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Sample records for cellulose microfibril orientation

  1. Isolation of cellulose microfibrils - An enzymatic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sain, M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Isolation methods and applications of cellulose microfibrils are expanding rapidly due to environmental benefits and specific strength properties, especially in bio-composite science. In this research, we have success-fully developed and explored a novel bio-pretreatment for wood fibre that can substantially improve the microfibril yield, in comparison to current techniques used to isolate cellulose microfibrils. Microfibrils currently are isolated in the laboratory through a combination of high shear refining and cryocrushing. A high energy requirement of these procedures is hampering momentum in the direction of microfibril isolation on a sufficiently large scale to suit potential applications. Any attempt to loosen up the microfibrils by either complete or partial destruction of the hydrogen bonds before the mechanical process would be a step forward in the quest for economical isolation of cellulose microfibrils. Bleached kraft pulp was treated with OS1, a fungus isolated from Dutch Elm trees infected with Dutch elm disease, under different treatment conditions. The percentage yield of cellulose microfibrils, based on their diameter, showed a significant shift towards a lower diameter range after the high shear refining, compared to the yield of cellulose microfibrils from untreated fibres. The overall yield of cellulose microfibrils from the treated fibres did not show any sizeable decrease.

  2. Unraveling cellulose microfibrils: a twisted tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Jodi A; French, Alfred D; Woods, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of cellulose microfibrils are pertinent to the paper, textile, and biofuels industries for their unique capacity to characterize dynamic behavior and atomic-level interactions with solvent molecules and cellulase enzymes. While high-resolution crystallographic data have established a solid basis for computational analysis of cellulose, previous work has demonstrated a tendency for modeled microfibrils to diverge from the linear experimental structure and adopt a twisted conformation. Here, we investigate the dependence of this twisting behavior on computational approximations and establish the theoretical basis for its occurrence. We examine the role of solvent, the effect of nonbonded force field parameters [partial charges and van der Waals (vdW) contributions], and the use of explicitly modeled oxygen lone pairs in both the solute and solvent. Findings suggest that microfibril twisting is favored by vdW interactions, and counteracted by both intrachain hydrogen bonds and solvent effects at the microfibril surface.

  3. A survey of cellulose microfibril patterns in dividing, expanding, and differentiating cells of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Miki; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2014-05-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are critical for plant cell specialization and function. Recent advances in live cell imaging of fluorescently tagged cellulose synthases to track cellulose synthesis have greatly advanced our understanding of cellulose biosynthesis. Nevertheless, cellulose deposition patterns remain poorly described in many cell types, including those in the process of division or differentiation. In this study, we used field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis of cryo-planed tissues to determine the arrangement of cellulose microfibrils in various faces of cells undergoing cytokinesis or specialized development, including cell types in which cellulose cannot be imaged by conventional approaches. In dividing cells, we detected microfibrillar meshworks in the cell plates, consistent with the concentration at the cell plate of cellulose synthase complexes, as detected by fluorescently tagged CesA6. We also observed a loss of parallel cellulose microfibril orientation in walls of the mother cell during cytokinesis, which corresponded with the loss of fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase complexes from these surfaces. In recently formed guard cells, microfibrils were randomly organized and only formed a highly ordered circumferential pattern after pore formation. In pit fields, cellulose microfibrils were arranged in circular patterns around plasmodesmata. Microfibrils were random in most cotyledon cells except the epidermis and were parallel to the growth axis in trichomes. Deposition of cellulose microfibrils was spatially delineated in metaxylem and protoxylem cells of the inflorescence stem, supporting recent studies on microtubule exclusion mechanisms.

  4. Cellulose Microfibril Formation by Surface-Tethered Cellulose Synthase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Snehasish; Omadjela, Okako; Gaddes, David; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Zimmer, Jochen; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2016-02-23

    Cellulose microfibrils are pseudocrystalline arrays of cellulose chains that are synthesized by cellulose synthases. The enzymes are organized into large membrane-embedded complexes in which each enzyme likely synthesizes and secretes a β-(1→4) glucan. The relationship between the organization of the enzymes in these complexes and cellulose crystallization has not been explored. To better understand this relationship, we used atomic force microscopy to visualize cellulose microfibril formation from nickel-film-immobilized bacterial cellulose synthase enzymes (BcsA-Bs), which in standard solution only form amorphous cellulose from monomeric BcsA-B complexes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques show that surface-tethered BcsA-Bs synthesize highly crystalline cellulose II in the presence of UDP-Glc, the allosteric activator cyclic-di-GMP, as well as magnesium. The cellulose II cross section/diameter and the crystal size and crystallinity depend on the surface density of tethered enzymes as well as the overall concentration of substrates. Our results provide the correlation between cellulose microfibril formation and the spatial organization of cellulose synthases.

  5. Antibacterial paperboard packaging using microfibrillated cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoine, Nathalie; Desloges, Isabelle; Manship, Brigitte; Bras, Julien

    2015-09-01

    The industry and consumers are focusing more and more on the development of biodegradable and lightweight food-packaging materials, which could better preserve the quality of the food and improve its shelf-life. In an attempt to meet these requirements, this study presents a novel bio-substrate able to contain active bio-molecules for future food-packaging applications. Based on a paperboard substrate, the development of an antibacterial bio-packaging material is, therein, achieved using a chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) solution as a model of an antibacterial molecule, mixed with microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and used as coating onto paperboard samples. AFM and FE-SEM analyses were performed to underline the nanoporous MFC network able to trap and to progressively release the CHX molecules. The release study of CHX was conducted in an aqueous medium and showed a lower proportion (20 %) of CHX released when using MFC. This led to the constant release of low amounts of CHX over 40 h. Antibacterial tests were carried out to assess the preservation of the antibacterial activity of the samples after the release studies. Samples remained active against Bacillus subtilis, with better results being obtained when MFC was used. The preservation of the quality of a model food was finally evaluated paving the way for future promising applications in the food packaging industry.

  6. Cobtorin target analysis reveals that pectin functions in the deposition of cellulose microfibrils in parallel with cortical microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Arata; Ito, Takuya; Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Saito, Tamio; Ishimizu, Takeshi; Osada, Hiroyuki; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Matsui, Minami; Demura, Taku

    2010-11-01

    Cellulose and pectin are major components of primary cell walls in plants, and it is believed that their mechanical properties are important for cell morphogenesis. It has been hypothesized that cortical microtubules guide the movement of cellulose microfibril synthase in a direction parallel with the microtubules, but the mechanism by which this alignment occurs remains unclear. We have previously identified cobtorin as an inhibitor that perturbs the parallel relationship between cortical microtubules and nascent cellulose microfibrils. In this study, we searched for the protein target of cobtorin, and we found that overexpression of pectin methylesterase and polygalacturonase suppressed the cobtorin-induced cell-swelling phenotype. Furthermore, treatment with polygalacturonase restored the deposition of cellulose microfibrils in the direction parallel with cortical microtubules, and cobtorin perturbed the distribution of methylated pectin. These results suggest that control over the properties of pectin is important for the deposition of cellulose microfibrils and/or the maintenance of their orientation parallel with the cortical microtubules.

  7. Structural characterization of a mixed-linkage glucan deficient mutant reveals alteration in cellulose microfibril orientation in rice coleoptile mesophyll cell walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Michelle Smith-Moritz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE F6 (CslF6 gene was previously shown to mediate the biosynthesis of mixed-linkage glucan (MLG, a cell wall polysaccharide that is hypothesized to be a tightly associated with cellulose and also have a role in cell expansion in the primary cell wall of young seedlings in grass species. We have recently shown that loss-of-function cslf6 rice mutants do not accumulate MLG in most vegetative tissues. Despite the absence of a structurally important polymer, MLG, these mutants are unexpectedly viable and only show a moderate growth compromise compared to wild type. Therefore these mutants are ideal biological systems to test the current grass cell wall model. In order to gain a better understanding of the role of MLG in the primary wall, we performed in-depth compositional and structural analyses of the cell walls of three day-old rice seedlings using various biochemical and novel microspectroscopic approaches. We found that cellulose content as well as matrix polysaccharide composition was not significantly altered in the MLG deficient mutant. However, we observed a significant change in cellulose microfibril bundle organization in mesophyll cell walls of the cslf6 mutant. Using synchrotron source Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared Spectromicroscopy for high-resolution imaging, we determined that the bonds associated with cellulose and arabinoxylan, another major component of the primary cell was of grasses, were in a lower energy configuration compared to wild type, suggesting a slightly weaker primary wall in MLG deficient mesophyll cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MLG may influence cellulose deposition in mesophyll cell walls without significantly affecting anisotropic growth thus challenging MLG importance in cell wall expansion.

  8. From Golgi body movement to cellulose microfibril alignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, M.

    2012-01-01


    The shape and strength of plant cells is determined by a combination of turgor pressure and constraining cell wall. The main load bearing structures in the cell wall, cellulose microfibrils (CMFs), are deposited in highly organized textures. For more than 50 years scientists have tried to elu

  9. How the deposition of cellulose microfibrils builds cell wall architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emons, A.M.C.; Mulder, B.M.

    2000-01-01

    Cell walls, the extracytoplasmic matrices of plant cells, consist of an ordered array of cellulose microfibrils embedded in a matrix of polysaccharides and glycoproteins. This construction is reminiscent of steel rods in reinforced concrete. How a cell organizes these ordered textures around itself,

  10. Microfibrillated cellulose and new nanocomposite materials: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siró, Istvan; Plackett, David

    2010-01-01

    typically required high energy input, chemical and/or enzymatic fiber pre-treatments have been developed to overcome this problem. A challenge associated with using nanocellulose in composites is the lack of compatibility with hydrophobic polymers and various chemical modification methods have been explored...... in order to address this hurdle. This review summarizes progress in nanocellulose preparation with a particular focus on microfibrillated cellulose and also discusses recent developments in bio-nanocomposite fabrication based on nanocellulose....

  11. Rheology and flocculation of polymer-modified microfibrillated cellulose suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Karppinen, Anni

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, the rheology and flocculation of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) suspensionswas modified using different cationic and anionic polymers and surface modification. For this purpose, MFC suspensions were studied simultaneously with a dynamic rotational rheometer and two imaging methods. The flocculation tendency of the suspensions was mainly evaluated using photographing through a transparent rheometer cup, and for some suspensions, optical coherence tomography (OCT), which gives...

  12. Visualization of Cellulose Microfibrils of Phyllostachys pubescens Fibers with Atomic Force Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Atomic force microscope(AFM) was used to investigate the arrangement of cellulose microfibrils (CMF) in Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) fibers. Two methods of sample preparation were used here for different purposes. The first method was chemical maceration with a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and glacial acetic acid, through which the obtained fibers were suitable for observing the orientation of CMF in the primary wal1. The other method was to prepare tangential microtomed sections with a thickness o...

  13. Physical properties and morphology of films prepared from microfibrillated cellulose and microfibrillated cellulose in combination with amylopectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plackett, David; Anturi, Harvey; Hedenqvist, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Two types of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) were prepared using either a sulfite pulp containing a high amount of hemicellulose (MFC 1) or a carboxymethylated dissolving pulp (MFC 2). MFC gels were then combined with amylopectin solutions to produce solvent-cast MFC-reinforced amylopectin films...... to illustrate the morphology of MFC nanofibers in pure films and in an amylopectin matrix. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2010...

  14. Yielding and flow of cellulose microfibril dispersions in the presence of a charged polymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, De Daan W.; Veen, Sandra J.; As, Van Henk; Bonn, Daniel; Velikov, Krassimir P.; Duynhoven, Van John P.M.

    2016-01-01

    The shear flow of microfibrillated cellulose dispersions is still not wholly understood as a consequence of their multi-length-scale heterogeneity. We added carboxymethyl cellulose, a charged polymer, that makes cellulose microfibril dispersions more homogeneous at the submicron and macro scales.

  15. Mineral-Ground Micro-Fibrillated Cellulose Reinforcement for Polymer Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phipps, Jon [Fiberlean Technologies, Par (United Kingdom); Ireland, Sean [Fiberlean Technologies, Par (United Kingdom); Skuse, David [Imerys, Paris (France); Edwards, Martha [Imerys, Paris (France); Mclain, Leslie [Imerys, Paris (France); Tekinalp, Halil L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Love, Lonnie J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kunc, Vlastimil [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ozcan, Soydan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ORNL worked with Imerys to demonstrate reinforcement of additive manufacturing feedstock materials using mineral-ground microfibrillated cellulose (MFC). Properly prepared/dried mineral-ground cellulose microfibrils significantly improved mechanical properties of both ABS and PLA resins. While tensile strength increases up to ~40% were observed, elastic modulus of the both resins doubled with the addition of 30% MFC.

  16. Spatial organization of cellulose microfibrils and matrix polysaccharides in primary plant cell walls as imaged by multichannel atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Zheng, Yunzhen; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), complemented with electron microscopy, to characterize the nanoscale and mesoscale structure of the outer (periclinal) cell wall of onion scale epidermis - a model system for relating wall structure to cell wall mechanics. The epidermal wall contains ~100 lamellae, each ~40 nm thick, containing 3.5-nm wide cellulose microfibrils oriented in a common direction within a lamella but varying by ~30 to 90° between adjacent lamellae. The wall thus has a crossed polylamellate, not helicoidal, wall structure. Montages of high-resolution AFM images of the newly deposited wall surface showed that single microfibrils merge into and out of short regions of microfibril bundles, thereby forming a reticulated network. Microfibril direction within a lamella did not change gradually or abruptly across the whole face of the cell, indicating continuity of the lamella across the outer wall. A layer of pectin at the wall surface obscured the underlying cellulose microfibrils when imaged by FESEM, but not by AFM. The AFM thus preferentially detects cellulose microfibrils by probing through the soft matrix in these hydrated walls. AFM-based nanomechanical maps revealed significant heterogeneity in cell wall stiffness and adhesiveness at the nm scale. By color coding and merging these maps, the spatial distribution of soft and rigid matrix polymers could be visualized in the context of the stiffer microfibrils. Without chemical extraction and dehydration, our results provide multiscale structural details of the primary cell wall in its near-native state, with implications for microfibrils motions in different lamellae during uniaxial and biaxial extensions.

  17. A novel method for preparing microfibrillated cellulose from bamboo fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dat Nguyen, Huu; Thanh Thuy Mai, Thi; Bich Nguyen, Ngoc; Duy Dang, Thanh; Loan Phung Le, My; Dang, Tan Tai; Tran, Van Man

    2013-03-01

    The bamboo fiber is a potential candidate for biomass and power source application. In this study, microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) is prepared from raw fibers of bamboo tree (Bambusa Blumeana J A & J H Schultes) by an alkali treatment at room temperature in association with a bleaching treatment followed by a sulfuric acid hydrolysis. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images indicated that final products ranged from 20 to 40 nm in diameter. The chemical composition measurement and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that both hemicellulose and lignin are mostly removed in the MFC. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) results also show that MFC has crystallinity of more than 70%. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves revealed that cellulose microfibers have a two-step thermal decomposition behavior owing to the attachment of sulfated groups onto the cellulose surface in the hydrolysis process with sulfuric acid. The obtained MFCs may have potential applications in alternative power sources as biomass, in pharmaceutical and optical industries as additives, as well as in composite fields as a reinforcement phase.

  18. Brittle Culm1, a COBRA-like protein, functions in cellulose assembly through binding cellulose microfibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lifeng; Shang-Guan, Keke; Zhang, Baocai; Liu, Xiangling; Yan, Meixian; Zhang, Lanjun; Shi, Yanyun; Zhang, Mu; Qian, Qian; Li, Jiayang; Zhou, Yihua

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose represents the most abundant biopolymer in nature and has great economic importance. Cellulose chains pack laterally into crystalline forms, stacking into a complicated crystallographic structure. However, the mechanism of cellulose crystallization is poorly understood. Here, via functional characterization, we report that Brittle Culm1 (BC1), a COBRA-like protein in rice, modifies cellulose crystallinity. BC1 was demonstrated to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein and can be released into cell walls by removal of the GPI anchor. BC1 possesses a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) at its N-terminus. In vitro binding assays showed that this CBM interacts specifically with crystalline cellulose, and several aromatic residues in this domain are essential for binding. It was further demonstrated that cell wall-localized BC1 via the CBM and GPI anchor is one functional form of BC1. X-ray diffraction (XRD) assays revealed that mutations in BC1 and knockdown of BC1 expression decrease the crystallite width of cellulose; overexpression of BC1 and the CBM-mutated BC1s caused varied crystallinity with results that were consistent with the in vitro binding assay. Moreover, interaction between the CBM and cellulose microfibrils was largely repressed when the cell wall residues were pre-stained with two cellulose dyes. Treating wild-type and bc1 seedlings with the dyes resulted in insensitive root growth responses in bc1 plants. Combined with the evidence that BC1 and three secondary wall cellulose synthases (CESAs) function in different steps of cellulose production as revealed by genetic analysis, we conclude that BC1 modulates cellulose assembly by interacting with cellulose and affecting microfibril crystallinity.

  19. Brittle Culm1, a COBRA-like protein, functions in cellulose assembly through binding cellulose microfibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Liu

    Full Text Available Cellulose represents the most abundant biopolymer in nature and has great economic importance. Cellulose chains pack laterally into crystalline forms, stacking into a complicated crystallographic structure. However, the mechanism of cellulose crystallization is poorly understood. Here, via functional characterization, we report that Brittle Culm1 (BC1, a COBRA-like protein in rice, modifies cellulose crystallinity. BC1 was demonstrated to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored protein and can be released into cell walls by removal of the GPI anchor. BC1 possesses a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM at its N-terminus. In vitro binding assays showed that this CBM interacts specifically with crystalline cellulose, and several aromatic residues in this domain are essential for binding. It was further demonstrated that cell wall-localized BC1 via the CBM and GPI anchor is one functional form of BC1. X-ray diffraction (XRD assays revealed that mutations in BC1 and knockdown of BC1 expression decrease the crystallite width of cellulose; overexpression of BC1 and the CBM-mutated BC1s caused varied crystallinity with results that were consistent with the in vitro binding assay. Moreover, interaction between the CBM and cellulose microfibrils was largely repressed when the cell wall residues were pre-stained with two cellulose dyes. Treating wild-type and bc1 seedlings with the dyes resulted in insensitive root growth responses in bc1 plants. Combined with the evidence that BC1 and three secondary wall cellulose synthases (CESAs function in different steps of cellulose production as revealed by genetic analysis, we conclude that BC1 modulates cellulose assembly by interacting with cellulose and affecting microfibril crystallinity.

  20. Dissecting the molecular mechanism underlying the intimate relationship between cellulose microfibrils and cortical microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eLei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A central question in plant cell development is how the cell wall determines directional cell expansion and therefore the final shape of the cell. As the major load-bearing component of the cell wall, cellulose microfibrils are laid down transversely to the axis of elongation, thus forming a spring-like structure that reinforces the cell laterally and while favoring longitudinal expansion in most growing cells. Mounting evidence suggests that cortical microtubules organize the deposition of cellulose microfibrils, but the precise molecular mechanisms linking microtubules to cellulose organization have remained unclear until the recent discovery of CSI1, a linker protein between the cortical microtubules and the cellulose biosynthesizing machinery. In this review, we will focus on the intimate relationship between cellulose microfibrils and cortical microtubules, in particular, we will discuss microtubule arrangement and cell wall architecture, the linkage between cellulose synthase complexes and microtubules, and the feedback mechanisms between cell wall and microtubules.

  1. Disorganization of cortical microtubules stimulates tangential expansion and reduces the uniformity of cellulose microfibril alignment among cells in the root of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Tobias I; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Judy-March, Jan E; Marga, Françoise

    2004-08-01

    To test the role of cortical microtubules in aligning cellulose microfibrils and controlling anisotropic expansion, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana roots to moderate levels of the microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin. After 2 d of treatment, roots grow at approximately steady state. At that time, the spatial profiles of relative expansion rate in length and diameter were quantified, and roots were cryofixed, freeze-substituted, embedded in plastic, and sectioned. The angular distribution of microtubules as a function of distance from the tip was quantified from antitubulin immunofluorescence images. In alternate sections, the overall amount of alignment among microfibrils and their mean orientation as a function of position was quantified with polarized-light microscopy. The spatial profiles of relative expansion show that the drug affects relative elongation and tangential expansion rates independently. The microtubule distributions averaged to transverse in the growth zone for all treatments, but on oryzalin the distributions became broad, indicating poorly organized arrays. At a subcellular scale, cellulose microfibrils in oryzalin-treated roots were as well aligned as in controls; however, the mean alignment direction, while consistently transverse in the controls, was increasingly variable with oryzalin concentration, meaning that microfibril orientation in one location tended to differ from that of a neighboring location. This conclusion was confirmed by direct observations of microfibrils with field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, these results suggest that cortical microtubules ensure microfibrils are aligned consistently across the organ, thereby endowing the organ with a uniform mechanical structure.

  2. Disorganization of Cortical Microtubules Stimulates Tangential Expansion and Reduces the Uniformity of Cellulose Microfibril Alignment among Cells in the Root of Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Tobias I.; Beemster, Gerrit T.S.; Judy-March, Jan E.; Marga, Françoise

    2004-01-01

    To test the role of cortical microtubules in aligning cellulose microfibrils and controlling anisotropic expansion, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana roots to moderate levels of the microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin. After 2 d of treatment, roots grow at approximately steady state. At that time, the spatial profiles of relative expansion rate in length and diameter were quantified, and roots were cryofixed, freeze-substituted, embedded in plastic, and sectioned. The angular distribution of microtubules as a function of distance from the tip was quantified from antitubulin immunofluorescence images. In alternate sections, the overall amount of alignment among microfibrils and their mean orientation as a function of position was quantified with polarized-light microscopy. The spatial profiles of relative expansion show that the drug affects relative elongation and tangential expansion rates independently. The microtubule distributions averaged to transverse in the growth zone for all treatments, but on oryzalin the distributions became broad, indicating poorly organized arrays. At a subcellular scale, cellulose microfibrils in oryzalin-treated roots were as well aligned as in controls; however, the mean alignment direction, while consistently transverse in the controls, was increasingly variable with oryzalin concentration, meaning that microfibril orientation in one location tended to differ from that of a neighboring location. This conclusion was confirmed by direct observations of microfibrils with field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, these results suggest that cortical microtubules ensure microfibrils are aligned consistently across the organ, thereby endowing the organ with a uniform mechanical structure. PMID:15299138

  3. Cellulose microfibril-water interaction as characterized by isothermal thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman K. Sen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Microfibrillated celluloses, liberated from macroscopic lignocellulosic fibers by mechanical means, are sub-fiber elements with lengths in the micron scale and diameters ranging from 10 to a few hundred nanometers. These materials have shown strong water interactions. This article describes an investigation and quantification of the ‘hard-to-remove (HR water content’ in cellulose fibers and microfibrillated structures prepared from fully bleached softwood pulp (BSW. The fiber/fibril structure was altered by using an extended beating process (up to 300 minutes, and water interactions were determined with isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Isothermal TGA is shown to be a convenient and insightful characterization method for fiber-water interactions for fibers and microfibrils at small sample size. In addition, scanning electron microscopic (SEM images depict the differences between fibers and microfibrils with respect to beating time in the dried consolidated structures. Highly refined pulps with microfibrils were determined to have two critical drying points, i.e., two minima in the second derivative of weight versus time, not before reported in the literature. Also in this study, hard-to-remove (HR water content is related to the area above the first derivative curve in the constant rate and falling rate drying zones. This measure of HR water correlates with a previous measurement method of HR water but is less ambiguous for materials that lack a constant drying rate zone. Blends of unbeaten fibers and microfibril containing samples were prepared and show potential as composite materials.

  4. Yielding and flow of cellulose microfibril dispersions in the presence of a charged polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kort, Daan W; Veen, Sandra J; Van As, Henk; Bonn, Daniel; Velikov, Krassimir P; van Duynhoven, John P M

    2016-05-25

    The shear flow of microfibrillated cellulose dispersions is still not wholly understood as a consequence of their multi-length-scale heterogeneity. We added carboxymethyl cellulose, a charged polymer, that makes cellulose microfibril dispersions more homogeneous at the submicron and macro scales. We then compared the yielding and flow behavior of these dispersions to that of typical thixotropic yield-stress fluids. Despite the apparent homogeneity of the dispersions, their flow velocity profiles in cone-plate geometry, as measured by rheo-MRI velocimetry, differ strongly from those observed for typical thixotropic model systems: the viscosity across the gap is not uniform, despite a flat stress field across the gap. We describe these velocity profiles with a nonlocal model, and attribute the non-locality to persistent micron-scale structural heterogeneity.

  5. Preparation and properties of self-reinforced cellulose composite films from Agave microfibrils using an ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Obi; Zhang, Jinming; Zhang, Jun; Rajulu, A Varada

    2014-12-19

    The applications of natural fibers and their microfibrils are increasing rapidly due to their environment benefits, specific strength properties and renewability. In the present work, we successfully extracted cellulose microfibrils from Agave natural fibers by chemical method. The extracted microfibrils were characterized by chemical analysis. The cellulose microfibrils were found to dissolve in an ionic liquid 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AmimCl) to larger extent along with little quantity of undissolved microfibrils. Using this solution, the self-reinforced regenerated cellulose composite films were prepared. The raw fiber, extracted cellulose microfibrils and regenerated cellulose composite films were characterized by FTIR, (13)C CP-MAS NMR, XRD, TGA and SEM techniques. The average tensile strength, modulus and elongation at break of the self-reinforced cellulose composite films were found to be 135 MPa, 8150 MPa and 3.2%, respectively. The high values of tensile strength and modulus were attributed to the self-reinforcement of Agave fibers in their generated matrix. These self-reinforced cellulose biodegradable composite films prepared from renewable source can find applications in packaging field.

  6. Highly transparent films from carboxymethylated microfibrillated cellulose: The effect of multiple homogenization steps on key properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siró, Istvan; Plackett, David; Hedenqvist, M.

    2011-01-01

    We produced microfibrillated cellulose by passing carboxymethylated sulfite-softwood-dissolving pulp with a relatively low hemicellulose content (4.5%) through a high-shear homogenizer. The resulting gel was subjected to as many as three additional homogenization steps and then used to prepare so...... of homogenization, whereas the mean tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and strain at break were increased by two or three extra homogenization steps. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2011...

  7. Investigation of mass transport properties of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minelli, Matteo; Baschetti, Marco Giacinti; Doghieri, Ferruccio

    2010-01-01

    sorption experiments confirmed the hydrophilic character of these cellulosic materials and showed a dual effect of glycerol which reduced the water uptake at low water activity while enhancing it at high relative humidity. The water diffusion in dry samples was remarkably slow for a porous material...... was observed in permeation experiments. Dry MFC films showed excellent oxygen barrier properties; however, a dramatic decrease in these properties was observed when the water content in the samples was increased....

  8. Aspen Tension Wood Fibers Contain β-(1---> 4)-Galactans and Acidic Arabinogalactans Retained by Cellulose Microfibrils in Gelatinous Walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshkova, Tatyana; Mokshina, Natalia; Chernova, Tatyana; Ibragimova, Nadezhda; Salnikov, Vadim; Mikshina, Polina; Tryfona, Theodora; Banasiak, Alicja; Immerzeel, Peter; Dupree, Paul; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2015-11-01

    Contractile cell walls are found in various plant organs and tissues such as tendrils, contractile roots, and tension wood. The tension-generating mechanism is not known but is thought to involve special cell wall architecture. We previously postulated that tension could result from the entrapment of certain matrix polymers within cellulose microfibrils. As reported here, this hypothesis was corroborated by sequential extraction and analysis of cell wall polymers that are retained by cellulose microfibrils in tension wood and normal wood of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides). β-(1→4)-Galactan and type II arabinogalactan were the main large matrix polymers retained by cellulose microfibrils that were specifically found in tension wood. Xyloglucan was detected mostly in oligomeric form in the alkali-labile fraction and was enriched in tension wood. β-(1→4)-Galactan and rhamnogalacturonan I backbone epitopes were localized in the gelatinous cell wall layer. Type II arabinogalactans retained by cellulose microfibrils had a higher content of (methyl)glucuronic acid and galactose in tension wood than in normal wood. Thus, β-(1→4)-galactan and a specialized form of type II arabinogalactan are trapped by cellulose microfibrils specifically in tension wood and, thus, are the main candidate polymers for the generation of tensional stresses by the entrapment mechanism. We also found high β-galactosidase activity accompanying tension wood differentiation and propose a testable hypothesis that such activity might regulate galactan entrapment and, thus, mechanical properties of cell walls in tension wood.

  9. In vitro synthesis of cellulose microfibrils by a membrane protein from protoplasts of the non-vascular plant Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Hyun; Du, Juan; Sines, Ian; Poosarla, Venkata Giridhar; Vepachedu, Venkata; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Yong Bum; Kim, Seong H; Kumar, Manish; Nixon, B Tracy

    2015-09-01

    Plant cellulose synthases (CesAs) form a family of membrane proteins that are associated with hexagonal structures in the plasma membrane called CesA complexes (CSCs). It has been difficult to purify plant CesA proteins for biochemical and structural studies. We describe CesA activity in a membrane protein preparation isolated from protoplasts of Physcomitrella patens overexpressing haemagglutinin (HA)-tagged PpCesA5. Incubating the membrane preparation with UDP-glucose predominantly produced cellulose. Negative-stain EM revealed microfibrils. Cellulase bound to and degraded these microfibrils. Vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopic analysis detected the presence of crystalline cellulose in the microfibrils. Putative CesA proteins were frequently observed attached to the microfibril ends. Combined cross-linking and gradient centrifugation showed bundles of cellulose microfibrils with larger particle aggregates, possibly CSCs. These results suggest that P. patens is a useful model system for biochemical and structural characterization of plant CSCs and their components.

  10. Low-cost, environmentally friendly route for producing CFRP laminates with microfibrillated cellulose interphase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. E. B. Uribe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a cost-effective and eco-friendly method to improve mechanical performance in continuous carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP matrix composites is presented. Unsized fiber fabric preforms are coated with self-assembling sugarcane bagasse microfibrillated cellulose, and undergo vacuum-assisted liquid epoxy resin infusion to produce solid laminates after curing at ambient temperature. Quasi-static tensile, flexural and short beam testing at room temperature indicated that the stiffness, ultimate strength and toughness at ultimate load of the brand-new two-level hierarchical composite are substantially higher than in baseline, unsized fiber-reinforced epoxy laminate. Atomic force microscopy for height and phase imaging, along with scanning electron microscopy for the fracture surface survey, revealed a 400 nm-thick fiber/matrix interphase wherein microfibrillated cellulose exerts strengthening and toughening roles in the hybrid laminate. Market expansion of this class of continuous fiber-reinforced-polymer matrix composites exhibiting remarkable mechanical performance/cost ratios is thus conceivable.

  11. Microfibrillated cellulose as reinforcement for Li-ion battery polymer electrolytes with excellent mechanical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappone, A.; Nair, Jijeesh R.; Gerbaldi, C.; Jabbour, L.; Bongiovanni, R.; Zeno, E.; Beneventi, D.; Penazzi, N.

    Methacrylic-based thermo-set gel-polymer electrolyte membranes obtained by a very easy, fast and reliable free radical photo-polymerisation process and reinforced with microfibrillated cellulose particles are here presented. The morphology of the composite electrolytes is investigated by scanning electron microscopy and their thermal behaviour (characteristic temperatures, degradation temperature) are investigated by thermo-gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The composite membranes prepared exhibit excellent mechanical properties, with a Young's modulus as high as about 80 MPa at ambient temperature. High ionic conductivity (approaching 10 -3 S cm -1 at 25 °C) and good overall electrochemical performances are maintained, enlightening that such specific approach would make these hybrid organic, cellulose-based composite polymer electrolyte systems a strong contender in the field of thin and flexible lithium based power sources.

  12. Transcriptome profiling of Pinus radiata juvenile wood with contrasting stiffness identifies putative candidate genes involved in microfibril orientation and cell wall mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Harry X

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanical properties of wood are largely determined by the orientation of cellulose microfibrils in secondary cell walls. Several genes and their allelic variants have previously been found to affect microfibril angle (MFA and wood stiffness; however, the molecular mechanisms controlling microfibril orientation and mechanical strength are largely uncharacterised. In the present study, cDNA microarrays were used to compare gene expression in developing xylem with contrasting stiffness and MFA in juvenile Pinus radiata trees in order to gain further insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying microfibril orientation and cell wall mechanics. Results Juvenile radiata pine trees with higher stiffness (HS had lower MFA in the earlywood and latewood of each ring compared to low stiffness (LS trees. Approximately 3.4 to 14.5% out of 3, 320 xylem unigenes on cDNA microarrays were differentially regulated in juvenile wood with contrasting stiffness and MFA. Greater variation in MFA and stiffness was observed in earlywood compared to latewood, suggesting earlywood contributes most to differences in stiffness; however, 3-4 times more genes were differentially regulated in latewood than in earlywood. A total of 108 xylem unigenes were differentially regulated in juvenile wood with HS and LS in at least two seasons, including 43 unigenes with unknown functions. Many genes involved in cytoskeleton development and secondary wall formation (cellulose and lignin biosynthesis were preferentially transcribed in wood with HS and low MFA. In contrast, several genes involved in cell division and primary wall synthesis were more abundantly transcribed in LS wood with high MFA. Conclusions Microarray expression profiles in Pinus radiata juvenile wood with contrasting stiffness has shed more light on the transcriptional control of microfibril orientation and the mechanical properties of wood. The identified candidate genes provide an

  13. Study on the sorption process of triclosan on cationic microfibrillated cellulose and its antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjie; Zeng, Xu; Xie, Jinglei; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Hailong

    2016-01-20

    Cationic microfibrillated cellulose (CMFC), as one kind of cellulose-based materials, is widely used in many fields. In this work, it was functionalized with a traditional antibacterial agent (triclosan, TCS). The sorption process of TCS onto CMFC was expressed by kinetic and isotherm models. The results showed that there was a high correlation coefficient (R(2)>0.9) in the pseudo-second-order model and the isotherm models, indicating that CMFC had a good sorption capacity for TCS. The sorption type was chemisorption, and the reaction power was electrostatic interactions. The antibacterial activity of the assembled TCS/CMFC compound was tested by disk diffusion method, and it was found a higher antibacterial activity than CMFC alone (bigger inhibition zone diameters). Further, the functionalized TCS/CMFC compound was used in the fiber network during handsheets making, and it had a higher antibacterial rate than TCS alone (increase by 45.1% against Escherichia coli and by 54.8% against Staphylococcus aureus, respectively).

  14. Differential regulation of cellulose orientation at the inner and outer face of epidermal cells in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crowell, E.F.; Timpano, H.; Desprez, T.; Franssen-Verheijen, M.A.W.; Emons, A.M.C.; Höfte, H.; Vernhettes, S.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally believed that cell elongation is regulated by cortical microtubules, which guide the movement of cellulose synthase complexes as they secrete cellulose microfibrils into the periplasmic space. Transversely oriented microtubules are predicted to direct the deposition of a parallel arr

  15. Microfibril orientation dominates the microelastic properties of human bone tissue at the lamellar length scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Granke

    Full Text Available The elastic properties of bone tissue determine the biomechanical behavior of bone at the organ level. It is now widely accepted that the nanoscale structure of bone plays an important role to determine the elastic properties at the tissue level. Hence, in addition to the mineral density, the structure and organization of the mineral nanoparticles and of the collagen microfibrils appear as potential key factors governing the elasticity. Many studies exist on the role of the organization of collagen microfibril and mineral nanocrystals in strongly remodeled bone. However, there is no direct experimental proof to support the theoretical calculations. Here, we provide such evidence through a novel approach combining several high resolution imaging techniques: scanning acoustic microscopy, quantitative scanning small-Angle X-ray scattering imaging and synchrotron radiation computed microtomography. We find that the periodic modulations of elasticity across osteonal bone are essentially determined by the orientation of the mineral nanoparticles and to a lesser extent only by the particle size and density. Based on the strong correlation between the orientation of the mineral nanoparticles and the collagen molecules, we conclude that the microfibril orientation is the main determinant of the observed undulations of microelastic properties in regions of constant mineralization in osteonal lamellar bone. This multimodal approach could be applied to a much broader range of fibrous biological materials for the purpose of biomimetic technologies.

  16. THE FORMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SUSTAINABLE LAYERED FILMS INCORPORATING MICROFIBRILLATED CELLULOSE (MFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Rodionova,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC, TEMPO-pretreated MFC, and hybrid polymer/MFC mix were used for the production of layered films with interesting properties for application in food packaging. The series of samples were prepared from MFC (base layers using a dispersion-casting method. The same procedure as well as a bar coating technique was applied to form top layers of different basis weights. The barrier properties and formation of the layered films were investigated in relationship to the preparation procedures, combination of layers, and areal weight (basis weight. Characterization was done with respect to oxygen transmission rates (OTR, water vapor transmission rates (WVTR, tensile properties, and contact angles (CA with water. The produced layered films yielded OTR values of 4 mL m-2 day-1 and fulfilled oxygen barrier requirements for a modified atmosphere packaging (MAP. Hornification of the MFC films, however, occurred during drying, which may result in a loss of the film’s beneficial properties.

  17. DIFFERENT TYPES OF MICROFIBRILLATED CELLULOSE AS FILLER MATERIALS IN POLYSODIUM ACRYLATE SUPERABSORBENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikael Larsson; Qi Zhou; Anette Larsson

    2011-01-01

    Three types of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) with differences in structure and surface charge were used at low concentration as filler materials in polysodium acrylate superabsorbents (SAPs). The swelling of the composite hydrogels was determined in 0.9% NaCl solution as well as in deionized water. The shear modulus of the samples was determined through uniaxial compression analysis after synthesis and after swelling in 0.9% NaCl solution. Furthermore, the ability to retain filler effects after washing was investigated. The results showed that all of the investigated MFCs had a strong reinforcing effect on the shear modulus after synthesis. The filler effect on swelling and on the associated shear modulus of swollen samples showed a more complicated dependence on structure and surface charge. Finally, it was found that the filler effects were reasonably retained after washing and subsequent drying. The results confirm that MFC holds great potential as a filler material in superabsorbent applications. Furthermore, the results provide some insight on how the structural properties and surface charge of MFC will affect gel properties depending on swelling conditions. This information should be useful in evaluating the use of different types of MFC in future applications.

  18. Synergy between cellulolytic enzymes during the biodegradation of cellulose microfibrils measured using angle-scanning surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raegen, Adam; Dion, Alexander; Reiter, Kyle; Clarke, Anthony; Lipkowski, Jacek; Dutcher, John

    2014-03-01

    The use of cellulosic ethanol, a promising emerging energy source, is limited by the energy intensive and costly step of first converting the cellulose fibers into their constituent glucose monomers. Industrial processes mimic those that occur in nature, using mixtures or ``cocktails'' of different classes of cellulolytic enzymes derived from fungi. Despite several decades of investigation, the molecular mechanisms for enzyme synergy remain poorly understood. To gain additional insight, we have used a custom angle-scanning surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging apparatus to obtain a sensitive measure of enzymatic degradation. By implementing a novel SPR data analysis procedure, we have been able to track the thickness and roughness of laterally heterogeneous cellulose microfibril-coated substrates as enzymatic degradation proceeds. This has allowed us to measure the synergistic actions of the different enzymes, providing data that are directly relevant to the cellulosic ethanol industry.

  19. Solid-state 13C and 1H spin diffusion NMR analyses of the microfibril structure for bacterial cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Kenji; Adachi, Masayuki; Hirai, Asako; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kaji, Hironori; Horii, Fumitaka

    2003-06-01

    To obtain further information about the cause for the rather large splitting of the C4 resonance line into the downfield (C4D) and upfield (C4U) lines in CP/MAS 13C NMR spectra for native cellulose, 13C and 1H spin diffusion measurements have been conducted by using different types of bacterial cellulose samples. In 13C spin diffusion measurements, the C4D resonance line is selectively inverted by the Dante pi pulse sequence and the 13C spin diffusion is allowed to proceed from the C4D carbons to other carbons including the C4U carbons with use of the 13C4-enriched bacterial cellulose sample. The analysis based on the simple spin diffusion theory for the process experimentally observed reveals that the C4U carbons may be located at distances less than about 1 nm from the C4D carbons. In 1H spin diffusion measurements, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) films in which ribbon assemblies of bacterial cellulose are dispersed are employed and the 1H spin diffusion process is examined from the water-swollen PVA continuous phase to the dispersed ribbon assemblies by the 13C detection through the 1H-13C CP technique. As a result, it is found that the C4D and C4U carbons are almost equally subjected to the 1H spin diffusion from the PVA phase, indicating that the C4U carbons are not localized in some limited area, e.g. in the surfacial region, but are distributed in the whole area in the microfibrils. These experimental results suggest that the C4U carbons may exist as structural defects probably due to conformational irregularity associated with disordered hydrogen bonding of the CH(2)OH groups in the microfibrils.

  20. Cellulose microfibril crystallinity is reduced by mutating C-terminal transmembrane region residues CESA1{sup A903V} and CESA3{sup T942I} of cellulose synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Darby; Corbin, Kendall; Wang, Tuo; Gutierrez, Ryan; Bertolo, Ana; Petti, Caroalberto; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Estevez, Jose Manuel; Bonetta, Dario; Urbanowicz, Breeanna; Ehrhardt, David; Somerville, Chris; Rose, Jocelyn; Hong, Mei; DeBolt, Seth

    2012-01-08

    The mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants are complex and still poorly understood. A central question concerns the mechanism of microfibril structure and how this is linked to the catalytic polymerization action of cellulose synthase (CESA). Furthermore, it remains unclear whether modification of cellulose microfibril structure can be achieved genetically, which could be transformative in a bio-based economy. To explore these processes in planta, we developed a chemical genetic toolbox of pharmacological inhibitors and corresponding resistance-conferring point mutations in the C-terminal transmembrane domain region of CESA1{sup A903V} and CESA3{sup T942I} in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using {sup 13}C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we show that the cellulose microfibrils displayed reduced width and an additional cellulose C4 peak indicative of a degree of crystallinity that is intermediate between the surface and interior glucans of wild type, suggesting a difference in glucan chain association during microfibril formation. Consistent with measurements of lower microfibril crystallinity, cellulose extracts from mutated CESA1{sup A903V} and CESA3{sup T942I} displayed greater saccharification efficiency than wild type. Using live-cell imaging to track fluorescently labeled CESA, we found that these mutants show increased CESA velocities in the plasma membrane, an indication of increased polymerization rate. Collectively, these data suggest that CESA1{sup A903V} and CESA3{sup T942I} have modified microfibril structure in terms of crystallinity and suggest that in plants, as in bacteria, crystallization biophysically limits polymerization.

  1. Size, Shape, and Arrangement of Cellulose Microfibril in Higher Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) are imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the sub-nanometer resolution. We found that the size and shape of fundamental cellulose elementary fibril (CEF) is essentially identical in different cell wall types, i.e., primary wall (PW), parenchyma secondary wall (pSW), and sclerenchyma secondary wall (sSW), which is consistent with previously proposed 36-chain model (Ding et al., 2006, J. Agric. Food Chem.). The arrangement of individual CEFs in these wall types exhibits two orientations. In PW, CEFs are horizontally associated through their hydrophilic faces, and the planar faces are exposed, forming ribbon-like macrofibrils. In pSW and sSW, CEFs are vertically oriented, forming layers, in which hemicelluloses are interacted with the hydrophobic faces of the CEF and serve as spacers between CEFs. Lignification occurs between CEF-hemicelluloses layers in secondary walls. Furthermore, we demonstrated quantitative analysis of plant cell wall accessibility to and digestibility by different cellulase systems at real-time using chemical imaging (e.g., stimulated Raman scattering) and fluorescence microscopy of labeled cellulases (Ding et al., 2012, Science, in press).

  2. Preparation of Photocrosslinked Fish Elastin Polypeptide/Microfibrillated Cellulose Composite Gels with Elastic Properties for Biomaterial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Yano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocrosslinked hydrogels reinforced by microfibrillated cellulose (MFC were prepared from a methacrylate-functionalized fish elastin polypeptide and MFC dispersed in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO. First, a water-soluble elastin peptide with a molecular weight of ca. 500 g/mol from the fish bulbus arteriosus was polymerized by N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC, a condensation reagent, and then modified with 2-isocyanatoethyl methacrylate (MOI to yield a photocrosslinkable fish elastin polypeptide. The product was dissolved in DMSO and irradiated with UV light in the presence of a radical photoinitiator. We obtained hydrogels successfully by substitution of DMSO with water. The composite gel with MFC was prepared by UV irradiation of the photocrosslinkable elastin polypeptide mixed with dispersed MFC in DMSO, followed by substitution of DMSO with water. The tensile test of the composite gels revealed that the addition of MFC improved the tensile properties, and the shape of the stress–strain curve of the composite gel became more similar to the typical shape of an elastic material with an increase of MFC content. The rheology measurement showed that the elastic modulus of the composite gel increased with an increase of MFC content. The cell proliferation test on the composite gel showed no toxicity.

  3. Suppression of xylan endotransglycosylase PtxtXyn10A affects cellulose microfibril angle in secondary wall in aspen wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derba-Maceluch, Marta; Awano, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Junko; Lucenius, Jessica; Ratke, Christine; Kontro, Inkeri; Busse-Wicher, Marta; Kosik, Ondrej; Tanaka, Ryo; Winzéll, Anders; Kallas, Åsa; Leśniewska, Joanna; Berthold, Fredrik; Immerzeel, Peter; Teeri, Tuula T; Ezcurra, Ines; Dupree, Paul; Serimaa, Ritva; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2015-01-01

    Certain xylanases from family GH10 are highly expressed during secondary wall deposition, but their function is unknown. We carried out functional analyses of the secondary-wall specific PtxtXyn10A in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides). PtxtXyn10A function was analysed by expression studies, overexpression in Arabidopsis protoplasts and by downregulation in aspen. PtxtXyn10A overexpression in Arabidopsis protoplasts resulted in increased xylan endotransglycosylation rather than hydrolysis. In aspen, the enzyme was found to be proteolytically processed to a 68 kDa peptide and residing in cell walls. Its downregulation resulted in a corresponding decrease in xylan endotransglycosylase activity and no change in xylanase activity. This did not alter xylan molecular weight or its branching pattern but affected the cellulose-microfibril angle in wood fibres, increased primary growth (stem elongation, leaf formation and enlargement) and reduced the tendency to form tension wood. Transcriptomes of transgenic plants showed downregulation of tension wood related genes and changes in stress-responsive genes. The data indicate that PtxtXyn10A acts as a xylan endotransglycosylase and its main function is to release tensional stresses arising during secondary wall deposition. Furthermore, they suggest that regulation of stresses in secondary walls plays a vital role in plant development.

  4. Preparation of photocrosslinked fish elastin polypeptide/microfibrillated cellulose composite gels with elastic properties for biomaterial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shinya; Mori, Megumi; Teramoto, Naozumi; Iisaka, Makoto; Suzuki, Natsumi; Noto, Masanari; Kaimoto, Yasuko; Kakimoto, Masashi; Yamada, Michio; Shiratsuchi, Eri; Shimasaki, Toshiaki; Shibata, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-09

    Photocrosslinked hydrogels reinforced by microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) were prepared from a methacrylate-functionalized fish elastin polypeptide and MFC dispersed in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). First, a water-soluble elastin peptide with a molecular weight of ca. 500 g/mol from the fish bulbus arteriosus was polymerized by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC), a condensation reagent, and then modified with 2-isocyanatoethyl methacrylate (MOI) to yield a photocrosslinkable fish elastin polypeptide. The product was dissolved in DMSO and irradiated with UV light in the presence of a radical photoinitiator. We obtained hydrogels successfully by substitution of DMSO with water. The composite gel with MFC was prepared by UV irradiation of the photocrosslinkable elastin polypeptide mixed with dispersed MFC in DMSO, followed by substitution of DMSO with water. The tensile test of the composite gels revealed that the addition of MFC improved the tensile properties, and the shape of the stress-strain curve of the composite gel became more similar to the typical shape of an elastic material with an increase of MFC content. The rheology measurement showed that the elastic modulus of the composite gel increased with an increase of MFC content. The cell proliferation test on the composite gel showed no toxicity.

  5. Plants control the properties and actuation of their organs through the orientation of cellulose fibrils in their cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgert, Ingo; Fratzl, Peter

    2009-07-01

    Plants use the orientation of cellulose microfibrils to create cell walls with anisotropic properties related to specific functions. This enables organisms to control the shape and size of cells during growth, to adjust the mechanical performance of tissues, and to perform bending movements of organs. We review the key function of cellulose orientation in defining structural-functional relationships in cell walls from a biomechanics perspective, and illustrate this by examples mainly from our own work. First, primary cell-wall expansion largely depends on the organization of cellulose microfibrils in newly deposited tissue and model calculations allow an estimate of how their passive re-orientation may influence the growth of cells. Moreover, mechanical properties of secondary cell walls depend to a large extent on the orientation of cellulose fibrils and we discuss strategies whereby plants utilize this interrelationship for adaptation. Lastly, we address the question of how plants regulate complex organ movements by designing appropriate supramolecular architectures at the level of the cell wall. Several examples, from trees to grasses, show that the cellulose architecture in the cell wall may be used to direct the swelling or shrinking of cell walls and thereby generate internal growth stress or movement of organs.

  6. Isolation and characterization of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) from jute%黄麻微纤化纤维素的制备及特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段玲; 于伟东

    2015-01-01

    Jute microfibrillated cellulose ( MFC ) was extracted from jute by means of a super-grinding method. Jute purified cellulose were prepared by treating jute fibers with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) pre-treatment and then applying acidified sodium chlorite and hydrogen peroxide/sodium hydroxide solution. Finally passed the slurry of purified cellulose through a grinder. Non-cellulosic materials were removed ef-ficiently during purified process. The jute samples after each treatment stage were characterized by chemi-cal testing, SEM, FE-SEM, FTIR and XRD. The result showed that the crystallinity of jute MFC was 70. 95%,and its diameter is in the range of 6~34 nm.%以黄麻为原料,先用二甲基亚砜溶液对黄麻进行前处理,再经酸性亚氯酸钠和双氧水/氢氧化钠溶液处理,除去其中的木质素与半纤维素等成分,得到黄麻纯纤维素,通过超微粉碎机处理,分离出黄麻微纤化纤维素。各阶段产物进行化学成分测试、扫描电镜( SEM)、场发射扫描电镜( FE-SEM)、傅里叶变换红外吸收光谱( FTIR)、X射线衍射(XRD)表征。结果表明,黄麻微纤化纤维素结晶度达到70.95%,直径主要分布在6~34 nm之间。

  7. Super-resolution imaging with Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS enables direct visualization of cellulose orientation and cell connection architecture in onion epidermis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Schulz, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    present the first super-resolution images of cellulose bundles in the plant cell wall produced by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) in combination with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Since TIRF limits observation to the cell surface, we tested...... microscopy of some 200 nm in xy and 550 nm in z for green light, restricts the direct visualization of cellulose to relatively large bundles, whereas the structure of cellulose microfibrils with their diameter below 10 nm remains unresolved. Over the last decade, several so-called super-resolution microscopy...... confocal microscopy and the approach could be used to demonstrate differences in fibril orientation in different layers of the cell wall as well as particular cellulose fortifications around plasmodesmata. Conclusions Super-resolution light microscopy of PFS-stained cellulose fibrils is possible...

  8. Synthesis of polycaprolactone-grafted microfibrillated cellulose for use in novel bionanocomposites--influence of the graft length on the mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnberg, Hanna; Larsson, Karolina; Lindström, Tom; Hult, Anders; Malmström, Eva

    2011-05-01

    In the present work, microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) made from bleached sulfite softwood dissolving pulp was utilized to reinforce a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) biopolymer matrix. To improve the dispersibility of the hydrophilic MFC in the nonpolar matrix and the interfacial adhesion in the composite material, we covalently grafted the MFC with PCL via ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL). To be able to investigate the effect of the PCL graft length on the mechanical properties of the composite material, we performed ROP to different molecular weights of the grafts. Bionanocomposites containing 0, 3, and 10 wt % MFC were prepared via hot pressing using both unmodified and PCL grafted MFC (MFC-g-PCL) as reinforcement. PCL grafting resulted in improved dispersion of the MFC in a nonpolar solvent and in the PCL matrix. The mechanical testing of the biocomposites showed an improvement in the mechanical properties for the PCL grafted MFC in comparison to ungrafted MFC. It was also shown that there was an impact on the mechanical properties with respect to the PCL graft lengths, and the strongest biocomposites were obtained after reinforcement with MFC grafted with the longest PCL graft length.

  9. Fibril orientation redistribution induced by stretching of cellulose nanofibril hydrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josefsson, Gabriella; Gamstedt, E. Kristofer [The Ångström Laboratory, Department of Engineering Sciences, Division of Applied Mechanics, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Ahvenainen, Patrik [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel [Department of Fiber and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-07

    The mechanical performance of materials reinforced by cellulose nanofibrils is highly affected by the orientation of these fibrils. This paper investigates the nanofibril orientation distribution of films of partly oriented cellulose nanofibrils. Stripes of hydrogel films were subjected to different amount of strain and, after drying, examined with X-ray diffraction to obtain the orientation of the nanofibrils in the films, caused by the stretching. The cellulose nanofibrils had initially a random in-plane orientation in the hydrogel films and the strain was applied to the films before the nanofibrils bond tightly together, which occurs during drying. The stretching resulted in a reorientation of the nanofibrils in the films, with monotonically increasing orientation towards the load direction with increasing strain. Estimation of nanofibril reorientation by X-ray diffraction enables quantitative comparison of the stretch-induced orientation ability of different cellulose nanofibril systems. The reorientation of nanofibrils as a consequence of an applied strain is also predicted by a geometrical model of deformation of nanofibril hydrogels. Conversely, in high-strain cold-drawing of wet cellulose nanofibril materials, the enhanced orientation is promoted by slipping of the effectively stiff fibrils.

  10. Cellulose biogenesis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Organisms that synthesize cellulose can be found amongst the bacteria, protistans, fungi, and animals, but it is in plants that the importance of cellulose in function (as the major structural constituent of plant cell walls) and economic use (as wood and fiber) can be best appreciated. The structure of cellulose and its biosynthesis have been the subjects of intense investigation. One of the most important insights gained from these studies is that the synthesis of cellulose by living organisms involves much more than simply the polymerization of glucose into a (1{r_arrow}4)-{beta}-linked polymer. The number of glucoses in a polymer (the degree of polymerization), the crystalline form assumed by the glucan chains when they crystallize to form a microfibril, and the dimensions and orientation of the microfibrils are all subject to cellular control. Instead of cellulose biosynthesis, a more appropriate term might be cellulose biogenesis, to emphasize the involvement of cellular structures and mechanisms in controlling polymerization and directing crystallization and deposition. Dictyostelium discoideum is uniquely suitable for the study of cellulose biogenesis because of its amenability to experimental study and manipulation and the extent of our knowledge of its basic cellular mechanisms (as will be evident from the rest of this volume). In this chapter, I will summarize what is known about cellulose biogenesis in D. discoideum, emphasizing its potential to illuminate our understanding both of D. discoideum development and plant cellulose biogenesis.

  11. Cellulose metabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahisa; Yoshida, Kouki; Park, Yong Woo; Konishi, Teruko; Baba, Kei'ichi

    2005-01-01

    Many bacterial genomes contain a cellulose synthase operon together with a cellulase gene, indicating that cellulase is required for cellulose biosynthesis. In higher plants, there is evidence that cell growth is enhanced by the overexpression of cellulase and prevented by its suppression. Cellulase overexpression could modify cell walls not only by trimming off the paracrystalline sites of cellulose microfibrils, but also by releasing xyloglucan tethers between the microfibrils. Mutants for membrane-anchored cellulase (Korrigan) also show a typical phenotype of prevention of cellulose biosynthesis in tissues. All plant cellulases belong to family 9, which endohydrolyzes cellulose, but are not strong enough to cause the bulk degradation of cellulose microfibrils in a plant body. It is hypothesized that cellulase participates primarily in repairing or arranging cellulose microfibrils during cellulose biosynthesis in plants. A scheme for the roles of plant cellulose and cellulases is proposed.

  12. Cell wall extension results in the coordinate separation of parallel microfibrils: evidence from scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marga, Francoise; Grandbois, Michel; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Baskin, Tobias I

    2005-07-01

    Enlargement of the cell wall requires separation of cellulose microfibrils, mediated by proteins such as expansin; according to the multi-net growth hypothesis, enlargement passively reorients microfibrils. However, at the molecular scale, little is known about the specific movement of microfibrils. To find out, we examined directly changes in microfibril orientation when walls were extended slowly in vitro under constant load (creep). Frozen-thawed cucumber hypocotyl segments were strained by 20-30% by incubation in pH 4.5 buffer or by incubation of heat-inactivated segments in alpha-expansin or a fungal endoglucanase (Cel12A). Subsequently, the innermost layer of the cell wall was imaged, with neither extraction nor homogenization, by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM images revealed that sample preparation for FESEM did not appreciably alter cell wall ultrastructure. In both FESEM and AFM, images from extended and non-extended samples appeared indistinguishable. To quantify orientational order, we used a novel algorithm to characterize the fast Fourier transform of the image as a function of spatial frequency. For both FESEM and AFM images, the transforms of non-extended samples were indistinguishable from those of samples extended by alpha-expansin or Cel12A, as were AFM images of samples extended by acidic buffer. We conclude that cell walls in vitro can extend slowly by a creep mechanism without passive reorientation of innermost microfibrils, implying that wall loosening agents act selectively on the cross-linking polymers between parallel microfibrils, rather than more generally on the wall matrix.

  13. Cellulose structure and lignin distribution in normal and compression wood of the Maidenhair tree (Ginkgo biloba L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Seppo; Wang, Yurong; Pönni, Raili; Hänninen, Tuomas; Mononen, Marko; Ren, Haiqing; Serimaa, Ritva; Saranpää, Pekka

    2015-04-01

    We studied in detail the mean microfibril angle and the width of cellulose crystals from the pith to the bark of a 15-year-old Maidenhair tree (Ginkgo biloba L.). The orientation of cellulose microfibrils with respect to the cell axis and the width and length of cellulose crystallites were determined using X-ray diffraction. Raman microscopy was used to compare the lignin distribution in the cell wall of normal/opposite and compression wood, which was found near the pith. Ginkgo biloba showed a relatively large mean microfibril angle, varying between 19° and 39° in the S2 layer, and the average width of cellulose crystallites was 3.1-3.2 nm. Mild compression wood without any intercellular spaces or helical cavities was observed near the pith. Slit-like bordered pit openings and a heavily lignified S2L layer confirmed the presence of compression wood. Ginkgo biloba showed typical features present in the juvenile wood of conifers. The microfibril angle remained large over the 14 annual rings. The entire stem disc, with a diameter of 18 cm, was considered to consist of juvenile wood. The properties of juvenile and compression wood as well as the cellulose orientation and crystalline width indicate that the wood formation of G. biloba is similar to that of modern conifers.

  14. Cellulose structure and lignin distribution in normal and compression wood of the Maidenhair tree (Ginkgo biloba L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seppo Andersson; Yurong Wang; Raili Ponni; Tuomas Hanninen; Marko Mononen; Haiqing Ren; Ritva Serimaa; Pekka Saranpaa

    2015-01-01

    We studied in detail the mean microfibril angle and the width of cellulose crystals from the pith to the bark of a 15-year-old Maidenhair tree (Ginkgo biloba L.). The orientation of cellulose microfibrils with respect to the cell axis and the width and length of cellulose crystallites were determined using X-ray diffraction. Raman microscopy was used to compare the lignin distribution in the cell wall of normal/opposite and compression wood, which was found near the pith. Ginkgo biloba showed a relatively large mean microfibril angle, varying between 19° and 39° in the S2 layer, and the average width of cellulose crystallites was 3.1–3.2 nm. Mild compres-sion wood without any intercellular spaces or helical cavities was observed near the pith. Slit-like bordered pit openings and a heavily lignified S2L layer confirmed the presence of compression wood. Ginkgo biloba showed typical features present in the juvenile wood of conifers. The microfibril angle remained large over the 14 annual rings. The entire stem disc, with a diameter of 18 cm, was considered to consist of juvenile wood. The properties of juvenile and compression wood as well as the cellulose orientation and crystalline width indicate that the wood formation of G. biloba is similar to that of modern conifers.

  15. A route to uniaxially oriented ribbons of bacterial cellulose nanocrystals based on isomalt spun sacrificial template

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out orientation of bacterial cellulose nanocrystals (BCNC) by implementing a process based on mechanical shearing BCNC dispersed in a viscous temporary isomalt glass. After the orientation, the isomalt matrix was selectively solubilized to afford uniaxially highly oriented BCNC ribbons as demonstrated by SEM and X-Ray studies. The 2D WAXS determined Herman's order parameter reached 0.85.

  16. Corneal stroma microfibrils

    KAUST Repository

    Hanlon, Samuel D.

    2015-03-01

    Elastic tissue was first described well over a hundred years ago and has since been identified in nearly every part of the body. In this review, we examine elastic tissue in the corneal stroma with some mention of other ocular structures which have been more thoroughly described in the past. True elastic fibers consist of an elastin core surrounded by fibrillin microfibrils. However, the presence of elastin fibers is not a requirement and some elastic tissue is comprised of non-elastin-containing bundles of microfibrils. Fibers containing a higher relative amount of elastin are associated with greater elasticity and those without elastin, with structural support. Recently it has been shown that the microfibrils, not only serve mechanical roles, but are also involved in cell signaling through force transduction and the release of TGF-β. A well characterized example of elastin-free microfibril bundles (EFMBs) is found in the ciliary zonules which suspend the crystalline lens in the eye. Through contraction of the ciliary muscle they exert enough force to reshape the lens and thereby change its focal point. It is believed that the molecules comprising these fibers do not turn-over and yet retain their tensile strength for the life of the animal. The mechanical properties of the cornea (strength, elasticity, resiliency) would suggest that EFMBs are present there as well. However, many authors have reported that, although present during embryonic and early postnatal development, EFMBs are generally not present in adults. Serial-block-face imaging with a scanning electron microscope enabled 3D reconstruction of elements in murine corneas. Among these elements were found fibers that formed an extensive network throughout the cornea. In single sections these fibers appeared as electron dense patches. Transmission electron microscopy provided additional detail of these patches and showed them to be composed of fibrils (~10nm diameter). Immunogold evidence clearly

  17. Stabilization of Oil/Water Emulsions by Microfibrillized Bacterial Cellulose%细菌纤维素纳米纤维稳定乳液的性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾原媛; 万同; 霍明明; 闫蒙蒙; 贾士儒; 陈晗; 周余来

    2013-01-01

    Pickering emulsions(O/W) were stabilized by bacterial cellulose(BC) nanofibers which had been disintegrated by two methods,ultrasonication and high pressure homogenization,corresponding to USBC and HGBC.Influences of fiber content,pH,and disintegration method on the stability of emulsions were investigated.Emulsions prepared with higher loading of BC had better stability; and the BC suspensions with higher pH values gave higher emulsion stability index (ESI),and the ESI reached the highest at pH =12.Since fibers disintegrated from high pressure homogenization were shorter than those from ultrasonication,emulsifying effect of HGBC was better than that of USBC.Nanofibers distributed on the surface of emulsified drops,forming a network,were visualized by SEM.The three-phase contact angle of BC nanofibers on the interface of water and liquid paraffin is calculated to be 73.1°,implying both hydrophilic and lipophilic nature,which renders BC adequate to stabilize O/W emulsions.As a biological origin nanofiber,BC has the potential to substitute conventional surfactants,especially in food,pharmaceutical and biodegradable products.%采用超声和高压均质两种方式分散的细菌纤维素(BC)悬浮液制备了BC纳米纤维稳定的水包油型Pickering乳液,并考察了纤维用量、pH值和机械分散方式对乳液稳定性的影响.结果表明,乳液的稳定性随纳米纤维用量的增加而增加;碱性条件比酸性条件制备的乳液稳定性高,且在pH=12时达到最高.用高压均质方式分散的BC稳定乳液的效果优于采用超声方式分散的BC的效果,这是由于高压均质后的纤维较短,可以提供更多的纳米纤维稳定乳液.计算结果表明,BC纳米纤维在液体石蜡/水界面上的三相接触角为72.5°,说明BC适合稳定水包油型乳液.

  18. Molecular Orientation in Dry and Hydrated Cellulose Fibers: A Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerley, Maxwell; Younger, Rebecca; Valenton, Tiffany; Oertel, David C.; Ward, Jimmie L.; Potma, Eric O.

    2010-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is combined with spontaneous Raman scattering microspectroscopy and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to interrogate the molecular alignment in dry and hydrated cellulose fibers. Two types of cellulose were investigated: natural cellulose I in cotton fibers and regenerated cellulose II in rayon fibers. On the basis of the orientation of the methylene symmetric stretching vibration, the molecular alignment of cellulose microfibr...

  19. Variation of microfibril angle and its correlation to wood properties in poplars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANGSheng-zuo; YANGWen-zhong; FUXiang-xiang

    2004-01-01

    The microfibril angle of seven poplar clones was determined by using X-ray diffraction technique. Microfibril angle,wood basic density, fiber length, fiber width and cellulose content were assessed for every growth ring at breast height for all sample trees. Significant variation in microfibril angle was observed among growth rings. Mean microfibril angle (MFA) at breast height varied from 7.8°to 28° between growth rings with cambial age and showed a consistent pith-to-bark trend of decline angles. Analysis of variance also indicated that there were significant differences in wood basic density, fiber length, fiber width and cellulose content between the growth rings, which had an increasing tendency from pith to bark. Correlations between MFA and examined wood properties were predominantly large and significant negative (α=0.01), and the coefficients were -0.660 for cellulose content, -0.586 for fiber length, -0.516 for fiber width and -0.450 for wood basic density, respectively. Regression analysis with linear and curve estimation indicated that a quadratic function showed the largest R2 and the least standard error for describing the relationships between microfibril angle and measured wood properties, and the correlation coefficients were over -0.45 (n=125). The results from this study suggested that microfibril angle would be a good characteristic for improvement in the future breeding program of poplars.

  20. RADIAL VARIATION OF MICROFIBRIL ANGLE AND WOOD DENSITY AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS IN 14-YEAR-OLD Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. BLAKE WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Brancheriau Mail

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The orientation of cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall along the stem axis has major effects on stiffness and longitudinal shrinkage and is of key importance in wood quality. The aim of this study was to investigate the radial variability of MFA and wood density (ρ and their relationships in Eucalyptus urophylla wood. Three MFA values were estimated by X-ray diffraction at three points of each one of the 175 tangential sections, and the basic density was measured. A decrease of microfibril angles from pith to bark can be observed in most samples; however, some radial strips presented different patterns of variation. For basic density, a linear significant increase from pith to bark was confirmed. There was no significant correlation between microfibril angle and density. The relationships among the three MFA estimated on tangential sections of wood were strong. The “curvature effect” due to the growth rings had a negligible effect on the three measurements of tangential sections cut near to the pith. This study showed that a single T value measurement by X-ray diffraction, preferably at the centre of the tangential section, is precisely sufficient to estimate the mean MFA of Eucalyptus urophylla wood.

  1. Microfibrillated Lignocellulose Enables the Suspension-Polymerisation of Unsaturated Polyester Resin for Novel Composite Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutao Yan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A new route towards embedding fibrillated cellulose in a non-polar thermoset matrix without any use of organic solvent or chemical surface modification is presented. It is shown that microfibrillated lignocellulose made from cellulose with high residual lignin content is capable of stabilising an emulsion of unsaturated polyester resin in water due to its amphiphilic surface-chemical character. Upon polymerisation of the resin, thermoset microspheres embedded in a microfibrillated cellulose network are formed. The porous network structure persists after conventional drying in an oven, yielding a mechanically stable porous material. In an application experiment, the porous material was milled into a fine powder and added to the polyester matrix of a glass fibre-reinforced composite. This resulted in a significant improvement in fracture toughness of the composite, whereas a reduction of bending strength and stiffness was observed in parallel.

  2. [Supramolecular reorganizations in cellulose during hydration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunin, Iu B; Grunin, L Iu; Talantsev, V I; Nikol'skaia, E A; Masas, D S

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of modern ideas about the structural organization of the cellulose microfibrils is carried out. The mechanism of the formation of additional capillary-porous system of cellulose under moistening is offered. It is established that when the moisture content of cellulose reaches 8-10%, the filling of its micropores occurs with a simultaneous increase in their cross sizes, a specific surface and reduction in the degree of crystallinity of specimens. Within the proposed model of microfibril construction the parameters of supramolecular structure and capillary-porous system of cotton cellulose are determined.

  3. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-06-08

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

  4. Fibrillin microfibrils in bone physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldone, Silvia; Ramirez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The severe skeletal abnormalities associated with Marfan syndrome (MFS) and congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) underscore the notion that fibrillin assemblies (microfibrils and elastic fibers) play a critical role in bone formation and function in spite of representing a low abundance component of skeletal matrices. Studies of MFS and CCA mice have correlated the skeletal phenotypes of these mutant animals with distinct pathophysiological mechanisms that reflect the contextual contribution of fibrillin-1 and -2 scaffolds to TGFβ and BMP signaling during bone patterning, growth and metabolism. Illustrative examples include the unique role of fibrillin-2 in regulating BMP-dependent limb patterning and the distinct impact of the two fibrillin proteins on the commitment and differentiation of marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Collectively, these findings have important implication for our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that drive age- and injury-related processes of bone degeneration.

  5. A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Putnam, Daniel K; Zhang, Qiu; Petridis, Loukas; Heller, William T; Nixon, B Tracy; Haigler, Candace H; Kalluri, Udaya; Coates, Leighton; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C; Meiler, Jens; O'Neill, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    A cellulose synthesis complex with a "rosette" shape is responsible for synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. This work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer in solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. The conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. This study strongly supports the "hexamer of trimers" model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product.

  6. Fibrillin: from microfibril assembly to biomechanical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielty, Cay M; Baldock, Clair; Lee, David; Rock, Matthew J; Ashworth, Jane L; Shuttleworth, C Adrian

    2002-02-28

    Fibrillins form the structural framework of a unique and essential class of extracellular microfibrils that endow dynamic connective tissues with long-range elasticity. Their biological importance is emphasized by the linkage of fibrillin mutations to Marfan syndrome and related connective tissue disorders, which are associated with severe cardiovascular, ocular and skeletal defects. These microfibrils have a complex ultrastructure and it has proved a major challenge both to define their structural organization and to relate it to their biological function. However, new approaches have at last begun to reveal important insights into their molecular assembly, structural organization and biomechanical properties. This paper describes the current understanding of the molecular assembly of fibrillin molecules, the alignment of fibrillin molecules within microfibrils and the unique elastomeric properties of microfibrils.

  7. Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Sadat Maleki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose is the most significant structural component of plant cell wall. Cellulose, polysaccharide containing repeated unbranched β (1-4 D-glucose units, is synthesized at the plasma membrane by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC from bacteria to plants. The CSC is involved in biosynthesis of cellulose microfibrils containing 18 cellulose synthase (CesA proteins. Macrofibrils can be formed with side by side arrangement of microfibrils. In addition, beside CesA, various proteins like the KORRIGAN, sucrose synthase, cytoskeletal components, and COBRA-like proteins have been involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Understanding the mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis is of great importance not only for improving wood production in economically important forest trees to mankind but also for plant development. This review article covers the current knowledge about the cellulose biosynthesis-related gene family.

  8. Alteration of in vivo cellulose ribbon assembly by carboxymethylcellulose and other cellulose derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    In vivo cellulose ribbon assembly by the Gram-negative bacterium Acetobacter xylinum can be altered by incubation in carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), a negatively charged water-soluble cellulose derivative, and also by incubation in a variety of neutral, water-soluble cellulose derivatives. In the presence of all of these substituted celluloses, normal fasciation of microfibril bundles to form the typical twisting ribbon is prevented. Alteration of ribbon assembly is most extensive in the presen...

  9. Property evaluations of dry-cast reconstituted bacterial cellulose/tamarind xyloglucan biocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Clayton F; Lucyszyn, Neoli; Woehl, Marco A; Riegel-Vidotti, Izabel C; Borsali, Redouane; Sierakowski, Maria Rita

    2013-03-01

    We describe the mechanical defibrillation of bacterial cellulose (BC) followed by the dry-cast generation of reconstituted BC films (RBC). Xyloglucan (XGT), extracted from tamarind seeds, was incorporated into the defibrillated cellulose at various compositions, and new films were created using the same process. Microscopy and contact angle analyses of films revealed an increase in the microfibre adhesion, a reduced polydispersity in the diameters of the microfibrils and increased hydrophobic behaviour as a function of %XGT. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed changes to the crystallographic planes of the RBC and the biocomposite films with preferential orientation along the (110) plane. Compared with BC, RBC/XGT biocomposite with 10% XGT exhibited improvement in its thermal properties and in Young's modulus. These results indicated a reorganisation of the microfibres with mechanical treatment, which when combined with hydrocolloids, can create cellulose-based materials that could be applied as scaffolding for tissue engineering and drug release.

  10. Super-resolution imaging with Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS enables direct visualization of cellulose orientation and cell connection architecture in onion epidermis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Schulz, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    of cellulose fibril orientation and growth. The fluorescent dye Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS (PFS) was shown to stain cellulose with high specificity and could be used to visualize cellulose bundles in cell walls of Arabidopsis root epidermal cells with confocal microscopy. The resolution limit of confocal...... as alternatives 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) and confocal microscopy, combined with image deconvolution. Both methods offer lower resolution than STORM, but enable 3D imaging. While 3D-SIM produced strong artifacts, deconvolution gave good results. The resolution was improved over conventional...... confocal microscopy and the approach could be used to demonstrate differences in fibril orientation in different layers of the cell wall as well as particular cellulose fortifications around plasmodesmata. Conclusions Super-resolution light microscopy of PFS-stained cellulose fibrils is possible...

  11. Folding of xylan onto cellulose fibrils in plant cell walls revealed by solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Thomas J.; Mortimer, Jenny C.; Bernardinelli, Oigres D.; Pöppler, Ann-Christin; Brown, Steven P.; Deazevedo, Eduardo R.; Dupree, Ray; Dupree, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Exploitation of plant lignocellulosic biomass is hampered by our ignorance of the molecular basis for its properties such as strength and digestibility. Xylan, the most prevalent non-cellulosic polysaccharide, binds to cellulose microfibrils. The nature of this interaction remains unclear, despite its importance. Here we show that the majority of xylan, which forms a threefold helical screw in solution, flattens into a twofold helical screw ribbon to bind intimately to cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. 13C solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, supported by in silico predictions of chemical shifts, shows both two- and threefold screw xylan conformations are present in fresh Arabidopsis stems. The twofold screw xylan is spatially close to cellulose, and has similar rigidity to the cellulose microfibrils, but reverts to the threefold screw conformation in the cellulose-deficient irx3 mutant. The discovery that induced polysaccharide conformation underlies cell wall assembly provides new principles to understand biomass properties.

  12. Plant cellulose synthesis: CESA proteins crossing kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Turner, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Cellulose is a biopolymer of considerable economic importance. It is synthesised by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) in species ranging from bacteria to higher plants. Enormous progress in our understanding of bacterial cellulose synthesis has come with the recent publication of both the crystal structure and biochemical characterisation of a purified complex able to synthesis cellulose in vitro. A model structure of a plant CESA protein suggests considerable similarity between the bacterial and plant cellulose synthesis. In this review article we will cover current knowledge of how plant CESA proteins synthesise cellulose. In particular the focus will be on the lessons learned from the recent work on the catalytic mechanism and the implications that new data on cellulose structure has for the assembly of CESA proteins into the large complex that synthesis plant cellulose microfibrils.

  13. Macroscopic control of helix orientation in films dried from cholesteric liquid crystalline cellulose nanocrystal suspensions


    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic ability of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) to self-organize into films and bulk materials with helical order in a cholesteric liquid crystal is scientifically intriguing and potentially important for the production of renewable multifunctional materials with attractive optical properties. A major obstacle, however, has been the lack of control of helix direction, which results in a defect-rich, mosaic-like domain structure. Herein, a method for guiding the helix during film format...

  14. The Effect of Water Molecules on Mechanical Properties of Bamboo Microfibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbar, Nima

    Bamboo fibers have higher strength-to-weight ratios than steel and concrete. The unique properties of bamboo fibers come from their natural composite structures that comprise mainly cellulose nanofibrils in a matrix of intertwined hemicellulose and lignin called lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC). Here, we have utilized atomistic simulations to investigate the mechanical properties and mechanisms of interactions between these materials, in the presence of water molecules. Our results suggest that hemicellulose exhibits better mechanical properties and lignin shows greater tendency to adhere to cellulose nanofibrils. Consequently, the role of hemicellulose found to be enhancing the mechanical properties and lignin found to be providing the strength of bamboo fibers. The abundance of Hbonds in hemicellulose chains is responsible for improving the mechanical behavior of LCC. The strong van der Waals forces between lignin molecules and cellulose nanofibrils is responsible for higher adhesion energy between LCC/cellulose nanofibrils. We also found out that the amorphous regions of cellulose nanofibrils is the weakest interface in bamboo Microfibrils. In presence of water, the elastic modulus of lignin increases at low water content (less than 10 NSF CAREER Grant No. 1261284.

  15. Cellulose-hemicellulose interaction in wood secondary cell-wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Shi; Xiong, Liming; Hong, Yu; Chen, Youping

    2015-12-01

    The wood cell wall features a tough and relatively rigid fiber reinforced composite structure. It acts as a pressure vessel, offering protection against mechanical stress. Cellulose microfibrils, hemicellulose and amorphous lignin are the three major components of wood. The structure of secondary cell wall could be imagined as the same as reinforced concrete, in which cellulose microfibrils acts as reinforcing steel bar and hemicellulose-lignin matrices act as the concrete. Therefore, the interface between cellulose and hemicellulose/lignin plays a significant role in determine the mechanical behavior of wood secondary cell wall. To this end, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study attempting to quantify the strength of the interface between cellulose microfibrils and hemicellulose. Since hemicellulose binds with adjacent cellulose microfibrils in various patterns, the atomistic models of hemicellulose-cellulose composites with three typical binding modes, i.e. bridge, loop and random binding modes are constructed. The effect of the shape of hemicellulose chain on the strength of hemicellulose-cellulose composites under shear loadings is investigated. The contact area as well as hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose, together with the covalent bonds in backbone of hemicellulose chain are found to be the controlling parameters which determine the strength of the interfaces in the composite system. For the bridge binding model, the effect of shear loading direction on the strength of the cellulose material is also studied. The obtained results suggest that the shear strength of wood-inspired engineering composites can be optimized through maximizing the formations of the contributing hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose.

  16. Cellulose Synthases and Synthesis in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne Endler; Staffan Persson

    2011-01-01

    Plant cell walls are complex structures composed of high-molecular-weight polysaccharides,proteins,and lignins. Among the wall polysaccharides,cellulose,a hydrogen-bonded β-1,4-linked glucan microfibril,is the main load-bearing wall component and a key precursor for industrial applications. Cellulose is synthesized by large multi-meric cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes,tracking along cortical microtubules at the plasma membrane. The only known components of these complexes are the cellulose synthase proteins. Recent studies have identified tentative interaction partners for the CesAs and shown that the migratory patterns of the CesA complexes depend on phosphorylation status. These advances may become good platforms for expanding our knowledge about cellulose synthesis in the near future. In addition,our current understanding of cellulose chain polymerization in the context of the CesA complex is discussed.

  17. Nanocomposites of natural rubber and polyaniline-modified cellulose nanofibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) were isolated from cotton microfibrils (CM) by acid hydrolysis and coated with polyaniline (PANI) by in situ polymerization of aniline onto CNF in the presence of hydrochloride acid and ammonium peroxydisulfate to produce CNF/PANI. Nanocomposites of natural rubber (NR) re...

  18. Arabidopsis cortical microtubules position cellulose synthase delivery to the plasma membrane and interact with cellulose synthase trafficking compartments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, R.; Lindeboom, J.J.; Paredez, A.R.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ehrhardt, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis relies on the organization and function of two polymer arrays separated by the plasma membrane: the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton and cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. Studies using in vivo markers confirmed that one function of the cortical microtubule array is t

  19. Spider Silk-CBD-Cellulose Nanocrystal Composites: Mechanism of Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Sigal Meirovitch; Zvi Shtein; Tal Ben-Shalom; Shaul Lapidot; Carmen Tamburu; Xiao Hu; Kluge, Jonathan A; Uri Raviv; Kaplan, David L.; Oded Shoseyov

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of cellulose-spider silk bio-nanocomposites comprised of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and recombinant spider silk protein fused to a cellulose binding domain (CBD) is described. Silk-CBD successfully binds cellulose, and unlike recombinant silk alone, silk-CBD self-assembles into microfibrils even in the absence of CNCs. Silk-CBD-CNC composite sponges and films show changes in internal structure and CNC alignment related to the addition of silk-CBD. The silk-CBD sponges exhib...

  20. Recurrent corneal ulceration in presence of synthetic microfibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barsam A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A Barsam1, N Patel1, H Laganowski2, HD Perry31Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Queen Mary's Hospital, Sidcup, Kent, UK; 3Ophthalmic Consultants of Long Island, Nassau University, Long Island, NY, USAAbstract: Recurrence of microbial keratitis in the presence of protozoal infection is very rare and infrequently reported unless predisposing factors are present. The association of recurrent microbial keratitis and synthetic microfibrils has never previously been reported to our knowledge. This single interventional case study describes the clinical course and treatment of a contact lens wearer who was treated for Acanthamoeba keratitis with superinfection from bacterial organisms in the presence of synthetic microfibrils. The presence of synthetic fibrils on a corneal ulcer base may act as a nidus for pathological organisms and interfere with normal corneal healing. This may result in infection recurrence and the growth of resistant opportunistic organisms.Keywords: Acanthamoeba, microbial keratitis, cornea ulcer, contact lens infection, synthetic microfibrils

  1. Patterning and lifetime of plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase is dependent on actin organization in Arabidopsis interphase cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Gutierrez, Ryan; McFarlane, Heather E; Bringmann, Martin; Lindeboom, Jelmer; Emons, Anne-Mie; Samuels, Lacey; Ketelaar, Tijs; Ehrhardt, David W; Persson, Staffan

    2013-06-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons regulate cell shape across phyla, from bacteria to metazoans. In organisms with cell walls, the wall acts as a primary constraint of shape, and generation of specific cell shape depends on cytoskeletal organization for wall deposition and/or cell expansion. In higher plants, cortical microtubules help to organize cell wall construction by positioning the delivery of cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes and guiding their trajectories to orient newly synthesized cellulose microfibrils. The actin cytoskeleton is required for normal distribution of CesAs to the plasma membrane, but more specific roles for actin in cell wall assembly and organization remain largely elusive. We show that the actin cytoskeleton functions to regulate the CesA delivery rate to, and lifetime of CesAs at, the plasma membrane, which affects cellulose production. Furthermore, quantitative image analyses revealed that actin organization affects CesA tracking behavior at the plasma membrane and that small CesA compartments were associated with the actin cytoskeleton. By contrast, localized insertion of CesAs adjacent to cortical microtubules was not affected by the actin organization. Hence, both actin and microtubule cytoskeletons play important roles in regulating CesA trafficking, cellulose deposition, and organization of cell wall biogenesis.

  2. Mechanism of cellobiose inhibition in cellulose hydrolysis by cellobiohydrolase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yue; WU Bin; YAN Baixu; GAO Peiji

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study of cellobiose inhibition in cellulose hydrolysis by synergism of cellobiohydrolyse I and endoglucanase I is presented. Cellobiose is the structural unit of cellulose molecules and also the main product in enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. It has been identified that cellobiose can strongly inhibit hydrolysis reaction of cellulase, whereas it has no effect on the adsorption of cellulase on cellulose surface. The experimental data of FT-IR spectra, fluorescence spectrum and circular dichroism suggested that cellobiose can be combined with tryptophan residue located near the active site of cellobiohydrolase and then form steric hindrance, which prevents cellulose molecule chains from diffusing into active site of cellulase. In addition, the molecular conformation of cellobiohydrolase changes after cellobiose binding, which also causes most of the non-productive adsorption. Under these conditions, microfibrils cannot be separated from cellulose chains, thus further hydrolysis of cellulose can hardly proceed.

  3. Fabrication of cellulose nanofiber transparent films for IT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lindong; Song, Sangho; Kim, Jeong Woong; Li, Yaguang; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-04-01

    One of the abundant renewable biomaterials in the world - cellulose is produced from plants forming micro-fibrils which in turn aggregate of form cellulose fibers. These fibers size can be disintegrated from micro-fibrils to nanofibers by physical and chemical methods. Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) can be a new building block of renewable smart materials. The CNF has excellent mechanical strength, dimensional stability, thermal stability and good optical properties on top of their renewable behavior. This paper reports CNF transparent films made by CNF extracted by the physical method: a high pressure physical, so called aqueous counter collision method. Natural behaviors, extraction and film formation of CNF are explained and their characteristics are illustrated, which is suit for IT applications.

  4. Comparative Structural and Computational Analysis Supports Eighteen Cellulose Synthases in the Plant Cellulose Synthesis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, B Tracy; Mansouri, Katayoun; Singh, Abhishek; Du, Juan; Davis, Jonathan K; Lee, Jung-Goo; Slabaugh, Erin; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; O'Neill, Hugh; Roberts, Eric M; Roberts, Alison W; Yingling, Yaroslava G; Haigler, Candace H

    2016-06-27

    A six-lobed membrane spanning cellulose synthesis complex (CSC) containing multiple cellulose synthase (CESA) glycosyltransferases mediates cellulose microfibril formation. The number of CESAs in the CSC has been debated for decades in light of changing estimates of the diameter of the smallest microfibril formed from the β-1,4 glucan chains synthesized by one CSC. We obtained more direct evidence through generating improved transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and image averages of the rosette-type CSC, revealing the frequent triangularity and average cross-sectional area in the plasma membrane of its individual lobes. Trimeric oligomers of two alternative CESA computational models corresponded well with individual lobe geometry. A six-fold assembly of the trimeric computational oligomer had the lowest potential energy per monomer and was consistent with rosette CSC morphology. Negative stain TEM and image averaging showed the triangularity of a recombinant CESA cytosolic domain, consistent with previous modeling of its trimeric nature from small angle scattering (SAXS) data. Six trimeric SAXS models nearly filled the space below an average FF-TEM image of the rosette CSC. In summary, the multifaceted data support a rosette CSC with 18 CESAs that mediates the synthesis of a fundamental microfibril composed of 18 glucan chains.

  5. Cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus strains ATCC 53524 and ATCC 23768: Pellicle formation, post-synthesis aggregation and fiber density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher M; Gu, Jin; Kafle, Kabindra; Catchmark, Jeffrey; Kim, Seong H

    2015-11-20

    The pellicle formation, crystallinity, and bundling of cellulose microfibrils produced by bacterium Gluconacetobacter xylinus were studied. Cellulose pellicles were produced by two strains (ATCC 53524 and ATCC 23769) for 1 and 7 days; pellicles were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrational sum-frequency-generation (SFG) spectroscopy, and attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. The bacterial cell population was higher at the surface exposed to air, indicating that the newly synthesized cellulose is deposited at the top of the pellicle. XRD, ATR-IR, and SFG analyses found no significant changes in the cellulose crystallinity, crystal size or polymorphic distribution with the culture time. However, SEM and SFG analyses revealed cellulose macrofibrils produced for 7 days had a higher packing density at the top of the pellicle, compared to the bottom. These findings suggest that the physical properties of cellulose microfibrils are different locally within the bacterial pellicles.

  6. Patterning and Lifetime of Plasma Membrane-Localized Cellulose Synthase Is Dependent on Actin Organization in Arabidopsis Interphase Cells1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Gutierrez, Ryan; McFarlane, Heather E.; Bringmann, Martin; Lindeboom, Jelmer; Emons, Anne-Mie; Samuels, Lacey; Ketelaar, Tijs; Ehrhardt, David W.; Persson, Staffan

    2013-01-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons regulate cell shape across phyla, from bacteria to metazoans. In organisms with cell walls, the wall acts as a primary constraint of shape, and generation of specific cell shape depends on cytoskeletal organization for wall deposition and/or cell expansion. In higher plants, cortical microtubules help to organize cell wall construction by positioning the delivery of cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes and guiding their trajectories to orient newly synthesized cellulose microfibrils. The actin cytoskeleton is required for normal distribution of CesAs to the plasma membrane, but more specific roles for actin in cell wall assembly and organization remain largely elusive. We show that the actin cytoskeleton functions to regulate the CesA delivery rate to, and lifetime of CesAs at, the plasma membrane, which affects cellulose production. Furthermore, quantitative image analyses revealed that actin organization affects CesA tracking behavior at the plasma membrane and that small CesA compartments were associated with the actin cytoskeleton. By contrast, localized insertion of CesAs adjacent to cortical microtubules was not affected by the actin organization. Hence, both actin and microtubule cytoskeletons play important roles in regulating CesA trafficking, cellulose deposition, and organization of cell wall biogenesis. PMID:23606596

  7. Role of in-situ formed nano-and micro-fibrils in micro-fatigue resistance of bio-polyethylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EJisheng; M.J.Bevis

    2001-01-01

    In response to the need for the reduction of micro-debris generation in artificial humanjoints for extending the service life, a novel polymer process technology, SCORIM (shear con-trolled orientation injection moulding), was employed to manufacture a polyethylene compositereinforced by in-situ formed nano- and micro-fibrils. Tribological performance of a blend of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) was evalu-ated on a pin-on-disc wear machine. Results indicate a significant improvement in micro fatiguewear resistance compared with those moulded by a conventional injection moulding technology.Scanning electron microscopy reveals that a micro-fibril structure forms as an in-situ fibre rein-forced composite using SCORIM while an aggregated structure occurs in specimens moulded byconventional technology. DSC analysis shows the occurrence of a second phase: shish kebabmicrostructure using SCORIM. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the transformation ofmicrostructure from randomly orientated lamella in the specimens moulded by conventional injec-tion moulding into nano-fibril shish kebab microstructure, which results in a significant reduction inthe possibility of the initiation and development of micro-cracks parallel to the contact surfacesusing SCORIM. Consequently, the formation of nano-fibril shish kebab and micro-fibril microstruc-ture by using the novel SCORIM technology results in a significant reduction in micro-fatigue whenusing the surface normal to the direction of the orientated molecular fibril microstructure as a con-tact surface.

  8. Cellulose synthase complexes act in a concerted fashion to synthesize highly aggregated cellulose in secondary cell walls of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shundai; Bashline, Logan; Zheng, Yunzhen; Xin, Xiaoran; Huang, Shixin; Kong, Zhaosheng; Kim, Seong H; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Gu, Ying

    2016-10-04

    Cellulose, often touted as the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, is a critical component of the plant cell wall and is synthesized by plasma membrane-spanning cellulose synthase (CESA) enzymes, which in plants are organized into rosette-like CESA complexes (CSCs). Plants construct two types of cell walls, primary cell walls (PCWs) and secondary cell walls (SCWs), which differ in composition, structure, and purpose. Cellulose in PCWs and SCWs is chemically identical but has different physical characteristics. During PCW synthesis, multiple dispersed CSCs move along a shared linear track in opposing directions while synthesizing cellulose microfibrils with low aggregation. In contrast, during SCW synthesis, we observed swaths of densely arranged CSCs that moved in the same direction along tracks while synthesizing cellulose microfibrils that became highly aggregated. Our data support a model in which distinct spatiotemporal features of active CSCs during PCW and SCW synthesis contribute to the formation of cellulose with distinct structure and organization in PCWs and SCWs of Arabidopsis thaliana This study provides a foundation for understanding differences in the formation, structure, and organization of cellulose in PCWs and SCWs.

  9. Functional analysis of zebrafish microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (Magp1) in vivo reveals roles for microfibrils in vascular development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eleanor; Larson, Jon D; Ekker, Stephen C

    2006-06-01

    Mutations in fibrillin-1 (FBN1) result in Marfan syndrome, demonstrating a critical requirement for microfibrils in vessel structure and function. However, the identity and function of many microfibril-associated molecules essential for vascular development and function have yet to be characterized. In our morpholino-based screen for members of the secretome required for vascular development, we identified a key player in microfibril formation in zebrafish embryogenesis. Microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (MAGP1) is a conserved protein found in mammalian and zebrafish microfibrils. Expression of magp1 mRNA is detected in microfibril-producing cells. Analysis of a functional Magp1-mRFP fusion protein reveals localization along the midline and in the vasculature during embryogenesis. Underexpression and overexpression analyses demonstrate that specific Magp1 protein levels are critical for vascular development. Integrin function is compromised in magp1 morphant embryos, suggesting that reduced integrin-matrix interaction is the main mechanism for the vascular defects in magp1 morphants. We further show that Magp1 and fibrillin-1 interact in vivo. This study implicates MAGP1 as a key player in microfibril formation and integrity during development. The essential role for MAGP1 in vascular morphogenesis and function also supports a wide range of clinical applications, including therapeutic targets in vascular disease and cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  10. Role of supramolecular cellulose structures in enzymatic hydrolysis of plant cell walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Hidayat, Budi Juliman; Johansen, Katja Salomon

    2011-01-01

    The study of biomass deconstruction by enzymatic hydrolysis has hitherto not focussed on the importance of supramolecular structures of cellulose. In lignocellulose fibres, regions with a different organisation of the microfibrils are present. These regions are called dislocations or slip planes ...

  11. Isolation and characterization of two cellulose morphology mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 producing cellulose with lower crystallinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Deng

    Full Text Available Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC. These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To address this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of

  12. Loosening Xyloglucan Accelerates the Enzymatic Degradation of Cellulose in Wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rumi Kaida; Tomomi Kaku; Kei'ichi Baba; Masafumi Oyadomari; Takashi Watanabe; Koji Nishida; Toshiji Kanaya; Ziv Shani; Oded Shoseyov; Takahisa Hayashi

    2009-01-01

    In order to create trees in which cellulose, the most abundant component in biomass, can be enzymatically hydrolyzed highly for the production of bioethanol, we examined the saccharification of xylem from several transgenic poplars, each overexpressing either xyloglucanase, cellulase, xylanase, or galactanase. The level of cellulose degradation achieved by a cellulase preparation was markedly greater in the xylem overexpressing xyloglucanase and much greater in the xylems overexpressing xylanase and cellulase than in the xylem of the wild-type plant. Although a high degree of degradation occurred in all xylems at all loci, the crystalline region of the cellulose microfibrUs was highly degraded in the xylem overexpressing xyloglucanase. Since the complex between microfibrils and xyloglucans could be one region that is particularly resistant to cellulose degradation, loosening xyloglucan could facilitate the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in wood.

  13. Isolation of Cellulose Nanofibers: Effect of Biotreatment on Hydrogen Bonding Network in Wood Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreekumar Janardhnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of cellulose nanofibres as high-strength reinforcement in nano-biocomposites is very enthusiastically being explored due to their biodegradability, renewability, and high specific strength properties. Cellulose, through a regular network of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds, is organized into perfect stereoregular configuration called microfibrils which further aggregate to different levels to form the fibre. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding at various levels, especially at the elementary level, is the major binding force that one need to overcome to reverse engineer these fibres into their microfibrillar level. This paper briefly describes a novel enzymatic fibre pretreatment developed to facilitate the isolation of cellulose microfibrils and explores effectiveness of biotreatment on the intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the fiber. Bleached Kraft Softwood Pulp was treated with a fungus (OS1 isolated from elm tree infected with Dutch elm disease. Cellulose microfibrils were isolated from these treated fibers by high-shear refining. The % yield of nanofibres and their diameter distribution (<50 nm isolated from the bio-treated fibers indicated a substantial increase compared to those isolated from untreated fibers. FT-IR spectral analysis indicated a reduction in the density of intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding within the fiber. X-ray spectrometry indicated a reduction in the crystallinity. Hydrogen bond-specific enzyme and its application in the isolation of new generation cellulose nano-fibers can be a huge leap forward in the field of nano-biocomposites.

  14. Cellulose nanowhiskers and nanofibers from biomass for composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao

    2011-12-01

    Biological nanocomposites such as plant cell wall exhibit high mechanical properties at a light weight. The secret of the rigidity and strength of the cell wall lies in its main structural component -- cellulose. Native cellulose exists as highly-ordered microfibrils, which are just a few nanometers wide and have been found to be stiffer than many synthetic fibers. In the quest for sustainable development around the world, using cellulose microfibrils from plant materials as renewable alternatives to conventional reinforcement materials such as glass fibers and carbon fibers is generating particular interest. In this research, by mechanical disintegration and by controlled chemical hydrolysis, both cellulose nanofibers and nanowhiskers were extracted from the cell wall of an agricultural waste, wheat straw. The reinforcement performances of the two nanofillers were then studied and compared using the water-soluble polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) as a matrix material. It was found that while both of these nanofillers could impart higher stiffness to the polymer, the nanofibers from biomass were more effective in composite reinforcement than the cellulose crystals thanks to their large aspect ratio and their ability to form interconnected network structures through hydrogen bonding. One of the biggest challenges in the development of cellulose nanocomposites is achieving good dispersion. Because of the high density of hydroxyl groups on the surface of cellulose, it remains a difficult task to disperse cellulose nanofibers in many commonly used polymer matrices. The present work addresses this issue by developing a water-based route taking advantage of polymer colloidal suspensions. Combining cellulose nanofibers with one of the most important biopolymers, poly(lactic acid) (PLA), we have prepared nanocomposites with excellent fiber dispersion and improved modulus and strength. The bio-based nanocomposites have a great potential to serve as light-weight structural materials

  15. Microfibril angle variability in Masson Pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) using X-ray diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Bo; Fei Ben-hua; Yu Yan; Zhao Rong-jun

    2007-01-01

    The microfibril angle of fiber walls is an ultra-microscopic feature affecting the performance of wood products. It is therefore essential to get more definitive information to improve selection and utilization. X-ray diffraction is a rapid method for measuring micro fibril angles. In this paper, the variability of microfibril angle in plantation-grown Masson pine was investigated by peak-fitting method. This method was compared with the traditional hand-drawn method, 40% peak height method and half peak height method. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that the microfibril angle changed as a function of the position in the tree.The mean micro fibril angle decreased more gradually as the distance increased from the pith and reached the same level in mature wood. The microfibril angle also seemed to decrease clearly from the base upward. Differences of angle-intensity curves between heartwood and sapwood were also examined.

  16. Atmospheric plasma assisted PLA/microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) multilayer biocomposite for sustainable barrier application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meriçer, Çağlar; Minelli, Matteo; Angelis, Maria G De

    2016-01-01

    on different PLA substrates by activating film surface with an atmospheric plasma treatment, leading to the fabrication of robust and transparent multilayer composite films, which were then characterized by different experimental techniques. UV transmission measurements confirmed the transparency of multilayer...... films (60% of UV transmission rate), while SEM micrographs showed the presence of a continuous, dense and defect free layer of MFC on PLA surface. Concerning the mechanical behavior of the samples, tensile tests revealed that the multilayer films significantly improved the stress at break value of neat...... PLA. Moreover, the oxygen barrier properties of the multilayer films were improved more than one order of magnitude compared to neat PLA film at 35. °C and 0% R.H. and the permeability values were maintained up to 60% R.H. The obtained materials therefore showed interesting properties...

  17. Pectin impacts cellulose fibre architecture and hydrogel mechanics in the absence of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia; Martinez-Sanz, Marta; Bonilla, Mauricio R; Wang, Dongjie; Walsh, Cherie T; Gilbert, Elliot P; Stokes, Jason R; Gidley, Michael J

    2016-11-20

    Pectin is a major polysaccharide in many plant cell walls and recent advances indicate that its role in wall mechanics is more important than previously thought. In this work cellulose hydrogels were synthesised in pectin solutions, as a biomimetic tool to investigate the influence of pectin on cellulose assembly and hydrogel mechanical properties. Most of the pectin (60-80%) did not interact at the molecular level with cellulose, as judged by small angle scattering techniques (SAXS and SANS). Despite the lack of strong interactions with cellulose, this pectin fraction impacted the mechanical properties of the hydrogels through poroelastic effects. The other 20-40% of pectin (containing neutral sugar sidechains) was able to interact intimately with cellulose microfibrils at the point of assembly. These results support the need to revise the role of pectin in cell wall architecture and mechanics, and; furthermore they assist the design of cellulose-based products through controlling the viscoelasticity of the fluid phase.

  18. Understanding the Role of Physical Properties of Cellulose on Its Hydrolyzability by Cellulases

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Patrick Jonathan

    Cellulose has long been explored as a potential feedstock for biofuel, however the recalcitrance of cellulose makes its conversion into biofuel much more challenging and economically unfavorable compared to well-established processes for converting starch or sugar feedstocks into biofuel. Enzymes capable of hydrolyzing cellulose into soluble sugars, glucose and cellobiose, have been found to work processively along cellulose microfibrils starting from reducing end groups. For this study, cellulose was produced and purified in-house from Gluconacetobacter xylinum cultures, and characterized by quantifying functional groups (aldehyde, ketone, and carboxyl groups) to determine the extent of oxidation of cellulose due to the processing steps. The main goal of this study was to look at the impacts of ultrasonication on cellulose's structure and the enzymatic hydrolyzability of cellulose. A completely randomized experimental design was used to test the effect of ultrasonication time and amplitude (intensity) on changes in cellulose fibril length, degree of polymerization, and rates and extents of hydrolysis. Results indicated that sonication time does significantly impact both the fibril length and average degree of polymerization of cellulose. The impact of ultrasonication on the hydrolyzability of cellulose by commercial cellulase and beta-glucosidase preparations could not be effectively resolved due to high variability in the experimental results. These studies serve as a basis for future studies understanding the role of cellulose microstructure in the mechanism of cellulase hydrolysis of cellulose.

  19. Spider Silk-CBD-Cellulose Nanocrystal Composites: Mechanism of Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirovitch, Sigal; Shtein, Zvi; Ben-Shalom, Tal; Lapidot, Shaul; Tamburu, Carmen; Hu, Xiao; Kluge, Jonathan A; Raviv, Uri; Kaplan, David L; Shoseyov, Oded

    2016-09-18

    The fabrication of cellulose-spider silk bio-nanocomposites comprised of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and recombinant spider silk protein fused to a cellulose binding domain (CBD) is described. Silk-CBD successfully binds cellulose, and unlike recombinant silk alone, silk-CBD self-assembles into microfibrils even in the absence of CNCs. Silk-CBD-CNC composite sponges and films show changes in internal structure and CNC alignment related to the addition of silk-CBD. The silk-CBD sponges exhibit improved thermal and structural characteristics in comparison to control recombinant spider silk sponges. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of the silk-CBD sponge was higher than the control silk sponge and similar to native dragline spider silk fibers. Gel filtration analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that silk-CBD, but not the recombinant silk control, formed a nematic liquid crystalline phase similar to that observed in native spider silk during the silk spinning process. Silk-CBD microfibrils spontaneously formed in solution upon ultrasonication. We suggest a model for silk-CBD assembly that implicates CBD in the central role of driving the dimerization of spider silk monomers, a process essential to the molecular assembly of spider-silk nanofibers and silk-CNC composites.

  20. Spider Silk-CBD-Cellulose Nanocrystal Composites: Mechanism of Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigal Meirovitch

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of cellulose-spider silk bio-nanocomposites comprised of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs and recombinant spider silk protein fused to a cellulose binding domain (CBD is described. Silk-CBD successfully binds cellulose, and unlike recombinant silk alone, silk-CBD self-assembles into microfibrils even in the absence of CNCs. Silk-CBD-CNC composite sponges and films show changes in internal structure and CNC alignment related to the addition of silk-CBD. The silk-CBD sponges exhibit improved thermal and structural characteristics in comparison to control recombinant spider silk sponges. The glass transition temperature (Tg of the silk-CBD sponge was higher than the control silk sponge and similar to native dragline spider silk fibers. Gel filtration analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (TEM indicated that silk-CBD, but not the recombinant silk control, formed a nematic liquid crystalline phase similar to that observed in native spider silk during the silk spinning process. Silk-CBD microfibrils spontaneously formed in solution upon ultrasonication. We suggest a model for silk-CBD assembly that implicates CBD in the central role of driving the dimerization of spider silk monomers, a process essential to the molecular assembly of spider-silk nanofibers and silk-CNC composites.

  1. Spider Silk-CBD-Cellulose Nanocrystal Composites: Mechanism of Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirovitch, Sigal; Shtein, Zvi; Ben-Shalom, Tal; Lapidot, Shaul; Tamburu, Carmen; Hu, Xiao; Kluge, Jonathan A.; Raviv, Uri; Kaplan, David L.; Shoseyov, Oded

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of cellulose-spider silk bio-nanocomposites comprised of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and recombinant spider silk protein fused to a cellulose binding domain (CBD) is described. Silk-CBD successfully binds cellulose, and unlike recombinant silk alone, silk-CBD self-assembles into microfibrils even in the absence of CNCs. Silk-CBD-CNC composite sponges and films show changes in internal structure and CNC alignment related to the addition of silk-CBD. The silk-CBD sponges exhibit improved thermal and structural characteristics in comparison to control recombinant spider silk sponges. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of the silk-CBD sponge was higher than the control silk sponge and similar to native dragline spider silk fibers. Gel filtration analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that silk-CBD, but not the recombinant silk control, formed a nematic liquid crystalline phase similar to that observed in native spider silk during the silk spinning process. Silk-CBD microfibrils spontaneously formed in solution upon ultrasonication. We suggest a model for silk-CBD assembly that implicates CBD in the central role of driving the dimerization of spider silk monomers, a process essential to the molecular assembly of spider-silk nanofibers and silk-CNC composites. PMID:27649169

  2. The Arabidopsis cellulose synthase complex: a proposed hexamer of CESA trimers in an equimolar stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joseph L; Hammudi, Mustafa B; Tien, Ming

    2014-12-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant renewable polymer on Earth and a major component of the plant cell wall. In vascular plants, cellulose synthesis is catalyzed by a large, plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase complex (CSC), visualized as a hexameric rosette structure. Three unique cellulose synthase (CESA) isoforms are required for CSC assembly and function. However, elucidation of either the number or stoichiometry of CESAs within the CSC has remained elusive. In this study, we show a 1:1:1 stoichiometry between the three Arabidopsis thaliana secondary cell wall isozymes: CESA4, CESA7, and CESA8. This ratio was determined utilizing a simple but elegant method of quantitative immunoblotting using isoform-specific antibodies and (35)S-labeled protein standards for each CESA. Additionally, the observed equimolar stoichiometry was found to be fixed along the axis of the stem, which represents a developmental gradient. Our results complement recent spectroscopic analyses pointing toward an 18-chain cellulose microfibril. Taken together, we propose that the CSC is composed of a hexamer of catalytically active CESA trimers, with each CESA in equimolar amounts. This finding is a crucial advance in understanding how CESAs integrate to form higher order complexes, which is a key determinate of cellulose microfibril and cell wall properties.

  3. A CELLULOSE SYNTHASE (CESA) GENE FROM THE RED ALGA PORPHYRA YEZOENSIS (RHODOPHYTA)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eric; Roberts, Alison W

    2009-02-01

    The cell walls of Porphyra species, like those of land plants, contain cellulose microfibrils that are synthesized by clusters of cellulose synthase enzymes ("terminal complexes"), which move in the plasma membrane. However, the morphologies of the Porphyra terminal complexes and the cellulose microfibrils they produce differ from those of land plants. To characterize the genetic basis for these differences, we have identified, cloned, and sequenced a cellulose synthase (CESA) gene from Porphyra yezoensis Ueda strain TU-1. A partial cDNA sequence was identified in the P. yezoensis expressed sequence tag (EST) index using a land plant CESA sequence as a query. High-efficiency thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR was used to amplify sequences upstream of the cDNA sequence from P. yezoensis genomic DNA. Using the resulting genomic sequences as queries, we identified additional EST sequences and a full-length cDNA clone, which we named PyCESA1. The conceptual translation of PyCESA1 includes the four catalytic domains and the N- and C-terminal transmembrane domains that characterize CESA proteins. Genomic PCR demonstrated that PyCESA1 contains no introns. Southern blot analysis indicated that P. yezoensis has at least three genomic sequences with high similarity to the cloned gene; two of these are pseudogenes based on analysis of amplified genomic sequences. The P. yezoensis CESA peptide sequence is most similar to cellulose synthase sequences from the oomycete Phytophthora infestans and from cyanobacteria. Comparing the CESA genes of P. yezoensis and land plants may facilitate identification of sequences that control terminal complex and cellulose microfibril morphology.

  4. Breakdown of hierarchical architecture in cellulose during dilute acid pretreatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Inouye, Hideyo [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Yang, Lin [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Himmel, Michael E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tucker, Melvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Makowski, Lee [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-02-28

    Cellulose can work as a feedstock for sustainable bioenergy because of its global abundance. Pretreatment of biomass has significant influence on the chemical availability of cellulose locked in recalcitrant microfibrils. Optimizing pretreatment depends on an understanding of its impact on the microscale and nanoscale molecular architecture. X-ray scattering experiments have been performed on native and pre-treated maize stover and models of cellulose architecture have been derived from these data. Ultra small-angle, very small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS, VSAXS and SAXS) probe three different levels of architectural scale. USAXS and SAXS have been used to study cellulose at two distinct length scales, modeling the fibrils as ~30 Å diameter rods packed into ~0.14 μm diameter bundles. VSAXS is sensitive to structural features at length scales between these two extremes. Detailed analysis of diffraction patterns from untreated and pretreated maize using cylindrical Guinier plots and the derivatives of these plots reveals the presence of substructures within the ~0.14 μm diameter bundles that correspond to grouping of cellulose approximately 30 nm in diameter. These sub-structures are resilient to dilute acid pretreatments but are sensitive to pretreatment when iron sulfate is added. Our results provide evidence of the hierarchical arrangement of cellulose at three length scales and the evolution of these arrangements during pre-treatments.

  5. Microfibril Associated Protein 4 (MFAP4) as a biomarker of emphysema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sofie Lock; Roberts, Nassim Bazeghi; Schlosser, Anders;

    Background To enhance accuracy in evaluating prognosis and target therapy, there is a need for biomarkers in COPD. Yet, there are no reliable biomarkers that can differentiate between phenotypes of COPD. MFAP4 is a glycoprotein, co-localized with elastin and microfibrils in elastic fibres. We hyp...

  6. The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer of CESA Trimers in an Equimolar Stoichiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Joseph L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Hammudi, Mustafa B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Tien, Ming [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we show a 1:1:1 stoichiometry between the three Arabidopsis thaliana secondary cell wall isozymes: CESA4, CESA7, and CESA8. This ratio was determined utilizing a simple but elegant method of quantitative immunoblotting using isoform-specific antibodies and 35S-labeled protein standards for each CESA. Additionally, the observed equimolar stoichiometry was found to be fixed along the axis of the stem, which represents a developmental gradient. Our results complement recent spectroscopic analyses pointing toward an 18-chain cellulose microfibril. Taken together, we propose that the CSC is composed of a hexamer of catalytically active CESA trimers, with each CESA in equimolar amounts. This finding is a crucial advance in understanding how CESAs integrate to form higher order complexes, which is a key determinate of cellulose microfibril and cell wall properties.

  7. Cellulose is not just cellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidayat, Budi Juliman; Felby, Claus; Johansen, Katja Salomon

    2012-01-01

    or enzymatic hydrolysis of plant cell walls is carried out simultaneously with the application of shear stress, plant cells such as fibers or tracheids break at their dislocations. At present it is not known whether specific carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) and/or cellulases preferentially access cellulose......Most secondary plant cell walls contain irregular regions known as dislocations or slip planes. Under industrial biorefining conditions dislocations have recently been shown to play a key role during the initial phase of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in plant cell walls. In this review we...... are not regions where free cellulose ends are more abundant than in the bulk cell wall. In more severe cases cracks between fibrils form at dislocations and it is possible that the increased accessibility that these cracks give is the reason why hydrolysis of cellulose starts at these locations. If acid...

  8. Surface functionalization of nanofibrillated cellulose extracted from wheat straw: Effect of process parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mandeep; Kaushik, Anupama; Ahuja, Dheeraj

    2016-10-05

    Aggregates of microfibrillated cellulose isolated from wheat straw fibers were subjected to propionylation under different processing conditions of time, temperature and concentration. The treated fibers were then homogenized to obtain surface modified nanofibrillated cellulose. For varying parameters, progress of propionylation and its effects on various characteristics was investigated by FTIR, degree of substitution, elemental analysis, SEM, EDX, TEM, X-ray diffraction, static and dynamic contact angle measurements. Thermal stability of the nanofibrils was also investigated using thermogravimetric technique. FTIR analysis confirmed the propionylation of the hydroxyl groups of the cellulose fibers. The variations in reaction conditions such as time and temperature had shown considerable effect on degree of substitution (DS) and surface contact angle (CA). These characterization results represent the optimizing conditions under which cellulose nanofibrils with hydrophobic characteristics up to contact angle of 120° can be obtained.

  9. Effect of cooking temperature on the crystallinity of acid hydrolysed-oil palm cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthi, Fatin Afifah Binti Ahmad; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-01

    In this research, we studied the effect of acid hydrolysis temperature on the crystallinity of cellulose produced from empty fruit bunch (EFB). The hydrolysis temperature was studied from 120 to 140 °C at a fixed time and sulfuric acid, H2SO4 concentration which were 1 h and 1% (v/v) respectively. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) was carried out to measure the crystallinity of cellulose produced at varying hydrolysis temperatures. During hydrolysis, the amorphous region of α-cellulose was removed and the crystalline region was obtained. Percentage of crystallinity (CrI) for acid hydrolysed cellulose at 120, 130 and 140 °C were 54.21, 50.59 and 50.55 % respectively. Morphological studies using scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that acid hydrolysis defibrilised to microfibrils in α-cellulose. The extraction process to produce α-cellulose has also been successfully carried out as the impurities at the outer surface, lignin and hemicellulose were removed. These findings were supported by the disappearance of peaks at 1732, 1512 and 1243 cm-1 on Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of α-cellulose. Similar peaks were identified in both the commercial microcrystalline cellulose (C-MCC) and acid hydrolysed cellulose (H-EFB), indicating the effectiveness of heat-catalysed acid hydrolysis.

  10. 3D multiscale micromechanical model of wood: From annual rings to microfibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2010-01-01

    A 3D micromechanical analytical-computational model of softwood, which takes into account the wood microstructures at four scale levels, from microfibrils to annual rings, is developed. For the analysis of the effect of the annual rings structure on the properties of softwood, an improved rule......-of-mixture model, based on 3D orthotropic stress–strain relations and taking into account the compatibility of deformations at the interface of two phases and equilibrium of tractions at phase boundaries, is proposed. The improved rule of mixture model (IRoM) was compared with the classical rule-of-mixture (Ro......M) and finite element method (FEM) simulations. It was shown that IRoM gives almost as good results as FEM. The analytical model of annual rings is combined with the 3D finite element model of softwood as cellular material with multilayered, microfibril reinforced cell walls, developed by (Qing and Mishnaevsky...

  11. Rapid Estimation of Microfibril Angle of Increment Cores of Chinese Fir by Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscope and X-ray diffractometry have been used for rapid prediction of the microfibril angle (MFA) which is one of the important factors affecting wood properties. Wood property evaluation in breeding and resource evaluation requires effective and rapid analysis methods for thousands of samples. In the experiment, all samples from increment cores with moisture content of 60% to 150% were used for measuring MFA by X-ray scanning diffractometry. Then, a partial least squares regressi...

  12. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Li, An; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Pereira, Caroline S; Tryfona, Theodora; Gomes, Thiago C F; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls.

  13. Access to cellulose limits the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis: the role of amorphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddler Jack N

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The efficient enzymatic saccharification of cellulose at low cellulase (protein loadings continues to be a challenge for commercialization of a process for bioconversion of lignocellulose to ethanol. Currently, effective pretreatment followed by high enzyme loading is needed to overcome several substrate and enzyme factors that limit rapid and complete hydrolysis of the cellulosic fraction of biomass substrates. One of the major barriers faced by cellulase enzymes is their limited access to much of the cellulose that is buried within the highly ordered and tightly packed fibrillar architecture of the cellulose microfibrils. Rather than a sequential 'shaving' or 'planing' of the cellulose fibrils from the outside, it has been suggested that these inaccessible regions are disrupted or loosened by non-hydrolytic proteins, thereby increasing the cellulose surface area and making it more accessible to the cellulase enzyme complex. This initial stage in enzymatic saccharification of cellulose has been termed amorphogenesis. In this review, we describe the various amorphogenesis-inducing agents that have been suggested, and their possible role in enhancing the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

  14. Non-destructive determination of moisture content and micro-fibril angle of wood using a poly-chromatic X-ray beam theoretical and experimental approach; Exploitation d'un rayonnement X poly-energetique pour la determination de la teneur en eau et de l'angle de microfibrilles du bois: approche theorique et experimentale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baettig, R

    2005-07-15

    Non-destructive determination of moisture content and micro-fibril angle are important stakes for the sciences of the wood because these two parameters influence strongly the macroscopic behavior of the wood. For example, the shrinkage, the mechanical properties, the thermal and acoustic conductivity are dependent on the moisture content and their anisotropic character is largely governed by the micro-fibril angle. We used the light difference between X-ray mass attenuation coefficient for the water and for the wood in transmission. Regrettably, the results show that this difference between X-ray mass attenuation coefficient is insufficient to allow the precise measurement of the moisture content.In spite of this, the coherent scattering shows sensitive effects. So, by using a poly-energetic beam and a spectrometric system, we were able to discriminate between the crystalline constituent (cellulose) of the amorphous constituent (water) in a sample of wet wood, because for a given angle these phases scatter in different energy. Besides, the device created allowed us to study the crystalline phase of the wood. We were able to confront experimental profiles of diffraction with theoretical profiles of diffraction, obtained by means of a rigorous simulation, in the objective to estimate the average micro-fibril angle and its standard deviation. (author)

  15. Temporal changes in wood crystalline cellulose during degradation by brown rot fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howell, Caitlin; Hastrup, Anne Christine Steenkjær; Goodell, Barry;

    2009-01-01

    The degradation of wood by brown rot fungi has been studied intensely for many years in order to facilitate the preservation of in-service wood. In this work we used X-ray diffraction to examine changes in wood cellulose crystallinity caused by the brown rot fungi Gloeophyllum trabeum, Coniophora...... planes in all degraded samples after roughly 20% weight loss, as well as a decrease in the average observed relative peak width at 2¿ = 22.2°. These results may indicate a disruption of the outer most semi-crystalline cellulose chains comprising the wood microfibril. X-ray diffraction analysis of wood...... subjected to biological attack by fungi may provide insight into degradative processes and wood cellulose structure....

  16. Bacterial cellulose produced by a new acid-resistant strain of Gluconacetobacter genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Cristina; Zuluaga, Robin; Álvarez, Catalina; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Caro, Gloria; Rojas, Orlando J; Mondragon, Iñaki; Gañán, Piedad

    2012-08-01

    A bacterial strain isolated from the fermentation of Colombian homemade vinegar, Gluconacetobacter medellensis, was investigated as a new source of bacterial cellulose (BC). The BC produced from substrate media consisting of various carbon sources at different pH and incubation times was quantified. Hestrin-Schramm (HS) medium modified with glucose led to the highest BC yields followed by sucrose and fructose. Interestingly, the microorganisms are highly tolerant to low pH: an optimum yield of 4.5 g/L was achieved at pH 3.5, which is generally too low for other bacterial species to function. The cellulose microfibrils produced by the new strain were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. The morphological, structural and chemical characteristics of the cellulose produced are similar to those expected for BC.

  17. Deflocculation of Cellulosic Suspensions with Anionic High Molecular Weight Polyelectrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Heikki Juhani Korhonen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulp fibers have a strong tendency to form flocs in water suspensions, which may cause their undesirable distribution in the paper sheets. This flocculation can be controlled by adding, e.g., an anionic high molecular weight polyelectrolyte in the fiber suspension. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of anionic polyelectrolytes on deflocculation kinetics, dewatering, and rheology of cellulosic suspensions. The results showed that both microfibrillated cellulose (MFC and macroscopic pulp fibers can be dispersed using anionic polyacrylamides (APAM. The higher the molecular weight of APAM, the higher is its effect. Adsorption experiments illustrate that anionic polyelectrolytes do not strongly attach to cellulose surfaces but they can be partly entrapped or can disperse nanocellulose fibrils (increase the swelling. Based on rheological experiments, the MFC network became weaker with APAM addition. Similar to the flocculation mechanism of cellulosic materials with polymers, deflocculation is also time dependent. Deflocculation occurs very rapidly, and the maximum deflocculation level is achieved within a few seconds. When mixing is continued, the floc size starts to increase again. Also dewatering was found to be strongly dependent on the contact time with the APAMs. These results indicate that the positive effects of anionic deflocculants are quickly diminished due to shear forces, and therefore, the best deflocculating effect is achieved using as short a contact time as possible.

  18. Cellulose Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Fire retardant cellulose insulation is produced by shredding old newspapers and treating them with a combination of chemicals. Insulating material is blown into walls and attics to form a fiber layer which blocks the flow of air. All-Weather Insulation's founders asked NASA/UK-TAP to help. They wanted to know what chemicals added to newspaper would produce an insulating material capable of meeting federal specifications. TAP researched the query and furnished extensive information. The information contributed to successful development of the product and helped launch a small business enterprise which is now growing rapidly.

  19. Nano-Structural Investigation on Cellulose Highly Dissolved in Ionic Liquid: A Small Angle X-ray Scattering Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takatsugu Endo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated nano-structural changes of cellulose dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate—an ionic liquid (IL—using a small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS technique over the entire concentration range (0–100 mol %. Fibril structures of cellulose disappeared at 40 mol % of cellulose, which is a significantly higher concentration than the maximum concentration of dissolution (24–28 mol % previously determined in this IL. This behavior is explained by the presence of the anion bridging, whereby an anion prefers to interact with multiple OH groups of different cellulose molecules at high concentrations, discovered in our recent work. Furthermore, we observed the emergence of two aggregated nano-structures in the concentration range of 30–80 mol %. The diameter of one structure was 12–20 nm, dependent on concentration, which is ascribed to cellulose chain entanglement. In contrast, the other with 4.1 nm diameter exhibited concentration independence and is reminiscent of a cellulose microfibril, reflecting the occurrence of nanofibrillation. These results contribute to an understanding of the dissolution mechanism of cellulose in ILs. Finally, we unexpectedly proposed a novel cellulose/IL composite: the cellulose/IL mixtures of 30–50 mol % that possess liquid crystallinity are sufficiently hard to be moldable.

  20. Nanoscale cellulose films with different crystallinities and mesostructures--their surface properties and interaction with water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulin, Christian; Ahola, Susanna; Josefsson, Peter; Nishino, Takashi; Hirose, Yasuo; Osterberg, Monika; Wågberg, Lars

    2009-07-07

    A systematic study of the degree of molecular ordering and swelling of different nanocellulose model films has been conducted. Crystalline cellulose II surfaces were prepared by spin-coating of the precursor cellulose solutions onto oxidized silicon wafers before regeneration in water or by using the Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) technique. Amorphous cellulose films were also prepared by spin-coating of a precursor cellulose solution onto oxidized silicon wafers. Crystalline cellulose I surfaces were prepared by spin-coating wafers with aqueous suspensions of sulfate-stabilized cellulose I nanocrystals and low-charged microfibrillated cellulose (LC-MFC). In addition, a dispersion of high-charged MFC was used for the buildup of polyelectrolyte multilayers with polyetheyleneimine on silica with the aid of the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. These preparation methods produced smooth thin films on the nanometer scale suitable for X-ray diffraction and swelling measurements. The surface morphology and thickness of the cellulose films were characterized in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ellipsometry measurements, respectively. To determine the surface energy of the cellulose surfaces, that is, their ability to engage in different interactions with different materials, they were characterized through contact angle measurements against water, glycerol, and methylene iodide. Small incidence angle X-ray diffraction revealed that the nanocrystal and MFC films exhibited a cellulose I crystal structure and that the films prepared from N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO), LiCl/DMAc solutions, using the LS technique, possessed a cellulose II structure. The degree of crystalline ordering was highest in the nanocrystal films (approximately 87%), whereas the MFC, NMMO, and LS films exhibited a degree of crystallinity of about 60%. The N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc)/LiCl film possessed very low crystalline ordering (properties of the films, it was necessary to consider both the

  1. Temporal variation of microfibril angle in Eucalyptus nitens grown in different irrigation regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, R; Downes, G M; Evans, R

    2002-05-01

    In 1990, a 2-ha plantation of Eucalyptus nitens (Deane and Maiden) Maiden was established in southeastern Tasmania and subjected to different irrigation regimes. Point dendrometers were installed in March 1995 to monitor radial stem movement every 15 min over several growing seasons. In this study, data from two growing seasons (1996-1998) were considered. From these measurements, daily increments of stem radius were determined. At the end of the second growing season, we extracted 12-mm cores and measured microfibril angles (MFA) of the wood at high resolution. Microfibril angles were rescaled on a time axis and mapped to daily and distance-based elements. Among treatments, irrigated trees in particular formed higher MFA early in the growing season (September-November) and lower MFA later in the growing season. Trees subjected to cyclic droughts showed clear relationships between MFA and soil water deficits, with MFA increasing in response to water stress release. Increases in MFA were preceded by accelerations in daily increment of stem radius. Among treatments, trees subjected to severe drought had the smallest MFA and generally low fluctuations in MFA. Irrigated trees were susceptible to changes in climate, whereas growth of the trees in the other treatments was limited by water availability. Use of path-analysis showed that temperature had an effect on stem radius increment but not on MFA; wind speed was the only factor that influenced MFA directly. Microfibril angle was correlated with stem shrinking and expansion phases; growth period length and growth rates were positively related to MFA.

  2. Illustration of the development of bacterial cellulose bundles/ribbons by Gluconacetobacter xylinus via atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai

    2013-05-01

    The development of bacterial cellulose (BC) fibrils biosynthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). After various incubation times at 30 °C, both the length of BC fibrils and their average diameters increased significantly. After the first 2-h incubation, not only single BC microfibrils with an average diameter of 5.8 ± 0.7 nm were biosynthesized but single microfibrils also began to bind with each other forming bundles. After longer incubation times of 6 h, 16 h, and 48 h, only BC bundles and ribbons or even only ribbons were detectable. The development of BC fibrils and the formation of BC bundles/ribbons along with the biosynthesis time were illustrated using AFM. Furthermore, single BC fibrils were twisted in a right-handed manner. The twisting of BC fibrils possibly promoted the formation of bigger ribbons.

  3. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An; Gomes, Thiago C.F.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls. PMID:27325663

  4. Micromechanics of TEMPO-oxidized fibrillated cellulose composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulota, Mindaugas; Tanpichai, Supachok; Hughes, Mark; Eichhorn, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Composites of poly(lactic) acid (PLA) reinforced with TEMPO-oxidized fibrillated cellulose (TOFC) were prepared to 15, 20, 25, and 30% fiber weight fractions. To aid dispersion and to improve stress transfer, we acetylated the TOFC prior to the fabrication of TOFC-PLA composite films. Raman spectroscopy was employed to study the deformation micromechanics in these systems. Microtensile specimens were prepared from the films and deformed in tension with Raman spectra being collected simultaneously during deformation. A shift in a Raman peak initially located at ~1095 cm(-1), assigned to C-O-C stretching of the cellulose backbone, was observed upon deformation, indicating stress transfer from the matrix to the TOFC reinforcement. The highest band shift rate, with respect to strain, was observed in composites having a 30% weight fraction of TOFC. These composites also displayed a significantly higher strain to failure compared to pure acetylated TOFC film, and to the composites having lower weight fractions of TOFC. The stress-transfer processes that occur in microfibrillated cellulose composites are discussed with reference to the micromechanical data presented. It is shown that these TOFC-based composite materials are progressively dominated by the mechanics of the networks, and a shear-lag type stress transfer between fibers.

  5. New insights into the structure, assembly and biological roles of 10-12 nm connective tissue microfibrils from fibrillin-1 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sacha A; Handford, Penny A

    2016-04-01

    The 10-12 nm diameter microfibrils of the extracellular matrix (ECM) impart both structural and regulatory properties to load-bearing connective tissues. The main protein component is the calcium-dependent glycoprotein fibrillin, which assembles into microfibrils at the cell surface in a highly regulated process involving specific proteolysis, multimerization and glycosaminoglycan interactions. In higher metazoans, microfibrils act as a framework for elastin deposition and modification, resulting in the formation of elastic fibres, but they can also occur in elastin-free tissues where they perform structural roles. Fibrillin microfibrils are further engaged in a number of cell matrix interactions such as with integrins, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and the large latent complex of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ). Fibrillin-1 (FBN1) mutations are associated with a range of heritable connective disorders, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and the acromelic dysplasias, suggesting that the roles of 10-12 nm diameter microfibrils are pleiotropic. In recent years the use of molecular, cellular and whole-organism studies has revealed that the microfibril is not just a structural component of the ECM, but through its network of cell and matrix interactions it can exert profound regulatory effects on cell function. In this review we assess what is known about the molecular properties of fibrillin that enable it to assemble into the 10-12 nm diameter microfibril and perform such diverse roles.

  6. Cellulose nanocrystals the next big nano-thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postek, Michael T.; Vladar, Andras; Dagata, John; Farkas, Natalia; Ming, Bin; Sabo, Ronald; Wegner, Theodore H.; Beecher, James

    2008-08-01

    Biomass surrounds us from the smallest alga to the largest redwood tree. Even the largest trees owe their strength to a newly-appreciated class of nanomaterials known as cellulose nanocrystals (CNC). Cellulose, the world's most abundant natural, renewable, biodegradable polymer, occurs as whisker like microfibrils that are biosynthesized and deposited in plant material in a continuous fashion. Therefore, the basic raw materials for a future of new nanomaterials breakthroughs already abound in the environment and are available to be utilized in an array of future materials once the manufacturing processes and nanometrology are fully developed. This presentation will discuss some of the instrumentation, metrology and standards issues associated with nanomanufacturing of cellulose nanocrystals. The use of lignocellulosic fibers derived from sustainable, annually renewable resources as a reinforcing phase in polymeric matrix composites provides positive environmental benefits with respect to ultimate disposability and raw material use. Today we lack the essential metrology infrastructure that would enable the manufacture of nanotechnology-based products based on CNCs (or other new nanomaterial) to significantly impact the U.S. economy. The basic processes common to manufacturing - qualification of raw materials, continuous synthesis methods, process monitoring and control, in-line and off-line characterization of product for quality control purposes, validation by standard reference materials - are not generally in place for nanotechnology based products, and thus are barriers to innovation. One advantage presented by the study of CNCs is that, unlike other nanomaterials, at least, cellulose nanocrystal manufacturing is already a sustainable and viable bulk process. Literally tons of cellulose nanocrystals can be generated each day, producing other viable byproducts such as glucose (for alternative fuel) and gypsum (for buildings).There is an immediate need for the

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Cellulose Nanofibers from Gigantochloa scortechinii as a Reinforcement Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaturbhuj K. Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose nanofibers (CNF were isolated from Gigantochloa scortechinii bamboo fibers using sulphuric acid hydrolysis. This method was compared with pulping and bleaching process for bamboo fiber. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis were used to determine the properties of CNF. Structural analysis by FT-IR showed that lignin and hemicelluloses were effectively removed from pulp, bleached fibers, and CNF. It was found that CNF exhibited uniform and smooth morphological structures, with fiber diameter ranges from 5 to 10 nm. The percentage of crystallinity was significantly increased from raw fibers to cellulose nanofibers, microfibrillated, along with significant improvement in thermal stability. Further, obtained CNF were used as reinforcement material in epoxy based nanocomposites where tensile strength, flexural strength, and modulus of nanocomposites improved with the addition of CNF loading concentration ranges from 0 to 0.7%.

  8. Tissue engineering scaffolds electrospun from cotton cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xu; Cheng, Long; Zhang, Ximu; Xiao, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Canhui

    2015-01-22

    Nonwovens of cellulose nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning of cotton cellulose in its LiCl/DMAc solution. The key factors associated with the electrospinning process, including the intrinsic properties of cellulose solutions, the rotating speed of collector and the applied voltage, were systematically investigated. XRD data indicated the electrospun nanofibers were almost amorphous. When increasing the rotating speed of the collector, preferential alignment of fibers along the drawing direction and improved molecular orientation were revealed by scanning electron microscope and polarized FTIR, respectively. Tensile tests indicated the strength of the nonwovens along the orientation direction could be largely improved when collected at a higher speed. In light of the excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability as well as their unique porous structure, the nonwovens were further assessed as potential tissue engineering scaffolds. Cell culture experiments demonstrated human dental follicle cells could proliferate rapidly not only on the surface but also in the entire scaffold.

  9. BIOINFORMATICS AND BIOSYNTHESIS ANALYSIS OF CELLULOSE SYNTHASE OPERON IN ZYMOMONAS MOBILIS ZM4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheik Abdul Kader Sheik Asraf, K. Narayanan Rajnish, and Paramasamy Gunasekaran

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Biosynthesis of cellulose has been reported in many species of bacteria. The genes encoding cellulose biosynthetic enzymes of Z. mobilis have not been studied so far. Preliminary sequence analysis of the Z. mobilis ZM4 genome revealed the presence of a cellulose synthase operon comprised of Open Reading Frames (ORFs ZMO01083 (bcsA, ZMO1084 (bcsB and ZMO1085 (bcsC. The first gene of the operon bcsA encodes the cellulose synthase catalytic subunit BcsA. The second gene of the operon bcsB encodes the cellulose synthase subunit B (BcsB, which shows the presence of BcsB multi-domain and is inferred to bind c-di-GMP, the regulator of cellulose biosynthesis. The third gene of the operon bcsC encodes the cellulose synthase operon C domain protein (BcsC, which belongs to super family of teratrico peptide repeat (TPR that are believed to mediate protein – protein interactions for the formation of cellulose. Multiple sequence alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences of BcsA and BcsC with other closely related homologs showed the presence of PVDPYE, HAKAGNLN, DCD motif and TPR motif, the characteristic motifs of bacterial cellulose synthases. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the ORF ZMO1085 and neighboring ORFs namely ZMO1083 and ZMO1084 indicated that all the ORFs are translationally linked and form an operon. Transcript analysis using Real-time PCR indicated the expression of the genes involved in cellulose synthase operon in Zymomonas mobilis ZM4. Z. mobilis colonies grown on RM-glucose containing Congo red displayed a characteristic bright red-brown colour. Z. mobilis colonies grown on RM-glucose medium supplemented with Calcoflour exhibited fluorescence. The arrangement of Calcofluor stained microfibrils can be seen in fluorescence microscopy which is an indicative for cellulose biosynthesis. AFM micrograph of the extracellular matrix of Z. mobilis shows a relatively dense matrix with bacterial cell residues. The presence of cellulose was

  10. Sucrose synthase affects carbon partitioning to increase cellulose production and altered cell wall ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Heather D; Yan, Jimmy; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2009-08-04

    Overexpression of the Gossypium hirsutum sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene under the control of 2 promoters was examined in hybrid poplar (Populus alba x grandidentata). Analysis of RNA transcript abundance, enzyme activity, cell wall composition, and soluble carbohydrates revealed significant changes in the transgenic lines. All lines showed significantly increased SuSy enzyme activity in developing xylem. This activity manifested in altered secondary cell wall cellulose content per dry weight in all lines, with increases of 2% to 6% over control levels, without influencing plant growth. The elevated concentration of cellulose was associated with an increase in cell wall crystallinity but did not alter secondary wall microfibril angle. This finding suggests that the observed increase in crystallinity is a function of altered carbon partitioning to cellulose biosynthesis rather than the result of tension wood formation. Furthermore, the augmented deposition of cellulose in the transgenic lines resulted in thicker xylem secondary cell wall and consequently improved wood density. These findings clearly implicate SuSy as a key regulator of sink strength in poplar trees and demonstrate the tight association of SuSy with cellulose synthesis and secondary wall formation.

  11. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  12. Cellulose-Pectin Spatial Contacts Are Inherent to Never-Dried Arabidopsis Primary Cell Walls: Evidence from Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2015-07-01

    The structural role of pectins in plant primary cell walls is not yet well understood because of the complex and disordered nature of the cell wall polymers. We recently introduced multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize the spatial proximities of wall polysaccharides. The data showed extensive cross peaks between pectins and cellulose in the primary wall of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), indicating subnanometer contacts between the two polysaccharides. This result was unexpected because stable pectin-cellulose interactions are not predicted by in vitro binding assays and prevailing cell wall models. To investigate whether the spatial contacts that give rise to the cross peaks are artifacts of sample preparation, we now compare never-dried Arabidopsis primary walls with dehydrated and rehydrated samples. One-dimensional (13)C spectra, two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra, water-polysaccharide correlation spectra, and dynamics data all indicate that the structure, mobility, and intermolecular contacts of the polysaccharides are indistinguishable between never-dried and rehydrated walls. Moreover, a partially depectinated cell wall in which 40% of homogalacturonan is extracted retains cellulose-pectin cross peaks, indicating that the cellulose-pectin contacts are not due to molecular crowding. The cross peaks are observed both at -20 °C and at ambient temperature, thus ruling out freezing as a cause of spatial contacts. These results indicate that rhamnogalacturonan I and a portion of homogalacturonan have significant interactions with cellulose microfibrils in the native primary wall. This pectin-cellulose association may be formed during wall biosynthesis and may involve pectin entrapment in or between cellulose microfibrils, which cannot be mimicked by in vitro binding assays.

  13. A 3D Multiscale Modelling of Cortical Bone Structure, Using the Inverse Identification Method: Microfibril Scale Study

    CERN Document Server

    Barkaoui, Abdelwahed

    2011-01-01

    Complexity and heterogeneity of bone tissue require a multiscale modelling to understand their mechanical behaviour and their remodelling mechanism. Human cortical bone structure consists of six structural scale levels which are the (macroscopic) cortical bone, osteonal, lamellar, fibrous, fibril and microfibril. In this paper, a 3D model based on finite elements method was achieved to study the nanomechanical behaviour of collagen Microfibril. The mechanical properties and the geometry (gap, overlap and diameter) of both tropocollagen and mineral were taken into consideration as well as the effects of cross-links. An inverse identification method has been applied to determine equivalent averaged properties in order to link up these nanoscopic characteristics to the macroscopic mechanical behaviour of bone tissue. Results of nanostructure modelling of the nanomechanical properties of strain deformation under varying cross-links were investigated in this work.

  14. Multiscale approach including microfibril scale to assess elastic constants of cortical bone based on neural network computation and homogenization method

    CERN Document Server

    Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Tarek, Merzouki; Hambli, Ridha; Ali, Mkaddem

    2014-01-01

    The complexity and heterogeneity of bone tissue require a multiscale modelling to understand its mechanical behaviour and its remodelling mechanisms. In this paper, a novel multiscale hierarchical approach including microfibril scale based on hybrid neural network computation and homogenisation equations was developed to link nanoscopic and macroscopic scales to estimate the elastic properties of human cortical bone. The multiscale model is divided into three main phases: (i) in step 0, the elastic constants of collagen-water and mineral-water composites are calculated by averaging the upper and lower Hill bounds; (ii) in step 1, the elastic properties of the collagen microfibril are computed using a trained neural network simulation. Finite element (FE) calculation is performed at nanoscopic levels to provide a database to train an in-house neural network program; (iii) in steps 2 to 10 from fibril to continuum cortical bone tissue, homogenisation equations are used to perform the computation at the higher s...

  15. Magnetic Alignment of Cellulose Nanowhiskers in an All-Cellulose Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Zuyan; Al-Haik, Marwan; Tehrani, Mehran; Murray, Frank; Tennenbaum, Rina; Garmestani, Hamid

    2010-08-01

    Unidirectional reinforced nanocomposite paper was fabricated from cellulose nanowhiskers and wood pulp under an externally-applied magnetic field. A 1.2 Tesla magnetic field was applied in order to align the nanowhiskers in the pulp as it was being formed into a sheet of paper. The magnetic alignment was driven by the characteristic negative diamagnetic anisotropy of the cellulose nanowhiskers. ESEM micrographs demonstrated unidirectional alignment of the nanowhiskers in the all-cellulose composite paper. Comparing with control paper sheets made from wood pulp only, the storage modulus in the all-cellulose nanocomposites increased dramatically. The storage modulus along the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field was much stronger than that parallel to the magnetic field. This new nanocomposite, which contains preferentially-oriented microstructures and has improved mechanical properties, demonstrates the possibility of expanding the functionality of paper products and constitutes a promising alternative to hydrocarbon based materials and fibers.

  16. Elucidation of Xylem-Specific Transcription Factors and Absolute Quantification of Enzymes Regulating Cellulose Biosynthesis in Populus trichocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loziuk, Philip L; Parker, Jennifer; Li, Wei; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Wang, Jack P; Li, Quanzi; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L; Muddiman, David C

    2015-10-02

    Cellulose, the main chemical polymer of wood, is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature.1 The ability to perturb the abundance and structure of cellulose microfibrils is of critical importance to the pulp and paper industry as well as for the textile, wood products, and liquid biofuels industries. Although much has been learned at the transcript level about the biosynthesis of cellulose, a quantitative understanding at the proteome level has yet to be established. The study described herein sought to identify the proteins directly involved in cellulose biosynthesis during wood formation in Populus trichocarpa along with known xylem-specific transcription factors involved in regulating these key proteins. Development of an effective discovery proteomic strategy through a combination of subcellular fractionation of stem differentiating xylem tissue (SDX) with recently optimized FASP digestion protocols, StageTip fractionation, as well as optimized instrument parameters for global proteomic analysis using the quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer resulted in the deepest proteomic coverage of SDX protein from P. trichocarpa with 9,146 protein groups being identified (1% FDR). Of these, 20 cellulosic/hemicellulosic enzymes and 43 xylem-specific transcription factor groups were identified. Finally, selection of surrogate peptides led to an assay for absolute quantification of 14 cellulosic proteins in SDX of P. trichocarpa.

  17. Cellulose synthase (CesA) genes in the green alga Mesotaenium caldariorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Alison W; Roberts, Eric M; Delmer, Deborah P

    2002-12-01

    Cellulose, a microfibrillar polysaccharide consisting of bundles of beta-1,4-glucan chains, is a major component of plant and most algal cell walls and is also synthesized by some prokaryotes. Seed plants and bacteria differ in the structures of their membrane terminal complexes that make cellulose and, in turn, control the dimensions of the microfibrils produced. They also differ in the domain structures of their CesA gene products (the catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase), which have been localized to terminal complexes and appear to help maintain terminal complex structure. Terminal complex structures in algae range from rosettes (plant-like) to linear forms (bacterium-like). Thus, algal CesA genes may reveal domains that control terminal complex assembly and microfibril structure. The CesA genes from the alga Mesotaenium caldariorum, a member of the order Zygnematales, which have rosette terminal complexes, are remarkably similar to seed plant CesAs, with deduced amino acid sequence identities of up to 59%. In addition to the putative transmembrane helices and the D-D-D-QXXRW motif shared by all known CesA gene products, M. caldariorum and seed plant CesAs share a region conserved among plants, an N-terminal zinc-binding domain, and a variable or class-specific region. This indicates that the domains that characterize seed plant CesAs arose prior to the evolution of land plants and may play a role in maintaining the structures of rosette terminal complexes. The CesA genes identified in M. caldariorum are the first reported for any eukaryotic alga and will provide a basis for analyzing the CesA genes of algae with different types of terminal complexes.

  18. EMILIN2 (Elastin microfibril interface located protein, potential modifier of thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoover-Plow Jane L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elastin microfibril interface located protein 2 (EMILIN2 is an extracellular glycoprotein associated with cardiovascular development. While other EMILIN proteins are reported to play a role in elastogenesis and coagulation, little is known about EMILIN2 function in the cardiovascular system. The objective of this study was to determine whether EMILIN2 could play a role in thrombosis. Results EMILIN2 mRNA was expressed in 8 wk old C57BL/6J mice in lung, heart, aorta and bone marrow, with the highest expression in bone marrow. In mouse cells, EMILIN2 mRNA expression in macrophages was higher than expression in endothelial cells and fibroblasts. EMILIN2 was identified with cells and extracellular matrix by immunohistochemistry in the carotid and aorta. After carotid ferric chloride injury, EMILIN2 was abundantly expressed in the thrombus and inhibition of EMILIN2 increased platelet de-aggregation after ADP-stimulated platelet aggregation. Conclusions These results suggest EMILIN2 could play a role in thrombosis as a constituent of the vessel wall and/or a component of the thrombus.

  19. The effect of chemical composition on microfibrillar cellulose films from wood pulps: mechanical processing and physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Kelley L; Venditti, Richard A; Habibi, Youssef; Rojas, Orlando J; Pawlak, Joel J

    2010-08-01

    Films of microfibrillated celluloses (MFCs) from pulps of different yields, containing varying amounts of extractives, lignin, and hemicelluloses, were produced by combining refining and high-pressure homogenization techniques. MFC films were produced using a casting-evaporation technique and the physical and mechanical properties (including density, roughness, fold endurance and tensile properties) were determined. Homogenization of bleached and unbleached Kraft pulps gave rise to highly individualized MFCs, but not for thermo-mechanical pulp (TMP). The resulting MFC films had a roughness equivalent to the surface upon which the films were cast. Interestingly, after homogenization, the presence of lignin significantly increased film toughness, tensile index, and elastic modulus. The hornification of fibers through a drying and rewetting cycle prior to refining and homogenization did not produce any significant effect compared to films from never-dried fibers, indicating that MFC films can potentially be made from low-cost recycled cellulosic materials.

  20. Exploration of a Chemo-Mechanical Technique for the Isolation of Nanofibrillated Cellulosic Fiber from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch as a Reinforcing Agent in Composites Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireana Yusra A. Fatah

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of sulphuric acid hydrolysis and high-pressure homogenization as an effective chemo-mechanical process for the isolation of quality nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC. The cellulosic fiber was isolated from oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB using acid hydrolysis methods and, subsequently, homogenized using a high-pressure homogenizer to produce NFC. The structural analysis and the crystallinity of the raw fiber and extracted cellulose were carried out by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The morphology and thermal stability were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and thermogravimetric (TGA analyses, respectively. The FTIR results showed that lignin and hemicellulose were removed effectively from the extracted cellulose nanofibrils. XRD analysis revealed that the percentage of crystallinity was increased from raw EFB to microfibrillated cellulose (MFC, but the decrease for NFC might due to a break down the hydrogen bond. The size of the NFC was determined within the 5 to 10 nm. The TGA analysis showed that the isolated NFC had high thermal stability. The finding of present study reveals that combination of sulphuric acid hydrolysis and high-pressure homogenization could be an effective chemo-mechanical process to isolate cellulose nanofibers from cellulosic plant fiber for reinforced composite materials.

  1. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  2. Cellulose Degradation by Cellulose-Clearing and Non-Cellulose-Clearing Brown-Rot Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Highley, Terry L.

    1980-01-01

    Cellulose degradation by four cellulose-clearing brown-rot fungi in the Coniophoraceae—Coniophora prasinoides, C. puteana, Leucogyrophana arizonica, and L. olivascens—is compared with that of a non-cellulose-clearing brown-rot fungus, Poria placenta. The cellulose- and the non-cellulose-clearing brown-rot fungi apparently employ similar mechanisms to depolymerize cellulose; most likely a nonenzymatic mechanism is involved.

  3. Uniaxially aligned electrospun all-cellulose nanocomposite nanofibers reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals: scaffold for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xu; Xiao, Qiang; Lu, Canhui; Wang, Yaru; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhao, Jiangqi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Ximu; Deng, Yulin

    2014-02-10

    Uniaxially aligned cellulose nanofibers with well oriented cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) embedded were fabricated via electrospinning using a rotating drum as the collector. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images indicated that most cellulose nanofibers were uniaxially aligned. The incorporation of CNCs into the spinning dope resulted in more uniform morphology of the electrospun cellulose/CNCs nanocomposite nanofibers (ECCNN). Polarized light microscope (PLM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed that CNCs dispersed well in ECCNN nonwovens and achieved considerable orientation along the long axis direction. This unique hierarchical microstructure of ECCNN nonwovens gave rise to remarkable enhancement of their physical properties. By incorporating 20% loading (in weight) of CNCs, the tensile strength and elastic modulus of ECCNN along the fiber alignment direction were increased by 101.7 and 171.6%, respectively. Their thermal stability was significantly improved as well. In addition, the ECCNN nonwovens were assessed as potential scaffold materials for tissue engineering. It was elucidated from MTT tests that the ECCNN were essentially nontoxic to human cells. Cell culture experiments demonstrated that cells could proliferate rapidly not only on the surface but also deep inside the ECCNN. More importantly, the aligned nanofibers of ECCNN exhibited a strong effect on directing cellular organization. This feature made the scaffold particularly useful for various artificial tissues or organs, such as blood vessel, tendon, nerve, and so on, in which cell orientation was crucial for their performance.

  4. Hazy Transparent Cellulose Nanopaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Koga, Hirotaka; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Nogi, Masaya

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify light scattering mechanism of hazy transparent cellulose nanopaper. Clear optical transparent nanopaper consists of 3–15 nm wide cellulose nanofibers, which are obtained by the full nanofibrillation of pulp fibers. At the clear transparent nanopaper with 40 μm thickness, their total transmittance are 89.3–91.5% and haze values are 4.9–11.7%. When the pulp fibers are subjected to weak nanofibrillation, hazy transparent nanopapers are obtained. The hazy transparent nanopaper consists of cellulose nanofibers and some microsized cellulose fibers. At the hazy transparent nanopaper with 40 μm thickness, their total transmittance were constant at 88.6–92.1% but their haze value were 27.3–86.7%. Cellulose nanofibers are solid cylinders, whereas the pulp fibers are hollow cylinders. The hollow shape is retained in the microsized cellulose fibers, but they are compressed flat inside the nanopaper. This compressed cavity causes light scattering by the refractive index difference between air and cellulose. As a result, the nanopaper shows a hazy transparent appearance and exhibits a high thermal durability (295–305 °C), and low thermal expansion (8.5–10.6 ppm/K) because of their high density (1.29–1.55 g/cm3) and crystallinity (73–80%).

  5. Investigation of age-related decline of microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 in human skin through immunohistochemistry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Q

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Qian Zheng, Siming Chen, Ying Chen, John Lyga, Russell Wyborski, Uma SanthanamGlobal Research and Development, Avon Products Inc., Suffern, New York, USAAbstract: During aging, the reduction of elastic and collagen fibers in dermis can lead to skin atrophy, fragility, and aged appearance, such as increased facial wrinkling and sagging. Microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (MAGP-1 is an extracellular matrix protein critical for elastic fiber assembly. It integrates and stabilizes the microfibril and elastin matrix network that helps the skin to endure mechanical stretch and recoil. However, the observation of MAGP-1 during skin aging and its function in the dermis has not been established. To better understand age-related changes in the dermis, we investigated MAGP-1 during skin aging and photoaging, using a combination of in vitro and in vivo studies. Gene expression by microarray was performed using human skin biopsies from young and aged female donors. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis on the MAGP-1 protein was performed in dermal fibroblast cultures and in human skin biopsies. Specific antibodies against MAGP-1 and fibrillin-1 were used to examine protein expression and extracellular matrix structure in the dermis via biopsies from donors of multiple age groups. A reduction of the MAGP-1 gene and protein levels were observed in human skin with increasing age and photoexposure, indicating a loss of the functional MAGP-1 fiber network and a lack of structural support in the dermis. Loss of MAGP-1 around the hair follicle/pore areas was also observed, suggesting a possible correlation between MAGP-1 loss and enlarged pores in aged skin. Our findings demonstrate that a critical “pre-elasticity” component, MAGP-1, declines with aging and photoaging. Such changes may contribute to age-related loss of dermal integrity and perifollicular structural support, which may lead to skin fragility, sagging, and enlarged pores

  6. The Influence of S_2 Microfibril Angle on Longitudinal and Tangential Shrinkage in China-fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) Plantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The first objective of this study was to investigate the variation of microfibril angle (Mfa), tracheid morphology and shrinkage within China-fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) plantation tree. The second objective was to discuss the relationship between Mfa and tracheid morphology, and the influence of Mfa on longitudinal and tangential shrinkage. The results showed that the mean value of Mfa decreased from the 2nd (30.8°) to 26th growth ring (7.7°); the radial variation of latewood tracheid length ranged f...

  7. Properties of films composed of cellulose nanowhiskers and a cellulose matrix regenerated from alkali/urea solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haisong; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Lina; Kuga, Shigenori

    2009-06-01

    All-cellulose composite films were prepared, for the first time, from native cellulose nanowhiskers and cellulose matrix regenerated from aqueous NaOH-urea solvent system on the basis of their temperature-dependent solubility. The cellulose whiskers retained their needlelike morphology with mean length and diameter of 300 and 21 nm as well as native crystallinity when added to the latter solution at ambient temperature. The structure and physical properties of the nanocomposite films were characterized by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and tensile tests. The composite films were isotropic and transparent to visible light and showed good mechanical properties as a result of the reinforcement by the whiskers. By varying the ratio of the cellulose whiskers to regenerated cellulose matrix (cellulose II), the tensile strength and elastic modulus of the nanocomposite films could be tuned to reach 124 MPa and 5 GPa, respectively. The tensile strength of the nanocomposite films could reach 157 MPa through a simple drawing process, with the calculated Hermans' orientation parameter of 0.30. This work provided a novel pathway for the preparation of biodegradable all-cellulose nanocomposites, which are expected to be useful as biomaterials and food ingredients.

  8. Fulton Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumait, Necy [BlueFire Ethanol, Irvine, CA (United States); Cuzens, John [BlueFire Ethanol, Irvine, CA (United States); Klann, Richard [BlueFire Ethanol, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-07-24

    Final report on work performed by BlueFire on the deployment of acid hydrolysis technology to convert cellulosic waste materials into renewable fuels, power and chemicals in a production facility to be located in Fulton, Mississippi.

  9. Overview of bacterial cellulose composites: a multipurpose advanced material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nasrullah; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khattak, Waleed Ahmad; Park, Joong Kon

    2013-11-06

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has received substantial interest owing to its unique structural features and impressive physico-mechanical properties. BC has a variety of applications in biomedical fields, including use as biomaterial for artificial skin, artificial blood vessels, vascular grafts, scaffolds for tissue engineering, and wound dressing. However, pristine BC lacks certain properties, which limits its applications in various fields; therefore, synthesis of BC composites has been conducted to address these limitations. A variety of BC composite synthetic strategies have been developed based on the nature and relevant applications of the combined materials. BC composites are primarily synthesized through in situ addition of reinforcement materials to BC synthetic media or the ex situ penetration of such materials into BC microfibrils. Polymer blending and solution mixing are less frequently used synthetic approaches. BC composites have been synthesized using numerous materials ranging from organic polymers to inorganic nanoparticles. In medical fields, these composites are used for tissue regeneration, healing of deep wounds, enzyme immobilization, and synthesis of medical devices that could replace cardiovascular and other connective tissues. Various electrical products, including biosensors, biocatalysts, E-papers, display devices, electrical instruments, and optoelectronic devices, are prepared from BC composites with conductive materials. In this review, we compiled various synthetic approaches for BC composite synthesis, classes of BC composites, and applications of BC composites. This study will increase interest in BC composites and the development of new ideas in this field.

  10. Conductive nano composites based on cellulose nano fiber coated poly aniline via in situ polymerization; Nanocompositos condutores de nanofibras de celulose recobertas com polianilina via polimerizacao in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Michael J. da; Sanches, Alex O.; Malmonge, Luiz F.; Malmonge, Jose A. [Grupo de Polimero, Depto de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil); Medeiros, Eliton S. de [Depto de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Rosa, Morsyleide F. [Embrapa Agroindustria Tropical, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Cellulose nano fiber (CNF) was extracted by acid hydrolysis from cotton microfibril and nano composites of CNF/PANI-DBSA were obtained by in situ polymerization of aniline onto CNF. The ratios between DBSA/aniline and aniline/oxidant were varied and the nano composites were characterized by four probes direct current (dc) electrical conductivity, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis-NIR) and FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electrical conductive about {approx}10{sup -1}S/cm was research and was independent of DBSA/aniline molar ratio between 2-4 and the aniline/oxidant molar ratio between 1-5. X-ray patterns of the samples show crystalline peaks characteristic of cellulose I. The FTIR spectra confirmed the presence of PANI and CNF in all samples. (author)

  11. The cellulose resource matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  12. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF REGENERATED CELLULOSE MEMBRANES HYDROLYZED FROM CELLULOSE ACETATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Chen; Xiao-peng Xiong; Guang Yang; Li-na Zhang; Sen-lin Lei; Hui Lianga

    2002-01-01

    A series of cellulose acetate membranes were prepared by using formamide as additive, and then were hydrolyzedin 4 wt% aqueous NaOH solution for 8 h to obtain regenerated cellulose membranes. The dependence of degree ofsubstitution, structure, porous properties, solubility and thermal stability on hydrolysis time was studied by chemical titration,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction, and differentialscanning calorimetry, respectively. The results indicated that the pore size of the regenerated cellulose membranes wasslightly smaller than that of cellulose acetate membrane, while solvent-resistance, crystallinity and thermostability weresignificantly improved. This work provides a simple way to prepare the porous cellulose membranes, which not only kept thegood pore characteristics of cellulose acetate membranes, but also possessed solvent-resistance, high crystallinity andthermostability. Therefore, the application range of cellulose acetate membranes can be expanded.

  14. Investigation of age-related decline of microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 in human skin through immunohistochemistry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qian; Chen, Siming; Chen, Ying; Lyga, John; Wyborski, Russell; Santhanam, Uma

    2013-01-01

    During aging, the reduction of elastic and collagen fibers in dermis can lead to skin atrophy, fragility, and aged appearance, such as increased facial wrinkling and sagging. Microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (MAGP-1) is an extracellular matrix protein critical for elastic fiber assembly. It integrates and stabilizes the microfibril and elastin matrix network that helps the skin to endure mechanical stretch and recoil. However, the observation of MAGP-1 during skin aging and its function in the dermis has not been established. To better understand age-related changes in the dermis, we investigated MAGP-1 during skin aging and photoaging, using a combination of in vitro and in vivo studies. Gene expression by microarray was performed using human skin biopsies from young and aged female donors. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis on the MAGP-1 protein was performed in dermal fibroblast cultures and in human skin biopsies. Specific antibodies against MAGP-1 and fibrillin-1 were used to examine protein expression and extracellular matrix structure in the dermis via biopsies from donors of multiple age groups. A reduction of the MAGP-1 gene and protein levels were observed in human skin with increasing age and photoexposure, indicating a loss of the functional MAGP-1 fiber network and a lack of structural support in the dermis. Loss of MAGP-1 around the hair follicle/pore areas was also observed, suggesting a possible correlation between MAGP-1 loss and enlarged pores in aged skin. Our findings demonstrate that a critical "pre-elasticity" component, MAGP-1, declines with aging and photoaging. Such changes may contribute to age-related loss of dermal integrity and perifollicular structural support, which may lead to skin fragility, sagging, and enlarged pores.

  15. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  16. The cellulose resource matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, E.R.P.; Yilmaz, G.; Dam, van J.E.G.

    2013-01-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where

  17. Fatigue damage evaluation of plain woven carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) modified with MFC (micro-fibrillated cellulose) by thermo-elastic damage analysis (TDA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Ryohei; Okubo, Kazuya; Fujii, Toru

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate characteristics of fatigue damage of CFRP modified with MFC by TDA under tensile cyclic loading. In this paper, fatigue life of CFRP modified with MFC was investigated under cyclic loading. Characteristics of fatigue damage of CFRP modified with MFC were evaluated by thermo-elastic damage analysis. Maximum improvement in fatigue life was also obtained under cyclic loading when epoxy matrix was enhanced with 0.3wt% of MFC as well as under static loading. Result of TDA showed same tendency as the result of fatigue test, and the result of TDA well expressed the fatigue damage behavior of plain woven CFRP plate. Eventually, TDA was effective for clear understanding the degree of fatigue damage progression of CFRP modified with MFC.

  18. Cellulose Isolation Methodology for NMR Analysis of Cellulose Ultrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Art J. Ragauskas

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain accurate information about the ultrastructure of cellulose from native biomass by 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy the cellulose component must be isolated due to overlapping resonances from both lignin and hemicellulose. Typically, cellulose isolation has been achieved via holocellulose pulping to remove lignin followed by an acid hydrolysis procedure to remove the hemicellulose components. Using 13C CP/MAS NMR and non-linear line-fitting of the cellulose C4 region, it was observed that the standard acid hydrolysis procedure caused an apparent increase in crystallinity of ~10% or less on the cellulose isolated from Populus holocellulose. We have examined the effect of the cellulose isolation method, particularly the acid treatment time for hemicellulose removal, on cellulose ultrastructural characteristics by studying these effects on cotton, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC and holocellulose pulped Populus. 13C CP/MAS NMR of MCC indicated that holocellulose pulping and acid hydrolysis has little effect on the crystalline ultrastructural components of cellulose. Although any chemical method to isolate cellulose from native biomass will invariably alter substrate characteristics, especially those related to regions accessible to solvents, we found those changes to be minimal and consistent in samples of typical crystallinity and lignin/hemicellulose content. Based on the rate of the hemicellulose removal, as determined by HPLC-carbohydrate analysis and magnitude of cellulose ultrastructural alteration, the most suitable cellulose isolation methodology utilizes a treatment of 2.5 M HCl at 100 °C for a standard residence time between 1.5 and 4 h. However, for the most accurate crystallinity results this residence time should be determined empirically for a particular sample.

  19. Gremlin-1 associates with fibrillin microfibrils in vivo and regulates mesothelioma cell survival through transcription factor slug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminen, J A; Parviainen, V; Rönty, M; Wohl, A P; Murray, L; Joenväärä, S; Varjosalo, M; Leppäranta, O; Ritvos, O; Sengle, G; Renkonen, R; Myllärniemi, M; Koli, K

    2013-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a form of cancer that is highly resistant to conventional cancer therapy for which no major therapeutic advances have been introduced. Here, we identify gremlin-1, a known bone morphogenetic protein inhibitor crucial for embryonic development, as a potential therapeutic target for mesothelioma. We found high expression levels of gremlin-1 in the mesothelioma tumor tissue, as well as in primary mesothelioma cells cultured from pleural effusion samples. Downregulation of gremlin-1 expression by siRNA-mediated silencing in a mesothelioma cell line inhibited cell proliferation. This was associated with downregulation of the transcription factor slug as well as mesenchymal proteins linked to cancer epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Further, resistance to paclitaxel-induced cell death was associated with high gremlin-1 and slug expression. Treatment of gremlin-1-silenced mesothelioma cells with paclitaxel or pemetrexed resulted in efficient loss of cell survival. Finally, our data suggest that concomitant upregulation of fibrillin-2 in mesothelioma provides a mechanism for extracellular localization of gremlin-1 to the tumor microenvironment. This was supported by the demonstration of interactions between gremlin-1, and fibrillin-1 and -2 peptides as well as by colocalization of gremlin-1 to fibrillin microfibrils in cells and tumor tissue samples. Our data suggest that gremlin-1 is also a potential target for overcoming drug resistance in mesothelioma. PMID:23978876

  20. Acetoacetylation of Hydroxyethyl Cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓锋; 高彦芳; 杜奕; 刘德山

    2002-01-01

    The acetoacetyl group can be used to improve superabsorbent resins since it is more active than the hydroxyethyl group. The acetoacetyl group can be introduced into the side group of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) to activate HEC using the ester exchange reaction between HEC and ethyl acetoacetate (EAA) to improve HEC grafting. This paper discusses the main factors affecting the reaction, such as the amount of EAA and catalyzer, the reaction temperature, and the reaction time. The acetoacetyl group was successfully introduced into HEC. Within specified ranges, increasing the amount of EAA, the reaction temperature and the reaction time will increase the acetoacetylation.

  1. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  2. Cellulose Synthesis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan R. White; Ann G. Matthysse

    2004-07-31

    We have cloned the celC gene and its homologue from E. coli, yhjM, in an expression vector and expressed the both genes in E. coli; we have determined that the YhjM protein is able to complement in vitro cellulose synthesis by extracts of A. tumefaciens celC mutants, we have purified the YhjM protein product and are currently examining its enzymatic activity; we have examined whole cell extracts of CelC and various other cellulose mutants and wild type bacteria for the presence of cellulose oligomers and cellulose; we have examined the ability of extracts of wild type and cellulose mutants including CelC to incorporate UDP-14C-glucose into cellulose and into water-soluble, ethanol-insoluble oligosaccharides; we have made mutants which synthesize greater amounts of cellulose than the wild type; and we have examined the role of cellulose in the formation of biofilms by A. tumefaciens. In addition we have examined the ability of a putative cellulose synthase gene from the tunicate Ciona savignyi to complement an A. tumefaciens celA mutant. The greatest difference between our knowledge of bacterial cellulose synthesis when we started this project and current knowledge is that in 1999 when we wrote the original grant very few bacteria were known to synthesize cellulose and genes involved in this synthesis were sequenced only from Acetobacter species, A. tumefaciens and Rhizobium leguminosarum. Currently many bacteria are known to synthesize cellulose and genes that may be involved have been sequenced from more than 10 species of bacteria. This additional information has raised the possibility of attempting to use genes from one bacterium to complement mutants in another bacterium. This will enable us to examine the question of which genes are responsible for the three dimensional structure of cellulose (since this differs among bacterial species) and also to examine the interactions between the various proteins required for cellulose synthesis. We have carried out one

  3. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing.

  4. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications

    OpenAIRE

    George J.; Sabapathi SN

    2015-01-01

    Johnsy George, SN Sabapathi Food Engineering and Packaging Division, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka, India Abstract: Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers...

  5. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose...

  6. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethyl cellulose. 573.420 Section 573.420 Food and... Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  7. Cellulose Nanomaterials in Water Treatment Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles François; Mark R. Wiesner

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials’ potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials’ beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, ...

  8. Conductivity of microfibrillar polymer-polymer composites with CNT-loaded microfibrils or compatibilizer: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fakirov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Conductive polymer composites have wide ranging applications, but when they are produced by conventional melt blending, high conductive filler loadings are normally required, hindering their processability and reducing mechanical properties. In this study, two types of polymer-polymer composites were studied: i microfibrillar composites (MFC of polypropylene (PP and 5 wt% carbon nanotube (CNT loaded poly(butylene terephthalate (PBT as reinforcement, and ii maleic anhydride-grafted polypropylene (PP-g-MA compatibilizer, loaded with 5 wt% CNTs introduced into an MFC of PP and poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET in concentrations of 5 and 10 wt%. For the compatibilized composite type, PP and PET were melt-blended, cold-drawn and pelletized, followed by dry-mixing with PP-g-MA/CNT, re-extrusion at 200°C, and cold-drawing. The drawn blends produced were compression moulded to produce sheets with MFC structure. Using scanning electron microscopy, CNTs coated with PP-g-MA could be observed at the interface between PP matrix and PET microfibrils in the compatibilized blends. The volume resistivities tested by four-point test method were: 2.87•108 and 9.93•107 Ω•cm for the 66.5/28.5/5 and 63/27/10 (by wt% PP/PET/(PP-g-MA/CNT blends, corresponding to total CNT loadings (in the composites of 0.07 vol% (0.24 wt% and 0.14 vol% (0.46 wt%, respectively. For the non-compatibilized MFC types based on PP/(PBT/CNT with higher and lower melt flow grades of PP, the resistivities of 70/(95/5 blends were 1.9•106 and 1.5•107 Ω•cm, respectively, corresponding to a total filler loading (in the composite of 0.44 vol% (1.5 wt% in both MFCs.

  9. Collagen VI microfibril formation is abolished by an {alpha}2(VI) von Willebrand factor type A domain mutation in a patient with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Leona D; Zamurs, Laura K; Beecher, Nicola; Baker, Naomi L; Peat, Rachel A; Adams, Naomi E; Bateman, John F; North, Kathryn N; Baldock, Clair; Lamandé, Shireen R

    2010-10-22

    Collagen VI is an extracellular protein that most often contains the three genetically distinct polypeptide chains, α1(VI), α2(VI), and α3(VI), although three recently identified chains, α4(VI), α5(VI), and α6(VI), may replace α3(VI) in some situations. Each chain has a triple helix flanked by N- and C-terminal globular domains that share homology with the von Willebrand factor type A (VWA) domains. During biosynthesis, the three chains come together to form triple helical monomers, which then assemble into dimers and tetramers. Tetramers are secreted from the cell and align end-to-end to form microfibrils. The precise molecular mechanisms responsible for assembly are unclear. Mutations in the three collagen VI genes can disrupt collagen VI biosynthesis and matrix organization and are the cause of the inherited disorders Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. We have identified a Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy patient with compound heterozygous mutations in α2(VI). The first mutation causes skipping of exon 24, and the mRNA is degraded by nonsense-mediated decay. The second mutation is a two-amino acid deletion in the C1 VWA domain. Recombinant C1 domains containing the deletion are insoluble and retained intracellularly, indicating that the mutation has detrimental effects on domain folding and structure. Despite this, mutant α2(VI) chains retain the ability to associate into monomers, dimers, and tetramers. However, we show that secreted mutant tetramers containing structurally abnormal C1 VWA domains are unable to associate further into microfibrils, directly demonstrating the critical importance of a correctly folded α2(VI) C1 domain in microfibril formation.

  10. Bacterial cellulose/boehmite composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvi, Denise T.B. de; Barud, Hernane S.; Messaddeq, Younes; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho. UNESP. Instituto de Quimica de Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Caiut, Jose Mauricio A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo. Departamento de Quimica - FFCLRP/USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Composites based on bacterial cellulose membranes and boehmite were obtained. SEM results indicate that the bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes are totally covered by boehmite and obtained XRD patterns suggest structural changes due to this boehmite addition. Thermal stability is accessed through TG curves and is dependent on boehmite content. Transparency is high comparing to pure BC as can be seen through UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  11. Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyley, Samuel; Thielemans, Wim

    2014-06-01

    Chemical modification of cellulose nanocrystals is an increasingly popular topic in the literature. This review analyses the type of cellulose nanocrystal modification reactions that have been published in the literature thus far and looks at the steps that have been taken towards analysing the products of the nanocrystal modifications. The main categories of reactions carried out on cellulose nanocrystals are oxidations, esterifications, amidations, carbamations and etherifications. More recently nucleophilic substitutions have been used to introduce more complex functionality to cellulose nanocrystals. Multi-step modifications are also considered. This review emphasizes quantification of modification at the nanocrystal surface in terms of degree of substitution and the validity of conclusions drawn from different analysis techniques in this area. The mechanisms of the modification reactions are presented and considered with respect to the effect on the outcome of the reactions. While great strides have been made in the quality of analytical data published in the field of cellulose nanocrystal modification, there is still vast scope for improvement, both in data quality and the quality of analysis of data. Given the difficulty of surface analysis, cross-checking of results from different analysis techniques is fundamental for the development of reliable cellulose nanocrystal modification techniques.

  12. Nanomechanics of cellulose crystals and cellulose-based polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakzad, Anahita

    Cellulose-polymer composites have potential applications in aerospace and transportation areas where lightweight materials with high mechanical properties are needed. In addition, these economical and biodegradable composites have been shown to be useful as polymer electrolytes, packaging structures, optoelectronic devices, and medical implants such as wound dressing and bone scaffolds. In spite of the above mentioned advantages and potential applications, due to the difficulties associated with synthesis and processing techniques, application of cellulose crystals (micro and nano sized) for preparation of new composite systems is limited. Cellulose is hydrophilic and polar as opposed to most of common thermoplastics, which are non-polar. This results in complications in addition of cellulose crystals to polymer matrices, and as a result in achieving sufficient dispersion levels, which directly affects the mechanical properties of the composites. As in other composite materials, the properties of cellulose-polymer composites depend on the volume fraction and the properties of individual phases (the reinforcement and the polymer matrix), the dispersion quality of the reinforcement through the matrix and the interaction between CNCs themselves and CNC and the matrix (interphase). In order to develop economical cellulose-polymer composites with superior qualities, the properties of individual cellulose crystals, as well as the effect of dispersion of reinforcements and the interphase on the properties of the final composites should be understood. In this research, the mechanical properties of CNC polymer composites were characterized at the macro and nano scales. A direct correlation was made between: - Dispersion quality and macro-mechanical properties - Nanomechanical properties at the surface and tensile properties - CNC diameter and interphase thickness. Lastly, individual CNCs from different sources were characterized and for the first time size-scale effect on

  13. Ionic liquid processing of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Gurau, Gabriela; Rogers, Robin D

    2012-02-21

    Utilization of natural polymers has attracted increasing attention because of the consumption and over-exploitation of non-renewable resources, such as coal and oil. The development of green processing of cellulose, the most abundant biorenewable material on Earth, is urgent from the viewpoints of both sustainability and environmental protection. The discovery of the dissolution of cellulose in ionic liquids (ILs, salts which melt below 100 °C) provides new opportunities for the processing of this biopolymer, however, many fundamental and practical questions need to be answered in order to determine if this will ultimately be a green or sustainable strategy. In this critical review, the open fundamental questions regarding the interactions of cellulose with both the IL cations and anions in the dissolution process are discussed. Investigations have shown that the interactions between the anion and cellulose play an important role in the solvation of cellulose, however, opinions on the role of the cation are conflicting. Some researchers have concluded that the cations are hydrogen bonding to this biopolymer, while others suggest they are not. Our review of the available data has led us to urge the use of more chemical units of solubility, such as 'g cellulose per mole of IL' or 'mol IL per mol hydroxyl in cellulose' to provide more consistency in data reporting and more insight into the dissolution mechanism. This review will also assess the greenness and sustainability of IL processing of biomass, where it would seem that the choices of cation and anion are critical not only to the science of the dissolution, but to the ultimate 'greenness' of any process (142 references).

  14. Directed Biosynthesis of Oriented Crystalline Cellulose for Advanced Composite Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    Carbon Sources Concentration (%) Fructose 4 Sodium DL-Lactate 0.04 Mineral Salts Concentration (mg/L) FeSO4•7H2O 8.6 CaCl2•H2O 14.7 Na2MoO4• 2H2O ...2.4 ZnSO4•7H2O 1.7 MnSO4•5H2O 1.4 CuSO4 •5H2O 0.05 Vitamins Concentration (mg/L) Inositol 2 nicotinic acid 0.4 pyroxidine hydrochloride 0.4

  15. Bovine latent transforming growth factor beta 1-binding protein 2: molecular cloning, identification of tissue isoforms, and immunolocalization to elastin-associated microfibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, M A; Hatzinikolas, G; Davis, E C; Baker, E; Sutherland, G R; Mecham, R P

    1995-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to fibrillin 1 (MP340), a component of elastin-associated microfibrils, were used to screen cDNA libraries made from bovine nuchal ligament mRNA. One of the selected clones (cL9; 1.2 kb) hybridized on Northern (RNA) blotting with nuchal ligament mRNA to two abundant mRNAs of 9.0 and 7.5 kb, which were clearly distinct from fibrillin mRNA (10 kb). Further library screening and later reverse transcription PCR by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique resulted in the isolation of additional overlapping cDNAs corresponding to about 6.7 kb of the mRNA. The encoded protein exhibited sequence similarity of around 80% with a recently identified human protein named latent transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1)-binding protein 2 (LTBP-2), indicating that the new protein was bovine LTBP-2. This was confirmed by the specific localization of bovine LTBP-2 cDNA probes to human chromosome 14q24.3, which is the locus of the human LTBP-2 gene. The domain structure of bovine LTBP-2 is very similar to that of the human LTBP-2, containing 20 examples of 6-cysteine epidermal growth factor-like repeats, 16 of which have the consensus sequence for calcium binding, together with 4 examples of 8-cysteine motifs characteristic of fibrillins and LTBP-1. A 4-cysteine sequence which is unique to bovine LTBP-2 and which has similarity to the 8-cysteine motifs was also present. Antibodies raised to two unique bovine LTBP-2 peptides specifically localized in tissue sections to the elastin-associated microfibrils, indicating that LTBP-2 is closely associated with these structures. Immunoblotting experiments identified putative LTBP-2 isoforms as a 260-kDa species released into the medium by cultured elastic tissue cells and as larger 290- and 310-kDa species in tissue extracts. A major proportion of tissue-derived LTBP-2 required treatment with 6 M guanidine for solubilization, indicating that the protein was strongly bound to the microfibrils. Most of

  16. Static and Dynamic Characterization of Cellulose Nanofibril Scaffold-Based Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani F. Elhajjar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The reinforcement potential of novel nanocellulose-based scaffolding reinforcements composed of microfibrils 5 to 50 nm in diameter and several microns in length was investigated. The cellulose nanofibril reinforcement was used to produce a three-dimensional scaffolding. A hybrid two-step approach using vacuum pressure and hot pressing was used to integrate the nanocellulose reinforcements in a liquid molding process with an epoxy resin to manufacture composites containing fiber volume contents ranging from 0.6% to 7.5%. The mechanical properties were studied using three-point bending. The Shore-D hardness test and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC were used to investigate the curing response and its relation to the mechanical properties. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA with a three-point bend setup was used to investigate the viscoelastic behavior of the nanocellulose composite samples at various temperatures and dynamic loadings. The results using the proposed liquid resin manufacturing method for processing the nanocellulose composites showed an increased modulus and a lower strain-to-failure compared to neat resin. Dynamic testing showed a trend of lower tan delta peaks and a reduction in the glass transition temperature with the addition of nanocellulose reinforcement.

  17. INFLUENCE OF ADSORBED AND DISSOLVED CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULOSE ON FIBRE SUSPENSION DISPERSING, DEWATERABILITY, AND FINES RETENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrikki Liimatainen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of adsorbed and soluble carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC on dispersing, dewaterability, and fines retention of pulp fibre suspensions was investigated. CMC was added to a suspension in the presence of electrolytes, causing its adsorption to the fibre surfaces, or to a suspension without electrolytes, so that it stayed in the liquid phase. Both the CMC adsorbed on fibre surfaces and that in the liquid phase were able to disperse the fibre suspension due to the ability of CMC to reduce fibre-to-fibre friction in both phases. Adsorbed CMC promoted the formation of a water-rich microfibrillar gel on the fibre surfaces through the spreading out of microfibrils, leading to a decrease in friction at the fibre-fibre contact points and to the increased dispersion of fibres. CMC in the liquid phase of the suspension was in turn thought to prevent fibre-to-fibre contacts due to the large physical size of the CMC molecules. CMC in both phases had detrimental effects on dewatering of the pulp suspension, but adsorbed CMC caused more plugging of the filter cake, and this was attributed to its ability to disperse fibre fines, in particular. Thus, adsorbed CMC also reduced fines retention considerably more than did CMC in the liquid phase of a suspension.

  18. Hydrodynamic alignment and assembly of nanofibrils resulting in strong cellulose filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkansson, Karl M. O.; Fall, Andreas B.; Lundell, Fredrik; Yu, Shun; Krywka, Christina; Roth, Stephan V.; Santoro, Gonzalo; Kvick, Mathias; Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; Wågberg, Lars; Söderberg, L. Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Cellulose nanofibrils can be obtained from trees and have considerable potential as a building block for biobased materials. In order to achieve good properties of these materials, the nanostructure must be controlled. Here we present a process combining hydrodynamic alignment with a dispersion-gel transition that produces homogeneous and smooth filaments from a low-concentration dispersion of cellulose nanofibrils in water. The preferential fibril orientation along the filament direction can be controlled by the process parameters. The specific ultimate strength is considerably higher than previously reported filaments made of cellulose nanofibrils. The strength is even in line with the strongest cellulose pulp fibres extracted from wood with the same degree of fibril alignment. Successful nanoscale alignment before gelation demands a proper separation of the timescales involved. Somewhat surprisingly, the device must not be too small if this is to be achieved.

  19. An improved X-ray diffraction method for cellulose crystallinity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiaohui; Bowden, Mark; Brown, Elvie E; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-06-05

    We show in this work a modified X-ray diffraction method to determine cellulose crystallinity index (CrI). Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) derived from bleached wood pulp was used as a model substrate. Rietveld refinement was applied with consideration of March-Dollase preferred orientation at the (001) plane. In contrast to most previous methods, three distinct amorphous peaks identified from new model samples which used to calculate CrI. A 2 theta range from 10° to 75° was found to be more suitable to determine CrI and crystallite structural parameters such as d-spacing and crystallite size. This method enables a more reliable measurement of CrI of cellulose and may be applicable to other types of cellulose polymorphs.

  20. STRUCTURAL INVESTIGATIONS OF VARIOUS COTTON FIBERS AND COTTON CELLULOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ioelovich

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Macro- and crystalline structure, as well as chemical composition of fibers related to various types and sorts of Israeli cottons, both white and naturally colored, were investigated. The differences in structural parameters and chemical compositions of the cotton fibers were evaluated. Samples of cotton of the “Pima”-type had long, thin and strong fibers with highly ordered supermolecular structure. Fibers of middle-long and hybrid cottons had some lower-ordered structural organization in comparison to long-length cotton, while fibers of naturally colored cotton were characterized with disordered supermolecular and crystalline structure. Dependence of tensile strength on orientation of nano-fibrils towards the fiber axis was found. Conditions of cellulose isolation from the different cotton fibers were studied. Structural characteristics of isolated cotton celluloses and obtained MCC are discussed.

  1. Development of nonflammable cellulosic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttinger, M.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a moldable cellulosic foam for use in Skylab instrument storage cushions is considered. Requirements include density of 10 lb cu ft or less, minimal friability with normal handling, and nonflammability in an atmosphere of 70 percent oxygen and 30 percent nitrogen at 6.2 psia. A study of halogenated foam components was made, including more highly chlorinated binders, halogen-containing additives, and halogenation of the cellulose. The immediate objective was to reduce the density of the foam through reduction in inorganic phosphate without sacrificing flame-retarding properties of the foams. The use of frothing techniques was investigated, with particular emphasis on a urea-formaldehyde foam. Halogen-containing flame retardants were deemphasized in favor of inorganic salts and the preparation of phosphate and sulphate esters of cellulose. Utilization of foam products for civilian applications was also considered.

  2. Biocompatibility of Bacterial Cellulose Based Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Some bacteria can synthesize cellulose when they are cultivated under adequate conditions. These bacteria produce a mat of cellulose on the top of the culture medium, which is formed by a three-dimensional coherent network of pure cellulose nanofibers. Bacterial cellulose (BC) has been widely used in different fields, such as the paper industry, electronics and tissue engineering due to its remarkable mechanical properties, conformability and porosity. Nanocomposites based on BC have received...

  3. The trafficking and behavior of cellulose synthase and a glimpse of potential cellulose synthesis regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Logan BASHLINE; Juan DU; Ying GU

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose biosynthesis is a topic of intensive research not only due to the significance of cellulose in the integrity of plant cell walls,but also due to the potential of using cellulose,a natural carbon source,in the production ot biofuels.Characterization of the composition,regulation,and trafficking of cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs) is critical to an understanding of cellulose biosynthesis as well as the characterization of additional proteins that contribute to the production of cellulose either through direct interactions with CSCs or through indirect mechanisms.In this review,a highlight of a few proteins that appear to affect cellulose biosynthesis,which includes:KORRIGAN (KOR),Cellulose Synthase-Interactive Protein 1 (CSI1),and the poplar microtubule-associated protein,PttMAP20,will accompany a description of cellulose synthase (CESA) behavior and a discussion of CESA trafficking compartments that might act in the regulation of cellulose biosynthesis.

  4. Bioengineering cellulose-hemicellulose networks in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obembe, O.

    2006-01-01

    The interactions between cellulose and hemicellulose in the cell walls are important in the industrial application of the cellulose (natural) fibres. We strive to modify these interactions (i) by interfering with cellulose biosynthesis and (ii) by direct interference of the

  5. Adsorption and desorption of cellulose derivatives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendam, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Cellulose derivatives, in particular carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) are used in many (industrial) applications. The aim of this work is to obtain insight into the adsorption mechanism of cellulose derivatives on solid-liquid interfaces.In chapter 1 of this thesis we discuss some appl

  6. Atomic force microscopy study of cellulose surface interaction controlled by cellulose binding domains

    OpenAIRE

    Nigmatullin, R.; Lovitt, R.; Wright, C; Linder, M.; Nakari-Setälä, T; Gama, F. M.

    2004-01-01

    Colloidal probe microscopy has been used to study the interaction between model cellulose surfaces and the role of cellulose binding domain (CBD), peptides specifically binding to cellulose, in interfacial interaction of cellulose surfaces modified with CBDs. The interaction between pure cellulose surfaces in aqueous electrolyte solution is dominated by double layer repulsive forces with the range and magnitude of the net force dependent on electrolyte concentration. AFM imaging reve...

  7. Physicotechnical, spectroscopic and thermogravimetric properties of powdered cellulose and microcrystalline cellulose derived from groundnut shells

    OpenAIRE

    Chukwuemeka P. Azubuike; Jimson O. Odulaja; Augustine O Okhamafe

    2012-01-01

    α-Cellulose and microcrystalline cellulose powders, derived from agricultural waste products, that have for thepharmaceutical industry, desirable physical (flow) properties were investigated. α–Cellulose (GCN) wasextracted from groundnut shell (an agricultural waste product) using a non-dissolving method based oninorganic reagents. Modification of this α -cellulose was carried out by partially hydrolysing it with 2Nhydrochloric acid under reflux to obtain microcrystalline cellulose (MCGN). Th...

  8. Impact of Biofield Treatment on Chemical and Thermal Properties of Cellulose and Cellulose Acetate

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose being an excellent biopolymer has cemented its place firmly in many industries as a coating material, textile, composites, and biomaterial applications. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of biofield treatment on physicochemical properties of cellulose and cellulose acetate. The cellulose and cellulose acetate were exposed to biofield and further the chemical and thermal properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction study asserted that the biofield treatment did...

  9. Ionic Liquids and Cellulose: Dissolution, Chemical Modification and Preparation of New Cellulosic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Isik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to its abundance and a wide range of beneficial physical and chemical properties, cellulose has become very popular in order to produce materials for various applications. This review summarizes the recent advances in the development of new cellulose materials and technologies using ionic liquids. Dissolution of cellulose in ionic liquids has been used to develop new processing technologies, cellulose functionalization methods and new cellulose materials including blends, composites, fibers and ion gels.

  10. Strength and Water Interactions of Cellulose I Filaments Wet-Spun from Cellulose Nanofibril Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Meri J.; Cunha, A. Gisela; Rojo, Ester; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C.; Rautkari, Lauri; Arboleda, Julio C.; Rojas, Orlando J.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogels comprising cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) were used in the synthesis of continuous filaments via wet-spinning. Hydrogel viscosity and spinnability, as well as orientation and strength of the spun filaments, were found to be strongly affected by the osmotic pressure as determined by CNF surface charge and solid fraction in the spinning dope. The tensile strength, Young’s modulus and degree of orientation (wide-angle X-ray scattering, WAXS) of filaments produced without drawing were 297 MPa, 21 GPa and 83%, respectively, which are remarkable values. A thorough investigation of the interactions with water using dynamic vapour sorption (DVS) experiments revealed the role of sorption sites in the stability of the filaments in wet conditions. DVS analysis during cycles of relative humidity (RH) between 0 and 95% revealed major differences in water uptake by the filaments spun from hydrogels of different charge density (CNF and TEMPO-oxidised CNF). It is concluded that the mechanical performance of filaments in the presence of water deteriorates drastically by the same factors that facilitate fibril alignment and, consequently, enhance dry strength. For the most oriented filaments, the maximum water vapour sorption at 95% RH was 39% based on dry weight.

  11. Orienteering injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering.

  12. Foaming of Ethyl Hydroxyethyl Cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo Agilera, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The current depletion of petroleum resources together with environmental issues have led to new approaches in plastic manufacturing. This trend involves using ecofriendly materials coming from renewable resources. Good candidates for this, due to their properties and availability, are the cellulose derivatives. Some of them, such as hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), showed in previous studies a promising behavior when making polymeric foams. Unfortunately, the corresponding...

  13. Cellulose nanomaterials review: structure, properties and nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Robert J; Martini, Ashlie; Nairn, John; Simonsen, John; Youngblood, Jeff

    2011-07-01

    This critical review provides a processing-structure-property perspective on recent advances in cellulose nanoparticles and composites produced from them. It summarizes cellulose nanoparticles in terms of particle morphology, crystal structure, and properties. Also described are the self-assembly and rheological properties of cellulose nanoparticle suspensions. The methodology of composite processing and resulting properties are fully covered, with an emphasis on neat and high fraction cellulose composites. Additionally, advances in predictive modeling from molecular dynamic simulations of crystalline cellulose to the continuum modeling of composites made with such particles are reviewed (392 references).

  14. The matrix-binding domain of microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 targets active connective tissue growth factor to a fibroblast-produced extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbaum, Justin S; Tranquillo, Robert T; Mecham, Robert P

    2010-11-10

    It is advantageous to use biomaterials in tissue engineering that stimulate extracellular matrix (ECM) production by the cellular component. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) stimulates type I collagen (COL1A1) transcription, but is functionally limited as a free molecule. Using a matrix-binding domain (MBD) from microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1, the fusion protein MBD-CTGF was targeted to the ECM and tested for COL1A1 transcriptional activation. MBD-CTGF produced by the ECM-synthesizing fibroblasts, or provided exogenously, localized to the elastic fiber ECM. MBD-CTGF, but not CTGF alone, led to a two-fold enhancement of COL1A1 expression. This study introduces a targeting technology that can be used to elevate collagen transcription in engineered tissues and thereby improve tissue mechanics.

  15. Microfibril-associated Protein 4 Binds to Surfactant Protein A (SP-A) and Colocalizes with SP-A in the Extracellular Matrix of the Lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlosser, Anders; Thomsen, Theresa H.; Shipley, J. Michael;

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an oligomeric collectin that recognizes lipid and carbohydrate moieties present on broad range of micro-organisms, and mediates microbial lysis and clearance. SP-A also modulates multiple immune-related functions including cytokine production and chemotaxis...... for phagocytes. Here we describe the molecular interaction between the extracellular matrix protein microfibril-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) and SP-A. MFAP4 is a collagen-binding molecule containing a C-terminal fibrinogen-like domain and a N-terminal located integrin-binding motif. We produced recombinant MFAP4...... with a molecular mass of 36 and 66 kDa in the reduced and unreduced states respectively. Gel filtration chromatography and chemical crosslinking showed that MFAP4 forms oligomers of four dimers. We demonstrated calcium-dependent binding between MFAP4 and human SP-A1 and SP-A2. No binding was seen to recombinant SP...

  16. Cellulose nanomaterials in water treatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles-François; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-05-05

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials' potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials' beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, including their high surface area-to-volume ratio, low environmental impact, high strength, functionalizability, and sustainability. We make direct comparison between cellulose nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of physical and chemical properties, production costs, use and disposal in order to show the potential of cellulose nanomaterials as a sustainable replacement for CNTs in water treatment technologies. Finally, we comment on the need for improved communication and collaboration across the myriad industries invested in cellulose nanomaterials production and development to achieve an efficient means to commercialization.

  17. Orientation and the Young Orienteer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, S. E.; Martland, J. R.

    Orientation within orienteering is dependent on the use of two basic strategies; that is, either a compass or Magnetic-North-based strategy, which relies on the use of one set of information; or the use of a map and landmark-based strategy which relies on the use of at least two sets of information. Walsh and found that, when given the choice, young children use the compass-based strategy when following complex potentially disorientating routes.The efficacy of these two basic orientation strategies was investigated within three different orienteering environments: (1) a familiar known environment; (2) a familiar unknown environment and (3) an unfamiliar unknown environment.Subjects, age range from 9 to 10think aloud particularly the introduction of basic skills to young performers. They support the argument that is essential to introduce the map and compass simultaneously and that relocation and orientation skills should be coached concurrently.

  18. From Cellulosic Based Liquid Crystalline Sheared Solutions to 1D and 2D Soft Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Godinho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystalline cellulosic-based solutions described by distinctive properties are at the origin of different kinds of multifunctional materials with unique characteristics. These solutions can form chiral nematic phases at rest, with tuneable photonic behavior, and exhibit a complex behavior associated with the onset of a network of director field defects under shear. Techniques, such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Rheology coupled with NMR (Rheo-NMR, rheology, optical methods, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Wide Angle X-rays Scattering (WAXS, were extensively used to enlighten the liquid crystalline characteristics of these cellulosic solutions. Cellulosic films produced by shear casting and fibers by electrospinning, from these liquid crystalline solutions, have regained wider attention due to recognition of their innovative properties associated to their biocompatibility. Electrospun membranes composed by helical and spiral shape fibers allow the achievement of large surface areas, leading to the improvement of the performance of this kind of systems. The moisture response, light modulated, wettability and the capability of orienting protein and cellulose crystals, opened a wide range of new applications to the shear casted films. Characterization by NMR, X-rays, tensile tests, AFM, and optical methods allowed detailed characterization of those soft cellulosic materials. In this work, special attention will be given to recent developments, including, among others, a moisture driven cellulosic motor and electro-optical devices.

  19. Analyzing Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Archaeoastronomical field survey typically involves the measurement of structural orientations (i.e., orientations along and between built structures) in relation to the visible landscape and particularly the surrounding horizon. This chapter focuses on the process of analyzing the astronomical potential of oriented structures, whether in the field or as a desktop appraisal, with the aim of establishing the archaeoastronomical "facts". It does not address questions of data selection (see instead Chap. 25, "Best Practice for Evaluating the Astronomical Significance of Archaeological Sites", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_25) or interpretation (see Chap. 24, "Nature and Analysis of Material Evidence Relevant to Archaeoastronomy", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_22). The main necessity is to determine the azimuth, horizon altitude, and declination in the direction "indicated" by any structural orientation. Normally, there are a range of possibilities, reflecting the various errors and uncertainties in estimating the intended (or, at least, the constructed) orientation, and in more formal approaches an attempt is made to assign a probability distribution extending over a spread of declinations. These probability distributions can then be cumulated in order to visualize and analyze the combined data from several orientations, so as to identify any consistent astronomical associations that can then be correlated with the declinations of particular astronomical objects or phenomena at any era in the past. The whole process raises various procedural and methodological issues and does not proceed in isolation from the consideration of corroborative data, which is essential in order to develop viable cultural interpretations.

  20. Cellulose nanocrystal submonolayers by spin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontturi, Eero; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Kontturi, Katri S; Ahonen, Päivi; Thüne, Peter C; Laine, Janne

    2007-09-11

    Dilute concentrations of cellulose nanocrystal solutions were spin coated onto different substrates to investigate the effect of the substrate on the nanocrystal submonolayers. Three substrates were probed: silica, titania, and amorphous cellulose. According to atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, anionic cellulose nanocrystals formed small aggregates on the anionic silica substrate, whereas a uniform two-dimensional distribution of nanocrystals was achieved on the cationic titania substrate. The uniform distribution of cellulose nanocrystal submonolayers on titania is an important factor when dimensional analysis of the nanocrystals is desired. Furthermore, the amount of nanocrystals deposited on titania was multifold in comparison to the amounts on silica, as revealed by AFM image analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Amorphous cellulose, the third substrate, resulted in a somewhat homogeneous distribution of the nanocrystal submonolayers, but the amounts were as low as those on the silica substrate. These differences in the cellulose nanocrystal deposition were attributed to electrostatic effects: anionic cellulose nanocrystals are adsorbed on cationic titania in addition to the normal spin coating deposition. The anionic silica surface, on the other hand, causes aggregation of the weakly anionic cellulose nanocrystals which are forced on the repulsive substrate by spin coating. The electrostatically driven adsorption also influences the film thickness of continuous ultrathin films of cellulose nanocrystals. The thicker films of charged nanocrystals on a substrate of opposite charge means that the film thickness is not independent of the substrate when spin coating cellulose nanocrystals in the ultrathin regime (<100 nm).

  1. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  2. CELLULOSE DEGRADATION BY OXIDATIVE ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  3. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 cellulose fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez Miguel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 wild-type strain to hydrolyze cellulose and ferment the degradation products directly to ethanol and other metabolic byproducts makes it an attractive candidate for consolidated bioprocessing of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. In this study, whole-genome microarrays were used to investigate the expression of C. thermocellum mRNA during growth on crystalline cellulose in controlled replicate batch fermentations. Results A time-series analysis of gene expression revealed changes in transcript levels of ~40% of genes (~1300 out of 3198 ORFs encoded in the genome during transition from early-exponential to late-stationary phase. K-means clustering of genes with statistically significant changes in transcript levels identified six distinct clusters of temporal expression. Broadly, genes involved in energy production, translation, glycolysis and amino acid, nucleotide and coenzyme metabolism displayed a decreasing trend in gene expression as cells entered stationary phase. In comparison, genes involved in cell structure and motility, chemotaxis, signal transduction and transcription showed an increasing trend in gene expression. Hierarchical clustering of cellulosome-related genes highlighted temporal changes in composition of this multi-enzyme complex during batch growth on crystalline cellulose, with increased expression of several genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes involved in degradation of non-cellulosic substrates in stationary phase. Conclusions Overall, the results suggest that under low substrate availability, growth slows due to decreased metabolic potential and C. thermocellum alters its gene expression to (i modulate the composition of cellulosomes that are released into the environment with an increased proportion of enzymes than can efficiently degrade plant polysaccharides other than cellulose, (ii enhance signal transduction and chemotaxis mechanisms perhaps to sense

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 cellulose fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeown, Catherine K [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 wild-type strain to hydrolyze cellulose and ferment the degradation products directly to ethanol and other metabolic byproducts makes it an attractive candidate for consolidated bioprocessing of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. In this study, whole-genome microarrays were used to investigate the expression of C. thermocellum mRNA during growth on crystalline cellulose in controlled replicate batch fermentations. A time-series analysis of gene expression revealed changes in transcript levels of {approx}40% of genes ({approx}1300 out of 3198 ORFs encoded in the genome) during transition from early-exponential to late-stationary phase. K-means clustering of genes with statistically significant changes in transcript levels identified six distinct clusters of temporal expression. Broadly, genes involved in energy production, translation, glycolysis and amino acid, nucleotide and coenzyme metabolism displayed a decreasing trend in gene expression as cells entered stationary phase. In comparison, genes involved in cell structure and motility, chemotaxis, signal transduction and transcription showed an increasing trend in gene expression. Hierarchical clustering of cellulosome-related genes highlighted temporal changes in composition of this multi-enzyme complex during batch growth on crystalline cellulose, with increased expression of several genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes involved in degradation of non-cellulosic substrates in stationary phase. Overall, the results suggest that under low substrate availability, growth slows due to decreased metabolic potential and C. thermocellum alters its gene expression to (i) modulate the composition of cellulosomes that are released into the environment with an increased proportion of enzymes than can efficiently degrade plant polysaccharides other than cellulose, (ii) enhance signal transduction and chemotaxis mechanisms perhaps to sense the oligosaccharide hydrolysis products

  5. Flexible Photonic Cellulose Nanocrystal Films

    OpenAIRE

    Guidetti, G.; Atifi, S; Vignolini, S; Hamad, WY

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of self-assembled cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) films of tunable photonic and mechanical properties using a facile, green approach is demonstrated. The combination of tunable flexibility and iridescence can dramatically expand CNC coating and film barrier capabilities for paints and coating applications, sustainable consumer packaging products, as well as effective templates for photonic and optoelectronic materials and structures. CelluForce Inc., Biotechnology and Biologica...

  6. Preparation of 14C Radiolabelled Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Bao-jun; YANG; Hong-wei; LI; Shuai

    2013-01-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulose(CMC)is a kind of cellulose derivative.CMC has wide applications,including food,daily chemicals,pharmaceutical industry and chemical industry,etc.In order to study the metabolism of CMC,the sodium carboxymethyl cellulose was labelled with 14C.The carboxymethyl cellulose was labelled with 14C by treatment with alkalized cellulose and 14C-

  7. Effects of reaction conditions on cellulose structures synthesized in vitro by bacterial cellulose synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttilä, Paavo A; Sugiyama, Junji; Imai, Tomoya

    2016-01-20

    Cellulose was synthesized by cellulose synthases extracted from the Komagataeibacter xylinus (formerly known as Gluconacetobacter xylinus). The effects of temperature and centrifugation of the reaction solution on the synthesis products were investigated. Cellulose with number-average degree of polymerization (DPn) roughly in the range 60-80 and cellulose II crystal structure was produced under all conditions. The amount of cellulose varied with temperature and centrifugation, and the centrifugation at 2000 × g also slightly reduced the DPn. Cellulose production was maximal around the temperature 35 °C and without centrifugation. At higher temperatures and during centrifugation at 2000 × g the proteins started to denature, causing differences also in the morphology of the cellulosic aggregates, as seen with electron microscopy. These observations serve as a basis for discussions about the factors affecting the structure formation and chain length of in vitro synthesized cellulose.

  8. Assessment of solvents for cellulose dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Mohammad; Tsianou, Marina; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2017-03-01

    A necessary step in the processing of biomass is the pretreatment and dissolution of cellulose. A good solvent for cellulose involves high diffusivity, aggressiveness in decrystallization, and capability of disassociating the cellulose chains. However, it is not clear which of these factors and under what conditions should be improved in order to obtain a more effective solvent. To this end, a newly-developed phenomenological model has been applied to assess the controlling mechanism of cellulose dissolution. Among the findings, the cellulose fibers remain crystalline almost to the end of the dissolution process for decrystallization-controlled kinetics. In such solvents, decreasing the fiber crystallinity, e.g., via pretreatment, would result in a considerable increase in the dissolution rate. Such insights improve the understanding of cellulose dissolution and facilitate the selection of more efficient solvents and processing conditions for biomass. Specific examples of solvents are provided where dissolution is limited due to decrystallization or disentanglement.

  9. Cellulose nanomaterials review: structure, properties and nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Robert J.; Martini, Ashlie; Nairn, John; Simonsen, John; Youngblood, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    This critical review provides a processing-structure-property perspective on recent advances in cellulose nanoparticles and composites produced from them. It summarizes cellulose nanoparticles in terms of particle morphology, crystal structure, and properties. Also described are the self-assembly and rheological properties of cellulose nanoparticle suspensions. The methodology of composite processing and resulting properties are fully covered, with an emphasis on neat and high fraction...

  10. Drag Reduction of Bacterial Cellulose Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ogata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag reduction due to bacterial cellulose suspensions with small environmental loading was investigated. Experiments were carried out by measuring the pressure drop in pipe flow. It was found that bacterial cellulose suspensions give rise to drag reduction in the turbulent flow range. We observed a maximum drag reduction ratio of 11% and found that it increased with the concentration of the bacterial cellulose suspension. However, the drag reduction effect decreased in the presence of mechanical shear.

  11. Size Effects of Nano-crystalline Cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Kang LI; Xiao Fang LI; Yong JIANG; Mei Zhen ZENG; En Yong DING

    2003-01-01

    Natural cellulose with the crystal form of cellulose Ⅰ, when treated with condensed lye(e.g. 18%NaOH), can change into new crystal form of cellulose Ⅱ. But the nano-crystallinecellulose(NCC) can do it when only treated with dilute lye (e.g. 1%NaOH) at room temperatureand even can dissolve into slightly concentrated lye (e.g. 4%NaOH).

  12. Alexa Fluor-labeled Fluorescent Cellulose Nanocrystals for Bioimaging Solid Cellulose in Spatially Structured Microenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2015-03-18

    Cellulose nanocrystal materials have been labeled with modern Alexa Fluor dyes in a process that first links the dye to a cyanuric chloride molecule. Subsequent reaction with cellulose nanocrystals provides dyed solid microcrystalline cellulose material that can be used for bioimaging and suitable for deposition in films and spatially structured microenvironments. It is demonstrated with single molecular fluorescence microscopy that these films are subject to hydrolysis by cellulose enzymes.

  13. Plants flex their skeletons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Randy; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2003-01-01

    Recent work on the fragile fiber mutants of Arabidopsis has identified microtubule-associated proteins that affect the orientation of cellulose microfibrils in cell walls, a major determinant of plant elongation growth. These same proteins are implicated in responses to gibberellin, provoking fresh...

  14. Cytocompatible cellulose hydrogels containing trace lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Takaomi

    2016-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was used as a cellulose resource to prepare transparent and flexible cellulose hydrogel films. On the purification process from bagasse to cellulose, the effect of lignin residues in the cellulose was examined for the properties and cytocompatibility of the resultant hydrogel films. The cellulose was dissolved in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide solution and converted to hydrogel films by phase inversion. In the purification process, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment time was changed from 1 to 12h. This resulted in cellulose hydrogel films having small amounts of lignin from 1.62 to 0.68%. The remaining lignin greatly affected hydrogel properties. Water content of the hydrogel films was increased from 1153 to 1525% with a decrease of lignin content. Moreover, lower lignin content caused weakening of tensile strength from 0.80 to 0.43N/mm(2) and elongation from 45.2 to 26.5%. Also, similar tendency was observed in viscoelastic behavior of the cellulose hydrogel films. Evidence was shown that the lignin residue was effective for the high strength of the hydrogel films. In addition, scanning probe microscopy in the morphological observation was suggested that the trace lignin in the cellulose hydrogel affected the cellulose fiber aggregation in the hydrogel network. The trace of lignin in the hydrogels also influenced fibroblast cell culture on the hydrogel films. The hydrogel film containing 1.68% lignin showed better fibroblast compatibility as compared to cell culture polystyrene dish used as reference.

  15. Carboxymethylation of Cellulose by Microwave irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Jun; XIONG Jian; SU Yingzhi; XIAO Ping

    2001-01-01

    @@ Cellulose may be readily converted into ethers involving primary and secondary alcohol groups in each monomer unit and the glycosidic bonds. However, these reactions are rather more complicated than with simple substances, because the stereochemistry of the cellulose molecule is such that the vast majority of its hydroxyl groups form intra-chain hydrogen bonds or inter-chain hydrogen bonds with contiguous molecules. Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) has played an important part in the commercial uses of cellulose derivatives. CMC becomes alkali and water soluble. The polarity can, in fact, be increased by introduction of ionizing groups, ie carboxymethyl group. CMC is generally produced by the reaction of alkali cellulose with chloroacetic acid.

  16. Chemo-catalytic valorization of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palkovits, R. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie

    2012-07-01

    Cellulose can be utilized as carbon source for the production of novel platform molecules as well as fuel motifs. Promising transformation strategies cover the hydrolytic hydrogenation or hydrogenolysis of cellulose to sugar alcohols, the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose followed by dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural or levulinic acid and the further hydrogenation of levulinic acid to {gamma}-valerolactone. Main challenges result from the high degree of functionalization of cellulosic feedstocks. In line, processes are carried out in liquid phase utilizing rather polar solvents and aiming for a tailored defunctionalisation of these oxygen rich compounds. Consequently, such transformations require novel strategies concerning the development of suitable catalysts and appropriate process concepts. (orig.)

  17. Simultaneous cellulose conversion and hydrogen production assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV-light photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guan; Ni, Chengsheng; Huang, Xiubing; Welgamage, Aakash; Lawton, Linda A; Robertson, Peter K J; Irvine, John T S

    2016-01-28

    Photocatalytic conversion of cellulose to sugars and carbon dioxide with simultaneous production of hydrogen assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV or solar light irradiation was achieved upon immobilization of cellulose onto a TiO2 photocatalyst. This approach enables production of hydrogen from water without using valuable sacrificial agents, and provides the possibility for recovering sugars as liquid fuels.

  18. Liquid crystalline solutions of cellulose in phosphoric acid for preparing cellulose yarns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerstoel, H.

    2006-01-01

    The presen thesis describes a new process for manufacturing high tenacity and high modulus cellulose yarns. A new direct solvent for cellulose has been discovered, leading to liquid crystalline solutions. This new solvent, superphosphoric acid, rapidly dissolves cellulose. These liquid crystalline s

  19. High Performance Regenerated Cellulose Membranes from Trimethylsilyl Cellulose

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Ola

    2013-05-01

    Regenerated cellulose (RC) membranes are extensively used in medical and pharmaceutical separation processes due to their biocompatibility, low fouling tendency and solvent resistant properties. They typically possess ultrafiltration and microfiltration separation characteristics, but recently, there have been attempts to widen their pool of applications in nanofiltration processes. In this work, a novel method for preparing high performance composite RC membranes was developed. These membranes reveal molecular weight cut-offs (MWCO) of less than 250 daltons, which possibly put them ahead of all commercial RC membranes and in competition with high performance nanofiltration membranes. The membranes were prepared by acidic hydrolysis of dip-coated trimethylsilyl cellulose (TMSC) films. TMSC, with a degree of silylation (DS) of 2.8, was prepared from microcrystalline cellulose by reaction with hexamethyldisilazane under the homogeneous conditions of LiCl/DMAC solvent system. Effects of parameters, such as coating solution concentration and drying rates, were investigated. It was concluded that higher TMSC concentrations as well as higher solvent evaporation rates favor better MWCOs, mainly due to increase in the selective layer thickness. Successful cross-linking of prepared membranes with glyoxal solutions, in the presence of boric acid as a catalyst, resulted in MWCOs less than 250 daltons. The suitability of this crosslinking reaction for large scale productions was already proven in the manufacturing of durable-press fabrics. For us, the inexpensive raw materials as well as the low reaction times and temperatures were of interest. Moreover, the non-toxic nature of glyoxal is a key advantage in medical and pharmaceutical applications. The membranes prepared in this work are strong candidates for separation of small organic solutes from organic solvents streams in pharmaceutical industries. Their hydrophilicity, compared to typical nanofiltration membranes, offer

  20. Orienteering club

    CERN Document Server

    Club d'orientation

    2015-01-01

    Course d'orientation La reprise des courses d’orientation était attendue dans la région puisque près de 150 coureurs ont participé à la première épreuve automnale organisée par le club d’orientation du CERN sur le site de La Faucille. Les circuits ont été remportés par Yann Locatelli du club d’Orientation Coeur de Savoie avec 56 secondes d’avance sur Damien Berguerre du club SOS Sallanches pour le parcours technique long, Marie Vuitton du club CO CERN (membre également de l’Equipe de France Jeune) pour le parcours technique moyen avec presque 4 minutes d’avance sur Jeremy Wichoud du club Lausanne-Jorat, Victor Dannecker pour le circuit technique court devant Alina Niggli, Elliot Dannecker pour le facile moyen et Alice Merat sur le facile court, tous membres du club O’Jura. Les résultats comp...

  1. Pyrolytic sugars from cellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhiyil, Najeeb

    Sugars are the feedstocks for many promising advanced cellulosic biofuels. Traditional sugars derived from starch and sugar crops are limited in their availability. In principle, more plentiful supply of sugars can be obtained from depolymerization of cellulose, the most abundant form of biomass in the world. Breaking the glycosidic bonds between the pyranose rings in the cellulose chain to liberate glucose has usually been pursued by enzymatic hydrolysis although a purely thermal depolymerization route to sugars is also possible. Fast pyrolysis of pure cellulose yields primarily levoglucosan, an anhydrosugar that can be hydrolyzed to glucose. However, naturally occurring alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEM) in biomass are strongly catalytic toward ring-breaking reactions that favor formation of light oxygenates over anhydrosugars. Removing the AAEM by washing was shown to be effective in increasing the yield of anhydrosugars; but this process involves removal of large amount of water from biomass that renders it energy intensive and thereby impractical. In this work passivation of the AAEM (making them less active or inactive) using mineral acid infusion was explored that will increase the yield of anhydrosugars from fast pyrolysis of biomass. Mineral acid infusion was tried by previous researchers, but the possibility of chemical reactions between infused acid and AAEM in the biomass appears to have been overlooked, possibly because metal cations might be expected to already be substantially complexed to chlorine or other strong anions that are found in biomass. Likewise, it appears that previous researchers assumed that as long as AAEM cations were in the biomass, they would be catalytically active regardless of the nature of their complexion with anions. On the contrary, we hypothesized that AAEM can be converted to inactive or less active salts using mineral acids. Various biomass feedstocks were infused with mineral (hydrochloric, nitric, sulfuric and

  2. Utilization of makgeolli sludge filtrate (MSF) as low-cost substrate for bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Jo Yi; Mahanty, Biswanath; Kim, Chang Gyun

    2014-04-01

    Search for efficient low-cost substrate/additives are gaining significant impetus in bacterial cellulose (BC) production. Makgeolli sludge (a traditional Korean wine distillery waste) is enriched with organic acid, alcohol, and sugar. Using makgeolli sludge filtrate (MSF) and Hestrin-Schramm (HS) medium (g/l of distilled water: glucose, 10.0; peptone, 5.0; yeast extract, 5.0; disodium phosphate, 2.7; citric acid, 1.15; pH 5.0), two different media-namely the modified HS media (ingredients of HS media except glucose dissolved in MSF) and mixed modified HS media (equal volume mixture of original and modified HS media)-were formulated. BC production with Gluconacetobacter xylinus was studied using the two above referred medium. Keeping HS medium as reference, effect of initial pH, glucose, ethanol, and organic acid concentration on BC production was also studied. It suggests that increasing initial glucose (up to 25 g/l) though improves BC production but results in poor BC yield above 15 g/l of glucose. However, addition of alcohol (up to 1%v/v) or citric acid (up to 20 mM) escalate productivity up to four and two times, respectively. In both modified HS media and mixed modified HS medium, BC production was four to five times higher than that of original HS medium. Even MSF alone surpassed HS medium in BC production. Scanning electron microscopy showed that BC microfibrils from MSF based media were several micrometers long and about 25-60 nm widths. X-ray diffraction patterns suggested the produced BC were of cellulose I polymorph.

  3. Comparison of physical properties of regenerated cellulose films fabricated with different cellulose feedstocks in ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, JinHui; Wu, Miao; Zhang, QiaoHui; Tan, Xin; Xu, Feng; Zhang, XueMing; Sun, RunCang

    2015-05-05

    With the serious "white pollution" resulted from the non-biodegradable plastic films, considerable attention has been directed toward the development of renewable and biodegradable cellulose-based film materials as substitutes of petroleum-derived materials. In this study, environmentally friendly cellulose films were successfully prepared using different celluloses (pine, cotton, bamboo, MCC) as raw materials and ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate as a solvent. The SEM and AFM indicated that all cellulose films displayed a homogeneous and smooth surface. In addition, the FT-IR and XRD analysis showed the transition from cellulose I to II was occurred after the dissolution and regeneration process. Furthermore, the cellulose films prepared by cotton linters and pine possessed the most excellent thermal stability and mechanical properties, which were suggested by the highest onset temperature (285°C) and tensile stress (120 MPa), respectively. Their excellent properties of regenerated cellulose films are promising for applications in food packaging and medical materials.

  4. Orienteering Club

    CERN Document Server

    Club d'orientation

    2013-01-01

    Courses d’orientation Une bonne dizaine de clubs étaient représentés samedi dernier à La Faucille pour participer à la  2e manche de la coupe genevoise organisée par le club du CERN. Les 120 coureurs ont pu découvrir des parcours classés "technique". Ceux du Haut-Jura familiarisés à ce type de terrain ont pu sortir leur épingle du jeu et se sont octroyé la victoire sur 4 des 5 circuits. Samedi 21 septembre, la montagne du Haut-Jura était encore plébiscitée puisque les coureurs étaient attendus à Saint Cergue sur la carte des Pralies. Pour les résultats complets de La Faucille et les informations sur la prochaine étape, consultez le site du club http://cern.ch/club-orientation.

  5. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  6. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Johnsy George, SN Sabapathi Food Engineering and Packaging Division, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka, India Abstract: Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers are biodegradable and renewable in nature and hence they serve as a sustainable and environmentally friendly material for most applications. These nanocrystals are basically hydrophilic in nature; however, they can be surface functionalized to meet various challenging requirements, such as the development of high-performance nanocomposites, using hydrophobic polymer matrices. Considering the ever-increasing interdisciplinary research being carried out on cellulose nanocrystals, this review aims to collate the knowledge available about the sources, chemical structure, and physical and chemical isolation procedures, as well as describes the mechanical, optical, and rheological properties, of cellulose nanocrystals. Innovative applications in diverse fields such as biomedical engineering, material sciences, electronics, catalysis, etc, wherein these cellulose nanocrystals can be used, are highlighted. Keywords: sources of cellulose, mechanical properties, liquid crystalline nature, surface modification, nanocomposites 

  7. Idealized powder diffraction patterns for cellulose polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellulose samples are routinely analyzed by X-ray diffraction to determine their crystal type (polymorph) and crystallinity. However, the connection is seldom made between those efforts and the crystal structures of cellulose that have been determined with synchrotron X-radiation and neutron diffrac...

  8. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydroxypropyl cellulose. 172.870 Section 172.870... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.870 Hydroxypropyl cellulose. The food additive hydroxypropyl... anhydrous basis, not more than 4.6 hydroxypropyl groups per anhydroglucose unit. The additive has a...

  9. Conformational studies of cellulosic fragments by DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study of cellulosic fragments by DFTr is a continuation of our efforts to produce quality structural data that will be valuable to those working in the field of cellulose structure and enzymatic degradation. Using a reduced basis set and density functional DFTr (B3LYP), optimization of cellulosi...

  10. Diffraction from nonperiodic models of cellulose crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powder and fiber diffraction patterns were calculated for model cellulose crystallites with chains 20 glucose units long. Model sizes ranged from four chains to 169 chains, based on cellulose I' coordinates, and were subjected to various combinations of energy minimization and molecular dynamics (M...

  11. Orientation Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2014-01-01

    COURSE ORIENTATION Résultats de samedi 10 mai    C’est sur une carte entièrement réactualisée dans les bois de Versoix, que plus de 100 coureurs sont venus participer à la course d’orientation, type longue distance, préparée par des membres du club du CERN. Le terrain plutôt plat nécessitait une orientation à grande vitesse, ce qui a donné les podiums suivants :  Technique long avec 17 postes : 1er Jurg Niggli, O’Jura en 52:48, 2e Beat Muller, COLJ Lausanne-Jorat en 58:02, 3e Christophe Vuitton, CO CERN en 58:19 Technique moyen avec 13 postes : 1er Jean-Bernard Zosso, CO CERN, en 46:05 ; 2e Yves Rousselot, Balise 25 Besançon, en 55:11 ; 3e Laurent Merat, O'Jura, en 55:13 Technique court avec 13 postes : 1er Julien Vuitton, CO CERN en 40:59, 2e Marc Baumgartner, CO CERN en 43:18, 3e Yaelle Mathieu en 51:42 Su...

  12. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2013-01-01

    Courses d’orientation ce printemps Le Club d’orientation du CERN vous invite à venir découvrir la course d’orientation et vous propose, en partenariat avec d’autres clubs de la région, une dizaine de courses populaires. Celles-ci ont lieu les samedis après-midi, elles sont ouvertes à tous, quel que soit le niveau, du débutant au sportif confirmé, en famille ou en individuel, en promenade ou en course. Si vous êtes débutant vous pouvez profiter d’une petite initiation offerte par l’organisateur avant de vous lancer sur un parcours. Divers types de parcours sont à votre choix lors de chaque épreuve : facile court (2-3 km), facile moyen (3-5 km), technique court (3-4 km), technique moyen (4-5 km) et technique long (5-7 km). Les dates à retenir sont les suivantes : Samedi 23 mars: Pully (Vd) Samedi 13 avril: Pougny...

  13. BIODEGRADATION OF REGENERATED CELLULOSE FILMS BY FUNGI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lina; LIU Haiqing; ZHENG Lianshuang; ZHANG Jiayao; DU Yumin; LIU Weili

    1996-01-01

    The biodegradability of Aspergillus niger (A. niger), Mucor (M-305) and Trichoderma (T-311) strains on regenerated cellulose films in media was investigated. The results showed that T-311 strain isolated from soil adhered on the cellulose film fragments has stronger degradation effect on the cellulose film than A. niger strain. The weights, molecular weights and tensile strengths of the cellulose films in both shake culture and solid media decreased with incubation time, accompanied by producing CO2 and saccharides. HPLC, IR and released CO2 analysis indicated that the biodegradation products of the regenerated cellulose films mainly contain oligosaccharides, cellobiose, glucose, arabinose, erythrose, glycerose,glycerol, ethanal, formaldehyde and organic acid, the end products were CO2 and water.After a month, the films were completely decomposed by fungi in the media at 30℃.

  14. The valine and lysine residues in the conserved FxVTxK motif are important for the function of phylogenetically distant plant cellulose synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, Erin; Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess; Chaves, Arielle; Wilson, Liza; Wilson, Carmen; Davis, Jonathan K; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Anderson, Charles T; Roberts, Alison W; Haigler, Candace H

    2016-05-01

    Cellulose synthases (CESAs) synthesize the β-1,4-glucan chains that coalesce to form cellulose microfibrils in plant cell walls. In addition to a large cytosolic (catalytic) domain, CESAs have eight predicted transmembrane helices (TMHs). However, analogous to the structure of BcsA, a bacterial CESA, predicted TMH5 in CESA may instead be an interfacial helix. This would place the conserved FxVTxK motif in the plant cell cytosol where it could function as a substrate-gating loop as occurs in BcsA. To define the functional importance of the CESA region containing FxVTxK, we tested five parallel mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana CESA1 and Physcomitrella patens CESA5 in complementation assays of the relevant cesa mutants. In both organisms, the substitution of the valine or lysine residues in FxVTxK severely affected CESA function. In Arabidopsis roots, both changes were correlated with lower cellulose anisotropy, as revealed by Pontamine Fast Scarlet. Analysis of hypocotyl inner cell wall layers by atomic force microscopy showed that two altered versions of Atcesa1 could rescue cell wall phenotypes observed in the mutant background line. Overall, the data show that the FxVTxK motif is functionally important in two phylogenetically distant plant CESAs. The results show that Physcomitrella provides an efficient model for assessing the effects of engineered CESA mutations affecting primary cell wall synthesis and that diverse testing systems can lead to nuanced insights into CESA structure-function relationships. Although CESA membrane topology needs to be experimentally determined, the results support the possibility that the FxVTxK region functions similarly in CESA and BcsA.

  15. Enhancement of Cellulose Degradation by Cattle Saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Yasutaka; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Ryo; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Aburai, Kenichi; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ruike, Tatsushi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Saccharification of cellulose is a promising technique for producing alternative source of energy. However, the efficiency of conversion of cellulose into soluble sugar using any currently available methodology is too low for industrial application. Many additives, such as surfactants, have been shown to enhance the efficiency of cellulose-to-sugar conversion. In this study, we have examined first whether cattle saliva, as an additive, would enhance the cellulase-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose, and subsequently elucidated the mechanism by which cattle saliva enhanced this conversion. Although cattle saliva, by itself, did not degrade cellulose, it enhanced the cellulase-catalyzed degradation of cellulose. Thus, the amount of reducing sugar produced increased approximately 2.9-fold by the addition of cattle saliva. We also found that non-enzymatic proteins, which were present in cattle saliva, were responsible for causing the enhancement effect. Third, the mechanism of cattle saliva mediated enhancement of cellulase activity was probably similar to that of the canonical surfactants. Cattle saliva is available in large amounts easily and cheaply, and it can be used without further purification. Thus, cattle saliva could be a promising additive for efficient saccharification of cellulose on an industrial scale.

  16. Utilization of purified cellulose in fiber studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, M H; Liaw, E T

    1990-01-01

    Purified cellulose-type fiber products are widely used in experimental nutrition. Their use in a broad spectrum of studies may potentially lead to the acceptance of the misconception that the various commercially available cellulose products are equivalent. In this paper we have attempted to show that this is not the case. The comparative structural data of Table 2 and the compositional data of Olsen et al provide examples which indicate that purified cellulose preparations should not necessarily be considered equivalent. Unfortunately, our current lack of understanding of how fibers are metabolized and how they may affect specific physiological parameters makes it difficult to determine which, if any, of the measurable structural and chemical properties will be of relevance for a given in vivo study. At present, it appears that researchers utilizing/evaluating the consequences of consuming a purified cellulose-type fiber would be prudent to provide at least a limited amount of data on the properties of the cellulose preparation used in their studies. The characterization of the cellulose product may be done by a variety of methods depending on the expertise of the laboratory. The methods and results discussed in this paper provide an example of the type of information which may be obtained from an in vitro characterization of cellulose products.

  17. Club Orientation

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2014-01-01

      COURSE ORIENTATION   Pas moins de 100 concurrents sont venus s’affronter sur les parcours proposés par le club d’orientation du CERN ce samedi 26 avril lors de la 4e étape de la coupe genevoise de printemps. Les podiums ont été attribués à :  Technique long avec 19 postes : 1er Yvan Balliot, ASO Annecy en 1:01:39 ; 2e Dominique Fleurent, ASO Annecy, en 1:05:12 ; 3e Rémi Fournier, SOS Sallanches, en 1:05:40. Technique moyen avec 14 postes : 1er Jean-Bernard Zosso, CO CERN, en 46:42 ; 2e Céline Zosso, CO CERN, en 50:51 ; 3e Clément Poncet, O’Jura Prémanon, en 51:27. Technique court avec 13 postes : 1er Jaakko Murtomaki, YKV Seinaejoki, en 36:04 ; 2e Marc Baumgartner en 41:27 ; 3e Natalia Niggli, O’Jura Prémanon, en 52:43. Sur les parcours facile moyen et facile court, victoire respectivement de Stéphanie...

  18. Orienteering club

    CERN Multimedia

    Orienteering Club

    2016-01-01

    Course d'orientation Calendrier des courses d’orientation Coupe genevoise d’automne 2016 Samedi 3 septembre : La Faucille (01) Samedi 10 septembre : Prémanon (39) Samedi 17 septembre : Saint-Cergue (VD) Samedi 24 septembre : Jorat / Corcelles (VD) Samedi 1 octobre: Bière - Ballens (VD) -relais Vendredi 14 octobre : Parc Mon Repos (GE) - nocturne Samedi 15 octobre : Terrasse de Genève (74) Samedi 29 octobre : Bonmont (VD) Samedi 5 novembre : Pomier (74) – one-man-relay - Finale   Courses ouvertes à toutes et à tous, sportifs, familles, débutants ou confirmés, du CERN ou d’ailleurs. Cinq circuits disponibles, ceci va du facile court (2 km) adapté aux débutants et aux enfants jusqu’au parcours technique long de 6 km pour les chevronnés en passant par les parcours facile moyen (4&am...

  19. COURSE ORIENTATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation du CERN

    2015-01-01

      Les coureurs d’orientation de la région se sont donné rendez-vous samedi dernier dans les bois de Pougny/Challex lors de l’épreuve organisée par le club d’orientation du CERN. La carte proposée pour les 5 circuits offrait aussi bien un coté très technique avec un relief pentu qu’un coté avec de grandes zones plates à forêt claire. Le parcours technique long comportant 20 postes a été remporté par Beat Muller du COLJ Lausanne en 56:26 devançant Denis Komarov, CO CERN en 57:30 et Yvan Balliot, ASO Annecy en 57:46. Pour les autres circuits les résultats sont les suivants: Technique moyen (13 postes): 1er Joël Mathieu en 52:32 à une seconde du 2e Vladimir Kuznetsov, COLJ Lausanne-Jorat, 3e Jean-Bernard Zosso, CO CERN, en 54:01 Technique court (12 postes): 1er Lennart Jirden, ...

  20. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2010-01-01

    COURSE D’ORIENTATION La finale de la coupe de printemps Après avoir remporté le challenge club, samedi 29 juin lors du relais inter-club à Lausanne, le Club d’orientation du CERN organisait la dernière étape de la coupe genevoise de printemps samedi 5 juin à Saint-Cergue dans les bois de Monteret (Canton de Vaud). Plus de 100 participants se sont déplacés pour venir participer à la finale et découvrir une toute nouvelle carte dans une forêt vallonnée. Les résultats pour chaque circuit de cette étape sont : Technique long : 1. Jurg Niggli du club O’Jura, 2. Clément Poncet, 3. Oystein Midttun. Technique moyen : 1. Zoltan Trocsanyi CO CERN, 2. Christophe Ingold, 3. Christina Falga. Technique court : 1. Pierre-Andre Baum, CARE Vevey, 2. Emese Szunyog, 3. Solène Balay. Facile moyen : 1. Elisa P...

  1. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'Orientation

    2017-01-01

    Calendrier des courses de la Coupe Genevoise – printemps 2017 Club d'orientation - Julien,  jeune membre du club. Le Club d’orientation du CERN, en partenariat avec d’autres clubs de la région, vous propose une série de courses populaires, qui se dérouleront des deux côtés de la frontière franco-suisse, à savoir : Samedi 1 avril : Pougny/Challex (01) Samedi 8 avril: Ballens (VD) Samedi 22 avril: Apples (VD) Samedi 29 avril: Mont Mussy (01) Samedi 6 mai: Prémanon (39) Samedi 13 mai: Mont Mourex (01) Samedi 20 mai: Prévondavaux (VD) Samedi 10 juin: Chancy/Valleiry (74) Samedi 17 juin: Trélex - Finale (VD) Ces courses sont ouvertes à tous, quel que soit le niveau, du débutant au sportif confirmé, en famille ou en individuel. Les inscriptions sur un des 5 parcours proposés se font sur place le jour de...

  2. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'Orientation

    2012-01-01

     Course d’orientation C’est sous un magnifique soleil que s’est tenue la 7e épreuve de la coupe genevoise organisée par le club d’orientation du CERN. Les organisateurs avaient concocté des parcours assez techniques sur le site de La Faucille. Sur le parcours technique long, beau podium avec la victoire de Domenico Lepori (double médaillés aux championnats du monde en 2010 en vétéran) du club Care Vevey en 1:00:23, juste devant Jürg Niggli du club O’Jura en 1:00:56 puis Beat Mueller du club Lausanne-Jorat en 1:04:28. Sur le parcours technique moyen, Franck Longchampt s’est octroyé la première place, sur le parcours technique court, le jeune Julien Vuitton, qui n’a pas tout à fait 11 ans, a remporté son circuit. Coté parcours facile moyen, Victor Kuznetsov a une fois de plus gagn&eacut...

  3. Orienteering club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2010-01-01

    Course d’orientation : Coupe Genevoise de printemps 2010 Et c’est reparti pour une nouvelle saison! Pour cette coupe de printemps 2010, le Club d’Orientation du CERN, en partenariat avec d’autres clubs de la région, vous propose le calendrier suivant: – samedi 20 mars : Cossonay (Vd) – samedi 10 avril : Echallens (Vd) – samedi 17 avril : Trélex (Vd) – samedi 24 avril : Genolier (Vd) – samedi 1 mai : Vulbens/Valleiry (74) – samedi 8 mai : Bois de la Rippe (Vd) – samedi 29 mai : Sauvabellin (Vd) : relais – samedi 5 juin: St Cergue (Vd) : grande finale Les courses populaires ont lieu en général le samedi après-midi, elles sont ouvertes à tous, quel que soit le niveau, du débutant au sportif confirmé, en famille ou en individuel, en promenade ou en course. Pour cela, divers types de parcours sont &agr...

  4. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'Orientation

    2013-01-01

    Course d’orientation Face aux Championnats de France des Clubs à Poitiers, et à une météo hivernale (vent glaciale et pluie), il ne restait qu’une cinquantaine d’orienteurs pour participer à l’épreuve organisée le samedi 25 mai à Grange-Malval. Les participants ont tout de même bien apprécié les 5 circuits proposés par le Satus Genève. Les résultats sont disponibles sur notre site http://cern.ch/club-orientation. En plus des résultats, vous pourrez noter des informations sur la nouvelle école de CO encadrée par B. Barge, Prof. EPS à Ferney-Voltaire pour les jeunes à partir de 6 ans. La prochaine étape de la coupe genevoise se déroulera samedi 1er juin à Morez (39). Epreuve organisée par le club O’Jura&nb...

  5. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'Orientation

    2015-01-01

    Course orientation C’est au pied du Salève, proche du Golf de Bosset, que le club d’orientation du CERN (CO CERN) a organisé samedi 19 septembre une nouvelle épreuve comptant pour la Coupe Genevoise d’automne. La zone « des Terrasses de Genève » avait été cartographiée et mise en service l’année dernière. Les participants ont pu apprécier un terrain ludique avec beaucoup de microreliefs, de points d’eau et de gros rochers, le tout au milieu d’une forêt assez claire et agréable à courir. Sur le parcours technique long, le résultat a été très serré puisque Pierrick Merino du club d’Annecy a gagné avec seulement 9 secondes d’avance sur Gaëtan Vuitton (CO CERN) qui confiait avoir perdu beaucoup du te...

  6. Orienteering club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d’Orientation du CERN

    2015-01-01

    Courses d’orientation Nouvelle saison nouveau programme Le Club d’orientation du CERN, en partenariat avec d’autres clubs de la région, vous propose une dizaine de courses populaires comptant pour la coupe Genevoise de printemps: samedi 28 mars: Vernand Dessus samedi 18 avril: Pougny/Challex samedi 25 avril: Chancy/Valleiry samedi 2 mai: Mauvernay samedi 9 mai: Longchaumois samedi 16 mai: Genolier samedi 30 mai: Prevondavaux samedi 6 juin: Biere-Ballens samedi 13 juin: Haut-Jura samedi 20 juin: Bonmont - Finale Ces courses sont ouvertes à tous, quel que soit le niveau, du débutant au sportif confirmé, en famille ou en individuel, en promenade ou en course. Les inscriptions se font sur place le jour de l’épreuve. Si vous êtes débutant, vous pouvez profiter d’une initiation offerte par l’organisateur avant de vous lancer sur un parcours. Le club propose aussi...

  7. A novel cellulose hydrogel prepared from its ionic liquid solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lu; LIN ZhangBi; YANG Xiao; WAN ZhenZhen; CUI ShuXun

    2009-01-01

    A novel cellulose hydrogel is prepared by regenerating cellulose from its ionic liquid solution. The transparency cellulose hydrogel presents a good chemical stability and an acceptable mechanical property. This non-toxic cellulose hydrogel should be biocompatibie and may be useful in the future as a biomaterial.

  8. Model films of cellulose. I. Method development and initial results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunnars, S.; Wågberg, L.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents a new method for the preparation of thin cellulose films. NMMO (N- methylmorpholine- N-oxide) was used to dissolve cellulose and addition of DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) was used to control viscosity of the cellulose solution. A thin layer of the cellulose solution is spin- coated

  9. Chiral Nematic Structure of Cellulose Nanocrystal Suspensions and Films; Polarized Light and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek G. Gray

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellulosic liquid crystalline solutions and suspensions form chiral nematic phases that show a rich variety of optical textures in the liquid crystalline state. These ordered structures may be preserved in solid films prepared by evaporation of solvent or suspending medium. Film formation from aqueous suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC was investigated by polarized light microscopy, optical profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM. An attempt is made to interpret qualitatively the observed textures in terms of the orientation of the cellulose nanocrystals in the suspensions and films, and the changes in orientation caused by the evaporative process. Mass transfer within the evaporating droplet resulted in the formation of raised rings whose magnitude depended on the degree of pinning of the receding contact line. AFM of dry films at short length scales showed a radial orientation of the CNC at the free surface of the film, along with a radial height variation with a period of approximately P/2, ascribed to the anisotropic shrinkage of the chiral nematic structure.

  10. Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Neng; DING Enyong; CHENG Rongshi

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the dispersibility of cellulose nanocrystal(CNC) particles,three difierent grafted reactions of acetylation,hydroxyethylation and hydroxypropylation were introduced to modify the CNC surface.The main advantages of these methods were the simple and easily controlled reaction conditions,and the dispersibility of the resulting products was distinctly improved.The properties of the modified CNC were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FT-IR),13 C nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR),transmission electron microscopy(TEM)and thermogravimetric analyses(TGA).The results indicated mat after desiccation,the modification products could be dispersed again in the proper solvents by ultrasonic treatments,and the diameter of their particles had no obvious changes.However,their thermal degradation behaviors were quite different.The initial decomposition temperature of the modified products via hydroxyethylation or hydroxypropylation was lower than that of modified products via acetylation.

  11. Lyocell, The New Generation of Regenerated Cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éva Borbély

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available For the majority of the last century, commercial routes to regenerated cellulosefibres have coped with the difficulties of making a good cellulose solution by using an easyto dissolve derivative (e.g. xanthane in the case of viscose rayon or complex (e.g.cuprammonium rayon. For the purposes of this paper, advanced cellulosic fibres aredefined as those made from a process involving direct dissolution of cellulose. The firstexamples of such fibres have now been generically designaed as lyocell fibres todistinguish them from rayons, and the first commercial lyocell fibre is Courtaulds’ Tencel.

  12. Oxidizing Cellulose to 2,3-Dialdehyde Cellulose by Sodium Periodate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Shuxian; FENG Yaqing; LIANG Zupei; FU Qiang; ZHANG Enzhong

    2005-01-01

    Study on oxidizing cellulose to 2,3-dialdehyde cellulose by sodium periodate (NaIO4) was carried out. The effects of reaction conditions such as pH of solution, temperature, oxidant concentration, oxidation time, the particle size of 2,3-dialdehyde cellulose and alkali treatment temperature on the dialdehyde concentration of cellulose were investigated in detail. The results show that the aldehyde group content was created while reaction temperature and alkali treatment temperature increased.The most principal factors affecting the aldehyde group content of 2,3-dialdehyde cellulose were found out and the best oxidation conditions were as follows: the pH was 2, the reaction temperature was 45 ℃, the mass ratio of cellulose to NaIO4 was 1/2, the reaction time was 4 h, the alkali treatment temperature was 70 ℃ and smaller particle size was 0.80 mm.

  13. Cellulose-builder: a toolkit for building crystalline structures of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Thiago C F; Skaf, Munir S

    2012-05-30

    Cellulose-builder is a user-friendly program that builds crystalline structures of cellulose of different sizes and geometries. The program generates Cartesian coordinates for all atoms of the specified structure in the Protein Data Bank format, suitable for using as starting configurations in molecular dynamics simulations and other calculations. Crystalline structures of cellulose polymorphs Iα, Iβ, II, and III(I) of practically any size are readily constructed which includes parallelepipeds, plant cell wall cellulose elementary fibrils of any length, and monolayers. Periodic boundary conditions along the crystallographic directions are easily imposed. The program also generates atom connectivity file in PSF format, required by well-known simulation packages such as NAMD, CHARMM, and others. Cellulose-builder is based on the Bash programming language and should run on practically any Unix-like platform, demands very modest hardware, and is freely available for download from ftp://ftp.iqm.unicamp.br/pub/cellulose-builder.

  14. Orienting hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Anna E; Sugarman, Laurence I

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a new frame for understanding hypnosis and its clinical applications. Despite great potential to transform health and care, hypnosis research and clinical integration is impaired in part by centuries of misrepresentation and ignorance about its demonstrated efficacy. The authors contend that advances in the field are primarily encumbered by the lack of distinct boundaries and definitions. Here, hypnosis, trance, and mind are all redefined and grounded in biological, neurological, and psychological phenomena. Solutions are proposed for boundary and language problems associated with hypnosis. The biological role of novelty stimulating an orienting response that, in turn, potentiates systemic plasticity forms the basis for trance. Hypnosis is merely the skill set that perpetuates and influences trance. This formulation meshes with many aspects of Milton Erickson's legacy and Ernest Rossi's recent theory of mind and health. Implications of this hypothesis for clinical skills, professional training, and research are discussed.

  15. Orienteering club

    CERN Document Server

    Club d'orientation

    2011-01-01

    Reprise fin août Le Club d’orientation, en partenariat avec d’autres clubs de la région, vous propose une nouvelle série de courses pour cet automne. Le calendrier à retenir est le suivant : Samedi 27 août : Granges Malval (GE) – type classique Samedi 10 septembre : Lamoura (39) – type classique Samedi 17 septembre : La Dôle (F/VD) – type classique Samedi 24 septembre : Monteret (VD) – relais Samedi 8 octobre : Saint Cergue (VD) – type classique Vendredi 14 octobre : Les Evaux (GE) – nocturne Samedi 15 octobre : Grand Jorat (VD) – type classique Samedi 22 octobre : Pomier (74) – type classique Samedi 5 novembre : Echallens (VD) – type classique Samedi 12 novembre : CERN (GE) - sprint - Finale Généralement cinq circuits sont disponibles : ceci va du facile court (2 km) adapt&eacu...

  16. BIOSYNTHESIS OF BACTERIAL CELLULOSE BY МEDUSOMYCES GISEVII

    OpenAIRE

    E. K. Gladysheva; E. A. Skiba

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Bacterial cellulose is an organic material that is synthesized by microorganisms extracellularly. Bacterial cellulose can be used in various industries. Especially, bacterial cellulose has found its application basically in medicine. The production of bacterial cellulose is a complicated and long process. The principal criterion for the process to be successful is bacterial cellulose to be obtained in a higher yield. Russia is lacking an operating facility to produce bacterial cellul...

  17. Optimizing Extraction of Cellulose and Synthesizing Pharmaceutical Grade Carboxymethyl Sago Cellulose from Malaysian Sago Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Kumar Veeramachineni

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sago biomass is an agro-industrial waste produced in large quantities, mainly in the Asia-Pacific region and in particular South-East Asia. This work focuses on using sago biomass to obtain cellulose as the raw material, through chemical processing using acid hydrolysis, alkaline extraction, chlorination and bleaching, finally converting the material to pharmaceutical grade carboxymethyl sago cellulose (CMSC by carboxymethylation. The cellulose was evaluated using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA, Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and Field Emission Scanning Electronic Microscopy (FESEM. The extracted cellulose was analyzed for cellulose composition, and subsequently modified to CMSC with a degree of substitution (DS 0.6 by typical carboxymethylation reactions. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the crystallinity of the sago cellulose was reduced after carboxymethylation. FTIR and NMR studies indicate that the hydroxyl groups of the cellulose fibers were etherified through carboxymethylation to produce CMSC. Further characterization of the cellulose and CMSC were performed using FESEM and DSC. The purity of CMSC was analyzed according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM International standards. In this case, acid and alkaline treatments coupled with high-pressure defibrillation were found to be effective in depolymerization and defibrillation of the cellulose fibers. The synthesized CMSC also shows no toxicity in the cell line studies and could be exploited as a pharmaceutical excipient.

  18. Pre-irradiation grafting of cellulose and slightly carboxymethylated cellulose (CMC) fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benke, N. [Institute of Isotopes, HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Takacs, E. [Institute of Isotopes, HAS, Budapest (Hungary)]. E-mail: takacs@iki.kfki.hu; Wojnarovits, L. [Institute of Isotopes, HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Borsa, J. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2007-08-15

    Acrylamide, hydroxypropyl acrylate, hydroxypropyl methacrylate and 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate vinyl monomers were grafted onto cellulose as well as onto cellulose of improved accessibility (slightly carboxymethylated cellulose (CMC)) by the pre-irradiation grafting technique. The effect of dose, monomer structure, crosslinking agent and carboxymethylation on the grafting yield was studied and the optimal conditions for the grafting were established. Grafting, with the exception of acrylamide (AAm), decreased the swelling of the samples, which is advantageous for some applications. In case of AAm decrease in swelling was observed only when crosslinking agent was applied. At low doses (<5 kGy) the high accessibility of carboxymethylated cellulose resulted in a higher grafting yield.

  19. Fabrication of polyaniline/carboxymethyl cellulose/cellulose nanofibrous mats and their biosensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jiapeng, E-mail: firgexiao@sina.cn; Pang, Zengyuan, E-mail: pangzengyuan1212@163.com; Yang, Jie, E-mail: young1993@126.com; Huang, Fenglin, E-mail: flhuang@jiangnan.edu.cn; Cai, Yibing, E-mail: yibingcai@jiangnan.edu.cn; Wei, Qufu, E-mail: qfwei@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PANI nanorods have been grown onto the surface of CMC/cellulose nanofibers for the fabrication of biosensor substrate material. • The proposed laccase biosensor exhibited a low detection limit and high sensitivity in the detection of catechol. • Hierarchical PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers are the promising material in the design of high-efficient biosensors. - Abstract: We report a facile approach to synthesizing and immobilizing polyaniline nanorods onto carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified cellulose nanofibers for their biosensing application. Firstly, the hierarchical PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers were fabricated by in situ polymerization of aniline on the CMC-modified cellulose nanofiber. Subsequently, the PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibrous mat modified with laccase (Lac) was used as biosensor substrate material for the detection of catechol. PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers with highly conductive and three dimensional nanostructure were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Under optimum conditions, the Lac/PANI/CMC/cellulose/glassy carbon electrode (GCE) exhibited a fast response time (within 8 s), a linear response range from 0.497 μM to 2.27 mM with a high sensitivity and low detection limit of 0.374 μM (3σ). The developed biosensor also displayed good repeatability, reproducibility as well as selectivity. The results indicated that the composite mat has potential application in enzyme biosensors.

  20. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  1. Reactive Liftoff of Crystalline Cellulose Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Andrew R; Krumm, Christoph; Vinter, Katherine P; Paulsen, Alex D; Zhu, Cheng; Maduskar, Saurabh; Joseph, Kristeen E; Greco, Katharine; Stelatto, Michael; Davis, Eric; Vincent, Brendon; Hermann, Richard; Suszynski, Wieslaw; Schmidt, Lanny D; Fan, Wei; Rothstein, Jonathan P; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2015-06-09

    The condition of heat transfer to lignocellulosic biomass particles during thermal processing at high temperature (>400 °C) dramatically alters the yield and quality of renewable energy and fuels. In this work, crystalline cellulose particles were discovered to lift off heated surfaces by high speed photography similar to the Leidenfrost effect in hot, volatile liquids. Order of magnitude variation in heat transfer rates and cellulose particle lifetimes was observed as intermediate liquid cellulose droplets transitioned from low temperature wetting (500-600 °C) to fully de-wetted, skittering droplets on polished surfaces (>700 °C). Introduction of macroporosity to the heated surface was shown to completely inhibit the cellulose Leidenfrost effect, providing a tunable design parameter to control particle heat transfer rates in industrial biomass reactors.

  2. Efficient cellulose solvent: quaternary ammonium chlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; El Seoud, Omar A; Heinze, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Pure quaternary tetraalkylammonium chlorides with one long alkyl chain dissolved in various organic solvents constitute a new class of cellulose solvents. The electrolytes are prepared in high yields and purity by Menshutkin quaternization, an inexpensive and easy synthesis route. The pure molten tetraalkylammonium chlorides dissolve up to 15 wt% of cellulose. Cosolvents, including N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), may be added in large excess, leading to a system of decreased viscosity. Contrary to the well-established solvent DMA/LiCl, cellulose dissolves in DMA/quaternary ammonium chlorides without any pretreatment. Thus, the use of the new solvent avoids some disadvantages of DMA/LiCl and ionic liquids, the most extensively employed solvents for homogeneous cellulose chemistry.

  3. Rapid saccharification for production of cellulosic biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Seok; Wi, Seung Gon; Lee, Soo Jung; Lee, Yoon-Gyo; Kim, Yeong-Suk; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2014-04-01

    The economical production of biofuels is hindered by the recalcitrance of lignocellulose to processing, causing high consumption of processing enzymes and impeding hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. We determined the major rate-limiting factor in the hydrolysis of popping pre-treated rice straw (PPRS) by examining cellulase adsorption to lignin and cellulose, amorphogenesis of PPRS, and re-hydrolysis. Based on the results, equivalence between enzyme loading and the open structural area of cellulose was required to significantly increase productive adsorption of cellulase and to accelerate enzymatic saccharification of PPRS. Amorphogenesis of PPRS by phosphoric acid treatment to expand open structural area of the cellulose fibers resulted in twofold higher cellulase adsorption and increased the yield of the first re-hydrolysis step from 13% to 46%. The total yield from PPRS was increased to 84% after 3h. These results provide evidence that cellulose structure is one of major effects on the enzymatic hydrolysis.

  4. Carboxymethylation of Cellulose by Microwave irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE; Jun

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose may be readily converted into ethers involving primary and secondary alcohol groups in each monomer unit and the glycosidic bonds. However, these reactions are rather more complicated than with simple substances, because the stereochemistry of the cellulose molecule is such that the vast majority of its hydroxyl groups form intra-chain hydrogen bonds or inter-chain hydrogen bonds with contiguous molecules. Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) has played an important part in the commercial uses of cellulose derivatives. CMC becomes alkali and water soluble. The polarity can, in fact, be increased by introduction of ionizing groups, ie carboxymethyl group. CMC is generally produced by the reaction of alkali cellulose with chloroacetic acid.……

  5. Reactive Liftoff of Crystalline Cellulose Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Andrew R.; Krumm, Christoph; Vinter, Katherine P.; Paulsen, Alex D.; Zhu, Cheng; Maduskar, Saurabh; Joseph, Kristeen E.; Greco, Katharine; Stelatto, Michael; Davis, Eric; Vincent, Brendon; Hermann, Richard; Suszynski, Wieslaw; Schmidt, Lanny D.; Fan, Wei; Rothstein, Jonathan P.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.

    2015-06-01

    The condition of heat transfer to lignocellulosic biomass particles during thermal processing at high temperature (>400 °C) dramatically alters the yield and quality of renewable energy and fuels. In this work, crystalline cellulose particles were discovered to lift off heated surfaces by high speed photography similar to the Leidenfrost effect in hot, volatile liquids. Order of magnitude variation in heat transfer rates and cellulose particle lifetimes was observed as intermediate liquid cellulose droplets transitioned from low temperature wetting (500-600 °C) to fully de-wetted, skittering droplets on polished surfaces (>700 °C). Introduction of macroporosity to the heated surface was shown to completely inhibit the cellulose Leidenfrost effect, providing a tunable design parameter to control particle heat transfer rates in industrial biomass reactors.

  6. Dissolution enthalpies of cellulose in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Helena; Parviainen, Arno; Virtanen, Tommi; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Serimaa, Ritva; Grönqvist, Stina; Maloney, Thaddeus; Maunu, Sirkka Liisa

    2014-11-26

    In this work, interactions between cellulose and ionic liquids were studied calorimetrically and by optical microscopy. Two novel ionic liquids (1,5-Diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium propionate and N-methyl-1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium dimethyl phosphate) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate-water mixtures were used as solvents. Optical microscopy served in finding the extent of dissolution and identifying the dissolution pattern of the cellulose sample. Calorimetric studies identified a peak relating to dissolution of cellulose in solvent. The transition did, however, not indicate complete dissolution, but rather dissolution inside fibre or fibrils. This method was used to study differences between four cellulose samples with different pretreatment or origins.

  7. Cellulose-water interaction: a spectroscopic study

    OpenAIRE

    Lindh, Erik L

    2016-01-01

    The human society of today has a significantly negative impact on the environment and needs to change its way of living towards a more sustainable path if to continue to live on a healthy planet. One path is believed to be an increased usage of naturally degradable and renewable raw materials and, therefore, attention has been focused on the highly abundant biopolymer cellulose. However, a large drawback with cellulose-based materials is the significant change of their mechanical properties w...

  8. Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

    1996-09-01

    Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

  9. Biohydrogen, bioelectricity and bioalcohols from cellulosic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissila, M.

    2013-03-01

    The demand for renewable energy is increasing due to increasing energy demand and global warming associated with increasing use of fossil fuels. Renewable energy can be derived from biological production of energy carriers from cellulosic biomass. These biochemical processes include biomass fermentation to hydrogen, methane and alcohols, and bioelectricity production in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The objective of this study was to investigate the production of different energy carriers (hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol, bioelectricity) through biochemical processes. Hydrogen production potential of a hot spring enrichment culture from different sugars was determined, and hydrogen was produced continuously from xylose. Cellulolytic and hydrogenic cultures were enriched on cellulose, cellulosic pulp materials, and on silage at different process conditions. The enrichment cultures were further characterized. The effect of acid pretreatment on hydrogen production from pulp materials was studied and compared to direct pulp fermentation to hydrogen. Electricity and alcohol(s) were simultaneously produced from xylose in MFCs and the exoelectrogenic and alcohologenic enrichment cultures were characterized. In the end, the energy yields obtained from different biochemical processes were determined and compared. In this study, cultures carrying out simultaneous cellulose hydrolysis and hydrogen fermentation were enriched from different sources at different operational conditions. These cultures were successfully utilized for cellulose to hydrogen fermentation in batch systems. Based on these results further research should be conducted on continuous hydrogen production from cellulosic materials.

  10. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'Orientation

    2011-01-01

    Course d'orientation Avec la CO en nocturne organisée par le club du CERN vendredi 14 octobre au stade des Eveaux (Ge), et la CO à Savigny (Vd) proposée par le club de Lausanne-Jorat le lendemain, les étapes de la coupe genevoise d’automne s’enchainent rapidement. Il ne reste plus que 3 rendez-vous pour boucler la saison. Les premières places devraient certainement se jouer entre des membres du club du CERN, du O’Jura ou de Lausanne-Jorat. La prochaine course du club est programmée pour samedi 22 octobre à Pomier, près de Cruseilles. L’accueil se fera à partir de 12h30 et les départs s’échelonneront de 13h à 15h. * * * * * * * Nouvelle belle victoire samedi 8 octobre à Saint Cergue du jeune finlandais Ville Keskisaari (COLJ) en 50:56 devant Jürg Niggli (O’Jura) en 1:03:32, et Alexandre...

  11. Orienteering club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2013-01-01

    Course d'orientation Finale de la coupe genevoise Rapide et méthodique, voilà les qualités dont il fallait faire preuve pour remporter la dernière étape de la coupe organisée par le club du CERN dans les bois de Monteret. Il s’agissait d’une course au score où chaque concurrent disposait d’un temps imparti pour poinçonner le maximum de balises. Le parcours technique a été remporté par Tomas Shellman et le parcours facile par Victor Dannecker. Cette dernière étape était aussi décisive pour la désignation des lauréats de la coupe genevoise de printemps. Les résultats officiels étaient donnés par le président du club, L. Jirden : Circuit Technique Long : Berni Wehrle, Bruno Barge, Edvins Reisons Circuit Technique Moyen : J.-Bernard Zosso, ...

  12. Orienteering club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2013-01-01

    Course d'orientation Vers les dernières courses de printemps Une centaine de coureurs se sont déplacés sur le site de la Roche Fendue prés de Morez pour gouter à un des 5 parcours proposés par le club du O’Jura. Le terrain était gras mais que peut-on trouver d’autre avec cette météo! Les vainqueurs de chaque circuit sont : Alina Niggli (O’Jura) facile court, Natalja Niggli (O’Jura) facile moyen, Victor Kuznetsov (COLJ) technique court, Yves Rousselot (Balise 25) technique moyen et pour finir François Gonon (O’Jura) avec une victoire haut la main sur le technique long. Il ne reste plus que deux épreuves pour la coupe genevoise de printemps : à savoir samedi 8 juin, course de type longue distance organisée par le club de Lausanne Jorat (COLJ) dans le bois de Seyte sur Mutrux/Concise, inscription de 12h &...

  13. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    CLUB D'ORIENTATION

    2013-01-01

    Calendrier de la coupe d’automne Le Club d’orientation du CERN, en partenariat avec d’autres clubs de la région, vous propose, pour cette nouvelle coupe d’automne genevoise, une série de 10 courses. Le club du O’Jura donnera le coup d’envoi le samedi 31 août. Les courses s’enchaîneront selon le calendrier suivant : Samedi 31 août : Prémanon (39) - longue distance Samedi 14 septembre : La Faucille (01) - longue distance Samedi 21 septembre : Saint Cergue (VD) - longue distance Samedi 28 septembre : Ballens (VD) - relais Samedi 5 octobre : La Pile (VD) - longue distance Vendredi 11 octobre : Les Evaux (GE) - nocturne Samedi 12 octobre : Grand Jorat, Savigny (VD) - longue distance Samedi 19 octobre : Terrasses de Genève (74) - longue distance Samedi 26 octobre : Prémanon (39) - longue distance Samedi 2 novembre : Bois Tollot (GE) - score - Finale Les &a...

  14. Orienteering club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2014-01-01

    Course d'orientation Finale de la coupe d’automne La dernière épreuve de la coupe d’automne organisée par le club s’est déroulée ce samedi 1er novembre avec une course type «one-man-relay» dans la forêt de Trelex (Vd). Les concurrents des circuits techniques devaient parcourir trois boucles et ceux des circuits «faciles» deux boucles, avec changements de carte. Le parcours technique long a été remporté par un membre du club, Berni Wehrle. A l’issue de cette course, le Président du club, L. Jirden annonçait le classement général de la coupe d’automne, basé sur les 6 meilleurs résultats de la saison : Circuit technique long : 1er Juerg Niggli (O’Jura), 2e Berni Wehrle, 3e Beat Mueller. Circuit technique moyen : 1er Laurent Merat (O&r...

  15. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2013-01-01

    Finale de la coupe d’automne La dernière épreuve de la coupe d’automne organisée par le club d’orientation du CERN s’est déroulée ce samedi 2 novembre avec une course au score dans le bois Tollot (GE). Les concurrents disposaient d’un temps imparti pour poinçonner le maximum de balises différemment placées selon le circuit choisi. Juerg Niggli (club O’Jura) a remporté le parcours technique long. A l’issue de cette course, le classement général de la coupe d’automne, basé sur les 6 meilleurs résultats de la saison, est le suivant : Circuit technique long : 1er Juerg Niggli (O’Jura), 2e Bruno Barge, 3e Beat Mueller. Circuit technique moyen : 1er Laurent Merat (O’Jura), 2e Jirden Lennart, 3e Daria Niggli. Circuit technique court : 1er Victor Kuznetsov (COLJ), 2e N...

  16. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2013-01-01

    Course d'orientation Le coup d’envoi de la coupe genevoise a été donné samedi 31 août dans les bois de Combe Froide à Prémanon. Plus de 150 coureurs avaient fait le déplacement. Les parcours facile court, facile moyen et technique court ont été remportés par des coureurs du club O’Jura - Ulysse Dannecker, Léo Lonchampt, Franck Lonchampt, le technique moyen par Pekka Marti du club Ol Biel Seeland et le technique long par Térence Risse du CA Rosé – également membre de l’équipe nationale suisse des moins de 20 ans. Pour le club du CERN, les meilleures résultats ont été obtenus pas Emese Szunyog sur technique court et Marie Vuitton sur technique moyen avec une 4e place. La prochaine course aura lieu samedi 14 septembre à La Faucille. Le club propose aussi...

  17. Orienteering club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2014-01-01

    Course d'orientation C’est sous un beau soleil samedi 4 octobre que s’est déroulée la 6e étape de la Coupe genevoise d’automne organisée par le club. Plus d’une centaine de concurrents provenant de 7 clubs de CO avaient fait le déplacement pour courir sur un des cinq parcours proposés dans les bois de Trélex-Génolier (VD). Le podium est le suivant : Technique long (5,9 km, 19 postes) : 1er Jurg Niggli, O’Jura (1:00:02); 2e Berni Wehrle, CO CERN (1:06:44); 3e Konrad Ehrbar, COLJ (1:07:08) Technique moyen (4,8 km, 18 postes) : 1er Christophe Vuitton, CO CERN (54:25); 2e J.B. Zosso, CO CERN (1:01:19); 3e Jeremy Wichoud, COLJ (1:06:21) Technique court (3,8 km, 14 postes) : 1er Julien Vuitton, CO CERN (36:19); 2e Vladimir Kuznetsov, COLJ (48:47); 3e Natalia Niggli, O’Jura (50:38) Facile moyen (3,2 km, 11 postes) : 1ère Alina Niggli, O&...

  18. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2013-01-01

    De jour comme de nuit Les amateurs de course d’orientation ont pu s’en donner à cœur joie ce week-end puisqu’ils avaient la possibilité de courir sur deux épreuves en moins de 24 heures. En effet, le club du CERN organisait une course de nuit aux Evaux et la 7e étape de la coupe genevoise se tenait samedi après-midi dans les bois du Grand Jorat à Savigny. Les vainqueurs pour chaque course sont : Technique long CO de nuit: Julien Charlemagne, SOS Sallanches CO samedi: Philipp Khlebnikov, ANCO   Technique moyen CO de nuit: Céline Zosso, CO CERN CO samedi: Pavel Khlebnikov, ANCO Technique court CO de nuit: Colas Ginztburger, SOS Sallanches CO samedi: Victor Kuznetsov, COLJ Lausannne Facile moyen CO de nuit: Gaëtan Rickenbacher, CO CERN CO samedi: Tamas Szoke   Facile court CO de nuit:Oriane Rickenbacher, CO CERN CO samedi: Katya Kuznetsov...

  19. Orienteering Club

    CERN Document Server

    Club d'orientation

    2012-01-01

    Finale de la coupe d’automne   La coupe d’automne organisée par le club d’orientation du CERN s’est terminée ce samedi 10 novembre avec une course sprint à Prévessins. C’était la 12e épreuve de la saison. En stage dans la région, Tanya Ryabkina, championne d’Europe en titre et médaillée de bronze en moyenne distance lors des championnats du monde à La Givrine cet été, a fait l’honneur de sa présence et termine 2e à 8 secondes de Trygve Buanes, norvégien du club de Bergen. A l’issue de cette dernière épreuve, le classement général de la coupe d’automne, basé sur les 8 meilleurs résultats de la saison, est ainsi le suivant : Circuit technique long : 1er Jurg Niggli (O&rsqu...

  20. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2011-01-01

    Coupe genevoise, suite Résultats de la course de Saint-Cergue, sur la carte Les Pralies, samedi 17 septembre. Nouvelle victoire du finlandais Ville Keskisaari, du club COLJ sur le parcours technique long avec une belle avance sur le deuxième concurrent Christophe Vuitton du CO CERN. David Cuenin a remporté le parcours technique moyen, Franck Lonchampt du club O’Jura a, lui aussi, remporté à nouveau le parcours technique court, tout comme Julien Vuitton du club CO CERN sur le facile moyen. Pour finir, Stéphane Clément devance Victor Dannecker sur le parcours facile court. Les résultats complets sont disponibles sur le site du club du CERN http://cern.ch/club-orientation. Un abonnement est pris sur le secteur de Saint-Cergue, puisque le club organise les deux prochaines étapes de la coupe genevoise dans le Haut-Jura suisse. Tout d’abord le samedi 24 septembre, un relais inter-club se courr...

  1. Orienteering club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2010-01-01

    COURSE D’ORIENTATION  De La Rippe à Sauvabellin, la coupe genevoise continue ! Le rendez-vous était donné samedi 8 mai aux amateurs de course d’orientation dans les bois de La Rippe (Canton de Vaud). Cette 6e épreuve était organisée par le Club Satus Grutli de Genève. Il est dommage que les participants n’aient pas été aussi nombreux que lors des dernières courses, les Championnats de France des clubs à Dijon ayant certainement retenus plus d’un compétiteur. La première place est revenue à : – Technique long : Berni Wehrle – Technique moyen : Jean-Bernard Zosso – Technique court : Berni Wehrle – Facile moyen : Peter Troscanyi – Facile court : Claire Droz. Il ne restera plus que deux épreuves ...

  2. Orienteering club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2013-01-01

    Courses d’orientation Samedi 20 avril, les organisateurs du Club de CO du CERN ont accueilli au Mont Mourex 70 participants qui n’ont pas hésité à venir malgré la forte bise. Berni Wehrle du CO CERN s’est octroyé la première place en 1:04:49 sur le parcours technique long devant Pyry Kettunen du Saynso Juankoski en 1:06:52, la 3e place revenant à Bruno Barge, CO CERN, à 7 secondes. Les autres parcours ont été remportés par : Technique moyen : 1er Jacques Moisset, Chamonix (47:44), 2e Yves Rousselot, Balise 25 Besançon (57:16), 3e Jean-Bernard Zosso, CO CERN (59:28). Technique court : 1er Victor Kuznetsov, COLJ (51:53), 2e Pierrick Collet, CO CERN (1:12:52), 3e Dominique Balay, CO CERN (1:16:04). Pour les parcours facile moyen et facile court, Ralf Nardini et Léa Nicolas, tous deux du CO CERN, terminaient respectivement premier. Voi...

  3. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'Orientation

    2012-01-01

    Course d'orientation Ces deux dernières semaines, le club a organisé la troisième puis la quatrième étape de la coupe de printemps, une dans la forêt de Collogny/Moissey près de Vulbens, l’autre vers le parcours vita de Trélex. Les résultats sont: Facile court Vulbens : 1er Léo Lonchampt, O’Jura (16:04), 2e Timothée Bazin (23:07), 3e Francesco Pieri (26:57) Trélex : 1er Noora Maurent (23:11), 2e Sarah Stuber, COLJ (26:51), 3e T. Bazin (28:17) Facile moyen Vulbens : 1er Victor Kuznetsov, CO CERN (25:36), 2e Didier Descourvières (28:03), 3e Konstantinos Haider, CO CERN (36:53) Trélex : 1er V. Kuznetsov, COLJ (38:01), 2e K. Haider, CO CERN (43:15), 3e ex aequo Olivia Nguyen et Sven Vietmeier (58:11) Technique court Vulbens : 1er Benoit Bazin (41:21), 2e Colas Gintzburger (55:12), 3e Nathan Freydoz (55:48) Trélex : 1...

  4. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'Orientation

    2012-01-01

    Relais inter-club/Challenge Carlo Milan Samedi dernier, lors de l’épreuve de course d’orientation organisée par le club du O’Jura, le moteur de la discipline était l’esprit d’équipe, puisqu’il était question d’un relais inter-club avec le Challenge Carlo Milan. Les clubs avaient aligné leurs coureurs soit sur le relais technique (trois participants) soit sur le relais facile (deux participants). Côté O’Jura, il fallait noter la participation de François Gonon, champion du monde 2011, côté club du CERN, Marie et Gaëtan Vuitton, jeunes espoirs du club, devaient préparer la piste pour lancer le dernier relayeur. Côté Lausanne-Jorat, il fallait compter sur le très jeune Viktor Kuznetsov. Les 31 équipes engagées n’ont pas m&ea...

  5. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'Orientation

    2012-01-01

     Finale de la coupe de printemps   La dernière course d’orientation comptant pour la Coupe de printemps a eu lieu samedi dernier dans le village des Rousses et vers le Fort. Il s’agissait d’un sprint organisé par le club O’Jura. Les temps de course ont avoisiné les 20 minutes que ce soit pour le parcours technique moyen ou technique long. Tous les habitués étaient au rendez-vous pour venir consolider ou améliorer leur place au classement. A l’issue de cette course, le classement général de la Coupe de printemps prenant en compte les 6 meilleurs résultats des 9 courses était établi et les lauréats de chaque catégorie sont les suivants: Circuit technique long : 1er Berni Wehrle, 2e Bruno Barge, 3e Edvins Reisons. Circuit technique moyen : 1er Jean-Bernard Zosso, 2e Cédric Wehrl&...

  6. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'Orientation

    2015-01-01

    Course orientation Finale de la coupe genevoise La série des courses de printemps s’est achevée samedi dernier dans les bois de Bonmont (Vaud) avec une épreuve «one-man-relay» organisée par le club. Le vainqueur du parcours technique  long, Yann Locatelli (Club de Chambéry Savoie) a réalisé les deux boucles comportant 24 balises avec presque 6 minutes d’avance sur le second concurrent Domenico Lepori (Club CARE Vevey). Cette dernière étape était aussi décisive pour la désignation des lauréats de la coupe genevoise de printemps, en comptabilisant les 6 meilleurs résultats sur les 10 épreuves. Le podium officiel était donné par le président du club, L. Jirden, qui profitait de l’occasion pour remercier tous les participants et également tous les...

  7. Versatile Molding Process for Tough Cellulose Hydrogel Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mutsumi; Shinohara, Yoshie; Takizawa, Junko; Ren, Sixiao; Sagisaka, Kento; Lin, Yudeng; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Hinestroza, Juan P

    2015-11-05

    Shape-persistent and tough cellulose hydrogels were fabricated by a stepwise solvent exchange from a homogeneous ionic liquid solution of cellulose exposure to methanol vapor. The cellulose hydrogels maintain their shapes under changing temperature, pH, and solvents. The micrometer-scale patterns on the mold were precisely transferred onto the surface of cellulose hydrogels. We also succeeded in the spinning of cellulose hydrogel fibers through a dry jet-wet spinning process. The mechanical property of regenerated cellulose fibers improved by the drawing of cellulose hydrogel fibers during the spinning process. This approach for the fabrication of tough cellulose hydrogels is a major advance in the fabrication of cellulose-based structures with defined shapes.

  8. Preparation and Application as the Filler for Elastomers of Flake-Shaped Cellulose Particles and Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Asahiro; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Endo, Takashi; Tanaka, Tatsuya

    Fibrous cellulose made from wood pulp was mechanically milled into flake-shaped cellulose particles(FS-CPs) using a planetary ball mill with additives under several conditions. The average particle diameter of the FS-CPs was ca. 15μm, and the particles were available in a variety of thicknesses by changing the kind of the additives used in the milling process. FS-CPs-reinforced olefinic thermoplastic elastomer composites were prepared under melt mixing and passed through an open roll to orient the particles. The tensile modulus of the composites with a compatibilizer increased with increasing the particle content. The damping properties of the composites improved, compared to the neat elastomer. On the other hand, the fibrous cellulose was suspended in water, followed by wet disk-milled to prepare cellulose nanofibers(CNFs). The wet ground products showed nanoscopic fine morphology. CNFs-reinforced natural rubber(NR) composites were prepared by mixing the water suspension of CNFs with NR latex using a homogenizer. Then, it was dried in an oven and mixed again with vulcanizing ingredients of rubber using an open roll. The tensile properties of the composites improved remarkably by the addition of small amount of CNFs.

  9. Reinforcement of all-cellulose nanocomposite films using native cellulose nanofibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiangqi; He, Xu; Wang, Yaru; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xinxing; Zhang, Xiaodan; Deng, Yulin; Lu, Canhui

    2014-04-15

    All-cellulose nanocomposite films were prepared using native cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) as fillers and lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide (LiCl/DMAc) dissolved regenerated cellulose as the matrix. The CNFs, with diameters in the range of 15-40 nm were obtained by combined physical methods of ultrasonic treatment and high shear homogenization. The morphology, structure, and properties of the nanocomposite films were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical transmittance, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and mechanical testing. The nanocomposite films exhibited good optical transparency, thermal stability, and remarkably enhanced mechanical properties compared to the regenerated cellulose matrix. By varying the CNFs content, the tensile strength of the nanocomposite films increased from 61.56 MPa to 99.92 MPa and the Young's modulus increased from 0.76 GPa to 4.16 GPa. This work provided a promising pathway for manufacturing high performance and environmental-friendly all-cellulose nanocomposites.

  10. Laser cleaning of particulates from paper: Comparison between sized ground wood cellulose and pure cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, S.; Kautek, W.

    2013-07-01

    Visible laser cleaning of charcoal particulates from yellow acid mechanical ground wood cellulose paper was compared with that from bleached sulphite softwood cellulose paper. About one order of magnitude of fluence range is available for a cleaning dynamics between the cleaning threshold and the destruction threshold for two laser pulses. Wood cellulose paper exhibited a higher destruction threshold of the original paper than that of the contaminated specimen because of heat transfer from the hot or evaporating charcoal particulates. In contrast, the contaminated bleached cellulose paper exhibited a higher destruction threshold due to shading by the particulates. The graphite particles are not only detached thermo-mechanically, but also by evaporation or combustion. A cleaning effect was found also outside the illuminated areas due to lateral blasting. Infrared measurements revealed dehydration/dehydrogenation reactions and cross-links by ether bonds together with structural changes of the cellulose chain arrangement and the degree of crystallinity.

  11. Cellulose ethanol is ready to go

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hladik, M. [Iogen Corp., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Ottawa-based Iogen Corporation is a leader in industrial biotechnology with a focus on cellulose-based enzyme technology. The company designed and operates the world's first and largest cellulose ethanol demonstration facility making ethanol from biomass. This presentation described Iogen's cellulose ethanol demonstration facility and outlined the innovative process in which enzymes prepare the plant fibres for fermentation, distillation and finally conversion to cellulose ethanol fuel. Hydrolysis and fermentation are achieved using a multi-stage hydrolysis process. It is anticipated that biorefineries will use the residues from locally grown agriculture to produce the ethanol, but stakeholder alliances will have to be built in order to form the elements of commercialization. Feedstocks, government policy, infrastructure issues, investment climate and ethanol sales all contribute to the success of a commercial plant. An assessment of preliminary global feedstock availability was presented with reference to total wheat, coarse grains, barley, oats, rye, sorghum, rice straw and sugar cane production. To date, the use of cellulose ethanol fuel has been demonstrated in vehicle trials in Bonn, Germany, as well as fleet vehicles operated by Natural Resources Canada and Agriculture Canada. Sample feedstock basins in Germany, Canada and the United States were highlighted. The supply of cellulose feedstock is large enough to contribute significantly to reductions in fossil fuel consumption. The United States Department of Energy claims that cellulose ethanol could displace over 30 per cent of the current petroleum consumption in the United States, and that land resources in the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass. However, technology, financing and government policies are the factors which currently affect the commercialization of emerging technologies. tabs., figs.

  12. Production of Cellulosic Polymers from Agricultural Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. U. Israel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulosic polymers namely cellulose, di-and triacetate were produced from fourteen agricultural wastes; Branch and fiber after oil extraction from oil palm (Elais guineensis, raffia, piassava, bamboo pulp, bamboo bark from raphia palm (Raphia hookeri, stem and cob of maize plant (Zea mays, fruit fiber from coconut fruit (Cocos nucifera, sawdusts from cotton tree (Cossypium hirsutum, pear wood (Manilkara obovata, stem of Southern gamba green (Andropogon tectorus, sugarcane baggase (Saccharium officinarum and plantain stem (Musa paradisiaca. They were subjected to soda pulping and hypochlorite bleaching system. Results obtained show that pulp yield from these materials were: 70.00, 39.59, 55.40, 86.00, 84.60, 80.00, 40.84, 81.67, 35.70, 69.11, 4.54, 47.19, 31.70 and 52.44% respectively. The pulps were acetylated with acetic anhydride in ethanoic acid catalyzed by conc. H2SO4 to obtain cellulose derivatives (Cellulose diacetate and triacetate. The cellulose diacetate yields were 41.20, 17.85, 23.13, 20.80, 20.23, 20.00, 39.00, 44.00, 18.80, 20.75, 20.03, 41.20, 44.00, and 39.00% respectively while the results obtained as average of four determinations for cellulose triacetate yields were: 52.00, 51.00, 43.10, 46.60, 49.00, 35.00, 40.60, 54.00, 57.50, 62.52, 35.70. 52.00, 53.00 and 38.70% respectively for all the agricultural wastes utilized. The presence of these cellulose derivatives was confirmed by a solubility test in acetone and chloroform.

  13. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF BAMBOO NANOCRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengjiao Yu,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC has many potential applications because of its special properties. In this paper, NCC was prepared from bamboo pulp. Bamboo pulp was first pretreated with sodium hydroxide, followed by hydrolysis with sulfuric acid. The concentration of sulfuric acid and the hydrolysis time on the yield of NCC were studied. The results showed that sulfuric acid concentration had larger influence than the hydrolysis time on the yield of NCC. When the temperature was 50oC, the concentration of sulfuric acid was 48wt% and the reaction time was 30 minutes, a high quality of nanocrystalline cellulose was obtained; under these conditions, the length of the nanocrystalline cellulose ranged from 200 nm to 500 nm, the diameter was less than 20 nm, the yield was 15.67wt%, and the crystallinity was 71.98%, which is not only higher than those of cellulose nanocrystals prepared from some non-wood materials, but also higher than bamboo cellulose nanocrystals prepared by other methods.

  14. Cellulose multilayer Membranes manufacture with Ionic liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Livazovic, Sara

    2015-05-09

    Membrane processes are considered energy-efficient for water desalination and treatment. However most membranes are based on polymers prepared from fossil petrochemical sources. The development of multilayer membranes for nanofiltration and ultrafiltration, with thin selective layers of naturally available cellulose has been hampered by the availability of non-aggressive solvents. We propose the manufacture of cellulose membranes based on two approaches: (i) silylation, coating from solutions in tetrahydrofuran, followed by solvent evaporation and cellulose regeneration by acid treatment; (ii) casting from solution in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolum acetate ([C2mim]OAc), an ionic liquid, followed by phase inversion in water. By these methods porous supports could be easily coated with semi-crystalline cellulose. The membranes were hydrophilic with contact angles as low as 22.0°, molecular weight cut-off as low as 3000 g mol-1 with corresponding water permeance of 13.8 Lm−2 h−1 bar−1. Self-standing cellulose membranes were also manufactured without porous substrate, using only ionic liquid as green solvent. This membrane was insoluble in water, tetrahydrofuran, hexane, N,N-dimethylformamide, 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and N,N-dimethylacetamide.

  15. The CELLULOSE-SYNTHASE LIKE C (CSLC) Family of Barley Includes Members that Are Integral Membrane Proteins Targeted to the Plasma Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenny M. Dwivany; Dina Yuli; Rachel A. Burton; Neil J. Shirley; Sarah M. Wilson; Geoffrey B. Fincher; Antony Bacic; Ed Newbigin; Monika S. Doblin

    2009-01-01

    The CELLULOSESYNTHASE-LIKE C(CSLC) family is an ancient lineage within the CELLULOSE SYNTHASE/CEL-LULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE (CESA/CSL) polysaccharide synthase superfamily that is thought to have arisen before the diver-gence of mosses and vascular plants. As studies in the flowering plant Arabidopsis have suggested synthesis of the (1,4)-β-glucan backbone of xyloglucan (XyG), a wall polysaccharide that tethers adjacent cellulose microfibrils to each other, as a probable function for the CSLCs, CSLC function was investigated in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), a species with low amounts of XyG in its walls. Four barley CSLC genes were identified (designated HvCSLC1-4). Phylogenetic analysis reveals three well supported clades of CSLCs in flowering plants, with barley having representatives in two of these clades. The four barley CSLCs were expressed in various tissues, with in situ PCR detecting transcripts in all cell types of the coleoptile and root, including cells with primary and secondary cell walls. Co-expression analysis showed that HvCSLC3 was coor-dinately expressed with putative XyG xylosyltransferase genes. Both immuno-EM and membrane fractionation showed that HvCSLC2 was located in the plasma membrane of barley suspension-cultured cells and was not in internal membranes such as endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus. Based on our current knowledge of the sub-cellular locations of poly-saccharide synthesis, we conclude that the CSLC family probably contains more than one type of polysaccharide synthase.

  16. Rheological properties of aqueous suspension of bacterial cellulose%细菌纤维素水悬浮液的流变特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞; 杜双奎; 李志西; 程正丽; 乔艳霞; 靳玉红

    2014-01-01

    cellulose suspension. Firstly, the surface morphology of bacterial cellulose was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Secondly, the rheological properties of bacterial cellulose suspension were investigated by static and dynamic methods. Specifically, consistency and index of viscosity of bacterial cellulose suspension were determined by a Texture Analyzer (TA) with AB/E35 probe under static condition, and carboxymethyl cellulose(CMC) solution was used as a control. Furthermore, consistency and indexes of viscosity of these two kinds of suspension were compared in the present study. Additionally, the dynamic method was used to study the relationship of shear stress, apparent viscosity and shear rate with a rheometer. Finally, the stability of bacterial cellulose suspension and its improvement ways by centrifugation were studied in this paper. Results showed that the width of bacterial cellulose s was between 60-80 nm. The AFM imagines showed that the microfibrils were randomly arranged with plenty of spaces among them and some s may be gathered to form a parallel or spiral bundle. From the rheology analysis, it was found that the consistency and index of viscosity of bacterial cellulose suspension were significantly higher than those of carboxymethyl cellulose solution. Additionally, when the concentration changed from 0.4% to 1.2% a positive correlation was found between the consistency and viscosity index of bacterial cellulose suspension and the concentration of bacterial cellulose (P0.95). The equation between consistency and concentration of bacterial cellulose suspension wasy=936.17x+38.166 (R2=0.9753). The equation between viscosity index and concentration of bacterial cellulose aqueous suspension wasy=61.872x-21.641 (R2=0.9988). So bacterial cellulose s can be widely applied in food as thickening agent and dietary fiber, or paper and cosmetics industries as dispersing agent and binding agent. Under the condition of a relatively low shear rate(0.02-10 s-1), the

  17. Preparation and characterization of carboxymethyl cellulose from mechanically activated bagasse cellulose%机械活化甘蔗渣制备羧甲基纤维素及性能表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈渊; 韦庆敏; 杨家添; 朱万仁; 余桂英; 黄祖强

    2015-01-01

    type of CMC for specific user are becoming the development directions of CMC. Sugarcane bagasse (SCB), a kind of waste in the process of sugar extraction, is abundant and low-cost lignocelullosic material. SCB is mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Cellulose forms microfibril by intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bond, and hemicellulose and lignin are filling and adhering agent among the microfibril. Because of the special structure of SCB, chemical agents are difficult to penetrate and diffuse in it, which limits its application. Therefore, it is necessary to pretreat SCB to remove lignin and hemicellulose, reducing cellulose’s crystallinity. To utilize SCB and prepare CMC with high degree of substitution (DS), SCB was mechanically activated by a stirring-type ball mill. Using monochloroacetate (MCA) as etherifying agent and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) as catalyst, CMC was synthesized from SCB with different activation time. The effects of mechanical activation time, reaction time, reaction temperature, solid-liquid ratio, NaOH-MCA molar ratio and water content on carboxymethylation of SCB were investigated respectively by using the DS of CMC as evaluating parameter. The structure of CMC from SCB was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR),X-ray diffraction (XRD) and 1HNMR spectroscopy (1HNMR). The results indicated that mechanical activation considerably enhanced the carboxymethylation of SCB, the mechanically activated SCB was easier for carboxymethylation than the original SCB, and the DS increased first and then decreased with activation time. The reasons were that mechanical activation broke the sealing of cellulose by lignin, destroyed the crystalline structure and decreased the crystallinity of cellulose, which made etherification reagent more easily penetrate into the SCB and could increase reactivity and decrease the dependence on solid-liquid ratio, ratio of NaOH/MCA, H2O/substrate, reaction time and

  18. Highly ordered cellulose II crystalline regenerated from cellulose hydrolyzed by 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yongjun; Song, Younghan; Kwak, Seung-Yeop; Kim, Hyungsup

    2016-02-10

    This research focused on the preparation of highly ordered cellulose II crystalline by cellulose hydrolysis in ionic liquid, and the influence of molecular mobility on recrystallization of cellulose. The molar mass of cellulose was controlled by hydrolysis using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BmimCl). The molecular mobility of cellulose dissolved in BmimCl was characterized by rheological properties. After characterization of cellulose solution and regeneration, change of molar mass and conversion to crystalline were monitored using gel-permeation chromatography and powder X-ray diffraction, respectively. The molar mass of the cellulose in BmimCl was remarkably decreased with an increase in duration time, resulting in better mobility and a lower conformational constraint below critical molar mass. The decrease in molar mass surprisingly increased the crystallinity up to ∼ 85%, suggesting a recrystallization rate dependence of the mobility. The correlation between the mobility and recrystallization rate represented quit different behavior above and below a critical molar mass, which strongly demonstrated to the effect of mobility on the conversion of amorphous state to crystalline structure.

  19. Segal crystallinity index revisited by the simulation of X-ray diffraction patterns of cotton cellulose Iβ and cellulose II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sunghyun; French, Alfred D; Condon, Brian D; Concha, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The Segal method estimates the amorphous fraction of cellulose Iβ materials simply based on intensity at 18° 2θ in an X-ray diffraction pattern and was extended to cellulose II using 16° 2θ intensity. To address the dependency of Segal amorphous intensity on crystal size, cellulose polymorph, and the degree of polymorphic conversion, we simulated the diffraction patterns of cotton celluloses (Iβ and II) and compared the simulated amorphous fractions with the Segal values. The diffraction patterns of control and mercerized cottons, respectively, were simulated with perfect crystals of cellulose Iβ (1.54° FWHM) and cellulose II (2.30° FWHM) as well as 10% and 35% amorphous celluloses. Their Segal amorphous fractions were 15% and 31%, respectively. The higher Segal amorphous fraction for control cotton was attributed to the peak overlap. Although the amorphous fraction was set in the simulation, the peak overlap induced by the increase of FWHM further enhanced the Segal amorphous intensity of cellulose Iβ. For cellulose II, the effect of peak overlap was smaller; however the lower reflection of the amorphous cellulose scattering in its Segal amorphous location resulted in smaller Segal amorphous fractions. Despite this underestimation, the relatively good agreement of the Segal method with the simulation for mercerized cotton was attributed to the incomplete conversion to cellulose II. The (1-10) and (110) peaks of cellulose Iβ remained near the Segal amorphous location of cellulose II for blends of control and mercerized cotton fibers.

  20. Nanocrystalline cellulose from coir fiber: preparation, properties, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanocrystalline cellulose derived from various botanical sources offers unique and potentially useful characteristics. In principle, any cellulosic material can be considered as a potential source of a nanocrystalline material, including crops, crop residues, and agroindustrial wastes. Because of t...

  1. ADSORPTION AND RELEASING PROPERTIES OF BEAD CELLULOSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Morales; E. Bordallo; V. Leon; J. Rieumont

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of some dyes on samples of bead cellulose obtained in the Unit of Research-Production "Cuba 9"was studied. Methylene blue, alizarin red and congo red fitted the adsorption isotherm of Langmuir. Adsorption kinetics at pH = 6 was linear with the square root of time indicating the diffusion is the controlling step. At pH = 12 a non-Fickian trend was observed and adsorption was higher for the first two dyes. Experiments carried out to release the methylene blue occluded in the cellulose beads gave a kinetic behavior of zero order. The study of cytochrome C adsorption was included to test a proteinic material. Crosslinking of bead cellulose was performed with epichlorohydrin decreasing its adsorption capacity in acidic or alkaline solution.

  2. Chemical genetics to examine cellulose biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth eDebolt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term efforts to decode plant cellulose biosynthesis via molecular genetics and biochemical strategies are being enhanced by the ever-expanding scale of omics technologies. An alternative approach to consider are the prospects for inducing change in plant metabolism using exogenously supplied chemical ligands. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors (CBI have been identified among known herbicides, during diverse combinatorial chemical libraries screens, and natural chemical screens from microbial agents. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the inhibitory effects of CBIs and further group them by how they influence fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase A (CESA proteins. Additional attention is paid to the continuing development of the CBI toolbox to explore the cell biology and genetic mechanisms underpinning effector molecule activity.

  3. Novel Nitrocellulose Made from Bacterial Cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dong-Ping; Ma, Bo; Zhu, Chun-Lin; Liu, Chang-Sheng; Yang, Jia-Zhi

    2010-04-01

    Nitrocellulose (NC) is useful in several industrial segments, especially in the production of gun, rocket, and missile propellants. The conventional way to prepare NC is done through the nitration of plant cellulose with nitric acid. In this work, bacterial cellulose nitrate (NBC) is synthesized by bacterial cellulose (BC) and nitro-sulfric acid under heterogeneous conditions. NBC with the degree of substitution (DS) of 1-2.85 was obtained, and the effects of sulfuric to nitric ratio, reaction temperature, and reaction time on the value of DS of NBC are discussed. The samples are also characterized by elemental analysis, thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction.

  4. African perspective on cellulosic ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensah, Edem Cudjoe; Kemausuor, Francis; Miezah, Kodwo;

    2015-01-01

    to ethanol, among others. While the industrialized and some emerging countries are gradually breaking grounds in cellulosic ethanol, most African countries have made little effort in research and development even though the continent is rich in lignocellulosic biomass. The paper estimates residues from......A major challenge to commercial production of cellulosic ethanol pertains to the cost-effective breakdown of the complex and recalcitrant structure of lignocellulose into its components via pretreatment, the cost of enzymes for hydrolysis and fermentation, and the conversion rate of C5 sugars...... widely available crops and municipal waste and determines their respective theoretical ethanol potential (around 22 billion litres annually). It further reviews stages involved in the production of cellulosic ethanol, focussing on processing methods that can be adapted to current situation in most...

  5. POLYETHERSULFONE COMPOSITE MEMBRANE BLENDED WITH CELLULOSE FIBRILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Qu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyethersulfone (PES is a common material used for ultrafiltration (UF membranes, which has good chemical resistance, high mechanical properties, and wide temperature tolerances. The hydrophobic property of the PES membrane seriously limits its application. Cellulose fibrils are composed of micro-sized and nano-sized elements, which have high hydrophilicity, strength, and biodegradation. A composite membrane was prepared by the phase inversion induced by an immersion process. The characteristics of the composite membrane were investigated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The pure water flux of the composite membrane increased dramatically with the increase of cellulose firbils. Mean pore size and porosity were significantly increased. Both mechanical properties and hydrophilicity were enhanced due to the addition of the cellulose firbils.

  6. Sulfated cellulose thin films with antithrombin affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose thin films were chemically modified by in situ sulfation to produce surfaces with anticoagulant characteristics. Two celluloses differing in their degree of polymerization (DP: CEL I (DP 215–240 and CEL II (DP 1300–1400 were tethered to maleic anhydride copolymer (MA layers and subsequently exposed to SO3•NMe3 solutions at elevated temperature. The impact of the resulting sulfation on the physicochemical properties of the cellulose films was investigated with respect to film thickness, atomic composition, wettability and roughness. The sulfation was optimized to gain a maximal surface concentration of sulfate groups. The scavenging of antithrombin (AT by the surfaces was determined to conclude on their potential anticoagulant properties.

  7. Prospects for Irradiation in Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Saini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Second generation bioethanol production technology relies on lignocellulosic biomass composed of hemicelluloses, celluloses, and lignin components. Cellulose and hemicellulose are sources of fermentable sugars. But the structural characteristics of lignocelluloses pose hindrance to the conversion of these sugar polysaccharides into ethanol. The process of ethanol production, therefore, involves an expensive and energy intensive step of pretreatment, which reduces the recalcitrance of lignocellulose and makes feedstock more susceptible to saccharification. Various physical, chemical, biological, or combined methods are employed to pretreat lignocelluloses. Irradiation is one of the common and promising physical methods of pretreatment, which involves ultrasonic waves, microwaves, γ-rays, and electron beam. Irradiation is also known to enhance the effect of saccharification. This review explains the role of different radiations in the production of cellulosic ethanol.

  8. Magnetic alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Kimura and Tsunehisa Kimura

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers under magnetic fields are reported. Static and rotating magnetic fields were used to align cellulose fibers with sizes ranging from millimeter to nanometer sizes. Cellulose fibers of the millimeter order, which were prepared for papermaking, and much smaller fibers with micrometer to nanometer sizes prepared by the acid hydrolysis of larger ones underwent magnetic alignment. Under a rotating field, a uniaxial alignment of fibers was achieved. The alignment was successfully fixed by the photopolymerization of a UV-curable resin precursor used as matrix. A monodomain chiral nematic film was prepared from an aqueous suspension of nanofibers. Using a field modulator inserted in a homogeneous magnetic field, simultaneous alignment and patterning were achieved

  9. Magnetic alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Fumiko; Kimura, Tsunehisa [Division of Forest and Biomaterials Science, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: tkimura@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2008-04-01

    The alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers under magnetic fields are reported. Static and rotating magnetic fields were used to align cellulose fibers with sizes ranging from millimeter to nanometer sizes. Cellulose fibers of the millimeter order, which were prepared for papermaking, and much smaller fibers with micrometer to nanometer sizes prepared by the acid hydrolysis of larger ones underwent magnetic alignment. Under a rotating field, a uniaxial alignment of fibers was achieved. The alignment was successfully fixed by the photopolymerization of a UV-curable resin precursor used as matrix. A monodomain chiral nematic film was prepared from an aqueous suspension of nanofibers. Using a field modulator inserted in a homogeneous magnetic field, simultaneous alignment and patterning were achieved.

  10. Alexa fluor-labeled fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals for bioimaging solid cellulose in spatially structured microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, Jay W; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G; Kelly, Ryan T; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J; Brockman, Fred J; Wilkins, Michael J

    2015-03-18

    Methods to covalently conjugate Alexa Fluor dyes to cellulose nanocrystals, at limiting amounts that retain the overall structure of the nanocrystals as model cellulose materials, were developed using two approaches. In the first, aldehyde groups are created on the cellulose surfaces by reaction with limiting amounts of sodium periodate, a reaction well-known for oxidizing vicinal diols to create dialdehyde structures. Reductive amination reactions were then applied to bind Alexa Fluor dyes with terminal amino-groups on the linker section. In the absence of the reductive step, dye washes out of the nanocrystal suspension, whereas with the reductive step, a colored product is obtained with the characteristic spectral bands of the conjugated dye. In the second approach, Alexa Fluor dyes were modified to contain chloro-substituted triazine ring at the end of the linker section. These modified dyes then were reacted with cellulose nanocrystals in acetonitrile at elevated temperature, again isolating material with the characteristic spectral bands of the Alexa Fluor dye. Reactions with Alexa Fluor 546 are given as detailed examples, labeling on the order of 1% of the total glucopyranose rings of the cellulose nanocrystals at dye loadings of ca. 5 μg/mg cellulose. Fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals were deposited in pore network microfluidic structures (PDMS) and proof-of-principle bioimaging experiments showed that the spatial localization of the solid cellulose deposits could be determined, and their disappearance under the action of Celluclast enzymes or microbes could be observed over time. In addition, single molecule fluorescence microscopy was demonstrated as a method to follow the disappearance of solid cellulose deposits over time, following the decrease in the number of single blinking dye molecules with time instead of fluorescent intensity.

  11. Processing of cellulose for the advancement of biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Brian James

    2011-12-01

    The enzymatic degradation of cellulose polymers is currently a rate-limiting step in the bioconversion of biomass to biofuels. Cellulose polymers self assemble to form crystalline structures stabilized by a complex network of intermolecular interactions such as hydrogen bonding. The network of interactions in crystalline cellulose (cellulose nanostructure) poses an energy barrier that limits enzymatic degradation as apparent from the activity of Cel5H. To improve the degradability of cellulose the intermolecular interactions must be disrupted. The interactions of the cellulose nanostructure prevent solubilization by water and most other common solvents, but some organic solvents aid degradation of cellulose suggesting they influence cellulose nanostructure. The objective of this work is to understand the influence of solvents on cellulose nanostructure with the goal of improving the degradability of cellulose nanostructure using solvents. To understand solvent interaction with cellulose, phosphoric acid was used to first solubilize cellulose (PAS cellulose) followed by adding an organic liquid or water to wash the phosphate from the system. The Flory Huggins theory was used to predict wash liquids that could favorably interact with cellulose. A favorable wash liquid was predicted to prevent the reformation of crystalline domains to yield a disrupted cellulose nanostructure, which should be more degradable. Low molecular weight alcohols and glycols were calculated to be favorable wash liquids. Washing PAS cellulose with the predicted favorable liquids yielded semi-transparent gel-like materials compared to the opaque white precipitate formed when water or unfavorable solvents were used in the wash. Fractal analysis of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) of these apparent gels indicated cellulose polymers likely have the properties of clustered rods. This partial disruption increased degradability relative to the water washed PAS cellulose. The apparent rod

  12. The Synthesis of a Novel Cellulose Physical Gel

    OpenAIRE

    Jiufang Duan; Xiaojian Zhang; Jianxin Jiang; Chunrui Han; Jun Yang; Liujun Liu; Hongyun Lan; Daozhan Huang

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose possessing β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was used as a host molecule and cellulose possessing ferrocene (Fc) as a guest polymer. Infrared spectra, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), and contact angle analysis were used to characterise the material structure and the inclusion behaviour. The results showed that the β-CD-cellulose and the Fc-cellulose can form inclusion complexes. Moreover, ferrocene oxidation, and reduction of state can be adjusted by sodi...

  13. Development of hierarchical cellulosic reinforcement for polymer composites

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose is an environmentally friendly material which is obtainable in vast quantities, since it is present in every plant. Cellulosic fibers are commercially found in two forms: natural (flax, hemp, cotton, sisal, wood, etc.) and regenerated cellulose fibers (RCF). The biodegradability, the morphological and mechanical properties make these fibers a good alternative to the synthetic reinforcement (e.g. glass fibers). However, as all other cellulosic fibers these materials also have similar...

  14. New Solvents for Cellulose. II. Ethylenediamine/Thiocyanate Salt System

    OpenAIRE

    HATTORI, Kazuyuki; ABE, Emiko; Yoshida, Takashi; CUCULO, John A.; 服部,和幸; 吉田, 孝

    2004-01-01

    The ethylenediamine/thiocyanate salt system was found to be a new solvent for cellulose. The solubility, dissolution behavior, solution properties, and cellulose recovered from the solutions were investigated. The dissolution took place at room temperature, and the maximum solubility achieved was 16% (w/w) for cellulose of DP210 in the ethylenediamine/sodium thiocyanate 54/46 (w/w).The dependence of cellulose solubility on DP is also described. Tracing the dissolution behavior of the cellulos...

  15. Mercerization and Enzymatic Pretreatment of Cellulose in Dissolving Pulps

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the preparation of chemically and/or enzymatically modified cellulose. This modification can be either irreversible or reversible. Irreversible modification is used to prepare cellulose derivatives as end products, whereas reversible modification is used to enhance solubility in the preparation of regenerated cellulose. The irreversible modification studied here was the preparation of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) using extended mercerization of a spruce dissolving pulp...

  16. 21 CFR 172.872 - Methyl ethyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Methyl ethyl cellulose. 172.872 Section 172.872... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.872 Methyl ethyl cellulose. The food additive methyl ethyl cellulose... a cellulose ether having the general formula [C6H(10 -x-y)O5(CH3)x(C2H5)y]n, where x is the...

  17. Symmetric Euler orientation representations for orientational averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerhöfer, Thomas G

    2005-09-01

    A new kind of orientation representation called symmetric Euler orientation representation (SEOR) is presented. It is based on a combination of the conventional Euler orientation representations (Euler angles) and Hamilton's quaternions. The properties of the SEORs concerning orientational averaging are explored and compared to those of averaging schemes that are based on conventional Euler orientation representations. To that aim, the reflectance of a hypothetical polycrystalline material with orthorhombic crystal symmetry was calculated. The calculation was carried out according to the average refractive index theory (ARIT [T.G. Mayerhöfer, Appl. Spectrosc. 56 (2002) 1194]). It is shown that the use of averaging schemes based on conventional Euler orientation representations leads to a dependence of the result from the specific Euler orientation representation that was utilized and from the initial position of the crystal. The latter problem can be overcome partly by the introduction of a weighing factor, but only for two-axes-type Euler orientation representations. In case of a numerical evaluation of the average, a residual difference remains also if a two-axes type Euler orientation representation is used despite of the utilization of a weighing factor. In contrast, this problem does not occur if a symmetric Euler orientation representation is used as a matter of principle, while the result of the averaging for both types of orientation representations converges with increasing number of orientations considered in the numerical evaluation. Additionally, the use of a weighing factor and/or non-equally spaced steps in the numerical evaluation of the average is not necessary. The symmetrical Euler orientation representations are therefore ideally suited for the use in orientational averaging procedures.

  18. Electrospinning cellulose based nanofibers for sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nartker, Steven

    2009-12-01

    Bacterial pathogens have recently become a serious threat to the food and water supply. A biosensor based on an electrochemical immunoassay has been developed for detecting food borne pathogens, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7. These sensors consist of several materials including, cellulose, cellulose nitrate, polyaniline and glass fibers. The current sensors have not been optimized in terms of microscale architecture and materials. The major problem associated with the current sensors is the limited concentration range of pathogens that provides a linear response on the concentration conductivity chart. Electrospinning is a process that can be used to create a patterned fiber mat design that will increase the linear range and lower the detection limit of these sensors by improving the microscale architecture. Using the electrospinning process to produce novel mats of cellulose nitrate will offer improved surface area, and the cellulose nitrate can be treated to further improve chemical interactions required for sensor activity. The macro and micro architecture of the sensor is critical to the performance of the sensors. Electrospinning technology can be used to create patterned architectures of nanofibers that will enhance sensor performance. To date electrospinning of cellulose nitrate has not been performed and optimization of the electrospinning process will provide novel materials suitable for applications such as filtration and sensing. The goal of this research is to identify and elucidate the primary materials and process factors necessary to produce cellulose nitrate nanofibers using the electrospinning process that will improve the performance of biosensors. Cellulose nitrate is readily dissolved in common organic solvents such as acetone, tetrahydrofuran (THF) and N,N dimethylformamide (DMF). These solvents can be mixed with other latent solvents such as ethanol and other alcohols to provide a solvent system with good electrospinning behavior

  19. Preparation of zeolite covered cellulose fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mintova, S.; Valtchev, V. [Institute of Applied Mineralogy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-12-01

    Membrane separation has proved to be an important technology in chemical industry. That is why the design of different type of zeolite containing membranes has received much attention during the last decade. Zeolite containing filters and membranes were prepared by embedding zeolite crystals with adhesive substances in the cellulose matrix. This communication discussed the preparation of zeolite containing cellulose materials by in situ crystallization. Discussed axe: (1) the effect of the vegetal fiber structure and chemical composition (2) the effect of the type of the zeolite coating; (3) the effect of the mechanical and chemical treatment of the fibers on the process of the fiber zeolite coating.

  20. Cellulose hydrolysis by immobilized Trichoderma reesei cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Paetrice O; Vasudevan, Palligarnai T

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose hydrolysis by immobilized Trichoderma reesei cellulase in the presence of a low viscosity ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate (EMIM-DEP), was investigated. Preparation of the carrier-free immobilized cellulase was optimized with respect to concentration of the cross-linker and the type of precipitant. The addition of 2% (v/v) EMIM-DEP during hydrolysis gave an initial reaction rate 2.7 times higher than the hydrolysis rate with no ionic liquid. The initial yield after 2 h was 0.7 g glucose/g cellulose, and the carrier-free immobilized cellulase (CFIC) was effectively re-used five times.

  1. Fluoropolymer Microstructure and Dynamics: Influence of Molecular Orientation Induced by Uniaxial Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Daniel; Yin, Chaoqing; Runt, James

    Fluorinated semi-crystalline polymer films are attractive for dielectric film applications due to their chemical inertness, heat resistance, and high thermal stability. In the present investigation we explore the influence of orientation induced by uniaxial drawing on the crystalline microstructure and relaxation processes of poly(ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE), in order to ascertain how morphological control can benefit polymer dielectric design. When drawn below or near the Tg, the crystallinity of the drawn films is unchanged, and oriented amorphous structures and crystalline microfibrils form at high draw ratios. This orientation slows segmental relaxation, reflected by an increase in the dynamic Tg, and also delays the transition to the high temperature crystalline form of ETFE. When drawing above the Tg, the films undergo strain-induced crystallization at high draw ratios. For these films an increase in the dynamic Tg is also observed, in addition to a second segmental relaxation process, appearing as a shoulder on the primary process. We propose that this represents a contribution from a rigid amorphous fraction, having slowed chain dynamics. Supported by Office of Naval Research.

  2. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  3. Characterising the cellulose synthase complexes of cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansoori Zangir, N.

    2012-01-01

    One of the characteristics of the plant kingdom is the presence of a structural cell wall. Cellulose is a major component in both the primary and secondary cell walls of plants. In higher plants cellulose is synthesized by so called rosette protein complexes with cellulose synthases (CESAs) as the c

  4. Composites based on cellulose fiber nonwovens and a water-soluble polymer 2. Strength-deformation characteristics of the composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerpakovska, D.; Kalnins, M.

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between the strength-deformation properties and certain structural characteristics (volume content of polymer and voids, orientation of fibers) of composites prepared by impregnation of cellulose fiber nonwovens (CFNs) with poly(vinyl alcohol) water solutions is discussed. With growth in the volume fraction of polymer to 0.25-0.30, the tensile elastic modulus and ultimate strength of the composites increase compared with those of CFN. As a consequence of enhanced adhesion among the cellulose fibers, the relative values of tensile strength and elastic modulus in the main orientation direction of the fibers is higher than in the perpendicular one. Therefore, with increasing content of polymer in the composite, its degree of anisotropy diminishes significantly. The punching strength almost linearly correlates with the tensile strength. The breaking strain in tension increases considerably with growing content of polymer, but the tearing strength changes only slightly.

  5. Thinking in Orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Bjorn Tore

    1997-01-01

    A think-aloud technique, in which 20 orienteers verbalized their exact thoughts during orienteering, was used to examine the phenomenon of cognition during orienteering. Results indicate that orienteering is experienced as a task to be accomplished, a physical movement, and a dynamic process, and that thinking involves attuning perceptions to…

  6. Segal crystallinity index revisited by the simulation of x-ray diffraction patterns of cotton cellulose IB and cellulose II

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Segal method estimates the amorphous fraction of cellulose IB materials simply based on intensity at 18o 20 in an X-ray diffraction pattern and was extended to cellulose II using 16o 2O intensity. To address the dependency of Segal amorphous intensity on crystal size, cellulose polymorph, and th...

  7. Thin blend films of cellulose and polyacrylonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rui; Zhang, Xin; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert; Wang, Howard

    Cellulose is the most abundant renewable, biocompatible and biodegradable natural polymer. Cellulose exhibits excellent chemical and mechanical stability, which makes it useful for applications such as construction, filtration, bio-scaffolding and packaging. To further expand the potential applications of cellulose materials, their alloying with synthetic polymers has been investigated. In this study, thin films of cotton linter cellulose (CLC) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) blends with various compositions spanning the entire range from neat CLC to neat PAN were spun cast on silicon wafers from common solutions in dimethyl sulfoxide / ionic liquid mixtures. The morphologies of thin films were characterized using optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray reflectivity. Morphologies of as-cast films are highly sensitive to the film preparation conditions; they vary from featureless smooth films to self-organized ordered nano-patterns to hierarchical structures spanning over multiple length scales from nanometers to tens of microns. By selectively removing the PAN-rich phase, the structures of blend films were studied to gain insights in their very high stability in hot water, acid and salt solutions.

  8. Environmental sustainability of cellulosic energy cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The environmental sustainability of bioenergy production depends on both direct and indirect effects of the production systems to produce bioenergy feedstocks. This chapter evaluates what is known about the environmental sustainability of cellulosic bioenergy crop production for the types of produc...

  9. Nanomanufacturing metrology for cellulosic nanomaterials: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postek, Michael T.

    2014-08-01

    The development of the metrology and standards for advanced manufacturing of cellulosic nanomaterials (or basically, wood-based nanotechnology) is imperative to the success of this rising economic sector. Wood-based nanotechnology is a revolutionary technology that will create new jobs and strengthen America's forest-based economy through industrial development and expansion. It allows this, previously perceived, low-tech industry to leap-frog directly into high-tech products and processes and thus improves its current economic slump. Recent global investments in nanotechnology programs have led to a deeper appreciation of the high performance nature of cellulose nanomaterials. Cellulose, manufactured to the smallest possible-size ( 2 nm x 100 nm), is a high-value material that enables products to be lighter and stronger; have less embodied energy; utilize no catalysts in the manufacturing, are biologically compatible and, come from a readily renewable resource. In addition to the potential for a dramatic impact on the national economy - estimated to be as much as $250 billion worldwide by 2020 - cellulose-based nanotechnology creates a pathway for expanded and new markets utilizing these renewable materials. The installed capacity associated with the US pulp and paper industry represents an opportunity, with investment, to rapidly move to large scale production of nano-based materials. However, effective imaging, characterization and fundamental measurement science for process control and characterization are lacking at the present time. This talk will discuss some of these needed measurements and potential solutions.

  10. Nanofibrous microfiltration membrane based on cellulose nanowhiskers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongyang; Burger, Christian; Hsiao, Benjamin S; Chu, Benjamin

    2012-01-09

    A multilayered nanofibrous microfiltration (MF) membrane system with high flux, low pressure drop, and high retention capability against both bacteria and bacteriophages (a virus model) was developed by impregnating ultrafine cellulose nanowhiskers (diameter about 5 nm) into an electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibrous scaffold (fiber diameter about 150 nm) supported by a poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) nonwoven substrate (fiber diameter about 20 μm). The cellulose nanowhiskers were anchored on the PAN nanofiber surface, forming a cross-linked nanostructured mesh with very high surface-to-volume ratio and a negatively charged surface. The mean pore size and pore size distribution of this MF system could be adjusted by the loading of cellulose nanowhiskers, where the resulting membrane not only possessed good mechanical properties but also high surface charge density confirmed by the conductivity titration and zeta potential measurements. The results indicated that a test cellulose nanowhisker-based MF membrane exhibited 16 times higher adsorption capacity against a positively charged dye over a commercial nitrocellulose-based MF membrane. This experimental membrane also showed full retention capability against bacteria, for example, E. coli and B. diminuta (log reduction value (LRV) larger than 6) and decent retention against bacteriophage MS2 (LRV larger than 2).

  11. PRODUCTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ECONOMICAL BACTERIAL CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houssni El-Saied

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the economical production of bacterial cellulose (BC by Gluconacetobacter subsp. Xylinus (ATCC 10245 in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks cultivated under static conditions. The fermentation media used contained food industrial by-product liquors, such as black strap molasses solution and corn steep liquor (CSL, which represents some of the most economical carbon and nitrogen sources. However, because of the presence of undesirable components in molasses (such as coloring substances, heavy metals, and other compounds that may act as inhibitors, and in order to eliminate them, crude molasses has been treated with an acid, as an attempt to increase BC productivity. The amount of BC produced using these carbon and nitrogen sources was determined and compared to that produced using previously reported fermentation media. The characterizations of the bacterial cellulose (BC pellicles obtained using either conventional or by-product media were studied by thermal and spectral techniques and compared to those of plant-derived cellulose such as cotton linter, viscose pulp, and microcrystalline cellulose.

  12. Nitration of Wood Cellulose in HNO3/Organic Solvent Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A steam explosion pretreatment at various severities was applied to pure wood cellulose; the influences of steam pretreatment on the morphological structure, the hydrophilic property and viscosity-average molecular weight of cellulose were evaluated. The nitration of steam-exploded cellulose was carried out in the nitrating agent medium (HNO3/organic solvent). The performance indexes of nitrocellulose, prepared from original and steam exploded samples, were determined by using the polarized optical microscope. The results show that after pretreatment the reactivity of the three hydroxyl groups in anhydroglucose unit of cellulose is improved, and the nitrogen content and the uniformity of NC from steam exploded cellulose observably increas.

  13. Rheology Behavior of Cellulose/NMMO/Water Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾广新; 胡赛珠; 邵惠丽; 沈弋弋; 胡学超

    2001-01-01

    Rheology properties of cellulose/NMMO/water solution are important parameters for spinning. The storage and loss modulus and viscosity of the solution decrease with increasing water concentration of solvent in certain range. Flow-activation energy of two kinds of cellulose solution is quite different in view of their molecular weight. The molecular weigh distribution of cellulose samples can be characterized by the value of Gc/c Since the different cellulose samples have different MWD and DP, the relations of the first normal stress difference N1 vs. shear rate are different. Moreover, the rheology properties of cellulose solution produced by twin-screw extruder process are also investigated.

  14. Method of forming an electrically conductive cellulose composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2011-11-22

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  15. Characterization of cellulose nanowhiskers; Caracterizacao do nanowhiskers de celulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Nayra R.; Pinheiro, Ivanei F.; Morales, Ana R.; Ravagnani, Sergio P.; Mei, Lucia, E-mail: 25nareis@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant polymer earth. The cellulose nanowhiskers can be extracted from the cellulose. These have attracted attention for its use in nanostructured materials for various applications, such as nanocomposites, because they have peculiar characteristics, among them, high aspect ratio, biodegradability and excellent mechanical properties. This work aims to characterize cellulose nanowhiskers from microcrystalline cellulose. Therefore, these materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to assess the degree of crystallinity, infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to the morphology of nanowhiskers and thermal stability was evaluated by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). (author)

  16. Essays concerning the cellulosic biofuel industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosburg, Alicia Sue

    Despite market-based incentives and mandated production, the U.S. cellulosic biofuel industry has been slow to develop. This dissertation explores the economic factors that have limited industry development along with important economic tradeoffs that will be encountered with commercial-scale production. The first essay provides an overview of the policies, potential, and challenges of the biofuel industry, with a focus on cellulosic biofuel. The second essay considers the economics of cellulosic biofuel production. Breakeven models of the local feedstock supply system and biofuel refining process are constructed to develop the Biofuel Breakeven (BioBreak) program, a stochastic, Excel-based program that evaluates the feasibility of local biofuel and biomass markets under various policy and market scenarios. An application of the BioBreak program is presented using expected market conditions for 14 local cellulosic biofuel markets that vary by feedstock and location. The economic costs of biofuel production identified from the BioBreak application are higher than frequently anticipated and raise questions about the potential of cellulosic ethanol as a sustainable and economical substitute for conventional fuels. Program results also are extended using life-cycle analysis to evaluate the cost of reducing GHG emissions by substituting cellulosic ethanol for conventional fuel. The third essay takes a closer look at the economic trade-offs within the biorefinery industry and feedstock production processes. A long-run biomass production through bioenergy conversion cost model is developed that incorporates heterogeneity of biomass suppliers within and between local markets. The model builds on previous literature by treating biomass as a non-commoditized feedstock and relaxes the common assumption of fixed biomass density and price within local markets. An empirical application is provided for switchgrass-based ethanol production within U.S. crop reporting districts

  17. Pretreatment assisted synthesis and characterization of cellulose nanocrystals and cellulose nanofibers from absorbent cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Danso, Emmanuel; Srivastava, Varsha; Sillanpää, Mika; Bhatnagar, Amit

    2017-03-30

    In this work, cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) were synthesized from absorbent cotton. Two pretreatments viz. dewaxing and bleaching with mild alkali were applied to the precursor (cotton). Acid hydrolysis was conducted with H2SO4 and dissolution of cotton was achieved with a mixture of NaOH-thiourea-urea-H2O at -3°C. Synthesized cellulose samples were characterized using FTIR, XRD, SEM, BET, and zeta potential. It seems that synthesis conditions contributed to negative surface charge on cellulose samples and CNCs had the higher negative surface charge compared to CNFs. Furthermore, BET surface area, pore volume and pore diameter of CNCs were found to be higher as compared to CNFs. The dewaxed cellulose nanofibers (CNF D) had a slightly higher BET surface area (0.47m(2)/g) and bigger pore diameter (59.87Å) from attenuated contraction compared to waxed cellulose nanofibers (CNFW) (0.38m(2)/g and 44.89Å). The XRD of CNCs revealed a semi-crystalline structure and the dissolution agents influenced the crystallinity of CNFs. SEM images showed the porous nature of CNFs, the flaky nature and the nano-sized width of CNCs. Synthesized CNF D showed a better potential as an adsorbent with an average lead removal efficiency of 91.49% from aqueous solution.

  18. Cellulose affinity purification of fusion proteins tagged with fungal family 1 cellulose-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Naohisa; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    N- or C-terminal fusions of red-fluorescent protein (RFP) with various fungal cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) belonging to carbohydrate binding module (CBM) family 1 were expressed in a Pichia pastoris expression system, and the resulting fusion proteins were used to examine the feasibility of large-scale affinity purification of CBD-tagged proteins on cellulose columns. We found that RFP fused with CBD from Trichoderma reesei CBHI (CBD(Tr)(CBHI)) was expressed at up to 1.2g/l in the culture filtrate, which could be directly injected into the cellulose column. The fusion protein was tightly adsorbed on the cellulose column in the presence of a sufficient amount of ammonium sulfate and was efficiently eluted with pure water. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was not captured under these conditions, whereas both BSA and the fusion protein were adsorbed on a phenyl column, indicating that the cellulose column can be used for the purification of not only hydrophilic proteins but also for hydrophobic proteins. Recovery of various fusion proteins exceeded 80%. Our results indicate that protein purification by expression of a target protein as a fusion with a fungal family 1 CBD tag in a yeast expression system, followed by affinity purification on a cellulose column, is simple, effective and easily scalable.

  19. The Synthesis of a Novel Cellulose Physical Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiufang Duan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose possessing β-cyclodextrin (β-CD was used as a host molecule and cellulose possessing ferrocene (Fc as a guest polymer. Infrared spectra, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV, and contact angle analysis were used to characterise the material structure and the inclusion behaviour. The results showed that the β-CD-cellulose and the Fc-cellulose can form inclusion complexes. Moreover, ferrocene oxidation, and reduction of state can be adjusted by sodium hypochlorite (NaClO as an oxidant and glutathione (GSH as a reductant. In this study, a physical gel based on β-CD-cellulose/Fc-cellulose was formed under mild conditions in which autonomous healing between cut surfaces occurred after 24 hours. The physical gel can be controlled in the sol-gel transition. The compressive strength of the Fc-cellulose/β-CD-cellulose gel increased with increased cellulose concentration. The host-guest interaction between the side chains of cellulose could strengthen the gel. The cellulose physical gel may eventually be used as a stimulus-responsive, healing material in biomedical applications.

  20. Assessing nano cellulose developments using science and technology indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milanez, Douglas Henrique; Amaral, Roniberto Morato do; Faria, Leandro Innocentini Lopes de; Gregolin, Jose Angelo Rodrigues, E-mail: douglasmilanez@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Nucleo de Informacao Tecnologica em Materiais. Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2013-11-01

    This research aims to examine scientific and technological trends of developments in nano cellulose based on scientometric and patent indicators obtained from the Science Citation Index and Derwent Innovations Index in 2001-2010. The overall nano cellulose activity indicators were compared to nanotechnology and other selected nano materials. Scientific and technological future developments in nano cellulose were forecasted using extrapolation growth curves and the main countries were also mapped. The results showed that nano cellulose publications and patent documents have increased rapidly over the last five years with an average growth rate higher than that of nanotechnology and fullerene. The USA, Japan, France, Sweden and Finland all played a significant role in nano cellulose development and the extrapolation growth curves suggested that nano cellulose scientific and technological activities are still emerging. Finally, the evidence from this study recommends monitoring nano cellulose S and T advances in the coming years. (author)

  1. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases disrupt the cellulose fibers structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Garajova, Sona; Foucat, Loïc; Falourd, Xavier; Saake, Bodo; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Cathala, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that breakdown recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose. Here we investigate the action of LPMOs on cellulose fibers. After enzymatic treatment and dispersion, LPMO-treated fibers show intense fibrillation. Cellulose structure modifications visualized at different scales indicate that LPMO creates nicking points that trigger the disintegration of the cellulose fibrillar structure with rupture of chains and release of elementary nanofibrils. Investigation of LPMO action using solid-state NMR provides direct evidence of modification of accessible and inaccessible surfaces surrounding the crystalline core of the fibrils. The chains breakage likely induces modifications of the cellulose network and weakens fibers cohesion promoting their disruption. Besides the formation of new initiation sites for conventional cellulases, this work provides the first evidence of the direct oxidative action of LPMOs with the mechanical weakening of the cellulose ultrastructure. LPMOs can be viewed as promising biocatalysts for enzymatic modification or degradation of cellulose fibers. PMID:28071716

  2. Nanofibers of cellulose and its derivatives fabricated using direct electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Kousaku

    2015-05-19

    A short review with 49 references describes the electrospinninng (ES) process for polysaccharides, cellulose and chitosan, and their derivatives, including cellulose acetate and hydroxypropyl cellulose. A majority of applied studies adopted a two step-process, in which the cellulose acetate was used for the first ES process, followed by acetyl group removal to regenerate cellulose thin fibers. The electrospun nonwoven fabrics (ESNW) of regenerated cellulose can be modified by introduction of aldehyde groups by oxidative cleavage of vicinal diols using periodates, and these aldehyde groups serve as acceptors of foreign substances, with various chemical/biological functions, to be immobilized on the fiber surfaces in the ESNW matrices. Direct electrospinning of cellulose from trifluroacetic acid solution was also developed and the applied studies were summarized to conclude the current trends of interests in the ES and related technologies.

  3. Nanofibers of Cellulose and Its Derivatives Fabricated Using Direct Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousaku Ohkawa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A short review with 49 references describes the electrospinninng (ES process for polysaccharides, cellulose and chitosan, and their derivatives, including cellulose acetate and hydroxypropyl cellulose. A majority of applied studies adopted a two step-process, in which the cellulose acetate was used for the first ES process, followed by acetyl group removal to regenerate cellulose thin fibers. The electrospun nonwoven fabrics (ESNW of regenerated cellulose can be modified by introduction of aldehyde groups by oxidative cleavage of vicinal diols using periodates, and these aldehyde groups serve as acceptors of foreign substances, with various chemical/biological functions, to be immobilized on the fiber surfaces in the ESNW matrices. Direct electrospinning of cellulose from trifluroacetic acid solution was also developed and the applied studies were summarized to conclude the current trends of interests in the ES and related technologies.

  4. Characterization of cellulose and other exopolysaccharides produced from Gluconacetobacter strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-22

    This study characterized the cellulosic and non-cellulosic exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by four Gluconacetobacter strains. The yields of bacterial cellulose and water-soluble polysaccharides were dependent on both carbon source and Gluconacetobacter strain. The carbon substrate also affected the composition of the free EPS. When galactose served as an exclusive carbon source, Gluconacetobacter xylinus (G. xylinus) ATCC 53524 and ATCC 700178 produced a distinct alkaline stable crystalline product, which influenced the crystallization of cellulose. Gluconacetobacter hansenii (G. hansenii) ATCC 23769 and ATCC 53582, however, did not exhibit any significant change in cellulose crystal properties when galactose was used as the carbon source. Microscopic observation further confirmed significant incorporation of EPS into the cellulose composites. The cellulosic network produced from galactose medium showed distinctive morphological and structural features compared to that from glucose medium.

  5. Characterization of cellulose extracted from oil palm empty fruit bunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisak, Muhammad Asri Abdul; Daik, Rusli; Ramli, Suria

    2015-09-01

    Recently, cellulose has been studied by many researchers due to its promising properties such as biodegradability, biocompatibility, hydrophilicity and robustness. Due to that it is applied in many fields such as paper, film, drug delivery, membranes, etc. Cellulose can be extracted from various plants while oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) is the one of its sources. In this study, cellulose was extracted by chemical treatments which involved the use of formic acid and hydrogen peroxide to remove hemicellulose and lignin components. Maximum yield was 43.22%. Based on the FT-IR spectra, the peak of wax (1735 cm-1), hemicellulose (1375 cm-1) and lignin (1248 cm-1 and 1037 cm-1) were not observed in extracted cellulose. TGA analysis showed that the extracted cellulose starts to thermally degrade at 340 °C. The SEM analysis suggested that the cellulose extracted from OPEFB was not much different from commercial cellulose.

  6. Characterisation of cellulose- and lignin-based materials using x-ray scattering methods

    OpenAIRE

    Vainio, Ulla

    2007-01-01

    Wood is an important material for the construction and pulping industries. Using x-ray diffraction the microfibril angle of Sitka spruce wood was studied in the first part of this thesis. Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis [Bong.] Carr.) is native to the west coast of North America, but due to its fast growth rate, it has also been imported to Europe. So far, its nanometre scale properties have not been systematically characterised. In this thesis the microfibril angle of Sitka spruce was shown t...

  7. Understanding political market orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert P.; Henneberg, Stephan C.

    This article develops a conceptual framework and measurement model of political market orientation that consists of attitudinal and behavioural constructs. The article reports on perceived relationships among different behavioral aspects of political market orientation and the attitudinal influen......, a more surprising result is the inconclusive effect of a voter orientation on market-oriented behaviours. The article discusses the findings in the context of the existing literature in political marketing and commercial market orientation.......This article develops a conceptual framework and measurement model of political market orientation that consists of attitudinal and behavioural constructs. The article reports on perceived relationships among different behavioral aspects of political market orientation and the attitudinal...... influences of such behavior. The study includes structural equation modeling to investigate several propositions. While the results show that political parties need to focus on several different aspects of market-oriented behavior, especially using an internal and external orientation as cultural antecedents...

  8. Posidonia oceanica as a Renewable Lignocellulosic Biomass for the Synthesis of Cellulose Acetate and Glycidyl Methacrylate Grafted Cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vismara

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available High-grade cellulose (97% α-cellulose content of 48% crystallinity index was extracted from the renewable marine biomass waste Posidonia oceanica using H2O2 and organic peracids following an environmentally friendly and chlorine-free process. This cellulose appeared as a new high-grade cellulose of waste origin quite similar to the high-grade cellulose extracted from more noble starting materials like wood and cotton linters. The benefits of α-cellulose recovery from P. oceanica were enhanced by its transformation into cellulose acetate CA and cellulose derivative GMA-C. Fully acetylated CA was prepared by conventional acetylation method and easily transformed into a transparent film. GMA-C with a molar substitution (MS of 0.72 was produced by quenching Fenton’s reagent (H2O2/FeSO4 generated cellulose radicals with GMA. GMA grafting endowed high-grade cellulose from Posidonia with adsorption capability. GMA-C removes β-naphthol from water with an efficiency of 47%, as measured by UV-Vis spectroscopy. After hydrolysis of the glycidyl group to glycerol group, the modified GMA-C was able to remove p-nitrophenol from water with an efficiency of 92%, as measured by UV-Vis spectroscopy. α-cellulose and GMA-Cs from Posidonia waste can be considered as new materials of potential industrial and environmental interest.

  9. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda

  10. Object oriented methods

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Ian

    1994-01-01

    This book is a revision of Ian Graham's successful survey of the whole area of object technology. It covers object- oriented programming, object-oriented design, object- oriented analysis, object-oriented databases and treats several related technologies. New to this edition are more applications of object-oriented methods and more coverage of object-oriented database products available. Graham has also doubled the design and analysis material that examines over 60 different approaches - making this the most comprehensive book on the market. Also new is the foreword by Grady Booch.

  11. They Call it Orienteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Mark

    1977-01-01

    Through the use of personal anecdotes, the author details his initial experience with orienteering, a sport rapidly increasing in popularity that teaches people not to get lost in the woods. Sources of information about orienteering are provided. (BT)

  12. Cotton cellulose: enzyme adsorption and enzymic hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltrame, P.L.; Carniti, P.; Focher, B.; Marzetti, A.; Cattaneo, M.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of a crude cellulase complex from Trichoderma viride on variously pretreated cotton cellulose samples was studied in the framework of the Langmuir approach at 2-8 degrees. The saturation amount of adsorbed enzyme was related to the susceptibility of the substrates to hydrolysis. In every case the adsorption process was faster by 2-3 orders of magnitude than the hydrolysis step to give end products. For ZnCl/sub 2/-treated cotton cellulose the Langmuir parameters correlated fairly well with the value of the Michaelis constant, measured for its enzymic hydrolysis, and the adsorptive complex was indistinguishable from the complex of the Michaelis-Menten model for the hydrolysis.

  13. Retention of Cationic Starch onto Cellulose Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaoui, Mohamed; Mauret, Evelyne; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2008-08-01

    Three methods of cationic starch titration were used to quantify its retention on cellulose fibres, namely: (i) the complexation of CS with iodine and measurement of the absorbency of the ensuing blue solution by UV-vis spectroscopy; (ii) hydrolysis of the starch macromolecules followed by the conversion of the resulting sugars to furan-based molecules and quantifying the ensuing mixture by measuring their absorbance at a Ι of 490 nm, using the same technique as previous one and; finally (iii) hydrolysis of starch macromolecules by trifluoro-acetic acid and quantification of the sugars in the resulting hydrolysates by high performance liquid chromatography. The three methods were found to give similar results within the range of CS addition from 0 to 50 mg per g of cellulose fibres.

  14. Cutinase promotes dry esterification of cotton cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoman, Zhao; Teresa, Matama; Artur, Ribeiro; Carla, Silva; Jing, Wu; Jiajia, Fu; Artur, Cavaco-Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Cutinase from Thermobifida fusca was used to esterify the hydroxyl groups of cellulose with the fatty acids from triolein. Cutinase and triolein were pre-adsorbed on cotton and the reaction proceeded in a dry state during 48 h at 35°C. The cutinase-catalyzed esterification of the surface of cotton fabric resulted in the linkage of the oleate groups to the glycoside units of cotton cellulose. The superficial modification was confirmed by performing ATR-FTIR on treated cotton samples and by MALDI-TOF analysis of the liquors from the treatment of the esterified cotton with a crude cellulase mixture. Modified cotton fabric also showed a significant increase of hydrophobicity. This work proposes a novel bio-based approach to obtain hydrophobic cotton.

  15. Reinforced plastics and aerogels by nanocrystalline cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Alfred C. W.; Lam, Edmond; Chong, Jonathan; Hrapovic, Sabahudin; Luong, John H. T., E-mail: john.luong@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada (Canada)

    2013-05-15

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), a rigid rod-like nanoscale material, can be produced from cellulosic biomass in powder, liquid, or gel forms by acid and chemical hydrolysis. Owing to its unique and exceptional physicochemical properties, the incorporation of a small amount of NCC into plastic enhances the mechanical strength of the latter by several orders of magnitudes. Carbohydrate-based NCC poses no serious environmental concerns, providing further impetus for the development and applications of this green and renewable biomaterial to fabricate lightweight and biodegradable composites and aerogels. Surface functionalization of NCC remains the main focus of NCC research to tailor its properties for dispersion in hydrophilic or hydrophobic media. It is of uttermost importance to develop tools and protocols for imaging of NCC in a complex matrix and quantify its reinforcement effect.

  16. Reinforced plastics and aerogels by nanocrystalline cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Alfred C. W.; Lam, Edmond; Chong, Jonathan; Hrapovic, Sabahudin; Luong, John H. T.

    2013-05-01

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), a rigid rod-like nanoscale material, can be produced from cellulosic biomass in powder, liquid, or gel forms by acid and chemical hydrolysis. Owing to its unique and exceptional physicochemical properties, the incorporation of a small amount of NCC into plastic enhances the mechanical strength of the latter by several orders of magnitudes. Carbohydrate-based NCC poses no serious environmental concerns, providing further impetus for the development and applications of this green and renewable biomaterial to fabricate lightweight and biodegradable composites and aerogels. Surface functionalization of NCC remains the main focus of NCC research to tailor its properties for dispersion in hydrophilic or hydrophobic media. It is of uttermost importance to develop tools and protocols for imaging of NCC in a complex matrix and quantify its reinforcement effect.

  17. A comparative study on properties of micro and nanopapers produced from cellulose and cellulose nanofibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtibe, A; Linganiso, Linda Z; Mathew, Aji P; Oksman, K; John, Maya J; Anandjiwala, Rajesh D

    2015-03-15

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and cellulose nanofibres (CNFs) were successfully extracted from cellulose obtained from maize stalk residues. A variety of techniques, such as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used for characterization and the experimental results showed that lignin and hemicellulose were removed to a greater extent by following the chemical methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results confirmed that the diameters of CNCs and CNFs were ranging from 3 to 7 nm and 4 to 10nm, respectively, with their lengths in micro scale. CNCs suspension showed a flow of birefringence, however, the same was not observed in the case of suspension containing CNFs. XRD analysis confirmed that CNCs had high crystallinity index in comparison to cellulose and CNFs. Nanopapers were prepared from CNCs and CNFs by solvent evaporation method. Micropapers were also prepared from cellulose pulp by the same technique. Nanopapers made from CNFs showed less transparency as compared to nanopapers produced from CNCs whereas high transparency as compared to micropaper. Nanopapers produced from CNFs provided superior mechanical properties as compared to both micropaper and nanopapers produced from CNCs. Also, nanopapers produced from CNFs were thermally more stable as compared to nanopapers produced from CNCs but thermally less stable as compared to micropapers.

  18. Using carboxylated nanocrystalline cellulose as an additive in cellulosic paper and poly (vinyl alcohol) fiber paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Ruitao; Wang, Chengyu; Cheng, Shaoling; He, Zhibin; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-09-22

    Specialty paper (e.g. cigarette paper and battery diaphragm paper) requires extremely high strength properties. The addition of strength agents plays an important role in increasing strength properties of paper. Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), or cellulose whiskers, has the potential to enhance the strength properties of paper via improving inter-fibers bonding. This paper was to determine the potential of using carboxylated nanocrystalline cellulose (CNCC) to improve the strength properties of paper made of cellulosic fiber or poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fiber. The results indicated that the addition of CNCC can effectively improve the strength properties. At a CNCC dosage of 0.7%, the tear index and tensile index of the cellulosic paper reached the maximum of 12.8 mN m2/g and 100.7 Nm/g, respectively. More importantly, when increasing the CNCC dosage from 0.1 to 1.0%, the tear index and tensile index of PVA fiber paper were increased by 67.29%, 22.55%, respectively.

  19. SPECIFIC INTERACTION ACTING AT A CELLULOSE-BINDING DOMAIN/CELLULOSE INTERFACE FOR PAPERMAKING APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Yokota

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Specific and strong cellulose-binding characteristics were utilized for promoting retention of additives in contaminated papermaking systems. Cellulose-binding domain (CBD of cellulase derived from Trichoderma viride was separated by digestion with papain, and then introduced into anionic polyacrylamide (A-PAM through a condensation reaction using water-soluble carbodiimide. The CBD-modified A-PAM (CBD-A-PAM showed good retention on pulp fibers, resulting in high tensile strength paper sheets. The effect remained almost unchanged in the presence of model interfering substances such as ligninsulfonate and Ca2+ ions, whereas commercial cationic paper-strengthening polymer became ineffective. The cellulose-binding force of CBD was quantitatively determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM in the liquid state. Histidine-tagged CBD protein was obtained using Escherichia coli via an expression of CBD derived from Cellulomonas fimi, and immobilized on a gold-coated AFM probe. A strong attractive force was detected only at a CBD/cellulose interface, even when Ca2+ ions were present in high concentration. Direct estimation of CBD affinity for cellulose substrate by AFM would provide significant information on the interfacial interactions useful for the functional design of papermaking additives.

  20. Structure and properties of a pulp fibre-reinforced composite with regenerated cellulose matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindl, W.; Schöberl, T.; Keckes, J.

    2006-04-01

    Fully bio-based cellulose cellulose composites were produced by partly dissolving beech pulp fibres in lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide (LiCl/DMAc) and subsequent regeneration of matrix cellulose in the presence of undissolved fibres. Compared to cellulose epoxy composites produced from the same fibres, a two-fold increase in tensile strength and elastic modulus was observed for cellulose cellulose composites. From scanning electron microscopy and nanoindentation it is concluded that changes in the fibre cell wall during LiCl/DMAc treatment, improved matrix properties of regenerated cellulose compared to epoxy, and improved fibre matrix adhesion are responsible for the superior properties of cellulose cellulose composites.

  1. Entrepreneurial orientation, market orientation, and competitive environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Eibe; Cadogan, John W.

    orientation, and competitive environment shape business performance via a three-way interaction. We test the model using primary data from the CEOs of 270 CEO of manufacturing firms, together with secondary data on these firms' profit performance. An assessment of the results indicates that customer...... orientation moderates the positive relationships between the competitiveness element of entrepreneurial orientation and market share and return on assets (ROA): the positive relationships between competitiveness and market share and competitiveness and ROA become stronger the greater the firms' customer...

  2. Transcriptomic and genomic analysis of cellulose fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, Babu [ORNL; McKeown, Catherine K [ORNL; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 wild-type strain to hydrolyze cellulose and ferment the degradation products directly to ethanol and other metabolic byproducts makes it an attractive candidate for consolidated bioprocessing of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. In this study, whole-genome microarrays were used to investigate the expression of C. thermocellum mRNA during growth on crystalline cellulose in controlled replicate batch fermentations. A time-series analysis of gene expression revealed changes in transcript levels of {approx}40% of genes ({approx}1300 out of 3198 ORFs encoded in the genome) during transition from early-exponential to late-stationary phase. K-means clustering of genes with statistically significant changes in transcript levels identified six distinct clusters of temporal expression. Broadly, genes involved in energy production, translation, glycolysis and amino acid, nucleotide and coenzyme metabolism displayed a decreasing trend in gene expression as cells entered stationary phase. In comparison, genes involved in cell structure and motility, chemotaxis, signal transduction and transcription showed an increasing trend in gene expression. Hierarchical clustering of cellulosome-related genes highlighted temporal changes in composition of this multi-enzyme complex during batch growth on crystalline cellulose, with increased expression of several genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes involved in degradation of non-cellulosic substrates in stationary phase. Overall, the results suggest that under low substrate availability, growth slows due to decreased metabolic potential and C. thermocellum alters its gene expression to (i) modulate the composition of cellulosomes that are released into the environment with an increased proportion of enzymes than can efficiently degrade plant polysaccharides other than cellulose, (ii) enhance signal transduction and chemotaxis mechanisms perhaps to sense the oligosaccharide hydrolysis products

  3. Cellulose - Decomposing Fungi From Saudi Arabian Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Bahkali, Ali H.; Khiyami, Mohammad A.

    1996-01-01

    Thirty fungal species belonging to fifteen genera were collected from 30 soil samples on cellulose Czapek agar. The highest number of fungal species was isolated from Dammam (20 species) followed by Niomas (18 species), Makkah and Riyadh (17 species each), Tabouk (16) species and Jizan (11 species). The most frequent genera isolated were Aspergillus, Pencillium, Alternaria, Ulocladium and Curvularia. Throughout this study, six fungal species belonging to four genera; Ulocladiun septosporum, E...

  4. Digital Color in Cellulose Nanocrystal Films

    OpenAIRE

    Dumanli, Ahu Gümrah; van der Kooij, Hanne M.; Kamita, Gen; Reisner, Erwin; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This is the final published version. It first appeared at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/am501995e. Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) form chiral nematic phases in aqueous suspensions that can be preserved upon evaporation of water. The resulting films show an intense directional coloration determined by their microstructure. Here, microreflection experiments correlated with analysis of the helicoidal nanostructure of the films reveal that the iridescent colors and the ordering of the ind...

  5. Bacterial Cellulose-based Biomimetic Composites

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Microbial cellulose has proven to be a remarkably versatile biomaterial and can be used in a wide variety of fields, to produce for instance paper products, electronics, acoustics, and biomedical devices. Various biodegradable and biocompatible polymeric materials have recently been investigated to fabricate inorganic-organic hybrid composites by mimicking the mineralization system of natural bone, with some successful outcomes. However, the search for an ideal biomaterial with properties and...

  6. Tensorial Orientation Scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Gronde, Jasper J.; Azzopardi, George; Petkov, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    Orientation scores are representations of images built using filters that only select on orientation (and not on the magnitude of the frequency). Importantly, they allow (easy) reconstruction, making them ideal for use in a filtering pipeline. Traditionally a specific set of orientations has to be c

  7. 21 CFR 177.1400 - Hydroxyethyl cellulose film, water-insoluble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydroxyethyl cellulose film, water-insoluble. 177... cellulose film, water-insoluble. Water-insoluble hydroxyethyl cellulose film may be safely used for... cellulose film consists of a base sheet manufactured by the ethoxylation of cellulose under...

  8. Drying of Pigment-Cellulose Nanofibril Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Timofeev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A new substrate containing cellulose nanofibrils and inorganic pigment particles has been developed for printed electronics applications. The studied composite structure contains 80% fillers and is mechanically stable and flexible. Before drying, the solids content can be as low as 20% due to the high water binding capacity of the cellulose nanofibrils. We have studied several drying methods and their effects on the substrate properties. The aim is to achieve a tight, smooth surface keeping the drying efficiency simultaneously at a high level. The methods studied include: (1 drying on a hot metal surface; (2 air impingement drying; and (3 hot pressing. Somewhat surprisingly, drying rates measured for the pigment-cellulose nanofibril substrates were quite similar to those for the reference board sheets. Very high dewatering rates were observed for the hot pressing at high moisture contents. The drying method had significant effects on the final substrate properties, especially on short-range surface smoothness. The best smoothness was obtained with a combination of impingement and contact drying. The mechanical properties of the sheets were also affected by the drying method and associated temperature.

  9. Expression of a mutant form of cellulose synthase AtCesA7 causes dominant negative effect on cellulose biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Morrison, W Herbert; Freshour, Glenn D; Hahn, Michael G; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2003-06-01

    Cellulose synthase catalytic subunits (CesAs) have been implicated in catalyzing the biosynthesis of cellulose, the major component of plant cell walls. Interactions between CesA subunits are thought to be required for normal cellulose synthesis, which suggests that incorporation of defective CesA subunits into cellulose synthase complex could potentially cause a dominant effect on cellulose synthesis. However, all CesA mutants so far reported have been shown to be recessive in terms of cellulose synthesis. In the course of studying the molecular mechanisms regulating secondary wall formation in fibers, we have found that a mutant allele of AtCesA7 gene in the fra5 (fragile fiber 5) mutant causes a semidominant phenotype in the reduction of fiber cell wall thickness and cellulose content. The fra5 missense mutation occurred in a conserved amino acid located in the second cytoplasmic domain of AtCesA7. Overexpression of the fra5 mutant cDNA in wild-type plants not only reduced secondary wall thickness and cellulose content but also decreased primary wall thickness and cell elongation. In contrast, overexpression of the fra6 mutant form of AtCesA8 did not cause any reduction in cell wall thickness and cellulose content. These results suggest that the fra5 mutant protein may interfere with the function of endogenous wild-type CesA proteins, thus resulting in a dominant negative effect on cellulose biosynthesis.

  10. BIOSYNTHESIS OF BACTERIAL CELLULOSE BY МEDUSOMYCES GISEVII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Gladysheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Bacterial cellulose is an organic material that is synthesized by microorganisms extracellularly. Bacterial cellulose can be used in various industries. Especially, bacterial cellulose has found its application basically in medicine. The production of bacterial cellulose is a complicated and long process. The principal criterion for the process to be successful is bacterial cellulose to be obtained in a higher yield. Russia is lacking an operating facility to produce bacterial cellulose; therefore, research in this art is the hottest topic. This paper reports details on the biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose by the Мedusomyces gisevii microbe and investigates the effect of active acidity level on the bacterial cellulose synthesis. It was found that the synthesis of bacterial cellulose by the symbiosis of Мedusomyces gisevii does not require pH to be artificially maintained. The substrate concentration effect on the bacterial cellulose yield was also examined. The bacterial cellulose synthesis was witnessed to be conjugated with the acetic-acid bacterium growth, and conditions corresponding to a maximal bacterial cells number correspond to a maximum microbial cellulose yield. The maximal bacterial cell number was observed when the glucose concentration in the broth was 20 g/l; as the glucose concentration was increased to 55 g/L, the acetic-acid bacterial cell number diminished in inverse proportion to the substrate concentration, which is likely due to the substrate inhibition. A glucose concentration of 15 g/l and lower is not enough, causing a decrease in the cell number, which is directly proportional to a decline in the substrate concentration. The maximum bacterial cellulose yield (8.7-9.0 % was achieved at an initial glucose concentration of 20-25 g/l in the broth. The conditions providing the maximum bacterial cellulose yield gave an enlarged bacterial cellulose specimen 605 g in weight. The physicochemical properties of the

  11. All-cellulose nanocomposite film made from bagasse cellulose nanofibers for food packaging application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Moein; Mousavi, Mohammad; Yousefi, Hossein; Labbafi, Mohsen

    2014-04-15

    All-cellulose nanocomposite (ACNC) film was produced from sugarcane bagasse nanofibers using N,N-dimethylacetamide/lithium chloride solvent. The average diameter of bagasse fibers (14 μm) was downsized to 39 nm after disk grinding process. X-ray diffraction showed that apparent crystallinity and crystallite size decreased relatively to an increased duration of dissolution time. Thermogravimetric analysis confirmed that thermal stability of the ACNC was slightly less than that of the pure cellulose nanofiber sheet. Tensile strength of the fiber sheet, nanofiber sheet and ACNC prepared with 10 min dissolution time were 8, 101 and 140 MPa, respectively. Water vapor permeability (WVP) of the ACNC film increased relatively to an increased duration of dissolution time. ACNC can be considered as a multi-performance material with potential for application in cellulose-based food packaging owing to its promising properties (tough, bio-based, biodegradable and acceptable levels of WVP).

  12. Preparation and Characterization of Super Absorbent Resin from Natural Cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杰; 马凤国; 谭惠民

    2003-01-01

    The grafting polyacrylamide onto wood pulp cellulose (cell-g-PAM) was performed with cerous ammonium nitrate as the initiator and hydrolyzed to produce the super absorbent resin. The FTIR shows that the polyacrylamide is grafted on the cellulose. After hydrolyzation, part of acrylamino groups are transformed into carboxyl groups. The XRD analysis shows that the graft polymerization occurred at the amorphous section and the surface of the crystal section of cellulose. The SEM graph reveals that there is a layer of polymer on the surface of cellulose fiber and the fibril structure of the cellulose surface is covered. After hydrolyzation, the surface of the product is different from that of cell-g-PAM's and the surface is scraggy. The technical conditions to prepare high water absorbent resin were confirmed. Through the radical graft copolymerization, the high water absorbent resin can be produced from wood pulp cellulose.

  13. Traffic jams reduce hydrolytic efficiency of cellulase on cellulose surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Koivula, Anu; Wada, Masahisa; Kimura, Satoshi; Okamoto, Tetsuaki; Penttilä, Merja; Ando, Toshio; Samejima, Masahiro

    2011-09-02

    A deeper mechanistic understanding of the saccharification of cellulosic biomass could enhance the efficiency of biofuels development. We report here the real-time visualization of crystalline cellulose degradation by individual cellulase enzymes through use of an advanced version of high-speed atomic force microscopy. Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (TrCel7A) molecules were observed to slide unidirectionally along the crystalline cellulose surface but at one point exhibited collective halting analogous to a traffic jam. Changing the crystalline polymorphic form of cellulose by means of an ammonia treatment increased the apparent number of accessible lanes on the crystalline surface and consequently the number of moving cellulase molecules. Treatment of this bulky crystalline cellulose simultaneously or separately with T. reesei cellobiohydrolase II (TrCel6A) resulted in a remarkable increase in the proportion of mobile enzyme molecules on the surface. Cellulose was completely degraded by the synergistic action between the two enzymes.

  14. Cellulose-Based Bio- and Nanocomposites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susheel Kalia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose macro- and nanofibers have gained increasing attention due to the high strength and stiffness, biodegradability and renewability, and their production and application in development of composites. Application of cellulose nanofibers for the development of composites is a relatively new research area. Cellulose macro- and nanofibers can be used as reinforcement in composite materials because of enhanced mechanical, thermal, and biodegradation properties of composites. Cellulose fibers are hydrophilic in nature, so it becomes necessary to increase their surface roughness for the development of composites with enhanced properties. In the present paper, we have reviewed the surface modification of cellulose fibers by various methods. Processing methods, properties, and various applications of nanocellulose and cellulosic composites are also discussed in this paper.

  15. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2011-06-07

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  16. Effect of Surface Attachment on Synthesis of Bacterial Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Barbara R [ORNL; O' Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter spp. synthesize a pure form of hydrophilic cellulose that has several industrial specialty applications. Literature reports have concentrated on intensive investigation of static and agitated culture in liquid media containing high nutrient concentrations optimized for maximal cellulose production rates. The behavior of these bacteria on semisolid and solid surfaces has not been specifically addressed. The species Gluconacetobacter hansenii was examined for cellulose synthesis and colony morphology on a range of solid supports, including cotton linters, and on media thickened with agar, methyl cellulose, or gellan. The concentration and chemical structure of the thickening agent were found to be directly related to the formation of contiguous cellulose pellicules. Viability of the bacteria following freezer storage was improved when the bacteria were frozen in their cellulose pellicules.

  17. Proper orientation of cacti

    OpenAIRE

    Araujo, Julio; Havet, Frédéric; Linhares Sales, Claudia; Silva, Ana

    2016-01-01

    International audience; An orientation of a graph G is proper if two adjacent vertices have different in-degrees. The proper-orientation number − → χ (G) of a graph G is the minimum maximum in-degree of a proper orientation of G. In [1], the authors ask whether the proper orientation number of a planar graph is bounded. We prove that every cactus admits a proper orientation with maximum in-degree at most 7. We also prove that the bound 7 is tight by showing a cactus having no proper orientati...

  18. USE CELLULOSE FOR CLEANING CONCENTRATED SUGAR SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Kul’neva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Producing high quality intermediate products in the boiling-crystallization station is an actual problem of sugar production. In the production of white sugar brown sugar syrup is not further purified that decreases the quality of the end product. Studies have been conducted using cellulose as an adsorbent for the purification of concentrated sugar solutions, having affinity to dyes and other impurities. Research have been carried out with the intermediate products of the Lebedyan sugar plant. Test results have shown cellulose ability to adsorb the dyes in sugar production. The influence of the adsorbent concentration and the mass fraction of solids in the syrup on the decolorization effect has been studied; rational process parameters have been obtained. It has been found that proceeding an additional adsorption purification of brown sugars syrup allows to reduce the solution color, increase the amount and quality of the end product. Adsorbing means, received from production wastes on the basis of organic resources, have many advantages: economical, environmentally friendly for disposal, safe to use, reliable and efficient in use. Conducted research on using cellulose as adsorbent for treatment of concentrated sugar solutions, having an affinity for colouring matter and other impurities. The experiments were carried out on the intermediates Lebedyanskiy sugar factory. The test results showed the ability of cellulose to adsorb coloring matter of sugar production. To evaluate the effect of bleaching depending on the mass fraction of dry substances prepared yellow juice filtration of sugar concentration of 55, 60, 65 % with subsequent adsorption purification of cellulose. The results of the experiment built adsorption isotherm of dyestuffs. The influence of the concentration of the adsorbent and a mass fraction of solids of juice filtration on the efficiency of decolorization obtained by rational parameters of the process. It is

  19. Characterization of Cellulose Microfibers Isolated from Rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junidah Lamaming

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose microfibers were isolated by chemical treatment followed by acid hydrolysis using sulphuric acid. The chemical compositions for extractive, holocellulose, cellulose and lignin were determined. The functional group of raw particles and cellulose microfibers of rubberwood were determined using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. Morphological studies were viewed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to investigate physical changes of the fibers after acid hydrolysis. The results show that cellulose content was increased to 63 % from 52 % after hydrolysis was conducted to the raw particles. Particle size distribution of cellulose microfibers falls in the range of below 100 µm. The removal of lignin and other extractives during chemical and acid hydrolysis can be seen by the absence of certain band in the FTIR spectra. The individualization of the fibers can be seen after hydrolysis with sulphuric acid. The removal of the surface impurities along with defibrillation were also shown in the cellulose microfibers. Cellulose microfibers were isolated by chemical treatment followed by acid hydrolysis using sulphuric acid. The chemical compositions for extractive, holocellulose, cellulose and lignin were determined. The functional group of raw particles and cellulose microfibers of rubberwood were determined using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. Morphological studies were viewed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to investigate physical changes of the fibers after acid hydrolysis. The results show that cellulose content was increased to 63 % from 52 % after hydrolysis was conducted to the raw particles. Particle size distribution of cellulose microfibers falls in the range of below 100 µm. The removal of lignin and other extractives during chemical and acid hydrolysis can be seen by the absence of certain band in the FTIR spectra. The individualization of the fibers can be seen after hydrolysis with

  20. Smart Cellulose Fibers Coated with Carbon Nanotube Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Haisong Qi; Jianwen Liu; Edith Mäder

    2014-01-01

    Smart multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-coated cellulose fibers with a unique sensing ability were manufactured by a simple dip coating process. The formation of electrically-conducting MWCNT networks on cellulose mono- and multi-filament fiber surfaces was confirmed by electrical resistance measurements and visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The interaction between MWCNT networks and cellulose fiber was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The piezoresistivity of these fibers fo...

  1. Regenerators with cellulose as storage material. Regeneratoren mit Cellulose als Speichermaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenk, J. (Inst. fuer Luft- und Kaeltetechnik, Dresden (Germany))

    1994-02-01

    Regenerators for heat and mass transfer are mostly based on storage materials made of aluminium or glass and ceramic fibres. For about 15 years, experience with storage masses made of cellulose paper has been available. A development carried out at the Institute for Air and Refrigeration Technology in Dresden led to the production of more than 1000 regenerative energy transfer units in the variant of heat exchanger as well as of enthalpy transfer units. At present, an advanced line of products of cellulose storage masses is prepared. The relations to be observed between microgeometry of the storage mass and performance data, such as transmission level and pressure loss, are presented. (orig.)

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of a Novel Cellulose Nonionic Ether

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Zi-qiang; XU Kun; TIAN Yong-sheng; WANG Fei-jun; WANG Ji-xun

    2005-01-01

    A kind of novel cellulose ether-trihydroxybutyl cellulose (THBC) was synthesized. The process includes the steam explosion treatment of cotton cellulose, alkalization, etherification and purification. Sweep electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the cellulose pretreated and the product. The effects of reaction conditions (temperature, time) on the molecular substitution (Sm) were discussed. To obtain a higher degree of molecular substitution, the reaction temperature is 80 ℃, and the reaction time is 4 h.

  3. Synthesis of cellulose dehydroabietate in ionic liquid [bmim]Br.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuetang; Duan, Wengui; Huang, Mei; Li, Guanghua

    2011-09-27

    A new type of cellulose derivative, cellulose dehydroabietate (CDA), was synthesized by the O-acylation reaction of cellulose with dehydroabietic acid chloride (DHAC) using ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([bmim]Br) as a solvent and 4-dimethyl-aminopyridine (DMAP) as a catalyst. The resulting CDA was characterized by means of FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and elemental analysis. Also, some properties of CDA were determined. These results showed that CDA has better solubility, water-repellency, and resistance to acids and bases than raw cellulose, and these properties increase with the DS of CDA.

  4. Effects of Ethanol Pulping on the Length of Bamboo Cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Yang; Liao Junhe; Luo Xuegang

    2006-01-01

    On the conditions of different ethanol concentration, acids and catalyzers, the effects of ethanol pulping on the cellulose length of bamboo were studied. The results indicates that ethanol pulping has remarkable effects on the length of cellulose, which is clearly reduced with adding ethanol and acid. The margin of length of cellulose become smaller with the increase of the catalyzer. When the ethanol concentration was 70%, the concentration of acid was 0.3% and some NaOH was used as catalyzer, the length of cellulose was the longest.

  5. CELLULOSE EXTRACTION FROM PALM KERNEL CAKE USING LIQUID PHASE OXIDATION

    OpenAIRE

    FARM YAN YAN; DUDUKU KRISHNIAH; MARIANI RAJIN; AWANG BONO

    2009-01-01

    Cellulose is widely used in many aspect and industries such as food industry, pharmaceutical, paint, polymers, and many more. Due to the increasing demand in the market, studies and work to produce cellulose are still rapidly developing. In this work, liquid phase oxidation was used to extract cellulose from palm kernel cake to separate hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin. The method is basically a two-step process. Palm kernel cake was pretreated in hot water at 180°C and followed by liquid ...

  6. Characterization of Bacterial Cellulose by Gluconacetobacter hansenii CGMCC 3917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xianchao; Ullah, Niamat; Wang, Xuejiao; Sun, Xuchun; Li, Chenyi; Bai, Yun; Chen, Lin; Li, Zhixi

    2015-10-01

    In this study, comprehensive characterization and drying methods on properties of bacterial cellulose were analyzed. Bacterial cellulose was prepared by Gluconacetobacter hansenii CGMCC 3917, which was mutated by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment. Bacterial cellulose is mainly comprised of cellulose Iα with high crystallinity and purity. High-water holding and absorption capacity were examined by reticulated structure. Thermogravimetric analysis showed high thermal stability. High tensile strength and Young's modulus indicated its mechanical properties. The rheological analysis showed that bacterial cellulose had good consistency and viscosity. These results indicated that bacterial cellulose is a potential food additive and also could be used for a food packaging material. The high textural stability during freeze-thaw cycles makes bacterial cellulose an effective additive for frozen food products. In addition, the properties of bacterial cellulose can be affected by drying methods. Our results suggest that the bacterial cellulose produced from HHP-mutant strain has an effective characterization, which can be used for a wide range of applications in food industry.

  7. Cellulosic Fibers: Effect of Processing on Fiber Bundle Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Madsen, Bo; Thomsen, Anne Belinda;

    2011-01-01

    A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding, and cotto......A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding...

  8. Modeling of Carbohydrate Binding Modules Complexed to Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Bomble, Y. J.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling results are presented for the interaction of two carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) with cellulose. The family 1 CBM from Trichoderma reesei's Cel7A cellulase was modeled using molecular dynamics to confirm that this protein selectively binds to the hydrophobic (100) surface of cellulose fibrils and to determine the energetics and mechanisms for locating this surface. Modeling was also conducted of binding of the family 4 CBM from the CbhA complex from Clostridium thermocellum. There is a cleft in this protein, which may accommodate a cellulose chain that is detached from crystalline cellulose. This possibility is explored using molecular dynamics.

  9. Studies on cellulose degradation by a Thermoactinimyces Sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-04-01

    Progress in studies on the mechanism of cellulose degradation by Thermoactinomyces is reported. Two pure cellulosic substrates AVICEL and SOLKA FLOC were used in the experiments. A low substituted carboxymethylcellulose (Hercules 4M CMC), cellobiose, and glucose were also used as growth substrates. Results indicate that glucose is not inhibitory to growth up to 1% concetrations, and that cellobiose may not be a good inducer of the cellobiase enzyme activity. Production of biomass and soluble protein was found to be 50% greater on crystalline AVICEL than on the amorphous SOLKA FLOC, even though approximately the same amount and rate of cellulose degradation occurred. A model for cellulose digestion is presented. (JGB)

  10. Parameter and Process Significance in Mechanistic Modeling of Cellulose Hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, B.; Barry, A.; Gerhard, J.; Small, J.; Tahar, B.

    2005-12-01

    The rate of cellulose hydrolysis, and of associated microbial processes, is important in determining the stability of landfills and their potential impact on the environment, as well as associated time scales. To permit further exploration in this field, a process-based model of cellulose hydrolysis was developed. The model, which is relevant to both landfill and anaerobic digesters, includes a novel approach to biomass transfer between a cellulose-bound biofilm and biomass in the surrounding liquid. Model results highlight the significance of the bacterial colonization of cellulose particles by attachment through contact in solution. Simulations revealed that enhanced colonization, and therefore cellulose degradation, was associated with reduced cellulose particle size, higher biomass populations in solution, and increased cellulose-binding ability of the biomass. A sensitivity analysis of the system parameters revealed different sensitivities to model parameters for a typical landfill scenario versus that for an anaerobic digester. The results indicate that relative surface area of cellulose and proximity of hydrolyzing bacteria are key factors determining the cellulose degradation rate.

  11. Engineering control of bacterial cellulose production using a genetic toolkit and a new cellulose-producing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Michael; Hagemann, Henrik; Santosa, Gabriella; Abbott, James; Micklem, Chris N; Spencer-Milnes, Xenia; de Arroyo Garcia, Laura; Paschou, Despoina; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Kong, Deze; Chughtai, Haroon; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S; Kitney, Richard; Reeve, Benjamin; Ellis, Tom

    2016-06-14

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong and ultrapure form of cellulose produced naturally by several species of the Acetobacteraceae Its high strength, purity, and biocompatibility make it of great interest to materials science; however, precise control of its biosynthesis has remained a challenge for biotechnology. Here we isolate a strain of Komagataeibacter rhaeticus (K. rhaeticus iGEM) that can produce cellulose at high yields, grow in low-nitrogen conditions, and is highly resistant to toxic chemicals. We achieved external control over its bacterial cellulose production through development of a modular genetic toolkit that enables rational reprogramming of the cell. To further its use as an organism for biotechnology, we sequenced its genome and demonstrate genetic circuits that enable functionalization and patterning of heterologous gene expression within the cellulose matrix. This work lays the foundations for using genetic engineering to produce cellulose-based materials, with numerous applications in basic science, materials engineering, and biotechnology.

  12. Manganese-containing cellulose nanocomposites: the restrain effect of cellulose treated with NaOH/urea aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming-Guo; Deng, Fu; Yao, Ke

    2014-10-13

    In this article, the manganese-containing cellulose nanocomposites were obtained using microcrystalline cellulose and Mn(CH3COO)2 · 4H2O in the NaOH/urea aqueous solutions by a efficient microwave-assisted method. The effects of the heating time and Mn(CH3COO)2 · 4H2O concentration on the cellulose nanocomposites were investigated. It was found that the microcrystalline cellulose pretreated with NaOH/urea aqueous solutions played an important role in the phase, shape, and thermal stability of manganese-containing cellulose nanocomposites. Well-crystalline phases of manganese oxides were not observed in the manganese-containing cellulose nanocomposites. Furthermore, well-crystalline phases of manganese oxides were not also observed by thermal treatment of the manganese-containing cellulose nanocomposites at 600 °C for 3h. These results could be attributed to the restrain effect of cellulose treated with NaOH/urea aqueous solutions. It was supposed the possible mechanism during the phase transformation of cellulose nanocomposites.

  13. ECOLOGY SAFE METHOD OF OBTAINING FROM FIR-WOOD THE CELLULOSIC PRODUCT WITH HIGH CONTENT OF ALFA-CELLULOSE

    OpenAIRE

    Владимир Александрович Левданский; Александр Владимирович Левданский; Борис Николаевич Кузнецов

    2014-01-01

    The «green» method of obtaining from fir-wood the cellulosic product with high content of alpha-cellulose was developed. It consists of the stage of wood delignification by hydrogen peroxide in the medium «acetic acid – water – sulfuric acid catalyst» and of the stage of alkaline treatment by NaOH. Preparation conditions were selected which allow to obtain with an acceptable yield (30–31% mas.) the cellulosic product containing 97,3–98,0% mas. of alpha-cellulose.

  14. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate)-cellulose nanowhiskers composites by solution casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten, Elena

    In this research, renewable biobased nanocomposites based on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate- co-3-hydroxyvalerate) and cellulose nanowhiskers were prepared by solution casting. Nanocomposite structure and property investigations were characterized to understand the reinforcing mechanism of CNWs in PHBV and establish longstanding goal of predicting structure--property relationships for material design and optimization. The CNW concentration strongly influenced the extent of nanowhiskers dispersion and level of property enhancement, as determined by structural, mechanical, thermal, dielectric and rheological characterizations. CNW content of 2.3 wt% indicated significant property transitions for all the investigated properties except for rheological ones. The change was believed to be due to the transition from homogeneous CNW dispersion to agglomeration. High CNW content led to CNW agglomerations and reduced nanocomposite moduli, yield strengths and real permittivity. DSC and POM analyses showed that CNWs could alter the nucleation and growth under both non-isothermal and isothermal crystallization conditions. Although the effect of CNW on nucleation ability and degree of crystallinity of PHBV was significant and could contribute to the mechanical properties improvement, the results of this study confirmed that primarily CNW homogeneous distribution and interconnected 3-D structure governed E' enhancement. Oriented PHBV/CNW composites were fabricated in-situ under electric field. CNW were oriented along the direction of applied filed. Image analysis revealed that degree of order and orientation distribution was mainly influenced by CNW content. TEM, DMA and XRD analysis showed that low CNW concentrations resulted in higher degree of anisotropy. Furthermore, for CNW content above 5 wt% the electric field was not sufficient to align CNW given the increased viscosity of PHBV/CNW solutions, hence, restricted mobility of CNW. The superior properties observed in both randomly

  15. The correlation between the enzymatic saccharification and the multidimensional structure of cellulose changed by different pretreatments

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Ting; Li, Jihong; Yan, Zhipei; Yu, Menghui; Li, Shizhong

    2014-01-01

    Background The bioconversion of cellulose into simple sugars or chemicals has attracted extensive attention in recent decades. The crystal allomorphs of cellulose are key factor affecting cellulose saccharification. However, due to the influence of lignin, hemicelluloses, and different characterization methods in the literature, the effect of cellulose allomorphs on cellulose saccharification is still unresolved. Thus, a systematic research on the effect of different cellulose allomorphs on e...

  16. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  17. Regenerating cellulose from ionic liquids for an accelerated enzymatic hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hua [Savannah State University; Jones, Cecil L [Savannah State University; Baker, Gary A [ORNL; Xia, Shuqian [Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; Olubajo, Olarongbe [Savannah State University; Person, Vernecia [Savannah State University

    2009-01-01

    The efficient conversion of lignocellulosic materials into fuel ethanol has become a research priority in producing affordable and renewable energy. The pretreatment of lignocelluloses is known to be key to the fast enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Recently, certain ionic liquids (ILs)were found capable of dissolving more than 10 wt% cellulose. Preliminary investigations [Dadi, A.P., Varanasi, S., Schall, C.A., 2006. Enhancement of cellulose saccharification kinetics using an ionic liquid pretreatment step. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 95, 904 910; Liu, L., Chen, H., 2006. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose materials treated with ionic liquid [BMIM]Cl. Chin. Sci. Bull. 51, 2432 2436; Dadi, A.P., Schall, C.A., Varanasi, S., 2007. Mitigation of cellulose recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis by ionic liquid pretreatment. Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 137 140, 407 421] suggest that celluloses regenerated from IL solutions are subject to faster saccharification than untreated substrates. These encouraging results offer the possibility of using ILs as alternative and nonvolatile solvents for cellulose pretreatment. However, these studies are limited to two chloride-based ILs: (a) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl), which is a corrosive, toxic and extremely hygroscopic solid (m.p. 70 C), and (b) 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl), which is viscous and has a reactive side-chain. Therefore, more in-depth research involving other ILs is much needed to explore this promising pretreatment route. For this reason, we studied a number of chloride- and acetate-based ILs for cellulose regeneration, including several ILs newly developed in our laboratory. This will enable us to select inexpensive, efficient and environmentally benign solvents for processing cellulosic biomass. Our data confirm that all regenerated celluloses are less crystalline (58 75% lower) and more accessible to cellulase (>2 times) than untreated substrates. As a result, regenerated Avicel

  18. Evaluating Models of Cellulose Degradation by Fibrobacter succinogenes S85.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meagan C Burnet

    Full Text Available Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 is an anaerobic non-cellulosome utilizing cellulolytic bacterium originally isolated from the cow rumen microbial community. Efforts to elucidate its cellulolytic machinery have resulted in the proposal of numerous models which involve cell-surface attachment via a combination of cellulose-binding fibro-slime proteins and pili, the production of cellulolytic vesicles, and the entry of cellulose fibers into the periplasmic space. Here, we used a combination of RNA-sequencing, proteomics, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM to further clarify the cellulolytic mechanism of F. succinogenes. Our RNA-sequence analysis shows that genes encoding type II and III secretion systems, fibro-slime proteins, and pili are differentially expressed on cellulose, relative to glucose. A subcellular fractionation of cells grown on cellulose revealed that carbohydrate active enzymes associated with cellulose deconstruction and fibro-slime proteins were greater in the extracellular medium, as compared to the periplasm and outer membrane fractions. TEMs of samples harvested at mid-exponential and stationary phases of growth on cellulose and glucose showed the presence of grooves in the cellulose between the bacterial cells and substrate, suggesting enzymes work extracellularly for cellulose degradation. Membrane vesicles were only observed in stationary phase cultures grown on cellulose. These results provide evidence that F. succinogenes attaches to cellulose fibers using fibro-slime and pili, produces cellulases, such as endoglucanases, that are secreted extracellularly using type II and III secretion systems, and degrades the cellulose into cellodextrins that are then imported back into the periplasm for further digestion by β-glucanases and other cellulases.

  19. Evaluating Models of Cellulose Degradation by Fibrobacter succinogenes S85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnet, Meagan C; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Neumann, Anthony P; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; Suen, Garret; Callister, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 is an anaerobic non-cellulosome utilizing cellulolytic bacterium originally isolated from the cow rumen microbial community. Efforts to elucidate its cellulolytic machinery have resulted in the proposal of numerous models which involve cell-surface attachment via a combination of cellulose-binding fibro-slime proteins and pili, the production of cellulolytic vesicles, and the entry of cellulose fibers into the periplasmic space. Here, we used a combination of RNA-sequencing, proteomics, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to further clarify the cellulolytic mechanism of F. succinogenes. Our RNA-sequence analysis shows that genes encoding type II and III secretion systems, fibro-slime proteins, and pili are differentially expressed on cellulose, relative to glucose. A subcellular fractionation of cells grown on cellulose revealed that carbohydrate active enzymes associated with cellulose deconstruction and fibro-slime proteins were greater in the extracellular medium, as compared to the periplasm and outer membrane fractions. TEMs of samples harvested at mid-exponential and stationary phases of growth on cellulose and glucose showed the presence of grooves in the cellulose between the bacterial cells and substrate, suggesting enzymes work extracellularly for cellulose degradation. Membrane vesicles were only observed in stationary phase cultures grown on cellulose. These results provide evidence that F. succinogenes attaches to cellulose fibers using fibro-slime and pili, produces cellulases, such as endoglucanases, that are secreted extracellularly using type II and III secretion systems, and degrades the cellulose into cellodextrins that are then imported back into the periplasm for further digestion by β-glucanases and other cellulases.

  20. Composite edible films based on hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose reinforced with microcrystalline cellulose nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been stated that hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) based films have promising applications in the food industry because of their environmental appeal, low cost, flexibility and transparency. Nevertheless, their mechanical and moisture barrier properties should be improved. The aim of th...

  1. Chemical modification of cellulose extracted from sugarcane bagasse: Preparation of hydroxyethyl cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Abdel-Halim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose was extracted from sugarcane bagasse by alkaline extraction with sodium hydroxide followed by delignification/bleaching using sodium chlorite/hexamethylenetetramine system. Factors affecting extraction process, including sodium hydroxide concentration, hexamethylenetetramine concentration and temperature were studied and optimum conditions for alkaline extraction were found to be boiling finely ground bagasse under reflux in 1 N sodium hydroxide solution and then carrying out the delignification/bleaching treatment at 95 °C using 5 g/l sodium chlorite together with 0.02 g/l hexamethylenetetramine. The extracted cellulose was used in the preparation of hydroxyethyl cellulose through reaction with ethylene oxide in alkaline medium. Factors affecting the hydroxyethylation reaction, like sodium hydroxide concentration during the alkali formation step, ethylene oxide concentration, reaction temperature and reaction duration were studied. Optimum conditions for hydroxyethylation reaction were using 20% NaOH solution and 200% ethylene oxide (based on weight of cellulose, carrying out the reaction at 100 °C for 60 min.

  2. Virtual Orienteering Game For Smartphones

    OpenAIRE

    Sainio, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Orienteering is a relatively famous sports activity in Nordic countries. Today technology provides attractive means for transition from traditional orienteering to virtual orienteering. Virtual orienteering can be thought as orienteering without using a traditional printed map and compass. On the other hand smartphones contain technology for implementing virtual orienteering. There are different smartphone platforms and types, making application development challenging because several cod...

  3. Mineralization of cellulose in frozen boreal soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquist, Mats G.; Segura, Javier; Sparrman, Tobias; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jurgen

    2015-04-01

    Soils of high-latitude ecosystems store a large fraction of the global soil carbon. In boreal forests, the microbial mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) during winter can affect the ecosystems net carbon balance. Recent research has shown that microorganisms in the organic surface layer of boreal forest soil can mineralize and grow on simple, soluble monomeric substrates under frozen conditions. However, any substantial impacts of microbial activity in frozen soils on long-term soil carbon balances ultimately depends on whether soil microorganisms can utilize and grow the more complex, polymeric constituents of SOM. In order to evaluate the potential for soil microorganisms to metabolize carbon polymers at low temperatures, we incubated boreal forest soil samples amended with [13C]-cellulose and studied the microbial catabolic and anabolic utilization of the substrate under frozen and unfrozen conditions (-4 and +4°C). Freezing of the soil markedly reduced microbial utilization of the cellulose. The [13C]-CO2 production rate in the samples at +4°C were 0.52 mg CO2 SOM -1 day-1 while rates in the frozen samples (-4°C) were 0.01 mg CO2 SOM -1 day-1. However, newly synthetized [13C]-enriched cell membrane lipids, PLFAs, were detected in soil samples incubated both above and below freezing, confirming that cellulose can sustain also anabolic activity of the microbial populations under frozen conditions. The reduced metabolic rates induced by freezing indicate constraints on exoenzymatic activity, as well as substrate diffusion rates that we can attribute to reduced liquid water content of the frozen soil. We conclude that the microbial population in boreal forest soil has the capacity to metabolize, and grow, on polymeric substrates at temperatures below zero, which involves maintaining exoenzymatic activity in frozen soils. This capacity manifests the importance of SOM mineralization during the winter season and its importance for the net carbon balance of

  4. Atomic-scale modeling of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiawa

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), the most abundant nanomaterials in nature, are recognized as one of the most promising candidates to meet the growing demand of green, bio-degradable and sustainable nanomaterials for future applications. CNCs draw significant interest due to their high axial elasticity and low density-elasticity ratio, both of which are extensively researched over the years. In spite of the great potential of CNCs as functional nanoparticles for nanocomposite materials, a fundamental understanding of CNC properties and their role in composite property enhancement is not available. In this work, CNCs are studied using molecular dynamics simulation method to predict their material' behaviors in the nanoscale. (a) Mechanical properties include tensile deformation in the elastic and plastic regions using molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics and nanoindentation methods. This allows comparisons between the methods and closer connectivity to experimental measurement techniques. The elastic moduli in the axial and transverse directions are obtained and the results are found to be in good agreement with previous research. The ultimate properties in plastic deformation are reported for the first time and failure mechanism are analyzed in details. (b) The thermal expansion of CNC crystals and films are studied. It is proposed that CNC film thermal expansion is due primarily to single crystal expansion and CNC-CNC interfacial motion. The relative contributions of inter- and intra-crystal responses to heating are explored. (c) Friction at cellulose-CNCs and diamond-CNCs interfaces is studied. The effects of sliding velocity, normal load, and relative angle between sliding surfaces are predicted. The Cellulose-CNC model is analyzed in terms of hydrogen bonding effect, and the diamond-CNC model compliments some of the discussion of the previous model. In summary, CNC's material properties and molecular models are both studied in this research, contributing to

  5. Microstructural effects on the dynamic fracture toughness of cellulose-fiber-reinforced polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemons, Craig Merrill

    Natural fiber reinforced thermoplastics are a rapidly growing, commercially interesting area. Unlike their glass reinforced counterparts, microstructure and dynamic fracture behavior of natural fiber reinforced thermoplastics have hardly been investigated. We characterized the microstructure of cellulose fiber reinforced polypropylene and determined its effect on dynamic fracture toughness. Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces and x-ray diffraction were used to investigate fiber orientation in injection molded composites. The polypropylene matrix was removed by solvent extraction, and the lengths of the residual fibers were optically determined. Fiber lengths were reduced by one-half when compounded in a high-intensity thermokinetic mixer and then injection molded. At low fiber contents, there was little fiber orientation; at high fiber contents, a layered structure arose exhibiting differing fiber orientations through the thickness of the injection molded specimen. Scanning electron microscopy of acid etched specimens revealed spherulitic structure emanating from cellulose fibers (i.e. transcrystallinity) in injection molded composites containing less than 5% fibers. The etching procedure failed to provide any matrix surface relief in high fiber content composites. To better understand fracture under impact loading, dynamic fracture analysis was performed based on linear elastic fracture mechanics. Dynamic critical energy release rates and dynamic critical stress intensity factors were deduced from instrumented Charpy impact test measurements. Dynamic fracture toughness increased with cellulose content and with orientation of fibers perpendicular to the crack plane. To better control composite microstructure, model laminates of highly aligned plies were produced and tested. Dynamic fracture toughness decreased with fiber alignment angle. A simple model successfully related the microstructure to the dynamic fracture toughness. Increasing test

  6. Temperature responsive hydroxypropyl cellulose for encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitfeld, Kevin A.; Guo, Tingtai; Yang, George; Schaefer, Dale W. (UCIN)

    2009-08-26

    This work focuses on the use of temperature responsive gels (TRGs) (polymeric hydrogels with a large temperature-dependent change in volume) for flavor retention at cooking temperatures. Specifically, we have studied a gel with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) that swells at low temperatures and collapses at high temperatures. In the collapsed state, the polymer acts as a transport barrier, keeping the volatile flavors inside. We have successfully synthesized a cellulose gel that exhibits this volume change and have encapsulated an oil phase inside the gel. The flavor-loaded encapsulated oil exhibited an increased release time when compared to similar gelatin capsules.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Cellulose Microfiber Reinforced Polyolefin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    Cellulose microfiber (CeF) has been expected as a reinforcement of polymer because of its high modulus and strength and lower cost. In the present study, mechanical properties of CeF/polyolefin were investigated. Tensile modulus increased with increasing CeF content. On the other hand, tensile strength decreased. Fatigue properties were also investigated with acoustic emission measurement. Stiffness of the composites gradually decreased with loading. Drastic decrease in stiffness was observed just before the final fracture. Based on the Mori-Tanaka's theory, the method to calculate modulus of CeF were proposed to evaluate dispersion of CeF.

  8. A Sorption Hysteresis Model For Cellulosic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Damkilde, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The equilibrium concentration of adsorbed water in cellulosic materials is dependent on the history of the variations of vapor pressure in the ambient air, i.e. sorption hysteresis. Existing models to describe this phenomenon such as the independent domain theory have numerical drawbacks and....../or imply accounting for the entire history variations of every material point. This paper presents a sorption hysteresis model based on a state formulation and expressed in closed-form solutions, which makes it suitable for implementation into a numerical method....

  9. Entrepreneurial Orientation and Internationalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decker, Arnim; Rollnik-Sadowska, Ewa; Servais, Per

    Entrepreneurial orientation is a multidimensional construct that determines the strategic posture of a firm. In this study we investigate a sample of six manufacturing firms which are located both in a remote area and in a transition economy. Through interpreting the construct of entrepreneurial...... orientation as an attitude held by principals we investigate how entrepreneurial orientation affected the behaviour of these firms, specifically in terms of their internationalisation. Despite the fact that all firms have identical roots we find that entrepreneurial orientation held by their principals affect...

  10. Understanding plant cellulose synthases through a comprehensive investigation of the cellulose synthase family sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eCarroll

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of cellulose as an organizing structure in the plant cell wall was a key event in both the initial colonization and the subsequent domination of the terrestrial ecosystem by vascular plants. A wealth of experimental data has demonstrated the complicated genetic interactions required to form the large synthetic complex that synthesizes cellulose. However, these results are lacking an extensive analysis of the evolution, specialization, and regulation of the proteins that compose this complex. Here we perform an in-depth analysis of the sequences in the cellulose synthase (CesA family. We investigate the phylogeny of the CesA family, with emphasis on evolutionary specialization. We define specialized subfamilies and identify the class-specific regions within the CesA sequence that may explain this specialization. We investigate changes in regulation of CesAs by looking at the conservation of proposed phosphorylation sites. We investigate the conservation of sites where mutations have been documented that impair cellulose synthase function, and compare these sites to those observed in the closest cellulose synthase-like (Csl families to better understand what regions may separate the CesAs from other Csls. Finally we identify two positions with strong conservation of the aromatic trait, but lacking conservation of amino acid identity, which may represent residues important for positioning the sugar substrate for catalysis. These analyses provide useful tools for understanding characterized mutations and post-translational modifications, and for informing further experiments to probe CesA assembly, regulation, and function through site-directed mutagenesis or domain swapping experiments.

  11. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoseyov, Oded (Shimshon, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (North Gallilea, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  12. Development and Characterization of Cellulose/clay Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton is the most important textile fiber for apparel use and is preferred to synthetic fibers for reasons such as comfort and feel. A major drawback of cellulosic fibers is flammability. The development of cellulose/clay nanocomposites for use as flame retardant materials based on cotton is repo...

  13. Cellulose-Lignin interactions during slow and fast pyrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilbers, T.J.; Wang, Z.; Pecha, B.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Pelaez-Samaniego, M.R.; Garcia-Perez, M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between lignin and cellulose during the slow pyrolysis of their blends were studied by means of Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fast pyrolysis was studied using Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (Py–GC/MS). Crystalline cellulose

  14. Life Cycle Assessment of man-made cellulose fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, L.; Patel, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    The production of textile materials has undergone dramatic changes in the last century. Man-made cellulose fibres have played an important role for more than 70 years. Today, the man-made cellulose fibre industry is the worldwide second largest biorefinery (next to the paper industry). In the last f

  15. Environmental impact assessment of man-made cellulose fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, L.; Worrell, E.; Patel, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Man-made cellulose fibres have played an important role in the production of textile products for more than 70 years. The purpose of this study is to assess the environmental impact of man-made cellulose fibres. Life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted for three types of fibres (i.e. Viscose, Modal

  16. Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

  17. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  18. Cellulose synthesizing Complexes in Vascular Plants andProcaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard M, Jr; Saxena, Inder Mohan

    2009-07-07

    Continuing the work initiated under DE-FG03-94ER20145, the following major accomplishments were achieved under DE-FG02-03ER15396 from 2003-2007: (a) we purified the acsD gene product of the Acetobacter cellulose synthase operon as well as transferred the CesA cellulose gene from Gossypium into E. coli in an attempt to crystallize this protein for x-ray diffraction structural analysis; however, crystallization attempts proved unsuccessful; (b) the Acetobacter cellulose synthase operon was successfully incorporated into Synechococcus, a cyanobacterium2; (c) this operon in Synechococcus was functionally expressed; (d) we successfully immunolabeled Vigna cellulose and callose synthase components and mapped their distribution before and after wounding; (e) we developed a novel method to produce replicas of cellulose synthases in tobacco BY-2 cells, and we demonstrated the cytoplasmic domain of the rosette TC; (f) from the moss Physcomitrella, we isolated two full-length cDNA sequences of cellulose synthase (PpCesA1 and PpCesA2) and attempted to obtain full genomic DNA sequences; (g) we examined the detailed molecular structure of a new form of non-crystalline cellulose known as nematic ordered cellulose (=NOC)3.

  19. Characterization of cellulose based sponges for wound dressings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustaite, S.; Kazlauske, J.; Bobokalonov, J.; Perni, S.; Dutschk, V.; Liesiene, J.; Prokopovich, P.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose based sponges were developed by freeze-drying of regenerated cellulose gels and characterizedas a potential wound dressing. Morphological characteristics were analyzed by means of micro-computedtomography. The results showed that the porosity of the sponges reached 75%, the pores were inte

  20. Molecular weights of cellulose nitrates by osmotic pressure measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    dr. V. Subramanyam

    1950-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that nitro celluloses are employed for a variety of purposes. Broadly  nitrocellulose with relatively high nitrogen content are used in propellant and explosive manufacture nitrocelluloses  with lower nitrogen content find application in celluloid, in the lacquer industry, in cellulose paints, etc.

  1. Recent Development in Spectroscopic and Chemical Characterization of Cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    the I β form. As noted earlier, the nomenclature chosen was intended to avoid confusion with the IA and IB forms previously used to clas- sify the...cellulose suspended in a mixture of acetic anhydride / acetic acid/H2SO4 around 60°C. Cellulose triacetate is soluble in chlorinated hydrocarbons such as

  2. Dual morphology (fibres and particles) cellulosic filler for WPC materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Marco; Tirillò, Jacopo; Quitadamo, Alessia; Santulli, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Wood-plastic composites (WPC) were fabricated by using a polyethylene (PE) matrix and filling it with wood flour in the amount of 30 wt.%, and compared with the same composites with further amount of 10 wt.% of cellulosic recycled fibres added. The materials were produced by turbomixing and subsequent moulding under pressure. Mechanical properties of both WPC and WPC with cellulosic recycled fibres were evaluated through mechanical and physical-chemical tests. Tensile tests clarified that a moderate reduction is strength is observed with the bare introduction of wood flour with respect to the neat PE matrix, whilst some recovery is offered by the addition of recycled cellulose fibres. Even more promisingly, the elastic modulus of PE matrix is substantially improved by the addition of wood flour (around 8% on average) and much more so with the further addition of recycled cellulose (around 20% on average). The fracture surfaces from the tensile test were analysed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) indicating a reduction in microporosity as an effect of added cellulose. The water absorption test and the hardness measure (Shore D) were also performed. SEM analysis underlined the weak interface between both wood particle and cellulosic recycled fibres and matrix. The water absorption test showed a higher mass variation for pure WPC than WPC with cellulosic recycled fibres. The hardness measurement showed that the presence of cellulosic recycled fibres improves both superficial hardness of the composite and temperature resistance.

  3. Cellulose: A review as natural, modified and activated carbon adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhas; Gupta, V K; Carrott, P J M; Singh, Randhir; Chaudhary, Monika; Kushwaha, Sarita

    2016-09-01

    Cellulose is a biodegradable, renewable, non-meltable polymer which is insoluble in most solvents due to hydrogen bonding and crystallinity. Natural cellulose shows lower adsorption capacity as compared to modified cellulose and its capacity can be enhanced by modification usually by chemicals. This review focuses on the utilization of cellulose as an adsorbent in natural/modified form or as a precursor for activated carbon (AC) for adsorbing substances from water. The literature revealed that cellulose can be a promising precursor for production of activated carbon with appreciable surface area (∼1300m(2)g(-1)) and total pore volume (∼0.6cm(3)g(-1)) and the surface area and pore volume varies with the cellulose content. Finally, the purpose of review is to report a few controversies and unresolved questions concerning the preparation/properties of ACs from cellulose and to make aware to readers that there is still considerable scope for future development, characterization and utilization of ACs from cellulose.

  4. CELLULOSE EXTRACTION FROM PALM KERNEL CAKE USING LIQUID PHASE OXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARM YAN YAN

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose is widely used in many aspect and industries such as food industry, pharmaceutical, paint, polymers, and many more. Due to the increasing demand in the market, studies and work to produce cellulose are still rapidly developing. In this work, liquid phase oxidation was used to extract cellulose from palm kernel cake to separate hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin. The method is basically a two-step process. Palm kernel cake was pretreated in hot water at 180°C and followed by liquid oxidation process with 30% H2O2 at 60°C at atmospheric pressure. The process parameters are hot water treatment time, ratio of palm kernel cake to H2O2, liquid oxidation reaction temperature and time. Analysis of the process parameters on production cellulose from palm kernel cake was performed by using Response Surface Methodology. The recovered cellulose was further characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR. Through the hot water treatment, hemicellulose in the palm kernel cake was successfully recovered as saccharides and thus leaving lignin and cellulose. Lignin was converted to water soluble compounds in liquid oxidation step which contains small molecular weight fatty acid as HCOOH and CH3COOH and almost pure cellulose was recovered.

  5. Endurance of high molecular weight carboxymethyl cellulose in corrosive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murodov, M. M.; Rahmanberdiev, G. R.; Khalikov, M. M.; Egamberdiev, E. A.; Negmatova, K. C.; Saidov, M. M.; Mahmudova, N.

    2012-07-01

    Lignin obtained from the waste cooking liquor, formed after soda pulping process, is used as an inhibitor of NaCMC thermo oxidative degradation in presence of in extreme conditions during drilling oil wells. In this paper the schematic process of obtaining NaCMC by the principle of "monoapparat" on the basis of cellulose produced by non-wood cellulose materials is presented.

  6. Carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles : Cellulose at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Jacco; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Vlietstra, Edward J.; Geus, John W.; Jenneskens, Leonardus W.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis of base metal salt loaded microcrystalline cellulose spheres gives a facile access to carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles, which have been characterized with temperature-dependent XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP-MS and elemental analysis. The role of cellulose is multifaceted: 1) it facilitates a

  7. Cellulose-reinforced composites: from micro-to nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Dufresne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the most relevant advances in the fields of: i cellulose fibres surface modification; ii cellulose fibres-based composite materials; and iii nanocomposites based on cellulose whiskers or starch platelet-like nanoparticles. The real breakthroughs achieved in the first topic concern the use of solvent-free grafting process (plasma and the grafting of the matrix at the surface of cellulose fibres through isocyanate-mediated grafting or thanks to "click chemistry". Concerning the second topic, it is worth to mention that for some cellulose/matrix combination and in the presence of adequate aids or specific surface treatment, high performance composite materials could be obtained. Finally, nanocomposites allow using the semi-crystalline nature and hierarchical structure of lignocellulosic fibres and starch granules to more deeply achieve this goal profitably exploited by Mother Nature

  8. Overview of Cellulose Nanomaterials, Their Capabilities and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Robert J.; Schueneman, Gregory T.; Simonsen, John

    2016-09-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials (CNs) are a new class of cellulose particles with properties and functionalities distinct from molecular cellulose and wood pulp, and as a result, they are being developed for applications that were once thought impossible for cellulosic materials. Momentum is growing in CN research and development, and commercialization in this field is happening because of the unique combination of characteristics (e.g., high mechanical properties, sustainability, and large-scale production potential) and utility across a broad spectrum of material applications (e.g. as an additive, self-sustaining structures, and template structures) that CNs offer. Despite the challenges typical for materials development, CN and near-CN production is ramping up with pilot scale to industry demonstration trials, and the first commercial products are starting to hit the marketplace. This review provides a broad overview of CNs and their capabilities that are enabling new application areas for cellulose-based materials.

  9. Cellulose destruction under successive thermal and radiation treatment. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershov, B.G.; Komarov, V.B.

    1985-02-01

    The influence of successive thermal and radiation effect on cellulose is investigated. The samples were ..gamma.. irradiated (/sup 60/Co) with a dose rate of 20 kGy/h (the absorbed doses ranged from 0 to 80 kGy) and heated up to 190 deg C. It is shown that the attainment of the same destruction depth for the heated-up cellulose occurs at noticeably lower absorbed doses than for the cellulose which has not been subjected to thermal treatment. For successive thermal and radiation treatment of cellulose the ratio S=S therm.+Ssub(rad) where S is a number of broken bonds in a macromolecule is correct. The radiation-chemical yield of cellulose destruction is determined to be: G=7.3 +- 0.1 mol/100 eV.

  10. Experimental study on cellulose particulate and its composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasababu, Nadendla

    2016-05-01

    Anselme Payen has discovered cellulose after conducting rigorous experiments on wood. In this work an attempt is made to reinforce cellulose particulate into polyester matrix from 1.84 - 9.18 wt % and the lamina is manufactured by JMFIL technique. The fabricated lamina is cut into specimens for various tests as per ASTM standards. Tensile strength of 22.61 MPa is achieved at 1.84 % of cellulose content in composites. Then the cellulose composites at 1.89% of reinforcement level showed 55.57 MPa, 1.86 GPa flexural strength, modulus respectively. `C' kind of failure is visualized for all the specimens and volume fractions during impact test. The cellulose particulate is also analyzed for its morphology, size.

  11. Employing ionic liquids to deposit cellulose on PET fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Textor, Torsten; Derksen, Leonie; Gutmann, Jochen S

    2016-08-01

    Several ionic liquids are excellent solvents for cellulose. Starting from that finishing of PET fabrics with cellulose dissolved in ionic liquids like 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium acetate, diethylphosphate and chloride, or the chloride of butyl-methyl imidazolium has been investigated. Finishing has been carried out from solutions of different concentrations, using microcrystalline cellulose or cotton and by employing different cross-linkers. Viscosity of solutions has been investigated for different ionic liquids, concentrations, cellulose sources, linkers and temperatures. Since ionic liquids exhibit no vapor pressure, simple pad-dry-cure processes are excluded. Before drying the ionic liquid has to be removed by a rinsing step. Accordingly rinsing with fresh ionic liquid followed by water or the direct rinsing with water have been tested. The amount of cellulose deposited has been investigated by gravimetry, zinc chloride iodine test as well as reactive dyeing. Results concerning wettability, water up-take, surface resistance, wear-resistance or washing stability are presented.

  12. Physical properties of agave cellulose graft polymethyl methacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosli, Noor Afizah; Ahmad, Ishak; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Anuar, Farah Hannan [Polymer Research Centre (PORCE), School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    The grafting polymerization of methyl methacrylate and Agave cellulose was prepared and their structural analysis and morphology were investigated. The grafting reaction was carried out in an aqueous medium using ceric ammonium nitrate as an initiator. The structural analysis of the graft copolymers was carried out by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The graft copolymers were also characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). An additional peak at 1732 cm{sup −1} which was attributed to the C=O of ester stretching vibration of poly(methyl methacrylate), appeared in the spectrum of grafted Agave cellulose. A slight decrease of crystallinity index upon grafting was found from 0.74 to 0.68 for cellulose and grafted Agave cellulose, respectively. Another evidence of grafting showed in the FESEM observation, where the surface of the grafted cellulose was found to be roughed than the raw one.

  13. Physical properties of agave cellulose graft polymethyl methacrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Noor Afizah; Ahmad, Ishak; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Anuar, Farah Hannan

    2013-11-01

    The grafting polymerization of methyl methacrylate and Agave cellulose was prepared and their structural analysis and morphology were investigated. The grafting reaction was carried out in an aqueous medium using ceric ammonium nitrate as an initiator. The structural analysis of the graft copolymers was carried out by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The graft copolymers were also characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). An additional peak at 1732 cm-1 which was attributed to the C=O of ester stretching vibration of poly(methyl methacrylate), appeared in the spectrum of grafted Agave cellulose. A slight decrease of crystallinity index upon grafting was found from 0.74 to 0.68 for cellulose and grafted Agave cellulose, respectively. Another evidence of grafting showed in the FESEM observation, where the surface of the grafted cellulose was found to be roughed than the raw one.

  14. The Solubility of Natural Cellulose After DBD Plasma Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jun; ZENG Fengcai; CHEN Bingqiang

    2008-01-01

    Natural cellulose was treated by an atmospheric DBD plasma. The solubility of cel-lulose in a diluted alkaline solution after the plasma treatment was investigated. The properties were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared spec-troscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the surface of cellulose treated by the argon DBD plasma was significantly etched, and the relevant force of hy-drogen bonding was decreased. This might be the essential reason for the solubility improvement of natural cellulose in the diluted alkaline solution. Through a comparison of two discharge modes, the atmospheric DBD plasma gun and the parallel plate capacitively coupled DBD plasma, it wasfound that the atmospheric DBD plasma gun was more effective in fragmentizing the cellulose due to its production of a high energy plasma based on its special structure [6] .

  15. Multifilament cellulose/chitin blend yarn spun from ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundsinger, Kai; Müller, Alexander; Beyer, Ronald; Hermanutz, Frank; Buchmeiser, Michael R

    2015-10-20

    Cellulose and chitin, both biopolymers, decompose before reaching their melting points. Therefore, processing these unmodified biopolymers into multifilament yarns is limited to solution chemistry. Especially the processing of chitin into fibers is rather limited to distinctive, often toxic or badly removable solvents often accompanied by chemical de-functionalization to chitosan (degree of acetylation, DA, cellulose/chitin blend fibers using ionic liquids (ILs) as gentle, removable, recyclable and non-deacetylating solvents. Chitin and cellulose are dissolved in ethylmethylimidazolium propionate ([C2mim](+)[OPr](-)) and the obtained one-pot spinning dope is used to produce multifilament fibers by a continuous wet-spinning process. Both the rheology of the corresponding spinning dopes and the structural and physical properties of the obtained fibers have been determined for different biopolymer ratios. With respect to medical or hygienic application, the cellulose/chitin blend fiber show enhanced water retention capacity compared to pure cellulose fibers.

  16. Regenerated cellulose/wool blend enhanced biomimetic hydroxyapatite mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Ahmed; El-Sakhawy, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    The current article investigates the effect of bioactive cellulose/wool blend on calcium phosphate biomimetic mineralization. Regenerated cellulose/wool blend was prepared by dissolution-regeneration of neat cellulose and natural wool in 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride [Bmim][Cl], as a solvent for the two polymers. Crystalline hydroxyapatite nanofibers with a uniform size, shape and dimension were formed after immersing the bioactive blend in simulated body fluid. The cytotoxicity of cellulose/wool/hydroxyapatite was studied using animal fibroblast baby hamster kidney cells (BHK-21) and the result displayed good cytocompatability. This research work presents a green processing method for the development of novel cellulose/wool/hydroxyapatite hybrid materials for tissue engineering applications.

  17. In-situ glyoxalization during biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Cristina; Cordeiro, Nereida; Faria, Marisa; Zuluaga, Robin; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Filpponen, Ilari; Velez, Lina; Rojas, Orlando J; Gañán, Piedad

    2015-08-01

    A novel method to synthesize highly crosslinked bacterial cellulose (BC) is reported. The glyoxalization is started in-situ, in the culture medium during biosynthesis of cellulose by Gluconacetobacter medellensis bacteria. Strong crosslinked networks were formed in the contact areas between extruded cellulose ribbons by reaction with the glyoxal precursors. The crystalline structure of cellulose was preserved while the acidic component of the surface energy was reduced. As a consequence, its predominant acidic character and the relative contribution of the dispersive component increased, endowing the BC network with a higher hydrophobicity. This route for in-situ crosslinking is expected to facilitate other modifications upon biosynthesis of cellulose ribbons by microorganisms and to engineer the strength and surface energy of their networks.

  18. NANOCOMPOSITES OF POLY(LACTIC ACID REINFORCED WITH CELLULOSE NANOFIBRILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Zhang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A chemo-mechanical method was used to prepare cellulose nanofibrils dispersed uniformly in an organic solvent. Poly(ethylene glycol (PEG 1000 was added to the matrix as a compatibilizer to improve the interfacial interaction between the hydrophobic poly(lactic acid (PLA and the hydrophilic cellulose nanofibrils. The composites obtained by solvent casting methods from N,N-Dimethylacetamide (DMAc were characterized by tensile testing machine, atomic force microscope (AFM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. The tensile test results indicated that, by adding PEG to the PLA and the cellulose nanofibrils matrix, the tensile strength and the elongation rate increased by 56.7% and 60%, respectively, compared with the PLA/cellulose nanofibrils composites. The FT-IR analysis successfully showed that PEG improved the intermolecular interaction, which is based on the existence of inter-molecular hydrogen bonding among PLA, PEG, and cellulose nanofibrils.

  19. Production of ethanol from cellulose using Clostridum thermocellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zertuche, L.; Zall, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum was used to produce ethanol from cellulose in a continuous system. Batch fermentations were first performed to observe the effects of buffers and agitation on generation time and ethanol production. Continuous fermentations were carried out at 60/sup 0/C and pH 7 using pure cellulose as the limiting substrate. The maximum ethanol concentrations produced with 1.5 and 3% cellulose fermenting liquid were 0.3 and 0.9% respectively. The yield of ethanol was about 0.3 grams per gram of cellulose consumed. While the continuous fermentaion of cellulose with Clostridium thermocellum appears to be feasible, it may not be economically promising due to the slow growth of the organism.

  20. Dissolution of cellulose in ionic liquid: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, N.; Draman, S. F. S.; Salleh, M. S. N.; Yusof, N. B.

    2017-02-01

    Dissolution of cellulose with ionic liquids (IL) and deep eutectic solvent (DES) lets the comprehensive dissolution of cellulose. Basically, cellulose can be dissolved, in some hydrophilic ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl) and 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AMIMCl). Chloride based ionic liquids are suitable solvents for cellulose dissolution. Although the ILs is very useful in fine chemical industry, its application in the pharmaceutical and food industry have been very limited due to issues with toxicity, purity, and high cost. Seeing to these limitations, new green alternative solvent which is DES was used. This green solvents, may be definitely treated as the next-generation reagents for more sustainable industrial development. Thus, this review aims to discuss the dissolution of cellulose either with ionic liquids or DES and its application.

  1. Titanium dioxide-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite based conductometric glucose biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniruzzaman, Mohammad; Mahadeva, Suresha K.; Khondoker, Abu Hasan; Kim, Jaehwan

    2012-04-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of conductometric glucose biosensor based on glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized TiO2-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite. TiO2 nanoparticles were blended with cellulose solution prepared by dissolving cotton pulp with lithium chloride/N, N-dimethylacetamide solvent to fabricate TiO2-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite. The enzyme (GOx) was immobilized into this hybrid material by physical adsorption method. The successful immobilization of GOx into TiO2-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite via covalent bonding between TiO2 and GOx was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron analysis. The linear response of our propose glucose biosensor is obtained in the range of 1-10mM with correlation coefficient of 0.93. Our study demonstrates TiO2-cellulose hybrid material as a potential candidate for an inexpensive, flexible and disposable glucose biosensor.

  2. Communication and Sensing Circuits on Cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Alimenti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a review of several circuits for communication and wireless sensing applications implemented on cellulose-based materials. These circuits have been developed during the last years exploiting the adhesive copper laminate method. Such a technique relies on a copper adhesive tape that is shaped by a photo-lithographic process and then transferred to the hosting substrate (i.e., paper by means of a sacrificial layer. The presented circuits span from UHF oscillators to a mixer working at 24 GHz and constitute an almost complete set of building blocks that can be applied to a huge variety communication apparatuses. Each circuit is validated experimentally showing performance comparable with the state-of-the-art. This paper demonstrates that circuits on cellulose are capable of operating at record frequencies and that ultra- low cost, green i.e., recyclable and biodegradable materials can be a viable solution to realize high frequency hardware for the upcoming Internet of Things (IoT era.

  3. Net energy of cellulosic ethanol from switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmer, M R; Vogel, K P; Mitchell, R B; Perrin, R K

    2008-01-15

    Perennial herbaceous plants such as switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) are being evaluated as cellulosic bioenergy crops. Two major concerns have been the net energy efficiency and economic feasibility of switchgrass and similar crops. All previous energy analyses have been based on data from research plots (biomass energy crop in field trials of 3-9 ha (1 ha = 10,000 m2) on marginal cropland on 10 farms across a wide precipitation and temperature gradient in the midcontinental U.S. to determine net energy and economic costs based on known farm inputs and harvested yields. In this report, we summarize the agricultural energy input costs, biomass yield, estimated ethanol output, greenhouse gas emissions, and net energy results. Annual biomass yields of established fields averaged 5.2-11.1 Mg x ha(-1) with a resulting average estimated net energy yield (NEY) of 60 GJ x ha(-1) x y(-1). Switchgrass produced 540% more renewable than nonrenewable energy consumed. Switchgrass monocultures managed for high yield produced 93% more biomass yield and an equivalent estimated NEY than previous estimates from human-made prairies that received low agricultural inputs. Estimated average greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from cellulosic ethanol derived from switchgrass were 94% lower than estimated GHG from gasoline. This is a baseline study that represents the genetic material and agronomic technology available for switchgrass production in 2000 and 2001, when the fields were planted. Improved genetics and agronomics may further enhance energy sustainability and biofuel yield of switchgrass.

  4. Modification of cellulose for high glucose generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xue; Gu, Jian; Tian, Xiuzhi; Li, Yali; Huang, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The influence of introduction of cyanuric chloride on glucose's yield (Y) in acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) has been studied. The content of cyanuric chloride (C) in modified MCCs was determined by X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy. The chemical structures of modified MCCs were analyzed by Fourier transformation-infrared spectroscopy and cross polarization/magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance. Crystal index (CI) and the ratio (R) representing the sum of content of (1 ̅10) and (110) to that of (200) were calculated based on diffraction intensity in wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Hydrolysis experiment and WAXD show that Y, CI and R vary with C. The modified MCC containing 3.9 mol% of cyanuric chloride has the highest Y, the highest R and the lowest CI. Variations of CI and R show that the chemical modification changed the proportion of crystal/amorphous and crystal planes, both of which influence glucose's generation in hydrolysis of cellulose.

  5. Starch composites reinforced by bamboo cellulosic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dagang; Zhong, Tuhua; Chang, Peter R; Li, Kaifu; Wu, Qinglin

    2010-04-01

    Using a method of combined HNO(3)-KClO(3) treatment and sulfuric acid hydrolysis, bamboo cellulose crystals (BCCs) were prepared and used to reinforce glycerol plasticized starch. The structure and morphology of BCCs were investigated using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and solid-state (13)C NMR. Results showed that BCCs were of typical cellulose I structure, and the morphology was dependent on its concentration in the suspension. BCC of 50-100 nm were assembled into leaf nervations at low concentration (i.e. 0.1 wt.% of solids), but congregated into a micro-sized "flower" geometry at high concentration (i.e. 10.0 wt.% of solids). Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the starch/BCC composite films (SBC) were enhanced by the incorporation of the crystals due to reinforcement of BCCs and reduction of water uptake. BCCs at the optimal 8% loading level exhibited a higher reinforcing efficiency for plasticized starch plastic than any other loading level.

  6. CELLULOSE DECOMPOSTION IN TROPICAL PEAT SWAMPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hjh Dulima Jali

    2003-01-01

    Given that organic soil is a complex substrate and there are many environmental factors which directly or indirectly control its decomposition processes, the use of standard substrate simplify the system in that the effect of substrate quality could be eliminated and influence of certain environmental conditions such as edaphic factors, acidity and moisture could be focused on. In addition to the forest floor, decomposition potential down the peat profile can also be examined. Cotton strip assay was used to estimate decomposition potentials in tropical peat swamp occupied by different Shorea Albida peat swamp forest communities, The' Alan Batu' , the ' Alan Bunga' , the' Alan Padang' and the 'mixed Alan'forest communities. Greatest decay rates on the peat surface took place during the wet period. The moist condition of the wet months appeared to favour the growth and stimulate activities of decomposer population and soil invertebrates.Generally, 50% of cotton tensile loss is achieved after four weeks of exposure. The results suggest that cellulose decomposition is influenced by the environmental variables of hydrological regime, water-table fluctuation, aeration, moisture availability,waterlogging and the resultant anaerobiosis, peat depths, and micro-sites characteristics. Decomposition of cellulose is inhibited by waterlogging and the resultant anaerobiosis in thelower segment of the cotton strip during wet periods and under dry conditions in the surface segment of the cotton strip during periods of less rain.

  7. Magnetic Cellulose Nanocrystal Based Anisotropic Polylactic Acid Nanocomposite Films: Influence on Electrical, Magnetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Prodyut; Kumar, Amit; Katiyar, Vimal

    2016-07-20

    This paper reports a single-step co-precipitation method for the fabrication of magnetic cellulose nanocrystals (MGCNCs) with high iron oxide nanoparticle content (∼51 wt % loading) adsorbed onto cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Raman spectroscopic studies confirmed that the hydroxyl groups on the surface of CNCs (derived from the bamboo pulp) acted as anchor points for the adsorption of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The fabricated MGCNCs have a high magnetic moment, which is utilized to orient the magnetoresponsive nanofillers in parallel or perpendicular orientations inside the polylactic acid (PLA) matrix. Magnetic-field-assisted directional alignment of MGCNCs led to the incorporation of anisotropic mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties in the fabricated PLA-MGCNC nanocomposites. Thermomechanical studies showed significant improvement in the elastic modulus and glass-transition temperature for the magnetically oriented samples. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and XRD studies confirmed that the alignment of MGCNCs led to the improvement in the percentage crystallinity and, with the absence of the cold-crystallization phenomenon, finds a potential application in polymer processing in the presence of magnetic field. The tensile strength and percentage elongation for the parallel-oriented samples improved by ∼70 and 240%, respectively, and for perpendicular-oriented samples, by ∼58 and 172%, respectively, in comparison to the unoriented samples. Furthermore, its anisotropically induced electrical and magnetic properties are desirable for fabricating self-biased electronics products. We also demonstrate that the fabricated anisotropic PLA-MGCNC nanocomposites could be laminated into films with the incorporation of directionally tunable mechanical properties. Therefore, the current study provides a novel noninvasive approach of orienting nontoxic bioderived CNCs in the presence of low

  8. Teaching Orienteering. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Carol; Cory-Wright, Jean; Renfrew, Tom

    The educational value provided by orienteering's blend of navigational and physical skills has given it a permanent place in the primary and secondary school curriculum in the United Kingdom. This book is a reference to orienteering for teachers, leaders, and coaches. It provides a "how to" approach to introducing and developing the…

  9. Orienteering in Camping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Elston F.

    One of the recent developments in camping is "orienteering", a program using a map and compass. Orienteering can be dovetailed into an overall camping program and used to "point up" the entire program, or it can be confined to a single simple game. The arrangement depends on the situation. The minimum age of the participants should be about 9 or…

  10. Decision Making In Orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Katia

    1997-01-01

    Eight psychometric instruments were administered to 10 elite male Portuguese orienteers. The cognitive process involved in decision making did not differ between the best orienteers and the others. This group of athletes had a high capacity for work realization and a strong need to be in control of interpersonal situations. (Author/SV)

  11. Wildlife value orientations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg, Christian; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2016-01-01

    This article examined value orientations toward wildlife among the adult general Danish public in relation to age, sex, past and present residence, education, and income, using a U.S. survey instrument on Wildlife Value Orientations (WVO). The study used an Internet-based questionnaire sent...

  12. Characterization of blend hydrogels based on plasticized starch/cellulose acetate/carboxymethyl cellulose synthesized by electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senna, Magdy M.; Mostafa, Abo El-Khair B.; Mahdy, Sanna R.; El-Naggar, Abdel Wahab M.

    2016-11-01

    Blend hydrogels based on aqueous solutions of plasticized starch and different ratios of cellulose acetate (CA) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were prepared by electron beam irradiation (EB). The blends before and after EB irradiation were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The physico-chemical properties of blend hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation were improved compared to unirradiated blends.

  13. Immobilization of Glucose Oxidase on Cellulose/Cellulose Acetate Membrane and its Detection by Scanning Electrochemical Microscope (SECM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yi He ZHANG; Zheng Yu YANG

    2004-01-01

    Cellulose/cellulose acetate membranes were prepared and functionalized by introducing amino group on it, and then immobilized the glucose oxidase (Gox) on the functionalizd membrane. SECM was applied for the detection of enzyme activity immobilized on the membrane. Immobilized biomolecules on such membranes was combined with analysis apparatus and can be used in bioassays.

  14. Preparation of cellulose II and III{sub I} films by allomorphic conversion of bacterial cellulose I pellicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria-Tischer, Paula C.S., E-mail: paula.tischer@pq.cnpq.br [BioPol, Departamento de Química, UFPR, Cx. Postal 19081, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Université Grenoble Alpes, Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules Végétales (CERMAV), F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, CERMAV, F-38000 Grenoble (France); UMR 5628 (LMGP), CNRS and Grenoble Institute of Technology, 3 Parvis Louis Néel, F-38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Tischer, Cesar A. [BioPol, Departamento de Química, UFPR, Cx. Postal 19081, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Université Grenoble Alpes, Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules Végétales (CERMAV), F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, CERMAV, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CIME Nanotech, 3 Parvis Louis Néel, F-38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Heux, Laurent [Université Grenoble Alpes, Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules Végétales (CERMAV), F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, CERMAV, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Le Denmat, Simon; Picart, Catherine [UMR 5628 (LMGP), CNRS and Grenoble Institute of Technology, 3 Parvis Louis Néel, F-38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Sierakowski, Maria-R. [BioPol, Departamento de Química, UFPR, Cx. Postal 19081, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); and others

    2015-06-01

    The structural changes resulting from the conversion of native cellulose I (Cel I) into allomorphs II (Cel II) and III{sub I} (Cel III{sub I}) have usually been studied using powder samples from plant or algal cellulose. In this work, the conversion of Cel I into Cel II and Cel III{sub I} was performed on bacterial cellulose films without any mechanical disruption. The surface texture of the films was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the morphology of the constituting cellulose ribbons, by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structural changes were characterized using solid-state NMR spectroscopy as well as X-ray and electron diffraction. The allomorphic change into Cel II and Cel III{sub I} resulted in films with different crystallinity, roughness and hydrophobic/hydrophilicity surface and the films remained intact during all process of allomorphic conversion. - Highlights: • Description of a method to modify the allomorphic structure of bacterial cellulose films • Preparation of films with specific morphologies and hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface characters • First report on cellulose III films from bacterial cellulose under swelling conditions • Detailed characterization of cellulose II and III films with complementary techniques • Development of films with specific properties as potential support for cells, enzymes, and drugs.

  15. Use of recombinant cellulose-binding domains of Trichoderma reesei cellulase as a selective immunocytochemical marker for cellulose in protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Markus; Winiecka-Krusnell, Jadwiga; Linder, Ewert

    2002-05-01

    Some unicellular organisms are able to encyst as a protective response to a harmful environment. The cyst wall usually contains chitin as its main structural constituent, but in some cases, as in Acanthamoeba, it consists of cellulose instead. Specific cytochemical differentiation between cellulose and chitin by microscopy has not been possible, due to the similarity of their constituent beta-1,4-linked hexose backbones. Thus, various fluorescent brightening agents and lectins bind to both cellulose and chitin. We have used a recombinant cellulose-binding protein consisting of two cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) from Trichoderma reesei cellulases linked together in combination with monoclonal anticellulase antibodies and anti-mouse immunoglobulin fluorescein conjugate to specifically stain cellulose in the cysts of Acanthamoeba strains for fluorescence microscopy imaging. Staining was observed in ruptured cysts and frozen sections of cysts but not in intact mature cysts. No staining reaction was observed with the chitin-containing cyst walls of Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba dispar, or Pneumocystis carinii. Thus, the recombinant CBD can be used as a marker to distinguish between cellulose and chitin. Thirteen of 25 environmental or clinical isolates of amoebae reacted in the CBD binding assay. All 13 isolates were identified as Acanthamoeba spp. Five isolates of Hartmannella and seven isolates of Naegleria tested negative in the CBD binding assay. Whether cyst wall cellulose really is a unique property of Acanthamoeba spp. among free-living amoebae, as suggested by our findings, remains to be shown in more extensive studies.

  16. Tunable Semicrystalline Thin Film Cellulose Substrate for High-Resolution, In-Situ AFM Characterization of Enzymatic Cellulose Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganner, Thomas; Roŝker, Stephanie; Eibinger, Manuel; Kraxner, Johanna; Sattelkow, Jürgen; Rattenberger, Johannes; Fitzek, Harald; Chernev, Boril; Grogger, Werner; Nidetzky, Bernd; Plank, Harald

    2015-12-23

    In the field of enzymatic cellulose degradation, fundamental interactions between different enzymes and polymorphic cellulose materials are of essential importance but still not understood in full detail. One technology with the potential of direct visualization of such bioprocesses is atomic force microscopy (AFM) due to its capability of real-time in situ investigations with spatial resolutions down to the molecular scale. To exploit the full capabilities of this technology and unravel fundamental enzyme-cellulose bioprocesses, appropriate cellulose substrates are decisive. In this study, we introduce a semicrystalline-thin-film-cellulose (SCFTC) substrate which fulfills the strong demands on such ideal cellulose substrates by means of (1) tunable polymorphism via variable contents of homogeneously sized cellulose nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous cellulose matrix; (2) nanoflat surface topology for high-resolution and high-speed AFM; and (3) fast, simple, and reproducible fabrication. The study starts with a detailed description of SCTFC preparation protocols including an in-depth material characterization. In the second part, we demonstrate the suitability of SCTFC substrates for enzymatic degradation studies by combined, individual, and sequential exposure to TrCel6A/TrCel7A cellulases (Trichoderma reesei) to visualize synergistic effects down to the nanoscale.

  17. Optimization of cellulose acrylate and grafted 4-vinylpyridine and 1-vinylimidazole synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojanić Vaso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of cellulose acrylate synthesis by reaction with sodium cellulosate and acryloyl chloride was carried out. Optimal conditions for conducting the synthesis reaction of cellulose acrylate were as follows: the molar ratio of cellulose/potassium-t-butoxide/acryloyl chloride was 1:3:10 and the optimal reaction time was 10 h. On the basis of elemental analysis with optimal conditions for conducting the reaction of cellulose acrylate, the percentage of substitution of glucose units in cellulose Y = 80.7%, and the degree of substitution of cellulose acrylate DS = 2.4 was determined. The grafting reaction of acrylate vinyl monomers onto cellulose in acetonitrile with initiator azoisobutyronitrile (AIBN in a nitrogen atmosphere was performed, by mixing for 5 h at acetonitrile boiling temperature. Radical copolymerization of synthesized cellulose acrylate and 4-vinylpyridine, 1-vinylimidazole, 1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone and 9-vinylcarbazole, cellulose-poly-4-vinylpyridine (Cell-PVP, cellulose-poly-1- vinylimidazole (Cell-PVIm and cellulose-poly-1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (Cell-P1V2P and cellulose-poly-9-vinylcarbazole (Cell-P9VK were synthesized. Acrylate cellulose and cellulose grafted copolymers were confirmed by IR spectroscopy, based on elementary analysis and the characteristics of grafted copolymers of cellulose were determined. The mass share of grafted copolymers, X, the relationship of derivative parts/cellulose vinyl group, Z, and the degree of grafting copolymers of cellulose (mass% were determined. In reaction of methyl iodide and cellulose-poly-4-vinylpyridine (Cell-PVP the cellulose-1-methyl-poly-4-vinylpyridine iodide (Cell-1-Me-PVPJ was synthesized. Cellulose acrylate and grafted copolymers were obtained with better thermal, electrochemical and ion-emulation properties for bonding of noble metals Au, Pt, Pd from water solutions. The synthesis optimization of cellulose acrylate was applied as a model for the synthesis of grafted

  18. Biochemical Disincentives to Fertilizing Cellulosic Ethanol Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.; Snapp, S.; McSwiney, C.; Baldock, J.

    2010-12-01

    Corn grain biofuel crops produce the highest yields when the cropping ecosystem is not nitrogen (N)-limited, achieved by application of fertilizer. There are environmental consequences for excessive fertilizer application to crops, including greenhouse gas emissions, hypoxic “dead zones,” and health problems from N runoff into groundwater. The increase in corn acreage in response to demand for alternative fuels (i.e. ethanol) could exacerbate these problems, and divert food supplies to fuel production. A potential substitute for grain ethanol that could reduce some of these impacts is cellulosic ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol feedstocks include grasses (switchgrass), hardwoods, and crop residues (e.g. corn stover, wheat straw). It has been assumed that these feedstocks will require similar N fertilization rates to grain biofuel crops to maximize yields, but carbohydrate yield versus N application has not previously been monitored. We report the biochemical stocks (carbohydrate, protein, and lignin in Mg ha-1) of a corn ecosystem grown under varying N levels. We measured biochemical yield in Mg ha-1 within the grain, leaf and stem, and reproductive parts of corn plants grown at seven N fertilization rates (0-202 kg N ha-1), to evaluate the quantity and quality of these feedstocks across a N fertilization gradient. The N fertilization rate study was performed at the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research Site (KBS-LTER) in Michigan. Biochemical stocks were measured using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), combined with a molecular mixing model (Baldock et al. 2004). Carbohydrate and lignin are the main biochemicals of interest in ethanol production since carbohydrate is the ethanol feedstock, and lignin hinders the carbohydrate to ethanol conversion process. We show that corn residue carbohydrate yields respond only weakly to N fertilization compared to grain. Grain carbohydrate yields plateau in response to fertilization at

  19. Discrimination between naphthacene and triphenylene using cellulose tris(4-methylbenzoate) and cellulose tribenzoate: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yusuke; Shibata, Tohru; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2017-02-01

    The mechanisms of naphthacene and triphenylene discrimination using commercially available cellulose tris(4-methylbenzoate) (CMB) and cellulose tribenzoate (CB) chiral stationary phases were investigated using molecular mechanics calculations. Naphthacene and triphenylene could be separated by liquid chromatography on CMB and CB, with triphenylene being eluted earlier than naphthacene on both phases. However, the corresponding separation factor is much larger for CMB than for CB. The docking of these polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the above polymers suggested that the most important sites of CMB and CB for interacting with these hydrocarbons are located at equivalent positions, featuring a space surrounded by main chain glucose units and benzoyl side chains. The difference of hydrocarbon stabilization energies with CMB and CB agreed well with the observed chromatographic separation factors.

  20. Dental glass ionomer cement reinforced by cellulose microfibers and cellulose nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rafael M. [Departamento de Odontologia, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Centro Avançado de Avaliação e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais, BioMat, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Pereira, Fabiano V., E-mail: fabianovp@ufmg.br [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, UFMG, Belo Horizonte CEP: 31270-901, MG (Brazil); Mota, Felipe A.P. [Centro Avançado de Avaliação e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais, BioMat, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Watanabe, Evandro [Departamento de Odontologia Restauradora, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, USP, Ribeirão Preto CEP: 14040-904, SP (Brazil); Soares, Suelleng M.C.S. [Departamento de Odontologia, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Santos, Maria Helena [Departamento de Odontologia, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil); Centro Avançado de Avaliação e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais, BioMat, Universidade Federal do Vale do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, UFVJM, Diamantina CEP: 39100-000, MG (Brazil)

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate if the addition of cellulose microfibers (CmF) or cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) would improve the mechanical properties of a commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). Different amounts of CmF and CNC were previously prepared and then added to reinforce the GIC matrix while it was being manipulated. Test specimens with various concentrations of CmF or CNC in their total masses were fabricated and submitted to mechanical tests (to evaluate their compressive and diametral tensile strength, modulus, surface microhardness and wear resistance) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The incorporation of CmF in the GIC matrix did not greatly improve the mechanical properties of GIC. However, the addition of a small amount of CNC in the GIC led to significant improvements in all of the mechanical properties evaluated: compressive strength (increased up to 110% compared with the control group), elastic modulus increased by 161%, diametral tensile strength increased by 53%, and the mass loss decreased from 10.95 to 3.87%. Because the composites presented a considerable increase in mechanical properties, the modification of the conventional GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material. - Highlights: • Cellulose microfibers (CmF) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) were prepared. • The CmF and CNC were incorporated in commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). • Small amount of CNC improved significantly all the mechanical properties evaluated. • Modified GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material.

  1. 3D hierarchical computational model of wood as a cellular material with fibril reinforced, heterogeneous multiple layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    A 3D hierarchical computational model of deformation and stiffness of wood, which takes into account the structures of wood at several scale levels (cellularity, multilayered nature of cell walls, composite-like structures of the wall layers) is developed. At the mesoscale, the softwood cell...... is presented as a 3D hexagon-shape-tube with multilayered walls. The layers in the softwood cell are considered as considered as composite reinforced by microfibrils (celluloses). The elastic properties of the layers are determined with Halpin–Tsai equations, and introduced into mesoscale finite element...... cellular model. With the use of the developed hierarchical model, the influence of the microstructure, including microfibril angles (MFAs, which characterizes the orientation of the cellulose fibrils with respect to the cell axis), the thickness of the cell wall, the shape of the cell cross...

  2. Nanocrystalline cellulose extracted from pine wood and corncob.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzel, Fernanda I; Prestes, Eduardo; Carvalho, Benjamim M; Demiate, Ivo M; Pinheiro, Luís A

    2017-02-10

    The extraction of nanocrystalline cellulose from agro-residues is an interesting alternative to recover these materials. In the present study, nanocrystalline cellulose was extracted from pine wood and corncob. In addition, microcrystalline cellulose was used as a reference to compare results. Initially, the lignocellulosic residues were submitted to delignification pre-treatments. At the end of the process, the bleached fibre was submitted to acid hydrolysis. Additionally, microparticles were obtained from the spray-drying of the nanocrystalline cellulose suspensions. The nanocrystalline cellulose yield for the pine wood was 9.0-% of the value attained for the microcrystalline cellulose. For the corncob, the value was 23.5-%. Therefore, complementary studies are necessary to improve the yield. The spray-dried microparticles showed a crystallinity index of 67.8-% for the pine wood, 70.9-% for the corncob and 79.3-% for the microcrystalline cellulose. These microparticles have great potential for use in the production of polymer composites processed by extrusion.

  3. Smart Cellulose Fibers Coated with Carbon Nanotube Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haisong Qi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Smart multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT-coated cellulose fibers with a unique sensing ability were manufactured by a simple dip coating process. The formation of electrically-conducting MWCNT networks on cellulose mono- and multi-filament fiber surfaces was confirmed by electrical resistance measurements and visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The interaction between MWCNT networks and cellulose fiber was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The piezoresistivity of these fibers for strain sensing was investigated. The MWCNT-coated cellulose fibers exhibited a unique linear strain-dependent electrical resistance change up to 18% strain, with good reversibility and repeatability. In addition, the sensing behavior of these fibers to volatile molecules (including vapors of methanol, ethanol, acetone, chloroform and tetrahydrofuran was investigated. The results revealed a rapid response, high sensitivity and good reproducibility for these chemical vapors. Besides, they showed good selectivity to different vapors. It is suggested that the intrinsic physical and chemical features of cellulose fiber, well-formed MWCNT networks and favorable MWCNT-cellulose interaction caused the unique and excellent sensing ability of the MWCNT-coated cellulose fibers, which have the potential to be used as smart materials.

  4. Enhanced cellulose degradation using cellulase-nanosphere complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Blanchette

    Full Text Available Enzyme catalyzed conversion of plant biomass to sugars is an inherently inefficient process, and one of the major factors limiting economical biofuel production. This is due to the physical barrier presented by polymers in plant cell walls, including semi-crystalline cellulose, to soluble enzyme accessibility. In contrast to the enzymes currently used in industry, bacterial cellulosomes organize cellulases and other proteins in a scaffold structure, and are highly efficient in degrading cellulose. To mimic this clustered assembly of enzymes, we conjugated cellulase obtained from Trichoderma viride to polystyrene nanospheres (cellulase:NS and tested the hydrolytic activity of this complex on cellulose substrates from purified and natural sources. Cellulase:NS and free cellulase were equally active on soluble carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC; however, the complexed enzyme displayed a higher affinity in its action on microcrystalline cellulose. Similarly, we found that the cellulase:NS complex was more efficient in degrading natural cellulose structures in the thickened walls of cultured wood cells. These results suggest that nanoparticle-bound enzymes can improve catalytic efficiency on physically intractable substrates. We discuss the potential for further enhancement of cellulose degradation by physically clustering combinations of different glycosyl hydrolase enzymes, and applications for using cellulase:NS complexes in biofuel production.

  5. Biological evaluation of nanosilver incorporated cellulose pulp for hygiene products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha Sankar, P C; Ramakrishnan, Reshmi; Rosemary, M J

    2016-04-01

    Cellulose pulp has a visible market share in personal hygiene products such as sanitary napkins and baby diapers. However it offers good surface for growth of microorganisms. Huge amount of research is going on in developing hygiene products that do not initiate microbial growth. The objective of the present work is to produce antibacterial cellulose pulp by depositing silver nanopowder on the cellulose fiber. The silver nanoparticles used were of less than 100 nm in size and were characterised using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction studies. Antibacterial activity of the functionalized cellulose pulp was proved by JIS L 1902 method. The in-vitro cytotoxicity, in-vivo vaginal irritation and intracutaneous reactivity studies were done with silver nanopowder incorporated cellulose pulp for introducing a new value added product to the market. Cytotoxicity evaluation suggested that the silver nanoparticle incorporated cellulose pulp is non-cytotoxic. No irritation and skin sensitization were identified in animals tested with specific extracts prepared from the test material in the in-vivo experiments. The results indicated that the silver nanopowder incorporated cellulose pulp meets the requirements of the standard practices recommended for evaluating the biological reactivity and has good biocompatibility, hence can be classified as a safe hygiene product.

  6. Cellulose based hybrid hydroxylated adducts for polyurethane foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pisapia, Laura; Verdolotti, Letizia; Di Mauro, Eduardo; Di Maio, Ernesto; Lavorgna, Marino; Iannace, Salvatore

    2012-07-01

    Hybrid flexible polyurethane foams (HPU) were synthesized by using a hybrid hydroxilated adduct (HHA) based on renewable resources. In particular the HHA was obtained by dispersing cellulose wastes in colloidal silica at room temperature, pressure and humidity. The colloidal silica was selected for its ability of modifying the cellulose structure, by inducing a certain "destructurization" of the crystalline phase, in order to allow cellulose to react with di-isocyanate for the final synthesis of the polyurethane foam. In fact, cellulose-polysilicate complexes are engaged in the reaction with the isocyanate groups. This study provides evidence of the effects of the colloidal silica on the cellulose structure, namely, a reduction of the microfiber cellulose diameter and the formation of hydrogen bonds between the polysilicate functional groups and the hydroxyl groups of the cellulose, as assessed by IR spectroscopy and solid state NMR. The HHA was added to a conventional polyol in different percentages (between 5 and 20%) to synthesize HPU in presence of catalysts, silicone surfactant and diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI). The mixture was expanded in a mold and cured for two hours at room temperature. Thermal analysis, optical microscopy and mechanical tests were performed on the foams. The results highlighted an improvement of thermal stability and a decrease of the cell size with respect neat polyurethane foam. Mechanical tests showed an improvement of the elastic modulus and of the damping properties with increasing HHA amount.

  7. Microbial fuel cells using Cellulomonas spp. with cellulose as fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yuya; Khawdas, Wichean; Aso, Yuji; Ohara, Hitomi

    2017-03-01

    Cellulomonas fimi, Cellulomonas biazotea, and Cellulomonas flavigena are cellulose-degrading microorganisms chosen to compare the degradation of cellulose. C. fimi degraded 2.5 g/L of cellulose within 4 days, which was the highest quantity among the three microorganisms. The electric current generation by the microbial fuel cell (MFC) using the cellulose-containing medium with C. fimi was measured over 7 days. The medium in the MFC was sampled every 24 h to quantify the degradation of cellulose, and the results showed that the electric current increased with the degradation of cellulose. The maximum electric power generated by the MFC was 38.7 mW/m(2), and this numeric value was 63% of the electric power generated by an MFC with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a well-known current-generating microorganism. Our results showed that C. fimi was an excellent candidate to produce the electric current from cellulose via MFCs.

  8. Developing a market orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallums, A

    1994-03-01

    Developing a market-orientated organization is a complex task. An organization's market orientation is reflected in its ability to fulfil its customer's needs. The organization must look outside itself and adopt a flexible response to changing needs. This paper will examine what is meant by the term marketing and why it is necessary for an organization to incorporate the marketing concept. Analysis of the organization's culture and its relevance to the development of market orientation will also be considered. Reference will be made to health care where appropriate.

  9. Performance of cellulose derivatives in deep-fried battered snacks: Oil barrier and crispy properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Primo-Martín, C.; Sanz, T.; Steringa, D.W.; Salvador, A.; Fiszman, S.M.; Vliet, T. van

    2010-01-01

    The performance of batters containing cellulose derivatives (methyl cellulose (A4M), three hydroxypropylmethyl celluloses (E4M, F4M and K4M) with different degree of hydroxypropyl and/or methyl substitution and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)) to produce crispy deep-fried snacks crusts was studied by

  10. Direct fermentation of cellulose to ethanol by a cellulolytic filamentous fungus, monilia sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, C.S.; Maun, C.M.; Tsao, G.T.

    1981-01-01

    Monilia, isolated from bagasse compost, utilized many polysaccharides (including cellulose) and displayed cellulase and hemicellulase activities. Monilia also fermented glucose, xylose, and cellulosic materials to ethanol. Over 60% of the solid cellulose substrate added to Monilia cultures was converted to ethanol as the major fermentation product. Thus, Monilia is a potential organism for the direct conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethanol.

  11. Effects of Soybean Oil Modified Cellulose Fibril and Organosilane Modified Cellulose Fibril on Crystallization of Polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Thanomchat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean oil modified cellulose fibril (Oil-g-CF and organosilane modified cellulose fibril (Silane-g-CF were prepared using maleinized soybean oil and hexadecyltrimethoxysilane, respectively. Thus obtained modified cellulose fibril was added to polypropylene by a simple melt mixing on a hotplate. PP/modified CF composites with 4.0 wt% filler content were prepared. The composites were subject to a polarized optical microscope to investigate particle dispersion, supramolecular morphology, and crystallization behavior. It was found that Silane-g-CF exhibited smaller particle sizes with better particle distribution when compared to Oil-g-CF. In addition, the etched composite samples unveiled an increase in a number of spherulite crystals as well as a decrease in the spherulite size. The nonisothermal crystallization study of composites revealed that both Oil-g-CF and Silane-g-CF were capable of nucleating PP by facilitating faster crystallization process and raising the number of spherulites. The DSC results indicated that Silane-g-CF was able to perform a more effective nucleation than Oil-g-CF, judged by a higher crystallization temperature. Moreover, PP composites containing Oil-g-CF and Silane-g-CF had higher crystallinity by 7% and 10%, for the first and the latter, respectively, when compared to neat PP.

  12. Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced foamed nitrile rubber nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Yuanbing; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Xiaodong

    2015-10-05

    Research on foamed nitrile rubber (NBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) nanocomposites is rarely found in the literatures. In this paper, CNs suspension and NBR latex was mixed to prepared the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites. We found that the CNs mainly located in the cell walls, effectively reinforcing the foamed NBR. The strong interaction between the CNs and NBR matrix restricted the mobility of NBR chains surrounding the CNs, hence increasing the crosslink density of the NBR matrix. CNs exhibited excellent reinforcement on the foamed NBR: a remarkable increase nearly 76% in the tensile strength of the foamed nanocomposites was achieved with a load of only 15 phr CNs. Enhanced mechanical properties make the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites a promising damping material for industrial applications with a potential to reduce the petroleum consumption.

  13. The gelation of oil using ethyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovich-Pinhas, M; Barbut, S; Marangoni, A G

    2015-03-06

    The characterization of the thermo-gelation mechanism and properties of ethyl cellulose/canola oil oleogels was performed using rheology and thermal analysis. Thermal analysis detected no evidence for thermal transitions contributed to secondary conformational changes, suggesting a gelation mechanism that does not involve secondary ordered structure formation. Rheological analysis demonstrated a relationship between the polymer molecular weight and the final gel strength, the cross-over behavior as well as the gel point temperature. Increasing polymer molecular weight led to an increase in final gel strength, the modulus at cross-over, and the gel point temperature. Cooling/heating rates affect gel modulus only for the low molecular weight samples. A decrease in gel strength with increasing cooling rate was detected. The cross-over temperature was not affected by the cooling/heating rates. Cooling rate also affected the gelation setting time where slow cooling rates produced a stable gel faster.

  14. Inclusion of solid particles in bacterial cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafica, G; Mormino, R; Bungay, H

    2002-05-01

    Depending upon the strain and the method of cultivation, bacterial cellulose can be reticulated filaments, pellets, or a dense, tough gel called a pellicle. The pellicular form is commonly made by surface culture, but a rotating disk bioreactor is more efficient and reduces the time of a run to about 3.5 days instead of the usual 12-20 days. Particles added to the medium as the gel is forming are trapped to form a new class of composite materials. Particles enter the films that are forming on the disks at rates depending on the size and geometry of the particle, as well as the rotational speed and concentration of the suspension.

  15. Cellulose nanocrystal reinforced oxidized natural rubber nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Marcos; El Kissi, Nadia; Dufresne, Alain

    2016-02-10

    Natural rubber (NR) latex particles were oxidized using KMnO4 as oxidant to promote the insertion of hydroxyl groups in the surface polyisoprene chains. Different degrees of oxidation were investigated. Both unoxidized and oxidized NR (ONR) latex were used to prepare nanocomposite films reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) by casting/evaporation. The oxidation of NR was carried out to promote chemical interactions between the hydroxyl groups of ONR with those of CNCs through hydrogen bonding. The effect of the degree of oxidation of the NR latex on the rheological behavior of CNC/NR and CNC/ONR suspensions, as well as on the mechanical, swelling and thermal properties of ensuing nanocomposites was investigated. Improved properties were observed for intermediate degrees of oxidation but they were found to degrade for higher oxidation levels.

  16. Copper removal using electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Amir; Safari, Salman; Yang, Han; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-06-03

    Removal of heavy metal ions such as copper using an efficient and low-cost method with low ecological footprint is a critical process in wastewater treatment, which can be achieved in a liquid phase using nanoadsorbents such as inorganic nanoparticles. Recently, attention has turned toward developing sustainable and environmentally friendly nanoadsorbents to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous media. Electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose (ENCC), which can be prepared from wood fibers through periodate/chlorite oxidation, has been shown to have a high charge content and colloidal stability. Here, we show that ENCC scavenges copper ions by different mechanisms depending on the ion concentration. When the Cu(II) concentration is low (C0≲200 ppm), agglomerates of starlike ENCC particles appear, which are broken into individual starlike entities by shear and Brownian motion, as evidenced by photometric dispersion analysis, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. On the other hand, at higher copper concentrations, the aggregate morphology changes from starlike to raftlike, which is probably due to the collapse of protruding dicarboxylic cellulose (DCC) chains and ENCC charge neutralization by copper adsorption. Such raftlike structures result from head-to-head and lateral aggregation of neutralized ENCCs as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to starlike aggregates, the raftlike structures grow gradually and are prone to sedimentation at copper concentrations C0≳500 ppm, which eliminates a costly separation step in wastewater treatment processes. Moreover, a copper removal capacity of ∼185 mg g(-1) was achieved thanks to the highly charged DCC polyanions protruding from ENCC. These properties along with the biorenewability make ENCC a promising candidate for wastewater treatment, in which fast, facile, and low-cost removal of heavy metal ions is desired most.

  17. Impact of cellulose ethers on the cement paste microstructure

    OpenAIRE

    Pourchez, Jérémie; Grosseau, Philippe; Rouèche-Pourchez, Emilie; Debayle, Johan; Pinoli, Jean-Charles; Maire, Eric; Boller, Elodie; Parra-Denis, Estelle

    2007-01-01

    ISBN = 3-87264-022-4 7 pages; International audience; Complementary investigation tools (2D and 3D observations by optical microscopy and fast X-ray microtomography and then image analysis) were developed in order to examine the effects of cellulose ethers on the cement paste microstructure. The obtained results show that the presence of cellulose ether may induce an increase of both 50-250 µm-diameter air voids. The chemistry of the cellulose ethers appears as a main controlling factor of th...

  18. Sustainable green composites of thermoplastic starch and cellulose fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnuay Wattanakornsiri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Green composites have gained renewed interest as environmental friendly materials and as biodegradable renewable resources for a sustainable development. This review provides an overview of recent advances in green composites based on thermoplastic starch (TPS and cellulose fibers. It includes information about compositions, preparations, and properties of starch, cellulose fibers, TPS, and green composites based on TPS and cellulose fibers. Introduction and production of these recyclable composites into the material market would be important for environmental sustainability as their use can decrease the volume of petroleum derived plastic waste dumps. Green composites are comparable cheap and abundant, but further research and development is needed for a broader utilization.

  19. Fabrication of Piezoelectric Cellulose Paper and Audio Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jung-Hwan Kim; Sungryul Yun; Joo-Hyung Kim; Jaehwan Kim

    2009-01-01

    We report the fabrication process of piezoelectric cellulose paper and the enhancement method of its piezoelectric property.Stretching method with different wet-drawing ratios was introduced to increase the piezoelectric property of cellulose paper during regeneration process. It is observed that the Young's modulus and the piezoelectric charge constants are very dependent on the drawing ratio and the direction of nanofibrils of piezoelectric paper. Using the enhanced piezoelectric property, we prove that the flexible regenerated piezoelectric cellulose can be applied to the potential acoustic applications such as thin piezoelectric paper speaker.

  20. Preliminary Research on Structure and Properties of Nano-cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The structure of bacterial cellulose (BC) produced by Acetobacter xylinum NUST4 (A.xylinum NUST4) under static (SBC) and shake culture condition (ABC) was studied by means of transmission electron microscopic (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform-infrared spectrum (FT-IR). It was revealed that BC is Ⅰ crystal cellulose and the proportion of cellulose Ⅰα exceeds 80% and BC diameter is 10-80 nm.Mechanical properties and water absorption capacity were also determined. These properties could result from crystalline and nanometer structure of BC.

  1. GRAFTING OF HUMIC ACID ONTO COTTON CELLULOSE (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qi; ZHANG Dehe

    1988-01-01

    Cotton cellulose reacted with epichlorohydrin under the catalytic action of HClO4 and H2O to form 3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl ether with a substitution degree of 0.61. The chlorine-containing product was treated with aliphatic diamines (ethylenediamine, propylenediamine, etc.) to produce nitrogen-containing cellulose which further reacted with humic acid to give black fiberous graft cellulose. This product contains 27-35%humic acid, 0.90 meq/g acidic groups, possesses 0.49 meq/g Cu2 +-complexing capacity and good mechanical strength, and can be used under pH12.

  2. Sexual Orientation (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to reconcile their teen's sexual orientation with their religious or personal beliefs. Sadly, some react with anger, hostility, or rejection. But many parents find that they just need time to adjust ...

  3. The mathematical model of dye diffusion and adsorption on modified cellulose with triazine derivatives containing cationic and anionic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, K.; Hou, A.; Chen, Y.

    2008-02-01

    Cellulose fabric is chemically modified with the compounds containing cationic and anionic groups. The molecular chains of modified cellulose have both cationic and anionic groups. Dye diffusion properties on modified cellulose are discussed. The dye adsorption and diffusion on modified cellulose are higher than those on unmodified cellulose. The diffusion properties of dyes at different temperature are discussed. Compared with unmodified cellulose, the diffusion processing of dyes in the modified cotton cellulose shows significant change.

  4. Cultural Orientation and Interdisciplinarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie Søndergaard

    2004-01-01

    I begin the article with an account of the background to the German debate on ‘Literaturwissenschaft als Kulturwissenschaft’, including the introduction of the concept of ’cultural orientation’ as a strategy for achieving interdisciplinarity. This is followed by a consideration of the discussion...... of the object of literary studies as a way of defining the disciplinarity or identity of literary studies. Finally I summarize some of the characteristics of culturally orientated literary studies....

  5. Gas permeability and selectivity of cellulose nanocrystals films (layers) deposited by spin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Martha A; Mathew, Aji P; Oksman, Kristiina

    2014-11-04

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) were extracted from a cellulose residue using two different acid hydrolysis procedures. CNC extracted with sulfuric acid (CNC(S)) showed higher surface charge (339 μmol/g) compared with crystals extracted with hydrochloric acid (CNC(HCl)). Spin-coated films with two different configurations were prepared; the first with alternate layers of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAHCl) and CNC, and the second with a single layer of PAHCl coated with multilayers of CNC. Film characteristics such as roughness, thickness, contact angle, orientation, gas permeability and gas selectivity were studied. Optical microscopy showed more homogeneous films of CNC(S) compared to CNC(HCl). The surface charge of the crystals impacted the films' hydrophobicity, being highest for 25 alternate layers of PAHCl and CNC(HCl). The gas permeability coefficient was different for each film, depending primarily on the surface charge of the crystals and secondly on the film configuration. The films made with CNC(HCl) displayed gas barriers with nitrogen and oxygen, and gas selectivity with some gas combinations. CNC(S) films did not show gas selectivity. These results indicate that CNC with low surface charge can be further developed for gas separation and barrier applications.

  6. Ultradrawing novel ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene fibers filled with bacterial cellulose nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jen-Taut; Tsai, Chih-Chen; Wang, Chuen-Kai; Shao, Jhih-Wun; Xiao, Ming-Zheng; Chen, Su-Chen

    2014-01-30

    Novel ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)/bacterial cellulose (BC) (F100BCy) and UHMWPE/modified bacterial cellulose (MBC) (F100MBCx-y) as-prepared fibers were prepared and ultra-drawn. The achievable draw ratio (Dra) values of each F100MBCx-y as-prepared fiber series specimens approached a maximum value as their MBC contents reached the optimal value at 0.0625phr. In which, the maximum Dra value obtained for F100MBCx-0.0625 as-prepared fiber specimen prepared at the optimal MBC content reached another maximum value at 347 as the weight ratio of maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene to BC approach an optimal value at 10. In contrast, no significant improvement in Dra values was found for F100BCy as-prepared fiber specimens. To understand these interesting ultradrawing properties described above, Fourier transform infra-red, specific surface areas, and transmission electron microcopic analyses of original and modified BC nanofibers together with the thermal, orientation and tensile properties of F100BCy and F100MBCx-y fiber specimens were performed.

  7. Biomimetic Mineralization on a Macroporous Cellulose-Based Matrix for Bone Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the biomimetic mineralization on a cellulose-based porous matrix with an improved biological profile. The cellulose matrix was precalcified using three methods: (i) cellulose samples were treated with a solution of calcium chloride and diammonium hydrogen phosphate; (ii) the carboxymethylated cellulose matrix was stored in a saturated calcium hydroxide solution; (iii) the cellulose matrix was mixed with a calcium silicate solution in order to introduce ...

  8. Screening of the effective cellulose-degradable strain and its application in the production of cellulose bioethanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-fei Gao; Dai-di Fan; Pei Ma; Yan-e Luo; Xiao-xuan Ma; Chen-hui Zhu; Jun-feng Hui

    2009-01-01

    Strains from the cellulose-containing environment were collected. Primary screening(by filter-paper Hutchison solid culture medium and sodium carboxymethylcellulose solid culture medium) and reelection(by filter-paper inorganic salt culture medium and sodium carboxymethylcellulosc Congo red coltnre medium) indicated that five strains obtained were best suited for high performance cellulose degradation. Determination of sodium carboxymethylcellulose activity(CMCA) and filter paper activity(FPA) was accomplished for each of the five. The strongest of the five in CMCA and FPA was applied to the production of cellulose bioethanol by separate hydrolysis and fermentation(SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation(SSF) respectively.

  9. Microcrystal-like cellulose fibrils as the diamagnetic director for microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Kimura, T.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, nanostructures and nanostructuring of biogenic materials have been studied intensively, with a view to "high-tech" applications of sustainable, biologically derived materials. Magnetic orientation is useful for creating industrial products. Techniques for diamagnetic alignment of materials using fields of several Tesla (T) or more have been reported. In the present study, we explore the optical characteristics of microcrystalline cellulose whisker (CW), under sub-Tesla magnetic fields. Our eventual target is to create a biogenic optical device. We isolated microcrystalline CWs with high aspect ratio using centrifugation and found that these anisotropic whiskers, when in an aqueous suspension, respond to sub-T order magnetic fields, as observed using an optical microscope and a spectrometer. During observations with dark-field illumination, we found that the scattered light intensity changed during the magnetic orientation process, and depended on the directions of the magnetic field and dark-field illumination. These oriented microcrystalline CWs can be bio-mimetic optical tools for microscale wet processes, such as bio-MEMS.

  10. Novel cellulose ester substrates for high performance flat-sheet thin-film composite (TFC) forward osmosis (FO) membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Ong, Rui Chin

    2015-01-01

    A novel hydrophilic cellulose ester with a high intrinsic water permeability and a water partition coefficient was discovered to construct membrane supports for flat-sheet thin film composite (TFC) forward osmosis (FO) membranes for water reuse and seawater desalination with high performance. The performance of TFC-FO membranes prepared from the hydrophilic cellulose ester containing a high degree of OH and a moderate degree of Pr substitutions clearly surpasses those prepared from cellulose esters and other polymers with moderate hydrophilicity. Post-treatments of TFC-FO membranes using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and glycerol followed by heat treatment further enhance the water flux without compromising the selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime analyses have confirmed that the SDS/glycerol post-treatment increases the free volume size and fractional free volume of the polyamide selective layer. The newly developed post-treated TFC-FO membranes exhibit a remarkably high water flux up to 90 LMH when the selective layer is oriented towards the draw solution (i.e., PRO mode) using 1. M NaCl as the draw solution and DI water as the feed. For seawater desalination, the membranes display a high water flux up to 35 LMH using a 2. M NaCl draw solution. These water fluxes exceeded the water fluxes achieved by other types of FO membranes reported in literatures. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  11. 6-Deoxy-6-aminoethyleneamino cellulose: synthesis and study of hemocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, Michael; Wurlitzer, Michael; Wiegand, Cornelia; Reddersen, Kirsten; Finger, Susanne; Elsner, Peter; Laudeley, Peggy; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas; Hipler, Uta-Christina

    2015-01-01

    Hemocompatibility of aqueous solutions of antimicrobial 6-deoxy-6-aminoethyleneamino (AEA) cellulose with different degrees of substitution (DS, 0.54-0.92) was investigated in vitro. The AEA cellulose derivatives were synthesized by tosylation of cellulose and subsequent nucleophilic substitution with 1,2-diaminoethane. The structure was confirmed by elemental analysis as well as by FTIR and NMR spectroscopies. Markers for coagulation (thrombin generation, aPTT, PT, blood clotting, thrombocyte activation) and membrane integrity (hemolysis) were measured in human whole blood, human platelet-rich plasma, human pooled plasma, and erythrocytes suspension. AEA cellulose with a low DS of 0.54 showed the highest hemocompatibility in vitro, suggesting the possibility of biomedical applications.

  12. Sustainable commercial nanocrystalline cellulose manufacturing process with acid recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Ayadi, Mariem; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Berry, Richard

    2017-01-20

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) is a biomaterial having potential applications in a wide range of industries. It is industrially produced by concentrated acid hydrolysis of cellulosic materials. In this process, the sulfuric acid rich liquor can be concentrated and reused. However, removal of sugar monomers and oligomers is necessary for such recycling. Membrane and ion exchange technology can be employed to remove sugars; however, such technologies are not efficient in meeting the quality required to recycle the acid solution. As a part of the present study, activated carbon (AC) has been evaluated as an adsorbent for sugar removal from the acidic solution generated during commercial nanocrystalline cellulose manufacturing process. Almost complete removal of sugar can be achieved by this approach. The maximum sugar removal observed during this study was 3.4g/g of AC. Based on this finding, a sustainable method has been proposed for commercial nanocrystalline cellulose manufacturing.

  13. Photooxidation of cellulose nitrate: new insights into degradation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthumeyrie, Sebastien; Collin, Steeve; Bussiere, Pierre-Olivier; Therias, Sandrine

    2014-05-15

    Cellulose nitrate (or nitrocellulose) has received considerable interest due to its uses in various applications, such as paints, photographic films and propellants. However, it is considered as one of the primary pollutants in the energetic material industries because it can be degraded to form polluting chemical species. In this work, the UV light degradation of cellulose nitrate films was studied under conditions of artificially accelerated photooxidation. To eliminate the reactivity of nitro groups, the degradation of ethylcellulose was also investigated. Infrared spectroscopy analyses of the chemical modifications caused by the photooxidation of cellulose nitrate films and the resulting formation of volatile products revealed the occurrence of de-nitration and the formation of oxidation photoproducts exhibiting lactone and anhydride functions. The impact of these chemical modifications on the mechanical and thermal properties of cellulose nitrate films includes embrittlement and lower temperatures of ignition when used as a propellant.

  14. Natural Composites: Cellulose Fibres and the related Performance of Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilholt, Hans; Madsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Biobased materials are becoming of increasing interest as potential structural materials for the future. A useful concept in this context is the fibre reinforcement of materials by stiff and strong fibres. The biobased resources can contribute with cellulose fibres and biopolymers. This offers...... the potential for stiff and strong biocomposite materials, but these have some limitations and obstacles to full performance. The focus will be on the ultra-structure, and the strength and stiffness of cellulose fibres, on the (unavoidable) defects causing large reductions in strength and moderate reductions...... in stiffness, on the packing ability of cellulose fibres and the related maximum fibre volume fraction in composites, on the moisture sorption of cellulose fibres and the related mass increase and (large) hygral strains induced, and on the mechanical performance of composites....

  15. Decomposition of Cellulose by Continuous Near-Critical Water Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A pilot-scale apparatus for continuous supercritical and near-critical water reaction was set up. A high- pressure slurry supplying system was developed to feed the solid material-water slurries. The apparatus features temperature up to 600℃, pressure up to 40MPa, residence time from 24s to 15min, maximum amount of slurry supply of 2.4 L.h-1, maximum solid content of slurry up to 10%(by mass) for cellulose from Merck, and resistance to corrosion. Long-time runs of decomposition of cellulose were carried out and steady runs were confirmed. Kinetics of cellulose decomposition was studied. The apparent activation energy evaluated was 147kJ·mol-1. In addition, a new three-step pathway for cellulose hydrolysis was proposed. The derived kinetic equation is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Synthesis and properties of fluorescent cotton cellulose labeled with norfloxacin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To expand the application of cellulose in the field of fluorescence techniques, the cotton cellulose was labeled with norfloxacin (Cell-NF) via a three-step reaction, involving alkali treatment, epoxy activation, and opening of the epoxy rings with norfloxacin molecules. And the coordination complexes of Cell-NF with rare earth ions terbium (Cell-NF-Tb) and europium (Cell-NF-Eu) were obtained. The products were detected by IR, TG, XPS, UV and fluorescence spectra. Results showed that the norfloxacin content of the labeled cellulose was about 6.73 w‰ and the start temperature of decomposition of the Cell-NF was raised by 40°C compared with the stock cotton cellulose. When excited at 340 nm, the Cell-NF, Cell-NF-Tb, and Cell-NF-Eu in the solid state could emit violet (430 nm), green (549 nm) and red (620 nm) light, respectively.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of novel cellulose ether sulfates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohowsky, Juta; Heise, Katja; Fischer, Steffen; Hettrich, Kay

    2016-05-20

    The synthesis and characterization of novel cellulose sulfate derivatives was reported. Various cellulose ethers were prepared in a homogeneous reaction with common sulfating agents. The received product possess different properties in dependence on the reaction conditions like sulfating agent, solvent, reaction time and reaction temperature. The cellulose ether sulfates are all soluble in water, they rheological behavior could be determined by viscosity measurements and the determination of the sulfur content by elemental analysis lead to a resulting degree of substitution ascribed to sulfate groups (DSSul) of the product. A wide range of products from DSSul 0.1 to DSSul 2.7 will be obtained. Furthermore the cellulose sulfate ethers could be characterized by Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Dielectric properties of solution-grown-undoped and acrylic-acid-doped ethyl cellulose

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Khare; Sandeep K Jain

    2000-02-01

    Dielectric capacities and losses were measured, in the temperature (50–170°C) and frequency (01–100 kHz range), for undoped and acrylic acid (AA) doped ethyl cellulose (EC) films (thickness about 20 m) with progressive increase in the concentration of dopant in the polymer matrix. The variation of capacity with temperature is attributed to thermal expansion in the lower temperature region to the orientation of dipolar molecules in the neighbourhood of glass transition temperature () and random thermal motion of molecules above . The dielectric losses exhibit a broad peak. Doping with AA is found to affect the magnitude and position of the peak. AA is found to have a two-fold action. Firstly, it enhances the chain mobility and secondly, it increases the dielectric loss by forming charge transfer complexes.

  19. High-Strength Composite Fibers from Cellulose-Lignin Blends Regenerated from Ionic Liquid Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yibo; Asaadi, Shirin; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Reza, Mehedi; Alekhina, Marina; Rautkari, Lauri; Michud, Anne; Hauru, Lauri; Hummel, Michael; Sixta, Herbert

    2015-12-01

    Composite fibres that contain cellulose and lignin were produced from ionic liquid solutions by dry-jet wet spinning. Eucalyptus dissolving pulp and organosolv/kraft lignin blends in different ratios were dissolved in the ionic liquid 1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium acetate to prepare a spinning dope from which composite fibres were spun successfully. The composite fibres had a high strength with slightly decreasing values for fibres with an increasing share of lignin, which is because of the reduction in crystallinity. The total orientation of composite fibres and SEM images show morphological changes caused by the presence of lignin. The hydrophobic contribution of lignin reduced the vapour adsorption in the fibre. Thermogravimetric analysis curves of the composite fibres reveal the positive effect of the lignin on the carbonisation yield. Finally, the composite fibre was found to be a potential raw material for textile manufacturing and as a precursor for carbon fibre production.

  20. Short cellulosic fiber/starch acetate composites — micromechanical modeling of Young’s modulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Joffe, Roberts; Peltola, Heidi;

    2011-01-01

    This study is presented to predict the Young’s modulus of injection-molded short cellulosic fiber/plasticized starch acetate composites with variable fiber and plasticizer content. A modified rule of mixtures model is applied where the effect of porosity is included, and where the fiber weight...... fraction is used as the basic independent variable. The values of the input model parameters are derived from experimental studies of the configuration of the composites (volumetric composition, dimensions, and orientation of fibers), as well as the properties of the constituent fiber and matrix phases...... (density and Young’s modulus). The measured Young’s modulus of the composites varies in the range 1.1—8.3 GPa, and this is well predicted by the model calculations. A property diagram is presented to be used for the tailor-making of composites with Young’s modulus in the range 0.2—10 GPa....