Power Cathodic Protection of Embedded Steel in Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Niall; Byrne, Aimee; Norton, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the first steps in developing innovative cement-based batteries to power cathodic protection in reinforced concrete structures. Initial electrical outputs of 1.55V and 23mA have been found to be sufficient to polarise prescribed corrosion currents of 20mA per m2 of embedded steel. Cathodic protection is a well-developed and powerful technique to limit the effects of steel reinforcement corrosion. However, as it requires an electrical supply day and night, it is often power...

  14. New data on the fatigue and ultimate limit state of grouted tubular joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morahan, D.J.; Foeken, R.J. van; Lalani, M.; Wardenier, J.

    1996-12-31

    A Joint Industry Project (JIP) commenced in 1993 to develop a design manual for tubular joints which are strengthened or repaired through chord grout-filling. This project has been funded by five oil companies and two regulatory bodies. The project has comprised the conduct of over 150 Stress Concentration Factor (SCF) and ultimate load tests on large scale as-welded and grouted tubular joints. Separate data capture studies, including capture of data on double-skin grout reinforced joints, have been conducted, together with studies on offshore deployment, to ensure that complete chord grout-filling is achieved for all practical scenarios. The primary reason for carrying out this project has been an industry-wide recognition that chord grout-filling represents an extremely cost-effective and technically-efficient method to strengthen or repair tubular joints. Further, it has been recognized that double-skin joints (e.g. pile through leg with annulus grout-filled) are often present in structures and the resulting enhanced strength and fatigue characteristics should be exploited to permit more efficient new platform designs or better estimation of joint performance for existing installations. Although API RP2A permits the use of grouted joints, little guidance is provided, reflecting the lack of data and information in this area. This project has been carried out to generate a significant amount of new data/information, leading to the creation of a design manual for grouted joints.

  15. Development of laboratory test methods to replace the simulated high-temperature grout fluidity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report contains a summary of the research performed to develop a replacement for the high-temperature grout : fluidity (HTGF) test. The HTGF test was employed in the past by FDOT to qualify post-tensioning (PT) grouts for use in : post-tensioned...

  16. Estimation of Frost Resistance of the Tile Adhesive on a Cement Based with Application of Amorphous Aluminosilicates as a Modifying Additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovna Loganina, Valentina; Vladimirovna Zhegera, Christina

    2017-10-01

    In the article given information on the possibility of using amorphous aluminosilicates as a modifying additive in the offered tile cement adhesive. In the article, the data on the preparation of an additive based on amorphous aluminosilicates, on its microstructure and chemical composition. Presented information on the change in the porosity of cement stone when introduced of amorphous aluminosilicates in the his composition. The formulation of a dry building mix on a cement base is proposed with use of an additive based on amorphous aluminosilicates as a modifying additive. Recipe of dry adhesive mixes include Portland cement M400, mineral aggregate in proportion fraction 0.63-0.315:0.315-0.14 respectively 80:20 (%) and filling density of 1538.2 kg/m3, a plasticizer Kratasol, redispersible powder Neolith P4400 and amorphous alumnosilicates. The developed formulation can be used as a tile adhesive for finishing walls of buildings and structure with tiles. Presented results of the evaluation of frost resistance of adhesives based on cement with using of amorphous aluminosilicates as a modifying additive. Installed the mark on the frost resistance of tile glue and frost resistance of the contact zone of adhesive. Established, that the adhesive layer based on developed formulation dry mixture is crack-resistant and frost-resistant for conditions city Penza and dry humidity zone – zone 3 and climatic subarea IIB (accordance with Building codes and regulations 23-01-99Ȋ) cities Russia’s.

  17. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  18. Residence time effects on technetium reduction in slag-based cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yuji; Powell, Brian A; Kaplan, D I

    2018-01-15

    A long-term disposal of technetium-99 ((99)Tc) has been considered in a type of cementitious formulation, slag-based grout, at the U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Site, Aiken SC, U.S.A. Blast furnace slag, which contains S and Fe electron donors, has been used in a mixture with fly ash, and Portland cement to immobilize (99)Tc(VII)O4(-)(aq) in low level radioactive waste via reductive precipitation reaction. However the long-term stability of Tc(IV) species is not clearly understood as oxygen gradually diffuses into the solid structure. In this study, aging effects of Tc speciation were investigated as a function of depth (<2.5cm) in slag-based grout using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. All of Fe(II) in solids was oxidized to Fe(III) after 117d. However, elemental S, sulfide, and sulfoxide persists at the 0-8mm depths even after 485d, suggesting the presence of a reduced zone below the surface few millimeters. Pertechnetate was successfully reduced to Tc(IV) after 29d. Distorted hydrolyzed Tc(IV) octahedral molecules were partially sulfidized and or polymerized at all depths (0-8mm) and were stable in 485d aged sample. The results of this study suggest that variable S species contribute to stabilize the partially sulfidized Tc(IV) species in aged slag-based grout. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Self-healing of Early Age Cracks in Cement-based Materials by Mineralization of Carbonic Anhydrase Microorganism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang eQian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research investigated the self-healing potential of early age cracks in cement-based materials incorporating the bacteria which can produce carbonic anhydrase. Cement-based materials specimens were pre-cracked at the age of 7, 14, 28, 60 days to study the repair ability influenced by cracking time, the width of cracks were between 0.1 and 1.0 mm to study the healing rate influenced by width of cracks. The experimental results indicated that the bacteria showed excellent repairing ability to small cracks formed at early age of 7 days, cracks below 0.4 mm was almost completely closed. The repair effect reduced with the increasing of cracking age. Cracks width influenced self-healing effectiveness significantly. The transportation of CO2 and Ca2+ controlled the self-healing process. The computer simulation analyses revealed the self-healing process and mechanism of microbiologically precipitation induced by bacteria and the depth of precipitated CaCO3 could be predicted base on valid Ca2+.

  20. Self-healing of early age cracks in cement-based materials by mineralization of carbonic anhydrase microorganism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chunxiang; Chen, Huaicheng; Ren, Lifu; Luo, Mian

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated the self-healing potential of early age cracks in cement-based materials incorporating the bacteria which can produce carbonic anhydrase. Cement-based materials specimens were pre-cracked at the age of 7, 14, 28, 60 days to study the repair ability influenced by cracking time, the width of cracks were between 0.1 and 1.0 mm to study the healing rate influenced by width of cracks. The experimental results indicated that the bacteria showed excellent repairing ability to small cracks formed at early age of 7 days, cracks below 0.4 mm was almost completely closed. The repair effect reduced with the increasing of cracking age. Cracks width influenced self-healing effectiveness significantly. The transportation of CO2and Ca(2+) controlled the self-healing process. The computer simulation analyses revealed the self-healing process and mechanism of microbiologically precipitation induced by bacteria and the depth of precipitated CaCO3 could be predicted base on valid Ca(2+).

  1. A study of self-adhesive resin cements for bonding to silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy -- effect of including primer components in cement base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraguchi, Koichi; Minami, Hiroyuki; Minesaki, Yoshito; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacies of adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting, Maxcem, G-CEM, RelyX Unicem Clicker, Vitremer Paste) for bonding to Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy not surface-pretreated with metal primer. For control, Panavia F 2.0 -developed for use with a proprietary metal primer, Alloy Primer- was tested with and without metal primer application. Pairs of alloy disks (10.0 and 8.0 mm in diameters, 3.0 mm thickness) were air-abraded with alumina and bonded with one of the cements. Shear bond strengths (SBSs) were measured before and after 50,000 times of thermocycling. Among Maxcem, RelyX Unicem Clicker and the control, there were no statistical differences in SBS before and after thermocycling. After thermocycling, Clearfil SA Luting exhibited the highest SBS among all the cements. Results showed that Clearfil SA Luting, Maxcem, and RelyX Unicem Clicker were efficacious for bonding to Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy after air abrasion surface treatment for the latter.

  2. Nano-Silica Sol-Gel and Carbon Nanotube Coupling Effect on the Performance of Cement-Based Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwen; Ji, Weiming; Torabian Isfahani, Forood; Wang, Yaocheng; Li, Gengying; Liu, Yi; Xing, Feng

    2017-07-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for improving the mechanical performance of cement composites through crack-bridging and frictional pull-out. The interactive behaviors between CNTs and cement matrix act are crucial in optimizing the reinforcement of CNTs in cement composites. This study investigates the effects of nano-silica (NS) sol-gel on the interactive behaviors of CNTs and the cement matrix through a series of experiments and analyses. UV-visible spectrometer results show that CNTs are well-dispersed in suspension and the addition of NS has a negligible effect on the stability of CNT dispersion. Calorimetry tests and dynamic mechanical analysis demonstrate the nucleation and frictional performance of CNTs in cement matrix, respectively. The paper shows that the physical adsorption of NS on the CNT surface could result in the acceleration of cement hydration. Morphology observation confirms that a denser interface between CNTs and cement hydrates is formed. Finally, the improved interaction between CNTs and cement hydrates leads to a substantial increase in friction between CNTs and the cement matrix under periodic loading. NS may act as an ideal admixture for improving both the interactive behaviors between CNTs and cement matrix and the damping properties of cement composite.

  3. Bond strength of a dental leucite-based glass ceramic to a resin cement using different silane coupling agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Keshvad, Alireza; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Zamani, Fereshteh

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of different types of novel silane coupling agents with two concentrations on the micro-tensile bond strength of a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystals to a dual-cured resin cement using an optimized method of silane application. Leucite-reinforced feldspathic ceramic blocks were fabricated, wet ground and cleansed. The bonding ceramic surfaces were treated with different organosilane solutions as follows: Control silane: Monobond S; methacryloxypropyltrimethoxy silane and experimental silanes with two concentrations (1.0 and 2.5 vol%): amino, isocyanate, styryl, and acrylate silanes. The silane application method consisted of brush application, hot air drying followed by rinsing with hot water and drying. Then a thin layer of an unfilled resin and a dual-cured resin cement was light-cured on the ceramic surfaces. The resin-ceramic blocks were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and sectioned to produce beam specimens (n=17) with a 1.0 mm(2) cross-sectional area. Specimens were then subjected to thermocycling and tested in a micro-tensile tester device. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tamhane post-hoc test. The mean micro-tensile bond strength value for the styryl silane was significantly higher (P0.05). The micro-tensile bond strength of the leucite-based dental glass ceramic to a resin cement was affected by the type of silane coupling agent and not by the concentration of silane solutions. The best bond strength overall was achieved by methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane and experimental styryl silane solutions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Thermal diffusivity of dental cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paroussis, D; Kakaboura, A; Chrysafidis, C; Mauroyiannakis, E

    1990-08-01

    Thermal insulative efficiency, is one of the desirable properties of the dental cements. In this study, the thermal diffusivity of three types of dental cements, were measured. Thermal diffusivity was determined by the following method. Two thermo-couples were used and connected to a chart record, the first was embedded in the cylindrical block of the cement specimen and the other in a mixing of ice and water (reference thermocouple). All them were set in a apparatus consisting of a double cooling bath. Calculation of thermal diffusivity were based on the curve provided of the record during cooling of the cement and a theoretical mathematic model. Values were ranged from 2,985 to 3,934 cm2.sec-1. ZOE cement exhibited the highest value, the glass-ionomers the lowest and the poly-carboxylates were average. The results showed that the thermal diffusivity of the cements is dependent from the type of the cement but the differences between them were not statistically significant. Additionally, the values obtained were about the same as the dentin, so the dental cements may consider as good thermal insulators.

  5. Shape Effect of Electrochemical Chloride Extraction in Structural Reinforced Concrete Elements Using a New Cement-Based Anodic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Carmona

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the research carried out by the authors focused on how the shape of structural reinforced concrete elements treated with electrochemical chloride extraction can affect the efficiency of this process. Assuming the current use of different anode systems, the present study considers the comparison of results between conventional anodes based on Ti-RuO2 wire mesh and a cement-based anodic system such as a paste of graphite-cement. Reinforced concrete elements of a meter length were molded to serve as laboratory specimens, to closely represent authentic structural supports, with circular and rectangular sections. Results confirm almost equal performances for both types of anode systems when electrochemical chloride extraction is applied to isotropic structural elements. In the case of anisotropic ones, such as rectangular sections with no uniformly distributed rebar, differences in electrical flow density were detected during the treatment. Those differences were more extreme for Ti-RuO2 mesh anode system. This particular shape effect is evidenced by obtaining the efficiencies of electrochemical chloride extraction in different points of specimens.

  6. Performance of Cement-Based Materials in Aggressive Aqueous Environments State-of-the-Art Report, RILEM TC 211 - PAE

    CERN Document Server

    Bertron, Alexandra; Belie, Nele

    2013-01-01

    Concrete and cement-based materials must operate in increasingly aggressive aqueous environments, which may be either natural or industrial.  These materials may suffer degradation in which ion addition and/or ion exchange reactions occur, leading to a breakdown of the matrix microstructure and consequent weakening.  Sometimes this degradation can be extremely rapid and serious such as in acidic environments, while in other cases degradation occurs over long periods.  Consequences of material failure are usually severe – adversely affecting the health and well-being of human communities and disturbing ecological balances. There are also large direct costs of maintaining and replacing deteriorated infrastructure and indirect costs from loss of production during maintenance work, which place a great burden on society. The focus of this book is on addressing issues concerning performance of cement-based materials in aggressive aqueous environments , by way of this State-of-the-Art Report. The book represe...

  7. Impact Mechanical Response of a 2-2 Cement-Based Piezoelectric Sensor Considering the Electrode Layer Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Taotao; Zhang, Keping; Liu, Wende; Liao, Yangchao

    2017-01-01

    Cement-based piezoelectric composite, has been widely used as a kind of smart material in structural health monitoring and active vibration control. However, transient dynamic loads such as impact loads may cause serious damage to the composite. Considering the electrode layer effect, this paper aimed to investigate the theoretical response of a 2-2 cement-based piezoelectric composite sensor subjected to an impact load. The vibration behaviors are analyzed by using the mode summation method and the virtual work principle. To simulate the impact load, transient haversine wave loads are assumed in the numerical simulation. Close agreements between theoretical and numerical solutions are found for peak transient haversine wave loads larger than 500 kPa, therefore proving the validity of the theory. Moreover, the influence of the electrode material and geometrical parameters on the dynamic characteristics of this sensor are considered. The present work should be beneficial to the design of this kind of sensor by taking into account the electrode layer effect.

  8. Effects on Mechanical Properties of Recycled PET in Cement-Based Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Ávila Córdoba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Concretes consisting of portland cement (OPC, silica sand, gravel, water, and recycled PET particles were developed. Specimens without PET particles were prepared for comparison. Curing times, PET particle sizes, and aggregate concentrations were varied. The compressive strength, compressive strain at yield point, and Young modulus were determined. Morphological and chemical compositions of recycled PET particles were seen in a scanning electron microscopy. Results show that smaller PET particle sizes in lower concentrations generate improvements on compressive strength and strain, and Young’s modulus decreases when the size of PET particles used was increased.

  9. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  10. EFFECTS OF BLAST-FURNACE SLAG ON NATURAL POZZOLAN-BASED GEOPOLYMER CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHSHAD YAZDANIPOUR

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A number of geopolymer cement mixes were designed and produced by alkali-activation of a pumice-type natural pozzolan. Effects of blast-furnace slag on basic engineering properties of the mixes were studied. Different engineering properties of the mixes such as setting times and 28-day compressive strength were studied at different amounts of blast-furnace slag, sodium oxide content, and water-to-cement ratio. The mix comprising of 5 wt.% blast-furnace slag and 8 wt.% Na2O with a water-to-dry binder ratio of 0.30 exhibits the highest 28-day compressive strength, i.e. 36 MPa. Mixes containing 5 wt.% of ground granulated blast furnace slag showed the least efflorescence or best soundness. Laboratory techniques of X-ray diffractometry (XRD, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were utilized for characterizing a number of mixes and studying their molecular and micro-structure. Investigations done by scanning electron microscopy confirm that smaller blast-furnace slag particles react totally while the larger ones react partially with alkaline activators and contribute to the formation of a composite microstructure.

  11. Cement-base bearing pads mortar for connections in the precast concrete: study of surface roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. El Debs

    Full Text Available Bearing pads are used in precast concrete connections to avoid concentrated stresses in the contact area between the precast elements. In the present research, the bearing pads are Portland cement mortar with styrene-butadiene latex (SB, lightweight aggregate (expanded vermiculite-term and short fibers (polypropylene, glass and PVA, in order to obtain a material with low modulus of elasticity and high tenacity, compared with normal Portland cement mortar. The objective of this paper is to analyze the influence of surface roughness on the pads and test other types of polypropylene fibers. Tests were carried out to characterize the composite and test on bearing pads. Characterization tests show compressive strength of 41MPa and modulus of elasticity of 12.8GPa. The bearing pads tests present 30% reduction of stiffness in relation to a reference mortar. The bearing pads with roughness on both sides present a reduction up to 30% in stiffness and an increase in accumulated deformation of more than 120%, regarding bearing pads with both sides smooth.

  12. COMPOSITE MATERIALS BASED ON CEMENT BINDERS MODIFIED WITH SiO2 NANOADDITIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of nanotechnologies allows to solve a number of problems of construction materials science: increase in strength, durability, abrasion and corrosion resistance that determines operational reliability of building constructions. Generally it is achieved due to nanoparticles that modify the structure and properties of the existing materials or products and are entered into their volume or on a surface layer. It’s theoretically and experimentally proved that the modified water has the bigger activity owing to the change of the ionic composition influencing the рН size and other parameters. As nanoparticles have a high level of surface energy, they show the increased tendency to agglomeration, meanwhile the size of agglomerates can reach several micrometers. In this regard an urgent task is to equally distribute and disaggregate the nanoparticles in the volume of tempering water. The experiments on studying of influence of the nanoparticles of silica distributed in volume of liquid by means of ultrasonic processing on characteristics of cement and sand solution and heavy concrete have been conducted. Nanoadditive influence on density, speed of strength development, final strength under compression of materials on the basis of cement depending on nanoadditive mass percent has been established.

  13. Design, fabrication, and properties of 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongyu, Xu [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Construction Materials Preparation and Measurement, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan, Shandong 250022 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Xin, Cheng; Shifeng, Huang [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Construction Materials Preparation and Measurement, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan, Shandong 250022 (China); Banerjee, Sourav [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)

    2014-12-28

    The laminated 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution were fabricated by employing Lead Zirconium Titanate ceramic as active phase, and mixture of cement powder, epoxy resin, and hardener as matrix phase with a mass proportion of 4:4:1. The dielectric, piezoelectric, and electromechanical coupling properties of the composites were studied. The composites with large total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric strain constant and relative permittivity, and the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites are independent of the dimensional variations of the piezoelectric ceramic layer. The composites with small total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric voltage constant, but also large dielectric loss. The composite with gradually increased dimension of piezoelectric ceramic layer has the smallest dielectric loss, and that with the gradually increased dimension of matrix layer has the largest piezoelectric voltage constant. The novel piezoelectric composites show potential applications in fabricating ultrasonic transducers with varied surface vibration amplitude of the transducer.

  14. Design, fabrication, and properties of 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongyu, Xu; Xin, Cheng; Banerjee, Sourav; Shifeng, Huang

    2014-12-01

    The laminated 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution were fabricated by employing Lead Zirconium Titanate ceramic as active phase, and mixture of cement powder, epoxy resin, and hardener as matrix phase with a mass proportion of 4:4:1. The dielectric, piezoelectric, and electromechanical coupling properties of the composites were studied. The composites with large total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric strain constant and relative permittivity, and the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites are independent of the dimensional variations of the piezoelectric ceramic layer. The composites with small total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric voltage constant, but also large dielectric loss. The composite with gradually increased dimension of piezoelectric ceramic layer has the smallest dielectric loss, and that with the gradually increased dimension of matrix layer has the largest piezoelectric voltage constant. The novel piezoelectric composites show potential applications in fabricating ultrasonic transducers with varied surface vibration amplitude of the transducer.

  15. Design, fabrication, and properties of 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongyu, Xu; Xin, Cheng; Banerjee, Sourav; Shifeng, Huang

    2014-12-28

    The laminated 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution were fabricated by employing Lead Zirconium Titanate ceramic as active phase, and mixture of cement powder, epoxy resin, and hardener as matrix phase with a mass proportion of 4:4:1. The dielectric, piezoelectric, and electromechanical coupling properties of the composites were studied. The composites with large total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric strain constant and relative permittivity, and the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites are independent of the dimensional variations of the piezoelectric ceramic layer. The composites with small total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric voltage constant, but also large dielectric loss. The composite with gradually increased dimension of piezoelectric ceramic layer has the smallest dielectric loss, and that with the gradually increased dimension of matrix layer has the largest piezoelectric voltage constant. The novel piezoelectric composites show potential applications in fabricating ultrasonic transducers with varied surface vibration amplitude of the transducer.

  16. Chemical characterization and bioactivity of epoxy resin and Portland cement-based sealers with niobium and zirconium oxide radiopacifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viapiana, Raqueli; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Hungaro-Duarte, Marco Antonio; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Camilleri, Josette

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize and to evaluate the bioactivity potential of experimental root canal sealers (ES) based on Portland cement, epoxy resin with nano- and micro-particles of niobium or zirconium oxide used as radiopacifiers in comparison to AH Plus and MTA Fillapex. Specimens of the sealers (10 mm in diameter×1 mm thick) were prepared and the radiopacity was evaluated according to ISO 6876 (2012) specifications. Characterization of the sealers was performed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM) immediately after setting and after immersion for 28 days in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). In addition X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were also performed. The pH and calcium ion release were measured after 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after completion of seating using a digital pH meter and an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, respectively. The experimental sealers exhibited an average radiopacity of 2.5 mm thickness of aluminum, which was similar to MTA Fillapex (P>0.05) and inferior to AH Plus (Pepoxy resin and radiopacifier exhibited a degree of bioactivity although no evidence of cement hydration was demonstrated on material characterization. The radiopacifier particle size had limited effect on the sealer microstructure and chemical properties. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modelling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behaviour of ion exchange resins incorporated into a cement-based matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Bescop P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a predictive model, based on experimental data, to determine the macroscopic mechanical behavior of a material made up of ion exchange resins solidified into a CEM III cement paste. Some observations have shown that in some cases, a significant macroscopic expansion of this composite material may be expected, due to internal pressures generated in the resin. To build the model, we made the choice to break down the problem in two scale’s studies. The first deals with the mechanical behavior of the different heterogeneities of the composite, i.e. the resin and the cement paste. The second upscales the information from the heterogeneities to the Representative Elementary Volume (REV of the composite. The heterogeneities effects are taken into account in the REV by applying a homogenization method derived from the Eshelby theory combined with an interaction coefficient drawn from the poroelasticity theory. At the first scale, from the second thermodynamic law, a formulation is developed to estimate the resin microscopic swelling. The model response is illustrated on a simple example showing the impact of the calculated internal pressure, on the macroscopic strain.

  18. Influence of Inertia and Low Active Mineral Admixture on Strength and Microstructure of Cement-Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meijuan Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement-based materials were investigated by comparing the strength and microstructure of pastes and mortar containing limestone powder or low quality fly ash. The compressive strength of the mortar at 28 and 90 d was examined whose microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA. The results indicated that the strength of mortar decreased with increasing mineral admixtures. The limestone powder mainly acted as inert filler and hardly took part in the chemical reaction. Low quality fly ash may accelerate the formation of hydration products in samples with more chemically bonded water. This further resulted in a higher degree of cement hydration and denser microstructure, while the overall heat of hydration was reduced. At the early stage of hydration, low quality fly ash can be considered as an inert material whereas its reactivity at the later stage became high, especially for ground low quality fly ash.

  19. Design, Explanation, and Evaluation of Training Model Structures Based on Learning Organization--In the Cement Industry with a Nominal Production Capacity of Ten Thousand Tons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimian, Hamid; Kazemi, Mojtaba; Abbspour, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to determine the effectiveness of training based on learning organization in the staff of cement industry with production capacity over ten thousand tons. The purpose of this study is to propose a training model based on learning organization. For this purpose, the factors of organizational learning were introduced by…

  20. Laboratory leach tests of phosphate/sulfate waste grout and leachate adsorption tests using Hanford sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; McLaurine, S.B.; Airhart, S.P.; LeGore, V.L.; Treat, R.L.

    1987-12-01

    An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout disposal at Hanford requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of waste species contained in the grout via contact with water that percolates through the ground. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of Hanford sediment (soil) surrounding the grout and concrete vault to retard migration of any wastes released from the grout. This report describes specific laboratory experiments that are producing empirical leach rate data and leachate-sediment adsorption data for Phosphate-Sulfate Waste (PSW) grout. The leach rate and adsorption values serve as inputs to computer codes used to forecast potential risk resulting from the use of ground water containing leached species. In addition, the report discusses other chemical analyses and geochemical computer code calculations that were used to identify mechanisms that control leach rates and adsorption potential. Knowledge of the controlling chemical and physical processes provides technical defensibility for using the empirical laboratory data to extrapolate the performance of the actual grout disposal system to the long time periods of interest. 59 refs., 83 figs., 18 tabs.

  1. Influence of Eugenol-based Sealers on Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post Luted with Resin Cement: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Aline Segatto Pires; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo

    2015-09-01

    It is unclear in the literature if the presence of eugenol in root dentin impairs the retention of a fiber post luted with resin cements. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature and perform meta-analysis on the influence of eugenol on the bond strength of posts luted to root canals. A systematic electronic search was performed in PubMed, Scopus, Lilacs, and Web of Science databases. No language or publication date restrictions were applied. Eligible studies were those that assessed the immediate push-out bond strength of posts cemented to root dentin after the removal of eugenol-based sealer and compared it with a eugenol-free group. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria although 2 were excluded after full-text reading and 1 study was identified by cross-reference. Nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. Global analysis showed a significant influence of eugenol, which lowered the bond strength of fiber posts cemented to root canals (P negative effect of eugenol on bond strength in all subgroups assessed (P posts luted to root canal with resin cement, regardless of the type of adhesive system or resin cement used. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dermal and neural toxicity caused by acrylamide exposure in two Korean grouting workers: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heeyun; Lee, Sang Gil; Rhie, Jeongbae

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral neuritis caused by acrylamide is well-known, and many Korean grouting workers are frequently exposed to acrylamide in grouting agents that are injected into cracked concrete. We recently encountered two cases of dermal and neural toxicity in Korean grouting workers with exposure to grouting agents that contained a high concentration of acrylamide. The first case involved a 44-year-old man with 8 years of waterproofing experience. The patient developed peeling skin on both hands while grouting, which progressed to systemic neurological symptoms, such as reduced sensory function and strength. The patient was diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy caused by acrylamide exposure, and fully recovered after conservative treatment and withdrawal of exposure to the grouting agent. The second case involved a 34-year-old man with 10 years of grouting experience. The patient initially experienced weakness in both legs, which progressed to weakness in his arms and uncontrolled phonation. After being hospitalized, he was diagnosed with cerebellar ataxia and peripheral neuropathy caused by acrylamide exposure, and was discharged after conservative treatment. Our follow-up investigation revealed that both workers were recently exposed to grouting agents that contained higher concentrations of acrylamide, compared to the agents that they had previously been using. Both workers had workplace acrylamide exposure through dermal contact plus inhalation of dust and vapor, which led to the neural toxicity and dermatitis. Therefore, government studies are needed to investigate the current status of workplace acrylamide use, and to protect workers from the hazardous effects of using acrylamide-containing grouting agents.

  3. Implementation of recycled cellulosic fibres into cement based composites and testing their influence on resulting properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospodarova, V.; Stevulova, N.; Vaclavik, V.; Dvorsky, T.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, the application of raw materials from renewable sources such as wood, plants and waste paper to building materials preparing has gained a significant interest in this research area. The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of the selected plasticizer on properties of fibres composites made of cellulosic fibres coming from recycled waste paper and cement. Investigations were performed on specimens with 0.5 wt. % of fibre addition without and with plasticizer. A comparative study did not show positive influence of plasticizer on the density and thermal conductivity of 28 days hardened composite. The specimens after 1, 3 and 7 days of hardening with plasticizer exhibited the highest impact on compressive strength in comparison to composite without plasticizer but 28 days hardened specimens reached the same value of strength characteristic (41 MPa).

  4. Ca stabilized zirconia based composites by wet consolidation of zirconia and high alumina cement mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruni, Y.L.; Garrido, L.B.; Aglietti, E.F., E-mail: lgarrido@cetmic.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Tecnologia de Recursos Minerales y Ceramica (CETMIC/CIC-CONICET La Plata), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    Composites of the CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} system are widely used in many industrial applications. In this study, porous Ca stabilized ZrO{sub 2} composites were developed from a starting mixture of m-ZrO{sub 2} and calcium aluminate cement. Ceramics were produced by wet consolidation of aqueous suspensions with and without corn starch as pore former agent and sintering at 1000-1500 °C. The influence of processing parameters on crystalline phases, sintering behavior and textural characteristics was examined. Stabilized c-ZrO{sub 2} formed with the composition of Ca{sub 0.15}Zr{sub 0.85}O{sub 1.85}. The sintering of the mixtures lead to porous composites materials. Textural properties were analyzed considering the initial composition and the present crystalline phases. (author)

  5. Development of shrinkage resistant microfibre-reinforced cement-based composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedanimojarrad, P.; Adam, G.; Ray, A.; Thomas, P.; Vessalas, K.

    2012-06-01

    Different shrinkage types may cause serious durability dilemma on restrained concrete parts due to crack formation and propagation. Several classes of fibres are used by concrete industry in order to reduce crack size and crack number. In previous studies, most of these fibre types were found to be effective in reducing the number and sizes of the cracks, but not in shrinkage strain reduction. This study deals with the influence of a newly introduced type of polyethylene fibre on drying shrinkage reduction. The novel fibre is a polyethylene microfibre in a new geometry, which is proved to reduce the amount of total shrinkage in mortars. This special hydrophobic polyethylene microfibre also reduces moisture loss of mortar samples. The experimental results on short and long-term drying shrinkage as well as on several other properties are reported. The hydrophobic polyethylene microfibre showed promising improvement in shrinkage reduction even at very low concentrations (0.1% of cement weight).

  6. Rheological behaviour of aluminosilicate slurries for oil well cementing; Comportamento reologico de pastas a base de aluminossilicatos para a cimentacao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinho, E.P.; Martinelli, A.E.; Melo, D.M.A.; Melo, M.A.F.; Garcia, R.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Araujo, R.G.S. [PETROBRAS, Natal/Fortaleza, RN/CE (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Steam injection is a technique used to stimulate wells to produce heavy oils, such as those commonly found in Rio Grande do Norte/Brazil. This procedure increases the temperature and the pressure in the well, thus affecting the integrity of its brittle cement. In this work, alternative oil well cements based on the polymerization of aluminosilicates in alkaline environments are proposed. These polymers are both heat- and fire-resistant due to their inorganic structure. However, the use of such materials in oil well cementing is limited due to their plastic viscosity. The results showed that the rheological behavior of the alternative slurries could be adjusted by setting appropriate SiO{sub 2}:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios as well as the nature of the alkali used. (author)

  7. Theoretical Analysis of the Dynamic Properties of a 2-2 Cement-Based Piezoelectric Dual-Layer Stacked Sensor under Impact Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Taotao; Liao, Yangchao; Zhang, Keping; Chen, Jun

    2017-05-04

    Cement-based piezoelectric materials are widely used due to the fact that compared with common smart materials, they overcome the defects of structure-incompatibility and frequency inconsistency with a concrete structure. However, the present understanding of the mechanical behavior of cement-based piezoelectric smart materials under impact load is still limited. The dynamic characteristics under impact load are of importance, for example, for studying the anti-collision properties of engineering structures and aircraft takeoff-landing safety. Therefore, in this paper, an analytical model was proposed to investigate the dynamic properties of a 2-2 cement-based piezoelectric dual-layer stacked sensor under impact load based on the piezoelectric effect. Theoretical solutions are obtained by utilizing the variable separation and Duhamel integral method. To simulate the impact load and verify the theory, three types of loads, including atransient step load, isosceles triangle load and haversine wave load, are considered and the comparisons between the theoretical results, Li's results and numerical results are presented by using the control variate method and good agreement is found. Furthermore, the influences of several parameters were discussed and other conclusions about this sensor are also given. This should prove very helpful for the design and optimization of the 2-2 cement-based piezoelectric dual-layer stacked sensor in engineering.

  8. Photocurable bioactive bone cement based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate-poly(acrylic/maleic) acid resin and mesoporous sol gel-derived bioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesaraki, S., E-mail: S-hesaraki@merc.ac.ir

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on strong and bioactive bone cement based on ternary bioactive SiO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass particles and a photocurable resin comprising hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(acrylic/maleic) acid. The as-cured composite represented a compressive strength of about 95 MPa but it weakened during soaking in simulated body fluid, SBF, qua its compressive strength reached to about 20 MPa after immersing for 30 days. Biodegradability of the composite was confirmed by reducing its initial weight (~ 32%) as well as decreasing the molecular weight of early cured resin during the soaking procedure. The composite exhibited in vitro calcium phosphate precipitation in the form of nanosized carbonated hydroxyapatite, which indicates its bone bonding ability. Proliferation of calvarium-derived newborn rat osteoblasts seeded on top of the composite was observed during incubation at 37 °C, meanwhile, an adequate cell supporting ability was found. Consequently, it seems that the produced composite is an appropriate alternative for bone defect injuries, because of its good cell responses, high compressive strength and ongoing biodegradability, though more in vivo experiments are essential to confirm this assumption. - Highlights: • Light cure cement based on SiO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass and polymer-like matrix was formed. • The matrix includes poly(acrylic/maleic acid) and poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate). • The cement is as strong as polymethylmethacrylate bone cement. • The cement exhibits apatite formation ability in simulated body fluid. • The cement is biodegradable and supports proliferation of osteoblastic cells.

  9. Thermo-hydro-mechanical modeling and analysis of cement-based energy storages for small-scale dwellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemariam, Henok; Wuttke, Frank

    2016-04-01

    One of the common technologies for balancing the energy demand and supply in district heating, domestic hot water production, thermal power plants and thermal process industries in general is thermal energy storage. Thermal energy storage, in particular sensible heat storage as compared to latent heat storage and thermo-chemical storage, has recently gained much interest in the renewable energy storage sector due to its comparatively low cost and technical development. Sensible heat storages work on the principle of storing thermal energy by raising or lowering the temperature of liquid (commonly water) or solid media, and do not involve material phase change or conversion of thermal energy by chemical reactions or adsorption processes as in latent heat and thermo-chemical storages, respectively. In this study, the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of a cement-based thermal energy storage system for domestic applications has been modeled in both saturated as well as unsaturated conditions using the Finite Element method along with an extensive experimental analysis program for parameter detection. For this purpose, a prototype model is used with three well-known thermal energy storage materials, and the temperature and heat distribution of the system were investigated under specific thermo-hydro-mechanical conditions. Thermal energy samples with controlled water to solids ratio and stored in water for up to 28 days were used for the experimental program. The determination of parameters included: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity and linear coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) using a transient line-source measurement technique as well as a steady-state thermal conductivity and expansion meter; mechanical strength parameters such as uni-axial strength, young's modulus of elasticity, poisson's ratio and shear parameters using uniaxial, oedometer and triaxial tests; and hydraulic properties such as hydraulic permeability or conductivity under

  10. The Performance and Mechanism Analysis of Cement Pastes Added to Aluminum Sulfate-Based Low-Alkali Setting Accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingdong Lv

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a type of low-alkali liquid state setting accelerator, named HLSA; it was environmentally friendly product. To investigate the temperature adaptation and cement flexibilities of HLSA, the setting time and strength development properties of cement with HLSA were discussed in this paper. The effects of HLSA on hydration process, hydration products, and microstructure were studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP. The results show that four typical 42.5-grade ordinary Portland cement types with 6–8% HLSA could satisfy the first-grade requirements according to JC477-2005 even at a lower temperature (e.g., 10°C. Further, the percentage ratio of 28 d compressive strength of cement with 6–8% HLSA was over 90%; the XRD diffraction peak of AFt integrated area of cement with 7% HLSA was 3818 at 5 min of hydration; SEM observation revealed that AFt crystals were filled in the pore of cement at 28 d of hydration; the temperature adaptation and cement flexibilities of HLSA were excellent; the cement with HLSA coagulating in a short time attributed to promoting the formation of abundant AFt and the hydration of C3S.

  11. The characterisation, improvement and modelling aspects of Frost Salt Scaling of Cement-Based Materials with a High Slag Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copuroglu, O.

    2006-01-01

    Blast furnace slag cement concrete is used extensively in a number of countries. In comparison with OPC, it is particularly well known for its excellent performance in marine environments. One dis-advantage of slag cement is its vulnerability to scaling under the combined load of freezing-thawing

  12. Grouting techniques for the unfavorable geological conditions of Xiang'an subsea tunnel in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingli Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges during subsea tunnel construction is to seal the potential water inflow. The paper presents a case study of Xiang'an subsea tunnel in Xiamen, the first subsea tunnel in China. During its construction, different grades of weathered geomaterials were encountered, which was the challenging issue for this project. To deal with these unfavorable geological conditions, grouting was adopted as an important measure for ground treatment. The grouting mechanism is first illustrated by introducing a typical grouting process. Then the site-specific grouting techniques employed in the Xiang'an subsea tunnel are elaborated. By using this ground reinforcement technique, the tunneling safety of the Xiang'an subsea tunnel was guaranteed.

  13. Double-parameter foundation beam modal of overlying thin rock stratum under loose layers grouting mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianghong, Chen; Lianjin, Tao; Honghua, Liu

    2017-04-01

    Strata movement of drilling grouting is distinctly different from that of traditional caving mining, especially for overlying thin rock stratum. Considering the horizontal shear transfer of foundation, a mechanical model of overlying strata movement was established using the theory of Pasternak double-parameter foundation beam. The deflection and internal force equations of rock beam were derived, and the influence mechanisms of grouting material parameter were discussed. The results showed that the thickness of layer grouting was the key influential factor than the foundation modulus coefficient and grout diffusion radius. The comparison with the theory of Winkler elastic foundation beam also showed that double-parameter foundation beam method is more applicable to reinforced strata.

  14. First study on gene expression of cement proteins and potential adhesion-related genes of a membranous-based barnacle as revealed from Next-Generation Sequencing technology

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Hsiu Chin

    2013-12-12

    This is the first study applying Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology to survey the kinds, expression location, and pattern of adhesion-related genes in a membranous-based barnacle. A total of 77,528,326 and 59,244,468 raw sequence reads of total RNA were generated from the prosoma and the basis of Tetraclita japonica formosana, respectively. In addition, 55,441 and 67,774 genes were further assembled and analyzed. The combined sequence data from both body parts generates a total of 79,833 genes of which 47.7% were shared. Homologues of barnacle cement proteins - CP-19K, -52K, and -100K - were found and all were dominantly expressed at the basis where the cement gland complex is located. This is the main area where transcripts of cement proteins and other potential adhesion-related genes were detected. The absence of another common barnacle cement protein, CP-20K, in the adult transcriptome suggested a possible life-stage restricted gene function and/or a different mechanism in adhesion between membranous-based and calcareous-based barnacles. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  15. Continuous and embedded solutions for SHM of concrete structures using changing electrical potential in self-sensing cement-based composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Austin; Garcia-Macias, Enrique; D'Alessandro, Antonella; Laflamme, Simon; Castro-Triguero, Rafael; Ubertini, Filippo

    2017-04-01

    Interest in the concept of self-sensing structural materials has grown in recent years due to its potential to enable continuous low-cost monitoring of next-generation smart-structures. The development of cement-based smart sensors appears particularly well suited for monitoring applications due to their numerous possible field applications, their ease of use and long-term stability. Additionally, cement-based sensors offer a unique opportunity for structural health monitoring of civil structures because of their compatibility with new or existing infrastructure. Particularly, the addition of conductive carbon nanofillers into a cementitious matrix provides a self-sensing structural material with piezoresistive characteristics sensitive to deformations. The strain-sensing ability is achieved by correlating the external loads with the variation of specific electrical parameters, such as the electrical resistance or impedance. Selection of the correct electrical parameter for measurement to correlate with features of interest is required for the condition assessment task. In this paper, we investigate the potential of using altering electrical potential in cement-based materials doped with carbon nanotubes to measure strain and detect damage in concrete structures. Experimental validation is conducted on small-scale specimens including a steel-reinforced beam of conductive cement paste. Comparisons are made with constant electrical potential and current methods commonly found in the literature. Experimental results demonstrate the ability of the changing electrical potential at detecting features important for assessing the condition of a structure.

  16. Composite cement mortars based on marine sediments and oyster shell powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ez-zaki, H.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Additions of dredged marine sediments and oyster shell powder (OS as cement substitute materials in mortars are examined by several techniques. The sediments have high water and chloride contents and calcite, quartz, illite and kaolinite as principal minerals. The OS powders are entirely composed of calcium carbonate and traces of other impurities. Four mixtures of treated sediments and OS powders at 650 °C and 850 °C are added to Portland cement at 8%, 16% and 33% by weight. The hydration of composite pastes is followed by calorimetric tests, the porosity accessible to water, the bulk density, the permeability to gas, the compressive strength and the accelerated carbonation resistance are measured. In general, the increase of addition amounts reduced the performance of mortars. However, a reduction of gas permeability was observed when the addition was up to 33%. Around 16% of addition, the compressive strength and carbonation resistance were improved.En este trabajo se ha valorado la sustitución de cemento en morteros por sedimentos marinos dragados y polvo de concha de ostra (OS. Los sedimentos tienen altos contenidos de agua, cloruros, calcita, cuarzo, illita y caolinita como minerales principales. Los polvos OS están compuestos de carbonato cálcico y trazas de otras impurezas. Se añadieron a un cemento Portland, cuatro mezclas de los sedimentos y polvos de OS tratados a 650 °C y 850 °C en proporciones del 8%, 16% y 33% en peso. La hidratación de pastas se estudió a través de calorimetría. Se estudió además la porosidad accesible al agua, densidad aparente, permeabilidad al gas, resistencia a compresión y carbonatación acelerada. En general, un aumento en la adición produjo una reducción del rendimiento de los morteros. Se observó, sin embargo, una reducción de la permeabilidad a los gases con porcentajes de adición de hasta el 33%. Con valores del 16% de sustitución, mejoraron las resistencias mecánicas y la

  17. Field lysimeter studies for performance evaluation of grouted Hanford defense wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, G.V.; Serne, R.J.; LeGore, V.L.

    1995-02-01

    The Grout Waste Test Facility (GWTF) consisted of four large field lysimeters designed to test the leaching and migration rates of grout-solidified low-level radioactive wastes generated by Hanford Site operations. Each lysimeter was an 8-m-deep by 2-media closed-bottom caisson that was placed in the ground such that the uppermost rim remained just above grade. Two of these lysimeters were used; the other two remained empty. The two lysimeters that were used (A-1 and B-1) were backfilled with a two-layer soil profile representative of the proposed grout disposal site. The proposed grout disposal site (termed the Grout Treatment Facility Landfill) is located immediately east of the Hanford Site`s 200 East Area. This soil profile consisted of a coarse sand into which the grout waste forms were placed and covered by 4 m of a very fine sand. The A-1 lysimeter was backfilled in March 1985, with a grout-solidified phosphate/sulfate liquid waste from N Reactor decontamination and ion exchange resin regeneration. The B-1 lysimeter was backfilled in September 1985 and received a grout-solidified simulated cladding removal waste representative of waste generated from fuel reprocessing operations at the head end of the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) plant. Routine monitoring and leachate collection activities were conducted for over three years, terminating in January 1989. Drainage was collected sporadically between January 1989 and December 1992. Decontamination and decommissioning of these lysimeters during the summer of 1994, confirmed the presence of a 15 to 20-cm-long hairline crack in one of the bottom plate welds. This report discusses the design and construction of the GWTF, presents the routine data collected from this facility through January 1989 and subsequent data collected sporadically between 1989 and 1993, and provides a brief discussion concerning preliminary interpretation of the results.

  18. A New Parameter to Assess Hydromechanical Effect in Single-hole Hydraulic Testing and Grouting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Fransson, A.; Tsang, C.-F.; Rutqvist, J.; Gustafson, G.

    2007-09-01

    Grouting or filling of the open voids in fractured rock is done by introducing a fluid, a grout, through boreholes under pressure. The grout may be either a Newtonian fluid or a Bingham fluid. The penetration of the grout and the resulting pressure profile may give rise to hydromechanical effects, which depends on factors such as the fracture aperture, pressure at the borehole and the rheological properties of the grout. In this paper, we postulate that a new parameter, {angstrom}, which is the integral of the fluid pressure change in the fracture plane, is an appropriate measure to describe the change in fracture aperture volume due to a change in effective stress. In many cases, analytic expressions are available to calculate pressure profiles for relevant input data and the {angstrom} parameter. The approach is verified against a fully coupled hydromechanical simulator for the case of a Newtonian fluid. Results of the verification exercise show that the new approach is reasonable and that the {angstrom}-parameter is a good measure for the fracture volume change: i.e., the larger the {angstrom}-parameter, the larger the fracture volume change, in an almost linear fashion. To demonstrate the application of the approach, short duration hydraulic tests and constant pressure grouting are studied. Concluded is that using analytic expressions for penetration lengths and pressure profiles to calculate the {angstrom} parameter provides a possibility to describe a complex situation and compare, discuss and weigh the impact of hydromechanical couplings for different alternatives. Further, the analyses identify an effect of high-pressure grouting, where uncontrolled grouting of larger fractures and insufficient (or less-than-expected) sealing of finer fractures is a potential result.

  19. Grout and Glass Performance Maximizing the Loading of ORNL Tank Sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, M.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Spence, R.D.; Travis, J.R.

    1999-03-01

    Grouting and vitrification are currently two likely stabilization and solidification alternatives for radioactive and hazardous mixed wastes stored at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Grouting has been used to stabilize and solidify hazardous and low-level radioactive waste for decades. Vitrification has been developed as a high-level radioactive alternative for decades and has been under development recently as a mixed-waste alternative disposal technology.

  20. CONSIDERATIONS FOR GROUT FORMULATIONS FOR FACILITY CLOSURES USING IN SITU STRATEGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladden, J.; Serrato, M.; Langton, C.; Long, T.; Blankenship, J.; Hannah, G.; Stubblefield, R.; Szilagyi, A.

    2010-08-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting in situ closures (entombment) at a large number of facilities throughout the complex. Among the largest closure actions currently underway are the closures of the P and R Reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. In these facilities, subgrade open spaces are being stabilized with grout; this ensures the long term structural integrity of the facilities and permanently immobilizes and isolates residual contamination. The large size and structural complexity of these facilities present a wide variety of challenges for the identification and selection of appropriate fill materials. Considerations for grout formulations must account for flowability, long term stability, set times, heat generation and interactions with materials within the structure. The large size and configuration of the facility necessitates that grout must be pumped from the exterior to the spaces to be filled, which requires that the material must retain a high degree of flowability to move through piping without clogging while achieving the required leveling properties at the pour site. Set times and curing properties must be controlled to meet operations schedules, while not generating sufficient heat to compromise the properties of the fill material. The properties of residual materials can result in additional requirements for grout formulations. If significant quantities of aluminum are present in the facility, common formulations of highly alkaline grouts may not be appropriate because of the potential for hydrogen generation with the resultant risks. SRS is developing specialized inorganic grout formulations that are designed to address this issue. One circum-neutral chemical grout formulation identified for initial consideration did not possess the proper chemical characteristics, having exceptionally short set times and high heat of hydration. Research efforts are directed toward developing grout formulations

  1. Utilization of Baggase Waste Based Materials as Improvement for Thermal Insulation of Cement Brick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminudin Eeydzah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Building materials having low thermal load and low thermal conductivity will provide thermal comforts to the occupants in building. In an effort to reduce the use of high energy and waste products from the agricultural industry, sugarcane bagasse and banana bagasse has been utilize as an additive in the manufacture of cement brick. The aim of this study is to investigate the insulation and mechanical properties of brick that has been mixed with bagasse and its effectiveness as thermal insulation using heat flow meter. Waste bagasse is being treated using sodium hydroxide (NaOH and is characterized using SEM and XRF. The samples produced with two different dimensions of 50 mm × 50 mm × 50 mm and 215mm × 102.5mm × 65mm for thermal conductivity test. Next, the sample varies from 0% (control sample, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10% in order to determine the best mix proportion. The compressive strength is being tested for 7, 14 and 28 days of water curing. Results showed that banana bagasse has lower thermal conductivity compared to sugarcane bagasse used, with compressive strength of 15.6MPa with thermal conductivity 0.6W/m.K.

  2. Fractal Characteristics of Pore Structures in GGBFS-based Cement Pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Choi, Young Cheol; Choi, Seongcheol

    2018-01-01

    The present study evaluated pore surface fractal characteristics of high-strength cement pastes with different ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBFS) replacement ratios. Using the results of mercury intrusion porosimetry measurements, the surface fractal dimension in various pore-size ranges was calculated. Experimental results show that the fractal characteristics appeared in mesopores in range of 6-10 nm and 10-25 nm and larger capillary pores with sizes of more than 100 nm. In larger capillary pores, as the GGBFS replacement ratio increased up to 65%, the surface fractal dimension and pore volume decreased, and they increased when the GGBFS replacement ratio increased from 65% to 80%. In contrast, higher GGBFS replacement ratios in mesopore regions resulted in an increased surface fractal dimension and pore volume. Furthermore, in the regions where fractal characteristics appeared, pore volume and the surface fractal dimension exhibited a proportional relationship. The ratio of the surface fractal dimension to the volume of larger capillary pores was strongly correlated with the compressive strength of the specimens.

  3. Mechanical Behavior and Thermal Stability of Acid-Base Phosphate Cements and Composites Fabricated at Ambient Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado Lopera, Henry Alonso

    This dissertation presents the study of the mechanical behavior and thermal stability of acid-base phosphate cements (PCs) and composites fabricated at ambient temperature. These materials are also known as chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs). Among other advantages of using PCs when compared with traditional cements are the better mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strength), lower density, ultra-fast (controllable) setting time, controllable pH, and an environmentally benign process. Several PCs based on wollastonite and calcium and alumino phosphates after thermal exposure up to 1000°C have been investigated. First, the thermo-mechanical and chemical stability of wollastonite-based PC (Wo-PC) exposed to temperatures up to 1000°C in air environment were studied. The effects of processing conditions on the curing and shrinkage of the wollastonite-based PC were studied. The chemical reactions and phase transformations during the fabrication and during the thermal exposure are analyzed in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA Then, the thermo-mechanical and chemical stability of glass, carbon and basalt fiber reinforced Wo-PC composites, were studied using SEM, XRD, TGA. The flexural strength and Weibull statistics were analyzed. A significant strength degradation in the composites were found after the thermal exposure at elevated temperatures due to the interdifusion and chemical reactions across the fibers and the matrix at temperatures over 600°C. To overcome this barrier, we have developed a new PC based on calcium and alumino-phosphates (Ca-Al PCs). The Ca-Al PCs were studied in detail using SEM, XRD, TGA, curing, shrinkage, Weibull statistics, and compression tests. Our study has confirmed that this new composite material is chemically and mechanically stable at temperatures up to 1000°C. Moreover, the compression strength increases after exposure to 1000

  4. Laboratory stabilization/solidification of surrogate and actual mixed-waste sludge in glass and grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

    1998-03-03

    Grouting and vitrification are currently the most likely stabilization/solidification technologies for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize and solidify hazardous and low-level waste for decades. Vitrification has long been developed as a high-level-waste alternative and has been under development recently as an alternative treatment technology for low-level mixed waste. Laboratory testing has been performed to develop grout and vitrification formulas for mixed-waste sludges currently stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to compare these waste forms. Envelopes, or operating windows, for both grout and soda-lime-silica glass formulations for a surrogate sludge were developed. One formulation within each envelope was selected for testing the sensitivity of performance to variations ({+-}10 wt%) in the waste form composition and variations in the surrogate sludge composition over the range previously characterized in the sludges. In addition, one sludge sample of an actual mixed-waste tank was obtained, a surrogate was developed for this sludge sample, and grout and glass samples were prepared and tested in the laboratory using both surrogate and the actual sludge. The sensitivity testing of a surrogate tank sludge in selected glass and grout formulations is discussed in this paper, along with the hot-cell testing of an actual tank sludge sample.

  5. Jet grouting for a groundwater cutoff wall in difficult glacial soil deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, R.F.; Pepe, F. Jr. [Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, New York, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Jet grouting is being used as part of a groundwater cutoff wall system in a major New York City subway construction project to limit drawdowns in an adjacent PCB contamination plume. A circular test shaft of jet grout columns was conducted during the design phase to obtain wall installation parameters. The test program also included shaft wall mapping, and measurements of; inflows, piezometric levels, ground heave and temperature, and jet grout hydraulic conductivity. An axisymmetric finite element method groundwater model was established to back calculate the in-situ hydraulic conductivities of both the surrounding glacial soils and the jet grout walls by matching observed inflows and piezometric levels. The model also verified the use of packer permeability test as a tool in the field to evaluate the hydraulic conductivities of jet grout columns. Both the test program and analytic studies indicated that adjustments to the construction procedures would be required to obtain lower hydraulic conductivities of the jet grout walls for construction. A comparison is made with the conductivities estimated from the test program/analytic studies with those from the present construction.

  6. Use of jet grouting to create a low permeability horizontal barrier below an incinerator ash landfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furth, A.J.; Burke, G.K. [Hayward Baker Inc., Odenton, MD (United States); Deutsch, W.L. Jr. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., West Chester, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The City of Philadelphia`s Division of Aviation (DOA) has begun construction of a new commuter runway, designated as Runway 8-26, at the Philadelphia International Airport. A portion of this runway will be constructed over a former Superfund site known as the Enterprise Avenue Landfill, which for many years was used to dispose of solid waste incinerator ash and other hazardous materials. The site was clay capped in the 1980`s, but in order for the DOA to use the site, additional remediation was needed to meet US EPA final closure requirements. One component of the closure plan included installation of a low permeability horizontal barrier above a very thin (approximately 0.61 to 0.91 meters) natural clay stratum which underlies an approximately 1020 m{sup 2} area of the landfill footprint so as to insure that a minimum 1.52 meter thick low permeability barrier exists beneath the entire 150,000 m{sup 2} landfill. The new barrier was constructed using jet grouting techniques to achieve remote excavation and replacement of the bottom 0.91 meters of the waste mass with a low permeability grout. The grout was formulated to meet the low permeability, low elastic modulus and compressive strength requirements of the project design. This paper will discuss the advantages of using jet grouting for the work and details the development of the grout mixture, modeling of the grout zone under load, field construction techniques, performance monitoring and verification testing.

  7. Freeze-Thaw Performance and Moisture-Induced Damage Resistance of Base Course Stabilized with Slow Setting Bitumen Emulsion-Portland Cement Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Shojaei Baghini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Freeze-thaw (FT cycles and moisture susceptibility are important factors influencing the geotechnical characteristics of soil-aggregates. Given the lack of published information on the behavior of cement-bitumen emulsion-treated base (CBETB under environmental conditions, especially freezing and thawing, this study investigated the effects of these additives on the CBETB performance. The primary goal was to evaluate the resistance of CBETB to moisture damage by performing FT, Marshall conditioning, and AASHTO T-283 tests and to evaluate the long-term stripping susceptibility of CBETB while also predicting the liquid antistripping additives to assess the mixture’s durability and workability. Specimens were stabilized with Portland cement (0%–6%, bitumen emulsion (0%–5%, and Portland cement-bitumen emulsion mixtures and cured for 7 days, and their short- and long-term performances were studied. Evaluation results of both the Marshall stability ratio and the tensile strength ratio show that the additions of additives increase the resistance of the mixtures to moisture damage. Results of durability tests performed for determining the resistance of compacted specimens to repeated FT cycles indicate that the specimen with the 4% cement-3% bitumen emulsion mixture significantly improves water absorption, volume changes, and weight losses. This indicates the effectiveness of this additive as a road base stabilizer with excellent engineering properties for cold regions.

  8. Effects of surface treatments and storage times on the tensile bond strength of adhesive cements to noble and base metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmann, Paulo Afonso; Santos, Jose Fortunato Ferreira; May, Liliana Gressler; Pereira, Joao Eduardo da Silva; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2008-01-01

    This work evaluated two resin cements and a glass-ionomer cement and their bond strength to gold-palladium (Au-Pd), silver-palladium (Ag-Pd), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloys, utilizing three surface treatments over a period of six months. Eight hundred ten pieces were cast (in a button shape flat surfaces) in one of three alloys. Each alloy group was assigned to three other groups, based on the surface treatment utilized. Specimens were fabricated by bonding similar buttons in using one of three adhesive cements. The 405 pairs were thermocycled and stored in saline solution (0.9% NaCl) at 37 degrees C. The tensile bond strengths were measured in a universal testing machine after storage times of 2, 90, or 180 days. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained with the base metal alloy (10.9 +/- 8.6 MPa). In terms of surface treatment, oxidation resulted in the highest mean bond strength (13.7 +/- 7.3 MPa), followed by sandblasting (10.3 +/- 5.5 MPa) and polishing (3.0 +/- 6.4 MPa). Panavia Ex (13.2 +/- 9.3 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strengths than the other two cements, although the storage time reduced all bond strengths significantly.

  9. Experimental ex-vivo validation of PMMA-based bone cements loaded with magnetic nanoparticles enabling hyperthermia of metastatic bone tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harabech, Mariem; Kiselovs, Normunds Rungevics; Maenhoudt, Wim; Crevecoeur, Guillaume; Van Roost, Dirk; Dupré, Luc

    2017-05-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty comprises the injection of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement into vertebrae and can be used for the treatment of compression fractures of vertebrae. Metastatic bone tumors can cause such compression fractures but are not treated when injecting PMMA-based bone cement. Hyperthermia of tumors can on the other hand be attained by placing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Loading the PMMA-based bone cement with MNPs could both serve vertebra stabilization and metastatic bone tumor hyperthermia when subjecting this PMMA-MNP to an AMF. A dedicated pancake coil is designed with a self-inductance of 10 μH in series with a capacitance of 0.1 μF that acts as resonant inductor-capacitor circuit to generate the AMF. The thermal rise is appraised in beef vertebra placed at 10 cm from the AMF generating circuit using optical temperatures sensors, i.e. in the center of the PMMA-MNP bone cement, which is located in the vicinity of metastatic bone tumors in clinical applications; and in the spine, which needs to be safeguarded to high temperature exposures. Results show a temperature rise of about 7 °C in PMMA-MNP whereas the temperature rise in the spine remains limited to 1 °C. Moreover, multicycles heating of PMMA-MNP is experimentally verified, validating the technical feasibility of having PMMA-MNP as basic component for percutaneous vertebroplasty combined with hyperthermia treatment of metastatic bone tumors.

  10. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  11. The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waanders, Daan; Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2010-01-01

    The cement-bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement-bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage, or micro cracks, and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect the mechanical response of the cement-bone interface at various load levels in terms of plastic displacement and crack formation. Two FEA models were created, which were based on micro-computed tomography data of two physical cement-bone interface specimens. These models were subjected to tensile fatigue loads with four different magnitudes. Three deformation modes of the cement were considered; ‘only creep’, ‘only damage’ or ‘creep and damage’. The interfacial plastic deformation, the crack reduction as a result of creep and the interfacial stresses in the bone were monitored. The results demonstrate that, although some models failed early, the majority of plastic displacement was caused by fatigue damage, rather than cement creep. However, cement creep does decrease the crack formation in the cement up to 20%. Finally, while cement creep hardly influences the stress levels in the bone, fatigue damage of the cement considerably increases the stress levels in the bone. We conclude that at low load levels the plastic displacement is mainly caused by creep. At moderate to high load levels, however, the plastic displacement is dominated by fatigue damage and is hardly affected by creep, although creep reduced the number of cracks in moderate to high load region. PMID:20692663

  12. Bonding of resin-based luting cements to zirconia with and without the use of ceramic priming agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nakayama, Daisuke; Komine, Futoshi; Blatz, Markus B; Matsumura, Hideo

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated and compared bonding characteristics of resin-based luting agents and special ceramic primers to zirconia. Disk specimens (n = 242) were fabricated from zirconium dioxide ceramics (Katana) and bonded with four resin-based luting agents without priming. In addition, zirconia was bonded with 7 bondingsystem combinations of three priming agents and three resin-based luting agents. Two of the resin-based luting agents and two ceramic priming agents contain an identical adhesive monomer, 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), either in the material itself or in the priming agent. Shear bond strength was determined after 20,000 cycles of thermocycling. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed for both pre- and post-thermocycling groups to evaluate the difference among primer and luting agent variations. On the basis of the Kruskal-Wallis test, Steel-Dwass multiple comparisons were further performed to compare the difference among four luting agents and seven conbinations of three primers and three luting agents for both pre- and post-thermocycling conditions. Within the four unprimed groups, Clearfil SA Cement (5.8 MPa) and Panavia F 2.0 (6.7 MPa) showed statistically higher post-thermocycling bond strength than the other materials (0.1 MPa) (p primed with Monobond Plus (4.0-4.6 MPa) (p priming agents containing the adhesive monomer MDP provide better bond strength to zirconia than do other systems.

  13. INFLUENCE OF SUPERPLASTICIZER TYPE AND DOSAGE ON THE WORKABILITY AND STRENGTH OF CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR SEMI-FLEXIBLE PAVEMENT APPLICATION

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KOTING, Suhana; MAHMUD, Hilmi; KARIM, Mohamed Rehan

    2007-01-01

    Semi-flexible pavement is a composite pavement that utilizes the porous pavement structure of the flexible bituminous pavement which is subsequently grouted with an appropriate cementitious material...

  14. D7.21 Report on Validation of design of grouted joints Work Package 7.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gintautas, Tomas; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2017-01-01

    Grouted joints for offshore wind turbines forming the connection between the transition piece to the monopile and tower are one of the weakest links of the support structure. The grout being a reinforced concrete material is susceptible to cyclic loading comprising of tensile and compressive...... components. As offshore wind turbines reach 10 MW capacities, it is extremely important to determine the reliability of grouted joints and their design configurations so as to ensure integrity of the 10 MW support structure. This report investigates two types of grouted joint connections, the conventional...

  15. Study of evaluation for grouting effect in a borehole; Yakueki chunyu koka hyoka gijutsu ni okeru ichikosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, H.; Matsuo, T. [Fukuoka Municipal Transportation Bureau, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamauchi, Y.; Imanishi, H. [Osaka Soil Test, Osaka (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    For the foundation improvement works by grouting in a borehole, evaluation of grouting effect is one of the most important management items. The grouting design and works are sometimes reconsidered depending on the evaluation of grouting effect during the test injection. The purpose of the evaluation of grouting effect is to grasp the range of improvement and consolidation after the injection, and to judge and estimate the strength and permeability of the consolidation part. This paper describes the judgment method of the strength using PS logging results and borehole televiewer (BHTV) logging results. The reflection intensity (Ir) by the BHTV logging increased after the grouting, which showed a same tendency as that using S-wave and P-wave velocities (Vs and Vp) before and after the grouting. This was considered to demonstrate the grouting effect. A relation was obtained between the Vs, Vp and Ir before and after the grouting, which was expressed by following equation. Ir=0.143{times}Vs-70=0.093{times}Vp-110. The relation with the dynamic elastic coefficient (Ed) was also obtained as follow; Ir=0.0013{times}Ed. 9 figs.

  16. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  17. Investigating flow properties of partially cemented fractures in Travis Peak Formation using image‐based pore‐scale modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tokan‐Lawal, Adenike; Prodanović, Maša; Eichhubl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ... or occludes fracture porosity and permeability. Fracture cement linings potentially reduce flow connectivity between the fracture and host rock and increase fracture wall roughness, which constricts flow. We combined image...

  18. Thermal Properties of Cement Based Composites with Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator Fly Ash Accessed by Two Different Transient Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan FOŘT

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermal properties of cement composite with Mixed Fly Ash (MFA from different parts of Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI process as a partial replacement of Portland cement are researched in the paper. MFA is applied in the amount of 10 %, 20 % and 30 % of the mass of cement, while sand and water quantities are kept constant. For the sake of comparison, a reference mixture with Portland cement as the only binder is studied as well. For the characterization of studied materials, their basic physical properties as bulk density, matrix density and total open porosity are measured using gravimetric method combined with helium pycnometry. Among the thermal properties, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity are accessed by two transient methods having different experimental arrangement and time of measurement. The measured data obtained by the particular methods are compared and the applicability of the methods for the measurement of thermal properties of solid building materials is discussed.

  19. The influence of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Korzen, Migge Sofie Hoffmann; Skibsted, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes effects of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste, which is an important subject in relation to life-time modelling of reinforced concrete structures. The influence of cement type on chloride binding is investigated by substituting cement with pure...... cement clinker. Both theoretical considerations and experimental data for chloride binding in cement pastes are presented. A physico-chemically based model to describe the influence of temperature on physical binding of chloride is presented. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear...... magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used for quantification of the anhydrous and hydrated aluminate and silicate phases in the chloride exposed cement pastes. The 27Al isotropic chemical shift and nuclear quadrupole coupling is reported for a synthetic sample of Friedel's salt, Ca2Al(OH)6Cl×2H2O....

  20. Cement degradation and the alteration of host rocks. Studies within the Grimsel Test Site Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Cement is a major component of the engineered barrier system in proposed underground repositories for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Cement grouting of highly-conductive fractures in the vicinity of such repositories is also planned. The interaction between the hyperalkaline solutions derived from the degradation of cement and the rocks hosting such repositories may change the physical and chemical properties of the host rocks. The HPF project (Hyperalkaline Plume in Fractured Rock; ANDRA-FR-, DOE-USA-, JAEA-JP-, NAGRA-CH-, POSIVA-FI-, SKB-SE-) studied the alteration of a fractured granite due to the circulation of a synthetic high-pH solution. A significant decrease in fracture permeability was observed both in the laboratory (core infiltration experiment; decimeter scale) and in the Grimsel Test Site (circulation along a fracture; meter scale), despite the relatively minor mineralogical alteration. Coupling of mineralogical alteration and permeability changes was incorporated into reactive transport modeling of the experiments. The hydration and degradation of cement are being explicitly incorporated into the new LCS (Long-Term Cement Studies; JAEA-JP-, NAGRA-CH-, NDA-GB-, POSIVA-FI-) project at Grimsel. New laboratory and field experiments including a cement source are being designed. Reactive transport modeling of the degradation of cement, causing the formation of hyperalkaline solutions and the alteration of the host rock, will be an essential part of the experiment.

  1. Effect of some prepared superplasticizers (Cyclohexanone Based on compressive strength and physico-chemical properties of oil well cement pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Aiad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Two different superplasticizers particularly cyclohexanone formaldehyde sulfanilate (CFS and cyclohexanone glyoxylic sulfanilate (CGS were prepared; also, their effect on mechanical and physico-chemical properties of oil well cement was assessed. The chemical structures were affirmed by FTIR technique. The designed chemical compounds were predestined as superplasticizers for cement pastes. The pastes were made by superplasticizer (CFS or CGS addition to cement by the ratios of 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and l.00 as mass% of cement. The water of consistency, setting time, chemically combined water content (Wn, the hydration rate and compressive strength of the admixed hardened pastes were predestined at various time periods. The phase composition was intended by DSC and XRD techniques. The results revealed that as the admixture dose rate increases the demand cement paste water of consistency decreases. Also, as the admixture addition rate increases the chemically combined water content decreases, so the rate of hydration decreases; meanwhile compressive strength magnitudes increase accounting for the low water/cement (initial porosity of the sample.

  2. Impact of plasma treatment of PMMA-based CAD/CAM blanks on surface properties as well as on adhesion to self-adhesive resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebermann, Anja; Keul, Christine; Bähr, Nora; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Roos, Malgorzata; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2013-09-01

    To test surface energy, roughness and tensile bond strength (TBS) to self-adhesive resin composite cements without/with plasma treatment combined with different conditioning methods of PMMA-based CAD/CAM blocks. PMMA specimens (10mm×10mm×2mm) were fabricated (N=260), polished and air-abraded (50μm Al2O3, 5s, 0.05MPa). Twenty specimens were selected for surface energy and roughness measurements (without/with plasma n=10 per group). The remaining specimens (n=240) were used for TBS testing without/with plasma treatment and following conditioning methods (n=20 per test group): (i) without conditioning, (ii) Visio.link, (iii) VP connect and luted with Clearfil SA Cement and RelyX Unicem Automix. Specimens were aged (24h 37°C water+5000 thermal cycles, 5°C/55°C), TBS was measured and failure types were assessed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney-U and Kruskal-Wallis-H tests, unpaired t-test, Chi(2) and the Spearman correlation test. Plasma treatment of PMMA increased the surface energy significantly (pVisio.link. Both resin composite cements showed the highest TBS for groups conditioned with Visio.link. Also, among Clearfil SA Cement, conditioning with VP connect showed comparable TBS to Visio.link. Plasma treatment of PMMA did not increase the adhesion to self-adhesive resin composite cements. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of the method of apatite seed crystals addition on setting reaction of α-tricalcium phosphate based apatite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuru, Kanji; Ruslin; Maruta, Michito; Matsuya, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate setting time is an important parameter that determines the effectiveness of apatite cement (AC) for clinical application, given the issues of crystalline inflammatory response phenomena if AC fails to set. To this end, the present study analyzes the effects of the method of apatite seed crystals addition on the setting reaction of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) based AC. Two ACs, both consisting of α-TCP and calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (cdHAp), were analyzed in this study. In one AC, cdHAp was added externally to α-TCP and this AC was abbreviated as AC(EA). In the other AC, α-TCP was partially hydrolyzed to form cdHAp on the surface of α-TCP. This AC was referred to as AC(PH). Results indicate a decrease in the setting time of both ACs with the addition of cdHAp. Among them, for the given amount of added cdHAp, AC(PH) showed relatively shorter setting time than AC(EA). Besides, the mechanical strength of the set AC(PH) was also higher than that of set AC(EA). These properties of AC(PH) were attributed to the predominant crystal growth of cdHAp in the vicinity of the α-TCP particle surface. Accordingly, it can be concluded that the partial hydrolysis of α-TCP may be a better approach to add low crystalline cdHAp onto α-TCP based AC.

  4. A comparative study of the modelling of cement hydration and cement-rock laboratory experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David, E-mail: savaged@me.com [Quintessa Ltd., The Hub, 14 Station Road, Henley-on-Thames, RG9 1AY (United Kingdom); Soler, Josep M. [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Yamaguchi, Kohei; Walker, Colin; Honda, Akira; Inagaki, Manabu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1194 (Japan); Watson, Claire; Wilson, James; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., The Hub, 14 Station Road, Henley-on-Thames, RG9 1AY (United Kingdom); Gaus, Irina; Rueedi, Joerg [Nagra, Hardstrasse 73, Wettingen CH-5430 (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > A modelling intercomparison has shown that the dominant reaction pathways are well understood. > However, significant differences in model parameterisation produced similar results. > The modelling showed that there is benefit in keeping the numerical models as simple as possible. - Abstract: The use of cement and concrete as fracture grouting or as tunnel seals in a geological disposal facility for radioactive wastes creates potential issues concerning chemical reactivity. From a long-term safety perspective, it is desirable to be able model these interactions and changes quantitatively. The 'Long-term Cement Studies' (LCS) project was formulated with an emphasis on in situ field experiments with more realistic boundary conditions and longer time scales compared with former experiments. As part of the project programme, a modelling inter-comparison has been conducted, involving the modelling of two experiments describing cement hydration on one hand and cement-rock reaction on the other, with teams representing the NDA (UK), Posiva (Finland), and JAEA (Japan). This modelling exercise showed that the dominant reaction pathways in the two experiments are fairly well understood and are consistent between the different modelling teams, although significant differences existed amongst the precise parameterisation (e.g. reactive surface areas, dependences of rate upon pH, types of secondary minerals), and in some instances, processes (e.g. partition of alkali elements between solids and liquid during cement hydration; kinetic models of cement hydration). It was not conclusive if certain processes such as surface complexation (preferred by some modellers, but not by others) played a role in the cement-rock experiment or not. These processes appear to be more relevant at early times in the experiment and the evolution at longer timescales was not affected. The observed permeability profile with time could not be matched. The fact that no secondary

  5. Cola à base de PVA e argamassa de solo-cimento como alternativas para o assentamento de alvenaria de tijolos maciços de solo-cimento PVA glue and cement soil mortars as alternatives for laying cement soil blocks masonry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisleiva C. dos S. Ferreira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, foi analisada a viabilidade de emprego de cola à base de PVA e argamassa de solo-cimento no assentamento de paredes de alvenaria de tijolos maciços de solo-cimento, em substituição à argamassa usual (cimento, cal e areia. Pequenos prismas, executados com quatro tijolos maciços de solo-cimento e assentados com as argamassas e a cola de PVA, foram ensaiados à compressão e à flexão. Os resultados dos ensaios dos prismas executados com a argamassa de assentamento usual foram tomados como padrão esperado de comportamento para os outros prismas executados com argamassa de solo-cimento e com cola de PVA. Os resultados obtidos nos ensaios dos prismas indicaram que tanto cola à base de PVA quanto argamassa de solo-cimento podem ser empregadas, satisfatoriamente, no assentamento de painéis de alvenaria de tijolos maciços de solo-cimento.This study presents the results of an experimental investigation in characterizing the properties of cement soil block masonry using cement-soil mortars and PVA glue. The study deals with the scantily explored area of tensile bond strength of soil-cement block masonry using cement-soil mortars and PVA glue. Flexural bond strength of masonry has been determined by testing stack-bonded prisms using a bond wrench test set-up. The study clearly demonstrates the superiority of cement-soil mortar over other conventional mortar such as cement mortar. The results of this study can be conveniently used to select a proportion for cement-soil mortar or PVA glue proportion for cement soil block masonry structures.

  6. Influence of the metakaolin on porous structure of matrixes based in mk/cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frías, M.

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of pozzolanic materials in the manufacturing of blended cement has a positive effect on the improvement of blended mortar and concretes performances. These active additions modify porous structure, impeding or delaying the access of aggressive solutions and, therefore materials more durable are possible of obtaining. An increase or decrease on the durability of blended pastes, mortars and concretes will depend on chemical and mineralogical compositions, fineness and reaction kinetics of these pozzolans. The current work shows the results of a research carried out in blended pastes to know the effect of activated material (metakaolin on the microporosity of pastes elaborated with different amounts of mk (0-25%. A water/ binder ratio of 0,55 was used. Samples were cured at 20ºC for 360 days. The evolution of total, capilary and gel porosity as well as average pore size were carried out through mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP. Also, the helium pycnometer as alternative method to obtain additional information about porosity above 1,4 Å was used. A good correlation between both methods has been obtained. In addition, it is proposed the best mk content for the elaboration of mk-blended pastes.

    La incorporación de materiales puzolánicos presenta un efecto positivo en la mejora de las prestaciones de los morteros y hormigones mixtos. Estos modifican la estructura porosa, impidiendo o retrasando el acceso de los medios agresivos y, por lo tanto, contribución a la obtención de materiales mixtos más durables. La mayor o menor durabilidad de las pastas, morteros y hormigones mixtos dependerá de la composición química, mineralógica, finura y de la cinética de reacción de estas adiciones activas. En el presente trabajo se recogen los resultados de una investigación llevada a cabo para conocer el efecto de un material activado (metacaolin en la microporosidad de pastas, elaboradas con diferentes contenidos de

  7. Topological calculation of key parameters of fibre for production of foam concrete based on cement-free nanostructured binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHARKHARDIN Anatoly Nikolaevich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforcement is the process of introduction of fibers of different origins into binding system to enhance strength, stress-strain behavior of products and structures. Maximal effect of reinforcing process is possible when optimal parameters (length and consumption of fibre are determined. Moreover one need to consider particle-size composition and hardening process of binding system. In this paper the critical length of natural and sinthesized fibres as well as minimally required content in cellular systems is calculated with the mathematical apparatus of structural topology. As an example the foam concrete based on cement-free nanostructured binder with basalt fibre and microreinforcing constructional polymeric fibre is studied. Fiber diameter, refined with microstructure analysis, accomplished by SEM-microscopy and experimentally determined packing density in loose and compact state are applied as input parameters. Measurement of the fibre topological characteristics with acceptable is accomplished according to material porosity and pore size. So the minimal effective fibre length taking into account homogeneous distribution in bulk of composite matrix is less of 1 mm; minimal fibre consumption is 0,2–0,5 (by wt. %. Irrational optimization leads to unreasonable cost growth of final materials as well as formation of balling inclusions that negatively affects on final performance of composite.

  8. Self-healing of drying shrinkage cracks in cement-based materials incorporating reactive MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, T. S.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Excessive drying shrinkage is one of the major issues of concern for longevity and reduced strength performance of concrete structures. It can cause the formation of cracks in the concrete. This research aims to improve the autogenous self-healing capacity of traditional Portland cement (PC) systems, adding expansive minerals such as reactive magnesium oxide (MgO) in terms of drying shrinkage crack healing. Two different reactive grades (high ‘N50’and moderately high ‘92-200’) of MgO were added with PC. Cracks were induced in the samples with restraining end prisms through natural drying shrinkage over 28 days after casting. Samples were then cured under water for 28 and 56 days, and self-healing capacity was investigated in terms of mechanical strength recovery, crack sealing efficiency and improvement in durability. Finally, microstructures of the healing materials were investigated using FT-IR, XRD, and SEM-EDX. Overall N50 mixes show higher expansion and drying shrinkage compared to 92-200 mixes. Autogenous self-healing performance of the MgO containing samples were much higher compared to control (only PC) mixes. Cracks up to 500 μm were sealed in most MgO containing samples after 28 days. In the microstructural investigations, highly expansive Mg-rich hydro-carbonate bridges were found along with traditional calcium-based, self-healing compounds (calcite, portlandite, calcium silicate hydrates and ettringite).

  9. Use of cement-fly ash-based stabilization techniques for the treatment of waste containing aromatic contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banaszkiewicz Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on evaluation of evaporation rate of volatile organic compounds from soil beds during processing is presented. For the experiment, soil samples were prepared with the same amounts of benzene and stabilized using a mixture of CEMI 42.5R cement and fly ash from pit-coal combustion. Solidification of soils contaminated with BTEX hydrocarbons using hydraulic binders involves a risk of releasing vapours of these compounds during homogenization of waste with stabilizing mixture introduced and its dilution with water. The primary purposes of the research were: analysis of benzene volume emitted from soil during stabilization/solidification process and characterization of factors that may negatively affect the quality of measurements/the course of stabilization process. Analysis of benzene emission intensity during the process was based on concentration (C6H6 values, recorded with flame-ionization detector above the surface of reacting mixture. At the same time, gaseous contaminants emitted during waste stabilization were passed through pipes filled with activated carbon (SCK, Anasorb CSC. Benzene vapours adsorbed on activated carbon were subjected to analysis using gas chromatograph Varian 450-GC. Evaporation characteristics of benzene during processing contaminated soils revealed the stages creating the highest danger to workers’ health, as well as a need for actions connected with modification of technological line.

  10. Use of cement-fly ash-based stabilization techniques for the treatment of waste containing aromatic contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszkiewicz, Kamil; Marcinkowski, Tadeusz

    2017-11-01

    Research on evaluation of evaporation rate of volatile organic compounds from soil beds during processing is presented. For the experiment, soil samples were prepared with the same amounts of benzene and stabilized using a mixture of CEMI 42.5R cement and fly ash from pit-coal combustion. Solidification of soils contaminated with BTEX hydrocarbons using hydraulic binders involves a risk of releasing vapours of these compounds during homogenization of waste with stabilizing mixture introduced and its dilution with water. The primary purposes of the research were: analysis of benzene volume emitted from soil during stabilization/solidification process and characterization of factors that may negatively affect the quality of measurements/the course of stabilization process. Analysis of benzene emission intensity during the process was based on concentration (C6H6) values, recorded with flame-ionization detector above the surface of reacting mixture. At the same time, gaseous contaminants emitted during waste stabilization were passed through pipes filled with activated carbon (SCK, Anasorb CSC). Benzene vapours adsorbed on activated carbon were subjected to analysis using gas chromatograph Varian 450-GC. Evaporation characteristics of benzene during processing contaminated soils revealed the stages creating the highest danger to workers' health, as well as a need for actions connected with modification of technological line.

  11. Freeze-Thaw Performance and Moisture-Induced Damage Resistance of Base Course Stabilized with Slow Setting Bitumen Emulsion-Portland Cement Additives

    OpenAIRE

    Mojtaba Shojaei Baghini; Amiruddin Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Freeze-thaw (FT) cycles and moisture susceptibility are important factors influencing the geotechnical characteristics of soil-aggregates. Given the lack of published information on the behavior of cement-bitumen emulsion-treated base (CBETB) under environmental conditions, especially freezing and thawing, this study investigated the effects of these additives on the CBETB performance. The primary goal was to evaluate the resistance of CBETB to moisture damage by performing FT, Marshall condi...

  12. Formulation and Analysis of Compliant Grouted Waste Forms for SHINE Waste Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, William [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pereira, Candido [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heltemes, Thad A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Youker, Amanda [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakhtang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Optional grouted waste forms were formulated for waste streams generated during the production of 99Mo to be compliant with low-level radioactive waste regulations. The amounts and dose rates of the various waste form materials that would be generated annually were estimated and used to determine the effects of various waste processing options, such as the of number irradiation cycles between uranium recovery operations, different combinations of waste streams, and removal of Pu, Cs, and Sr from waste streams for separate disposition (which is not evaluated in this report). These calculations indicate that Class C-compliant grouted waste forms can be produced for all waste streams. More frequent uranium recovery results in the generation of more chemical waste, but this is balanced by the fact that waste forms for those waste streams can accommodate higher waste loadings, such that similar amounts of grouted waste forms are required regardless of the recovery schedule. Similar amounts of grouted waste form are likewise needed for the individual and combined waste streams. Removing Pu, Cs, and Sr from waste streams lowers the waste form dose significantly at times beyond about 1 year after irradiation, which may benefit handling and transport. Although these calculations should be revised after experimentally optimizing the grout formulations and waste loadings, they provide initial guidance for process development.

  13. Grout performance in support of in situ stabilization/solidification of the GAAT tank sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kauschinger, J. L. [Ground Environmental Services, Inc., Alpharetta, GA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The Gunite{trademark} and associated tanks (GAATs) were constructed at ORNL between 1943 and 1951 and were used for many years to collect radioactive and chemical wastes. These tanks are currently inactive. Varying amounts of the sludge were removed and disposed of through the Hydrofracture Program. Thus, some tanks are virtually empty, while others still contain significant amounts of sludge and supernatant. In situ grouting of the sludges in the tanks using multi-point injection (MPI{trademark}), a patented, proprietary technique, is being investigated as a low-cost alternative to (1) moving the sludges to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) for later solidification and disposal, (2) ex situ grouting of the sludges followed by either disposal back in the tanks or containerizing and disposal elsewhere, and (3) vitrification of the sludges. The paper discusses the chemical characteristics of the GAATs and the type of chemical surrogate that was used during the leachability tests. T his is followed by the experimental work, which, consisted of scope testing and sensitivity testing. The scope testing explored the rheology of the proposed jetting slurries and the settling properties of the proposed grouts using sand-water mixes for the wet sludge. After establishing a jetting slurry and grout with an acceptable rheology and settling properties, the proposed in situ grout formulation was subjected to sensitivity testing for variations in the formulation.

  14. A prospective clinical trial on the influence of a triamcinolone/demeclocycline and a calcium hydroxide based temporary cement on pain perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willershausen Brita

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of this clinical trial was to compare the degree of short term post-operative irritation after application of a triamcinolone/demeclocycyline based or a calcium hydroxide based provisional cement. Methods A total of 109 patients (55 female and 54 male; mean age: 51 ± 14 years with primary or secondary dentinal caries were randomly assigned to the two treatment groups of this biomedical clinical trial (phase III. Selection criteria were good systemic health and treated teeth, which were vital and showed no symptoms of pulpitis. Up to three teeth were prepared for indirect metallic restorations, and the provisional restorations were cemented with a triamcinolone/demeclocycyline (Ledermix or a calcium hydroxide (Provicol based material. The intensity of post-operative pain experienced was documented according to the VAS (4, 12, 20, 24, and 82 h and compared to VAS baseline. Results A total of 159 teeth were treated (Ledermix: 83 teeth, Provicol: 76 teeth. The minor irritation of the teeth, experienced prior to treatment, was similar in both groups; however, 4 h after treatment this value was significantly higher in the Provicol group than in the Ledermix group (p Conclusions The patients had no long term post-operative pain experience in both groups. However, within the first hours after cementation the sensation of pain was considerably higher in the Provicol group than in the Ledermix group.

  15. Study on Mechanical Characteristics of Fully Grouted Rock Bolts for Underground Caverns under Seismic Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study establishes an analytical model for the interaction between the bolt and surrounding rock based on the bearing mechanism of fully grouted rock bolts. The corresponding controlled differential equation for load transfer is deduced. The stress distributions of the anchorage body are obtained by solving the equations. A dynamic algorithm for the bolt considering shear damage on the anchoring interface is proposed based on the dynamic finite element method. The rationality of the algorithm is verified by a pull-out test and excavation simulation of a rounded tunnel. Then, a case study on the mechanical characteristics of the bolts in underground caverns under seismic loads is conducted. The results indicate that the seismic load may lead to stress originating from the bolts and damage on the anchoring interface. The key positions of the antiseismic support can be determined using the numerical simulation. The calculated results can serve as a reference for the antiseismic optimal design of bolts in underground caverns.

  16. Re-use of stabilised flue gas ashes from solid waste incineration in cement-treated base layers for pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zuansi; Jensen, Dorthe L; Christensen, Thomas H; Bager, Dirch H

    2003-02-01

    Fly ash from coal-burning power plants has been used extensively as a pozzolan and fine filler in concrete for many years. Laboratory experiments were performed investigating the effect of substituting the coal-based fly ash with chemically stabilised flue gas ashes (FGA) from waste incineration. Two types of FGA were treated by the Ferrox-process, which removes the majority of the easily soluble salts in the FGA and provides binding sites for heavy metals in terms of ferrihydrite. Cubes of cement treated base layer materials containing 5% stabilised FGA were cast, sealed and cured for two weeks. Cylinders (diameter 100 mm, length 150 mm) were drilled from these cubes for tank leaching experiments. Duplicate specimens were subject to compression strength testing and to tank leaching experiments. The compressive strength of the CTB fulfilled the Danish requirements for CTB, i.e. strength more than 5 MPa after 7 days. The tank leaching tests revealed that leaching of heavy metals was not significantly affected by the use of chemically stabilised flue gas ashes from waste incineration. Assuming that diffusion controls the leaching process it was calculated that less than 1% of the metals would leach during a 100-year period from a 0.5 m thick concrete slab exposed to water on one side. Leaching of the common ions Ca, Cl, Na and SO4 was increased 3-20 times from the specimens with chemically stabilised flue gas ashes from waste incineration. However, the quantities leached were still modest. These experiments suggest that FGA from waste incineration after Ferrox-treatment could be re-used in CTB without compromising the strength and leaching from the base layer.

  17. Asphalt cement poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  18. Using low temperature calorimetry and moisture fixation method to study the pore structure of cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min

    .e., the baseline determination of the measured heat flow and the values adopted for the heat of fusion for the water/ice confined in pores. (2) Sample saturation has an impact on the porosity determination by LTC. The freezing/melting point of the water/ice in a non-fully saturated pore system is lower compared...... data, the impact of sample saturation on the detected porosity, the effect of frost damage on the pore size distribution determination by LTC, the effect of preconditioning the cement paste samples on the freezing and melting behavior of the pore solution, the impact of sample crushing...... preconditioning cases have very limited influence on the freezing and melting behaviors of the pore solution in the studied cement paste samples. (5) Two types of samples, i.e., in the form of powders and cylinders, of two types of cement pastes (CEM I and CEM III) were used to study the impact of sample crushing...

  19. Push-out Bond Strength of Fast-setting Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Pozzolan-based Cements: ENDOCEM MTA and ENDOCEM Zr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Carvalho, Nancy Kudsi; Guberman, Marta Reis da Costa Labanca; Prado, Marina; Senna, Plinio Mendes; Souza, Erick M; De-Deus, Gustavo

    2017-05-01

    The present study investigated the root canal dentin bond strength of 2 newly developed fast-setting mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and pozzolan-based cements: ENDOCEM MTA (Maruchi, Wonju, Korea) and ENDOCEM Zr (Maruchi). White MTA (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil) was used as the reference material for comparison. Root slices (1 mm ± 0.1 mm) were obtained from the middle third of 15 maxillary incisors previously selected. Three canal-like holes (0.8 diameter) were drilled perpendicularly on the axial surface of each root slice. A standardized irrigation protocol was applied for all samples, and after drying, each hole was filled with 1 of 3 test repair materials. Finally, slices were stored in contact with phosphate-buffered saline solution (pH = 7.2) for 7 days at 37°C before the push-out assay. Data were nonparametrically evaluated at α = 5%. The Friedman test was unable to confirm a significant dissimilarity in push-out ranks among the tested cements (P = .220). The new fast-setting MTA and pozzolan-based cements ENDOCEM MTA and ENDOCEM Zr present suitable bond strength performance, which is comparable with white MTA. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Grouting of fly ash in sanitary landfills; Injektering av flygaska i hushaallsavfallsdeponi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, Karin; Berg, Magnus [AaF-Energi och Miljoe AB, Stockhom (Sweden); Andreas, Lale; Lagerkvist, Anders [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden); Jannes, Sara; Tham, Gustav [Telge Aatervinning AB, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Sjoeblom, Rolf [Tekedo AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the potential for stabilization of sanitary landfills by injecting fly ash. The method is supposed to prevent differential settlements in landfills and by that to counteract damages in the final cover. Injecting fly ash may also affect the chemical development in a positive way and prevent metal leaching. Pilot experiments at the Tveta waste recycling center (Tveta Aatervinningsanlaeggning) have been performed in order to estimate if the grouting technology is a suitable method for sanitary landfills. Fly ashes from the combustion of bio fuels were used in these tests. A literature study and laboratory experiments in order to prepare the field experiments were also part of the project. About 100 tons of ash slurry were injected during the pilot experiments. This corresponds to a filling degree of approximately 12-16 % of the available pores in the landfill body. As a result of the pilot test, the following conclusions can be drawn: Ash can be mixed with water to a pumpable slurry which can be injected without hardening inside the equipment. Neither the waste nor the grouting material caused a backpressure during the injection and nothing indicates that the injected ash deforms the landfilled waste. The ash-water-slurry flows through the voids in the waste easily. Thus, the ash may dispread quite far from the injection holes. Using a more powerful equipment backpressure and movements in the waste might occur. It was not possible to estimate the flow required for backpressure in this study. Large variations are possible but for safety reasons the maximal pressure should be limited with regard to the expected stability in the actual area. The grouted ash will harden within the landfill body within a couple of days. It accumulates in hard but brittle lumps, which may result in an increased stability of the landfill. Further studies are necessary in order to evaluate how the stability is affected and what amounts of ash are

  1. Detecting Poor Cement Bonding and Zonal Isolation Problems Using Magnetic Cement Slurries

    KAUST Repository

    Nair, Sriramya D.

    2017-10-02

    There has been growing interest in the use of magnetorheological fluids to improve displacement efficiency of fluids (drilling fluids, spacer fluids, cement slurries) in the eccentric casing annuli. When magnetic particles are mixed with the cement slurry for improved displacement, they provide an excellent opportunity for sensing the presence and quality of cement in the annulus. This work focuses on using sophisticated 3D computational electromagnetics to simulate the use of a magnetic cement slurry for well cement monitoring. The main goal is to develop a new tool, which is capable of locating magnetic cement slurry that is placed behind a stainless steel casing. An electromagnetic coil was used to generate a magnetic field inside the borehole. It was found that when a current was passed through the electric coils, magnetic field lines passed through the stainless steel casing, the cement annulus and the rock formation. Three sensors were placed inside the cased borehole and the magnetic field strength variations were observed at these locations. Various factors that have a significant influence on zonal isolation were considered. These include, effect of debonding between casing and cement annulus, effect of changing annuli thickness, influence of a fracture in the rock formation, effect of changing magnetic permeability of cement and finally influence of annuli eccentricity. Based on the results shown in the paper along with the next generation of supersensitive magnetic sensors that are being developed, the magnetic approach appears to be a viable alternative for evaluating the quality of the cement annulus to ensure good zonal isolation.

  2. Roof instability characteristics and pre-grouting of the roof caving zone in residual coal mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tong; Liu, Changyou

    2017-12-01

    Abandoned roadways and roof caving zones are commonly found in residual coal, and can destroy the integrity of the coal seam and roof. Resulting from mining-induced stress, continuous collapse and fracture instability in roof caving zones (RCZs) jeopardize the safety and efficiency of residual coal mining. Based on the engineering geology conditions of remining face 3101 in Shenghua Mine, the roof fracture and instability features of the RCZ were analyzed through physical simulation, theoretical analysis, and field measurements. In this case, influenced by the RCZ, the main roof across the RCZ fractured and rotated towards the goaf, greatly increasing the working resistance, and crushing the supports. The sudden instability of the coal pillars weakened its support of the main roof, thus resulting in long-key blocks across the RCZ and hinged roof structures, which significantly decreased the stability of the underlying immediate roof. This study establishes a mechanical model for the interactions between the surrounding rock and the supports in the RCZ, determines the reasonable working resistance, and examines the use of pre-grouting solidification restoration technology (PSRT) to solidify the RCZ and reinforce the coal pillars—thus increasing their bearing capacity. Field measurements revealed no roof flaking, inhomogeneous loading or support crushing, indicating that the PSRT effectively controlled the surrounding rock of the RCZ.

  3. Determination of mechanical properties for cement-treated aggregate base : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) currently follows pavement design procedures for all new and rehabilitated pavements based on the 1993 AASHTO Guide for Design of Pavement Structures. VDOTs Materials Division is in the process of i...

  4. Nuclear waste viewed in a new light; a synchrotron study of uranium encapsulated in grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stitt, C.A., E-mail: Camilla.stitt@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Hart, M., E-mail: oxford.mike@gmail.com [Diamond Light Source Limited, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Fermi Avenue, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Harker, N.J., E-mail: nicholas.harker@esrf.fr [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Hallam, K.R., E-mail: k.r.hallam@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); MacFarlane, J., E-mail: james.macfarlane@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Banos, A., E-mail: antonis.banos@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Paraskevoulakos, C., E-mail: cp13846@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Butcher, E., E-mail: ed.j.butcher@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1 PG (United Kingdom); Padovani, C., E-mail: cristiano.padovani@nda.gov.uk [Radioactive Waste Management Limited (formerly the Radioactive Waste Management Directorate of the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority), Curie Avenue, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RH (United Kingdom); Scott, T.B., E-mail: t.b.scott@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • Unirradiated Magnox uranium was encapsulated in grout and exposed to hydrogen. • Synchrotron X-ray tomography imaged the uranium corrosion before and after exposure. • Synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction identified the corrosion products; UH{sub 3} and UO{sub 2}. • Uranium encapsulated in grout oxidised via the anoxic U + H{sub 2}O regime. • Successful in-situ, non-invasive examination of pyrophoric and radioactive material - Abstract: How do you characterise the contents of a sealed nuclear waste package without breaking it open? This question is important when the contained corrosion products are potentially reactive with air and radioactive. Synchrotron X-rays have been used to perform micro-scale in-situ observation and characterisation of uranium encapsulated in grout; a simulation for a typical intermediate level waste storage packet. X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction generated both qualitative and quantitative data from a grout-encapsulated uranium sample before, and after, deliberately constrained H{sub 2} corrosion. Tomographic reconstructions provided a means of assessing the extent, rates and character of the corrosion reactions by comparing the relative densities between the materials and the volume of reaction products. The oxidation of uranium in grout was found to follow the anoxic U + H{sub 2}O oxidation regime, and the pore network within the grout was observed to influence the growth of uranium hydride sites across the metal surface. Powder diffraction analysis identified the corrosion products as UO{sub 2} and UH{sub 3}, and permitted measurement of corrosion-induced strain. Together, X-ray tomography and diffraction provide means of accurately determining the types and extent of uranium corrosion occurring, thereby offering a future tool for isolating and studying the reactions occurring in real full-scale waste package systems.

  5. 18-year survival of posterior composite resin restorations with and without glass ionomer cement as base.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sande, F.H. van de; Rosa Rodolpho, P.A. Da; Basso, G.R.; Patias, R.; Rosa, Q.F. da; Demarco, F.F.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Cenci, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Advantages and disadvantages of using intermediate layers underneath resin-composite restorations have been presented under different perspectives. Yet, few long-term clinical studies evaluated the effect of glass-ionomer bases on restoration survival. The present study investigated the

  6. CHH Cement Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwirzen, A.; Habermehl-Cwirzen, K.; Nasibulina, L. I.; Shandakov, S. D.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Kauppinen, E. I.; Mudimela, P. R.; Penttala, V.

    The compressive strength and electrical resistivity for hardened pastes produced from nanomodified Portland SR cement (CHH- Carbon Hedge Hog cement) were studied. The nanomodification included growing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the cement particles. Pastes having water to binder ratio of 0.5 were produced. The obtained hardened material was characterized by increased compressive strength in comparison with the reference specimens made from pristine SR cement, which was attributed to reinforcing action of the CNTs and CNFs. The electrical resistivity of CHH composite was lower by one order of magnitude in comparison with reference Portland cement paste.

  7. Properties of Expansive Porous Materials Based on Aluminate Cement for Underground Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Wojciech

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents the results of laboratory tests of expansive mineral binding materials based on calcium aluminate with mineral additive and carbonate expander. The expansion size can be controlled by the amount of expander as well as by water-binder ratio. The study describes the method of measuring the expansion size and selected technical parameters of obtained expansive binders together with the proposed scope of their use in underground construction.

  8. Gamma irradiation resistance of early age Ba(OH){sub 2}-Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-slag cementitious grouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobasher, Neda [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Bernal, Susan A. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Department of Civil & Structural Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Frederick Mappin Building, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Kinoshita, Hajime, E-mail: h.kinoshita@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    The gamma irradiation resistance of early age Ba(OH){sub 2}-Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-slag cementitious grouts, formulated for the immobilisation of sulfate bearing nuclear waste, was assessed. The observable crystalline phases were not modified upon heating (50 °C) or upon gamma irradiation up to a total dose of 2.9 MGy over 256 h, but the compressive strengths of the irradiated samples increased significantly. {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy showed that the main binding phase, a calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C-A-S-H) type gel, had a more ordered and polymerised structure upon heating and irradiation compared to that identified in reference samples. This is associated with a higher degree of reaction of the slag. Samples formulated with the waste simulant Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, but without Ba(OH){sub 2}, became porous and cracked upon heating and irradiation, but still retained their compressive strength. The Ba(OH){sub 2}-Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-slag grouts evaluated in this work withstand gamma irradiation without showing identifiable damage, and are thus a technically feasible solution for immobilisation of sulfate-bearing nuclear wastes. - Highlights: • Ba(OH){sub 2}-Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-slag cements show gamma irradiation resistance. • Sulfate-bearing wastes are immobilised in ettringite and BaSO{sub 4} compounds. • Ordering in C-A-S-H binder gel increases with gamma irradiation.

  9. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  10. Transport Properties of Carbon-Nanotube/Cement Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Baoguo; Yang, Zhengxian; Shi, Xianming; Yu, Xun

    2013-01-01

    This paper preliminarily investigates the general transport properties (i.e., water sorptivity, water permeability, and gas permeability) of carbon-nanotube/cement composites. Carboxyl multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are dispersed into cement mortar to fabricate the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reinforced cement-based composites by applying ultrasonic energy in combination with the use of surfactants (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate and sodium dodecyl sulfate). Experimental results indicate that even at a very small dosage the addition of MWNTs can help decrease water sorptivity coefficient, water permeability coefficient, and gas permeability coefficient of cement mortar, which suggests that CNTs can effectively improve the durability properties of cement-based composites.

  11. Analysis of the influence of clay cement concrete components on its characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sol’skiy Stanislav Viktorovich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A sustained pace of construction of dams and dikes using water resources and intensive development of underground space in the construction of buildings and structures require ensuring anti-seepage measures. For efficient stoppage of fluid flow a variety of methods are applied such as cement and grout curtains, teeth, core walls including ones made of soil-cement mixtures performed by the method of diaphragm wall. The following characteristics are the main selection criteria of the material composition for a diaphragm wall : permeability, strength, deformability, efficiency. Clay-cement-concrete (CCC is one of the materials satisfying all the above characteristics. The influence of the components used to prepare CCC mixtures on its strength and deformation characteristics was the main objective of the performed study. In order to solve the task, the formulas of CCC used at the objects of hydroengineering construction have been considered. For analyzing the influence of the components of CCC on its characteristics, the dependences of compression strength and deformation modulus of CCC on water-cement and water-astringent ratios have been built. The dependence of compression strength of CCC on the cement/bentonite ratio was built as well. The analysis of the dependences defined that the compression strength of CCC depends primarily on water-cement ratio and the amount of cement used in the composition. The increase in the value of water-cement ratio and water-astringent ratio leads to monotone decrease of the compression strength of CCC and the deformation modulus of CCC. Change of the quantitative content of one or more components of CCC composition allows controlling physical-mechanical characteristics of the anti-seepage element which is an important advantage of clay-cement-concrete. The performed analysis of the influence of CCC formula on its physical and mechanical properties can be used to select the optimal composition of CCC when solving

  12. Shrinkage Properties of Cement Stabilized Gravel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    Cement stabilized gravel is an attractive material in road construction because its strength prop-erties are accommodating the increasingly higher requirements to the bearing capacity of a base course. However, reflection cracking of cement stabilized gravel is a major concern. In this pa......-per the shrinkage properties of cement stabilized gravel have been documented under various temperature and relative humidity conditions. Two cement contents corresponding to a 28-days compressive strength of 6.2 MPa and 12.3 MPa have been tested and compared. It is found that the coefficient of linear expansion...... for the two cement contents is 9.9 × 10-6 ⁰C-1 and 11.3 × 10-6 ⁰C-1, respectively. Furthermore, it is found that reflecting cracking can mainly be explained by temperature dependent shrinkage rather than moisture dependent shrinkage....

  13. THE GLASS IONOMER CEMENT IN DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Matos Vieira

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The glass ionomer cement was developed in the past century 70s, after continuous researches about silicate cement. Over the years, glass ionomers have been playing an important role on restorative dentistry. Initially, the material was used for restoration of small cavities, however, its usage has been increased. The main indications at present are: as core buildup restorative, luting cement, liner and base and as a sealant. Recently, glass ionomer cement has been used for ART restorations and in some medicine fields because of the positive biointeraction with bone cells. Although glass ionomer cements exhibit an initial critical solubility and poor aesthetics, great biological properties like fluoride release to oral environment, chemical bonding to tooth tissues and biocompatibility leads this material elective for many purposes. Finally, their inherent antimicrobial properties contributes to the treatment of many situations in dentistry.

  14. 3D printing cement based ink, and it’s application within the construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianchao Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3D printing technology is the engine key of the third industrial revolution, after introduction of the automation in the eighteenth century and the concept of mass production in early of twentieth century. 3D printing technology now offers the magic solution to balance both the benefits, and overcome the major associated problem with the previous concept which was the need of repetition. The 3D printing technology has two main critical success factors: the printing machine and the printing material (ink. This paper focusses on cementitious-based materials and the ability to utilize the technology in the construction industry. The research took a qualitative approach based on previous literature reviews as well as in-house research results carried out by the authors’ employer Research and Development Center. The paper summarizes the approach towards to an appropriate mix design which can achieve the requirement of the printing process, and overcome the current constraints which are hindering the wide application of 3D print in construction industry. The authors believe that the research topic and result will have great impact on pushing the construction industry forward towards achieving the UAE Government’s strategy and target to achieve twenty-five percent (25% of the buildings in Dubai by the year of 2030 relying on the 3D printing methodology. The research also concluded that even though the technology is adding a great value to the construction industry, it must be remembered that the technology is still in its infancy, and further research is required to achieve even higher strength printing materials that would be workable in multi-story buildings without the need of additional steel reinforcement.

  15. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    with Imported Class 'G' Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana”, Ghana Mining Journal, Vol. ... to compare the physical properties of locally manufactured cement in Ghana with the class G cement. 2 Materials and Methods. 2.1 Materials. Three brands of .... Rheology of cement slurries is of great importance.

  16. Nuclear waste viewed in a new light; a synchrotron study of uranium encapsulated in grout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitt, C A; Hart, M; Harker, N J; Hallam, K R; MacFarlane, J; Banos, A; Paraskevoulakos, C; Butcher, E; Padovani, C; Scott, T B

    2015-03-21

    How do you characterise the contents of a sealed nuclear waste package without breaking it open? This question is important when the contained corrosion products are potentially reactive with air and radioactive. Synchrotron X-rays have been used to perform micro-scale in-situ observation and characterisation of uranium encapsulated in grout; a simulation for a typical intermediate level waste storage packet. X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction generated both qualitative and quantitative data from a grout-encapsulated uranium sample before, and after, deliberately constrained H2 corrosion. Tomographic reconstructions provided a means of assessing the extent, rates and character of the corrosion reactions by comparing the relative densities between the materials and the volume of reaction products. The oxidation of uranium in grout was found to follow the anoxic U+H2O oxidation regime, and the pore network within the grout was observed to influence the growth of uranium hydride sites across the metal surface. Powder diffraction analysis identified the corrosion products as UO2 and UH3, and permitted measurement of corrosion-induced strain. Together, X-ray tomography and diffraction provide means of accurately determining the types and extent of uranium corrosion occurring, thereby offering a future tool for isolating and studying the reactions occurring in real full-scale waste package systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Grouting applications in civil engineering. Volume I and II. [800 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einstein, H.H.; Barvenik, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive description of grouting applications in civil engineering is presented that can serve as a basis for the selection of grouting methods in the borehole sealing problem. The breadth and depth of the study was assured by conducting the main part of the review, the collection and evaluation of information, without specifically considering the borehole sealing problem (but naturally incorporating any aspect of civil engineering applications that could be of potential use). Grouting is very much an art and not a science. In most cases, it is a trial and error procedure where an inexpensive method is initially tried and then a more expensive one is used until the desired results are obtained. Once a desired effect is obtained, it is difficult to credit any one procedure with the success because the results are due to the summation of all the methods used. In many cases, the method that proves successful reflects a small abnormality in the ground or structure rather than its overall characteristics. Hence, successful grouting relies heavily on good engineering judgement and experience, and not on a basic set of standard correlations or equations. 800 references. (JRD)

  18. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN C-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-07-12

    C-reactor disassembly basin is being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated scrap components and structures in a grout-like formulation. The disassembly basin will be the first area of the C-reactor building that will be immobilized. The scrap components contain aluminum alloy materials. Any aluminum will corrode very rapidly when it comes in contact with the very alkaline grout (pH > 13), and as a result would produce hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) reviewed and evaluated existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints are necessary. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen above the surface of the water during the injection of grout into the C-reactor disassembly area is low if the assessment of the aluminum surface area is reliable. Conservative calculations estimate that there is insufficient aluminum present in the basin areas to result in significant hydrogen accumulation in this local region. The minimum safety margin (or factor) on a 60% LFL criterion for a local region of the basin (i.e., Horizontal Tube Storage) was greater than 3. Calculations also demonstrated that a flammable situation in the vapor space above the basin is unlikely. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the risk of developing a flammable condition during grouting operations.

  19. PRETREATMENT OF TC CONTAINING WASTE AND ITS EFFECT ON 99 TC LEACHING FROM GROUTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, J

    2006-12-11

    A salt solution (doped with Tc-99), that simulates the salt waste stream to be processed at the Saltstone Production Facility, was immobilized in grout waste forms with and without (1) ground granulated blast furnace slag and (2) pretreatment with iron salts. The degree of immobilization of Tc-99 was measured through monolithic and crushed grout leaching tests. Although Fe (+2) was shown to be effective in reducing Tc-99 to the +4 state, the strong reducing nature of the blast furnace slag present in the grout formulation dominated the reduction of Tc-99 in the cured grouts. An effective diffusion coefficient of 4.75 x 10{sup -12} (Leach Index of 11.4) was measured using the ANSI/ANS-16.1 protocol. The leaching results show that, even in the presence of a concentrated salt solution, blast furnace slag can effectively reduce pertechnetate to the immobile +4 oxidation state. The measured diffusivity was introduced into a flow and transport model (PORFLOW) to calculate the release of Tc-99 from a Saltstone Vault as a function of hydraulic conductivity of the matrix.

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweigh cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary surface pipe and intermediate casing cementing conditions historically encountered in the US and establishment of average design conditions for ULHS cements. Russian literature concerning development and use of ultra-lightweight cements employing either nitrogen or ULHS was reviewed, and a summary is presented. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was conducted to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS. This protocol is presented and discussed. finally, results of initial testing of ULHS cements is presented along with analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project.

  1. ENERGY, ACOUSTICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ANALYSIS OF BUILDING SYSTEMS BASED ON WOOD WOOL MINERALIZED WITH PORTLAND CEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Pavarin, Cora

    2014-01-01

    In the present work various aspects of the energetic, thermal and acoustic properties of porous materials with wood wool mineralized Portland cement have been analyzed, in cooperation with the company Celenit Srl, a manufacturer of panels for building insulation. These products are also recognized interesting and desirable for their environmental sustainability through specific certifications. Remind that sustainability means "development that meets the needs of the present without comprom...

  2. Apical root-end filling with tricalcium silicate-based cement in a patient with diabetes mellitus: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Biočanin Vladimir; Milić Marija; Vučetić Milan; Baćević Miljana; Vasović Dina; Živadinović Milka; Ćetković Dejan; Ćalasan Dejan; Brković Božidar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The material used for root-end filling has to be biocompatible with adjacent periapical tissue and to stimulate its regenerative processes. Tricalcium silicate cement (TSC), as a new dental material, shows good sealing properties with dentin, high compression strengths and better marginal adaptation than commonly used root-end filling materials. Although optimal postoperative healing of periapical tissues is mainly influenced by characteristics of end-root material used, it coul...

  3. Hydration kinetics and morphology of cement pastes with pozzolanic volcanic ash studied via synchrotron-based techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Chin, Stephanie; Ilavsky, Jan; Andrews, Ross N.; Bumajdad, Ali; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2017-10-13

    This study investigates the early ages of hydration behavior when basaltic volcanic ash was used as a partial substitute to ordinary Portland cement using ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The mix design consisted of 10, 30 and 50% substitution of Portland cement with two different-sized volcanic ashes. The data showed that substitution of volcanic ash above 30% results in excess unreacted volcanic ash, rather than additional pozzolanic reactions along longer length scales. WAXS studies revealed that addition of finely ground volcanic ash facilitated calcium-silicate-hydrate related phases, whereas inclusion of coarser volcanic ash caused domination by calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate and unreacted MgO phases, suggesting some volcanic ash remained unreacted throughout the hydration process. Addition of more than 30% volcanic ash leads to coarser morphology along with decreased surface area and higher intensity of scattering at early-age hydration. This suggests an abrupt dissolution indicated by changes in surface area due to the retarding gel formation that can have implication on early-age setting influencing the mechanical properties of the resulting cementitious matrix. The findings from this work show that the concentration of volcanic ash influences the specific surface area and morphology of hydration products during the early age of hydration. Hence, natural pozzolanic volcanic ashes can be a viable substitute to Portland cement by providing environmental benefits in terms of lower-carbon footprint along with long-term durability.

  4. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  5. Application of accelerated carbonation with a combination of Na2CO3 and CO2 in cement-based solidification/stabilization of heavy metal-bearing sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quanyuan; Ke, Yujuan; Zhang, Lina; Tyrer, Mark; Hills, Colin D; Xue, Gang

    2009-07-15

    The efficient remediation of heavy metal-bearing sediment has been one of top priorities of ecosystem protection. Cement-based solidification/stabilization (s/s) is an option for reducing the mobility of heavy metals in the sediment and the subsequent hazard for human beings and animals. This work uses sodium carbonate as an internal carbon source of accelerated carbonation and gaseous CO(2) as an external carbon source to overcome deleterious effects of heavy metals on strength development and improve the effectiveness of s/s of heavy metal-bearing sediment. In addition to the compressive strength and porosity measurements, leaching tests followed the Chinese solid waste extraction procedure for leaching toxicity - sulfuric acid and nitric acid method (HJ/T299-2007), German leaching procedure (DIN38414-S4) and US toxicity characteristic leaching procedures (TCLP) have been conducted. The experimental results indicated that the solidified sediment by accelerated carbonation was capable of reaching all performance criteria for the disposal at a Portland cement dosage of 10 wt.% and a solid/water ratio of 1:1. The concentrations of mercury and other heavy metals in the leachates were below 0.10mg/L and 5mg/L, respectively, complying with Chinese regulatory level (GB5085-2007). Compared to the hydration, accelerated carbonation improved the compressive strength of the solidified sediment by more than 100% and reduced leaching concentrations of heavy metals significantly. It is considered that accelerated carbonation technology with a combination of Na(2)CO(3) and CO(2) may practically apply to cement-based s/s of heavy metal-bearing sediment.

  6. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, N.C., E-mail: nick.collier@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Milestone, N.B. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Callaghan Innovation, 69 Gracefield Road, PO Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); Gordon, L.E. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Geopolymer and Minerals Processing Group, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ko, S.-C. [Holcim Technology Ltd, Hagenholzstrasse 85, CH-8050 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste.

  7. Synthesized mesoporous silica and calcium aluminate cement fillers increased the fluoride recharge and lactic acid neutralizing ability of a resin-based pit and fissure sealant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surintanasarn, Atikom; Siralertmukul, Krisana; Thamrongananskul, Niyom

    2017-11-29

    This study evaluated the effect of different types of filler in a resin-based pit and fissure sealant on fluoride release, recharge, and lactic acid neutralization. Resin-based sealant was incorporated with 5% w/w of the following fillers: calcium aluminate cement (CAC), synthesized mesoporous silica (SI), a CAC and SI mixture (CAC+SI), glass-ionomer powder (GIC), and acetic acid-treated GIC (GICA). Sealant without filler served as control. The samples were immersed in deionized water or a lactic acid solution and the concentration of fluoride in the water, before and after fluoride recharge, and the lactic acid pH change, respectively, were determined. The CAC+SI group demonstrated the highest fluoride release after being recharged with fluoride gel. The CAC+SI group also demonstrated increased lactic acid pH. These findings suggest that a resin-based sealant containing synthesized mesoporous silica and calcium aluminate cement may enhance remineralization due to fluoride release and higher pH.

  8. The Effect of Polymer-Cement Stabilization on the Unconfined Compressive Strength of Liquefiable Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ateş

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil stabilization has been widely used as an alternative to substitute the lack of suitable material on site. The use of nontraditional chemical stabilizers in soil improvement is growing daily. In this study a laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of waterborne polymer on unconfined compression strength and to study the effect of cement grout on pre-venting of liquefiable sandy soils. The laboratory tests were performed including grain size of sandy soil, unit weight, ultrasonic pulse velocity, and unconfined compressive strength test. The sand and various amounts of polymer (1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% and cement (10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% were mixed with all of them into dough using mechanical kneader in laboratory conditions. Grouting experiment is performed with a cylindrical mould of  mm. The samples were subjected to unconfined compression tests to determine their strength after 7 and 14 days of curing. The results of the tests indicated that the waterborne polymer significantly improved the unconfined compression strength of sandy soils which have susceptibility of liquefaction.

  9. Jet Grouting. Control of execution and result parameters. Test fields - Experience in Chile; Jet Grouting. Control de parametros de ejecucion y de resultados. Campos de prueba-Experiencia en Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayarza, P. M.; Vukotic, G.

    2014-07-01

    This article emphasizes the importance of Test Fields in project that includes the Jet Grouting technique. In particular, the Chilean experience is analyzed, where the Jet Grouting was first introduced by Pilots Terratest S. A. in the year 2010, only, only in 2011 the first project using jet columns was constructed. The versatilely of this technique allows its use in a wide variety of projects, for example, soil capacity improvement, settlement control, reduction of soil permeability and other environmental applications. Currently, the most common applications are underpinning existing foundations, ground improvement, lateral support of excavations, hydraulic barriers, slope stabilization, liquefaction control, among others. The Jet Grouting is one of the most demanding soil improvement technique and requires excellence in designing and execution engineers and other involved specialist. It is therefore essential to ensure exhaustive control to the execution and final parameters, in order to check that the product- Jet Grouting element-have the design properties, and implement modifications if necessary. Many authors strongly advises that if there is no comparable experience and even if there is, a Test Field of Jet Grouting elements has to be executed in site. This field consists in a nearby area with similar geotechnical conditions of the project, where Jet Grouting test columns will be constructed. This Test Field will allow selecting the most effective execution parameters and verifying that the final product has he correct design properties. (Author)

  10. Assessing the potential of ToF-SIMS as a complementary approach to investigate cement-based materials — Applications related to alkali–silica reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Laetitia, E-mail: laetitia.bernard@empa.ch [Laboratory for Nanoscale Materials Science, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Ueberlandstr. 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Leemann, Andreas [Laboratory for Concrete/Construction Chemistry, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Ueberlandstr. 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2015-02-15

    In this study, the potential of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) for the application in cement-based materials is assessed in combination and comparison with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Mortar, concrete and samples from model systems providing products formed by the alkali–silica reaction (ASR) were studied. ToF-SIMS provides qualitative data on alkalis in cases where EDX reaches its limits in regard to detectable concentration, lateral resolution and atomic number of the elements. Due to its high in-depth resolution of a few atomic monolayers, thin layers of reaction products can be detected on the surfaces and chemically analyzed with ToF-SIMS. Additionally, it delivers information on the molecular conformation within the ASR product, its hydrogen content and its isotope ratios, information not provided by EDX. Provided the samples are carefully prepared, ToF-SIMS opens up new possibilities in the analysis of cement-based materials.

  11. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material and radioopaque posterior glass ionomer restorative cement in primary and permanent teeth: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh Guptha Raju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Restoration of carious primary molars is still a major concern while treating the young children that too in deep carious lesion which extends below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ where pulp protection and achieving adequate marginal seal are very important to prevent secondary caries. The needs were met with the development of new materials. One such of new bioactive material is tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine, recommended for restoring deep lesions. Aim: To evaluate and compare shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine and glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP in primary and permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: Occlusal surface of crowns were ground flat. PVC molds were stabilized over flat dentin surface and filled with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP according to group ascertained. Shear bond strength was evaluated using universal testing machine (INSTRON. Standardized Class II cavities were prepared on both primary and permanent teeth, and then restored with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP according to group ascertained, over which composite resin material was restored using an open sandwich technique. Microleakage was assessed using dye penetration. Microleakage was examined using a stereomicroscope. Results: Results showed that glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP exhibited better shear bond strength than tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine. Mean microleakage score for glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP in permanent teeth was 1.52 and for primary teeth was 1.56. The mean microleakage for tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine in permanent teeth was 0.76 and for primary teeth was 0.60. Glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP exhibited more microleakage than tricalcium silicate-based restorative

  12. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material and radioopaque posterior glass ionomer restorative cement in primary and permanent teeth: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Vignesh Guptha; Venumbaka, Nilaya Reddy; Mungara, Jayanthi; Vijayakumar, Poornima; Rajendran, Sakthivel; Elangovan, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of carious primary molars is still a major concern while treating the young children that too in deep carious lesion which extends below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) where pulp protection and achieving adequate marginal seal are very important to prevent secondary caries. The needs were met with the development of new materials. One such of new bioactive material is tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine), recommended for restoring deep lesions. To evaluate and compare shear bond strength and microleakage of tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine) and glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) in primary and permanent teeth. Occlusal surface of crowns were ground flat. PVC molds were stabilized over flat dentin surface and filled with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine)/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) according to group ascertained. Shear bond strength was evaluated using universal testing machine (INSTRON). Standardized Class II cavities were prepared on both primary and permanent teeth, and then restored with tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine)/glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) according to group ascertained, over which composite resin material was restored using an open sandwich technique. Microleakage was assessed using dye penetration. Microleakage was examined using a stereomicroscope. RESULTS showed that glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) exhibited better shear bond strength than tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine). Mean microleakage score for glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) in permanent teeth was 1.52 and for primary teeth was 1.56. The mean microleakage for tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine) in permanent teeth was 0.76 and for primary teeth was 0.60. Glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP) exhibited more microleakage than tricalcium silicate-based restorative material (Biodentine), which was statistically significant

  13. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  14. Estimating the chloride transport in cement paste

    OpenAIRE

    Princigallo, A.

    2012-01-01

    A method was developed to measure the diffusion coefficient of chloride ions in cement paste based on an analytical solution to Fick’s 2nd law in a cylindrical coordinate system. This natural method yielded diffusivity results within as little as a month. Testing time was reduced by exploiting the three-dimensional inward flux in the specimen. In an attempt to determine the saturation concentration, dense portland cement pastes were exposed to a concentrated chloride solution. The method prov...

  15. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a non-destructive test method to monitor the development of corrosion products as well as the corrosion-induced formation and propagation of cracks in cementitious materials. A parametric experimental investigation (utilizing x-ray attenuation measurement technique) was cond......This paper introduces a non-destructive test method to monitor the development of corrosion products as well as the corrosion-induced formation and propagation of cracks in cementitious materials. A parametric experimental investigation (utilizing x-ray attenuation measurement technique......) was conducted to describe the impact of water-to-cement ratio and corrosion current density (i.e., corrosion rate) on the reinforcement corrosion process. Focus was placed, in particular on the determination of the corrosion accommodating region (CAR) and time to corrosion-induced cracking. Experimental results......’s law. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the depth of penetration of corrosion products as well as time to corrosion-induced cracking is varying for the different water-to-cement ratios and applied corrosion current densities....

  16. Pseudo-dynamic analysis of a cemented hip arthroplasty using a force method based on the Newmark algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, A; Talaia, P; Queirós de Melo, F J

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to develop an approached model to study dynamic behavior and prediction of the stress distribution in an in vitro Charnley cemented hip arthroplasty. An alternative version of the described pseudo-dynamic procedure is proposed by using the time integration Newmark algorithm. An internal restoring force vector is numerically calculated from the displacement, velocity, and acceleration vectors. A numerical model of hip replacement was developed to analyze the deformation of a dynamically stressed structure for all time steps. The experimental measurement of resulting internal forces generated in the structure (internal restoring force vector) is the second fundamental step of the pseudo-dynamic procedure. These data (as a feedback) are used by the time integration algorithm, which allows updating of the structure's shape for the next displacement, velocity, and acceleration vectors. In the field of Biomechanics, the potentialities of this method contribute to the determination of a dynamically equivalent in vitro stress field of a cemented hip prosthesis; implant fitted in patients with a normal mobility or practice sports. Consequences of the stress distribution in the implant zone that underwent cyclic fatigue loads were also discussed by using a finite element model. Application of this method in Biomechanics appears as a useful tool in the approximate stress field characterization of the peak stress state. Results show a peak value around two times the static situation, more for making possible the prediction of future damage and a programed clinical examination in patients using hip prosthesis.

  17. Calcium carbonate precipitation by strain Bacillus licheniformis AK01, newly isolated from loamy soil: a promising alternative for sealing cement-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Ali; Ramezanianpour, Ali Akbar; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Vali, Hojatollah; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari

    2015-01-01

    The relevant experiments were designed to determine the ability of indigenous bacterial strains isolated from limestone caves, mineral springs, and loamy soils to induce calcium carbonate precipitation. Among all isolates examined in this study, an efficient carbonate-precipitating soil bacterium was selected from among the isolates and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequences as Bacillus licheniformis AK01. The ureolytic isolate was able to grow well on alkaline carbonate-precipitation medium and precipitate calcium carbonate more than 1 g L(-1). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) examinations were performed in order to confirm the presence of calcium carbonate in the precipitate and to determine which polymorphs were present. The selected isolate was determined to be an appropriate candidate for application in a surface treatment of cement-based material to improve the properties of the mortar. Biodeposition of a layer of calcite on the surface of cement specimens resulted in filling in pore spaces. This could be an alternative method to improve the durability of the mortar. The kind of bacterial culture and medium composition had a profound impact on the resultant CaCO(3) crystal morphology. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Mouhat, Mathieu; Nergård, John Magnus; Lægreid, Solveig Jenssen; Kanno, Taro; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The present study investigated the effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns in relation to their compressive strength. Materials and methods Four different cements were tested: zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), self-adhesive resin-based cement (SRC) and resin-based cement (RC). RC was used in both dual cure mode (RC-D) and chemical cure mode (RC-C). First, the compressive strength of each cement was tested according to a standard (ISO 9917-1:2004). Second, load-to-failure test was performed to analyze the crown fracture resistance. CAD/CAM-produced monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm were prepared and cemented to dies with each cement. The crown–die samples were loaded until fracture. Results The compressive strength of SRC, RC-D and RC-C was significantly higher than those of ZPC and GIC (p crown between the groups. Conclusion The values achieved in the load-to-failure test suggest that monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm may have good resistance against fracture regardless of types of cements. PMID:27335900

  19. Arcing test on an aged grouted solar cell coupon with a realistic flashover simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Siguier, J.M.; Inguimbert, V.; Murat, Gaétan; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; We have performed arcing tests on an aged grouted solar cell coupon provided by KIT (JAPAN) under NEDO grant. Aging is simulated by electrons, protons and UV irradiations combined with thermal cycling, corresponding to 10 years in geostationary orbit (GEO). Arcing tests are performed with a European standard setup implemented with two different flashover simulators. Instead of using a large capacitance corresponding to the missing solar panel surface, we have implement...

  20. Selection of Colloidal Silica Grouts with Respect to Gelling and Erosion Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingqian Shen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cembinder, Eka EXP36, and MEYCO MP320 are three colloidal silica materials that have been proposed for post-excavation grouting of deep tunnels in a radioactive waste repository. In this study, samples of these colloidal silicas were tested for their particle size distribution, gel induction time (tG, gel time (TG, and physical erosion, under mildly saline groundwater flow conditions. In order to achieve a desired gel time range, from 15 to 50 min, it is recommended that the colloidal silica is mixed with a NaCl accelerator at a 5:1 volume ratio. At 20 °C, the concentration range for the NaCl solution should be 1.5 to 1.7 M for MEYCO, 1.23 to 1.38 M for Eka EXP36, and 1.3 to 1.47 M for Cembinder. The physical erosion of the set silicas remained steady during a 10 h flow cell experiment, when grouts were subjected to 0.05 M NaCl at a superficial velocity of 2.2 × 10−5 m/s. For these test conditions, the results show that MEYCO has the highest average erosion rate (0.85 mg/h of the three grout materials, as well as the greatest variability in this rate. Cembinder performed best with the lowest silica removal rate. Extrapolation of the measured erosion rates suggests that grout fracture dilation would not be significant under natural quiescent groundwater flow conditions, but would be high if there was hydraulic communication between the geosphere and the repository.

  1. Evaluation of Sealing Materials and Techniques for Installing Quoin and Miter Block Backing Grout

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    adhesion. This is not a problem for the epoxy filler materials since they are applied in a confined space and are loaded in compression. However...material to leak out. When this happens, the gap must be cleaned and resealed. This work was undertaken to resolve the problems associated with pouring...21 3-5 Gel timetable (approximate) for HIT RE500 epoxy anchor grout

  2. Addition of large amount of municipal sewage sludge as raw material in cement clinker production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minrui; Feng, Huajun; Li, Na; Shen, Dongsheng; Zhou, Yuyang; Jia, Yufeng

    2017-12-01

    Two addition modes were used to explore the maximum addition of municipal sewage sludge as a raw material in cement clinker production. The clinker and cement product quality were determined by chemical analysis, cement quality testing, characterization of the clinker crystalline phases, and leaching tests. Municipal sewage sludge addition in the raw mix could be up to 30% based on the cement clinker moduli, and the cement quality met the P.O 42.5 cement standard (GB 175-2007). The amount of municipal sewage sludge added based on the direct addition mode should be less than 15% because of an insufficient early-term cement strength (third day). The leaching concentrations of heavy metals in all cements were below the threshold (GB 30760-2014) using the latest leaching procedure (GB 30810-2014). The municipal sewage sludge could be used with a high addition (30%) in the raw mix as a raw material in cement clinker production.

  3. Non-conventional cement-based composites reinforced with vegetable fibers: A review of strategies to improve durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, S. F.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present review shows the state-of-art on the approachs about improving the processing, physical- mechanical performance and durability of non-conventional fiber-cement composites. The objective of this review is to show some of these strategies to mitigate the degradation of the vegetable fibers used as reinforcement in cost-effective and non-conventional fiber-cement and, consequently, to improve their mechanical and durability properties for applications in the housing construction. Beyond the introduction about vegetable fibers, the content of this review is divided in the following sections: (i surface modification of the fibers; (ii improving fiber-to-cement interface; (iii natural pozzolans; (iv accelerated carbonation; (v applications of nanoscience; and (vi principles of functionally graded materials and extrusion process were briefly discussed with focus on future research needs.La presente revisión explora la actualidad en el campo de los compuestos de fibrocemento no convencionales en relación a mejoras en el proceso productivo, el rendimiento físico-mecánico y la durabilidad. El objetivo de esta revisión es exponer algunas estrategias para mitigar la degradación de las fibras vegetales utilizadas como refuerzo en fibrocementos no convencionales y rentables, obteniendo en consecuencia una mejoría en el rendimiento de sus propiedades mecánicas y durabilidad para su aplicación en el área de la construcción de viviendas. Además de la introducción en relación a las fibras vegetales, el contenido de esta revisión se divide en las siguientes secciones: (i modificación de la superficie de las fibras; (ii mejoramiento de la interfaz fibra-cemento; (iii puzolanas naturales; (iv carbonatación acelerada; (v aplicaciones de la nanociencia; y (vi principios de los materiales funcionalmente graduados y el proceso de extrusión fueron discutidos brevemente con un enfoque a investigaciones futuras.

  4. Grout and glass performance in support of stabilization/solidification of ORNL tank sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D.; Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

    1998-09-01

    Wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collected, evaporated, and stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and Bethel Valley Evaporator Storage Tanks (BVEST) pending treatment for disposal. In addition, some sludges and supernatants also requiring treatment remain in two inactive tank systems: the gunite and associated tanks (GAAT) and the old hydrofracture (OHF) tank. The waste consists of two phases: sludge and supernatant. The sludges contain a high amount of radioactivity, and some are classified as TRU sludges. Some Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough to be defined as RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges are presumed to be mixed TRU waste. Grouting and vitrification are currently two likely stabilization/solidification alternatives for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize/solidify hazardous and low-level radioactive waste for decades. Vitrification has been developed as a high-level radioactive alternative for decades and has been under development recently as an alternative disposal technology for mixed waste. The objective of this project is to define an envelope, or operating window, for grout and glass formulations for ORNL tank sludges. Formulations will be defined for the average composition of each of the major tank farms (BVEST/MVST, GAAT, and OHF) and for an overall average composition of all tank farms. This objective is to be accomplished using surrogates of the tank sludges with hot testing of actual tank sludges to check the efficacy of the surrogates.

  5. Propriedades e bioatividade de um cimento endodôntico à base de aluminato de cálcio Properties and bioactivity of endodontic calcium aluminate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Oliveira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Desde sua introdução na endodontia como um material retro-obturador e selador de defeitos da raiz dental, o agregado de trióxido mineral (MTA tem sido considerado como um material endodôntico revolucionário. Apesar disso, este material apresenta algumas propriedades limitantes, necessitando alterações em sua composição bem como desenvolvimento de novos materiais. Assim, o objetivo desse trabalho foi mostrar a influência de aditivos no desenvolvimento de um cimento endodôntico à base de cimento de aluminato de cálcio (ECAC. Além disso, foram avaliadas as propriedades do ECAC em comparação com o MTA, quando em contato com solução de fluido corporal simulado (SBF. Testes de manipulação e medidas de resistência à compressão, porosidade aparente, tempo de endurecimento, pH e condutividade iônica, foram realizados para os materiais MTA puro e ECAC contendo aditivos. Considerando as propriedades apresentadas pelo ECAC, este material alternativo pode ser indicado para múltiplas aplicações em endodontia.The mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA, a material primarily developed as a root-end filling has been extensively investigated as an innovative product for endodontic applications. However, changes in its formulation/composition involving its mineral aggregates and the development of alternatives of materials have been proposed in an attempt to overcome its negative physical-chemical characteristics. In this work, the influence of additives addition on the development of a novel endodontic cement based on calcium aluminate, has been evaluated. In addition, the properties of endodontic calcium aluminate cement (ECAC were compared with the gold standard mineral-trioxide-aggregate in contact with simulated body fluid (SBF. Manipulation tests and measurements of compressive strength, apparent porosity, setting time, pH and ionic conductivity were carried out on plain MTA and calcium aluminate cement with and without various additives

  6. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those...... of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy...

  7. The contemporary cement cycle of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, A.; Van Oss, H. G.; Keoleian, G.; Kesler, S.E.; Kendall, A.

    2009-01-01

    A country-level stock and flow model for cement, an important construction material, was developed based on a material flow analysis framework. Using this model, the contemporary cement cycle of the United States was constructed by analyzing production, import, and export data for different stages of the cement cycle. The United States currently supplies approximately 80% of its cement consumption through domestic production and the rest is imported. The average annual net addition of in-use new cement stock over the period 2000-2004 was approximately 83 million metric tons and amounts to 2.3 tons per capita of concrete. Nonfuel carbon dioxide emissions (42 million metric tons per year) from the calcination phase of cement manufacture account for 62% of the total 68 million tons per year of cement production residues. The end-of-life cement discards are estimated to be 33 million metric tons per year, of which between 30% and 80% is recycled. A significant portion of the infrastructure in the United States is reaching the end of its useful life and will need to be replaced or rehabilitated; this could require far more cement than might be expected from economic forecasts of demand for cement. ?? 2009 Springer Japan.

  8. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Old Hydrofracture Facility Tank Closure Plan and Grout Development Status Report for FY 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.E.

    2000-05-08

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities across the country have radioactive waste underground storage tanks, which will require either complete removal of the tank contents and tank shells or in-place stabilization of sludge heels. Complete removal of the sludge and tank shells can become costly while providing little benefit to health, safety, and the environment. An alternative to the removal of the residual wastes and tank shells is the use of in situ solidification and stabilization techniques to immobilize the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and radioactive components present in waste storage tanks. One technology for in situ remediation of tank wastes is Ground Environmental Service's (GES's) Multi-Point-Injection (MPI.) technology. MPI technology is a patented delivery system, which uses simple and inexpensive injection tools for rapid delivery of grout or other treatment agents, as well as for the emplacement of subsurface barriers. Through the use of tailored grout formulations in conjunction with a system of specially designed grout injection tools, MPI technology is capable of producing a uniform mixture of sludge and grout. Grouts can be tailored for the immobilization of specific RCRA and radioactive constituents. The system of injection tools is designed to maximize the mixing efficiency of the grout with the wastes in the tank. MPI technology has been successfully demonstrated on the solidification of shallow buried wastes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and in large-scale pumping and mixing tests in both cylindrical and horizontal simulated waste tanks. Hot demonstration of the technology will be accomplished during the closure of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tank at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in fiscal year 2000. This report describes the closure plan for the OHF tanks and presents the status of grout formulation development at ORNL.

  9. Cytotoxicity of four categories of dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Franz, Alexander; König, Franz; Bristela, Margit; Lucas, Trevor; Piehslinger, Eva; Watts, David C; Schedle, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    Assessment of dental material biocompatibility is gaining increasing importance for both patients and dentists. Dental cements may be in contact with oral soft tissues for prolonged periods of time and play an important role in prosthetic rehabilitation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate eight dental cements using a standardized L929-fibroblast cell culture test. For each material, fresh specimens (added to the cultures immediately after preparation) and specimens preincubated for 7 days in cell culture medium were prepared according to the manufacturers' recommendations. After exposure to test specimens, cell numbers were compared to glass controls. The main outcome was a two-sided 95% confidence interval for the mean value of the standardized cell number for each substance investigated. Fresh specimens of all tested cements showed significant cytotoxicity, which diminished after 7 days preincubation. Cytotoxicity of fresh adhesive and self-adhesive resin cements was lower when specimens were dual-cured compared to self-cured. A rank order of cytotoxicity was established based on mean values: Nexus 2 (dual-cured) showed least cytotoxicity, followed by Variolink II (dual-cured), Nexus 2 (self-cured), Harvard, RelyxUnicem (dual-cured), Panavia 21, Fujicem, Durelon, Variolink II (self-cured), RelyxUnicem (self-cured), Maxcem (dual-cured) and Maxcem (self-cured). When bondings were added to Nexus 2 or Variolink II specimens, a slight increase in cytotoxicity was observed. Adhesive resin cements showed less cytotoxicity than self-adhesive and chemically setting cements. Bonding only slightly influenced cytotoxicity of the adhesive resin cements. Dual-cured specimens of adhesive and self-adhesive resin cements showed significantly less toxicity than self-cured specimens.

  10. Experimental investigation of influence of acid rain on leaching and hydraulic characteristics of cement-based solidified/stabilized lead contaminated clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan-Jun; Jiang, Ning-Jun; Shen, Shui-Long; Jin, Fei

    2012-07-30

    Remediation of contaminated lands in China urban areas is of great concern. Degradation of construction facilities caused by acid rain is a serious environmental pollution issue in China. This paper presents an investigation of the effects of acid rain on leaching and hydraulic properties of cement-based solidified/stabilized lead contaminated soil. Laboratory tests including infiltration test and soaking test are conducted. It is found that the soil hydraulic conductivity decreases with increase in the pore volume of flow of permeant liquids (acid rain and distilled water). The decreasing rate in the case of the acid rain is lower than that in the case of the distilled water. The soaking test results show that pH and the presence of sulfate ions of acid rain have considerable influence on the leached concentrations and leaching rate of calcium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cements and adhesives for all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A; Pegoraro, Thiago A; Dias, Renata A; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2011-04-01

    Dental cements are designed to retain restorations, prefabricated or cast posts and cores, and appliances in a stable, and long-lasting position in the oral environment. Resin-based cements were developed to overcome drawbacks of nonresinous materials, including low strength, high solubility, and opacity. Successful cementation of esthetic restorations depends on appropriate treatment to the tooth substrate and intaglio surface of the restoration, which in turn, depends on the ceramic characteristics. A reliable resin cementation procedure can only be achieved if the operator is aware of the mechanisms involved to perform the cementation and material properties. This article addresses current knowledge of resin cementation concepts, exploring the bonding mechanisms that influence long-term clinical success of all-ceramic systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chemical and physical properties of bone cement for vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Liang Lai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral compression fracture is the most common complication of osteoporosis. It may result in persistent severe pain and limited mobility, and significantly impacts the quality of life. Vertebroplasty involves a percutaneous injection of bone cement into the collapsed vertebrae by fluorescent guide. The most commonly used bone cement in percutaneous vertebroplasty is based on the polymerization of methylmethacrylate monomers to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA polymers. However, information on the properties of bone cement is mostly published in the biomaterial sciences literature, a source with which the clinical community is generally unfamiliar. This review focuses on the chemistry of bone cement polymerization and the physical properties of PMMA. The effects of altering the portions and contents of monomer liquid and polymer powders on the setting time, polymerization temperature, and compressive strength of the cement are also discussed. This information will allow spine surgeons to manipulate bone cement characteristics for specific clinical applications and improve safety.

  13. A rapid method for soil cement design : Louisiana slope value method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-03-01

    The current procedure used by the Louisiana Department of Highways for laboratory design of cement stabilized soil base and subbase courses is taken from standard AASHO test methods, patterned after Portland Cement Association criteria. These methods...

  14. Alkaline activation of different aluminosilicates as an alternative to Portland cement: alkali activated cements or geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Torres-Carrasco

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement is considered an excellence building material. This is due mainly to its high performance, its good quality/price ratio and the raw materials from which it is made can be found almost everywhere in the world. However, the development of alternative Portland cements obtained through processes involves lower emission of CO2 into the atmosphere is a priority research and great interest worldwide. Alkaline activation constitutes an alternative to Portland cement, preferably amorphous or vitreous aluminosilicates and alkaline activator (such as NaOH, Na2CO3 or sodium silicates hydrates. The aluminosilicates may be natural products such as metakaolin or industrial by-products such as blast furnace slag or aluminosiliceous fly ash. These cements and concretes obtained by alkali activating aluminosilicates are characterised by high mechanical strength, low heat of hydration and high impermeability, as well as resistance to high and low temperatures and sulphate, seawater and acid attacks. Moreover, the preparation of these alkaline cements requires lower energy than in the manufacturing process of Portland cement. However, we still cannot say or establish that alkaline cements (alkali activated materials or geopolymers are based on a clean chemical to the environment, due to production processes of alkaline solutions such as sodium silicates emit large amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere. This article aims to make a trip back in time to the origins of the alkali activation to explain the most characteristic and important chemical concepts.

  15. Cementing and formation damage; Cimentacao e dano a formacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, David Soares de [PETROBRAS, BA (Brazil). Distrito de Perfuracao da Bahia. Div. de Tecnicas e Operacoes

    1994-07-01

    This work presents a general perspective on cementing and formation damage. Few relative experiments to the damage to the formation, that they involve the casing activity and cementing, consider all the factors that affect these operations. So that she can analyze the contribution of a primary cementing has in the formation damage , it should be considered, also, the contribution of the drilling fluid and of the operation of the perforation. With base in experimental data of several accomplished studies, it can be concluded that a primary cementing has small, or any, contribution in the decrease of the productivity of an oil well.

  16. Investigation of Pozzolanic Reaction in Nanosilica-Cement Blended Pastes Based on Solid-State Kinetic Models and 29Si MAS NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jiho; Reda Taha, Mahmoud M.; Youm, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Jung J.

    2016-01-01

    The incorporation of pozzolanic materials in concrete has many beneficial effects to enhance the mechanical properties of concrete. The calcium silicate hydrates in cement matrix of concrete increase by pozzolanic reaction of silicates and calcium hydroxide. The fine pozzolanic particles fill spaces between clinker grains, thereby resulting in a denser cement matrix and interfacial transition zone between cement matrix and aggregates; this lowers the permeability and increases the compressive strength of concrete. In this study, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was mixed with 1% and 3% nanosilica by weight to produce cement pastes with water to binder ratio (w/b) of 0.45. The specimens were cured for 7 days. 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are conducted and conversion fraction of nanosilica is extracted. The results are compared with a solid-state kinetic model. It seems that pozzolanic reaction of nanosilica depends on the concentration of calcium hydroxide. PMID:28787904

  17. Investigation of Pozzolanic Reaction in Nanosilica-Cement Blended Pastes Based on Solid-State Kinetic Models and 29Si MAS NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jiho; Taha, Mahmoud M Reda; Youm, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Jung J

    2016-02-06

    The incorporation of pozzolanic materials in concrete has many beneficial effects to enhance the mechanical properties of concrete. The calcium silicate hydrates in cement matrix of concrete increase by pozzolanic reaction of silicates and calcium hydroxide. The fine pozzolanic particles fill spaces between clinker grains, thereby resulting in a denser cement matrix and interfacial transition zone between cement matrix and aggregates; this lowers the permeability and increases the compressive strength of concrete. In this study, Ordinary Portl