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Sample records for cellular thiol-disulfide redox

  1. Thioredoxin Reductase Is Essential for Thiol/Disulfide Redox Control and Oxidative Stress Survival of the Anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Edson R.; Tzianabos, Arthur O; Smith, C. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Results of this study showed that the anaerobic, opportunistic pathogen Bacteroides fragilis lacks the glutathione/glutaredoxin redox system and possesses an extensive number of putative thioredoxin (Trx) orthologs. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed six Trx orthologs and an absence of genes required for synthesis of glutathione and glutaredoxins. In addition, it was shown that the thioredoxin reductase (TrxB)/Trx system is the major or sole redox system for thiol/disulfide cellular hom...

  2. Der Thiol:Disulfid-Redox Metabolismus und der Blaulichtrezeptor Lmo0799 von Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Ondrusch, Nicolai

    2010-01-01

    Der Thiol-Redox-Metabolismus, der in allen lebenden Zellen zu finden ist, wirkt oxidativem Stress entgegen. Des Weiteren dient er auch der Aufrechterhaltung der intrazellulären Thiol:Disulfid-Balance, die wiederum für die Funktion vieler Proteine essentiell ist. Auch stellt er Reduktionsäquivalente für die Produktion von Desoxyribonucleotiden für die DNA-Synthese bereit und hilft oxidierte Proteine zu reparieren. Der Thiol:Disulfid-Redox-Metabolismus (TDRM) unterscheidet sich von anderen meta...

  3. Thiol/Disulfide system plays a crucial role in redox protection in the acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium Leptospirillum ferriphilum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javiera Norambuena

    Full Text Available Thiol/disulfide systems are involved in the maintenance of the redox status of proteins and other molecules that contain thiol/disulfide groups. Leptospirillum ferriphilum DSM14647, an acidophilic bacterium that uses Fe(2+ as electron donor, and withstands very high concentrations of iron and other redox active metals, is a good model to study how acidophiles preserve the thiol/disulfide balance. We studied the composition of thiol/disulfide systems and their role in the oxidative stress response in this extremophile bacterium. Bioinformatic analysis using genomic data and enzymatic assays using protein extracts from cells grown under oxidative stress revealed that the major thiol/disulfide system from L. ferriphilum are a cytoplasmic thioredoxin system (composed by thioredoxins Trx and thioredoxin reductase TR, periplasmic thiol oxidation system (DsbA/DsbB and a c-type cytochrome maturation system (DsbD/DsbE. Upon exposure of L. ferriphilum to reactive oxygen species (ROS-generating compounds, transcriptional activation of the genes encoding Trxs and the TR enzyme, which results in an increase of the corresponding activity, was observed. Altogether these data suggest that the thioredoxin-based thiol/disulfide system plays an important role in redox protection of L. ferriphilum favoring the survival of this microorganism under extreme environmental oxidative conditions.

  4. Differential regulation of tissue thiol-disulfide redox status in a murine model of peritonitis

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    Benton Shana M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione (GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG and cysteine (Cys/cystine (CySS are major redox pools with important roles in cytoprotection. We determined the impact of septic peritonitis on thiol-disulfide redox status in mice. Methods FVB/N mice (6–12 week old; 8/group underwent laparotomy with cecal ligation and puncture (CLP or laparotomy alone (control. Sections of ileum, colon, lung and liver were obtained and GSH, GSSG, Cys and CySS concentrations determined by HPLC 24 h after laparotomy. Redox potential [Eh in millivolts (mV] of the GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS pools was calculated using the Nernst equation. Data were analyzed by ANOVA (mean ± SE. Results GSH/GSSG Eh in ileum, colon, and liver was significantly oxidized in septic mice versus control mice (ileum: septic −202±4 versus control −228±2 mV; colon: -195±8 versus −214±1 mV; and liver: -194±3 vs. -210±1 mV, all Ph was unchanged with CLP, while liver and lung Cys/CySS Eh became significantly more reducing (liver: septic = −103±3 versus control −90±2 mV; lung: -101±5 versus −81±1 mV, each P Conclusions Septic peritonitis induced by CLP oxidizes ileal and colonic GSH/GSSG redox but Cys/CySS Eh remains unchanged in these intestinal tissues. In liver, CLP oxidizes the GSH/GSSG redox pool and CyS/CySS Eh becomes more reducing; in lung, CLP does not alter GSH/GSSG Eh, and Cys/CySS Eh is less oxidized. CLP-induced infection/inflammation differentially regulates major thiol-disulfide redox pools in this murine model.

  5. Study of the thiol/disulfide redox systems of the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris points out pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase as a new target for thioredoxin 1.

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    Pieulle, Laetitia; Stocker, Pierre; Vinay, Manon; Nouailler, Matthieu; Vita, Nicolas; Brasseur, Gaël; Garcin, Edwige; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Dolla, Alain

    2011-03-11

    Sulfate reducers have developed a multifaceted adaptative strategy to survive against oxidative stresses. Along with this oxidative stress response, we recently characterized an elegant reversible disulfide bond-dependent protective mechanism in the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) of various Desulfovibrio species. Here, we searched for thiol redox systems involved in this mechanism. Using thiol fluorescent labeling, we show that glutathione is not the major thiol/disulfide balance-controlling compound in four different Desulfovibrio species and that no other plentiful low molecular weight thiol can be detected. Enzymatic analyses of two thioredoxins (Trxs) and three thioredoxin reductases allow us to propose the existence of two independent Trx systems in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). The TR1/Trx1 system corresponds to the typical bacterial Trx system. We measured a TR1 apparent K(m) value for Trx1 of 8.9 μM. Moreover, our results showed that activity of TR1 was NADPH-dependent. The second system named TR3/Trx3 corresponds to an unconventional Trx system as TR3 used preferentially NADH (K(m) for NADPH, 743 μM; K(m) for NADH, 5.6 μM), and Trx3 was unable to reduce insulin. The K(m) value of TR3 for Trx3 was 1.12 μM. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the TR1/Trx1 system was the only one able to reactivate the oxygen-protected form of Desulfovibrio africanus PFOR. Moreover, ex vivo pulldown assays using the mutant Trx1(C33S) as bait allowed us to capture PFOR from the DvH extract. Altogether, these data demonstrate that PFOR is a new target for Trx1, which is probably involved in the protective switch mechanism of the enzyme. PMID:21199874

  6. Quantifying changes in the cellular thiol-disulfide status during differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rosa Rebecca Erritzøe; Otsu, Mieko; Braakman, Ineke;

    2013-01-01

    by the differentiation, steady-state levels of glutathionylated protein thiols are less than 0.3% of the total protein cysteines, even in fully differentiated cells, and the overall protein redox state is not affected until late in differentiation, when large-scale IgM production is ongoing. A general expansion......Plasma cells produce and secrete massive amounts of disulfide-containing antibodies. To accommodate this load on the secretory machinery, the differentiation of resting B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells is accompanied by a preferential expansion of the secretory compartments of the cells...... of the ER does not affect global protein redox status until an extensive production of cargo proteins has started....

  7. Interchangeable modules in bacterial thiol-disulfide exchange pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwen, Thijs R. H. M.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2009-01-01

    Thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases (TDORs) catalyze thiol-disulfide exchange reactions that are crucial for protein activity and stability. Specifically, they can function as thiol oxidases, disulfide reductases or disulfide isomerases. The generally established view is that particular TDORs act unidir

  8. Thiol-Disulfide Exchange between Glutaredoxin and Glutathione

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Rasmus; Andersen, Peter Anders; Jensen, Kristine Steen;

    2010-01-01

    Glutaredoxins are ubiquitous thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases which catalyze the reduction of glutathione-protein mixed disulfides. Belonging to the thioredoxin family, they contain a conserved active site CXXC motif. The N-proximal active site cysteine can form a mixed disulfide with glutathione ...... has been replaced with serine. The exchange reaction between the reduced protein and oxidized glutathione leading to formation of the mixed disulfide could readily be monitored by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) due to the enthalpic contributions from the noncovalent interactions...... a substantial effect on the thermal stability of the protein as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry....

  9. Secreted APE1/Ref-1 inhibits TNF-α-stimulated endothelial inflammation via thiol-disulfide exchange in TNF receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung Soo; Choi, Sunga; Lee, Yu Ran; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Kang, Gun; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Kim, Soo Jin; Lee, Sang Do; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-03-11

    Apurinic apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein with redox activity and is proved to be secreted from stimulated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functions of extracellular APE1/Ref-1 with respect to leading anti-inflammatory signaling in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells in response to acetylation. Treatment of TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells with an inhibitor of deacetylase that causes intracellular acetylation, considerably suppressed vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). During TSA-mediated acetylation in culture, a time-dependent increase in secreted APE1/Ref-1 was confirmed. The acetyl moiety of acetylated-APE1/Ref-1 was rapidly removed based on the removal kinetics. Additionally, recombinant human (rh) APE1/Ref-1 with reducing activity induced a conformational change in rh TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) by thiol-disulfide exchange. Following treatment with the neutralizing anti-APE1/Ref-1 antibody, inflammatory signals via the binding of TNF-α to TNFR1 were remarkably recovered, leading to up-regulation of reactive oxygen species generation and VCAM-1, in accordance with the activation of p66(shc) and p38 MAPK. These results strongly indicate that anti-inflammatory effects in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells by acetylation are tightly linked to secreted APE1/Ref-1, which inhibits TNF-α binding to TNFR1 by reductive conformational change, with suggestion as an endogenous inhibitor of vascular inflammation.

  10. Live-cell imaging of biothiols via thiol/disulfide exchange to trigger the photoinduced electron transfer of gold-nanodot sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ching-Ping; Wu, Te-Haw; Liu, Chia-Yeh; Lin, Shu-Yi, E-mail: shuyi@nhri.org.tw

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • The ultrasmall size, PAMAM dendrimer-entrapped Au{sub 8}-clusters were synthesized. • Thiol/disulfide exchange with biothiols to release 2-PyT resulted in quenching. • The sensing platform can detect both low and high molecular weight thiols. • Capable of imaging biothiols including protein thiols in living cells. - Abstract: Biothiols have been reported to involve in intracellular redox-homeostasis against oxidative stress. In this study, a highly selective and sensitive fluorescent probe for sensing biothiols is explored by using an ultrasmall gold nanodot (AuND), the dendrimer-entrapped Au{sub 8}-cluster. This strategy relies upon a thiol/disulfide exchange to trigger the fluorescence change through a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process between the Au{sub 8}-cluster (as an electron donor) and 2-pyridinethiol (2-PyT) (as an electron acceptor) for sensing biothiols. When 2-PyT is released via the cleavage of disulfide bonds by biothiols, the PET process from the Au{sub 8}-cluster to 2-PyT is initiated, resulting in fluorescence quenching. The fluorescence intensity was found to decrease linearly with glutathione (GSH) concentration (0–1500 μM) at physiological relevant levels and the limit of detection for GSH was 15.4 μM. Compared to most nanoparticle-based fluorescent probes that are limited to detect low molecular weight thiols (LMWTs; i.e., GSH and cysteine), the ultrasmall Au{sub 8}-cluster-based probe exhibited less steric hindrance and can be directly applied in selectively and sensitively detecting both LMWTs and high molecular weight thiols (HMWTs; i.e., protein thiols). Based on such sensing platform, the surface-functionalized Au{sub 8}-cluster has significant promise for use as an efficient nanoprobe for intracellular fluorescence imaging of biothiols including protein thiols in living cells whereas other nanoparticle-based fluorescent probes cannot.

  11. A thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase of the Gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae is essential for viability, pilus assembly, toxin production and virulence

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    Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Jooya, Neda; Chang, Chungyu; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae exports through the Sec apparatus many extracellular proteins that include the key virulence factors diphtheria toxin and the adhesive pili. How these proteins attain their native conformations after translocation as unfolded precursors remains elusive. The fact that the majority of these exported proteins contain multiple cysteine residues and that several membrane-bound oxidoreductases are encoded in the corynebacterial genome suggests the existence of an oxidative protein-folding pathway in this organism. Here we show that the shaft pilin SpaA harbors a disulfide bond in vivo and alanine substitution of these cysteines abrogates SpaA polymerization and leads to the secretion of degraded SpaA peptides. We then identified a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase (MdbA), whose structure exhibits a conserved thioredoxin-like domain with a CPHC active site. Remarkably, deletion of mdbA results in a severe temperature-sensitive cell division phenotype. This mutant also fails to assemble pilus structures and is greatly defective in toxin production. Consistent with these defects, the ΔmdbA mutant is attenuated in a guinea pig model of diphtheritic toxemia. Given its diverse cellular functions in cell division, pilus assembly and toxin production, we propose that MdbA is a component of the general oxidative folding machine in C. diphtheriae. PMID:26294390

  12. Influence of liposome forms of the rhenium compounds and cis-platin on thiol-disulfide coefficient in the rats’ blood

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    I. V. Klenina

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Thiol-disulfide coefficient (TDC and its different modifications in model in vivo were studied. Introduction of the liposome forms of cluster rhenium compounds with organic ligands (CROL leads to both TDC increasing and to the constancy of the TDC. Thus, CROLs aren’t toxic agents and some compounds could mobilize organisms’ thiol defence system. Liposome form of cis-platin leads to the TDC decreasing. Important CROL capacities for its future medical treatment practice were shown.

  13. Principles in redox signaling: from chemistry to functional significance.

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    Bindoli, Alberto; Rigobello, Maria Pia

    2013-05-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are currently considered not only harmful byproducts of aerobic respiration but also critical mediators of redox signaling. The molecules and the chemical principles sustaining the network of cellular redox regulated processes are described. Special emphasis is placed on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), now considered as acting as a second messenger, and on sulfhydryl groups, which are the direct targets of the oxidant signal. Cysteine residues of some proteins, therefore, act as sensors of redox conditions and are oxidized in a reversible reaction. In particular, the formation of sulfenic acid and disulfide, the initial steps of thiol oxidation, are described in detail. The many cell pathways involved in reactive oxygen species formation are reported. Central to redox signaling processes are the glutathione and thioredoxin systems controlling H(2)O(2) levels and, hence, the thiol/disulfide balance. Lastly, some of the most important redox-regulated processes involving specific enzymes and organelles are described. The redox signaling area of research is rapidly expanding, and future work will examine new pathways and clarify their importance in cellular pathophysiology.

  14. The Tumorigenic Roles of the Cellular REDOX Regulatory Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphanie Anaís Castaldo; Joana Raquel Freitas; Nadine Vasconcelos Conchinha; Patrícia Alexandra Madureira

    2016-01-01

    The cellular REDOX regulatory systems play a central role in maintaining REDOX homeostasis that is crucial for cell integrity, survival, and proliferation. To date, a substantial amount of data has demonstrated that cancer cells typically undergo increasing oxidative stress as the tumor develops, upregulating these important antioxidant systems in order to survive, proliferate, and metastasize under these extreme oxidative stress conditions. Since a large number of chemotherapeutic agents cur...

  15. Hydrogen Sulfide and Cellular Redox Homeostasis

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    Zhi-Zhong Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular redox imbalance is mainly caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS or weakness of the natural antioxidant defense system. It is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide array of human diseases. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is now recognized as the third “gasotransmitters” and proved to exert a wide range of physiological and cytoprotective functions in the biological systems. Among these functions, the role of H2S in oxidative stress has been one of the main focuses over years. However, the underlying mechanisms for the antioxidant effect of H2S are still poorly comprehended. This review presents an overview of the current understanding of H2S specially focusing on the new understanding and mechanisms of the antioxidant effects of H2S based on recent reports. Both inhibition of ROS generation and stimulation of antioxidants are discussed. H2S-induced S-sulfhydration of key proteins (e.g., p66Shc and Keap1 is also one of the focuses of this review.

  16. Hydrogen Sulfide and Cellular Redox Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi-Zhong; Liu, Yang; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular redox imbalance is mainly caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or weakness of the natural antioxidant defense system. It is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide array of human diseases. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as the third “gasotransmitters” and proved to exert a wide range of physiological and cytoprotective functions in the biological systems. Among these functions, the role of H2S in oxidative stress has been one of the main focuses over years. However, the underlying mechanisms for the antioxidant effect of H2S are still poorly comprehended. This review presents an overview of the current understanding of H2S specially focusing on the new understanding and mechanisms of the antioxidant effects of H2S based on recent reports. Both inhibition of ROS generation and stimulation of antioxidants are discussed. H2S-induced S-sulfhydration of key proteins (e.g., p66Shc and Keap1) is also one of the focuses of this review. PMID:26881033

  17. Role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in regulation of redox-dependent processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, E V; Chernov, N N; Novichkova, M D

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade fundamentally new features have been revealed for the participation of glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes (glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin) in cell proliferation, apoptosis, protein folding, and cell signaling. Reduced glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining cellular redox status by participating in thiol-disulfide exchange, which regulates a number of cell functions including gene expression and the activity of individual enzymes and enzyme systems. Maintaining optimum GSH/GSSG ratio is essential to cell viability. Decrease in the ratio can serve as an indicator of damage to the cell redox status and of changes in redox-dependent gene regulation. Disturbance of intracellular GSH balance is observed in a number of pathologies including cancer. Consequences of inappropriate GSH/GSSG ratio include significant changes in the mechanism of cellular redox-dependent signaling controlled both nonenzymatically and enzymatically with the participation of isoforms of glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin. This review summarizes recent data on the role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in the regulation of cellular redox-dependent processes.

  18. The Tumorigenic Roles of the Cellular REDOX Regulatory Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, Stéphanie Anaís; Freitas, Joana Raquel; Conchinha, Nadine Vasconcelos; Madureira, Patrícia Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The cellular REDOX regulatory systems play a central role in maintaining REDOX homeostasis that is crucial for cell integrity, survival, and proliferation. To date, a substantial amount of data has demonstrated that cancer cells typically undergo increasing oxidative stress as the tumor develops, upregulating these important antioxidant systems in order to survive, proliferate, and metastasize under these extreme oxidative stress conditions. Since a large number of chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the clinic rely on the induction of ROS overload or change of ROS quality to kill the tumor, the cancer cell REDOX adaptation represents a significant obstacle to conventional chemotherapy. In this review we will first examine the different factors that contribute to the enhanced oxidative stress generally observed within the tumor microenvironment. We will then make a comprehensive assessment of the current literature regarding the main antioxidant proteins and systems that have been shown to be positively associated with tumor progression and chemoresistance. Finally we will make an analysis of commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs that induce ROS. The current knowledge of cancer cell REDOX adaptation raises the issue of developing novel and more effective therapies for these tumors that are usually resistant to conventional ROS inducing chemotherapy. PMID:26682014

  19. The Tumorigenic Roles of the Cellular REDOX Regulatory Systems

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    Stéphanie Anaís Castaldo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cellular REDOX regulatory systems play a central role in maintaining REDOX homeostasis that is crucial for cell integrity, survival, and proliferation. To date, a substantial amount of data has demonstrated that cancer cells typically undergo increasing oxidative stress as the tumor develops, upregulating these important antioxidant systems in order to survive, proliferate, and metastasize under these extreme oxidative stress conditions. Since a large number of chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the clinic rely on the induction of ROS overload or change of ROS quality to kill the tumor, the cancer cell REDOX adaptation represents a significant obstacle to conventional chemotherapy. In this review we will first examine the different factors that contribute to the enhanced oxidative stress generally observed within the tumor microenvironment. We will then make a comprehensive assessment of the current literature regarding the main antioxidant proteins and systems that have been shown to be positively associated with tumor progression and chemoresistance. Finally we will make an analysis of commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs that induce ROS. The current knowledge of cancer cell REDOX adaptation raises the issue of developing novel and more effective therapies for these tumors that are usually resistant to conventional ROS inducing chemotherapy.

  20. Cellular metabolic and autophagic pathways: traffic control by redox signaling.

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    Dodson, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-10-01

    It has been established that the key metabolic pathways of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are intimately related to redox biology through control of cell signaling. Under physiological conditions glucose metabolism is linked to control of the NADH/NAD redox couple, as well as providing the major reductant, NADPH, for thiol-dependent antioxidant defenses. Retrograde signaling from the mitochondrion to the nucleus or cytosol controls cell growth and differentiation. Under pathological conditions mitochondria are targets for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and are critical in controlling apoptotic cell death. At the interface of these metabolic pathways, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway functions to maintain mitochondrial quality and generally serves an important cytoprotective function. In this review we will discuss the autophagic response to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are generated from perturbations of cellular glucose metabolism and bioenergetic function.

  1. Reciprocal Control of the Circadian Clock and Cellular Redox State - a Critical Appraisal.

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    Putker, Marrit; O'Neill, John Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Redox signalling comprises the biology of molecular signal transduction mediated by reactive oxygen (or nitrogen) species. By specific and reversible oxidation of redox-sensitive cysteines, many biological processes sense and respond to signals from the intracellular redox environment. Redox signals are therefore important regulators of cellular homeostasis. Recently, it has become apparent that the cellular redox state oscillates in vivo and in vitro, with a period of about one day (circadian). Circadian time-keeping allows cells and organisms to adapt their biology to resonate with the 24-hour cycle of day/night. The importance of this innate biological time-keeping is illustrated by the association of clock disruption with the early onset of several diseases (e.g. type II diabetes, stroke and several forms of cancer). Circadian regulation of cellular redox balance suggests potentially two distinct roles for redox signalling in relation to the cellular clock: one where it is regulated by the clock, and one where it regulates the clock. Here, we introduce the concepts of redox signalling and cellular timekeeping, and then critically appraise the evidence for the reciprocal regulation between cellular redox state and the circadian clock. We conclude there is a substantial body of evidence supporting circadian regulation of cellular redox state, but that it would be premature to conclude that the converse is also true. We therefore propose some approaches that might yield more insight into redox control of cellular timekeeping.

  2. Quantitative Redox Biology: An approach to understanding the role of reactive species in defining the cellular redox environment

    OpenAIRE

    Buettner, Garry R.; Wagner, Brett A.; Victor G J Rodgers

    2013-01-01

    Systems biology is now recognized as a needed approach to understand the dynamics of inter- and intra-cellular processes. Redox processes are at the foundation of nearly all aspects of biology. Free radicals, related oxidants, and antioxidants are central to the basic functioning of cells and tissues. They set the cellular redox environment and therefore are key to regulation of biochemical pathways and networks, thereby influencing organism health. To understand how short-lived, quasi-stable...

  3. Polyethylenimine architecture-dependent metabolic imprints and perturbation of cellular redox homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Arnaldur; Parhamifar, Ladan; Lange, Marina Krarup;

    2015-01-01

    demonstrate that the central mechanisms of PEI architecture- and size-dependent perturbations of integrated cellular metabolomics involve destabilization of plasma membrane and mitochondrial membranes with consequences on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), glycolytic flux and redox homeostasis...

  4. Redox characteristics of the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R

    2007-01-01

    on multiple cytosolic factors but also on the redox homeostasis of other compartments like the secretory pathway and the mitochondria. Possibly, the cytosol is not just a reducing compartment surrounding organelles with high oxidative activity but also a milieu for regulation of the redox status of more than...... (ROS) and glutathionylated proteins are maintained at very low levels. In the present review, recent progress in the understanding of the cytosolic thiol-disulfide redox metabolism and novel analytical approaches to studying cytosolic redox properties are discussed. We will focus on the yeast model...... one compartment. Although much has been learned about redox homeostasis and oxidative stress response several important aspects of the redox regulation in the yeast cytosol are still unexplained. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Nov-7...

  5. Glutathione in Cellular Redox Homeostasis: Association with the Excitatory Amino Acid Carrier 1 (EAAC1

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    Koji Aoyama

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are by-products of the cellular metabolism of oxygen consumption, produced mainly in the mitochondria. ROS are known to be highly reactive ions or free radicals containing oxygen that impair redox homeostasis and cellular functions, leading to cell death. Under physiological conditions, a variety of antioxidant systems scavenge ROS to maintain the intracellular redox homeostasis and normal cellular functions. This review focuses on the antioxidant system’s roles in maintaining redox homeostasis. Especially, glutathione (GSH is the most important thiol-containing molecule, as it functions as a redox buffer, antioxidant, and enzyme cofactor against oxidative stress. In the brain, dysfunction of GSH synthesis leading to GSH depletion exacerbates oxidative stress, which is linked to a pathogenesis of aging-related neurodegenerative diseases. Excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1 plays a pivotal role in neuronal GSH synthesis. The regulatory mechanism of EAAC1 is also discussed.

  6. EFFECT OF CYTOKINE CEREBROPROTECITON ON THE STATE OF ANTIOXIDANT THIOL-DISULFIDE SYSTEM IN THE BRAIN TISSUE OF RATS WITH EXPERIMENTAL DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Suprun E.V

    2014-10-01

    persistent mitochondrial dysfunction, and as a result, to mitochondrial death – mitoptosis. Moreover, IL-1, produced in response to hypoxia, expresses inducible NOS (iNOS in the glial cells, which results in NO hyperproduction and toxic effects die to its excessive amount. Excessive amount and its highly toxic derivatives nitrosylate protein-clinging enzymes of the respiratory chain of mitochondria and Krebs cycle, and inhibit them. Dysfunction of mitochondrial enzyme complexes (MEC is formed, which causes qualitative changes of iron-sulfur centers in the mitochondrial enzymes and their functions, as well as suppression of a main (NAD-dependent pathway for the substrate oxidation in respiratory chain. Aerobic energy synthesis is suppressed, thus bioenergetic (tissue hypoxia is developed. Under conditions of the impaired generation of cell energy, caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, loss of NAD and ATP results in death of cells by necrosis or apoptosis. These pathophysiological changes form the basis of occurrence of early or late post-ischemic DM complications, resulting in disturbance of the usual lifestyle and lowering of life quality, persistent loss of occupational capacity and rapid progression of heavy neurological consequences up to lethal outcome. To gain maximum protective effect in the DM therapy, it is necessary to achieve interruption of pathogenetic ischemic/hypoxic cascade at earlier stages, which includes stage of thiol-disulfide imbalance establishing. Normalization of TDS state allows prevention of depolarization and destabilization of the mitochondrial internal membrane followed by development of mitochondrial dysfunction, energy imbalance and other post-ischemic consequences

  7. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many pathogenic fungi are becoming resistant to currently available drugs. Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that...

  8. Redox Sensitivities of Global Cellular Cysteine Residues under Reductive and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kazutaka; Kusano, Hidewo; Sasaki, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Riko; Hatta, Tomohisa; Fukui, Kazuhiko; Natsume, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The protein cysteine residue is one of the amino acids most susceptible to oxidative modifications, frequently caused by oxidative stress. Several applications have enabled cysteine-targeted proteomics analysis with simultaneous detection and quantitation. In this study, we employed a quantitative approach using a set of iodoacetyl-based cysteine reactive isobaric tags (iodoTMT) and evaluated the transient cellular oxidation ratio of free and reversibly modified cysteine thiols under DTT and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatments. DTT treatment (1 mM for 5 min) reduced most cysteine thiols, irrespective of their cellular localizations. It also caused some unique oxidative shifts, including for peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2), uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD), and thioredoxin (TXN), proteins reportedly affected by cellular reactive oxygen species production. Modest H2O2 treatment (50 μM for 5 min) did not cause global oxidations but instead had apparently reductive effects. Moreover, with H2O2, significant oxidative shifts were observed only in redox active proteins, like PRDX2, peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1), TXN, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Overall, our quantitative data illustrated both H2O2- and reduction-mediated cellular responses, whereby while redox homeostasis is maintained, highly reactive thiols can potentiate the specific, rapid cellular signaling to counteract acute redox stress.

  9. A genome-wide screen in yeast identifies specific oxidative stress genes required for the maintenance of sub-cellular redox homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ayer; S. Fellermeier; C. Fife; S.S. Li; G. Smits; A.J. Meyer; I.W. Dawes; G.G. Perrone

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of an optimal redox environment is critical for appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival. Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis, it is not clear how the optimal redox potential is sensed and set, and the processes that impact redox on a cellular/o

  10. Nitric oxide-releasing prodrug triggers cancer cell death through deregulation of cellular redox balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Maciag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available JS-K is a nitric oxide (NO-releasing prodrug of the O2-arylated diazeniumdiolate family that has demonstrated pronounced cytotoxicity and antitumor properties in a variety of cancer models both in vitro and in vivo. The current study of the metabolic actions of JS-K was undertaken to investigate mechanisms of its cytotoxicity. Consistent with model chemical reactions, the activating step in the metabolism of JS-K in the cell is the dearylation of the diazeniumdiolate by glutathione (GSH via a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction. The resulting product (CEP/NO anion spontaneously hydrolyzes, releasing two equivalents of NO. The GSH/GSSG redox couple is considered to be the major redox buffer of the cell, helping maintain a reducing environment under basal conditions. We have quantified the effects of JS-K on cellular GSH content, and show that JS-K markedly depletes GSH, due to JS-K's rapid uptake and cascading release of NO and reactive nitrogen species. The depletion of GSH results in alterations in the redox potential of the cellular environment, initiating MAPK stress signaling pathways, and inducing apoptosis. Microarray analysis confirmed signaling gene changes at the transcriptional level and revealed alteration in the expression of several genes crucial for maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis, as well as cell proliferation and survival, including MYC. Pre-treating cells with the known GSH precursor and nucleophilic reducing agent N-acetylcysteine prevented the signaling events that lead to apoptosis. These data indicate that multiplicative depletion of the reduced glutathione pool and deregulation of intracellular redox balance are important initial steps in the mechanism of JS-K's cytotoxic action.

  11. Redox Homeostasis and Cellular Antioxidant Systems: Crucial Players in Cancer Growth and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Barbara; Nitti, Mariapaola; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Colla, Renata; Ciucis, Chiara De; Marinari, Umberto Maria; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Traverso, Nicola; Domenicotti, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their products are components of cell signaling pathways and play important roles in cellular physiology and pathophysiology. Under physiological conditions, cells control ROS levels by the use of scavenging systems such as superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, and glutathione that balance ROS generation and elimination. Under oxidative stress conditions, excessive ROS can damage cellular proteins, lipids, and DNA, leading to cell damage that may contribute to carcinogenesis. Several studies have shown that cancer cells display an adaptive response to oxidative stress by increasing expression of antioxidant enzymes and molecules. As a double-edged sword, ROS influence signaling pathways determining beneficial or detrimental outcomes in cancer therapy. In this review, we address the role of redox homeostasis in cancer growth and therapy and examine the current literature regarding the redox regulatory systems that become upregulated in cancer and their role in promoting tumor progression and resistance to chemotherapy.

  12. Redox Homeostasis and Cellular Antioxidant Systems: Crucial Players in Cancer Growth and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Marengo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and their products are components of cell signaling pathways and play important roles in cellular physiology and pathophysiology. Under physiological conditions, cells control ROS levels by the use of scavenging systems such as superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, and glutathione that balance ROS generation and elimination. Under oxidative stress conditions, excessive ROS can damage cellular proteins, lipids, and DNA, leading to cell damage that may contribute to carcinogenesis. Several studies have shown that cancer cells display an adaptive response to oxidative stress by increasing expression of antioxidant enzymes and molecules. As a double-edged sword, ROS influence signaling pathways determining beneficial or detrimental outcomes in cancer therapy. In this review, we address the role of redox homeostasis in cancer growth and therapy and examine the current literature regarding the redox regulatory systems that become upregulated in cancer and their role in promoting tumor progression and resistance to chemotherapy.

  13. A Model of Redox Kinetics Implicates the Thiol Proteome in Cellular Hydrogen Peroxide Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Adimora, Nnenna J.; Jones, Dean P; Melissa L Kemp

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is appreciated as a cellular signaling molecule with second-messenger properties, yet the mechanisms by which the cell protects against intracellular H2O2 accumulation are not fully understood. We introduce a network model of H2O2 clearance that includes the pseudo-enzymatic oxidative turnover of protein thiols, the enzymatic actions of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, peroxiredoxin, and glutaredoxin, and the redox reactions of thioredoxin and glutathione. Simulations repro...

  14. A model of redox kinetics implicates the thiol proteome in cellular hydrogen peroxide responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adimora, Nnenna J; Jones, Dean P; Kemp, Melissa L

    2010-09-15

    Hydrogen peroxide is appreciated as a cellular signaling molecule with second-messenger properties, yet the mechanisms by which the cell protects against intracellular H(2)O(2) accumulation are not fully understood. We introduce a network model of H(2)O(2) clearance that includes the pseudo-enzymatic oxidative turnover of protein thiols, the enzymatic actions of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, peroxiredoxin, and glutaredoxin, and the redox reactions of thioredoxin and glutathione. Simulations reproduced experimental observations of the rapid and transient oxidation of glutathione and the rapid, sustained oxidation of thioredoxin on exposure to extracellular H(2)O(2). The model correctly predicted early oxidation profiles for the glutathione and thioredoxin redox couples across a range of initial extracellular [H(2)O(2)] and highlights the importance of cytoplasmic membrane permeability to the cellular defense against exogenous sources of H(2)O(2). The protein oxidation profile predicted by the model suggests that approximately 10% of intracellular protein thiols react with hydrogen peroxide at substantial rates, with a majority of these proteins forming protein disulfides as opposed to protein S-glutathionylated adducts. A steady-state flux analysis predicted an unequal distribution of the intracellular anti-oxidative burden between thioredoxin-dependent and glutathione-dependent antioxidant pathways, with the former contributing the majority of the cellular antioxidant defense due to peroxiredoxins and protein disulfides.

  15. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney Noreen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. Natural phenolic compounds can serve as potent redox cyclers that inhibit microbial growth through destabilization of cellular redox homeostasis and/or antioxidation systems. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that disrupt the fungal antioxidation system. These compounds could then function as chemosensitizing agents in concert with conventional drugs or fungicides to improve antifungal efficacy. Methods Benzaldehydes were tested as natural antifungal agents against strains of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. terreus and Penicillium expansum, fungi that are causative agents of human invasive aspergillosis and/or are mycotoxigenic. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also used as a model system for identifying gene targets of benzaldehydes. The efficacy of screened compounds as effective chemosensitizers or as antifungal agents in formulations was tested with methods outlined by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. Results Several benzaldehydes are identified having potent antifungal activity. Structure-activity analysis reveals that antifungal activity increases by the presence of an ortho-hydroxyl group in the aromatic ring. Use of deletion mutants in the oxidative stress-response pathway of S. cerevisiae (sod1Δ, sod2Δ, glr1Δ and two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK mutants of A. fumigatus (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ, indicates antifungal activity of the benzaldehydes is through disruption of cellular antioxidation. Certain benzaldehydes, in combination with phenylpyrroles, overcome tolerance of A. fumigatus MAPK mutants to this agent and/or increase sensitivity of fungal pathogens to mitochondrial respiration inhibitory agents. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC or fungicidal (MFC

  16. The relationship between redox enzyme activity and electrochemical potential-cellular and mechanistic implications from protein film electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Andrew J; Kemp, Gemma L; To, Chun Yip; Mann, James; Marritt, Sophie J; Mayes, Andrew G; Richardson, David J; Butt, Julea N

    2011-05-01

    In protein film electrochemistry a redox protein of interest is studied as an electroactive film adsorbed on an electrode surface. For redox enzymes this configuration allows quantification of the relationship between catalytic activity and electrochemical potential. Considered as a function of enzyme environment, i.e., pH, substrate concentration etc., the activity-potential relationship provides a fingerprint of activity unique to a given enzyme. Here we consider the nature of the activity-potential relationship in terms of both its cellular impact and its origin in the structure and catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. We propose that the activity-potential relationship of a redox enzyme is tuned to facilitate cellular function and highlight opportunities to test this hypothesis through computational, structural, biochemical and cellular studies. PMID:21423952

  17. A genome-wide screen in yeast identifies specific oxidative stress genes required for the maintenance of sub-cellular redox homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Ayer

    Full Text Available Maintenance of an optimal redox environment is critical for appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival. Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis, it is not clear how the optimal redox potential is sensed and set, and the processes that impact redox on a cellular/organellar level are poorly understood. The genetic bases of cellular redox homeostasis were investigated using a green fluorescent protein (GFP based redox probe, roGFP2 and a pH sensitive GFP-based probe, pHluorin. The use of roGFP2, in conjunction with pHluorin, enabled determination of pH-adjusted sub-cellular redox potential in a non-invasive and real-time manner. A genome-wide screen using both the non-essential and essential gene collections was carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using cytosolic-roGFP2 to identify factors essential for maintenance of cytosolic redox state under steady-state conditions. 102 genes of diverse function were identified that are required for maintenance of cytosolic redox state. Mutations in these genes led to shifts in the half-cell glutathione redox potential by 75-10 mV. Interestingly, some specific oxidative stress-response processes were identified as over-represented in the data set. Further investigation of the role of oxidative stress-responsive systems in sub-cellular redox homeostasis was conducted using roGFP2 constructs targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome and E(GSH was measured in cells in exponential and stationary phase. Analyses allowed for the identification of key redox systems on a sub-cellular level and the identification of novel genes involved in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis.

  18. Pattern-oriented Agent-based Monte Carlo simulation of Cellular Redox Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jiaowei; Holcombe, Mike; Boonen, Harrie C.M.

    /CYSS) and mitochondrial redox couples. Evidence suggests that both intracellular and extracellular redox can affect overall cell redox state. How redox is communicated between extracellular and intracellular environments is still a matter of debate. Some researchers conclude based on experimental data...... will be the agents [7]. Additionally, the spatial distribution of enzymes and reactants, and diffusion of reactants will be considered as a contributing factor. To initially simplify the modeling, the redox change of intracellular compartments will be ignored or only the export and import of redox will be modeled...... for Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems: Toronto, Canada. p. 1633-1636....

  19. Naringin abrogated radiation induced oxidative stress through modulation of redox regulated cellular signaling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is widely used as major diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation are due to generation of reactive oxygen species. The amounts of ionizing radiation that can be given to treat malignant tumours are often limited by toxicity in the surrounding normal tissues and organs. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Naringin (NG), a natural flavonoid, present in many plant parts against radiation induced oxidative stress with an evidence based exploration of the mechanism involved. Isolated murine splenocyte were irradiated with γ radiation (6 Gy) along with/without different concentrations of NG (50 and 100 μM). Biochemical, immunoblot, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence study was subject to be performed to observe its molecular mechanisms of action. Pretreatment with NG significantly prevented the radiation induced intracellular ROS generation, therefore prevented cellular TBARS formation and development of cellular nitrite. NG showed the significant reduction in nuclear DNA damage with respect to irradiated splenocyte through inhibition of DNA-PKcs and p-γH2AX. It recovered radiation induced reduced cell viability through modulation of redox regulated cell signaling system. It resulted in significant inhibition of radiation induced G1/S phase cell cycle arrest mediated by modulation of p53 dependent p21/WAF1 expression followed by Cyclin E and CDK2 expression. NG was involved in blocking radiation induced p38 function; reversed radiation mediated differential stress response through inhibition of NF-κB pathway. It prevented p-IKKα/β, p-IκBα, p-p65, COX2 expression. It also reversed the radiation induced p38/NF-κB guided inflammatory development. Thus it down regulated radiation induced CRP, MCP-1, and iNOS2 gene expression. This novel role of naringin provides a basis for therapeutic applications in future against radiation induced molecular and cellular functional

  20. Special Issue: Redox Active Natural Products and Their Interaction with Cellular Signalling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, “natural” cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature’s treasure chest of “green gold”. Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic “sensor/effector” anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for “intracellular diagnostics”. In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur

  1. Contribution of glutathione to the control of cellular redox homeostasis under toxic metal and metalloid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Luis E; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Montero-Palmero, M Belén; Carrasco-Gil, Sandra; Flores-Cáceres, M Laura; Ortega-Villasante, Cristina; Escobar, Carolina

    2015-05-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals and metalloids, such as cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), or arsenic (As), as a consequence of various anthropogenic activities, poses a serious threat to the environment and human health. The ability of plants to take up mineral nutrients from the soil can be exploited to develop phytoremediation technologies able to alleviate the negative impact of toxic elements in terrestrial ecosystems. However, we must select plant species or populations capable of tolerating exposure to hazardous elements. The tolerance of plant cells to toxic elements is highly dependent on glutathione (GSH) metabolism. GSH is a biothiol tripeptide that plays a fundamental dual role: first, as an antioxidant to mitigate the redox imbalance caused by toxic metal(loid) accumulation, and second as a precursor of phytochelatins (PCs), ligand peptides that limit the free ion cellular concentration of those pollutants. The sulphur assimilation pathway, synthesis of GSH, and production of PCs are tightly regulated in order to alleviate the phytotoxicity of different hazardous elements, which might induce specific stress signatures. This review provides an update on mechanisms of tolerance that depend on biothiols in plant cells exposed to toxic elements, with a particular emphasis on the Hg-triggered responses, and considering the contribution of hormones to their regulation.

  2. Redox Modulation of Cellular Signaling and Metabolism Through Reversible Oxidation of Methionine Sensors in Calcium Regulatory Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2005-01-17

    Adaptive responses associated with environmental stressors are critical to cell survival. These involve the modulation of central signaling protein functions through site-specific and enzymatically reversible oxidative modifications of methionines to coordinate cellular metabolism, energy utilization, and calcium signaling. Under conditions when cellular redox and antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, the selective oxidation of critical methionines within selected protein sensors functions to down-regulate energy metabolism and the further generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mechanistically, these functional changes within protein sensors take advantage of the helix-breaking character of methionine sulfoxide. Thus, depending on either the ecological niche of the organism or the cellular milieu of different organ systems, cellular metabolism can be fine-tuned to maintain optimal function in the face of variable amounts of collateral oxidative damage. The sensitivity of several calcium regulatory proteins to oxidative modification provides cellular sensors that link oxidative stress to cellular response and recovery. Calmodulin (CaM) is one such critical calcium regulatory protein, which is functionally sensitive to methionine oxidation. Helix destabilization resulting from the oxidation of either Met{sup 144} or Met{sup 145} results in the nonproductive association between CaM and target proteins. The ability of oxidized CaM to stabilize its target proteins in an inhibited state with an affinity similar to that of native (unoxidized) CaM permits this central regulatory protein to function as a cellular rheostat that down-regulates energy metabolism in response to oxidative stress. Likewise, oxidation of a methionine within a critical switch region of the regulatory protein phospholamban is expected to destabilize the phosphorylationdependent helix formation necessary for the release of enzyme inhibition, resulting in a down-regulation of the Ca-ATPase in

  3. The role of cysteine residues in redox regulation and protein stability of Arabidopsis thaliana starch synthase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M;

    2015-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1) responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1) that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences...... its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated...... by the physiological redox transmitters thioredoxin f1 (Trxf1), thioredoxin m4 (Trxm4) and the bifunctional NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). AtSS1 displayed an activity change within the physiologically relevant redox range, with a midpoint potential equal to -306 mV, suggesting that AtSS1...

  4. Correlating two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of breast cancer cellular redox state with seahorse flux analysis of normalized cellular oxygen consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Wright, Heather J.; Chan, Nicole; Tran, Richard; Razorenova, Olga V.; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of the cellular cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide is widely used to measure cellular metabolism, both in normal and pathological cells and tissues. When dual-wavelength excitation is used, ratiometric TPEF imaging of the intrinsic cofactor fluorescence provides a metabolic index of cells-the "optical redox ratio" (ORR). With increased interest in understanding and controlling cellular metabolism in cancer, there is a need to evaluate the performance of ORR in malignant cells. We compare TPEF metabolic imaging with seahorse flux analysis of cellular oxygen consumption in two different breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). We monitor metabolic index in living cells under both normal culture conditions and, for MCF-7, in response to cell respiration inhibitors and uncouplers. We observe a significant correlation between the TPEF-derived ORR and the flux analyzer measurements (R=0.7901, p<0.001). Our results confirm that the ORR is a valid dynamic index of cell metabolism under a range of oxygen consumption conditions relevant for cancer imaging.

  5. Simultaneous Analysis of Major Coenzymes of Cellular Redox Reactions and Energy Using ex Vivo (1)H NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagana Gowda, G A; Abell, Lauren; Lee, Chi Fung; Tian, Rong; Raftery, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Coenzymes of cellular redox reactions and cellular energy mediate biochemical reactions fundamental to the functioning of all living cells. Despite their immense interest, no simple method exists to gain insights into their cellular concentrations in a single step. We show that a simple (1)H NMR experiment can simultaneously measure oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+) and NADH), oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+) and NADPH), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and its precursors, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), using mouse heart, kidney, brain, liver, and skeletal muscle tissue extracts as examples. Combining 1D/2D NMR experiments, chemical shift libraries, and authentic compound data, reliable peak identities for these coenzymes have been established. To assess this methodology, cardiac NADH and NAD(+) ratios/pool sizes were measured using mouse models with a cardiac-specific knockout of the mitochondrial Complex I Ndufs4 gene (cKO) and cardiac-specific overexpression of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (cNAMPT) as examples. Sensitivity of NAD(+) and NADH to cKO or cNAMPT was observed, as anticipated. Time-dependent investigations showed that the levels of NADH and NADPH diminish by up to ∼50% within 24 h; concomitantly, NAD(+) and NADP(+) increase proportionately; however, degassing the sample and flushing the sample tubes with helium gas halted such changes. The analysis protocol along with the annotated characteristic fingerprints for each coenzyme is provided for easy identification and absolute quantification using a single internal reference for routine use. The ability to visualize the ubiquitous coenzymes fundamental to cellular functions, simultaneously and reliably, offers a new avenue to interrogate the mechanistic details of cellular function in health and disease. PMID:27043450

  6. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  7. Effects of PPARγ Agonist Pioglitazone on Redox-Sensitive Cellular Signaling in Young Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima Dovinová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARγ receptor plays an important role in oxidative stress response. Its agonists can influence vascular contractility in experimental hypertension. Our study was focused on the effects of a PPARγ agonist pioglitazone (PIO on blood pressure regulation, vasoactivity of vessels, and redox-sensitive signaling at the central (brainstem, BS and peripheral (left ventricle, LV levels in young prehypertensive rats. 5-week-old SHR were treated either with PIO (10 mg/kg/day, 2 weeks or with saline using gastric gavage. Administration of PIO significantly slowed down blood pressure increase and improved lipid profile and aortic relaxation after insulin stimulation. A significant increase in PPARγ expression was found only in BS, not in LV. PIO treatment did not influence NOS changes, but had tissue-dependent effect on SOD regulation and increased SOD activity, observed in LV. The treatment with PIO differentially affected also the levels of other intracellular signaling components: Akt kinase increased in the the BS, while β-catenin level was down-regulated in the BS and up-regulated in the LV. We found that the lowering of blood pressure in young SHR can be connected with insulin sensitivity of vessels and that β-catenin and SOD levels are important agents mediating PIO effects in the BS and LV.

  8. Thioredoxin-dependent Redox Regulation of Cellular Signaling and Stress Response through Reversible Oxidation of Methionines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-06-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a common feature of many forms of stress to which plants are exposed. Successful adaptation to changing environmental conditions requires sensitive sensors of ROS such as protein-bound methionines that are converted to their corresponding methionine sulfoxides, which in turn can influence cellular signaling pathways. Such a signaling protein is calmodulin, which represents an early and central point in calcium signaling pathways important to stress response in plants. We describe recent work elucidating fundamental mechanisms of reversible methionine oxidation within calmodulin, including the sensitivity of individual methionines within plant and animal calmodulin to ROS, the structural and functional consequences of their oxidation, and the interactions of oxidized calmodulin with methionine sulfoxide reductase enzymes.

  9. OSTEOPOROSIS AND ALZHEIMER PATHOLOGY: ROLE OF CELLULAR STRESS RESPONSE AND HORMETIC REDOX SIGNALING IN AGING AND BONE REMODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio eCalabrese

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD as well as osteoporosis are multifactorial progressive degenerative disorders characterized by low parenchymal density and microarchitectural deterioration of tissue. Though not referred to as one of the major complications of AD, osteoporosis and hip fracture are commonly observed in patients with AD, however, the mechanisms underlying this association remain poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are generally recognized as intracellular redox signaling molecules involved in the regulation of bone metabolism, including receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation, but they also have cytotoxic effects that include peroxidation of lipids and oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. ROS formation, which is positively implicated in cellular stress response mechanisms, is a highly regulated process controlled by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways which regulate life span across species including vitagenes which are genes involved in preserving cellular homeostasis during stressful conditions. Vitagenes encode for heat shock proteins (Hsp Hsp32, Hsp70, the thioredoxin and the sirtuin protein systems. Dietary antioxidants, have recently been demonstrated to be neuroprotective through the activation of hormetic pathways, including vitagenes. The hormetic dose–response, has the potential to affect significantly the design of pre-clinical studies and clinical trials as well as strategies for optimal patient dosing in the treatment of numerous diseases. Given the broad cytoprotective properties of the heat shock response there is now strong interest in discovering and developing pharmacological agents capable of inducing stress responses. Here we focus on possible signaling mechanisms involved in bone remodeling and activation of vitagenes resulting in enhanced defense against energy and stress resistance homeostasis dysruption with consequent impact on

  10. Cellular Redox Status Regulates Emodin-Induced Radiosensitization of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaxin Hou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report that regulation of cellular redox status is required for radiosensitization of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC cells by emodin. We evaluated emodin’s radiosensitivity-enhancing ability by using NPC cells in vitro and xenografts in vivo. A clonogenic assay was performed to evaluate NPC cell survival and to determine dose modification factors. Flow cytometry, western blot analysis, and in vivo radiation-induced tumor regrowth delay assays were performed to characterize emodin’s effects. Exposure of CNE-1 NPC cells to emodin enhanced their radiosensitivity. HIF-1α expression significantly increased under hypoxic conditions but did not change after treatment with emodin alone. Emodin downregulated mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α. Cells exposed to radiation and emodin underwent significant cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. The percentage of apoptotic cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels were significantly higher in the group exposed to emodin and radiation hypoxic group than in the other groups. Compared to the CNE-1 xenografts exposed to radiation alone, CNE-1 xenografts exposed to radiation with emodin showed significantly enhanced radiation effects. Our data suggest that emodin effectively enhanced the radiosensitivity of CNE-1 cells in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism appears to involve ROS generation and ROS-mediated inhibition of HIF-1α expression.

  11. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition

  12. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L., E-mail: viadimer@illinois.edu [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beaudoin, Jessica N. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hanafin, William P. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); DiLiberto, Stephen J. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kenis, Paul J.A. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rex Gaskins, H. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  13. Deranged Bioenergetics and Defective Redox Capacity in T Lymphocytes and Neutrophils Are Related to Cellular Dysfunction and Increased Oxidative Stress in Patients with Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Jen Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary excretion of N-benzoyl-glycyl-Nε-(hexanonyllysine, a biomarker of oxidative stress, was higher in 26 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE than in 11 non-SLE patients with connective tissue diseases and in 14 healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress in active SLE might be attributable to deranged bioenergetics, defective reduction-oxidation (redox capacity, or other factors. We demonstrated that, compared to normal cells, T lymphocytes (T and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN of active SLE showed defective expression of facilitative glucose transporters GLUT-3 and GLUT-6, which led to increased intracellular basal lactate and decreased ATP production. In addition, the redox capacity, including intracellular GSH levels and the enzyme activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT, was decreased in SLE-T. Compared to normal cells, SLE-PMN showed decreased intracellular GSH levels, and GGT enzyme activity was found in SLE-PMN and enhanced expression of CD53, a coprecipitating molecule for GGT. We conclude that deranged cellular bioenergetics and defective redox capacity in T and PMN are responsible for cellular immune dysfunction and are related to increased oxidative stress in active SLE patients.

  14. Plant redox proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte;

    2011-01-01

    In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox...... PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  15. Healthy aging: regulation of the metabolome by cellular redox modulation and prooxidant signaling systems: the essential roles of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnane, Anthony William; Kios, Michael; Vitetta, Luis

    2007-10-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) has long been proposed as leading to random deleterious modification of macromolecules with an associated progressive development of age associated systemic disease. ROS and RNS formation has been posited as a major contributor to the aging process. On the contrary, this review presents evidence that superoxide anion (and hydrogen peroxide) and nitric oxide (and peroxynitrite) constitute regulated prooxidant second messenger systems, with specific sub-cellular locales of production and are essential for normal metabolome and physiological function. The role of these second messengers in the regulation of the metabolome is discussed in terms of radical formation as an essential contributor to the physiologically normal regulation of sub-cellular bioenergy systems; proteolysis regulation; transcription activation; enzyme activation; mitochondrial DNA changes; redox regulation of metabolism and cell differentiation; the concept that orally administered small molecule antioxidant therapy is a chimera. The formation of superoxide anion/hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide do not conditionally lead to random macromolecular damage; under normal physiological conditions their production is actually regulated consistent with their second messenger roles.

  16. Glucose-dependent anaplerosis in cancer cells is required for cellular redox balance in the absence of glutamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinbas, Naniye Mallı; Sudderth, Jessica; Harris, Robert C.; Cebeci, Aysun; Negri, Gian L.; Yılmaz, Ömer H.; Deberardinis, Ralph J.; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cells have altered metabolism compared to normal cells, including dependence on glutamine (GLN) for survival, known as GLN addiction. However, some cancer cell lines do not require GLN for survival and the basis for this discrepancy is not well understood. GLN is a precursor for antioxidants such as glutathione (GSH) and NADPH, and GLN deprivation is therefore predicted to deplete antioxidants and increase reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using diverse human cancer cell lines we show that this occurs only in cells that rely on GLN for survival. Thus, the preference for GLN as a dominant antioxidant source defines GLN addiction. We show that despite increased glucose uptake, GLN addicted cells do not metabolize glucose via the TCA cycle when GLN is depleted, as revealed by 13C-glucose labeling. In contrast, GLN independent cells can compensate by diverting glucose-derived pyruvate into the TCA cycle. GLN addicted cells exhibit reduced PDH activity, increased PDK1 expression, and PDK inhibition partially rescues GLN starvation-induced ROS and cell death. Finally, we show that combining GLN starvation with pro-oxidants selectively kills GLN addicted cells. These data highlight a major role for GLN in maintaining redox balance in cancer cells that lack glucose-dependent anaplerosis.

  17. 'Venus trapped, Mars transits': Cu and Fe redox chemistry, cellular topography and in situ ligand binding in terrestrial isopod hepatopancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kille, P; Morgan, A J; Powell, K; Mosselmans, J F W; Hart, D; Gunning, P; Hayes, A; Scarborough, D; McDonald, I; Charnock, J M

    2016-03-01

    Woodlice efficiently sequester copper (Cu) in 'cuprosomes' within hepatopancreatic 'S' cells. Binuclear 'B' cells in the hepatopancreas form iron (Fe) deposits; these cells apparently undergo an apocrine secretory diurnal cycle linked to nocturnal feeding. Synchrotron-based µ-focus X-ray spectroscopy undertaken on thin sections was used to characterize the ligands binding Cu and Fe in S and B cells of Oniscus asellus (Isopoda). Main findings were: (i) morphometry confirmed a diurnal B-cell apocrine cycle; (ii) X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping indicated that Cu was co-distributed with sulfur (mainly in S cells), and Fe was co-distributed with phosphate (mainly in B cells); (iii) XRF mapping revealed an intimate morphological relationship between the basal regions of adjacent S and B cells; (iv) molecular modelling and Fourier transform analyses indicated that Cu in the reduced Cu(+) state is mainly coordinated to thiol-rich ligands (Cu-S bond length 2.3 Å) in both cell types, while Fe in the oxidized Fe(3+) state is predominantly oxygen coordinated (estimated Fe-O bond length of approx. 2 Å), with an outer shell of Fe scatterers at approximately 3.05 Å; and (v) no significant differences occur in Cu or Fe speciation at key nodes in the apocrine cycle. Findings imply that S and B cells form integrated unit-pairs; a functional role for secretions from these cellular units in the digestion of recalcitrant dietary components is hypothesized. PMID:26935951

  18. Effects of Methanol Extract of Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis on Atherogenic Indices and Redox Status of Cellular System of Hypercholesterolemic Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatosin Adekunle Adaramoye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of methanol extract of Artocarpus altilis (AA on atherogenic indices and redox status of cellular system of rats fed with dietary cholesterol while Questran (QUE served as standard. Biochemical indices such as total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, low- and high-density lipoproteins-cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C, aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST and ALT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, reduced glutathione, glutathione-s-transferase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and lipid peroxidation (LPO were assessed. Hypercholesterolemic (HC rats had significantly increased relative weight of liver and heart. Dietary cholesterol caused a significant increase (P<0.05 in the levels of serum, hepatic, and cardiac TC by 110%, 70%, and 85%, LDL-C by 79%, 82%, and 176%, and TG by 68%, 96%, and 62%, respectively. Treatment with AA significantly reduced the relative weight of the organs and lipid parameters. There were beneficial increases in serum and cardiac HDL-C levels in HC rats treated with AA. In HC rats, serum LDH, ALT, and AST activities and levels of LPO were increased, whereas hepatic and cardiac SOD, CAT, and GPx were reduced. All biochemical and histological alterations were ameliorated upon treatment with AA. Extract of AA had protective effects against dietary cholesterol-induced hypercholesterolemia.

  19. Redox environment is an intracellular factor to operate distinct pathways for aggregation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki eFurukawa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dominant mutations in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1 cause a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS. Misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 proteins are a pathological hallmark of SOD1-related fALS cases; however, the molecular mechanism of SOD1 aggregation remains controversial. Here, I have used E. coli as a model organism and shown multiple distinct pathways of SOD1 aggregation that are dependent upon its thiol-disulfide status. Overexpression of fALS-mutant SOD1s in the cytoplasm of E. coli BL21 and SHuffleTM, where redox environment is reducing and oxidizing, respectively, resulted in the formation of insoluble aggregates with notable differences; a disulfide bond of SOD1 was completely reduced in BL21 or abnormally formed between SOD1 molecules in SHuffleTM. Depending upon intracellular redox environment, therefore, mutant SOD1 is considered to misfold/aggregate through distinct pathways, which would be relevant in description of the pathological heterogeneity of SOD1-related fALS cases.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis WhiB3 maintains redox homeostasis by regulating virulence lipid anabolism to modulate macrophage response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Singh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic events associated with maintaining redox homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb during infection are poorly understood. Here, we discovered a novel redox switching mechanism by which Mtb WhiB3 under defined oxidizing and reducing conditions differentially modulates the assimilation of propionate into the complex virulence polyketides polyacyltrehaloses (PAT, sulfolipids (SL-1, phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIM, and the storage lipid triacylglycerol (TAG that is under control of the DosR/S/T dormancy system. We developed an in vivo radio-labeling technique and demonstrated for the first time the lipid profile changes of Mtb residing in macrophages, and identified WhiB3 as a physiological regulator of virulence lipid anabolism. Importantly, MtbDeltawhiB3 shows enhanced growth on medium containing toxic levels of propionate, thereby implicating WhiB3 in detoxifying excess propionate. Strikingly, the accumulation of reducing equivalents in MtbDeltawhiB3 isolated from macrophages suggests that WhiB3 maintains intracellular redox homeostasis upon infection, and that intrabacterial lipid anabolism functions as a reductant sink. MtbDeltawhiB3 infected macrophages produce higher levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, indicating that WhiB3-mediated regulation of lipids is required for controlling the innate immune response. Lastly, WhiB3 binds to pks2 and pks3 promoter DNA independent of the presence or redox state of its [4Fe-4S] cluster. Interestingly, reduction of the apo-WhiB3 Cys thiols abolished DNA binding, whereas oxidation stimulated DNA binding. These results confirmed that WhiB3 DNA binding is reversibly regulated by a thiol-disulfide redox switch. These results introduce a new paradigmatic mechanism that describes how WhiB3 facilitates metabolic switching to fatty acids by regulating Mtb lipid anabolism in response to oxido-reductive stress associated with infection, for maintaining redox balance. The link

  1. Calcitriol-copper interaction leads to non enzymatic, reactive oxygen species mediated DNA breakage and modulation of cellular redox scavengers in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Asim; Farhan, Mohd; Naseem, Imrana; Hadi, S M

    2016-09-01

    Calcitriol is the metabolically active form of Vitamin D and is known to kill cancer cells. Using the rat model of DEN induced hepatocellular carcinoma we show that there is a marked increase in cellular levels of copper in hepatocellular carcinoma and that calcitriol-copper interaction leads to reactive oxygen species mediated DNA breakage selectively in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. In vivo studies show that calcitriol selectively induces severe fluctuations in cellular enzymatic and non enzymatic scavengers of reactive oxygen species in the malignant tissue. Lipid peroxidation, a well established marker of oxidative stress, was found to increase, and substantial cellular DNA breakage was observed. We propose that calcitriol is a proxidant in the cellular milieu of hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and this copper mediated prooxidant action of calcitriol causes selective DNA breakage in malignant cells, while sparing normal (non malignant) cells. PMID:27343126

  2. In vivo monitoring of cellular energy metabolism using SoNar, a highly responsive sensor for NAD(+)/NADH redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuzheng; Wang, Aoxue; Zou, Yejun; Su, Ni; Loscalzo, Joseph; Yang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    NADH and its oxidized form NAD(+) have a central role in energy metabolism, and their concentrations are often considered to be among the most important readouts of metabolic state. Here, we present a detailed protocol to image and monitor NAD(+)/NADH redox state in living cells and in vivo using a highly responsive, genetically encoded fluorescent sensor known as SoNar (sensor of NAD(H) redox). The chimeric SoNar protein was initially developed by inserting circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) into the NADH-binding domain of Rex protein from Thermus aquaticus (T-Rex). It functions by binding to either NAD(+) or NADH, thus inducing protein conformational changes that affect its fluorescent properties. We first describe steps for how to establish SoNar-expressing cells, and then discuss how to use the system to quantify the intracellular redox state. This approach is sensitive, accurate, simple and able to report subtle perturbations of various pathways of energy metabolism in real time. We also detail the application of SoNar to high-throughput chemical screening of candidate compounds targeting cell metabolism in a microplate-reader-based assay, along with in vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenografts expressing SoNar in mice. Typically, the approximate time frame for fluorescence imaging of SoNar is 30 min for living cells and 60 min for living mice. For high-throughput chemical screening in a 384-well-plate assay, the whole procedure generally takes no longer than 60 min to assess the effects of 380 compounds on cell metabolism.

  3. Contributions of Open Burning to PM2.5 in Suburban Tokyo and the Impact of Biomass Smoke on Cellular Redox Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushimi, A.; Villalobos, A. M.; Takami, A.; Tanabe, K.; Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Fine atmospheric particles (PM2.5) in suburban Tokyo (Tsukuba), Japan were collected for 24 h every week over the course of a full year (2012-2013) to estimate the source contributions with a focus on open burning of crop residues. Using the quartz fiber filter-collected samples, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), inorganic ionic species, and organic markers were measured. More than 100 organic markers including levoglucosan, a marker of open burning, were measured using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) after derivatization. Using the Teflon filter-collected samples, particulate mass, elements, and biological redox activity using an in-vitro rat alveolar macrophage reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay were measured. The PM2.5 concentrations were higher in February-March and the annual average was 13.6 μg m-3. The EC and OC concentrations were higher in March and September. Levoglucosan concentrations were remarkably higher in fall and winter (September-March) with maximum in November, suggesting enhanced biomass burning contribution. The ROS activity of the PM2.5 (per air volume) was higher in spring (April) and summer (July). PM2.5 sources as estimated by a chemical mass balance model using the organic markers, and relationships of redox activity with chemical species and emission sources will be presented.

  4. Analysis of downregulation of cellular energy demand by 2D measurements of intracapillary HbO2, Hb, pO2, and redox state of cytochromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Alfons; Kessler, Manfred D.; Hoeper, Jens; Zellner, S.; Sourdoulaud, Valerie

    1995-04-01

    Rapid microlightguide spectrometers (EMPHO IIa/b) and a multiwire pO2 electrode are applied for measurements of heterogeneous distribution of tissue oxygenation and redox state of respiratory enzymes in heart and rat liver. Optical and pO2 measurements are noninvasively performed by use of sensors placed on the surface of tissue. Measurements in isolated perfused rat and in dog heart in situ were performed in order to investigate the relation between myocardial oxygenation and function. The tissue monitoring in liver was initiated by optical and polarographic monitoring in the hemoglobin free perfused organ. Subsequently, erythrocytes were added to the perfusate in several steps. The experiments reveal clear evidence that a protective system of tissue is activated when critical pO2 values at the lethal corner of micro vessels fall off a critical threshold around 5 mmHg, thus causing a depletion of oxidative metabolism.

  5. Trichomonas vaginalis: metronidazole and other nitroimidazole drugs are reduced by the flavin enzyme thioredoxin reductase and disrupt the cellular redox system. Implications for nitroimidazole toxicity and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitsch, David; Kolarich, Daniel; Binder, Marina; Stadlmann, Johannes; Altmann, Friedrich; Duchêne, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Infections with the microaerophilic parasite Trichomonas vaginalis are treated with the 5-nitroimidazole drug metronidazole, which is also in use against Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis and microaerophilic/anaerobic bacteria. Here we report that in T. vaginalis the flavin enzyme thioredoxin reductase displays nitroreductase activity with nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, and with the nitrofuran drug furazolidone. Reactive metabolites of metronidazole and other nitroimidazoles form covalent adducts with several proteins that are known or assumed to be associated with thioredoxin-mediated redox regulation, including thioredoxin reductase itself, ribonucleotide reductase, thioredoxin peroxidase and cytosolic malate dehydrogenase. Disulphide reducing activity of thioredoxin reductase was greatly diminished in extracts of metronidazole-treated cells and intracellular non-protein thiol levels were sharply decreased. We generated a highly metronidazole-resistant cell line that displayed only minimal thioredoxin reductase activity, not due to diminished expression of the enzyme but due to the lack of its FAD cofactor. Reduction of free flavins, readily observed in metronidazole-susceptible cells, was also absent in the resistant cells. On the other hand, iron-depleted T. vaginalis cells, expressing only minimal amounts of PFOR and hydrogenosomal malate dehydrogenase, remained fully susceptible to metronidazole. Thus, taken together, our data suggest a flavin-based mechanism of metronidazole activation and thereby challenge the current model of hydrogenosomal activation of nitroimidazole drugs. PMID:19415801

  6. Regulative roles of glutathione reductase and four glutaredoxins in glutathione redox, antioxidant activity, and iron homeostasis of Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long-Bin; Tang, Li; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Multiple glutaredoxins (Grx) and glutathione reductase (Glr) are vital for the thiol-disulfide redox system in budding yeast but generally unexplored in filamentous fungi. Here we characterized the Beauveria bassiana redox system comprising dithiol Grx1, monothiol Grx2-4, Grx-like Grx5, and Glr orthologue. Each grx or glr deletion was compensated by increased transcripts of some other grx genes in normal cultures. Particularly, grx3 compensated the absence of grx1, grx2, grx5, or glr under oxidative stress while its absence was compensated only by undeletable grx4 under normal conditions but by most of other undeleted grx and glr genes in response to menadione. Consequently, the redox state was disturbed in Δglr more than in Δgrx3 but not in Δgrx1/2/5. Superoxide dismutases were more active in normal Δgrx1-3 cultures but less in Δgrx5 or Δglr response to menadione. Total catalase activity increased differentially in all the mutant cultures stressed with or without H2O2 while total peroxidase activity decreased more in the normal or H2O2-stressed culture of Δglr than of Δgrx3. Among the mutants, Δgrx3 showed slightly increased sensitivity to menadione or H2O2; Δglr exhibited greater sensitivity to thiol-oxidizing diamide than thiol-reducing 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as well as increased sensitivity to the two oxidants. Intriguingly, all the mutants grew slower in a Fe(3+)-inclusive medium perhaps due to elevated transcripts of two Fe(3+) transporter genes. More or fewer phenotypes linked with biocontrol potential were altered in four deletion mutants excluding Δgrx5. All the changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Overall, Grx3 played more critical role than other Grx homologues in the Glr-dependent redox system of the fungal entomopathogen. PMID:26969041

  7. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity by protein thiol-disulfide exchange.

    OpenAIRE

    Pettit, F H; Humphreys, J; Reed, L J

    1982-01-01

    Endogenous kinase activity of highly purified pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from bovine kidney is markedly inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and by certain disulfides. Inhibition by disulfides is highly specific and is reversed by thiols. 5,5'-Dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) is the most potent inhibitor, showing significant inhibition at a concentration as low as 1 microM. Cystamine, oxidized glutathione, pantethine, lipoic acid, lipoamide, ergothionine, insulin, oxytocin, and vasopressin were ineffe...

  8. ‘Venus trapped, Mars transits': Cu and Fe redox chemistry, cellular topography and in situ ligand binding in terrestrial isopod hepatopancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kille, P.; Morgan, A. J.; Powell, K.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Hart, D.; Gunning, P.; Hayes, A.; Scarborough, D.; McDonald, I.; Charnock, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Woodlice efficiently sequester copper (Cu) in ‘cuprosomes' within hepatopancreatic ‘S' cells. Binuclear ‘B’ cells in the hepatopancreas form iron (Fe) deposits; these cells apparently undergo an apocrine secretory diurnal cycle linked to nocturnal feeding. Synchrotron-based µ-focus X-ray spectroscopy undertaken on thin sections was used to characterize the ligands binding Cu and Fe in S and B cells of Oniscus asellus (Isopoda). Main findings were: (i) morphometry confirmed a diurnal B-cell apocrine cycle; (ii) X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping indicated that Cu was co-distributed with sulfur (mainly in S cells), and Fe was co-distributed with phosphate (mainly in B cells); (iii) XRF mapping revealed an intimate morphological relationship between the basal regions of adjacent S and B cells; (iv) molecular modelling and Fourier transform analyses indicated that Cu in the reduced Cu+ state is mainly coordinated to thiol-rich ligands (Cu–S bond length 2.3 Å) in both cell types, while Fe in the oxidized Fe3+ state is predominantly oxygen coordinated (estimated Fe–O bond length of approx. 2 Å), with an outer shell of Fe scatterers at approximately 3.05 Å; and (v) no significant differences occur in Cu or Fe speciation at key nodes in the apocrine cycle. Findings imply that S and B cells form integrated unit-pairs; a functional role for secretions from these cellular units in the digestion of recalcitrant dietary components is hypothesized. PMID:26935951

  9. Managing the pools of cellular redox buffers and the control of oxidative stress during the ontogeny of drought-exposed mungbean (Vigna radiata L. – role of sulfur nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser A. Anjum

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of increasing environmental stresses (such as drought on crop productivity can be sustainably minimized by optimizing mineral nutrients (such as sulfur, S. This study, based on a pot-culture experiment conducted in greenhouse condition, investigates S-mediated influence of drought stress (imposed at pre-flowering, flowering and pod-filling stages on growth, photosynthesis and tolerance of mungbean (Vigna radiata L. plants. Drought stress alone hampered photosynthesis functions, enhanced oxidative stress [measured in terms of H2O2; lipid peroxidation (LPO; electrolyte leakage (EL] and decreased the pools of cellular redox buffers (namely ascorbate (AsA; glutathione (GSH], and the overall plant growth (measured as leaf area and plant dry mass, maximally at flowering stage, followed by pre-flowering and pod-filling stages. Contrarily, S-supplementation to drought-affected plants (particularly at flowering stage improved the growth- and photosynthesis-related parameters considerably. This may be ascribed to S-induced enhancements in the pools of reduced AsA and GSH, which jointly manage the balance between the production and scavenging of H2O2 and stabilize cell membrane by decreasing LPO and EL. It is inferred that alleviation of drought-caused oxidative stress depends largely on the status of AsA and GSH via S-application to drought-stressed V. radiata at an appropriate stage of plant growth, when this nutrient is maximally or efficiently utilized.

  10. Vanderbilt University Study Creates New Roadmap for Cellular Activity - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists studying cellular processes have long sought to measure redox modifications because they provide one of the normal layers of cell control. But redox disruption or oxidative stress at the cellular level can also create a pathway to diseases like

  11. Redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celien eLismont

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction-oxidation or ‘redox’ reactions are an integral part of a broad range of cellular processes such as gene expression, energy metabolism, protein import and folding, and autophagy. As many of these processes are intimately linked with cell fate decisions, transient or chronic changes in cellular redox equilibrium are likely to contribute to the initiation and progression of a plethora of human diseases. Since a long time, it is known that mitochondria are major players in redox regulation and signaling. More recently, it has become clear that also peroxisomes have the capacity to impact redox-linked physiological processes. To serve this function, peroxisomes cooperate with other organelles, including mitochondria. This review provides a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about the redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes in mammals. We first outline the pro- and antioxidant systems of both organelles and how they may function as redox signaling nodes. Next, we critically review and discuss emerging evidence that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. Key issues include possible physiological roles, messengers, and mechanisms. We also provide examples of how data mining of publicly-available datasets from ‘omics’ technologies can be a powerful means to gain additional insights into potential redox signaling pathways between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Finally, we highlight the need for more studies that seek to clarify the mechanisms of how mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress. The outcome of such studies may open up exciting new avenues for the community of researchers working on cellular responses to organelle-derived oxidative stress, a research field in which the role of peroxisomes is currently highly underestimated and an issue of

  12. The Redox Proteome*

    OpenAIRE

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2013-01-01

    The redox proteome consists of reversible and irreversible covalent modifications that link redox metabolism to biologic structure and function. These modifications, especially of Cys, function at the molecular level in protein folding and maturation, catalytic activity, signaling, and macromolecular interactions and at the macroscopic level in control of secretion and cell shape. Interaction of the redox proteome with redox-active chemicals is central to macromolecular structure, regulation,...

  13. Redox regulation in cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processe...

  14. Cytoplasmic glutathione redox status determines survival upon exposure to the thiol-oxidant 4,4'-dipyridyl disulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Thorsen, Michael; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C;

    2007-01-01

    Dipyridyl disulfide (DPS) is a highly reactive thiol oxidant that functions as electron acceptor in thiol-disulfide exchange reactions. DPS is very toxic to yeasts, impairing growth at low micromolar concentrations. The genes TRX2 (thioredoxin), SOD1 (superoxide dismutase), GSH1 (gamma-glutamyl-c...... sensitivity. DPS seems to induce a specific disulfide stress, where an increase in the cytoplasmic/nuclear GSSG/GSH ratio results in putative DPS target(s) becoming sensitive to DPS. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-May...

  15. Structural Basis of Redox Signaling in Photosynthesis : Structure and Function of Ferredoxin:thioredoxin Reductase and Target Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Shaodong; Johansson, Kenth; Miginiac-Maslow, Myroslawa; Schürmann, Peter; Eklund, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The role of the ferredoxin:thioredoxin system in the reversible light activation of chloroplast enzymes by thiol-disulfide interchange with thioredoxins is now well established. Recent fruitful collaboration between biochemists and structural biologists, reflected by the shared authorship of the paper, allowed to solve the structures of all of the components of the system, including several target enzymes, thus providing a structural basis for the elucidation of the activation mechanism at a ...

  16. Genetically encoded reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouvreau, Sandrine

    2014-02-01

    Redox processes are increasingly being recognized as key elements in the regulation of cellular signaling cascades. They are frequently encountered at the frontier between physiological functions and pathological events. The biological relevance of intracellular redox changes depends on the subcellular origin, the spatio-temporal distribution and the redox couple involved. Thus, a key task in the elucidation of the role of redox reactions is the specific and quantitative measurement of redox conditions with high spatio-temporal resolution. Unfortunately, until recently, our ability to perform such measurements was limited by the lack of adequate technology. Over the last 10 years, promising imaging tools have been developed from fluorescent proteins. Genetically encoded reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox indicators (GERRIs) have the potential to allow real-time and pseudo-quantitative monitoring of specific ROS and thiol redox state in subcellular compartments or live organisms. Redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent proteins (rxYFP family), redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFP family), HyPer (a probe designed to measure H2 O2 ), circularly permuted YFP and others have been used in several models and sufficient information has been collected to highlight their main characteristics. This review is intended to be a tour guide of the main types of GERRIs, their origins, properties, advantages and pitfalls.

  17. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Ursini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve “reactive oxygen species” rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles

  18. Measuring intracellular redox conditions using GFP-based sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Ostergaard, Henrik; Winther, Jakob R

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen the development of methods for analyzing the redox conditions in specific compartments in living cells. These methods are based on genetically encoded sensors comprising variants of Green Fluorescent Protein in which vicinal cysteine residues have been introduced at solvent......-exposed positions. Several mutant forms have been identified in which formation of a disulfide bond between these cysteine residues results in changes of their fluorescence properties. The redox sensors have been characterized biochemically and found to behave differently, both spectroscopically and in terms...... of redox properties. As genetically encoded sensors they can be expressed in living cells and used for analysis of intracellular redox conditions; however, which parameters are measured depends on how the sensors interact with various cellular redox components. Results of both biochemical and cell...

  19. Chloroplast Redox Poise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steccanella, Verdiana

    The redox state of the chloroplast is maintained by a delicate balance between energy production and consumption and is affected by the need to avoid increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox power and ROS generated in the chloroplast are essential for maintaining physiological...... metabolic pathways and for optimizing chloroplast functions. The redox poise of photosynthetic electron transport components like plastoquinone is crucial to initiate signaling cascades and might also be involved in key biosynthetic pathways such as chlorophyll biosynthesis. We, therefore, explored...

  20. Thioredoxin/Txnip: Redoxisome, As a Redox Switch for the Pathogenesis of Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji eYoshihara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past few decades, it has been widely recognized that reducing-oxidizing (Redox responses occurring at the intra- and extra-cellular levels are one of most important biological phenomena and dysregulated redox responses are involved in the initiation and progression of multiple diseases. Thioredoxin 1 (Trx1 and Thioredoxin 2 (Trx2, mainly located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria, respectively, are ubiquitously expressed in variety of cells and control cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS by reducing the disulfides into thiol groups. Thioredoxin interacting protein (Txnip/TBP-2/VDUP1 directly binds to Trx1 & Trx2 (Trx and inhibit the reducing activity of Trx through their disulfide exchange. Recent studies have revealed that Trx1 and Txnip are involved in some critical redox-dependent signal pathways including NLRP3 inflammasome activation in a redox-dependent manner. Therefore, Trx/Txnip, a redox-sensitive signaling complex is a regulator of cellular redox status and has emerged as a key component in the link between redox-regulation and the pathogenesis of diseases. Here, we review the novel functional concept of the redox-related protein complex, named Redoxisome, consisting of Trx/Txnip, as a critical regulator for intra- and extra-cellular redox signaling, involved in the pathogenesis of various diseases such as cancer, autoimmune disease, and diabetes.

  1. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested. PMID:26593894

  2. Identification of redox-sensitive cysteines in the arabidopsis proteome using OxiTRAQ, a quantitative redox proteomics method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Pei

    2014-01-28

    Cellular redox status plays a key role in mediating various physiological and developmental processes often through modulating activities of redox-sensitive proteins. Various stresses trigger over-production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species which lead to oxidative modifications of redox-sensitive proteins. Identification and characterization of redox-sensitive proteins are important steps toward understanding molecular mechanisms of stress responses. Here, we report a high-throughput quantitative proteomic approach termed OxiTRAQ for identifying proteins whose thiols undergo reversible oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells subjected to oxidative stress. In this approach, a biotinylated thiol-reactive reagent is used for differential labeling of reduced and oxidized thiols. The biotin-tagged peptides are affinity purified, labeled with iTRAQ reagents, and analyzed using a paralleled HCD-CID fragmentation mode in an LTQ-Orbitrap. With this approach, we identified 195 cysteine-containing peptides from 179 proteins whose thiols underwent oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells following the treatment with hydrogen peroxide. A majority of those redox-sensitive proteins, including several transcription factors, were not identified by previous redox proteomics studies. This approach allows identification of the specific redox-regulated cysteine residues, and offers an effective tool for elucidation of redox proteomes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Redox Regulation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Parakh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease that results from the death of upper and lower motor neurons. Due to a lack of effective treatment, it is imperative to understand the underlying mechanisms and processes involved in disease progression. Regulations in cellular reduction/oxidation (redox processes are being increasingly implicated in disease. Here we discuss the possible involvement of redox dysregulation in the pathophysiology of ALS, either as a cause of cellular abnormalities or a consequence. We focus on its possible role in oxidative stress, protein misfolding, glutamate excitotoxicity, lipid peroxidation and cholesterol esterification, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired axonal transport and neurofilament aggregation, autophagic stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. We also speculate that an ER chaperone protein disulphide isomerase (PDI could play a key role in this dysregulation. PDI is essential for normal protein folding by oxidation and reduction of disulphide bonds, and hence any disruption to this process may have consequences for motor neurons. Addressing the mechanism underlying redox regulation and dysregulation may therefore help to unravel the molecular mechanism involved in ALS.

  4. Tuning of redox regulatory mechanisms, reactive oxygen species and redox homeostasis under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain eSazzad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a crucial environmental constraint which limits biomass production at many sites on a global scale. Saline growth conditions cause osmotic and ionic imbalances, oxidative stress and perturb metabolism, e.g. the photosynthetic electron flow. The plant ability to tolerate salinity is determined by multiple biochemical and physiological mechanisms protecting cell functions, in particular by regulating proper water relations and maintaining ion homeostasis. Redox homeostasis is a fundamental cell property. Its regulation includes control of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, sensing deviation from and readjustment of the cellular redox state. All these redox related functions have been recognized as decisive factors in salinity acclimation and adaptation. This review focuses on the core response of plants to overcome the challenges of salinity stress through regulation of ROS generation and detoxification systems and to maintain redox homeostasis. Emphasis is given to the role of NADH oxidase (RBOH, alternative oxidase (AOX, the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX and the malate valve with the malate dehydrogenase isoforms under salt stress. Overwhelming evidence assigns an essential auxiliary function of ROS and redox homeostasis to salinity acclimation of plants.

  5. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  6. Annexin A2: the importance of being redox sensitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Patrícia A; Waisman, David M

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is an important second messenger in cellular signal transduction. H(2)O(2)-dependent signalling regulates many cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Nevertheless, H(2)O(2) is an oxidant and a major contributor to DNA damage, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, which can ultimately result in cell death and/or tumourigenesis. For this reason, cells have developed complex antioxidant systems to scavenge ROS. Recently, our laboratory identified the protein, annexin A2, as a novel cellular redox regulatory protein. Annexin A2 possesses a reactive cysteine residue (Cys-8) that is readily oxidized by H(2)O(2) and subsequently reduced by the thioredoxin system, thereby enabling annexin A2 to participate in multiple redox cycles. Thus, a single molecule of annexin A2 can inactivate several molecules of H(2)O(2). In this report, we will review the studies detailing the reactivity of annexin A2 thiols and the importance of these reactive cysteine(s) in regulating annexin A2 structure and function. We will also focus on the recent reports that establish novel functions for annexin A2, namely as a protein reductase and as a cellular redox regulatory protein. We will further discuss the importance of annexin A2 redox regulatory function in disease, with a particular focus on tumour progression.

  7. Annexin A2: The Importance of Being Redox Sensitive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia A. Madureira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is an important second messenger in cellular signal transduction. H2O2-dependent signalling regulates many cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Nevertheless, H2O2 is an oxidant and a major contributor to DNA damage, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, which can ultimately result in cell death and/or tumourigenesis. For this reason, cells have developed complex antioxidant systems to scavenge ROS. Recently, our laboratory identified the protein, annexin A2, as a novel cellular redox regulatory protein. Annexin A2 possesses a reactive cysteine residue (Cys-8 that is readily oxidized by H2O2 and subsequently reduced by the thioredoxin system, thereby enabling annexin A2 to participate in multiple redox cycles. Thus, a single molecule of annexin A2 can inactivate several molecules of H2O2. In this report, we will review the studies detailing the reactivity of annexin A2 thiols and the importance of these reactive cysteine(s in regulating annexin A2 structure and function. We will also focus on the recent reports that establish novel functions for annexin A2, namely as a protein reductase and as a cellular redox regulatory protein. We will further discuss the importance of annexin A2 redox regulatory function in disease, with a particular focus on tumour progression.

  8. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Adam Z.

    2013-01-01

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  9. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  10. Influence of extra-cellular and intra-cellular acting thiol oxidants on the 45calcium uptake by the islets of Langerhans of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glucose-stimulated calcium uptake by the islets of Langerhans is dependent on the intra-cellular GSH/GSSG ratios. The inhibition of calcium uptake is not the consequence of a direct oxidation of membrane-fixed thiol groups. In contrast, direct oxidation of extra cellular thiols leads to an increase in calcium uptake when intra-cellular oxidation is simultaneously prevented. Since this effect only occurs at high intra-cellular GSH/GSSG ratios it can be assumed that the redox state of extra-cellular thiols is dependent on the redox state of the intra-cellular GSH/GSSG ratios. These findings support the theory that the oxidation of extra-cellular thiols by thiol oxidants leads to an increase in calcium uptake and that the extent of uptake is higher, the more the redox state of the extra-cellular thiols tends towards the reduced state prior to oxidation. (orig./MG)

  11. Reengineering redox sensitive GFP to measure mycothiol redox potential of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Ashima; Chawla, Manbeena; Mehta, Mansi; Parikh, Pankti; Chandra, Pallavi; Bhave, Devayani; Kumar, Dhiraj; Carroll, Kate S; Singh, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives under oxidatively hostile environments encountered inside host phagocytes. To protect itself from oxidative stress, Mtb produces millimolar concentrations of mycothiol (MSH), which functions as a major cytoplasmic redox buffer. Here, we introduce a novel system for real-time imaging of mycothiol redox potential (EMSH ) within Mtb cells during infection. We demonstrate that coupling of Mtb MSH-dependent oxidoreductase (mycoredoxin-1; Mrx1) to redox-sensitive GFP (roGFP2; Mrx1-roGFP2) allowed measurement of dynamic changes in intramycobacterial EMSH with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Using Mrx1-roGFP2, we report the first quantitative measurements of EMSH in diverse mycobacterial species, genetic mutants, and drug-resistant patient isolates. These cellular studies reveal, for the first time, that the environment inside macrophages and sub-vacuolar compartments induces heterogeneity in EMSH of the Mtb population. Further application of this new biosensor demonstrates that treatment of Mtb infected macrophage with anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs induces oxidative shift in EMSH , suggesting that the intramacrophage milieu and antibiotics cooperatively disrupt the MSH homeostasis to exert efficient Mtb killing. Lastly, we analyze the membrane integrity of Mtb cells with varied EMSH during infection and show that subpopulation with higher EMSH are susceptible to clinically relevant antibiotics, whereas lower EMSH promotes antibiotic tolerance. Together, these data suggest the importance of MSH redox signaling in modulating mycobacterial survival following treatment with anti-TB drugs. We anticipate that Mrx1-roGFP2 will be a major contributor to our understanding of redox biology of Mtb and will lead to novel strategies to target redox metabolism for controlling Mtb persistence. PMID:24497832

  12. Redox mechanisms in hepatic chronic wound healing and fibrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novo Erica

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS generated within cells or, more generally, in a tissue environment, may easily turn into a source of cell and tissue injury. Aerobic organisms have developed evolutionarily conserved mechanisms and strategies to carefully control the generation of ROS and other oxidative stress-related radical or non-radical reactive intermediates (that is, to maintain redox homeostasis, as well as to 'make use' of these molecules under physiological conditions as tools to modulate signal transduction, gene expression and cellular functional responses (that is, redox signalling. However, a derangement in redox homeostasis, resulting in sustained levels of oxidative stress and related mediators, can play a significant role in the pathogenesis of major human diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, chronic activation of wound healing and tissue fibrogenesis. This review has been designed to first offer a critical introduction to current knowledge in the field of redox research in order to introduce readers to the complexity of redox signalling and redox homeostasis. This will include ready-to-use key information and concepts on ROS, free radicals and oxidative stress-related reactive intermediates and reactions, sources of ROS in mammalian cells and tissues, antioxidant defences, redox sensors and, more generally, the major principles of redox signalling and redox-dependent transcriptional regulation of mammalian cells. This information will serve as a basis of knowledge to introduce the role of ROS and other oxidative stress-related intermediates in contributing to essential events, such as the induction of cell death, the perpetuation of chronic inflammatory responses, fibrogenesis and much more, with a major focus on hepatic chronic wound healing and liver fibrogenesis.

  13. Redox theory of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean P. Jones

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Metazoan genomes encode exposure memory systems to enhance survival and reproductive potential by providing mechanisms for an individual to adjust during lifespan to environmental resources and challenges. These systems are inherently redox networks, arising during evolution of complex systems with O2 as a major determinant of bioenergetics, metabolic and structural organization, defense, and reproduction. The network structure decreases flexibility from conception onward due to differentiation and cumulative responses to environment (exposome. The redox theory of aging is that aging is a decline in plasticity of genome–exposome interaction that occurs as a consequence of execution of differentiation and exposure memory systems. This includes compromised mitochondrial and bioenergetic flexibility, impaired food utilization and metabolic homeostasis, decreased barrier and defense capabilities and loss of reproductive fidelity and fecundity. This theory accounts for hallmarks of aging, including failure to maintain oxidative or xenobiotic defenses, mitochondrial integrity, proteostasis, barrier structures, DNA repair, telomeres, immune function, metabolic regulation and regenerative capacity.

  14. Microfluidic redox battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-01

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications. PMID:23712370

  15. Microfluidic redox battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-01

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  16. Ediacaran Redox Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jiang, G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Kendall, B.; Owens, J. D.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for pervasive oxic conditions, and likely even deep ocean oxygenation has been documented at three intervals in the lower (ca. 632 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma) and upper (ca. 551 Ma) Ediacaran. The Doushantuo Formation in South China hosts large enrichments of redox-sensitive trace element (e.g., molybdenum, vanadium and uranium) in anoxic shales, which are indicative of a globally oxic ocean-atmosphere system. However, ocean redox conditions between these periods continue to be a topic of debate and remain elusive. We have found evidence for widespread anoxic conditions through much of the Ediacaran in the deep-water Wuhe section in South China. During most of the Ediacaran-early Cambrian in basinal sections is characterized by Fe speciation data and pyrite morphologies that indicate deposition under euxinic conditions with near-crustal enrichments of redox-sensitive element and positive pyrite-sulfur isotope values, which suggest low levels of marine sulfate and widespread euxinia. Our work reinforces an emerging view that the early Earth, including the Ediacaran, underwent numerous rises and falls in surface oxidation state, rather than a unidirectional rise as originally imagined. The Ediacaran ocean thus experienced repetitive expansion and contraction of marine chalcophilic trace-metal levels that may have had fundamental impact on the slow evolution of early animals and ecosystems. Further, this framework forces us to re-examine the relationship between Neoproterozoic oxygenation and metazoan diversification. Varying redox conditions through the Cryogenian and Ediacaran may help explain molecular clock and biomarker evidence for an early appearance and initial diversification of metazoans but with a delay in the appearance of most major metazoan crown groups until close to Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

  17. Characterisation of the Redox Sensitive NMDA Receptor

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Ohood

    2016-05-01

    Glucose entry into the brain and its subsequent metabolism to L-lactate, regulated by astrocytes, plays a major role in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. A recent study has shown that L-lactate produced by the brain upon stimulation of glycolysis, and glycogen-derived L-lactate from astrocytes and its transport into neurons, is crucial for memory formation. A recent study revealed the molecular mechanisms that underlie the role of L-lactate in neuronal plasticity and long-term memory formation. L-lactate was shown to induce a cascade of molecular events via modulation of redox-sensitive N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity that was mimicked by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydride (NADH) co-enzyme. This indicated that changes in cellular redox state, following L-lactate transport inside the cells and its subsequent metabolism, production of NADH, and favouring a reduced state are the key effects of L-lactate. Therefore, we are investigating the role of L-lactate in modulating NMDA receptor function via redox modulatory sites. Accordingly, crucial redox-sensitive cysteine residues, Cys320 and Cys87, of the NR2A NMDA receptor subunit are mutated using site-directed mutation, transfected, and expressed in HEK293 cells. This cellular system will then be used to characterise and monitor its activity upon Llactate stimulation, compared to the wild type. This will be achieved by calcium imaging, using fluorescent microscopy. Our data shows that L-lactate potentiated NMDA receptor activity and increased intracellular calcium influx in NR1/NR2A wild type compared to the control condition (WT NR1/NR2A perfused with (1μM) glutamate and (1μM) glycine agonist only), showing faster response initiation and slower decay rate of the calcium signal to the baseline. Additionally, stimulating with L-lactate associated with greater numbers of cells having high fluorescent intensity (peak amplitude) compared to the control. Furthermore, L-lactate rescued the

  18. Modulation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar motility by redox poise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; King, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Redox-based regulatory systems are essential for many cellular activities. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits alterations in motile behavior in response to different light conditions (photokinesis). We hypothesized that photokinesis is signaled by variations in cytoplasmic redox poise resulting from changes in chloroplast activity. We found that this effect requires photosystem I, which generates reduced NADPH. We also observed that photokinetic changes in beat frequency and duration of the photophobic response could be obtained by altering oxidative/reductive stress. Analysis of reactivated cell models revealed that this redox poise effect is mediated through the outer dynein arms (ODAs). Although the global redox state of the thioredoxin-related ODA light chains LC3 and LC5 and the redox-sensitive Ca2+-binding subunit of the docking complex DC3 did not change upon light/dark transitions, we did observe significant alterations in their interactions with other flagellar components via mixed disulfides. These data indicate that redox poise directly affects ODAs and suggest that it may act in the control of flagellar motility. PMID:16754958

  19. A fluorescent probe which allows highly specific thiol labeling at low pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jonas W.; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Hansen, Rosa E.;

    2012-01-01

    Determination of the thiol-disulfide status in biological systems is challenging as redox pools are easily perturbed during sample preparation. This is particularly pertinent under neutral to mildly alkaline conditions typically required for alkylation of thiols. Here we describe the synthesis...

  20. Redox Changes during the Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christine Chang; Isabelle Damiani; Alain Puppo; Pierre Frendol

    2009-01-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are continuously produced as a result of aerobic metabolism or in response to biotic and abiotic stresses.ROS are not only toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism,but are also signaling molecules involved in plant growth and environmental adaptation.Antioxidants can protect the cell from oxidative damage by scav-enging the ROS.Thus,they play an important role in optimizing cell function by regulating cellular redox state and mod-ifying gene expression.This article aims to review recent studies highlighting the role of redox signals in establishing and maintaining symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes.

  1. Redox Regulation in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and ROS-dependent (redox regulation signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processes are strongly associated with human diseases including many cancers. ROS levels are elevated in cancer cells partially due to their higher metabolism rate. In the past 15 years, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs has been gaining ground as the subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties and characteristics have been identified in various cancers. CSCs possess low levels of ROS and are responsible for cancer recurrence after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, how CSCs control ROS production and scavenging and how ROS-dependent signaling pathways contribute to CSCs function remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the role of redox balance, especially in ROS-dependent cellular processes in cancer stem cells (CSCs. We updated recent advances in our understanding of ROS generation and elimination in CSCs and their effects on CSC self-renewal and differentiation through modulating signaling pathways and transcriptional activities. The review concludes that targeting CSCs by manipulating ROS metabolism/dependent pathways may be an effective approach for improving cancer treatment.

  2. Cellular Telephone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨周

    1996-01-01

    Cellular phones, used in automobiles, airliners, and passenger trains, are basically low-power radiotelephones. Calls go through radio transmitters that are located within small geographical units called cells. Because each cell’s signals are too weak to interfere with those of other cells operating on the same fre-

  3. 1,4-Naphthoquinones: From Oxidative Damage to Cellular and Inter-Cellular Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars-Oliver Klotz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Naphthoquinones may cause oxidative stress in exposed cells and, therefore, affect redox signaling. Here, contributions of redox cycling and alkylating properties of quinones (both natural and synthetic, such as plumbagin, juglone, lawsone, menadione, methoxy-naphthoquinones, and others to cellular and inter-cellular signaling processes are discussed: (i naphthoquinone-induced Nrf2-dependent modulation of gene expression and its potentially beneficial outcome; (ii the modulation of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor by naphthoquinones, resulting in altered gap junctional intercellular communication. Generation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of redox signaling are properties of naphthoquinones that render them interesting leads for the development of novel compounds of potential use in various therapeutic settings.

  4. Direct electrochemistry of redox proteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heering, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the project was to obtain more detailed insight in interactions between redox proteins and solid electrodes and the mechanisms of electron transfer. In addition to this, the influence of the protein environment on the redox properties of the active site and the possible influence of the

  5. Characterization of plasma thiol redox potential in a common marmoset model of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Roede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its short lifespan, ease of use and age-related pathologies that mirror those observed in humans, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus is poised to become a standard nonhuman primate model of aging. Blood and extracellular fluid possess two major thiol-dependent redox nodes involving cysteine (Cys, cystine (CySS, glutathione (GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG. Alteration in these plasma redox nodes significantly affects cellular physiology, and oxidation of the plasma Cys/CySS redox potential (EhCySS is associated with aging and disease risk in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine age-related changes in plasma redox metabolites and corresponding redox potentials (Eh to further validate the marmoset as a nonhuman primate model of aging. We measured plasma thiol redox states in marmosets and used existing human data with multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS to model the relationships between age and redox metabolites. A classification accuracy of 70.2% and an AUC of 0.703 were achieved using the MARS model built from the marmoset redox data to classify the human samples as young or old. These results show that common marmosets provide a useful model for thiol redox biology of aging.

  6. Extracellular Cysteine in Connexins: Role as Redox Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; García, Isaac E.; Pinto, Bernardo I.; Pupo, Amaury; Báez, David; Stehberg, Jimmy; Del Rio, Rodrigo; González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Connexin-based channels comprise hemichannels and gap junction channels. The opening of hemichannels allow for the flux of ions and molecules from the extracellular space into the cell and vice versa. Similarly, the opening of gap junction channels permits the diffusional exchange of ions and molecules between the cytoplasm and contacting cells. The controlled opening of hemichannels has been associated with several physiological cellular processes; thereby unregulated hemichannel activity may induce loss of cellular homeostasis and cell death. Hemichannel activity can be regulated through several mechanisms, such as phosphorylation, divalent cations and changes in membrane potential. Additionally, it was recently postulated that redox molecules could modify hemichannels properties in vitro. However, the molecular mechanism by which redox molecules interact with hemichannels is poorly understood. In this work, we discuss the current knowledge on connexin redox regulation and we propose the hypothesis that extracellular cysteines could be important for sensing changes in redox potential. Future studies on this topic will offer new insight into hemichannel function, thereby expanding the understanding of the contribution of hemichannels to disease progression. PMID:26858649

  7. Modulation of the matrix redox signaling by mitochondrial Ca2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime; Santo-Domingo; Andreas; Wiederkehr; Umberto; De; Marchi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria sense,shape and integrate signals,and thus function as central players in cellular signal transduction. Ca2+ waves and redox reactions are two such intracellular signals modulated by mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca2+ transport is of utmost physio-pathological relevance with a strong impact on metabolism and cell fate. Despite its importance,the molecular nature of the proteins involvedin mitochondrial Ca2+ transport has been revealed only recently. Mitochondrial Ca2+ promotes energy metabolism through the activation of matrix dehydrogenases and downstream stimulation of the respiratory chain. These changes also alter the mitochondrial NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio,but at the same time will increase reactive oxygen species(ROS) production. Reducing equivalents and ROS are having opposite effects on the mitochondrial redox state,which are hard to dissect. With the recent development of genetically encoded mitochondrial-targeted redoxsensitive sensors,real-time monitoring of matrix thiol redox dynamics has become possible. The discoveries of the molecular nature of mitochondrial transporters of Ca2+ combined with the utilization of the novel redox sensors is shedding light on the complex relation between mitochondrial Ca2+ and redox signals and their impact on cell function. In this review,we describe mitochondrial Ca2+ handling,focusing on a number of newly identified proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and release. We further discuss our recent findings,revealing how mitochondrial Ca2+ influences the matrix redox state. As a result,mitochondrial Ca2+ is able to modulate the many mitochondrial redox-regulated processes linked to normal physiology and disease.

  8. Redox and zinc signalling pathways converging on protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, Elisa; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Zinc ions, though redox-inert, have either pro-antioxidant or pro-oxidant functions at critical junctures in redox metabolism and redox signalling. They are released from cells and in cells, e.g. from metallothionein, a protein that transduces redox signals into zinc signals (1). The released zinc ions inhibit enzymes such as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), key regulatory enzymes of cellular phosphorylation signalling. The Ki(Zn) value for inhibition of receptor PTPB is 21pM (2). The binding is about as tight as the binding of zinc to zinc metalloenzymes and suggests tonic zinc inhibition. PTP1-B (PTPN1), an enzyme regulating the insulin and leptin receptors and involved in cancer and diabetes pathobiochemistry, has a Ki(Zn) value of about 5nM (3). Zinc ions bind to the enzyme in the closed conformation when additional metal-binding ligands are brought into the vicinity of the active site. In contrast, redox reactions target cysteines in the active sites of PTPs in the open conformation. This work provides a molecular basis how hydrogen peroxide and free zinc ions generated by growth factor signalling stimulate phosphorylation signalling differentially. (Supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council UK, grant BB/K001442/1.). PMID:26461422

  9. Vegetarian diets and public health: biomarker and redox connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzie, Iris F F; Wachtel-Galor, Sissi

    2010-11-15

    Vegetarian diets are rich in antioxidant phytochemicals. However, they may not act as antioxidants in vivo, and yet still have important signaling and regulatory functions. Some may act as pro-oxidants, modulating cellular redox tone and oxidizing redox sensitive sites. In this review, evidence for health benefits of vegetarian diets is presented from different perspectives: epidemiological, biomarker, evolutionary, and public health, as well as antioxidant. From the perspective of molecular connections between diet and health, evidence of a role for plasma ascorbic acid as a biomarker for future disease risk is presented. Basic concepts of redox-based cell signaling are presented, and effects of antioxidant phytochemicals on signaling, especially via redox tone, sulfur switches and the Antioxidant Response Element (ARE), are explored. Sufficient scientific evidence exists for public health policy to promote a plant-rich diet for health promotion. This does not need to wait for science to provide all the answers as to why and how. However, action and interplay of dietary antioxidants in the nonequilibrium systems that control redox balance, cell signaling, and cell function provide rich ground for research to advance understanding of orthomolecular nutrition and provide science-based evidence to advance public health in our aging population. PMID:20222825

  10. Redox Regulation of the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Yingying Han; Qilong Wang; Ping Song; Yi Zhu; Ming-Hui Zou

    2010-01-01

    Redox state is a critical determinant of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death. Objectives The aim of this study is to determine if AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a cellular energy sensor, is activated by oxidants generated by Berberine in endothelial cells (EC). Methods Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were exposed to Berberine. AMPK activity and reactive oxygen species were monitored after the incubation. Results In BAEC, Berberine caused a dos...

  11. Redox Control of Multidrug Resistance and Its Possible Modulation by Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Aysegul Cort; Tomris Ozben; Luciano Saso; Chiara De Luca; Liudmila Korkina

    2016-01-01

    Clinical efficacy of anticancer chemotherapies is dramatically hampered by multidrug resistance (MDR) dependent on inherited traits, acquired defence against toxins, and adaptive mechanisms mounting in tumours. There is overwhelming evidence that molecular events leading to MDR are regulated by redox mechanisms. For example, chemotherapeutics which overrun the first obstacle of redox-regulated cellular uptake channels (MDR1, MDR2, and MDR3) induce a concerted action of phase I/II metabolic en...

  12. Analysis of the redox oscillations in the circadian clockwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, Nikolay B.; Rey, Guillaume; Valekunja, Utham K.; Edgar, Rachel S.; O’Neill, John S.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of tight coupling between the circadian system and redox homeostasis of the cell has been proposed to coincide roughly with the appearance of the first aerobic organisms, around 3 billion years ago. The rhythmic production of oxygen and its effect on core metabolism are thought to have exerted selective pressure for the temporal segregation of numerous metabolic pathways. Until recently, the only evidence for such coupling came from studies showing circadian cycles in the abundance of various redox metabolites, with many arguing that these oscillations are simply an output from the transcription/translation-feedback loop (TTFL). The recent discovery that the peroxiredoxin (PRX) proteins exhibit circadian cycles in their oxidation status, even in the absence of transcription, demonstrated the existence of autonomous oscillations in the redox status of the cell. The PRXs are a family of cellular thiol peroxidases whose abundance and high reaction rate make them the major cellular sink for cellular peroxides. Interestingly, as part of the normal catalytic cycle, PRXs become inactivated by their own substrate via over-oxidation of the catalytic residue, with the inactivated form of the enzyme displaying circadian accumulation. Here, we describe the biochemical properties of the PRX system, with particular emphasis on the features important for the experimental analysis of these enzymes. We will also present a detailed protocol for measuring PRX over-oxidation across circadian time in adherent cell cultures, red blood cells and fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), providing practical suggestions for ensuring consistency and reproducibility of the results. PMID:25707278

  13. Redox control of calcium channels: from mechanisms to therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hool, Livia C; Corry, Ben

    2007-04-01

    Calcium plays an integral role in cellular function. It is a well-recognized second messenger necessary for signaling cellular responses, but in excessive amounts can be deleterious to function, causing cell death. The main route by which calcium enters the cytoplasm is either from the extracellular compartment or internal addistores via calcium channels. There is good evidence that calcium channels can respond to pharmacological compounds that reduce or oxidize thiol groups on the channel protein. In addition, reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide that can mediate oxidative pathology also mediate changes in channel function via alterations of thiol groups. This review looks at the structure and function of calcium channels, the evidence that changes in cellular redox state mediate changes in channel function, and the role of redox modification of channels in disease processes. Understanding how redox modification of the channel protein alters channel structure and function is providing leads for the design of therapeutic interventions that target oxidative stress responses.

  14. A new hybrid redox flow battery with multiple redox couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Luo, Qingtao; Shao, Yuyan; Wei, Xiaoliang; Chen, Feng; Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-10-01

    A redox flow battery using V4+/V5+ vs. V2+/V3+ and Fe2+/Fe3+ vs. V2+/V3+ redox couples in chloric/sulfuric mixed acid supporting electrolyte was investigated for potential stationary energy storage applications. The Fe/V hybrid redox flow cell using mixed reactant solutions and operated within a voltage window of 0.5-1.7 V demonstrated stable cycling over 100 cycles with energy efficiency ˜80% and negligible capacity fading at room temperature. A 66% improvement in the energy density of the Fe/V hybrid cell was achieved compared with the previously reported Fe/V cell using only Fe2+/Fe3+ vs. V2+/V3+ redox couples.

  15. Thiol chemistry and specificity in redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2008-09-01

    Exposure of cells to sublethal oxidative stress results in the modulation of various signaling pathways. Oxidants can activate and inactivate transcription factors, membrane channels, and metabolic enzymes, and regulate calcium-dependent and phosphorylation signaling pathways. Oxidation and reduction of thiol proteins are thought to be the major mechanisms by which reactive oxidants integrate into cellular signal transduction pathways. This review focuses on mechanisms for sensing and transmitting redox signals, from the perspective of their chemical reactivity with specific oxidants. We discuss substrate preferences for different oxidants and how the kinetics of these reactions determines how each oxidant will react in a cell. This kinetic approach helps to identify initial oxidant-sensitive targets and elucidate mechanisms involved in transmission of redox signals. It indicates that only those proteins with very high reactivity, such as peroxiredoxins, are likely to be direct targets for hydrogen peroxide. Other more modestly reactive thiol proteins such as protein tyrosine phosphatases are more likely to become oxidized by an indirect mechanism. The review also examines oxidative changes observed during receptor-mediated signaling, the strengths and limitations of detection methods for reactive oxidant production, and the evidence for hydrogen peroxide acting as the second messenger. We discuss areas where observations in cell systems can be rationalized with the reactivity of specific oxidants and where further work is needed to understand the mechanisms involved.

  16. Redox characterization of functioning skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eZuo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle physiology is influenced by the presence of chemically reactive molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS. These molecules regulate multiple redox-sensitive signaling pathways that play a critical role in cellular processes including gene expression and protein modification. While ROS have gained much attention for their harmful effects in muscle fatigue and dysfunction, research has also shown ROS to facilitate muscle adaptation after stressors such as physical exercise. This manuscript aims to provide a comprehensive review of the current understanding of redox signaling in skeletal muscle. ROS-induced oxidative stress and its role in the aging process are discussed. Mitochondria have been shown to generate large amounts of ROS during muscular contractions, and thus are susceptible to oxidative stress. ROS can modify proteins located in the mitochondrial membrane leading to cell death and osmotic swelling. ROS also contribute to the necrosis and inflammation of muscle fibers that is associated with muscular diseases including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. It is imperative that future research continues to investigate the exact role of ROS in normal skeletal muscle function as well as muscular dysfunction and disease.

  17. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  18. [Redox-sensors of microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushchak, V I

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes available literature data on the existence and operation of redox sensors of microorganisms. It is partially focused on the activation by hyrdrogen peroxide OxyR protein and by superoxide anion SoxR protein in bacteria Escherichia coli and the activation by hyrdrogen peroxide and superoxide anion of Orp1-Yap1 protein system in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The similarities and peculiarities of redox signal sensing in pro- and eukaryotes have been discussed. PMID:19140447

  19. Developments in redox flow batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Tangirala, Ravichandra

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of the electrochemistry principles, technology, construction and composition of the electrode materials, electrolyte and additives used in redox flow batteries. The aim was to study a flow battery system with an appreciable working performance. The study explores and compares mainly three different redox flow battery technologies; all-vanadium, soluble lead-acid and a novel copper-lead dioxide flow batteries. The first system is based in sulfuric acid e...

  20. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis induces cellular oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jereme G. Spiers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal gland in response to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis induce activity in the cellular reduction-oxidation (redox system. The redox system is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism allowing the transfer of electrons between donor/acceptors and target molecules during oxidative phosphorylation while simultaneously maintaining the overall cellular environment in a reduced state. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the current literature discussing the link between HPA axis-derived glucocorticoids and increased oxidative stress, particularly focussing on the redox changes observed in the hippocampus following glucocorticoid exposure.

  1. Redox electrode materials for supercapatteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linpo; Chen, George Z.

    2016-09-01

    Redox electrode materials, including transition metal oxides and electronically conducting polymers, are capable of faradaic charge transfer reactions, and play important roles in most electrochemical energy storage devices, such as supercapacitor, battery and supercapattery. Batteries are often based on redox materials with low power capability and safety concerns in some cases. Supercapacitors, particularly those based on redox inactive materials, e.g. activated carbon, can offer high power output, but have relatively low energy capacity. Combining the merits of supercapacitor and battery into a hybrid, the supercapattery can possess energy as much as the battery and output a power almost as high as the supercapacitor. Redox electrode materials are essential in the supercapattery design. However, it is hard to utilise these materials easily because of their intrinsic characteristics, such as the low conductivity of metal oxides and the poor mechanical strength of conducting polymers. This article offers a brief introduction of redox electrode materials, the basics of supercapattery and its relationship with pseudocapacitors, and reviews selectively some recent progresses in the relevant research and development.

  2. Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Ježek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed mechanisms that determine reactive oxygen species (redox homeostasis, redox information signaling and metabolic/regulatory function of autocrine insulin signaling in pancreatic β cells, and consequences of oxidative stress and dysregulation of redox/information signaling for their dysfunction. We emphasize the role of mitochondrion in β cell molecular physiology and pathology, including the antioxidant role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2. Since in pancreatic β cells pyruvate cannot be easily diverted towards lactate dehydrogenase for lactate formation, the respiration and oxidative phosphorylation intensity are governed by the availability of glucose, leading to a certain ATP/ADP ratio, whereas in other cell types, cell demand dictates respiration/metabolism rates. Moreover, we examine the possibility that type 2 diabetes mellitus might be considered as an inevitable result of progressive self-accelerating oxidative stress and concomitantly dysregulated information signaling in peripheral tissues as well as in pancreatic β cells. It is because the redox signaling is inherent to the insulin receptor signaling mechanism and its impairment leads to the oxidative and nitrosative stress. Also emerging concepts, admiting participation of redox signaling even in glucose sensing and insulin release in pancreatic β cells, fit in this view. For example, NADPH has been firmly established to be a modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin release.

  3. Redox pioneer: professor Helmut Sies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P; Radi, Rafael

    2014-12-20

    Dr. Helmut Sies (MD, 1967) is recognized as a Redox Pioneer, because he authored five articles on oxidative stress, lycopene, and glutathione, each of which has been cited more than 1000 times, and coauthored an article on hydroperoxide metabolism in mammalian systems cited more than 5000 times (Google Scholar). He obtained preclinical education at the University of Tübingen and the University of Munich, clinical training at Munich (MD, 1967) and Paris, and completed Habilitation at Munich (Physiological Chemistry and Physical Biochemistry, 1972). In early research, he first identified hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a normal aerobic metabolite and devised a method to quantify H2O2 concentration and turnover in cells. He quantified central redox systems for energy metabolism (NAD, NADP systems) and antioxidant GSH in subcellular compartments. He first described ebselen, a selenoorganic compound, as a glutathione peroxidase mimic. He contributed a fundamental discovery to the physiology of GSH, selenium nutrition, singlet oxygen biochemistry, and health benefits of dietary lycopene and cocoa flavonoids. He has published more than 600 articles, 134 of which are cited at least 100 times, and edited 28 books. His h-index is 115. During the last quarter of the 20th century and well into the 21st, he has served as a scout, trailblazer, and pioneer in redox biology. His formulation of the concept of oxidative stress stimulated and guided research in oxidants and antioxidants; his pioneering research on carotenoids and flavonoids informed nutritional strategies against cancer, cardiovascular disease, and aging; and his quantitative approach to redox biochemistry provides a foundation for modern redox systems biology. Helmut Sies is a true Redox Pioneer. PMID:25178739

  4. Direct determination of the redox status of cysteine residues in proteins in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new DNA-maleimide which is cleaved by UV irradiation, DNA-PCMal, was developed. • DNA-PCMal can be used like DNA-Mal to analyze the redox state of cysteine residues. • It is useful for detecting the thiol redox status of a protein in vivo by Western blotting method. • Thus, DNA-PCMal can be a powerful tool for redox proteomics analysis. - Abstract: The redox states of proteins in cells are key factors in many cellular processes. To determine the redox status of cysteinyl thiol groups in proteins in vivo, we developed a new maleimide reagent, a photocleavable maleimide-conjugated single stranded DNA (DNA-PCMal). The DNA moiety of DNA-PCMal is easily removed by UV-irradiation, allowing DNA-PCMal to be used in Western blotting applications. Thereby the state of thiol groups in intracellular proteins can be directly evaluated. This new maleimide compound can provide information concerning redox proteins in vivo, which is important for our understanding of redox networks in the cell

  5. Direct determination of the redox status of cysteine residues in proteins in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Satoshi [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259-R1-8, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Tatenaka, Yuki; Ohuchi, Yuya [Dojindo Laboratories, 2025-5 Tabaru, Mashiki-machi, Kumamoto 861-2202 (Japan); Hisabori, Toru, E-mail: thisabor@res.titech.ac.jp [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259-R1-8, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • A new DNA-maleimide which is cleaved by UV irradiation, DNA-PCMal, was developed. • DNA-PCMal can be used like DNA-Mal to analyze the redox state of cysteine residues. • It is useful for detecting the thiol redox status of a protein in vivo by Western blotting method. • Thus, DNA-PCMal can be a powerful tool for redox proteomics analysis. - Abstract: The redox states of proteins in cells are key factors in many cellular processes. To determine the redox status of cysteinyl thiol groups in proteins in vivo, we developed a new maleimide reagent, a photocleavable maleimide-conjugated single stranded DNA (DNA-PCMal). The DNA moiety of DNA-PCMal is easily removed by UV-irradiation, allowing DNA-PCMal to be used in Western blotting applications. Thereby the state of thiol groups in intracellular proteins can be directly evaluated. This new maleimide compound can provide information concerning redox proteins in vivo, which is important for our understanding of redox networks in the cell.

  6. Redox biology of hydrogen sulfide: Implications for physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asaf Stein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple physiological processes in mammalian systems. The pathways involved in the production, consumption, and mechanism of action of H2S appear to be sensitive to alterations in the cellular redox state and O2 tension. Indeed, the catabolism of H2S through a putative oxidation pathway, the sulfide quinone oxido-reductase system, is highly dependent on O2 tension. Dysregulation of H2S homeostasis has also been implicated in numerous pathological conditions and diseases. In this review, the chemistry and the main physiological actions of H2S are presented. Some examples highlighting the cytoprotective actions of H2S within the context of cardiovascular disease are also reported. Elucidation of the redox biology of H2S will enable the development of new pharmacological agents based on this intriguing new redox cellular signal.

  7. Evolutionary Acquisition of Cysteines determines FOXO Paralog-Specific Redox Signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putker, Marrit; Vos, Harmjan; van Dorenmalen, Kim; de Ruiter, Hesther; Duran, Ana G; Snel, Berend; Burgering, Boudewijn Marius; Vermeulen, Michiel; Dansen, T B

    2015-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) signaling, the translation of an oxidative intracellular environment into a cellular response, is mediated by the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine thiols. The latter can result in disulfide formation between protein hetero- or homodimers that alter protein functi

  8. Evolutionary acquisition of cysteines determines FOXO paralog-specific redox signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putker, Marrit; Vos, HR; Van Dorenmalen, Kim; De Ruiter, Hesther; Duran, Ana G.; Snel, Berend; Burgering, Boudewijn M T; Vermeulen, M; Dansen, TB

    2015-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) signaling, the translation of an oxidative intracellular environment into a cellular response, is mediated by the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine thiols. The latter can result in disulfide formation between protein hetero- or homodimers that alter protein functi

  9. Targeting the Redox Balance in Inflammatory Skin Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditte M. S. Lundvig

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS can be both beneficial and deleterious. Under normal physiological conditions, ROS production is tightly regulated, and ROS participate in both pathogen defense and cellular signaling. However, insufficient ROS detoxification or ROS overproduction generates oxidative stress, resulting in cellular damage. Oxidative stress has been linked to various inflammatory diseases. Inflammation is an essential response in the protection against injurious insults and thus important at the onset of wound healing. However, hampered resolution of inflammation can result in a chronic, exaggerated response with additional tissue damage. In the pathogenesis of several inflammatory skin conditions, e.g., sunburn and psoriasis, inflammatory-mediated tissue damage is central. The prolonged release of excess ROS in the skin can aggravate inflammatory injury and promote chronic inflammation. The cellular redox balance is therefore tightly regulated by several (enzymatic antioxidants and pro-oxidants; however, in case of chronic inflammation, the antioxidant system may be depleted, and prolonged oxidative stress occurs. Due to the central role of ROS in inflammatory pathologies, restoring the redox balance forms an innovative therapeutic target in the development of new strategies for treating inflammatory skin conditions. Nevertheless, the clinical use of antioxidant-related therapies is still in its infancy.

  10. Redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and Fe(III)-bleomycin by thioredoxin reductase: specificity of enzymatic redox centers and analysis of reactive species formation by ESR spin trapping

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Judith M.; Cheng, Qing; Antholine, William E.; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Arnér, ArnerElias S.J.; Myers, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Thiosemicarbazones such as triapine (Tp) and Dp44mT are tridentate iron (Fe) chelators that have well-documented anti-neoplastic activity. While Fe-thiosemicarbazones can undergo redox-cycling to generate reactive species that may have important roles in their cytotoxicity, there is only limited insight into specific cellular agents that can rapidly reduce Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and thereby promote their redox activity. Here we report that thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) and glutathione r...

  11. Characterization of protein redox dynamics induced during light-to-dark transitions and nutrient limitation in cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansong, Charles; Sadler, Natalie C.; Hill, Eric A.; Lewis, Michael P.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-07-03

    Protein redox chemistry constitutes a major void in knowledge pertaining to photoautotrophic system regulation and signaling processes. We have employed a chemical biology approach to analyze redox sensitive proteins in live Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cells in both light and dark periods, and to understand how cellular redox balance is disrupted during nutrient perturbation. The present work identified several novel putative redox-sensitive proteins that are involved in the generation of reductant, macromolecule synthesis, and carbon flux through central metabolic pathways, and may be involved in cell signaling and response mechanisms. Furthermore, our research suggests that dynamic redox changes in response to specific nutrient limitations contribute to the regulatory changes driven by a shift from light to dark. Taken together, these results contribute to the high-level understanding of post-translational mechanisms regulating flux distributions and therefore present potential metabolic engineering targets for redirecting carbon towards biofuel precursors.

  12. Protein Redox Dynamics During Light-to-Dark Transitions in Cyanobacteria and Impacts Due to Nutrient Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron T Wright

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein redox chemistry constitutes a major void in knowledge pertaining to photoautotrophic system regulation and signaling processes. We have employed a chemical biology approach to analyze redox sensitive proteins in live Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cells in both light and dark periods, and to understand how cellular redox balance is disrupted during nutrient perturbation. The present work identified 300 putative redox-sensitive proteins that are involved in the generation of reductant, macromolecule synthesis, and carbon flux through central metabolic pathways, and may be involved in cell signaling and response mechanisms. Furthermore, our research suggests that dynamic redox changes in response to specific nutrient limitations, including carbon and nitrogen limitations, contribute to the regulatory changes driven by a shift from light to dark. Taken together, these results contribute to a high-level understanding of post-translational mechanisms regulating flux distributions and suggest potential metabolic engineering targets for redirecting carbon towards biofuel precursors.

  13. Arabidopsis redox status in response to caterpillar herbivory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamuna ePaudel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant responses to insect herbivory are regulated through complex, hormone-mediated interactions. Some caterpillar species have evolved strategies to manipulate this system by inducing specific pathways that suppress plant defense responses. Effectors in the labial saliva (LS secretions of Spodoptera exigua caterpillars are believed to induce the salicylic acid (SA pathway to interfere with the jasmonic acid (JA defense pathway; however, the mechanism underlying this subversion is unknown. Since Noctuid caterpillar LS contains enzymes that may affect cellular redox balance, this study investigated rapid changes in cellular redox metabolites within 45 min after herbivory. Caterpillar LS is involved in suppressing the increase in oxidative stress that was observed in plants fed upon by caterpillars with impaired LS secretions. To further understand the link between cellular redox balance and plant defense responses, marker genes of SA, JA and ethylene (ET pathways were compared in wildtype, the glutathione-compromised pad2-1 mutant and the tga2/5/6 triple mutant plants. AtPR1 and AtPDF1.2 showed LS-dependent expression that was alleviated in the pad2-1 and tga2/5/6 triple mutants. In comparison, the ET-dependent genes ERF1 expression showed LS-associated changes in both wildtype and pad2-1 mutant plants and the ORA 59 marker AtHEL had increased expression in response to herbivory, but a LS-dependent difference was not noted. These data support the model that there are SA/NPR1-, glutathione-dependent and ET-, glutathione-independent mechanisms leading to LS-associated suppression of plant induced defences.

  14. Oxygen in human health from life to death – An approach to teaching redox biology and signaling to graduate and medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M. Briehl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of oxygen human life is measured in minutes. In the presence of oxygen, normal metabolism generates reactive species (ROS that have the potential to cause cell injury contributing to human aging and disease. Between these extremes, organisms have developed means for sensing oxygen and ROS and regulating their cellular processes in response. Redox signaling contributes to the control of cell proliferation and death. Aberrant redox signaling underlies many human diseases. The attributes acquired by altered redox homeostasis in cancer cells illustrate this particularly well. This teaching review and the accompanying illustrations provide an introduction to redox biology and signaling aimed at instructors of graduate and medical students.

  15. Redox Regulation of T-Cell Function: From Molecular Mechanisms to Significance in Human Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kesarwani, Pravin; Murali, Anuradha K.; Al-Khami, Amir A.; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to have effects on T-cell function and proliferation. Low concentrations of ROS in T cells are a prerequisite for cell survival, and increased ROS accumulation can lead to apoptosis/necrosis. The cellular redox state of a T cell can also affect T-cell receptor signaling, skewing the immune response. Various T-cell subsets have different redox statuses, and this differential ROS susceptibility could modulate the outcome of an immune response in various...

  16. Cellular: Toward personal communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Stuart

    1991-09-01

    The cellular industry is one of the fastest growing segment of the telecommunications industry. With an estimated penetration rate of 20 percent in the near future, cellular is becoming an ubiquitous telecommunications service in the U.S. In this paper we will examine the major advancements in the cellular industry: customer equipment, cellular networks, engineering tools, customer support, and nationwide seamless service.

  17. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  18. Proteomic identification of early salicylate- and flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Pei

    2015-02-27

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the early defense responses against pathogen infection in plants. The mechanism about the initial and direct regulation of the defense signaling pathway by ROS remains elusive. Perturbation of cellular redox homeostasis by ROS is believed to alter functions of redox-sensitive proteins through their oxidative modifications. Here we report an OxiTRAQ-based proteomic study in identifying proteins whose cysteines underwent oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells during the early response to salicylate or flg22, two defense pathway elicitors that are known to disturb cellular redox homeostasis. Among the salicylate- and/or flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins are those involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, RNA processing, post-translational modifications, and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. The identification of the salicylate-/flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins provides a foundation from which further study can be conducted toward understanding biological significance of their oxidative modifications during the plant defense response.

  19. Mitochondria: Redox Metabolism and Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Kang; Shazib Pervaiz

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are the main intracellular location for fuel generation; however, they are not just power plants but involved in a range of other intracellular functions including regulation of redox homeostasis and cell fate. Dysfunction of mitochondria will result in oxidative stress which is one of the underlying causal factors for a variety of diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. In this paper, generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen sp...

  20. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  1. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhakar; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD). Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH) and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP). Results show that curcumin significantly (p < 0.01) downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b 5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP) of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects. PMID:26904287

  2. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD. Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP. Results show that curcumin significantly (p<0.01 downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects.

  3. New Approach in Translational Medicine: Effects of Electrolyzed Reduced Water (ERW on NF-κB/iNOS Pathway in U937 Cell Line under Altered Redox State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Franceschelli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is known that increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS can exert harmful effects, altering the cellular redox state. Electrolyzed Reduced Water (ERW produced near the cathode during water electrolysis exhibits high pH, high concentration of dissolved hydrogen and an extremely negative redox potential. Several findings indicate that ERW had the ability of a scavenger free radical, which results from hydrogen molecules with a high reducing ability and may participate in the redox regulation of cellular function. We investigated the effect of ERW on H2O2-induced U937 damage by evaluating the modulation of redox cellular state. Western blotting and spectrophotometrical analysis showed that ERW inhibited oxidative stress by restoring the antioxidant capacity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Consequently, ERW restores the ability of the glutathione reductase to supply the cell of an important endogenous antioxidant, such as GSH, reversing the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on redox balance of U937 cells. Therefore, this means a reduction of cytotoxicity induced by peroxynitrite via a downregulation of the NF-κB/iNOS pathway and could be used as an antioxidant for preventive and therapeutic application. In conclusion, ERW can protect the cellular redox balance, reducing the risk of several diseases with altered cellular homeostasis such as inflammation.

  4. Thiol redox transitions by thioredoxin and thioredoxin-binding protein-2 in cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Eiji; Chen, Zhe; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Masutani, Hiroshi; Yodoi, Junji

    2010-01-01

    The cellular thiol redox state is a crucial mediator of metabolic, signaling and transcriptional processes in cells, and an exquisite balance between the oxidizing and reducing states is essential for the normal function and survival of cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are widely known to function as a kind of second messenger for intracellular signaling and to modulate the thiol redox state. Thiol reduction is mainly controlled by the thioredoxin (TRX) system and glutathione (GSH) systems as scavengers of ROS and regulators of the protein redox states. The thioredoxin system is composed of several related molecules interacting through the cysteine residues at the active site, including thioredoxin, thioredoxin-2, a mitochondrial thioredoxin family, and transmembrane thioredoxin-related protein (TMX), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-specific thioredoxin family. Thioredoxin couples with thioredoxin-dependent peroxidases (peroxiredoxin) to scavenge hydrogen peroxide. In addition, thioredoxin does not simply act only as a scavenger of ROS but also as an important regulator of oxidative stress response through protein-protein interaction. The interaction of thioredoxin and thioredoxin-binding proteins such as thioredoxin-binding protein-2 (TBP-2, also called as Txnip or VDUP1), apoptosis signal kinase (ASK-1), redox factor 1 (Ref-1), Forkhead box class O 4 (FoxO4), and nod-like receptor proteins (NLRPs) suggested unconventional functions of thioredoxin and a novel mechanism of redox regulation. Here, we introduce the central mechanism of thiol redox transition in cell signaling regulated by thioredoxin and related molecules.

  5. Mitochondrial peroxiredoxin involvement in antioxidant defence and redox signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew G; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2010-01-15

    Prxs (peroxiredoxins) are a family of proteins that are extremely effective at scavenging peroxides. The Prxs exhibit a number of intriguing properties that distinguish them from conventional antioxidants, including a susceptibility to inactivation by hyperoxidation in the presence of excess peroxide and the ability to form complex oligomeric structures. These properties, combined with a high cellular abundance and reactivity with hydrogen peroxide, have led to speculation that the Prxs function as redox sensors that transmit signals as part of the cellular response to oxidative stress. Multicellular organisms express several different Prxs that can be categorized by their subcellular distribution. In mammals, Prx 3 and Prx 5 are targeted to the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondria are a major source of hydrogen peroxide, and this oxidant is implicated in the damage associated with aging and a number of pathologies. Hydrogen peroxide can also act as a second messenger, and is linked with signalling events in mitochondria, including the induction of apoptosis. A simple kinetic competition analysis estimates that Prx 3 will be the target for up to 90% of hydrogen peroxide generated in the matrix. Therefore, mitochondrial Prxs have the potential to play a major role in mitochondrial redox signalling, but the extent of this role and the mechanisms involved are currently unclear.

  6. The redox biology network in cancer pathophysiology and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Manda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The review pinpoints operational concepts related to the redox biology network applied to the pathophysiology and therapeutics of solid tumors. A sophisticated network of intrinsic and extrinsic cues, integrated in the tumor niche, drives tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Critical mutations and distorted redox signaling pathways orchestrate pathologic events inside cancer cells, resulting in resistance to stress and death signals, aberrant proliferation and efficient repair mechanisms. Additionally, the complex inter-cellular crosstalk within the tumor niche, mediated by cytokines, redox-sensitive danger signals (HMGB1 and exosomes, under the pressure of multiple stresses (oxidative, inflammatory, metabolic, greatly contributes to the malignant phenotype. The tumor-associated inflammatory stress and its suppressive action on the anti-tumor immune response are highlighted. We further emphasize that ROS may act either as supporter or enemy of cancer cells, depending on the context. Oxidative stress-based therapies, such as radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy, take advantage of the cytotoxic face of ROS for killing tumor cells by a non-physiologically sudden, localized and intense oxidative burst. The type of tumor cell death elicited by these therapies is discussed. Therapy outcome depends on the differential sensitivity to oxidative stress of particular tumor cells, such as cancer stem cells, and therefore co-therapies that transiently down-regulate their intrinsic antioxidant system hold great promise. We draw attention on the consequences of the damage signals delivered by oxidative stress-injured cells to neighboring and distant cells, and emphasize the benefits of therapeutically triggered immunologic cell death in metastatic cancer. An integrative approach should be applied when designing therapeutic strategies in cancer, taking into consideration the mutational, metabolic, inflammatory and oxidative status of tumor cells, cellular

  7. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Skyllas-Kazacos; Aishwarya Parasuraman; Tuti Mariana Lim; Suminto Winardi; Helen Prifti

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. Th...

  8. Lacasa de alto potencial redox

    OpenAIRE

    Maté, Diana M.; Valdivieso, Malena; Fernández, Layla; Alcalde Galeote, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    La presente invención describe la evolución dirigida de una lacasa de alto potencial redox expresada funcionalmente en S. cerevisiae que presenta una alta tasa de producción, una elevada actividad y una gran termoestabilidad. La presente invención se refiere a la secuencia aminoacídica de dicha lacasa y a la secuencia nucleotídica que codifica para dicha lacasa. La lacasa de la invención presenta aplicaciones en diversos sectores: nano- biotecnología, industria papeler...

  9. Redox control of iron biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie Rhianon

    Magnetotactic bacteria have evolved complex subcellular machinery to construct linear chains of magnetite nanocrystals that allow the host cell to sense direction. Each mixed-valent iron nanoparticle is mineralized from soluble iron within a membrane-encapsulated vesicle termed the magnetosome, which serves as a specialized compartment that regulates the iron, redox, and pH environment of the growing mineral. In order to dissect the biological components that control this process, we have carried out genetic and biochemical studies of proteins proposed to function in iron mineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. As iron biomineralization by magnetotactic bacteria represents a particularly interesting case for understanding how the production of nanomaterials can be programmed at the genetic level, we also apply synthetic biology techniques towards the production of new cellular materials and new cellular functions. As the production of magnetite requires both the formation of Fe(II) and Fe(III), the redox components of the magnetosome play an essential role in this process. Using genetic complementation studies, we show that the redox cofactors or heme sites of the two putative redox partners, MamP and MamT, are required for magnetite biomineralization in vivo and that removal of one or both sites leads to defects in mineralization. We develop and optimize a heterologous expression method in the E. coli periplasm to cleanly isolate fully heme-loaded MamP for biochemical studies. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the reduction potential of MamP lies in a different range than other c-type cytochrome involved in either Fe(III) reduction or Fe(II) oxidation. Nonetheless, in vitro mineralization studies with MamP and Fe(II) show that it is able to catalyze the formation of mixed-valent Fe(II)/Fe(III) oxides such as green rust. Biomineralization also requires lattice-templating proteins that guide the growth of the functional crystalline material. We

  10. A redox signalling globin is essential for reproduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Henau, Sasha; Tilleman, Lesley; Vangheel, Matthew; Luyckx, Evi; Trashin, Stanislav; Pauwels, Martje; Germani, Francesca; Vlaeminck, Caroline; Vanfleteren, Jacques R.; Bert, Wim; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; de Wael, Karolien; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2015-12-01

    Moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now recognized as redox signalling molecules. However, thus far, only mitochondria and NADPH oxidases have been identified as cellular sources of ROS in signalling. Here we identify a globin (GLB-12) that produces superoxide, a type of ROS, which serves as an essential signal for reproduction in C. elegans. We find that GLB-12 has an important role in the regulation of multiple aspects in germline development, including germ cell apoptosis. We further describe how GLB-12 displays specific molecular, biochemical and structural properties that allow this globin to act as a superoxide generator. In addition, both an intra- and extracellular superoxide dismutase act as key partners of GLB-12 to create a transmembrane redox signal. Our results show that a globin can function as a driving factor in redox signalling, and how this signal is regulated at the subcellular level by multiple control layers.

  11. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M.F.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain informatio

  12. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.;

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  13. Muscle redox signalling pathways in exercise. Role of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Shaun A; Morrison, Dale; McConell, Glenn K; Wadley, Glenn D

    2016-09-01

    Recent research highlights the importance of redox signalling pathway activation by contraction-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in normal exercise-related cellular and molecular adaptations in skeletal muscle. In this review, we discuss some potentially important redox signalling pathways in skeletal muscle that are involved in acute and chronic responses to contraction and exercise. Specifically, we discuss redox signalling implicated in skeletal muscle contraction force, mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant enzyme induction, glucose uptake and muscle hypertrophy. Furthermore, we review evidence investigating the impact of major exogenous antioxidants on these acute and chronic responses to exercise. Redox signalling pathways involved in adaptive responses in skeletal muscle to exercise are not clearly elucidated at present, and further research is required to better define important signalling pathways involved. Evidence of beneficial or detrimental effects of specific antioxidant compounds on exercise adaptations in muscle is similarly limited, particularly in human subjects. Future research is required to not only investigate effects of specific antioxidant compounds on skeletal muscle exercise adaptations, but also to better establish mechanisms of action of specific antioxidants in vivo. Although we feel it remains somewhat premature to make clear recommendations in relation to application of specific antioxidant compounds in different exercise settings, a bulk of evidence suggests that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is ergogenic through its effects on maintenance of muscle force production during sustained fatiguing events. Nevertheless, a current lack of evidence from studies using performance tests representative of athletic competition and a potential for adverse effects with high doses (>70mg/kg body mass) warrants caution in its use for performance enhancement. In addition, evidence implicates high dose vitamin C (1g/day) and E

  14. Reverse Engineering Applied to Red Human Hair Pheomelanin Reveals Redox-Buffering as a Pro-Oxidant Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Panzella, Lucia; Micillo, Raffaella; Bentley, William E; Napolitano, Alessandra; Payne, Gregory F

    2015-01-01

    Pheomelanin has been implicated in the increased susceptibility to UV-induced melanoma for people with light skin and red hair. Recent studies identified a UV-independent pathway to melanoma carcinogenesis and implicated pheomelanin's pro-oxidant properties that act through the generation of reactive oxygen species and/or the depletion of cellular antioxidants. Here, we applied an electrochemically-based reverse engineering methodology to compare the redox properties of human hair pheomelanin with model synthetic pigments and natural eumelanin. This methodology exposes the insoluble melanin samples to complex potential (voltage) inputs and measures output response characteristics to assess redox activities. The results demonstrate that both eumelanin and pheomelanin are redox-active, they can rapidly (sec-min) and repeatedly redox-cycle between oxidized and reduced states, and pheomelanin possesses a more oxidative redox potential. This study suggests that pheomelanin's redox-based pro-oxidant activity may contribute to sustaining a chronic oxidative stress condition through a redox-buffering mechanism. PMID:26669666

  15. Reverse Engineering Applied to Red Human Hair Pheomelanin Reveals Redox-Buffering as a Pro-Oxidant Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Panzella, Lucia; Micillo, Raffaella; Bentley, William E; Napolitano, Alessandra; Payne, Gregory F

    2015-01-01

    Pheomelanin has been implicated in the increased susceptibility to UV-induced melanoma for people with light skin and red hair. Recent studies identified a UV-independent pathway to melanoma carcinogenesis and implicated pheomelanin's pro-oxidant properties that act through the generation of reactive oxygen species and/or the depletion of cellular antioxidants. Here, we applied an electrochemically-based reverse engineering methodology to compare the redox properties of human hair pheomelanin with model synthetic pigments and natural eumelanin. This methodology exposes the insoluble melanin samples to complex potential (voltage) inputs and measures output response characteristics to assess redox activities. The results demonstrate that both eumelanin and pheomelanin are redox-active, they can rapidly (sec-min) and repeatedly redox-cycle between oxidized and reduced states, and pheomelanin possesses a more oxidative redox potential. This study suggests that pheomelanin's redox-based pro-oxidant activity may contribute to sustaining a chronic oxidative stress condition through a redox-buffering mechanism.

  16. Periodic Exposure of Keratinocytes to Cold Physical Plasma: An In Vitro Model for Redox-Related Diseases of the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress illustrates an imbalance between radical formation and removal. Frequent redox stress is critically involved in many human pathologies including cancer, psoriasis, and chronic wounds. However, reactive species pursue a dual role being involved in signaling on the one hand and oxidative damage on the other. Using a HaCaT keratinocyte cell culture model, we investigated redox regulation and inflammation to periodic, low-dose oxidative stress after two, six, eight, ten, and twelve weeks. Chronic redox stress was generated by recurrent incubation with cold physical plasma-treated cell culture medium. Using transcriptome microarray technology, we identified both acute ROS-stress responses as well as numerous adaptions after several weeks of redox challenge. We determined a differential expression (2-fold, FDR < 0.01, p<0.05 of 260 genes that function in inflammation and redox homeostasis, such as cytokines (e.g., IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10, growth factors (e.g., CSF2, FGF, and IGF-2, and antioxidant enzymes (e.g., HMOX, NQO1, GPX, and PRDX. Apoptotic signaling was affected rather modestly, especially in p53 downstream targets (e.g., BCL2, BBC3, and GADD45. Strikingly, the cell-protective heat shock protein HSP27 was strongly upregulated (p<0.001. These results suggested cellular adaptions to frequent redox stress and may help to better understand the inflammatory responses in redox-related diseases.

  17. Method for characterization of the redox condition of cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, Philip M.; Langton, Christine A.; Stefanko, David B.

    2015-12-22

    Disclosed are methods for determining the redox condition of cementitious materials. The methods are leaching methods that utilize an in situ redox indicator that is present in the cementitious materials as formed. The in situ redox indicator leaches from cementitious material and, when the leaching process is carried out under anaerobic conditions can be utilized to determine the redox condition of the material. The in situ redox indicator can exhibit distinct characteristics in the leachate depending upon the redox condition of the indicator.

  18. Screening of redox couples and electrode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner, J.; Swette, L.; Cahill, K.

    1976-01-01

    Electrochemical parameters of selected redox couples that might be potentially promising for application in bulk energy storage systems were investigated. This was carried out in two phases: a broad investigation of the basic characteristics and behavior of various redox couples, followed by a more limited investigation of their electrochemical performance in a redox flow reactor configuration. In the first phase of the program, eight redox couples were evaluated under a variety of conditions in terms of their exchange current densities as measured by the rotating disk electrode procedure. The second phase of the program involved the testing of four couples in a redox reactor under flow conditions with a varity of electrode materials and structures.

  19. Redox activity of naphthalene secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. McWhinney

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the observed redox cycling activity. The redox-active 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was identified as a new minor product of naphthalene oxidation, and including this species in redox activity predictions increased the predicted DTT reactivity to 30 ± 5% of observations. Similar attempts to predict redox behaviour of oxidised two-stroke engine exhaust particles by measuring 1,2-naphthoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone predicted DTT decay rates only 4.9 ± 2.5% of those observed. Together, these results suggest that there are substantial unidentified redox-active SOA constituents beyond the small quinones that may be important toxic components of these particles. A gas-to-SOA particle partitioning coefficient was calculated to be (7.0 ± 2.5 × 10−4 m3 μg−1 for 1,4-naphthoquinone at 25 °C. This value suggests that under typical warm conditions, 1,4-naphthoquinone is unlikely to contribute strongly to redox behaviour of ambient particles, although further work is needed to determine the potential impact under conditions such as low temperatures where partitioning to the particle is more favourable. As well, higher order oxidation products that likely account for a substantial fraction of the redox cycling capability of the naphthalene SOA are likely to partition much more strongly to the particle phase.

  20. Redox activity of naphthalene secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhinney, R. D.; Zhou, S.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-04-01

    Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the observed redox cycling activity. The redox-active 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was identified as a new minor product of naphthalene oxidation, and including this species in redox activity predictions increased the predicted DTT reactivity to 30 ± 5% of observations. Similar attempts to predict redox behaviour of oxidised two-stroke engine exhaust particles by measuring 1,2-naphthoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone predicted DTT decay rates only 4.9 ± 2.5% of those observed. Together, these results suggest that there are substantial unidentified redox-active SOA constituents beyond the small quinones that may be important toxic components of these particles. A gas-to-SOA particle partitioning coefficient was calculated to be (7.0 ± 2.5) × 10-4 m3 μg-1 for 1,4-naphthoquinone at 25 °C. This value suggests that under typical warm conditions, 1,4-naphthoquinone is unlikely to contribute strongly to redox behaviour of ambient particles, although further work is needed to determine the potential impact under conditions such as low temperatures where partitioning to the particle is more favourable. As well, higher order oxidation products that likely account for a substantial fraction of the redox cycling capability of the naphthalene SOA are likely to partition much more strongly to the particle phase.

  1. Selective induction of oxidative stress in cancer cells via synergistic combinations of agents targeting redox homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akladios, Fady N; Andrew, Scott D; Parkinson, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy is still a heavy burden that impairs the response of many cancer patients to conventional chemotherapy. Using drug combinations is one therapeutic approach to overcome the developing resistance to any one drug. Oxidative stress is now a generally regarded hallmark of cancer that can be one approach to selectively target cancer cells while sparing normal cells. With the aim of increasing oxidative stress in cancer cells to a lethal set point, we have generated and combined several series of redox active compounds that act at different points of the cellular oxidative cascade. The premise of such combinations is to deplete of endogenous antioxidant defence proteins (e.g., Glutathione) while concomitantly increasing the generation of ROS via metal redox recycling and Fenton chemistry which eventually leads to the disruption of cellular redox homeostasis and induction of cell death. Through this approach, we have identified highly synergistic combinations of two distinctive classes of compounds (Azines and Copper(II) complexes of 2-pyridyl ketone thiosemicarbazones) which are capable of eliminating cancer cells without concomitant increase in toxicity toward normal cells. In one of our most potent combinations, a combination index (CI) value of 0.056 was observed, representing a 17 fold enhancement in activity beyond additive effects. Such new combination regimen of redox active compounds can be one step closer to potentially safer low dose chemotherapy. PMID:26022081

  2. Protein redox chemistry: post-translational cysteine modifications that regulate signal transduction and drug pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revati eWani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception of reactive oxygen species (ROS has evolved over the past decade from agents of cellular damage to secondary messengers which modify signaling proteins in physiology and the disease state (e.g. cancer. New protein targets of specific oxidation are rapidly being identified. One emerging class of redox modification occurs to the thiol side chain of cysteine residues which can produce multiple chemically-distinct alterations to the protein (e.g. sulfenic/sulfinic/sulfonic acid, disulfides. These post-translational modifications (PTM are shown to affect the protein structure and function. Because redox-sensitive proteins can traffic between subcellular compartments that have different redox environments, cysteine oxidation enables a spatio-temporal control to signaling. Understanding ramifications of these oxidative modifications to the functions of signaling proteins is crucial for understanding cellular regulation as well as for informed-drug discovery process. The effects of EGFR oxidation of Cys797 on inhibitor pharmacology are presented to illustrate the principle. Taken together, cysteine redox PTM can impact both cell biology and drug pharmacology.

  3. Nonlinear optical molecular imaging enables metabolic redox sensing in tissue-engineered constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Leng-Chun; Lloyd, William R.; Wilson, Robert H.; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2011-07-01

    Tissue-engineered constructs require noninvasive monitoring of cellular viability prior to implantation. In a preclinical study on human Ex Vivo Produced Oral Mucosa Equivalent (EVPOME) constructs, nonlinear optical molecular imaging was employed to extract morphological and functional information from intact constructs. Multiphoton excitation fluorescence images were acquired using endogenous fluorescence from cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). The images were analyzed to report quantitatively on tissue structure and metabolism (redox ratio). Both thickness variations over time and cell distribution variations with depth were identified, while changes in redox were quantified. Our results show that nonlinear optical molecular imaging has the potential to visualize and quantitatively monitor the growth and viability of a tissue-engineered construct over time.

  4. Organelle redox autonomy during environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Avishay; Rosenwasser, Shilo; Meyer, Andreas; Fluhr, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress is generated in plants because of inequalities in the rate of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and scavenging. The subcellular redox state under various stress conditions was assessed using the redox reporter roGFP2 targeted to chloroplastic, mitochondrial, peroxisomal and cytosolic compartments. In parallel, the vitality of the plant was measured by ion leakage. Our results revealed that during certain physiological stress conditions the changes in roGFP2 oxidation are comparable to application of high concentrations of exogenous H2 O2 . Under each stress, particular organelles were affected. Conditions of extended dark stress, or application of elicitor, impacted chiefly on the status of peroxisomal redox state. In contrast, conditions of drought or high light altered the status of mitochondrial or chloroplast redox state, respectively. Amalgamation of the results from diverse environmental stresses shows cases of organelle autonomy as well as multi-organelle oxidative change. Importantly, organelle-specific oxidation under several stresses proceeded cell death as measured by ion leakage, suggesting early roGFP oxidation as predictive of cell death. The measurement of redox state in multiple compartments enables one to look at redox state connectivity between organelles in relation to oxidative stress as well as assign a redox fingerprint to various types of stress conditions. PMID:27037976

  5. Engineering an NADPH/NADP+ Redox Biosensor in Yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jie; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Pihl, Thomas Peter Boye;

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors have emerged as powerful tools for timely and precise in vivo evaluation of cellular metabolism. In particular, biosensors that can couple intercellular cues with downstream signaling responses are currently attracting major attention within health science and biote......Genetically encoded biosensors have emerged as powerful tools for timely and precise in vivo evaluation of cellular metabolism. In particular, biosensors that can couple intercellular cues with downstream signaling responses are currently attracting major attention within health science...... and biotechnology. Still, there is a need for bioprospecting and engineering of more biosensors to enable real-time monitoring of specific cellular states and controlling downstream actuation. In this study, we report the engineering and application of a transcription factor-based NADPH/NADP+ redox biosensor...... in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using the biosensor, we are able to monitor the cause of oxidative stress by chemical induction, and changes in NADPH/NADP+ ratios caused by genetic manipulations. Because of the regulatory potential of the biosensor, we also show that the biosensor can actuate upon...

  6. Redox kinetics and mechanism in silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work contributes to better understand iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate melts. It was conducted on compositions in both Na2O-B2O3-SiO2-FeO and Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO systems. The influence of boron-sodium and aluminum-sodium substitutions and iron content on properties and structure of glasses and on the iron redox kinetics has been studied by Raman, Moessbauer and XANES spectroscopies at the B and Fe K-edges. In borosilicate glasses, an increase in iron content or in the Fe3+/ΣFe redox state implies a structural rearrangement of the BO4 species in the glass network whereas the BO3 and BO4 relative proportions remain nearly constant. In all studied glasses and melts, Fe3+ is a network former in tetrahedral coordination, unless for aluminosilicates of ratio Al/Na≥1 where Fe3+ is a network modifier in five-fold coordination. Near Tg, diffusion of network modifying cations controls the iron redox kinetics along with a flux of electron holes. At liquidus temperatures, oxygen diffusion is considered to be the mechanism that governs redox reactions. This study shows the role played by the silicate network polymerization on the redox kinetics. In borosilicate melts, iron redox kinetics depends on the boron speciation between BO3 and BO4 that depends itself on the sodium content. Furthermore, an increase in the network-former/network-modifier ratio implies a decrease in oxygen diffusion that results in a slowing down of the redox kinetics. The obtained results allow a description of the iron redox kinetics for more complex compositions as natural lavas or nuclear waste model glasses. (author)

  7. Redox signaling: Potential arbitrator of autophagy and apoptosis in therapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Kui; Lei, Yunlong; Li, Qifu; Nice, Edouard Collins; Huang, Canhua

    2015-12-01

    Redox signaling plays important roles in the regulation of cell death and survival in response to cancer therapy. Autophagy and apoptosis are discrete cellular processes mediated by distinct groups of regulatory and executioner molecules, and both are thought to be cellular responses to various stress conditions including oxidative stress, therefore controlling cell fate. Basic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may function as signals to promote cell proliferation and survival, whereas increase of ROS can induce autophagy and apoptosis by damaging cellular components. Growing evidence in recent years argues for ROS that below detrimental levels acting as intracellular signal transducers that regulate autophagy and apoptosis. ROS-regulated autophagy and apoptosis can cross-talk with each other. However, how redox signaling determines different cell fates by regulating autophagy and apoptosis remains unclear. In this review, we will focus on understanding the delicate molecular mechanism by which autophagy and apoptosis are finely orchestrated by redox signaling and discuss how this understanding can be used to develop strategies for the treatment of cancer.

  8. Modelling cellular behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  9. Reversible quantum cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Schumacher, B

    2004-01-01

    We define quantum cellular automata as infinite quantum lattice systems with discrete time dynamics, such that the time step commutes with lattice translations and has strictly finite propagation speed. In contrast to earlier definitions this allows us to give an explicit characterization of all local rules generating such automata. The same local rules also generate the global time step for automata with periodic boundary conditions. Our main structure theorem asserts that any quantum cellular automaton is structurally reversible, i.e., that it can be obtained by applying two blockwise unitary operations in a generalized Margolus partitioning scheme. This implies that, in contrast to the classical case, the inverse of a nearest neighbor quantum cellular automaton is again a nearest neighbor automaton. We present several construction methods for quantum cellular automata, based on unitaries commuting with their translates, on the quantization of (arbitrary) reversible classical cellular automata, on quantum c...

  10. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) redox function negatively regulates NRF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishel, Melissa L; Wu, Xue; Devlin, Cecilia M; Logsdon, Derek P; Jiang, Yanlin; Luo, Meihua; He, Ying; Yu, Zhangsheng; Tong, Yan; Lipking, Kelsey P; Maitra, Anirban; Rajeshkumar, N V; Scandura, Glenda; Kelley, Mark R; Ivan, Mircea

    2015-01-30

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) (henceforth referred to as Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein that in addition to its base excision DNA repair activity exerts redox control of multiple transcription factors, including nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), STAT3, activator protein-1 (AP-1), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), and tumor protein 53 (p53). In recent years, Ref-1 has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, particularly in pancreatic ductal carcinoma. Although a significant amount of research has centered on Ref-1, no wide-ranging approach had been performed on the effects of Ref-1 inhibition and transcription factor activity perturbation. Starting with a broader approach, we identified a previously unsuspected effect on the nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2), a critical regulator of cellular defenses against oxidative stress. Based on genetic and small molecule inhibitor-based methodologies, we demonstrated that repression of Ref-1 potently activates NRF2 and its downstream targets in a dose-dependent fashion, and that the redox, rather than the DNA repair function of Ref-1 is critical for this effect. Intriguingly, our results also indicate that this pathway does not involve reactive oxygen species. The link between Ref-1 and NRF2 appears to be present in all cells tested in vitro, noncancerous and cancerous, including patient-derived tumor samples. In particular, we focused on understanding the implications of the novel interaction between these two pathways in primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumor cells and provide the first evidence that this mechanism has implications for overcoming the resistance against experimental drugs targeting Ref-1 activity, with clear translational implications.

  11. Redox potential tuning by redox-inactive cations in nature's water oxidizing catalyst and synthetic analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewald, Vera; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-04-28

    The redox potential of synthetic oligonuclear transition metal complexes has been shown to correlate with the Lewis acidity of a redox-inactive cation connected to the redox-active transition metals of the cluster via oxo or hydroxo bridges. Such heterometallic clusters are important cofactors in many metalloenzymes, where it is speculated that the redox-inactive constituent ion of the cluster serves to optimize its redox potential for electron transfer or catalysis. A principal example is the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of natural photosynthesis, a Mn4CaO5 cofactor that oxidizes water into dioxygen, protons and electrons. Calcium is critical for catalytic function, but its precise role is not yet established. In analogy to synthetic complexes it has been suggested that Ca(2+) fine-tunes the redox potential of the manganese cluster. Here we evaluate this hypothesis by computing the relative redox potentials of substituted derivatives of the oxygen-evolving complex with the cations Sr(2+), Gd(3+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Sc(3+), Na(+) and Y(3+) for two sequential transitions of its catalytic cycle. The theoretical approach is validated with a series of experimentally well-characterized Mn3AO4 cubane complexes that are structural mimics of the enzymatic cluster. Our results reproduce perfectly the experimentally observed correlation between the redox potential and the Lewis acidities of redox-inactive cations for the synthetic complexes. However, it is conclusively demonstrated that this correlation does not hold for the oxygen evolving complex. In the enzyme the redox potential of the cluster only responds to the charge of the redox-inactive cations and remains otherwise insensitive to their precise identity, precluding redox-tuning of the metal cluster as a primary role for Ca(2+) in biological water oxidation.

  12. High energy density redox flow device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  13. Symproportionation versus Disproportionation in Bromine Redox Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • The disproportionation and symproportionation of bromine in different media is presented. • All the redox systems are elaborated according to the principles of the generalized approach to electrolytic redox systems (GATES/GEB). • All physicochemical knowledge is involved in the algorithm applied for this purpose. • The graphical representation of the systems is the basis of gaining the detailed physicochemical knowledge on the systems in question. -- Abstract: The paper refers to dynamic (titration) redox systems where symproportionation or disproportionation of bromine species occur. The related systems are modeled according to principles assumed in the Generalized Approach to Electrolytic Redox Systems (GATES), with Generalized Electron Balance (GEB) concept involved in the GATES/GEB software. The results obtained from calculations made with use of iterative computer programs prepared according to MATLAB computational software, are presented graphically, as 2D and 3D graphs

  14. Measurement of Redox Potential in Nanoecotoxicological Investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Dipak Gohil; Jacqueline Snowden; Roger Peck; Alex Cackett; Ratna Tantra

    2012-01-01

    Redox potential has been identified by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) as one of the parameters that should be investigated for the testing of manufactured nanomaterials. There is still some ambiguity concerning this parameter, i.e., as to what and how to measure, particularly when in a nanoecotoxicological context. In this study the redox potentials of six nanomaterials (either zinc oxide (ZnO) or cerium oxide (CeO2)) dispersions were measured using an oxida...

  15. Membranes for redox flow battery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention. PMID:24958177

  16. Membranes for redox flow battery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-06-19

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  17. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Skyllas-Kazacos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  18. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  19. Intracellular redox status controls membrane localization of pro- and anti-migratory signaling molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Hempel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shifts in intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS have been shown to contribute to carcinogenesis and to tumor progression. In addition to DNA and cell damage by surges in ROS, sub-lethal increases in ROS are implicated in regulating cellular signaling that enhances pro-metastatic behavior. We previously showed that subtle increases in endogenous H2O2 regulate migratory and invasive behavior of metastatic bladder cancer cells through phosphatase inhibition and consequential phosphorylation of p130cas, an adapter of the FAK signaling pathway. We further showed that enhanced redox status contributed to enhanced localization of p130cas to the membrane of metastatic cells. Here we show that this signaling complex can similarly be induced in a redox-engineered cell culture model that enables regulation of intracellular steady state H2O2 level by enforced expression of superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2 and catalase. Expression of Sod2 leads to enhanced p130cas phosphorylation in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma and UM-UC-6 bladder cancer cells. These changes are mediated by H2O2, as co-expression of Catalase abrogates p130cas phosphorylation and its interaction with the adapter protein Crk. Importantly, we establish that the redox environment influence the localization of the tumor suppressor and phosphatase PTEN, in both redox-engineered and metastatic bladder cancer cells that display endogenous increases in H2O2. Importantly, PTEN oxidation leads to its dissociation from the plasma membrane. This indicates that oxidation of PTEN not only influences its activity, but also regulates its cellular localization, effectively removing it from its primary site of lipid phosphatase activity. These data introduce hitherto unappreciated paradigms whereby ROS can reciprocally regulate the cellular localization of pro- and anti-migratory signaling molecules, p130cas and PTEN, respectively. These data further confirm that altering antioxidant status and the intracellular ROS

  20. Cobalt and marine redox evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Saito, Mak A.; Kappler, Andreas; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2014-03-01

    Cobalt (Co) is a bio-essential trace element and limiting nutrient in some regions of the modern oceans. It has been proposed that Co was more abundant in poorly ventilated Precambrian oceans based on the greater utilization of Co by anaerobic microbes relative to plants and animals. However, there are few empirical or theoretical constraints on the history of seawater Co concentrations. Herein, we present a survey of authigenic Co in marine sediments (iron formations, authigenic pyrite and bulk euxinic shales) with the goal of tracking changes in the marine Co reservoir throughout Earth's history. We further provide an overview of the modern marine Co cycle, which we use as a platform to evaluate how changes in the redox state of Earth's surface were likely to have affected marine Co concentrations. Based on sedimentary Co contents and our understanding of marine Co sources and sinks, we propose that from ca. 2.8 to 1.8 Ga the large volume of hydrothermal fluids circulating through abundant submarine ultramafic rocks along with a predominantly anoxic ocean with a low capacity for Co burial resulted in a large dissolved marine Co reservoir. We tentatively propose that there was a decrease in marine Co concentrations after ca. 1.8 Ga resulting from waning hydrothermal Co sources and the expansion of sulfide Co burial flux. Changes in the Co reservoir due to deep-water ventilation in the Neoproterozoic, if they occurred, are not resolvable with the current dataset. Rather, Co enrichments in Phanerozoic euxinic shales deposited during ocean anoxic events (OAE) indicate Co mobilization from expanded anoxic sediments and enhanced hydrothermal sources. A new record of marine Co concentrations provides a platform from which we can reevaluate the role that environmental Co concentrations played in shaping biological Co utilization throughout Earth's history.

  1. Nanostructured cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, P; Taylor, M D R; Brust, M

    2002-12-01

    Au nanocrystals spin-coated onto silicon from toluene form cellular networks. A quantitative statistical crystallography analysis shows that intercellular correlations drive the networks far from statistical equilibrium. Spin-coating from hexane does not produce cellular structure, yet a strong correlation is retained in the positions of nanocrystal aggregates. Mechanisms based on Marangoni convection alone cannot account for the variety of patterns observed, and we argue that spinodal decomposition plays an important role in foam formation.

  2. Cellular Cardiomyoplasty: Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Chachques, J. (J.); Acar, C; J. Herreros; Trainini, J. (Jorge); Prosper, F.; D’Attellis, N. (N.); Fabiani, J. N.; Carpentier, A

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration can be induced with the implantation of a variety of myogenic and angiogenic cell types. More than 150 patients have been treated with cellular cardiomyoplasty worldwide, 18 patients have been treated by our group. Cellular cardiomyoplasty seems to reduce the size and fibrosis of infarct scars, limit postischemic remodelling, and restore regional myocardial contractility. Techniques for skeletal myoblasts culture and ex vivo expansion using auto...

  3. A new metabolomic assay to examine inflammation and redox pathways following LPS challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suh Jung H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shifts in intracellular arginine (Arg and sulfur amino acid (SAA redox metabolism modulate macrophage activation, polarization and phenotype. Despite their importance in inflammation and redox regulatory pathways, comprehensive analysis of these metabolic networks was not previously possible with existing analytical methods. Methods The Arg/thiol redox LC-MS/MS metabolomics assay permits simultaneous assessment of amino acids and derivative products generated from Arg and SAA metabolism. Using this assay, LPS-induced changes in macrophage amino acid metabolism were monitored to identify pathway shifts during activation and their linkage to cellular redox regulation. Results Metabolite concentrations most significantly changed after treatment of a macrophage-like cell line (RAW with LPS for 24 hrs were citrulline (Cit (48-fold increase, ornithine (Orn (8.5-fold increase, arginine (Arg (66% decrease, and aspartic acid (Asp (73% decrease. The ratio Cit + Orn/Arg + Asp (CO/AA was more sensitive to LPS stimulation than other amino acid ratios commonly used to measure LPS-dependent inflammation (e.g., SAM/SAH, GSH/GSSG and total media NOx. The CO/AA ratio was also the first ratio to change significantly after LPS treatment (4 hrs. Changes in the overall metabolomic profile over time indicated that metabolic pathways shifted from Arg catabolism to thiol oxidation. Conclusions Simultaneous quantification of Arg and SAA metabolic pathway shifts following LPS challenge of macrophage indicate that, in this system, the Arg-Citrulline/NO cycle and arginase pathways are the amino acid metabolic pathways most sensitive to LPS-challenge. The cellular (Cit + Orn/(Arg + Asp ratio, which summarizes this pathway, was more responsive to lower concentrations of LPS and responded earlier than other metabolic biomarkers of macrophage activation including GSH redox. It is suggested that the CO/AA ratio is a redox- independent early biomarker of

  4. Redox Regulation in Cancer: A Double-edged Sword with Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Acharya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, implicated in the etiology of cancer, results from an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and cell’s own antioxidant defenses. ROS deregulate the redox homeostasis and promote tumor formation by initiating an aberrant induction of signaling networks that cause tumorigenesis. Ultraviolet (UV exposures, γ-radiation and other environmental carcinogens generate ROS in the cells, which can exert apoptosis in the tumors, thereby killing the malignant cells or induce the progression of the cancer growth by blocking cellular defense system. Cancer stem cells take the advantage of the aberrant redox system and spontaneously proliferate. Oxidative stress and gene-environment interactions play a significant role in the development of breast, prostate, pancreatic and colon cancer. Prolonged lifetime exposure to estrogen is associated with several kinds of DNA damage. Oxidative stress and estrogen receptor-associated proliferative changes are suggested to play important roles in estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. BRCA1, a tumor suppressor against hormone responsive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer, plays a significant role in inhibiting ROS and estrogen mediated DNA damage; thereby regulate the redox homeostasis of the cells. Several transcription factors and tumor suppressors are involved during stress response such as Nrf2, NFκB and BRCA1. A promising strategy for targeting redox status of the cells is to use readily available natural substances from vegetables, fruits, herbs and spices. Many of the phytochemicals have already been identified to have chemopreventive potential, capable of intervening in carcinogenesis.

  5. Redox states of Desulfovibrio vulgaris DsrC, a key protein in dissimilatory sulfite reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venceslau, Sofia S. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Cort, John R.; Baker, Erin S. [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Chu, Rosalie K.; Robinson, Errol W. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Dahl, Christiane [Institut für Mikrobiologie and Biotechnologie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Meckenheimer Allee 168, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Saraiva, Lígia M. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Pereira, Inês A.C., E-mail: ipereira@itqb.unl.pt [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •DsrC is known to interact with the dissimilatory sulfite reductase enzyme (DsrAB). •We show that, however, most cellular DsrC is not associated with DsrAB. •A gel-shift assay was developed that allows monitoring of the DsrC redox state. •The DsrC intramolecularly oxidized state could only be produced by arginine treatment. -- Abstract: Dissimilatory reduction of sulfite is carried out by the siroheme enzyme DsrAB, with the involvement of the protein DsrC, which has two conserved redox-active cysteines. DsrC was initially believed to be a third subunit of DsrAB. Here, we report a study of the distribution of DsrC in cell extracts to show that, in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the majority of DsrC is not associated with DsrAB and is thus free to interact with other proteins. In addition, we developed a cysteine-labelling gel-shift assay to monitor the DsrC redox state and behaviour, and procedures to produce the different redox forms. The oxidized state of DsrC with an intramolecular disulfide bond, which is proposed to be a key metabolic intermediate, could be successfully produced for the first time by treatment with arginine.

  6. Redox-based epigenetic status in drug addiction: a potential contributor to gene priming and a mechanistic rationale for metabolic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Malav S; Deth, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and other drugs of abuse, including psychostimulants and opioids, can induce epigenetic changes: a contributing factor for drug addiction, tolerance, and associated withdrawal symptoms. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism and it is one of more than 200 methylation reactions supported by methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Levels of SAM are controlled by cellular redox status via the folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS). For example, under oxidative conditions MS is inhibited, diverting its substrate homocysteine (HCY) to the trans sulfuration pathway. Alcohol, dopamine, and morphine, can alter intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH)-based cellular redox status, subsequently affecting SAM levels and DNA methylation status. Here, existing evidence is presented in a coherent manner to propose a novel hypothesis implicating the involvement of redox-based epigenetic changes in drug addiction. Further, we discuss how a "gene priming" phenomenon can contribute to the maintenance of redox and methylation status homeostasis under various stimuli including drugs of abuse. Additionally, a new mechanistic rationale for the use of metabolic interventions/redox-replenishers as symptomatic treatment of alcohol and other drug addiction and associated withdrawal symptoms is also provided. Hence, the current review article strengthens the hypothesis that neuronal metabolism has a critical bidirectional coupling with epigenetic changes in drug addiction exemplified by the link between redox-based metabolic changes and resultant epigenetic consequences under the effect of drugs of abuse. PMID:25657617

  7. Redox-based Epigenetic status in Drug Addiction: Potential mediator of drug-induced gene priming phenomenon and use of metabolic intervention for symptomatic treatment in drug addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malav Suchin Trivedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol and other drugs of abuse, including psychostimulants and opioids, can induce epigenetic changes: a contributing factor for drug addiction, tolerance and associated withdrawal symptoms. DNA methylation is the major epigenetic mechanism and it is one of more than 200 methylation reactions supported by methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM. The levels of SAM are controlled by cellular redox status via the folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS, for example; under oxidative conditions MS is inhibited, diverting its substrate homocysteine (HCY to the transsulfuration pathway. Alcohol, dopamine and morphine, can alter intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH-based cellular redox status, subsequently affecting S-adenosylmethionine (SAM levels and DNA methylation status. In this discussion, we compile this and other existing evidence in a coherent manner to present a novel hypothesis implicating the involvement of redox-based epigenetic changes in drug addiction. Next, we also discuss how gene priming phenomenon can contribute to maintenance of redox and methylation status homeostasis under various stimuli including drugs of abuse. Lastly, based on our hypothesis and some preliminary evidence, we discuss a mechanistic explanation for use of metabolic interventions / redox-replenishers as symptomatic treatment of alcohol addiction and associated withdrawal symptoms. Hence, the current review article strengthens the hypothesis that neuronal metabolism has a critical bidirectional coupling with epigenetic changes in drug addiction and we support this claim via exemplifying the link between redox-based metabolic changes and resultant epigenetic consequences under the effect of drugs of abuse.

  8. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by cellular labile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kyohei; Kawakami, Toru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Tomizawa, Miyu; Fujiwara, Tohru; Ishii, Tomonori; Harigae, Hideo; Ogasawara, Kouetsu

    2016-02-01

    Cellular labile iron, which contains chelatable redox-active Fe(2+), has been implicated in iron-mediated cellular toxicity leading to multiple organ dysfunction. Iron homeostasis is controlled by monocytes/macrophages through their iron recycling and storage capacities. Furthermore, iron sequestration by monocytes/macrophages is regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1, highlighting the importance of these cells in the crosstalk between inflammation and iron homeostasis. However, a role for cellular labile iron in monocyte/macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses has not been defined. Here we describe how cellular labile iron activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes. Stimulation of lipopolysaccharide-primed peripheral blood mononuclear cells with ferric ammonium citrate increases the level of cellular Fe(2+) levels in monocytes and induces production of interleukin-1β in a dose-dependent manner. This ferric ammonium citrate-induced interleukin-1β production is dependent on caspase-1 and is significantly inhibited by an Fe(2+)-specific chelator. Ferric ammonium citrate consistently induced interleukin-1β secretion in THP1 cells, but not in NLRP3-deficient THP1 cells, indicating a requirement for the NLRP3 inflammasome. Additionally, activation of the inflammasome is mediated by potassium efflux, reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction, and lysosomal membrane permeabilization. Thus, these results suggest that monocytes/macrophages not only sequestrate iron during inflammation, but also mediate inflammation in response to cellular labile iron, which provides novel insights into the role of iron in chronic inflammation. PMID:26577567

  9. Carbon Redox-Polymer-Gel Hybrid Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, A.; Singh, N.; Melinte, S.; Gohy, J.-F.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy storage devices that provide high specific power without compromising on specific energy are highly desirable for many electric-powered applications. Here, we demonstrate that polymer organic radical gel materials support fast bulk-redox charge storage, commensurate to surface double layer ion exchange at carbon electrodes. When integrated with a carbon-based electrical double layer capacitor, nearly ideal electrode properties such as high electrical and ionic conductivity, fast bulk redox and surface charge storage as well as excellent cycling stability are attained. Such hybrid carbon redox-polymer-gel electrodes support unprecedented discharge rate of 1,000C with 50% of the nominal capacity delivered in less than 2 seconds. Devices made with such electrodes hold the potential for battery-scale energy storage while attaining supercapacitor-like power performances.

  10. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  11. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  12. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  13. Electrochemical Potential Gradient as a Quantitative in Vitro Test Platform for Cellular Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Carson; Atha, Donald; Reipa, Vytas

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress in a biological system is often defined as a redox imbalance within cells or groups of cells within an organism. Reductive-oxidative (redox) imbalances in cellular systems have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer. To better understand the redox environment within cellular systems, it is important to be able to characterize the relationship between the intensity of the oxidative environment, characterized by redox potential, and the biomolecular consequences of oxidative damage. In this study, we show that an in situ electrochemical potential gradient can serve as a tool to simulate exogenous oxidative stress in surface-attached mammalian cells. A culture plate design, which permits direct imaging and analysis of the cell viability, following exposure to a range of solution redox potentials, was developed. The in vitro oxidative stress test vessel consists of a cell growth flask fitted with two platinum electrodes that support a direct current along the flask bottom. The applied potential span and gradient slope can be controlled by adjusting the constant current magnitude across the vessel with spatially localized media potentials measured with a sliding reference electrode. For example, the viability of Chinese Hamster Ovary cells under a gradient of redox potentials indicated that cell death was initiated at approximately 0.4 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) media potential and this potential could be modified with antioxidants. This experimental platform may facilitate studies of oxidative stress characteristics on different types of cells by enabling imaging live cell cultures that have been exposed to a gradient of exogenous redox potentials. PMID:27409641

  14. Cellular Response to Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bo; YAN Shi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    To explore the nonlinear activities of the cellular signaling system composed of one transcriptional arm and one protein-interaction arm, we use an irradiation-response module to study the dynamics of stochastic interactions.It is shown that the oscillatory behavior could be described in a unified way when the radiation-derived signal and noise are incorporated.

  15. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  16. Redox imbalance mediates entomotoxic effects of the conifer Araucaria angustifolia in Anticarsia gemmatalis velvetbean caterpillar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia dos Santos Branco

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The velvetbean caterpillar, Anticarsia gemmatalis is one of the most important pests of soybean crops in tropical America. By feeding on leaves, significant defoliation occurs resulting in reduced photosynthetic capacity required for plants’ maintenance and growth, which subsequently can lead to crop losses and reduced agricultural productivity. Many studies have sought to look for compounds that have insecticidal effects. One class of compounds is phenolics, which are produced by plants and have been found to influence the behavior and development of defoliators, representing an important alternative approach to many synthetic insecticides. Particularly, Araucaria angustifolia is a plant rich in polyphenols, which are compounds able to alter cellular dynamics through modulating redox status. In this study, A. angustifolia extract (AAE was added to the artificial diet of A. gemmatalis. The results demonstrated that AAE was able to reduce larval viability by inducing morphological changes and a delay in the insect’s development. In addition, AAE was found to induce oxidative damage to lipids and proteins, as well as increased nitric oxide levels in A. gemmatalis larvae. AAE treatments also decreased the antioxidant defense systems, leading to a redox imbalance. The reduction in viability in A. gemmatalis was positively correlated with oxidative markers, suggesting that redox imbalance can lead to larvae’s death. These results suggest that AAE possess insecticidal potential through the mechanisms of action of altering cellular redox state. Though further studies are required to confirm this, our study nevertheless contributes to a better understanding of AAE’s mechanisms of action as potential biopesticides in pest management, opening new perspectives on the development of compounds with insecticidal action.

  17. Increasing the reactivity of an artificial dithiol-disulfide pair through modification of the electrostatic milieu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rosa E; Østergaard, Henrik; Winther, Jakob R

    2005-01-01

    The thiol-disulfide exchange reaction plays a central role in the formation of disulfide bonds in newly synthesized proteins and is involved in many aspects of cellular metabolism. Because the thiolate form of the cysteine residue is the key reactive species, its electrostatic milieu is thought...... to play a key role in determining the rates of thiol disulfide exchange reactions. While modest reactivity effects have previously been seen in peptide model studies, here, we show that introduction of positive charges can have dramatic effects on disulfide bond formation on a structurally restricted....... Introduction of positively charged amino acids in the proximity of the two cysteines resulted in an up to 13-fold increase in reactivity toward glutathione disulfide. Determination of the individual pK(a) values of the cysteines showed that the observed increase in reactivity was caused by a decrease in the p...

  18. Electron Transfer rate between a electrode and a bridged redox

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, A. V. B.; Mishra, A. K.; Schmickler, W.

    2009-01-01

    We derive an explict bias dependent expression for electron transfer reaction rate from a solvated redox to a electrode through a bridged molecule of arbitrary length. The interaction of the solvated redox with the solvent is modelled as a classical harmonic oscillator bath. The effect of competing process, namely resonance tunneling between redox and bridge and the solvation of the redox is investigated. Plots were produced for the case of 5 atom bridge. Our analysis shows that for certain s...

  19. Le reazioni redox: un pasticcio concettuale?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ghibaudi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Le reazioni di ossidoriduzione costituiscono un argomento centrale di qualsiasi corso di base di chimica, sia a livello scolastico che universitario. Il loro apprendimento comporta il superamento di svariati ostacoli concettuali, la cui difficoltà può risultare amplificata da prassi didattiche inadeguate. Gli errori più ricorrenti nel presentare l’argomento sono di due tipi: i fare implicitamente riferimento a modelli esplicativi distinti (es. il numero di ossidazione e il trasferimento elettronico, senza esplicitarli e senza evidenziarne la differente natura e il campo di validità; ii confondere il livello della spiegazione formale con quello della realtà fisica. I fenomeni redox sono normalmente interpretati sulla base di tre distinti modelli empirici, che fanno riferimento al trasferimento di atomi di ossigeno, di atomi di idrogeno, di elettroni; e di un quarto modello, formale, fondato sul cambiamento del numero di ossidazione. La confusione tra questi modelli può generare considerevoli problemi di apprendimento. Il presente lavoro riporta un’analisi critica delle implicazioni concettuali della didattica dei processi redox. L’analisi è articolata in tre sezioni: i disamina della evoluzione storica del concetto di ossidoriduzione; ii analisi dei modelli redox e del loro campo di validità; iii discussione di alcuni aspetti epistemologici inerenti i processi redox che sono rilevanti per la didattica della chimica.

  20. Redox cycling of potential antitumor aziridinylquinones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lusthof, Klaas J.; Mol, de Nicolaas J.; Richter, Wilma; Janssen, Lambert H.M.; Butler, John; Hoey, Brigid M.; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1992-01-01

    The formation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) during redox cycling of newly synthetized potential antitumor 2,5-bis (1-aziridinyl)-1,4-benzoquinone (BABQ) derivatives has been studied by assaying the production of ROI (superoxide, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide) by xanthine oxidase i

  1. Metathetical Redox Reaction of (Diacetoxyiodoarenes and Iodoarenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Jobin-Des Lauriers

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of iodoarenes is central to the field of hypervalent iodine chemistry. It was found that the metathetical redox reaction between (diacetoxyiodoarenes and iodoarenes is possible in the presence of a catalytic amount of Lewis acid. This discovery opens a new strategy to access (diacetoxyiodoarenes. A computational study is provided to rationalize the results observed.

  2. Cytosolic NADH-NAD+ Redox Visualized in Brain Slices by Two-Photon Fluorescence Lifetime Biosensor Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongeon, Rebecca; Venkatachalam, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Cytosolic NADH-NAD+ redox state is central to cellular metabolism and a valuable indicator of glucose and lactate metabolism in living cells. Here we sought to quantitatively determine NADH-NAD+ redox in live cells and brain tissue using a fluorescence lifetime imaging of the genetically-encoded single-fluorophore biosensor Peredox. Results: We show that Peredox exhibits a substantial change in its fluorescence lifetime over its sensing range of NADH-NAD+ ratio. This allows changes in cytosolic NADH redox to be visualized in living cells using a two-photon scanning microscope with fluorescence lifetime imaging capabilities (2p-FLIM), using time-correlated single photon counting. Innovation: Because the lifetime readout is absolutely calibrated (in nanoseconds) and is independent of sensor concentration, we demonstrate that quantitative assessment of NADH redox is possible using a single fluorophore biosensor. Conclusion: Imaging of the sensor in mouse hippocampal brain slices reveals that astrocytes are typically much more reduced (with higher NADH:NAD+ ratio) than neurons under basal conditions, consistent with the hypothesis that astrocytes are more glycolytic than neurons. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 553–563. PMID:26857245

  3. Bimetallic redox synergy in oxidative palladium catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, David C; Ritter, Tobias

    2012-06-19

    Polynuclear transition metal complexes, which are embedded in the active sites of many metalloenzymes, are responsible for effecting a diverse array of oxidation reactions in nature. The range of chemical transformations remains unparalleled in the laboratory. With few noteworthy exceptions, chemists have primarily focused on mononuclear transition metal complexes in developing homogeneous catalysis. Our group is interested in the development of carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions, with a particular focus on identifying reactions that can be applied to the synthesis of complex molecules. In this context, we have hypothesized that bimetallic redox chemistry, in which two metals participate synergistically, may lower the activation barriers to redox transformations relevant to catalysis. In this Account, we discuss redox chemistry of binuclear Pd complexes and examine the role of binuclear intermediates in Pd-catalyzed oxidation reactions. Stoichiometric organometallic studies of the oxidation of binuclear Pd(II) complexes to binuclear Pd(III) complexes and subsequent C-X reductive elimination from the resulting binuclear Pd(III) complexes have confirmed the viability of C-X bond-forming reactions mediated by binuclear Pd(III) complexes. Metal-metal bond formation, which proceeds concurrently with oxidation of binuclear Pd(II) complexes, can lower the activation barrier for oxidation. We also discuss experimental and theoretical work that suggests that C-X reductive elimination is also facilitated by redox cooperation of both metals during reductive elimination. The effect of ligand modification on the structure and reactivity of binuclear Pd(III) complexes will be presented in light of the impact that ligand structure can exert on the structure and reactivity of binuclear Pd(III) complexes. Historically, oxidation reactions similar to those discussed here have been proposed to proceed via mononuclear Pd(IV) intermediates, and the hypothesis of mononuclear Pd

  4. Are bioassays useful tools to assess redox processes and biodegradation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Pedersen, Philip Grinder; Ludvigsen, L.

    2002-01-01

    When evaluating potentials for natural attenuation, assessment of ongoing redox processes are important. Terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) such as denitrification, Fe(Ill), Mn(IV), and sulphate reduction and methane production have been assessed by several approaches including redox s...... of aromatic and chlorinated aliphatic compounds in landfill leachate plumes, and of pesticides in aquifers with various redox conditions....

  5. Redox proteomics for the assessment of redox-related posttranslational regulation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Hans-Peter; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-08-01

    The methodological developments of in vivo and in vitro protein labeling and subsequent detection enable sensitive and specific detection of redox modifications. Such methods are presently applied to diverse cells and tissues, subproteomes and developmental as well as environmental conditions. The chloroplast proteome is particularly suitable for such kind of studies, because redox regulation of chloroplast proteins is well established, many plastid proteins are abundant, redox network components have been inventoried in great depth, and functional consequences explored. Thus the repertoire of redox-related posttranslational modifications on the one hand side and their abundance on the other pose a challenge for the near future to understand their contribution to physiological regulation. The various posttranslational redox modifications are introduced, followed by a description of the available proteomics methods. The significance of the redox-related posttranslational modification is exemplarily worked out using established examples from photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock.

  6. Redox proteomics for the assessment of redox-related posttranslational regulation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Hans-Peter; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-08-01

    The methodological developments of in vivo and in vitro protein labeling and subsequent detection enable sensitive and specific detection of redox modifications. Such methods are presently applied to diverse cells and tissues, subproteomes and developmental as well as environmental conditions. The chloroplast proteome is particularly suitable for such kind of studies, because redox regulation of chloroplast proteins is well established, many plastid proteins are abundant, redox network components have been inventoried in great depth, and functional consequences explored. Thus the repertoire of redox-related posttranslational modifications on the one hand side and their abundance on the other pose a challenge for the near future to understand their contribution to physiological regulation. The various posttranslational redox modifications are introduced, followed by a description of the available proteomics methods. The significance of the redox-related posttranslational modification is exemplarily worked out using established examples from photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics - a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26784836

  7. Differential Contribution of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complexes to Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Redox Cycling Agents Implicated in Parkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    Drechsel, Derek A.; Patel, Manisha

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to environmental pesticides can cause significant brain damage and has been linked with an increased risk of developing neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease. Bipyridyl herbicides, such as paraquat (PQ), diquat (DQ), and benzyl viologen (BV), are redox cycling agents known to exert cellular damage through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We examined the involvement of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in ROS production by bipyridyl herbicides. I...

  8. Regulation of autophagy in oxygen-dependent cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by supraphysiological production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), can cause cellular injury associated with protein and lipid oxidation, DNA damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The cellular responses triggered by oxidative stress include the altered regulation of signaling pathways that culminate in the regulation of cell survival or cell death pathways. Recent studies suggest that autophagy, a cellular homeostatic process that governs the turnover of damaged organelles and proteins, may represent a general cellular and tissue response to oxidative stress. The autophagic pathway involves the encapsulation of substrates in double-membraned vesicles, which are subsequently delivered to the lysosome for enzymatic degradation and recycling of metabolic precursors. Autophagy may play multifunctional roles in cellular adaptation to stress, by maintaining mitochondrial integrity, and removing damaged proteins. Additionally, autophagy may play important roles in the regulation of inflammation and immune function. Modulation of the autophagic pathway has been reported in cell culture models of oxidative stress, including altered states of oxygen tension (i.e., hypoxia, hyperoxia), and exposure to oxidants. Furthermore, proteins that regulate autophagy may be subject to redox regulation. The heme oxygenase- 1 (HO)-1 enzyme system may have a role in the regulation of autophagy. Recent studies suggest that carbon monoxide (CO), a reaction product of HO activity which can alter mitochondrial function, may induce autophagy in cultured epithelial cells. In conclusion, current research suggests a central role for autophagy as a mammalian oxidative stress response and its interrelationship to other stress defense systems. PMID:23092322

  9. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  10. Magnetic Cellular Switches

    OpenAIRE

    Overby, Darryl R.; Alenghat, Francis J.; Montoya-Zavala, Martín; Bei, HuCheng; Oh, Philmo; Karavitis, John; Ingber, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of magnetic cellular switches to enable magnetic control of intracellular functions in living mammalian cells, including receptor signal transduction and gene transcription. Our approach takes advantage of the mechanosensitivity of adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) induction and downstream transcription controlled by the cAMP regulatory element (CRE) to engineer gene constructs that optically report gene expression in living cells. We activate transcri...

  11. The role of intracellular redox imbalance in nanomaterial induced cellular damage and genotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Chauché, Caroline; Brown, David M;

    2015-01-01

    as one of the main contributors to nanomaterial (NM) induced adverse effects. One of the most important and widely investigated of these effects is genotoxicity. In general, systems that defend an organism against oxidative damage to DNA are very complex and include prevention of reactive oxygen species...

  12. Cellular Interaction and Toxicity Depends on Physiochemical Properties and Surface Modification of Redox Active Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Dowding, Janet M.; Das, Soumen; Kumar, Amit; Dosani, Talib; McCormack, Rameech; Gupta, Ankur; Sayle, Thi X. T.; Sayle, Dean C.; von Kalm, Laurence; SEAL, SUDIPTA; Self, William T.

    2013-01-01

    The study of the chemical and biological properties of CeO2 NPs (CNPs) has expanded recently due to its therapeutic potential, and the methods used to synthesize these materials are diverse. Moreover, conflicting reports exists regarding the toxicity of CNP. To help resolve these discrepancies, we must first determine whether CeO2 NPs made by different methods are similar or different in their physiochemical and catalytic properties. In this paper, we have synthesized several forms of CNPs us...

  13. Cellular interaction and toxicity depend on physicochemical properties and surface modification of redox-active nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Janet M; Das, Soumen; Kumar, Amit; Dosani, Talib; McCormack, Rameech; Gupta, Ankur; Sayle, Thi X T; Sayle, Dean C; von Kalm, Laurence; Seal, Sudipta; Self, William T

    2013-06-25

    The study of the chemical and biological properties of CeO2 nanoparticles (CNPs) has expanded recently due to its therapeutic potential, and the methods used to synthesize these materials are diverse. Moreover, conflicting reports exist regarding the toxicity of CNPs. To help resolve these discrepancies, we must first determine whether CNPs made by different methods are similar or different in their physicochemical and catalytic properties. In this paper, we have synthesized several forms of CNPs using identical precursors through a wet chemical process but using different oxidizer/reducer; H2O2 (CNP1), NH4OH (CNP2), or hexamethylenetetramine (HMT-CNP1). Physicochemical properties of these CNPs were extensively studied and found to be different depending on the preparation methods. Unlike CNP1 and CNP2, HMT-CNP1 was readily taken into endothelial cells and the aggregation can be visualized using light microscopy. Exposure to HMT-CNP1 also reduced cell viability at a 10-fold lower concentration than CNP1 or CNP2. Surprisingly, exposure to HMT-CNP1 led to substantial decreases in ATP levels. Mechanistic studies revealed that HMT-CNP1 exhibited substantial ATPase (phosphatase) activity. Though CNP2 also exhibits ATPase activity, CNP1 lacked ATPase activity. The difference in catalytic (ATPase) activity of different CNPs preparation may be due to differences in their morphology and oxygen extraction energy. These results suggest that the combination of increased uptake and ATPase activity of HMT-CNP1 may underlie the biomechanism of the toxicity of this preparation of CNPs and may suggest that ATPase activity should be considered when synthesizing CNPs for use in biomedical applications. PMID:23668322

  14. Adaptation of Organisms by Resonance of RNA Transcription with the Cellular Redox Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    Sequence variation in organisms differs across the genome and the majority of mutations are caused by oxidation, yet its origin is not fully understood. It has also been shown that the reduction-oxidation reaction cycle is the fundamental biochemical cycle that coordinates the timing of all biochemical processes in that cell, including energy production, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. It is shown that the temporal resonance of transcriptome biosynthesis with the oscillating binary state of the reduction-oxidation reaction cycle serves as a basis for non-random sequence variation at specific genome-wide coordinates that change faster than by accumulation of chance mutations. This work demonstrates evidence for a universal, persistent and iterative feedback mechanism between the environment and heredity, whereby acquired variation between cell divisions can outweigh inherited variation.

  15. Cellular therapy in Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreemanta K. Parida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB. We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs, as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy.

  16. Cellular Defense System Gene Expression Profiling of Human Whole Blood: Opportunities to Predict Health Benefits in Response to Diet12

    OpenAIRE

    Drew, Janice E.

    2012-01-01

    Diet is a critical factor in the maintenance of human cellular defense systems, immunity, inflammation, redox regulation, metabolism, and DNA repair that ensure optimal health and reduce disease risk. Assessment of dietary modulation of cellular defense systems in humans has been limited due to difficulties in accessing target tissues. Notably, peripheral blood gene expression profiles associated with nonhematologic disease are detectable. Coupled with recent innovations in gene expression te...

  17. Nerves Control Redox Levels in Mature Tissues Through Schwann Cells and Hedgehog Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Meda, Francesca; Gauron, Carole; Rampon, Christine; Teillon, Jérémie; Volovitch, Michel; Vriz, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Recent advances in redox biology have emphasized the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the modulation of signaling pathways and revealed that H2O2 plays a role in cellular remodeling in adults. Thus, an understanding of the mechanisms that control H2O2 levels in mature tissue would be of great interest. Results: We used a denervation strategy to demonstrate that sensory neurons are responsible for controlling H2O2 levels under normal conditions and after being lesioned. Moreo...

  18. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented rise of mobile user demand over the years have led to an enormous growth of the energy consumption of wireless networks as well as the greenhouse gas emissions which are estimated currently to be around 70 million tons per year. This significant growth of energy consumption impels network companies to pay huge bills which represent around half of their operating expenditures. Therefore, many service providers, including mobile operators, are looking for new and modern green solutions to help reduce their expenses as well as the level of their CO2 emissions. Base stations are the most power greedy element in cellular networks: they drain around 80% of the total network energy consumption even during low traffic periods. Thus, there is a growing need to develop more energy-efficient techniques to enhance the green performance of future 4G/5G cellular networks. Due to the problem of traffic load fluctuations in cellular networks during different periods of the day and between different areas (shopping or business districts and residential areas), the base station sleeping strategy has been one of the main popular research topics in green communications. In this presentation, we present several practical green techniques that provide significant gains for mobile operators. Indeed, combined with the base station sleeping strategy, these techniques achieve not only a minimization of the fossil fuel consumption but also an enhancement of mobile operator profits. We start with an optimized cell planning method that considers varying spatial and temporal user densities. We then use the optimal transport theory in order to define the cell boundaries such that the network total transmit power is reduced. Afterwards, we exploit the features of the modern electrical grid, the smart grid, as a new tool of power management for cellular networks and we optimize the energy procurement from multiple energy retailers characterized by different prices and pollutant

  19. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation.......Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...

  20. Reactive oxygen species and redox compartmentalization

    OpenAIRE

    Kaludercic, Nina; Deshwal, Soni; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and signaling are of major importance and regulate a number of processes in physiological conditions. A disruption in redox status regulation, however, has been associated with numerous pathological conditions. In recent years it has become increasingly clear that oxidative and reductive modifications are confined in a spatio-temporal manner. This makes ROS signaling similar to that of Ca2+ or other second messengers. Some subcellular compartments are m...

  1. Proterozoic ocean redox and biogeochemical stasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Christopher T; Planavsky, Noah J; Robbins, Leslie J; Partin, Camille A; Gill, Benjamin C; Lalonde, Stefan V; Bekker, Andrey; Konhauser, Kurt O; Lyons, Timothy W

    2013-04-01

    The partial pressure of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere has increased dramatically through time, and this increase is thought to have occurred in two rapid steps at both ends of the Proterozoic Eon (∼2.5-0.543 Ga). However, the trajectory and mechanisms of Earth's oxygenation are still poorly constrained, and little is known regarding attendant changes in ocean ventilation and seafloor redox. We have a particularly poor understanding of ocean chemistry during the mid-Proterozoic (∼1.8-0.8 Ga). Given the coupling between redox-sensitive trace element cycles and planktonic productivity, various models for mid-Proterozoic ocean chemistry imply different effects on the biogeochemical cycling of major and trace nutrients, with potential ecological constraints on emerging eukaryotic life. Here, we exploit the differing redox behavior of molybdenum and chromium to provide constraints on seafloor redox evolution by coupling a large database of sedimentary metal enrichments to a mass balance model that includes spatially variant metal burial rates. We find that the metal enrichment record implies a Proterozoic deep ocean characterized by pervasive anoxia relative to the Phanerozoic (at least ∼30-40% of modern seafloor area) but a relatively small extent of euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic) seafloor (less than ∼1-10% of modern seafloor area). Our model suggests that the oceanic Mo reservoir is extremely sensitive to perturbations in the extent of sulfidic seafloor and that the record of Mo and chromium enrichments through time is consistent with the possibility of a Mo-N colimited marine biosphere during many periods of Earth's history.

  2. Advanced Materials for Redox Flow Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Friedl, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    We investigate two advanced materials electrochemically in order to see if they can be applied to improve energy- and power-density of Redox Flow Batteries (RFBs). First, multi-walled carbon nanotubes are analyzed as electrode material for the All-Vanadium RFB. We discovered that an enhanced activity assigned by previous studies was a misinterpretation caused by an apparent catalytic effect. Second, large inorganic molecules, polyoxometalates (POMs), were investigated as nano-sized el...

  3. Progress of all vanadium redox flow batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Aresearch team headed by Prof.ZHANG Huamin from the CAS Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics has made important progress in the research and development of a LED screen demo system powered by vanadium redox flow batteries (VRB).The system has operated continuously for over one year without any malfunction.So far,the total running time is up to 11,000 hours.

  4. Protein carbonylation as a novel mechanism in redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chi Ming; Cheema, Amrita K; Zhang, Lihua; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2008-02-15

    Reactive oxygen species serve as second messengers for signal transduction; however, molecular targets of oxidant signaling have not been defined. Here, we show that ligand-receptor-mediated signaling promotes reactive oxygen species-dependent protein carbonylation. Treatment of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells with endothelin-1 increased protein carbonyls. Carbonylation of the majority of proteins occurred transiently, suggesting that there is also a mechanism for decarbonylation induced by endothelin-1. Decarbonylation was suppressed by inhibition of thioredoxin reductase, and cellular thioredoxin was upregulated during the decarbonylation phase. These results indicate that endothelin-1 promotes oxidant signaling as well as thioredoxin-mediated reductive signaling to regulate carbonylation and decarbonylation mechanisms. In cells treated with endothelin receptor antagonists, hydrogen peroxide scavengers, or an iron chelator, we identified, via mass spectrometry, proteins that are carbonylated in a receptor- and Fenton reaction-dependent manner, including annexin A1, which promotes apoptosis and suppresses cell growth. Carbonylation of annexin A1 by endothelin-1 was followed by proteasome-dependent degradation of this protein. We propose that carbonylation and subsequent degradation of annexin A1 may play a role in endothelin-mediated cell growth and survival, important events in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Protein carbonylation in response to ligand-receptor interactions represents a novel mechanism in redox signaling.

  5. The Roles of Peroxiredoxin and Thioredoxin in Hydrogen Peroxide Sensing and in Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Luis E. S.; Antunes, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in the redox field is the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms, by which H2O2 mediates signal transduction in cells. This is relevant since redox pathways are disturbed in some pathologies. The transcription factor OxyR is the H2O2 sensor in bacteria, whereas Cys-based peroxidases are involved in the perception of this oxidant in eukaryotic cells. Three possible mechanisms may be involved in H2O2 signaling that are not mutually exclusive. In the simplest pathway, H2O2 signals through direct oxidation of the signaling protein, such as a phosphatase or a transcription factor. Although signaling proteins are frequently observed in the oxidized state in biological systems, in most cases their direct oxidation by H2O2 is too slow (101 M−1s−1 range) to outcompete Cys-based peroxidases and glutathione. In some particular cellular compartments (such as vicinity of NADPH oxidases), it is possible that a signaling protein faces extremely high H2O2 concentrations, making the direct oxidation feasible. Alternatively, high H2O2 levels can hyperoxidize peroxiredoxins leading to local building up of H2O2 that then could oxidize a signaling protein (floodgate hypothesis). In a second model, H2O2 oxidizes Cys-based peroxidases that then through thiol-disulfide reshuffling would transmit the oxidized equivalents to the signaling protein. The third model of signaling is centered on the reducing substrate of Cys-based peroxidases that in most cases is thioredoxin. Is this model, peroxiredoxins would signal by modulating the thioredoxin redox status. More kinetic data is required to allow the identification of the complex network of thiol switches. PMID:26813662

  6. Measurement of Redox Potential in Nanoecotoxicological Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Tantra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Redox potential has been identified by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD as one of the parameters that should be investigated for the testing of manufactured nanomaterials. There is still some ambiguity concerning this parameter, i.e., as to what and how to measure, particularly when in a nanoecotoxicological context. In this study the redox potentials of six nanomaterials (either zinc oxide (ZnO or cerium oxide (CeO2 dispersions were measured using an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP electrode probe. The particles under testing differed in terms of their particle size and dispersion stability in deionised water and in various ecotox media. The ORP values of the various dispersions and how they fluctuate relative to each other are discussed. Results show that the ORP values are mainly governed by the type of liquid media employed, with little contributions from the nanoparticles. Seawater was shown to have reduced the ORP value, which was attributed to an increase in the concentration of reducing agents such as sulphites or the reduction of dissolved oxygen concentration. The lack of redox potential value contribution from the particles themselves is thought to be due to insufficient interaction of the particles at the Pt electrode of the ORP probe.

  7. X-ray voltabsorptometry on redox proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascone, Isabella [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy) and LURE/CNRS Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, bat. 209 D, B.P. 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France)]. E-mail: i.ascone@caspur.it; Zamponi, Silvia [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Camerino, Via S. Agostino 1, 62032 Camerino (Italy); Cognigni, Andrea [LURE/CNRS Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, bat. 209 D, B.P. 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Marmocchi, Franco [Dipartimento di Biologia Molecolare, Cellulare e Animale, Universita di Camerino, Via Camerini, 1 Camerino (Italy); Marassi, Roberto [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Camerino, Via S. Agostino 1, 62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2005-04-15

    Biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS) is able to describe the metal environment in a metalloprotein and is sensitive to metal oxidation state. Coupling of BioXAS and electrochemistry permits the characterization of different oxidation states and avoids uncontrolled protein redox state changes due to X-ray beam irradiation. XAS spectroelectrochemistry requires electrochemical cells specifically designed to meet the requirements of both XAS measurements and electrochemical effectiveness in potential control. In this context, this paper describes a new cell tested with different types of working electrodes developed for BioXAS, in particular for in situ studies of redox proteins. The XAS electrochemical measurements of a relatively high-molecular-weight protein (Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase) for which it is difficult to observe direct electrochemistry have been achieved. New working electrodes, capable of fast and unmediated electron transfer, are described. The cell permits to isolate protein redox states and to measure X-ray absorption intensity during a potential scan (X-ray voltabsorptometry)

  8. Membrane development for vanadium redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Zhang, Jianlu; Kim, Soowhan; Li, Liyu; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-17

    Large-scale energy storage has become the main bottleneck for increasing the percentage of renewable energy in our electricity grids. Redox flow batteries are considered to be among the best options for electricity storage in the megawatt range and large demonstration systems have already been installed. Although the full technological potential of these systems has not been reached yet, currently the main problem hindering more widespread commercialization is the high cost of redox flow batteries. Nafion, as the preferred membrane material, is responsible for about 11% of the overall cost of a 1 MW/8 MWh system. Therefore, in recent years two main membrane related research threads have emerged: 1) chemical and physical modification of Nafion membranes to optimize their properties with regard to vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application; and 2) replacement of the Nafion membranes with different, less expensive materials. This review summarizes the underlying basic scientific issues associated with membrane use in VRFBs and presents an overview of membrane-related research approaches aimed at improving the efficiency of VRFBs and making the technology cost-competitive. Promising research strategies and materials are identified and suggestions are provided on how materials issues could be overcome. PMID:22102992

  9. Membrane development for vanadium redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Zhang, Jianlu; Kim, Soowhan; Li, Liyu; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-17

    Large-scale energy storage has become the main bottleneck for increasing the percentage of renewable energy in our electricity grids. Redox flow batteries are considered to be among the best options for electricity storage in the megawatt range and large demonstration systems have already been installed. Although the full technological potential of these systems has not been reached yet, currently the main problem hindering more widespread commercialization is the high cost of redox flow batteries. Nafion, as the preferred membrane material, is responsible for about 11% of the overall cost of a 1 MW/8 MWh system. Therefore, in recent years two main membrane related research threads have emerged: 1) chemical and physical modification of Nafion membranes to optimize their properties with regard to vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application; and 2) replacement of the Nafion membranes with different, less expensive materials. This review summarizes the underlying basic scientific issues associated with membrane use in VRFBs and presents an overview of membrane-related research approaches aimed at improving the efficiency of VRFBs and making the technology cost-competitive. Promising research strategies and materials are identified and suggestions are provided on how materials issues could be overcome.

  10. Measurement of redox potential in nanoecotoxicological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantra, Ratna; Cackett, Alex; Peck, Roger; Gohil, Dipak; Snowden, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Redox potential has been identified by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) as one of the parameters that should be investigated for the testing of manufactured nanomaterials. There is still some ambiguity concerning this parameter, i.e., as to what and how to measure, particularly when in a nanoecotoxicological context. In this study the redox potentials of six nanomaterials (either zinc oxide (ZnO) or cerium oxide (CeO(2))) dispersions were measured using an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) electrode probe. The particles under testing differed in terms of their particle size and dispersion stability in deionised water and in various ecotox media. The ORP values of the various dispersions and how they fluctuate relative to each other are discussed. Results show that the ORP values are mainly governed by the type of liquid media employed, with little contributions from the nanoparticles. Seawater was shown to have reduced the ORP value, which was attributed to an increase in the concentration of reducing agents such as sulphites or the reduction of dissolved oxygen concentration. The lack of redox potential value contribution from the particles themselves is thought to be due to insufficient interaction of the particles at the Pt electrode of the ORP probe. PMID:22131988

  11. Crossing redox boundaries--aquifer redox history and effects on iron mineralogy and arsenic availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, Andre; Rüde, Thomas R; Dölling, Bettina

    2013-11-15

    Cretaceous shallow marine sediments from northwestern Germany exhibit a distinct colour and geochemical boundary in a depth of several decametres, witnessing a terrestrial oxidative paleo redox process which resulted in cement loss and oxidation of Fe(II) phases. Sediment samples were obtained from boreholes drilled in near-coastal and further basinward paleo environments, including both reduced and oxidized redox facies, to characterize As and Fe occurrence in unaltered layers and redistributional consequences of the redox event. Geochemical and mineralogical composition and As fractionation were assessed. Arsenic resides in pyrite in the reduced section with a bulk rock maximum concentration of 39 μg g(-1), calculated Aspyrite is ~0.2 wt.%. Siderite concretions in the fine sands do not function as As sinks, neither does glauconite whose general As/Fe leaching behaviour was characterized. In the zone of redox transition, reduced and oxidized phases coexist and elevated As concentrations (up to 73 μg g(-1)) with high proportions of reactive As were detected. Arsenic behaviour changes from relatively homogeneous Fe sulphide-control in the unaltered sediments to very heterogeneous Fe hydroxide-control above the paleo redox boundary. The studied characteristics determine recent As availability in the subsurface and must be considered during groundwater extraction from this highly important aquifer. PMID:23280400

  12. Therapeutic Targeting of Redox Signaling in Myofibroblast Differentiation and Age-Related Fibrotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Sampson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofibroblast activation plays a central role during normal wound healing. Whereas insufficient myofibroblast activation impairs wound healing, excessive myofibroblast activation promotes fibrosis in diverse tissues (including benign prostatic hyperplasia, BPH leading to organ dysfunction and also promotes a stromal response that supports tumor progression. The incidence of impaired wound healing, tissue fibrosis, BPH, and certain cancers strongly increases with age. This paper summarizes findings from in vitro fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation systems that serve as cellular models to study fibrogenesis of diverse tissues. Supported by substantial in vivo data, a large body of evidence indicates that myofibroblast differentiation induced by the profibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor beta is driven by a prooxidant shift in redox homeostasis due to elevated production of NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4-derived hydrogen peroxide and supported by concomitant decreases in nitric oxide/cGMP signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging enzymes. Fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation can be inhibited and reversed by restoring redox homeostasis using antioxidants or NOX4 inactivation as well as enhancing nitric oxide/cGMP signaling via activation of soluble guanylyl cyclases or inhibition of phosphodiesterases. Current evidence indicates the therapeutic potential of targeting the prooxidant shift in redox homeostasis for the treatment of age-related diseases associated with myofibroblast dysregulation.

  13. A Regulatory Role of NAD Redox Status on Flavin Cofactor Homeostasis in S. cerevisiae Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Anna Giancaspero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms. A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18, which is inhibited by NAD+ and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae.

  14. Physical Training Status Determines Oxidative Stress and Redox Changes in Response to an Acute Aerobic Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Seifi-skishahr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the influence of different physical training status on exercise-induced oxidative stress and changes in cellular redox state. Methods. Thirty male subjects participated in this study and were assigned as well-trained (WT, moderately trained (MT, and untrained (UT groups. The levels of cortisol, creatine kinase, plasma reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG, cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS, and GSH/GSSG ratio in red blood cells (RBCs were measured immediately and 10 and 30 min after exercise. Results. Following the exercise, plasma GSH/GSSG (p=0.001 and Cys/CySS (p=0.005 were significantly reduced in all groups. Reduction in plasma GSH/GSSG ratio in all groups induced a transient shift in redox balance towards a more oxidizing environment without difference between groups (p=0.860, while RBCs GSH/GSSG showed significant reduction (p=0.003 and elevation (p=0.007 in UT and MT groups, respectively. The highest level of RBCs GSH/GSSG ratio was recorded in MT group, and the lowest one was recorded in the WT group. Conclusion. Long term regular exercise training with moderate intensity shifts redox balance towards more reducing environment, versus intensive exercise training leads to more oxidizing environment and consequently development of related diseases.

  15. Unveiling the Redox Control of Plant Reproductive Development during Abiotic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinta, Gaurav; Khan, Asif; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Verma, Vipasha; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Plants being sessile in nature are often challenged to various abiotic stresses including temperature fluctuations, water supply, salinity, and nutrient availability. Exposure of plants to such environmental perturbations result in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. To scavenge ROS, enzymatic and molecular antioxidants are produced at a cellular level. ROS act as a signaling entity at lower concentrations maintaining normal growth and development, but if their levels increase beyond certain threshold, they produce toxic effects in plants. Some developmental stages, such as development of reproductive organs are more sensitive to abiotic stress than other stages of growth. As success of plant reproductive development is directly correlated with grain yield, stresses coinciding with reproductive phase results in the higher yield losses. In this article, we summarize the redox control of plant reproductive development, and elaborate how redox homeostasis is compromised during abiotic stress exposure. We highlight why more emphasis should be given to understand redox control of plant reproductive organ development during abiotic stress exposure96to engineer crops with better crop yield. We specifically discuss the role of ROS as a signaling molecule and its cross-talk with other signaling molecules such as hormones and sugars. PMID:27379102

  16. The Role of Copper Chaperone Atox1 in Coupling Redox Homeostasis to Intracellular Copper Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatori, Yuta; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) is a small cytosolic protein with an essential role in copper homeostasis. Atox1 functions as a copper carrier facilitating copper transfer to the secretory pathway. This process is required for activation of copper dependent enzymes involved in neurotransmitter biosynthesis, iron efflux, neovascularization, wound healing, and regulation of blood pressure. Recently, new cellular roles for Atox1 have emerged. Changing levels of Atox1 were shown to modulate response to cancer therapies, contribute to inflammatory response, and protect cells against various oxidative stresses. It has also become apparent that the activity of Atox1 is tightly linked to the cellular redox status. In this review, we summarize biochemical information related to a dual role of Atox1 as a copper chaperone and an antioxidant. We discuss how these two activities could be linked and contribute to establishing the intracellular copper balance and functional identity of cells during differentiation. PMID:27472369

  17. Redox Enzymes of Red Beetroot Vacuoles (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Pradedova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Years of research have shown that some of the redox elements (enzymes, coenzymes, and co-substrate are isolated from each other kinetic and spatial manner (compartmentalization in the eukaryotic cells. The redox elements forming the "highly" and "widely" specialized redox system are found in all cell structures: mitochondria, plastids, peroxisomes, apoplast, nucleus etc. In recent years the active involvement of the central vacuole in the maintenance of the plant cell redox homeostasis is discussed, actually the information about the vacuolar redox system is very small. The high-priority redox processes and "redox-specialization" of the vacuolar compartment are not known. We have begun a study of red beet-root vacuole redox systems (Beta vulgaris L. and have identified redox enzymes such as: phenol peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7, superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1 and glutathione reductase (EC 1.8.1.7. This paper presents some of the characteristics of these enzymes and considers the probable ways of their functioning in vacuolar redox chains.

  18. Redox environment effect on redox sensitive elements in surface sediments of the Changjiang Estuary hypoxia zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shumei XU; Shikui ZHAI; Aibin ZHANG; Huaijing ZHANG; Haijian LU

    2008-01-01

    The grain size and element (including redox sensitive elements and terrigenous elements) concentration of surface sediments from the Changjiang Estuary hypoxia zone and its adjacent sea area were measured in this research.Based on the obtained data,the hypoxic environment's influence on the distribution of elements in surface sediments was further studied.We believe that the "redox environment effect" greatly influences the distribution of the RSE,which reveals the "patchy enrichment pattern" offshore in the hypoxia zone,while the distribution of the terrigenous elements which shows the "stripped enrichment pattern" near shore is mainly affected by "granularity effects".Due to the existence of the hypoxia zone of the Changjiang Estuary,the distribution of the RSE such as Mo,Cd and V in the study area exhibits the characteristics of "redox environment effects".

  19. Local glutathione redox status does not regulate ileal mucosal growth after massive small bowel resection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Junqiang; Washizawa, Naohiro; Gu, Li H; Levin, Marc S; Wang, Lihua; Rubin, Deborah C; Mwangi, Simon; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Jones, Dean P; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2007-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) concentration affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in intestinal and other cell lines in vitro. However, in vivo data on gut mucosal GSH redox status and cell turnover are limited. We investigated the effect of altered GSH redox status on the ileal mucosa in a rat model of short bowel syndrome following massive small bowel resection (SBR). Rats underwent 80% mid-jejunoileal resection (RX) or small bowel transection (TX; as operative controls), with administration of either saline or D, L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO), a specific inhibitor of cellular GSH synthesis. Ileal mucosal redox, morphology, and indices of cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined at different days after surgery. Ileal GSH redox status was assessed by GSH and GSH disulfide (GSSG) concentrations and the redox potential of GSH/GSSG (Eh). Ileal lipid peroxidation [free malondialdehyde (MDA)] was measured as an index of lipid peroxidation. BSO markedly decreased ileal mucosal GSH, oxidized GSH/GSSG Eh, and increased MDA content without inducing morphological damage as assessed by light or electron microscopy. As expected, SBR stimulated adaptive growth of ileal villus height and total mucosal height at 7 d after surgery, but this response was unaffected by BSO treatment despite a modest increase in crypt cell apoptosis. Ileal cell proliferation (crypt cell bromodeoxyuridine incorporation) increased at 2 d after SBR but was unaffected by BSO. Collectively, our in vivo data show that marked depletion of ileal GSH and oxidation of the GSH redox pool does not alter indices of ileal epithelial proliferation or SBR-induced ileal mucosal adaptive growth.

  20. Nanoscale Electrochemical Sensor Arrays: Redox Cycling Amplification in Dual-Electrode Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrum, Bernhard; Kätelhön, Enno; Yakushenko, Alexey; Krause, Kay J; Adly, Nouran; Hüske, Martin; Rinklin, Philipp

    2016-09-20

    Micro- and nanofabriation technologies have a tremendous potential for the development of powerful sensor array platforms for electrochemical detection. The ability to integrate electrochemical sensor arrays with microfluidic devices nowadays provides possibilities for advanced lab-on-a-chip technology for the detection or quantification of multiple targets in a high-throughput approach. In particular, this is interesting for applications outside of analytical laboratories, such as point-of-care (POC) or on-site water screening where cost, measurement time, and the size of individual sensor devices are important factors to be considered. In addition, electrochemical sensor arrays can monitor biological processes in emerging cell-analysis platforms. Here, recent progress in the design of disease model systems and organ-on-a-chip technologies still needs to be matched by appropriate functionalities for application of external stimuli and read-out of cellular activity in long-term experiments. Preferably, data can be gathered not only at a singular location but at different spatial scales across a whole cell network, calling for new sensor array technologies. In this Account, we describe the evolution of chip-based nanoscale electrochemical sensor arrays, which have been developed and investigated in our group. Focusing on design and fabrication strategies that facilitate applications for the investigation of cellular networks, we emphasize the sensing of redox-active neurotransmitters on a chip. To this end, we address the impact of the device architecture on sensitivity, selectivity as well as on spatial and temporal resolution. Specifically, we highlight recent work on redox-cycling concepts using nanocavity sensor arrays, which provide an efficient amplification strategy for spatiotemporal detection of redox-active molecules. As redox-cycling electrochemistry critically depends on the ability to miniaturize and integrate closely spaced electrode systems, the

  1. Nanoscale Electrochemical Sensor Arrays: Redox Cycling Amplification in Dual-Electrode Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrum, Bernhard; Kätelhön, Enno; Yakushenko, Alexey; Krause, Kay J; Adly, Nouran; Hüske, Martin; Rinklin, Philipp

    2016-09-20

    Micro- and nanofabriation technologies have a tremendous potential for the development of powerful sensor array platforms for electrochemical detection. The ability to integrate electrochemical sensor arrays with microfluidic devices nowadays provides possibilities for advanced lab-on-a-chip technology for the detection or quantification of multiple targets in a high-throughput approach. In particular, this is interesting for applications outside of analytical laboratories, such as point-of-care (POC) or on-site water screening where cost, measurement time, and the size of individual sensor devices are important factors to be considered. In addition, electrochemical sensor arrays can monitor biological processes in emerging cell-analysis platforms. Here, recent progress in the design of disease model systems and organ-on-a-chip technologies still needs to be matched by appropriate functionalities for application of external stimuli and read-out of cellular activity in long-term experiments. Preferably, data can be gathered not only at a singular location but at different spatial scales across a whole cell network, calling for new sensor array technologies. In this Account, we describe the evolution of chip-based nanoscale electrochemical sensor arrays, which have been developed and investigated in our group. Focusing on design and fabrication strategies that facilitate applications for the investigation of cellular networks, we emphasize the sensing of redox-active neurotransmitters on a chip. To this end, we address the impact of the device architecture on sensitivity, selectivity as well as on spatial and temporal resolution. Specifically, we highlight recent work on redox-cycling concepts using nanocavity sensor arrays, which provide an efficient amplification strategy for spatiotemporal detection of redox-active molecules. As redox-cycling electrochemistry critically depends on the ability to miniaturize and integrate closely spaced electrode systems, the

  2. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals: 3. Relationships between smectite redox and structural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Christopher A; Klüpfel, Laura E; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Structural Fe in clay minerals is an important redox-active species in many pristine and contaminated environments as well as in engineered systems. Understanding the extent and kinetics of redox reactions involving Fe-bearing clay minerals has been challenging due to the inability to relate structural Fe(2+)/Fe(total) fractions to fundamental redox properties, such as reduction potentials (EH). Here, we overcame this challenge by using mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO) to characterize the fraction of redox-active structural Fe (Fe(2+)/Fe(total)) in smectites over a wide range of applied EH-values (-0.6 V to +0.6 V). We examined Fe(2+)/Fe(total )- EH relationships of four natural Fe-bearing smectites (SWy-2, SWa-1, NAu-1, NAu-2) in their native, reduced, and reoxidized states and compared our measurements with spectroscopic observations and a suite of mineralogical properties. All smectites exhibited unique Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships, were redox active over wide EH ranges, and underwent irreversible electron transfer induced structural changes that were observable with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Variations among the smectite Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships correlated well with both bulk and molecular-scale properties, including Fe(total) content, layer charge, and quadrupole splitting values, suggesting that multiple structural parameters determined the redox properties of smectites. The Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships developed for these four commonly studied clay minerals may be applied to future studies interested in relating the extent of structural Fe reduction or oxidation to EH-values.

  3. Multiple redox states of multiheme cytochromes may enable bacterial response to changing redox environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Mullin, S. W.; Castelle, C.; Luef, B.; Gilbert, B.; Banfield, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) are key components in electron-transport pathways that enable some microorganisms to transfer electron byproducts of metabolism to a variety of minerals. As a response to changes in mineral redox potential, microbial communities may shift their membership, or individual organisms may adjust protein expression. Alternatively, the ability to respond may be conferred by the innate characteristics of certain electron-transport-chain components. Here, we used potentiostat-controlled microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to measure the timescale of response to imposed changes in redox conditions, thus placing constraints on the importance of these different mechanisms. In the experiments, a solid electrode acts as an electron-accepting mineral whose redox potential can be precisely controlled. We inoculated duplicate MFCs with a sediment/groundwater mixture from an aquifer at Rifle, Colorado, supplied acetate as an electron donor, and obtained stable, mixed-species biofilms dominated by Geobacter and a novel Geobacter-related family. We poised the anode at potentials spanning the range of natural Fe(III)-reduction, then performed cyclic voltammetry (CV) to characterize the overall biofilm redox signature. The apparent biofilm midpoint potential shifted directly with anode set potential when the latter was changed within the range from about -250 to -50 mV vs. SHE. Following a jump in set potential by 200 mV, the CV-midpoint shift by ~100 mV over a timescale of ~30 minutes to a few hours, depending on the direction of the potential change. The extracellular electron transfer molecules, whose overall CV signature is very similar to those of purified MHCs, appear to span a broad redox range (~200 mV), supporting the hypothesis that MHCs confer substantial redox flexibility. This flexibility may be a principle reason for the abundance of MHCs expressed by microorganisms capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals.

  4. Integrated cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason C.

    The generation of new three-dimensional (3D) matrices that enable integration of biomolecular components and whole cells into device architectures, without adversely altering their morphology or activity, continues to be an expanding and challenging field of research. This research is driven by the promise that encapsulated biomolecules and cells can significantly impact areas as diverse as biocatalysis, controlled delivery of therapeutics, environmental and industrial process monitoring, early warning of warfare agents, bioelectronics, photonics, smart prosthetics, advanced physiological sensors, portable medical diagnostic devices, and tissue/organ replacement. This work focuses on the development of a fundamental understanding of the biochemical and nanomaterial mechanisms that govern the cell directed assembly and integration process. It was shown that this integration process relies on the ability of cells to actively develop a pH gradient in response to evaporation induced osmotic stress, which catalyzes silica condensation within a thin 3D volume surrounding the cells, creating a functional bio/nano interface. The mechanism responsible for introducing functional foreign membrane-bound proteins via proteoliposome addition to the silica-lipid-cell matrix was also determined. Utilizing this new understanding, 3D cellular immobilization capabilities were extended using sol-gel matrices endowed with glycerol, trehalose, and media components. The effects of these additives, and the metabolic phase of encapsulated S. cerivisiase cells, on long-term viability and the rate of inducible gene expression was studied. This enabled the entrapment of cells within a novel microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous colorimetric, fluorescent, and electrochemical detection of a single analyte, significantly improving confidence in the biosensor output. As a complementary approach, multiphoton protein lithography was utilized to engineer 3D protein matrices in which to

  5. Natural dietary anti-cancer chemopreventive compounds: redox-mediated differential signaling mechanisms in cytoprotection of normal cellsversus cytotoxicity in tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sujit NAIR; Wenge LI; Ah-Ng Tony KONG

    2007-01-01

    Many dietary phytochemicals exhibit health-beneficial effects including preven-tion of diseases such as cancer, as well as neurological, cardiovascular, inflam-matory, and metabolic diseases. Evolutionarily, herbivorous and omnivorous animals have been ingesting plants. This interaction between "animal-plant"ecosystems has resulted in an elaborate system of detoxification and defense mechanisms evolved by animals including humans. Mammalian cells, including human cells, respond to these dietary phytochemicals by "non-classical receptor sensing" mechanisms of electrophilic chemical-stress typified by "thiol-modu-lated" cellular signaling events primarily leading to the gene expression of phar-macologically beneficial effects, but sometimes unwanted cytotoxicity also. Our laboratory has been studying two groups of dietary phytochemical cancer-chemopreventive compounds (isothiocyanates and polyphenols), which are effective in chemical-induced, as well as genetically-induced, animal carcinogen-esis models. These compounds typically generate "cellular stress" and modulate gene expression of phase Ⅱ detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes. Electrophiles, reac-tive oxygen species, and reactive nitrogen species are known to act as second messengers in the modulation of many cellular signaling pathways leading to gene expression changes and pharmacological responses. Redox-sensitive tran-scription factors such as nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), AP-1, NF-κB, to cite a few examples, sense and transduce changes in the cellular redox status and modulate gene expression responses to oxidative and electrophilic stresses, pre-sumably via sulfhydryl modification of critical cysteine residues found on these proteins and/or other upstream redox-sensitive molecular targets. In the current review, we will explore dietary cancer chemopreventive phytochemicals, discuss the link between oxidative/electrophilic stresses and the redox circuitry, and con-sider different redox

  6. Sources and implications of NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance in diabetes and its complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu J

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jinzi Wu,1Zhen Jin,1Hong Zheng,1,2Liang-Jun Yan1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, UNT System College of Pharmacy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA; 2Department of Basic Theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Basic Medicine, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: NAD+ is a fundamental molecule in metabolism and redox signaling. In diabetes and its complications, the balance between NADH and NAD+ can be severely perturbed. On one hand, NADH is overproduced due to influx of hyperglycemia to the glycolytic and Krebs cycle pathways and activation of the polyol pathway. On the other hand, NAD+ can be diminished or depleted by overactivation of poly ADP ribose polymerase that uses NAD+ as its substrate. Moreover, sirtuins, another class of enzymes that also use NAD+ as their substrate for catalyzing protein deacetylation reactions, can also affect cellular content of NAD+. Impairment of NAD+ regeneration enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and complex I in mitochondria can also contribute to NADH accumulation and NAD+ deficiency. The consequence of NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance is initially reductive stress that eventually leads to oxidative stress and oxidative damage to macromolecules, including DNA, lipids, and proteins. Accordingly, redox imbalance-triggered oxidative damage has been thought to be a major factor contributing to the development of diabetes and its complications. Future studies on restoring NADH/NAD+ redox balance could provide further insights into design of novel antidiabetic strategies. Keywords: mitochondria, complex I, reactive oxygen species, polyol pathway, poly ADP ribosylation, sirtuins, oxidative stress, oxidative damage

  7. Multiuser Cellular Network

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Modern radio communication is faced with a problem about how to distribute restricted frequency to users in a certain space. Since our task is to minimize the number of repeaters, a natural idea is enlarging coverage area. However, coverage has restrictions. First, service area has to be divided economically as repeater's coverage is limited. In this paper, our fundamental method is to adopt seamless cellular network division. Second, underlying physics content in frequency distribution problem is interference between two close frequencies. Consequently, we choose a proper frequency width of 0.1MHz and a relevantly reliable setting to apply one frequency several times. We make a few general assumptions to simplify real situation. For instance, immobile users yield to homogenous distribution; repeaters can receive and transmit information in any given frequency in duplex operation; coverage is mainly decided by antenna height. Two models are built up to solve 1000 users and 10000 users situations respectively....

  8. Redox Imbalance and Morphological Changes in Skin Fibroblasts in Typical Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Signorini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of oxidative stress has been reported in the blood of patients with Rett syndrome (RTT, a neurodevelopmental disorder mainly caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. Little is known regarding the redox status in RTT cellular systems and its relationship with the morphological phenotype. In RTT patients (n = 16 we investigated four different oxidative stress markers, F2-Isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs, F4-Neuroprostanes (F4-NeuroPs, nonprotein bound iron (NPBI, and (4-HNE PAs, and glutathione in one of the most accessible cells, that is, skin fibroblasts, and searched for possible changes in cellular/intracellular structure and qualitative modifications of synthesized collagen. Significantly increased F4-NeuroPs (12-folds, F2-IsoPs (7.5-folds NPBI (2.3-folds, 4-HNE PAs (1.48-folds, and GSSG (1.44-folds were detected, with significantly decreased GSH (−43.6% and GSH/GSSG ratio (−3.05 folds. A marked dilation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, associated with several cytoplasmic multilamellar bodies, was detectable in RTT fibroblasts. Colocalization of collagen I and collagen III, as well as the percentage of type I collagen as derived by semiquantitative immunofluorescence staining analyses, appears to be significantly reduced in RTT cells. Our findings indicate the presence of a redox imbalance and previously unrecognized morphological skin fibroblast abnormalities in RTT patients.

  9. Effects of Dental Methacrylates on Oxygen Consumption and Redox Status of Human Pulp Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Nocca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have already demonstrated that the incomplete polymerization of resin-based dental materials causes the release of monomers which might affect cell metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, urethane dimethacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate on (1 cellular energy metabolism, evaluating oxygen consumption rate, glucose consumption, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and lactate production, and (2 cellular redox status, through the evaluation of glutathione concentration and of the activities of enzymes regulating glutathione metabolism. Methods. Human pulp cells were used and oxygen consumption was measured by means of a Clark electrode. Moreover, reactive oxygen species production was quantified. Enzymatic activity and glucose and lactate concentrations were determined through a specific kit. Results. Triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate induced a decrease in oxygen consumption rate, an enhancement of glucose consumption, and lactate production, whilst glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activity were not significantly modified. Moreover, the monomers induced an increase of reactive oxygen species production with a consequent increase of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymatic activities. A depletion of both reduced and total glutathione was also observed. Conclusion. The obtained results indicate that dental monomers might alter energy metabolism and glutathione redox balance in human pulp cells.

  10. H2S and its role in redox signaling☆,☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabil, Omer; Motl, Nicole; Banerjee, Ruma

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important gaseous signaling molecule that is produced endogenously by enzymes in the sulfur metabolic network. H2S exerts its effects on multiple physiological processes important under both normal and pathological conditions. These functions include neuromodulation, regulation of blood pressure and cardiac function, inflammation, cellular energetics and apoptosis. Despite the recognition of its biological importance and its beneficial effects, the mechanism of H2S action and the regulation of its tissue levels remain unclear in part owing to its chemical and physical properties that render handling and analysis challenging. Furthermore, the multitude of potential H2S effects has made it difficult to dissect its signaling mechanism and to identify specific targets. In this review, we focus on H2S metabolism and provide an overview of the recent literature that sheds some light on its mechanism of action in cellular redox signaling in health and disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Thiol-Based Redox Processes. PMID:24418393

  11. Characterization of redox conditions in groundwater contaminant plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwarth, Steven A.;

    2000-01-01

    Evaluation of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behaviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...... cases have been reported. No standardised or generally accepted approach exists. Slow electrode kinetics and the common lack of internal equilibrium of redox processes in pollution plumes make, with a few exceptions, direct electrochemical measurement and rigorous interpretation of redox potentials...... dubious, if not erroneous. Several other approaches have been used in addressing redox conditions in pollution plumes: redox-sensitive compounds in groundwater samples, hydrogen concentrations in groundwater, concentrations of volatile fatty acids in groundwater, sediment characteristics and microbial...

  12. Nanostructured Electrocatalysts for All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minjoon; Ryu, Jaechan; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-10-01

    Vanadium redox reactions have been considered as a key factor affecting the energy efficiency of the all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). This redox reaction determines the reaction kinetics of whole cells. However, poor kinetic reversibility and catalytic activity towards the V(2+)/V(3+) and VO(2+)/VO2(+) redox couples on the commonly used carbon substrate limit broader applications of VRFBs. Consequently, modified carbon substrates have been extensively investigated to improve vanadium redox reactions. In this Focus Review, recent progress on metal- and carbon-based nanomaterials as an electrocatalyst for VRFBs is discussed in detail, without the intention to provide a comprehensive review on the whole components of the system. Instead, the focus is mainly placed on the redox chemistry of vanadium ions at a surface of various metals, different dimensional carbons, nitrogen-doped carbon nanostructures, and metal-carbon composites. PMID:25899910

  13. Organic non-aqueous cation-based redox flow batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Andrew N.; Vaughey, John T.; Chen, Zonghai; Zhang, Lu; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-03-29

    The present invention provides a non-aqueous redox flow battery comprising a negative electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid negative electrolyte, a positive electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid positive electrolyte, and a cation-permeable separator (e.g., a porous membrane, film, sheet, or panel) between the negative electrolyte from the positive electrolyte. During charging and discharging, the electrolytes are circulated over their respective electrodes. The electrolytes each comprise an electrolyte salt (e.g., a lithium or sodium salt), a transition-metal free redox reactant, and optionally an electrochemically stable organic solvent. Each redox reactant is selected from an organic compound comprising a conjugated unsaturated moiety, a boron cluster compound, and a combination thereof. The organic redox reactant of the positive electrolyte is selected to have a higher redox potential than the redox reactant of the negative electrolyte.

  14. Nanostructured Electrocatalysts for All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minjoon; Ryu, Jaechan; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-10-01

    Vanadium redox reactions have been considered as a key factor affecting the energy efficiency of the all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). This redox reaction determines the reaction kinetics of whole cells. However, poor kinetic reversibility and catalytic activity towards the V(2+)/V(3+) and VO(2+)/VO2(+) redox couples on the commonly used carbon substrate limit broader applications of VRFBs. Consequently, modified carbon substrates have been extensively investigated to improve vanadium redox reactions. In this Focus Review, recent progress on metal- and carbon-based nanomaterials as an electrocatalyst for VRFBs is discussed in detail, without the intention to provide a comprehensive review on the whole components of the system. Instead, the focus is mainly placed on the redox chemistry of vanadium ions at a surface of various metals, different dimensional carbons, nitrogen-doped carbon nanostructures, and metal-carbon composites.

  15. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living

    OpenAIRE

    Fulvio Ursini; Matilde Maiorino; Henry Jay Forman

    2016-01-01

    The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the...

  16. Electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins. Significant achievements in the relevant fields are summarized including the direct electron transfer between proteins and electrodes, the thermodynamic and kinetic properties, catalytic activities and activity regulation of the redox proteins. It has been demonstrated that the electrochemical technique is an effective tool for protein studies, especially for probing into the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins.

  17. Redox shuttles for safer lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overcharge protection is not only critical for preventing the thermal runaway of lithium-ion batteries during operation, but also important for automatic capacity balancing during battery manufacturing and repair. A redox shuttle is an electrolyte additive that can be used as intrinsic overcharge protection mechanism to enhance the safety characteristics of lithium-ion batteries. The advances on stable redox shuttles are briefly reviewed. Fundamental studies for designing stable redox shuttles are also discussed.

  18. DNA-mediated Charge Transport in Redox Sensing and Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Genereux, Joseph C.; Boal, Amie K.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2010-01-01

    The transport of charge through the DNA base pair stack offers a route to carry out redox chemistry at a distance. Here we describe characteristics of this chemistry that have been elucidated and how this chemistry may be utilized within the cell. The shallow distance dependence associated with these redox reactions permits DNA-mediated signaling over long molecular distances in the genome and facilitates the activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors globally in response to oxidativ...

  19. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulenova, Alena [Principal Investigator; Vandegrift, III, George F. [Collaborator

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  20. Chiral Redox-Active Isosceles Triangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Liu, Zhichang; Wu, Yilei; Hermann, Keith R; Samanta, Avik; Kim, Dong Jun; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-05-11

    Designing small-molecule organic redox-active materials, with potential applications in energy storage, has received considerable interest of late. Herein, we report on the synthesis, characterization, and application of two rigid chiral triangles, each of which consist of non-identical pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) and naphthalene diimide (NDI)-based redox-active units. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopic investigations in solution confirm the lower symmetry (C2 point group) associated with these two isosceles triangles. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal their rigid triangular prism-like geometries. Unlike previously investigated equilateral triangle containing three identical NDI subunits, both isosceles triangles do not choose to form one-dimensional supramolecular nanotubes by dint of [C-H···O] interaction-driven columnar stacking. The rigid isosceles triangle, composed of one NDI and two PMDI subunits, forms-in the presence of N,N-dimethylformamide-two different types of intermolecular NDI-NDI and NDI-PMDI π-π stacked dimers with opposite helicities in the solid state. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that both isosceles triangles can accept reversibly up to six electrons. Continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double-resonance spectroscopic investigations, supported by density functional theory calculations, on the single-electron reduced radical anions of the isosceles triangles confirm the selective sharing of unpaired electrons among adjacent redox-active NDI subunit(s) within both molecules. The isosceles triangles have been employed as electrode-active materials in organic rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The evaluation of the structure-performance relationships of this series of diimide-based triangles reveals that the increase in the number of NDI subunits, replacing PMDI ones, within the molecules improves the electrochemical cell performance of the batteries.

  1. Chiral Redox-Active Isosceles Triangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Liu, Zhichang; Wu, Yilei; Hermann, Keith R; Samanta, Avik; Kim, Dong Jun; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-05-11

    Designing small-molecule organic redox-active materials, with potential applications in energy storage, has received considerable interest of late. Herein, we report on the synthesis, characterization, and application of two rigid chiral triangles, each of which consist of non-identical pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) and naphthalene diimide (NDI)-based redox-active units. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopic investigations in solution confirm the lower symmetry (C2 point group) associated with these two isosceles triangles. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal their rigid triangular prism-like geometries. Unlike previously investigated equilateral triangle containing three identical NDI subunits, both isosceles triangles do not choose to form one-dimensional supramolecular nanotubes by dint of [C-H···O] interaction-driven columnar stacking. The rigid isosceles triangle, composed of one NDI and two PMDI subunits, forms-in the presence of N,N-dimethylformamide-two different types of intermolecular NDI-NDI and NDI-PMDI π-π stacked dimers with opposite helicities in the solid state. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that both isosceles triangles can accept reversibly up to six electrons. Continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double-resonance spectroscopic investigations, supported by density functional theory calculations, on the single-electron reduced radical anions of the isosceles triangles confirm the selective sharing of unpaired electrons among adjacent redox-active NDI subunit(s) within both molecules. The isosceles triangles have been employed as electrode-active materials in organic rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The evaluation of the structure-performance relationships of this series of diimide-based triangles reveals that the increase in the number of NDI subunits, replacing PMDI ones, within the molecules improves the electrochemical cell performance of the batteries. PMID:27070768

  2. Sedimentary cobalt concentrations track marine redox evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth; Planavsky, Noah; Lalonde, Stefan; Robbins, Jamie; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2013-04-01

    Oxygen production by photosynthesis drove the redox evolution of the atmosphere and ocean. Primary productivity by oxygenic photosynthesizers in the modern surface ocean is limited by trace nutrients such as iron, but previous studies have also observed high Co uptake associated with natural cyanobacterial populations. Constraining the size and variation of the oceanic reservoir of Co through time will help to understand the regulation of primary productivity and hence oxygenation through time. In this study, Co concentrations from iron formations (IF), shales and marine pyrites deposited over nearly 4 billion years of Earth's history are utilized to reconstruct secular changes in the mechanisms of Co removal from the oceanic reservoir. The Co reservoir prior to ~2 Ga was dominated by hydrothermal inputs and Fe(III)oxyhydroxides were likely involved in the removal of Co from the water column. Fe(II) oxidation in the water column resulted in the deposition of IF in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic, and the Co inventory of IF records a large oceanic reservoir of Co during this time. Lower Co concentrations in sediments during the Middle Proterozoic signify a decrease in the oceanic reservoir due to the expansion euxinic environments, corresponding to the results of previous studies. A transition to an oxidized deep ocean in the Phanerozoic is evidenced by correlation between Co and manganese (Mn) concentrations in hydrothermal and exhalative deposits, and in marine pyrites. This relationship between Co and Mn, signifying deposition of Co in association with Mn(IV)oxides, does not occur in the Precambrian. Mn(II) oxidation occurs at higher redox potentials than that required for Fe(II) oxidation, and the extent of Mn redox cycling prior to full ventilation of the oceans at the end of the Neoproterozoic was likely limited to spatially restricted oxic surface waters. In this regard, Co is another valuable redox proxy for tracking the growth and decline in oxygenated

  3. Proterozoic ocean redox and biogeochemical stasis

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhard, Christopher T.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Partin, Camille A.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Lalonde, Stefan V; Bekker, Andrey; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    The partial pressure of oxygen in Earth’s atmosphere has increased dramatically through time, and this increase is thought to have occurred in two rapid steps at both ends of the Proterozoic Eon (∼2.5–0.543 Ga). However, the trajectory and mechanisms of Earth’s oxygenation are still poorly constrained, and little is known regarding attendant changes in ocean ventilation and seafloor redox. We have a particularly poor understanding of ocean chemistry during the mid-Proterozoic (∼1.8–0.8 Ga). G...

  4. New all-vanadium redox flow cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyllas-Kazacos, M.; Rychcik, M.; Robins, R. G.; Fane, A. G.; Green, M. A.

    1986-05-01

    A laboratory-scale cell was constructed to test the performance of V(II)/V(III) and V(IV)/V(V) half-cells in an all-vanadium redox battery. Graphite plates were used as electrodes, and the membrane was manufactured from a sulfonated polyehylene anion-selective material. The average charging efficiency of the cell was over 90 percent. Stability tests on the reduced and oxidized electrolytes, measured over the temperature range of -5 C to 60 C, showed no accelerated decomposition at high temperatures and no crystallization at the lower temperatures. After prolonged usage, however, a slow deterioration of the positive electrode and the membrane was observed.

  5. Rebalancing electrolytes in redox flow battery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, On Kok; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2014-12-23

    Embodiments of redox flow battery rebalancing systems include a system for reacting an unbalanced flow battery electrolyte with a rebalance electrolyte in a first reaction cell. In some embodiments, the rebalance electrolyte may contain ferrous iron (Fe.sup.2+) which may be oxidized to ferric iron (Fe.sup.3+) in the first reaction cell. The reducing ability of the rebalance reactant may be restored in a second rebalance cell that is configured to reduce the ferric iron in the rebalance electrolyte back into ferrous iron through a reaction with metallic iron.

  6. Electronic Tongue Containing Redox and Conductivity Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The Electronic Tongue (E-tongue 2) is an assembly of sensors for measuring concentrations of metal ions and possibly other contaminants in water. Potential uses for electronic tongues include monitoring the chemical quality of water in a variety of natural, industrial, and laboratory settings, and detecting micro-organisms indirectly by measuring microbially influenced corrosion. The device includes a heater, a temperature sensor, an oxidation/reduction (redox) sensor pair, an electrical sensor, an array of eight galvanic cells, and eight ion-specific electrodes.

  7. Fe-V redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianlu; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Xia, Guanguang

    2014-07-08

    A redox flow battery having a supporting solution that includes Cl.sup.- anions is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in the supporting solution, a catholyte having Fe.sup.2+ and Fe.sup.3+ in the supporting solution, and a membrane separating the anolyte and the catholyte. The anolyte and catholyte can have V cations and Fe cations, respectively, or the anolyte and catholyte can each contain both V and Fe cations in a mixture. Furthermore, the supporting solution can contain a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- anions.

  8. Fine Tuning of Redox Networks on Multiheme Cytochromes from Geobacter sulfurreducens Drives Physiological Electron/Proton Energy Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Morgado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens (Gs can grow in the presence of extracellular terminal acceptors, a property that is currently explored to harvest electricity from aquatic sediments and waste organic matter into microbial fuel cells. A family composed of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E was identified in Gs. These cytochromes play a crucial role by bridging the electron transfer from oxidation of cytoplasmic donors to the cell exterior and assisting the reduction of extracellular terminal acceptors. The detailed thermodynamic characterization of such proteins showed that PpcA and PpcD have an important redox-Bohr effect that might implicate these proteins in the e−/H+ coupling mechanisms to sustain cellular growth. The physiological relevance of the redox-Bohr effect in these proteins was studied by determining the fractional contribution of each individual redox-microstate at different pH values. For both proteins, oxidation progresses from a particular protonated microstate to a particular deprotonated one, over specific pH ranges. The preferred e−/H+ transfer pathway established by the selected microstates indicates that both proteins are functionally designed to couple e−/H+ transfer at the physiological pH range for cellular growth.

  9. Never-ageing cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Ogrunc, Müge; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence was historically discovered as a form of cellular ageing of in vitro cultured cells. It has been under the spotlight following the evidence of oncogene-induced senescence in vivo and its role as a potent tumour suppressor mechanism. Presently, a PubMed search using keywords ‘cellular senescence and cancer’ reveals 8398 number of references (by April 2011) showing that while our knowledge of senescence keeps expanding, the complexity of the phenomenon keeps us – researchers...

  10. The State of Cellular Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Youngbin

    2003-01-01

    Cellular probe technology is one of several potentially promising technologies for obtaining accurate travel time information. In 1996, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) mandated E911 requirements that cellular location be provided when 911 emergency calls come in to emergency management authorities. The E911 requirements allow 50 -300 meters from the emergency call location, depending on the type of cellular phone technology used and whether handset-based or network-based solutions...

  11. Cellular bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, David K; Noguchi, Takako

    2012-08-01

    Bioluminescence imaging of live cells has recently been recognized as an important alternative to fluorescence imaging. Fluorescent probes are much brighter than bioluminescent probes (luciferase enzymes) and, therefore, provide much better spatial and temporal resolution and much better contrast for delineating cell structure. However, with bioluminescence imaging there is virtually no background or toxicity. As a result, bioluminescence can be superior to fluorescence for detecting and quantifying molecules and their interactions in living cells, particularly in long-term studies. Structurally diverse luciferases from beetle and marine species have been used for a wide variety of applications, including tracking cells in vivo, detecting protein-protein interactions, measuring levels of calcium and other signaling molecules, detecting protease activity, and reporting circadian clock gene expression. Such applications can be optimized by the use of brighter and variously colored luciferases, brighter microscope optics, and ultrasensitive, low-noise cameras. This article presents a review of how bioluminescence differs from fluorescence, its applications to cellular imaging, and available probes, optics, and detectors. It also gives practical suggestions for optimal bioluminescence imaging of single cells.

  12. Redox regulation of mammalian sperm capacitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian O′Flaherty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacitation is a series of morphological and metabolic changes necessary for the spermatozoon to achieve fertilizing ability. One of the earlier happenings during mammalian sperm capacitation is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS that will trigger and regulate a series of events including protein phosphorylation, in a time-dependent fashion. The identity of the sperm oxidase responsible for the production of ROS involved in capacitation is still elusive, and several candidates are discussed in this review. Interestingly, ROS-induced ROS formation has been described during human sperm capacitation. Redox signaling during capacitation is associated with changes in thiol groups of proteins located on the plasma membrane and subcellular compartments of the spermatozoon. Both, oxidation of thiols forming disulfide bridges and the increase on thiol content are necessary to regulate different sperm proteins associated with capacitation. Reducing equivalents such as NADH and NADPH are necessary to support capacitation in many species including humans. Lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phospohate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase are responsible in supplying NAD (P H for sperm capacitation. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs are newly described enzymes with antioxidant properties that can protect mammalian spermatozoa; however, they are also candidates for assuring the regulation of redox signaling required for sperm capacitation. The dysregulation of PRDXs and of enzymes needed for their reactivation such as thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system and glutathione-S-transferases impairs sperm motility, capacitation, and promotes DNA damage in spermatozoa leading to male infertility.

  13. Dissolution of UO2 in redox conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance assessment of the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel in geological formations is strongly dependent on the spent fuel matrix dissolution. Unirradiated uranium (IV) dioxide has shown to be very useful for such purposes. The stability of UO2 is very dependent on vault redox conditions. At reducing conditions, which are expected in deep groundwaters, the dissolution of the UO2-matrix can be explained in terms of solubility, while under oxidizing conditions, the UO2 is thermodynamically unstable and the dissolution is kinetically controlled. In this report the parameters which affect the uranium solubility under reducing conditions, basically pH and redox potential are discussed. Under oxidizing conditions, UO2 dissolution rate equations as a function of pH, carbonate concentration and oxidant concentration are reported. Dissolution experiments performed with spent fuel are also reviewed. The experimental equations presented in this work, have been used to model independent dissolution experiments performed with both unirradiated and irradiated UO2. (Author)

  14. Biochemical reaction engineering for redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandrey, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Redox reactions are still a challenge for biochemical engineers. A personal view for the development of this field is given. Cofactor regeneration was an obstacle for quite some time. The first technical breakthrough was achieved with the system formate/formate dehydrogenase for the regeneration of NADH2. In cases where the same enzyme could be used for chiral reduction as well as for cofactor regeneration, isopropanol as a hydrogen source proved to be beneficial. The coproduct (acetone) can be removed by pervaporation. Whole-cell reductions (often yeast reductions) can also be used. By proper biochemical reaction engineering, it is possible to apply these systems in a continuous way. By cloning a formate dehydrogenase and an oxidoreductase "designer bug" can be obtained where formate is used instead of glucose as the hydrogen source. Complex sequences of redox reactions can be established by pathway engineering with a focus on gene overexpression or with a focus on establishing non-natural pathways. The success of pathway engineering can be controlled by measuring cytosolic metabolite concentrations. The optimal exploitation of such systems calls for the integrated cooperation of classical and molecular biochemical engineering.

  15. Investigate the variation in optical redox ratio of epicardial adipose tissue in patients with CAD through auto-fluorescence metabolic molecular image (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lun-Zhang; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lin, Jong-Wei; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, it has been suggested that epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) plays an important role in development of coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). In this article, we used two-photon fluoresce microscope to measure the fluorescence metabolic image of EAT, which obtained from the patient with/without CAD/DM. We used 740nm and 890nm infrared light to excite the auto-fluorescence of metabolic molecules NADH and FAD respectively. We collected the fluorescence signal at wavelength 450nm to 500nm and 500nm to 550nm to obtain the metabolic image. Through the image, we computed the redox ratio (NADH/FAD) by analyzing the intensity. The preliminary result showed that the redox ratio increase in the patients with CAD. It indicates EAT adipocytes of patient with CAD have decreased cellular metabolic activity. But there were no significant variation of redox ratio in the patients with DM.

  16. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Farhan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C, epicatechin (EC, epigallocatechin (EGC and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells.

  17. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-02-04

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells.

  18. A mitochondrially targeted compound delays aging in yeast through a mechanism linking mitochondrial membrane lipid metabolism to mitochondrial redox biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle T. Burstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study revealed a mechanism of delaying aging in yeast by a natural compound which specifically impacts mitochondrial redox processes. In this mechanism, exogenously added lithocholic bile acid enters yeast cells, accumulates mainly in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and elicits an age-related remodeling of phospholipid synthesis and movement within both mitochondrial membranes. Such remodeling of mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics progresses with the chronological age of a yeast cell and ultimately causes significant changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome. These changes in the composition of membrane phospholipids alter mitochondrial abundance and morphology, thereby triggering changes in the age-related chronology of such longevity-defining redox processes as mitochondrial respiration, the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, the preservation of cellular homeostasis of mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species, and the coupling of electron transport to ATP synthesis.

  19. About Strongly Universal Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Margenstern

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we construct a strongly universal cellular automaton on the line with 11 states and the standard neighbourhood. We embed this construction into several tilings of the hyperbolic plane and of the hyperbolic 3D space giving rise to strongly universal cellular automata with 10 states.

  20. Dimensional behavior of Ni-YSZ composites during redox cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihlatie, Mikko; Kaiser, Andreas; Larsen, Peter Halvor;

    2009-01-01

    The dimensional behavior of Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) cermets during redox cycling was tested in dilatometry within the temperature range 600-1000 degrees C. The effect Of humidity oil redox stability was investigated at intermediate and low temperatures. We show that both the sintering...

  1. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Redox Grafting of Diazotated Anthraquinone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chernyy, Sergey; Bousquet, Antoine; Torbensen, Kristian;

    2012-01-01

    Redox grafting of aryldiazonium salts containing redox units may be used to form exceptionally thick covalently attached conductingfilms, even in the micrometers range, in a controlled manner on glassy carbon and gold substrates. With the objective to investigate the mechanism of this process...

  2. Fenton Redox Chemistry: Arsenite Oxidation by Metallic Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borges Freitas, S.C.; Van Halem, D.; Badruzzaman, A.B.M.; Van der Meer, W.G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-oxidation of As(III) is necessary in arsenic removal processes in order to increase its efficiency. Therefore, the Fenton Redox Chemistry is defined by catalytic activation of H2O2 and currently common used for its redox oxidative properties. In this study the effect of H2O2 production catalysed

  3. Synthesis and characterization of humic acids with distinct redox capacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, S.; Heise, K.H.; Bernhard, G.

    2002-05-01

    Various humic acids with distinct redox capacities were synthesized, based on the oxidation of hydroquinone in alkaline solution in the presence or absence of amino acids. The synthesized humic acids show Fe(III) redox capacities which are up to 10 times higher than that of natural humic acid from Aldrich. (orig.)

  4. Coenzyme A disulfide reductase, the primary low molecular weight disulfide reductase from Staphylococcus aureus. Purification and characterization of the native enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    delCardayre, S B; Stock, K P; Newton, G L; Fahey, R C; Davies, J E

    1998-03-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus does not utilize the glutathione thiol/disulfide redox system employed by eukaryotes and many bacteria. Instead, this organism produces CoA as its major low molecular weight thiol. We report the identification and purification of the disulfide reductase component of this thiol/disulfide redox system. Coenzyme A disulfide reductase (CoADR) catalyzes the specific reduction of CoA disulfide by NADPH. CoADR has a pH optimum of 7.5-8.0 and is a dimer of identical subunits of Mr 49,000 each. The visible absorbance spectrum is indicative of a flavoprotein with a lambdamax = 452 nm. The liberated flavin from thermally denatured enzyme was identified as flavin adenine dinucleotide. Steady-state kinetic analysis revealed that CoADR catalyzes the reduction of CoA disulfide by NADPH at pH 7.8 with a Km for NADPH of 2 muM and for CoA disulfide of 11 muM. In addition to CoA disulfide CoADR reduces 4,4'-diphosphopantethine but has no measurable ability to reduce oxidized glutathione, cystine, pantethine, or H2O2. CoADR demonstrates a sequential kinetic mechanism and employs a single active site cysteine residue that forms a stable mixed disulfide with CoA during catalysis. These data suggest that S. aureus employs a thiol/disulfide redox system based on CoA/CoA-disulfide and CoADR, an unorthodox new member of the pyridine nucleotide-disulfide reductase superfamily. PMID:9488707

  5. Redox regulation of the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Han

    Full Text Available Redox state is a critical determinant of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death.The aim of this study is to determine if AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, a cellular energy sensor, is activated by oxidants generated by Berberine in endothelial cells (EC.Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC were exposed to Berberine. AMPK activity and reactive oxygen species were monitored after the incubation.In BAEC, Berberine caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of AMPK at Thr172 and acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC at Ser79, a well characterized downstream target of AMPK. Concomitantly, Berberine increased peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant formed by simultaneous generation of superoxide and nitric oxide. Pre-incubation of BAEC with anti-oxidants markedly attenuated Berberine-enhanced phosphorylation of both AMPK and ACC. Consistently, adenoviral expression of superoxide dismutase and pretreatment of L-N(G-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME; a non-selective NOS inhibitor blunted Berberine-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. Furthermore, mitochondria-targeted tempol (mito-tempol pretreatment or expression of uncoupling protein attenuated AMPK activation caused by Berberine. Depletion of mitochondria abolished the effects of Berberine on AMPK in EC. Finally, Berberine significantly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 at Ser307 and gene silencing of LKB1 attenuated Berberine-enhanced AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation in BAEC.Our results suggest that mitochondria-derived superoxide anions and peroxynitrite are required for Berberine-induced AMPK activation in endothelial cells.

  6. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Howard; Venkatesan, Sivarama

    2012-01-01

    As the theoretical foundations of multiple-antenna techniques evolve and as these multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques become essential for providing high data rates in wireless systems, there is a growing need to understand the performance limits of MIMO in practical networks. To address this need, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks presents a systematic description of MIMO technology classes and a framework for MIMO system design that takes into account the essential physical-layer features of practical cellular networks. In contrast to works that focus on the theoretical performance of abstract MIMO channels, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks emphasizes the practical performance of realistic MIMO systems. A unified set of system simulation results highlights relative performance gains of different MIMO techniques and provides insights into how best to use multiple antennas in cellular networks under various conditions. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks describes single-user,...

  7. Redox Impact on Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna

    Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism...... are coordinated by the redox state of the cell via post-translational modification of the starch metabolic enzymes containing redox active cysteine residues and these cysteine residues became cross-linked upon oxidation providing a conformational change leading to activity loss; 2) cysteine residues...... of chloroplast enzymes can play a role not only in enzyme activity and redox sensitivity but also in protein folding and stability upon oxidation. Several redox sensitive enzymes identified in this study can serve as potential targets to control the carbon flux to and from starch during the day and night...

  8. High level of oxygen treatment causes cardiotoxicity with arrhythmias and redox modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C.; Panguluri, Siva K. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Bennett, Eric S. [Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Kolliputi, Narasaiah [Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Tipparaju, Srinivas M., E-mail: stippara@health.usf.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia exposure in mice leads to cardiac hypertrophy and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel remodeling. Because redox balance of pyridine nucleotides affects Kv function and hyperoxia alters cellular redox potential, we hypothesized that hyperoxia exposure leads to cardiac ion channel disturbances and redox changes resulting in arrhythmias. In the present study, we investigated the electrical changes and redox abnormalities caused by 72 h hyperoxia treatment in mice. Cardiac repolarization changes were assessed by acquiring electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac action potentials (AP). Biochemical assays were employed to identify the pyridine nucleotide changes, Kv1.5 expression and myocardial injury. Hyperoxia treatment caused marked bradycardia, arrhythmia and significantly prolonged (ms) the, RR (186.2 ± 10.7 vs. 146.4 ± 6.2), PR (46.8 ± 3.1 vs. 39.3 ± 1.6), QRS (10.8 ± 0.6 vs. 8.5 ± 0.2), QTc (57.1 ± 3.5 vs. 40 ± 1.4) and JT (13.4 ± 2.1 vs. 7.0 ± 0.5) intervals, when compared with normoxia group. Hyperoxia treatment also induced significant increase in cardiac action potential duration (APD) (ex-APD{sub 90}; 73.8 ± 9.5 vs. 50.9 ± 3.1 ms) and elevated levels of serum markers of myocardial injury; cardiac troponin I (TnI) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Hyperoxia exposure altered cardiac levels of mRNA/protein expression of; Kv1.5, Kvβ subunits and SiRT1, and increased ratios of reduced pyridine nucleotides (NADH/NAD and NADPH/NADP). Inhibition of SiRT1 in H9C2 cells using Splitomicin resulted in decreased SiRT1 and Kv1.5 expression, suggesting that SiRT1 may mediate Kv1.5 downregulation. In conclusion, the cardiotoxic effects of hyperoxia exposure involve ion channel disturbances and redox changes resulting in arrhythmias. - Highlights: • Hyperoxia treatment leads to arrhythmia with prolonged QTc and action potential duration. • Hyperoxia treatment alters cardiac pyridine nucleotide [NAD(P)H/NAD(P)] levels. • SiRT1 and Kv1.5 are co

  9. Bioelectrochemical probing of intracellular redox processes in living yeast cells—application of redox polymer wiring in a microfluidic environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Coman, Vasile; Kostesha, Natalie;

    2013-01-01

    utilizing a new double mediator system to map redox metabolism and screen for genetic modifications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The function of this new double mediator system based on menadione and osmium redox polymer (PVI-Os) is demonstrated. “Wiring” of S. cerevisiae cells using PVI-Os shows...

  10. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2016-06-14

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  11. High energy density redox flow device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, William Craig; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described including a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector, and an ion-permeable membrane separating said positive and negative current collectors, positioned and arranged to define a positive electroactive zone and a negative electroactive zone; wherein at least one of said positive and negative electroactive zone comprises a flowable semi-solid composition comprising ion storage compound particles capable of taking up or releasing said ions during operation of the cell, and wherein the ion storage compound particles have a polydisperse size distribution in which the finest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume, is at least a factor of 5 smaller than the largest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume.

  12. High energy density redox flow device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Yet -Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2015-10-06

    Redox flow devices are described including a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector, and an ion-permeable membrane separating said positive and negative current collectors, positioned and arranged to define a positive electroactive zone and a negative electroactive zone; wherein at least one of said positive and negative electroactive zone comprises a flowable semi-solid composition comprising ion storage compound particles capable of taking up or releasing said ions during operation of the cell, and wherein the ion storage compound particles have a polydisperse size distribution in which the finest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume, is at least a factor of 5 smaller than the largest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume.

  13. Hybrid anodes for redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xiao, Jie; Wei, Xiaoliang; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-12-15

    RFBs having solid hybrid electrodes can address at least the problems of active material consumption, electrode passivation, and metal electrode dendrite growth that can be characteristic of traditional batteries, especially those operating at high current densities. The RFBs each have a first half cell containing a first redox couple dissolved in a solution or contained in a suspension. The solution or suspension can flow from a reservoir to the first half cell. A second half cell contains the solid hybrid electrode, which has a first electrode connected to a second electrode, thereby resulting in an equipotential between the first and second electrodes. The first and second half cells are separated by a separator or membrane.

  14. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  15. Economics of vanadium redox flow battery membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, Christine; Turek, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The membrane is a key component of the vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) in terms of electrochemical performance as well as costs. The standard material Nafion® is cost intensive and therefore several alternative materials are in the focus of research. In this paper a substantial analytical approach is presented in order to quantify bottom price limits for different types of membranes. An in-depth analysis of material and production cost allows statements concerning cost potentials of different ion exchange membranes (IEM) and nano filtration membranes (NFM). The final result reveals that expected costs of IEM and NFM at high production volumes differ by one order of magnitude. Moreover, an analysis of the current market situation is made to provide a framework for economic considerations at present.

  16. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Walter H; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an 'end-stage' process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  17. Redox reactivity and coordination chemistry of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study and the understanding of actinides chemistry have important implications in the nuclear field both for the development of new actinides materials and the retreatment of the nuclear wastes. One of the major issues in that chemistry is that the actinides elements are known to undergo redox reaction and to form assemblies of different size and different topologies. In that context uranium can be a good model of the heavier radioelement because it is much less radioactive. So, this work concerns the synthesis and the study of the spectroscopy and the magnetic properties of several uranium based polymetallic assemblies synthesized by taking advantage of the redox properties and the coordination chemistry of uranium. The hydrolysis reactivity of trivalent uranium has been studied in absence of sterically hindered ligands and led to the synthesis of oxo/hydroxo uranium assemblies with different sizes by changing the starting complex or the reaction conditions. By following the same strategy, the controlled oxidation of trivalent uranium complexes led to an original azido/nitrido uranium complex. The coordination chemistry of the pentavalent uranyl polymer {[UO2py5][KI2py3]}n has also been studied with different ligand and in different conditions and led to several cation-cation complexes for which the stability is sufficient for studying there dismutation by proton NMR. By changing the ancillary ligands stable monomeric complexes of pentavalent uranyl complexes were also obtained. The magnetic properties of all the complexes, monomers and polymetallic complexes were studied and an antiferromagnetic coupling was observed for the cation-cation pentavalent uranyl dimer [UO2(dbm)2(K18C6)]2. (author)

  18. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Watson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an ‘end-stage’ process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation–reduction (redox reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This

  19. Redox freezing and melting in the Earth's deep mantle resulting from carbon-iron redox coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbach, Arno; Schmidt, Max W

    2011-04-14

    Very low seismic velocity anomalies in the Earth's mantle may reflect small amounts of melt present in the peridotite matrix, and the onset of melting in the Earth's upper mantle is likely to be triggered by the presence of small amounts of carbonate. Such carbonates stem from subducted oceanic lithosphere in part buried to depths below the 660-kilometre discontinuity and remixed into the mantle. Here we demonstrate that carbonate-induced melting may occur in deeply subducted lithosphere at near-adiabatic temperatures in the Earth's transition zone and lower mantle. We show experimentally that these carbonatite melts are unstable when infiltrating ambient mantle and are reduced to immobile diamond when recycled at depths greater than ∼250 kilometres, where mantle redox conditions are determined by the presence of an (Fe,Ni) metal phase. This 'redox freezing' process leads to diamond-enriched mantle domains in which the Fe(0), resulting from Fe(2+) disproportionation in perovskites and garnet, is consumed but the Fe(3+) preserved. When such carbon-enriched mantle heterogeneities become part of the upwelling mantle, diamond will inevitably react with the Fe(3+) leading to true carbonatite redox melting at ∼660 and ∼250 kilometres depth to form deep-seated melts in the Earth's mantle. PMID:21441908

  20. Cellular systems biology profiling applied to cellular models of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Kenneth A; Premkumar, Daniel R; Strock, Christopher J; Johnston, Patricia; Taylor, Lansing

    2009-11-01

    Building cellular models of disease based on the approach of Cellular Systems Biology (CSB) has the potential to improve the process of creating drugs as part of the continuum from early drug discovery through drug development and clinical trials and diagnostics. This paper focuses on the application of CSB to early drug discovery. We discuss the integration of protein-protein interaction biosensors with other multiplexed, functional biomarkers as an example in using CSB to optimize the identification of quality lead series compounds.

  1. Actual problems of cellular cardiomyoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kaupov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides review of cellular technologies used incardiology, describes types of cellular preparations depending onsources of cells and types of compounding cells. The generalmechanisms of therapies with stem cells applications are described.Use of cellular preparations for treatment of cardiovascular diseasesand is improvement of the forecast at patients with heartinsufficiency of various genesis is considered as alternative topractice with organ transplantations. Efforts of biotechnologicallaboratories are directed on search of optimum population of cellsfor application in cardiology and studying of mechanisms andfactors regulating function of cardiac stem cells.

  2. Redox-based Epigenetic status in Drug Addiction: Potential mediator of drug-induced gene priming phenomenon and use of metabolic intervention for symptomatic treatment in drug addiction.

    OpenAIRE

    Malav Suchin Trivedi; Richard eDeth

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol and other drugs of abuse, including psychostimulants and opioids, can induce epigenetic changes: a contributing factor for drug addiction, tolerance and associated withdrawal symptoms. DNA methylation is the major epigenetic mechanism and it is one of more than 200 methylation reactions supported by methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). The levels of SAM are controlled by cellular redox status via the folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS), for example; un...

  3. Mitochondrial and cellular mechanisms for managing lipid excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Aon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Current scientific debates center on the impact of lipids and mitochondrial function on diverse aspects of human health, nutrition and disease, among them the association of lipotoxicity with the onset of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, and with heart dysfunction in obesity and diabetes. Mitochondria play a fundamental role in aging and in prevalent acute or chronic diseases. Lipids are main mitochondrial fuels however these molecules can also behave as uncouplers and inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Knowledge about the functional composition of these contradictory effects and their impact on mitochondrial-cellular energetics/redox status is incomplete.Cells store fatty acids (FAs as triacylglycerol and package them into cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs. New emerging data shows the LD as a highly dynamic storage pool of FAs that can be used for energy reserve. Lipid excess packaging into LDs can be seen as an adaptive response to fulfilling energy supply without hindering mitochondrial or cellular redox status and keeping low concentration of lipotoxic intermediates.Herein we review the mechanisms of action and utilization of lipids by mitochondria reported in liver, heart and skeletal muscle under relevant physiological situations, e.g. exercise. We report on perilipins, a family of proteins that associate with LDs in response to loading of cells with lipids. Evidence showing that in addition to physical contact, mitochondria and LDs exhibit metabolic interactions is presented and discussed. A hypothetical model of channeled lipid utilization by mitochondria is proposed. Direct delivery and channeled processing of lipids in mitochondria could represent a reliable and efficient way to maintain ROS within levels compatible with signaling while ensuring robust and reliable energy supply.

  4. A Bacterial Biosensor for Oxidative Stress Using the Constitutively Expressed Redox-Sensitive Protein roGFP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Arias-Barreiro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A highly specific, high throughput-amenable bacterial biosensor for chemically induced cellular oxidation was developed using constitutively expressed redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein roGFP2 in E. coli (E. coli-roGFP2. Disulfide formation between two key cysteine residues of roGFP2 was assessed using a double-wavelength ratiometric approach. This study demonstrates that only a few minutes were required to detect oxidation using E. coli-roGFP2, in contrast to conventional bacterial oxidative stress sensors. Cellular oxidation induced by hydrogen peroxide, menadione, sodium selenite, zinc pyrithione, triphenyltin and naphthalene became detectable after 10 seconds and reached the maxima between 80 to 210 seconds, contrary to Cd2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, Zn2+ and sodium arsenite, which induced the oxidation maximum immediately. The lowest observable effect concentrations (in ppm were determined as 1.0 x 10−7 (arsenite, 1.0 x 10−4 (naphthalene, 1.0 x 10−4 (Cu2+, 3.8 x 10−4 (H2O2, 1.0 x 10−3 (Cd2+, 1.0 x 10−3 (Zn2+, 1.0 x 10−2 (menadione, 1.0 (triphenyltin, 1.56 (zinc pyrithione, 3.1 (selenite and 6.3 (Pb2+, respectively. Heavy metal-induced oxidation showed unclear response patterns, whereas concentration-dependent sigmoid curves were observed for other compounds. In vivo GSH content and in vitro roGFP2 oxidation assays together with E. coli-roGFP2 results suggest that roGFP2 is sensitive to redox potential change and thiol modification induced by environmental stressors. Based on redox-sensitive technology, E. coli-roGFP2 provides a fast comprehensive detection system for toxicants that induce cellular oxidation.

  5. Ageing in relation to skeletal muscle dysfunction: redox homoeostasis to regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna; Iwanejko, Lesley A; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Pekovic-Vaughan, Vanja; McDonagh, Brian

    2016-08-01

    Ageing is associated with a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality and function-sarcopenia, associated with reduced independence and quality of life in older generations. A better understanding of the mechanisms, both genetic and epigenetic, underlying this process would help develop therapeutic interventions to prevent, slow down or reverse muscle wasting associated with ageing. Currently, exercise is the only known effective intervention to delay the progression of sarcopenia. The cellular responses that occur in muscle fibres following exercise provide valuable clues to the molecular mechanisms regulating muscle homoeostasis and potentially the progression of sarcopenia. Redox signalling, as a result of endogenous generation of ROS/RNS in response to muscle contractions, has been identified as a crucial regulator for the adaptive responses to exercise, highlighting the redox environment as a potentially core therapeutic approach to maintain muscle homoeostasis during ageing. Further novel and attractive candidates include the manipulation of microRNA expression. MicroRNAs are potent gene regulators involved in the control of healthy and disease-associated biological processes and their therapeutic potential has been researched in the context of various disorders, including ageing-associated muscle wasting. Finally, we discuss the impact of the circadian clock on the regulation of gene expression in skeletal muscle and whether disruption of the peripheral muscle clock affects sarcopenia and altered responses to exercise. Interventions that include modifying altered redox signalling with age and incorporating genetic mechanisms such as circadian- and microRNA-based gene regulation, may offer potential effective treatments against age-associated sarcopenia. PMID:27215643

  6. An unexplored role for Peroxiredoxin in exercise-induced redox signalling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadley, Alex J; Aldred, Sarah; Coles, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    Peroxiredoxin (PRDX) is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase protein with a conserved ionised thiol that permits catalysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) up to a million times faster than any thiol-containing signalling protein. The increased production of H2O2 within active tissues during exercise is thought to oxidise conserved cysteine thiols, which may in turn facilitate a wide variety of physiological adaptations. The precise mechanisms linking H2O2 with the oxidation of signalling thiol proteins (phosphates, kinases and transcription factors) are unclear due to these proteins' low reactivity with H2O2 relative to abundant thiol peroxidases such as PRDX. Recent work has shown that following exposure to H2O2 in vitro, the sulfenic acid of the PRDX cysteine can form mixed disulphides with transcription factors associated with cell survival. This implicates PRDX as an 'active' redox relay in transmitting the oxidising equivalent of H2O2 to downstream proteins. Furthermore, under oxidative stress, PRDX can form stable oxidised dimers that can be secreted into the extracellular space, potentially acting as an extracellular 'stress' signal. There is extensive literature assessing non-specific markers of oxidative stress in response to exercise, however the PRDX catalytic cycle may offer a more robust approach for measuring changes in redox balance following exercise. This review discusses studies assessing PRDX-mediated cellular signalling and integrates the recent advances in redox biology with investigations that have examined the role of PRDX during exercise in humans and animals. Future studies should explore the role of PRDX as a key regulator of peroxide mediated-signal transduction during exercise in humans. PMID:26748042

  7. An unexplored role for Peroxiredoxin in exercise-induced redox signalling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J. Wadley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxin (PRDX is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase protein with a conserved ionised thiol that permits catalysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 up to a million times faster than any thiol-containing signalling protein. The increased production of H2O2 within active tissues during exercise is thought to oxidise conserved cysteine thiols, which may in turn facilitate a wide variety of physiological adaptations. The precise mechanisms linking H2O2 with the oxidation of signalling thiol proteins (phosphates, kinases and transcription factors are unclear due to these proteins' low reactivity with H2O2 relative to abundant thiol peroxidases such as PRDX. Recent work has shown that following exposure to H2O2 in vitro, the sulfenic acid of the PRDX cysteine can form mixed disulphides with transcription factors associated with cell survival. This implicates PRDX as an ‘active’ redox relay in transmitting the oxidising equivalent of H2O2 to downstream proteins. Furthermore, under oxidative stress, PRDX can form stable oxidised dimers that can be secreted into the extracellular space, potentially acting as an extracellular ‘stress’ signal. There is extensive literature assessing non-specific markers of oxidative stress in response to exercise, however the PRDX catalytic cycle may offer a more robust approach for measuring changes in redox balance following exercise. This review discusses studies assessing PRDX-mediated cellular signalling and integrates the recent advances in redox biology with investigations that have examined the role of PRDX during exercise in humans and animals. Future studies should explore the role of PRDX as a key regulator of peroxide mediated-signal transduction during exercise in humans.

  8. Analyzing redox balance in a synthetic yeast platform to improve utilization of brown macroalgae as feedstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Contador

    2015-12-01

    An analysis of the redox balance during ethanol fermentation from alginate and mannitol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae using metabolic engineering tools was carried out. To represent the strain designed for conversion of macroalgae carbohydrates to ethanol, a context-specific model was derived from the available yeast genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. Flux balance analysis and dynamic simulations were used to determine the flux distributions. The model indicates that ethanol production is determined by the activity of 4-deoxy-l-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronate (DEHU reductase (DehR and its preferences for NADH or NADPH which influences strongly the flow of cellular resources. Different scenarios were explored to determine the equilibrium between NAD(H and NADP(H that will lead to increased ethanol yields on mannitol and DEHU under anaerobic conditions. When rates of mannitol dehydrogenase and DehRNADH tend to be close to a ratio in the range 1–1.6, high growth rates and ethanol yields were predicted. The analysis shows a number of metabolic limitations that are not easily identified through experimental procedures such as quantifying the impact of the cofactor preference by DEHU reductase in the system, the low flux into the alginate catabolic pathway, and a detailed analysis of the redox balance. These results show that production of ethanol and other chemicals can be optimized if a redox balance is achieved. A possible methodology to achieve this balance is presented. This paper shows how metabolic engineering tools are essential to comprehend and overcome this limitation.

  9. Radical Decisions in Cancer: Redox Control of Cell Growth and Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free radicals play a key role in many physiological decisions in cells. Since free radicals are toxic to cellular components, it is known that they cause DNA damage, contribute to DNA instability and mutation and thus favor carcinogenesis. However, nowadays it is assumed that free radicals play a further complex role in cancer. Low levels of free radicals and steady state levels of antioxidant enzymes are responsible for the fine tuning of redox status inside cells. A change in redox state is a way to modify the physiological status of the cell, in fact, a more reduced status is found in resting cells while a more oxidative status is associated with proliferative cells. The mechanisms by which redox status can change the proliferative activity of cancer cells are related to transcriptional and posttranscriptional modifications of proteins that play a critical role in cell cycle control. Since cancer cells show higher levels of free radicals compared with their normal counterparts, it is believed that the anti-oxidative stress mechanism is also increased in cancer cells. In fact, the levels of some of the most important antioxidant enzymes are elevated in advanced status of some types of tumors. Anti-cancer treatment is compromised by survival mechanisms in cancer cells and collateral damage in normal non-pathological tissues. Though some resistance mechanisms have been described, they do not yet explain why treatment of cancer fails in several tumors. Given that some antitumoral treatments are based on the generation of free radicals, we will discuss in this review the possible role of antioxidant enzymes in the survival mechanism in cancer cells and then, its participation in the failure of cancer treatments

  10. N-Acetyl Cysteine Protects against Methamphetamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration via Modulation of Redox Status and Autophagy in Dopaminergic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Chandramani Shivalingappa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine- (MA- induced neurotoxicity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and enhanced oxidative stress. Our previous study demonstrated that MA induces autophagy in a dopaminergic neuronal cell model (N27 cells. The cellular mechanisms underlying MA-induced autophagy and apoptosis remain poorly characterized. In the present study we sought to investigate the importance of GSH redox status in MA-induced neurotoxicity using a thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC. Morphological and biochemical analysis revealed that MA-induced autophagy in N27 dopaminergic cells was associated with pronounced depletion of GSH levels. Moreover, pretreatment with NAC reduced MA-induced GSH depletion and autophagy, while depletion of GSH using L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO enhanced autophagy. Furthermore, treatment with NAC significantly attenuated MA-induced apoptotic cell death as well as oxidative stress markers, namely, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE. Together, these results suggest that NAC exhibits significant protective effects against MA-induced dopaminergic cell death, presumably via modulation of the GSH level and autophagy. Collectively, our data provide mechanistic insights into the role of cellular GSH redox status in MA-induced autophagy and apoptotic cell death, and additional studies are needed to determine the therapeutic effectiveness of cellular redox modifiers in attenuating dopaminergic neurodegeneration in vivo.

  11. Catalytic therapy of cancer by ascorbic acid involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions and generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, S M; Ullah, M F; Shamim, U; Bhatt, S H; Azmi, A S

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic therapy is a cancer treatment modality based on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through administration of ascorbate/medicinal herbal extracts and copper. It is known that antioxidants such as ascorbate also exhibit prooxidant activity in the presence of transition metals such as copper. Based on our work and that in the literature, in this review we propose a mechanism for the cytotoxic action of ascorbate against cancer cells. It involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions and the consequent generation of ROS leading to oxidative DNA breakage. Using human peripheral lymphocytes and the Comet assay, we have shown that ascorbic acid is able to cause oxidative breakage in cellular DNA. Such DNA degradation is inhibited by neocuproine (a Cu(I) sequestering agent) and scavengers of ROS indicating that the cellular DNA breakage involves the generation of Cu(I) and formation of ROS. Similar results are also obtained with plant polyphenol antioxidants that are important constituents of medicinal herbal extracts. Copper is an essential component of chromatin and can take part in redox reactions. It is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies. Therefore, cancer cells may be more subject to electron transfer between copper ions and ascorbate/plant polyphenols to generate ROS. In this review we cite evidence to indicate that in catalytic therapy cytotoxic action against cancer cells involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions.

  12. Cellular mechanisms during vascular development

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    The vascular system is an essential organ in vertebrate animals and provides the organism with enough oxygen and nutrients. It is composed of an interconnected network of blood vessels, which form using a number of different morphogenetic mechanisms. Angiogenesis describes the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting vessels. A number of molecular pathways have been shown to be essential during angiogenesis. However, cellular architecture of blood vessels as well as cellular mechanisms...

  13. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    OpenAIRE

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the...

  14. An Excel Workbook for Identifying Redox Processes in Ground Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; McMahon, Peter B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    The reduction/oxidation (redox) condition of ground water affects the concentration, transport, and fate of many anthropogenic and natural contaminants. The redox state of a ground-water sample is defined by the dominant type of reduction/oxidation reaction, or redox process, occurring in the sample, as inferred from water-quality data. However, because of the difficulty in defining and applying a systematic redox framework to samples from diverse hydrogeologic settings, many regional water-quality investigations do not attempt to determine the predominant redox process in ground water. Recently, McMahon and Chapelle (2008) devised a redox framework that was applied to a large number of samples from 15 principal aquifer systems in the United States to examine the effect of redox processes on water quality. This framework was expanded by Chapelle and others (in press) to use measured sulfide data to differentiate between iron(III)- and sulfate-reducing conditions. These investigations showed that a systematic approach to characterize redox conditions in ground water could be applied to datasets from diverse hydrogeologic settings using water-quality data routinely collected in regional water-quality investigations. This report describes the Microsoft Excel workbook, RedoxAssignment_McMahon&Chapelle.xls, that assigns the predominant redox process to samples using the framework created by McMahon and Chapelle (2008) and expanded by Chapelle and others (in press). Assignment of redox conditions is based on concentrations of dissolved oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3-), manganese (Mn2+), iron (Fe2+), sulfate (SO42-), and sulfide (sum of dihydrogen sulfide [aqueous H2S], hydrogen sulfide [HS-], and sulfide [S2-]). The logical arguments for assigning the predominant redox process to each sample are performed by a program written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The program is called from buttons on the main worksheet. The number of samples that can be analyzed

  15. Performance of redox flow battery systems in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shibata Toshikazu; Kumamoto Takahiro; Nagaoko Yoshiyuki; Kawase Kazunori; Yano Keiji

    2013-01-01

    Renewable energies, such as solar and wind power, are increasingly being introduced as alternative energy sources on a glosbal scale toward a low-carbon society. For the next generation power network, which uses a large number of these distributed power generation sources, energy storage technologies will be indispensable. Among these technologies, battery energy storage technology is considered to be most viable. Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. has developed a redox flow battery system suitable for large scale energy storage, and carried out several demonstration projects on the stabilization of renewable energy output using the redox flow battery system. This paper describes the advantages of the redox flow battery and reviews the demonstration projects.

  16. The Redox Flow System for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odonnell, P.; Gahn, R. F.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The interfacing of a Solar Photovoltaic System and a Redox Flow System for storage was workable. The Redox Flow System, which utilizes the oxidation-reduction capability of two redox couples, in this case iron and titanium, for its storage capacity, gave a relatively constant output regardless of solar activity so that a load could be run continually day and night utilizing the sun's energy. One portion of the system was connected to a bank of solar cells to electrochemically charge the solutions, while a separate part of the system was used to electrochemically discharge the stored energy.

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research.

  18. Targeting ligand-functionalized and redox-sensitive heparin-Pluronic nanogels for intracellular protein delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dai Hai; Joung, Yoon Ki; Choi, Jong Hoon; Park, Ki Dong [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, 5 Wonchon, Yeoungtong, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hyun Tae, E-mail: kdp@ajou.ac.kr [Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The heparin-Pluronic (HP) conjugate was coupled via redox-sensitive disulfide bond and contains a vinyl sulfone (VS) group with high reactivity to some functional groups such as thiol group. Heparin was conjugated with cystamine and the terminal hydroxyl groups of Pluronic were activated with the VS group, followed by coupling of VS groups of Pluronic with cystamine of heparin. The chemical structure, heparin content and VS group content of the resulting product were determined by {sup 1}H NMR, FT-IR, toluidine blue assay and Ellman's method. The HP conjugate formed a type of nanogel in an aqueous medium, showing a critical micelle concentration of approximately 129.35 mg L{sup -1}, a spherical shape and the mean diameter of 115.7 nm, which were measured by AFM and DLS. The release test demonstrated that HP nanogel was rapidly degraded when treated with glutathione. Cytotoxicity results showed a higher viability of drug-free HP nanogel than that of drug-loaded one. Cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Cys) (cRGDfC) peptide was efficiently conjugated to VS groups of HP nanogel and exhibited higher cellular uptake than unmodified nanogels. All results suggest a novel multi-functional nanocarrier delivery and effective release of proteins to the intracellular region in a redox-sensitive manner.

  19. Redox-Triggered Gatekeeper-Enveloped Starlike Hollow Silica Nanoparticles for Intelligent Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nana; Lin, Xinyi; Zhang, Qing; Ji, Zhaoxia; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2015-12-22

    The design and development of multifunctional carriers for drug delivery based on hollow nanoparticles (HNPs) have attracted intense interests. Ordinary spherical HNPs are demonstrated to be promising candidates. However, the application of HNPs with special morphologies has rarely been reported. HNPs with sharp horns are expected to own higher endocytosis efficiencies than spherical counterparts. In this work, novel starlike hollow silica nanoparticles (SHNPs) with different sizes are proposed as platforms for the fabrication of redox-triggered multifunctional systems for synergy of gene therapy and chemotherapy. The CD-PGEA gene vectors (consisting of β-CD cores and ethanolamine-functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (denoted BUCT-PGEA) arms) are introduced ingeniously onto the surfaces of SHNPs with plentiful disulfide bond-linked adamantine guests. The resulting supramolecular assemblies (SHNP-PGEAs) possess redox-responsive gatekeepers for loaded drugs in the cavities of SHNPs. Meanwhile, they also demonstrate excellent performances to deliver genes. The gene transfection efficiencies, controlled drug release behaviors, and synergistic antitumor effect of hollow silica-based carriers with different morphologies are investigated in detail. Compared with ordinary spherical HNP-based counterparts, SHNP-PGEA carriers with six sharp horns are proven to be superior gene vectors and possess better efficacy for cellular uptake and antitumor effects. The present multifunctional carriers based on SHNPs will have promising applications in drug/gene codelivery and cancer treatment. PMID:26528765

  20. Cooperative function of antioxidant and redox systems against oxidative stress in male reproductive tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunichiFujii; YoshihitoIuchi; ShingoMatsuki; TatsuyaIshii

    2003-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced under oxidative stress, such as high oxygen concentration and during the metabolic consumption of oxygen molecules. Male reproductive tissues appear to be continuously exposed to ROS produced by active metabolism. In addition, spermatozoa must pass through a high oxygen environ-ment during the mating process. Thus, to maintain viable reproductive ability, a protective mechanism against oxida-tive stress is of importance. Here, we overview our current understanding of the cooperative function of antioxidative and redox systems that are involved in male fertility. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase are major enzymes that scavenge harmful ROS in male reproductive organs. In turn, glutathione and thioredoxin systems constitute the main redox systems that repair oxidized and damaged molecules and also play a role in regulating a variety of cellular functions. While glutathione functions as an antioxidant by donating electrons to glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin donates electrons to peroxiredoxin as a counterpart of glutathione peroxidase. In addition,aldo-keto reductases, which detoxify carbonyl compounds produced by oxidative stress, are present at high levels in the epithelia of the genital tract and Sertoli cells of the testis. Since these systems are involved in cross-talk, a comprehensive understanding will be required to maintain the physiological functions of male reproductive system.( Asian J Andro12003 Sep; 5: 231-242)

  1. Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B involves a sulphenyl-amide intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmeen, Annette; Andersen, Jannik N; Myers, Michael P; Meng, Tzu-Ching; Hinks, John A; Tonks, Nicholas K; Barford, David

    2003-06-12

    The second messenger hydrogen peroxide is required for optimal activation of numerous signal transduction pathways, particularly those mediated by protein tyrosine kinases. One mechanism by which hydrogen peroxide regulates cellular processes is the transient inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases through the reversible oxidization of their catalytic cysteine, which suppresses protein dephosphorylation. Here we describe a structural analysis of the redox-dependent regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which is reversibly inhibited by oxidation after cells are stimulated with insulin and epidermal growth factor. The sulphenic acid intermediate produced in response to PTP1B oxidation is rapidly converted into a previously unknown sulphenyl-amide species, in which the sulphur atom of the catalytic cysteine is covalently linked to the main chain nitrogen of an adjacent residue. Oxidation of PTP1B to the sulphenyl-amide form is accompanied by large conformational changes in the catalytic site that inhibit substrate binding. We propose that this unusual protein modification both protects the active-site cysteine residue of PTP1B from irreversible oxidation to sulphonic acid and permits redox regulation of the enzyme by promoting its reversible reduction by thiols.

  2. Redox-directed cancer therapeutics: Taurolidine and Piperlongumine as broadly effective antineoplastic agents (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhler, Hanns; Pfirrmann, Rolf W; Frei, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Targeting the oxygen stress response pathway is considered a promising strategy to exert antineoplastic activity in a broad spectrum of tumor types. Supporting this view, we summarize the mechanism of action of Taurolidine and Piperlongumine, two antineoplastic agents with strikingly broad tumor selectivity. Taurolidine enhances the oxidative stress (ROS) selectively in tumor cells. Its cytotoxicity for various tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, which includes tumor stem cells, is based on the induction of programmed cell death, largely via apoptosis but also necroptosis and autophagy. The redox-directed mechanism of action of Taurolidine is apparent from the finding that reducing agents e.g., N-acetylcysteine or glutathione impair its cytotoxicity, while its effectiveness is enhanced by agents which inhibit the cellular anti‑oxidant capacity. A similar redox-directed antineoplastic action is shown by Piperlongumine, a recently described experimental drug of plant origin. Taurolidine is particularly advantageous in surgical oncology as this taurine-derivative can be applied perioperatively or systemically with good tolerability as shown in initial clinical applications. PMID:25175943

  3. Plumbagin Modulates Leukemia Cell Redox Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Gaascht

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plumbagin is a plant naphtoquinone exerting anti-cancer properties including apoptotic cell death induction and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The aim of this study was to elucidate parameters explaining the differential leukemia cell sensitivity towards this compound. Among several leukemia cell lines, U937 monocytic leukemia cells appeared more sensitive to plumbagin treatment in terms of cytotoxicity and level of apoptotic cell death compared to more resistant Raji Burkitt lymphoma cells. Moreover, U937 cells exhibited a ten-fold higher ROS production compared to Raji. Neither differential incorporation, nor efflux of plumbagin was detected. Pre-treatment with thiol-containing antioxidants prevented ROS production and subsequent induction of cell death by apoptosis whereas non-thiol-containing antioxidants remained ineffective in both cellular models. We conclude that the anticancer potential of plumbagin is driven by pro-oxidant activities related to the cellular thiolstat.

  4. Preliminary results in the redox balance in healthy cats: influence of age and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Cristina; Pereira, Victor; Abuelo, Angel; Guimarey, Rebeca; García-Vaquero, Marco; Benedito, José L; Hernández, Joaquín

    2013-04-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) impairs organic function and is considered causally related to cellular senescence and death. This study aims to evaluate if the redox balance varies in relation to age and gender in healthy cats. To quantify the oxidative status of this species we determined the oxidative damage as serum reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) and the total serum antioxidant capacity (SAC). In addition, we used the ratio of ROM to SAC as a measure of the oxidative balance, with higher values meaning higher oxidative stress (oxidative stress index). Our results suggest that the male population is at oxidative risk when compared with females, especially between the age of 2 and 7 years. Nutritional strategies in this population looking for additional antioxidant support would probably avoid the oxidative stress status that predisposes to chronic processes in senior male cats. Further clinical trials in this field are recommended.

  5. Redox Changes Induced by General Anesthesia in Critically Ill Patients with Multiple Traumas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Papurica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The critically ill polytrauma patient is a constant challenge for the trauma team due to the complexity of the complications presented. Intense inflammatory response and infections, as well as multiple organ dysfunctions, significantly increase the rate of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Moreover, due to the physiological and biochemical imbalances present in this type of patients, the bioproduction of free radicals is significantly accelerated, thus installing the oxidative stress. In the therapeutic management of such patients, multiple surgical interventions are required and therefore they are being subjected to repeated general anesthesia. In this paper, we want to present the pathophysiological implications of oxidative stress in critically ill patients with multiple traumas and the implications of general anesthesia on the redox mechanisms of the cell. We also want to summarize the antioxidant treatments able to reduce the intensity of oxidative stress by modulating the biochemical activity of some cellular mechanisms.

  6. Computation of the Redox and Protonation Properties of Quinones: Towards the Prediction of Redox Cycling Natural Products.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cape, Jonathan L.; Bowman, Michael K.; Kramer, David M.

    2006-08-01

    Quinone metabolites perform a variety of key functions in plants, including pathogen protection, oxidative phosphorylation, and redox signaling. Many of these structurally diverse compounds have been shown to exhibit potent antimicrobial, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory properties, although the exact mechanisms of action are far from understood. Redox cycling has been proposed as a possible mechanism of action for many quinine species. Experimental determination of the essential thermodynamic data (i.e. electrochemical and pKa values) required to predict the propensity towards redox cycling is often difficult or impossible to obtain due to the experimental limitations. We demonstrate a practical computational approach to obtain reasonable estimates of these parameters.

  7. Hierarchical Cellular Structures in High-Capacity Cellular Communication Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, R K; Agrawal, N K

    2011-01-01

    In the prevailing cellular environment, it is important to provide the resources for the fluctuating traffic demand exactly in the place and at the time where and when they are needed. In this paper, we explored the ability of hierarchical cellular structures with inter layer reuse to increase the capacity of mobile communication network by applying total frequency hopping (T-FH) and adaptive frequency allocation (AFA) as a strategy to reuse the macro and micro cell resources without frequency planning in indoor pico cells [11]. The practical aspects for designing macro- micro cellular overlays in the existing big urban areas are also explained [4]. Femto cells are inducted in macro / micro / pico cells hierarchical structure to achieve the required QoS cost effectively.

  8. [Exercise and aging: regulation of mitochondrial function and redox system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Juan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Jian-Kang

    2014-10-01

    Evidence shows that aging is closely related to mitochondrial decay and redox imbalance. With aging, both mitochondrial content and protein synthesis declined and free radicals, the by-products of mitochondrial metabolism and their oxidation to lipids, proteins and nuclear acids increased. The age-related declines in mitochondrial function and redox imbalance affect physical function, induce insulin resistance and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, thus, play a major role in regulation of life span. Therefore, mitochondrion may be the most important determinant of life span. Increasing evidence demonstrates that long-term aerobic exercise could prevent age-related diseases and improve life quality of aged people. Exercise may possibly stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II antioxidant defense system to regulate mitochondrial function and balance of redox system. Therefore, regular aerobic exercise may prevent age-related diseases, increase life quality and prolong life span through regulation of mitochondrial function and redox balance. PMID:25764789

  9. Redox Dysregulation in the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulak, Anita; Steullet, Pascal; Cabungcal, Jan-Harry;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are classified as two distinct diseases. However, accumulating evidence shows that both disorders share genetic, pathological, and epidemiological characteristics. Based on genetic and functional findings, redox dysregulation due...

  10. A Redox-Active Binder for Electrochemical Capacitor Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Corentin; Demeter, Dora; Bélanger, Daniel; Cougnon, Charles

    2016-04-18

    A promising strategy for increasing the performance of supercapacitors is proposed. Until now, a popular strategy for increasing the specific capacity of the electrode consists of grafting redox molecules onto a high surface area carbon structure to add a faradaic contribution to the charge storage. Unfortunately, the grafting of molecules to the carbon surface leads to a dramatic decrease of the electrochemical performances of the composite material. Herein, we used the organic binder as an active material in the charge/discharge process. Redox molecules were attached onto its polymeric skeleton to obtain a redox binder with the dual functionalities of both the binder and the active material. In this way, the electrochemical performance was improved without detrimentally affecting the properties of the porous carbon. Results showed that the use of a redox binder is promising for enhancing both energy and power densities. PMID:26997572

  11. Redox Stable Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang eXiao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs can convert chemical energy from the fuel directly to electrical energy with high efficiency and fuel flexibility. Ni-based cermets have been the most widely adopted anode for SOFCs. However, the conventional Ni-based anode has low tolerance to sulfur-contamination, is vulnerable to deactivation by carbon build-up (coking from direct oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels, and suffers volume instability upon redox cycling. Among these limitations, the redox instability of the anode is particularly important and has been intensively studied since the SOFC anode may experience redox cycling during fuel cell operations even with the ideal pure hydrogen as the fuel. This review aims to highlight recent progresses on improving redox stability of the conventional Ni-based anode through microstructure optimization and exploration of alternative ceramic-based anode materials.

  12. E-tongue 2 REDOX response to heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, M. G.; Kuhlman, G. M.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2002-01-01

    E-Tongue 2 an array of electrochemical sensors including REDOX electrodes for Cylic Voltammetry and Anodic Stripping Voltammetry measurements, Galvanic cells for corrosion measurements, and Ion Selective Electrodes.

  13. Redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khalil; Chen, Zonghai; Wang, Qingzheng

    2010-12-14

    The present invention is generally related to electrolytes containing novel redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium-ion batteries. The redox shuttles are capable of thousands hours of overcharge tolerance and have a redox potential at about 3-5.5 V vs. Li and particularly about 4.4-4.8 V vs. Li. Accordingly, in one aspect the invention provides electrolytes comprising an alkali metal salt; a polar aprotic solvent; and a redox shuttle additive that is an aromatic compound having at least one aromatic ring with four or more electronegative substituents, two or more oxygen atoms bonded to the aromatic ring, and no hydrogen atoms bonded to the aromatic ring; and wherein the electrolyte solution is substantially non-aqueous. Further there are provided electrochemical devices employing the electrolyte and methods of making the electrolyte.

  14. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eBenzine

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ i-chip enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria and six Fe(II phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8, Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5, and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31 were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments.

  15. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzine, Jason; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xiong, Mai Yia; Kennedy, David W.; McKinley, James P.; Lin, Xueju; Roden, Eric E.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe) in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ "i-chip" enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria) and six Fe(II) phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8), Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5), and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31) were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II)-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II)-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II)-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments.

  16. Real-time monitoring of cellular dynamics using a microfluidic cell culture system with integrated electrode array and potentiostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zor, Kinga; Vergani, M.; Heiskanen, Arto;

    2011-01-01

    A versatile microfluidic, multichamber cell culture and analysis system with an integrated electrode array and potentiostat suitable for electrochemical detection and microscopic imaging is presented in this paper. The system, which allows on-line electrode cleaning and modification, was developed...... for real-time monitoring of cellular dynamics, exemplified in this work by monitoring of redox metabolism inside living yeast cells and dopamine release from PC12 cells....

  17. Redox thermodynamics of lactoperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Bellei, Marzia; Vlasits, Jutta; Banerjee, Srijib; Furtmüller, Paul G; Sola, Marco; Obinger, Christian

    2010-02-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are important constituents of the innate immune system of mammals. These heme enzymes belong to the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily and catalyze the oxidation of thiocyanate, bromide and nitrite to hypothiocyanate, hypobromous acid and nitrogen dioxide that are toxic for invading pathogens. In order to gain a better understanding of the observed differences in substrate specificity and oxidation capacity in relation to heme and protein structure, a comprehensive spectro-electrochemical investigation was performed. The reduction potential (E degrees ') of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of EPO and LPO was determined to be -126mV and -176mV, respectively (25 degrees C, pH 7.0). Variable temperature experiments show that EPO and LPO feature different reduction thermodynamics. In particular, reduction of ferric EPO is enthalpically and entropically disfavored, whereas in LPO the entropic term, which selectively stabilizes the oxidized form, prevails on the enthalpic term that favors reduction of Fe(III). The data are discussed with respect to the architecture of the heme cavity and the substrate channel. Comparison with published data for myeloperoxidase demonstrates the effect of heme to protein linkages and heme distortion on the redox chemistry of mammalian peroxidases and in consequence on the enzymatic properties of these physiologically important oxidoreductases.

  18. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  19. Redox reactions with empirical potentials: Atomistic battery discharge simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Müser, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Batteries are pivotal components in overcoming some of today's greatest technological challenges. Yet to date there is no self-consistent atomistic description of a complete battery. We take first steps toward modeling of a battery as a whole microscopically. Our focus lies on phenomena occurring at the electrode-electrolyte interface which are not easily studied with other methods. We use the redox split-charge equilibration (redoxSQE) method that assigns a discrete ionization state to each ...

  20. Automated and continuous redox potential measurements in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G; van Marum, Daan; Wattel, Kees; Eijsackers, Herman J P

    2004-01-01

    Redox potential (Eh) describes the electrical state of a matrix. In soils, Eh is an important parameter controlling the persistence of many organic and inorganic compounds. A popular, but also criticized, manual measuring method makes use of a small tip of Pt placed on a copper wire that is placed in the soil; a reference electrode is placed in the same soil at a fixed distance. Fluctuations in redox potential values measured in the soil can be very large and depth-dependent. This will be overlooked when making single-point measurements. We developed the datalogger Hypnos 2.0 for continuous redox potential and temperature measurements at various depths in the soil and without disturbance of the site. Hypnos is field-deployable, relatively cheap, and runs on batteries. The datalogger can use a "sleep mode" between sampling events. In sleep mode, there is no constant voltage on the Pt wire or the reference electrode, but there is only a short pulse during sampling. We did not measure an effect of this short pulse on the measured redox potential. In sandy soils in mesocosms and in a salt marsh soil we measured changes in the Eh as large as from -400 to +100 mV within 4 d, and daily cycles of 200 mV. Both absolute redox potential values and their diurnal variations were depth-dependent. Because single redox measurements are insufficient in describing redox conditions in some soil systems, Hypnos can be a powerful tool when studying the effects of fluctuating redox conditions on metal availability and pollutant degradation.

  1. Redox modifier genes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Marden, Jennifer J.; Harraz, Maged M.; Williams, Aislinn J.; Nelson, Kathryn; Luo, Meihui; Paulson, Henry; Engelhardt, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), one of the most common adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases, has no known cure. Enhanced redox stress and inflammation have been associated with the pathoprogression of ALS through a poorly defined mechanism. Here we determined that dysregulated redox stress in ALS mice caused by NADPH oxidases Nox1 and Nox2 significantly influenced the progression of motor neuron disease caused by mutant SOD1G93A expression. Deletion of either Nox gene significantly slo...

  2. Alternative Evaluation for the REDOX (202-S) Plutonium Loadout Hood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. R. Kerr

    1999-09-20

    Located in the 200 Areas is the inactive 202-S Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) Facility, which is managed by the Bechtel Hanford, Inc. Surveillance/Maintenance and Transition project. This facility is contaminated from nuclear material processes related to nuclear material separation from Hanford Site facility operations. This alternative evaluation report describes the alternatives and selection criteria based on the necessary protective requirements to maintain the REDOX Plutonium Loadout Hood in a safe and stable condition awaiting a final waste response action.

  3. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  4. Prognosis of Different Cellular Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetish Ranjan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advancement in mobile telephony from 1G to 3G, 4G and 5G has a very axiomatic fact that made an entire world a global village. The cellular system employs a different design approach and technology that most commercial radio and television system use. In the cellular system, the service area is divided into cells and a transmitter is designed to serve an individual cell. The system seeks to make efficient use of available channels by using low-power transmitters to allow frequency reuse at a smaller distance. Maximizing the number of times each channel can be reused in a given geographical area is the key to an efficient cellular system design. During the past three decades, the world has seen significant changes in telecommunications industry. There have been some remarkable aspects to the rapid growth in wireless communications, as seen by the large expansion in mobile systems. This paper focuses on “Past, Present & Future of Cellular Telephony” and some light has been thrown upon the technologies of the cellular systems, namely 1G, 2G, 2.5G, 3G and future generations like 4G and 5G systems as well.

  5. Hypothyroidism minimizes the effects of acute hepatic failure caused by endoplasmic reticulum stress and redox environment alterations in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blas-Valdivia, Vanessa; Cano-Europa, Edgar; Martinez-Perez, Yoalli; Lezama-Palacios, Ruth; Franco-Colin, Margarita; Ortiz-Butron, Rocio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a protective effect from hypothyroidism in acute liver failure resulted from reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes to the redox environment. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided in four groups: (1) euthyroid (sham surgery), (2) hypothyroid, (3) euthyroid (sham surgery)+thioacetamide and (4) hypothyroid+thioacetamide. Hypothyroidism was confirmed two weeks after thyroidectomy, and thioacetamide (TAA) (400mg/kg, ip) was administrated to the appropriate groups for three days with supportive therapy. Grades of encephalopathy in all animals were determined using behavioral tests. Animals were decapitated and their blood was obtained to assess liver function. The liver was dissected: the left lobe was used for histology and the right lobe was frozen for biochemical assays. Body weight, rectal temperature and T4 concentration were lower in hypothyroid groups. When measurements of oxidative stress markers, redox environment, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione-S-transferase were determined, we observed that hypothyroid animals with TAA compensated better with oxidative damage than euthyroid animals treated with TAA. Furthermore, we measured reduced expressions of GADD34, caspase-12 and GRP78 and subsequently less hypothyroidism-induced cellular damage in hypothyroid animals. We conclude that hypothyroidism protects against hepatic damage caused by TAA because it reduces endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes to the redox environment.

  6. Hypothyroidism minimizes the effects of acute hepatic failure caused by endoplasmic reticulum stress and redox environment alterations in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blas-Valdivia, Vanessa; Cano-Europa, Edgar; Martinez-Perez, Yoalli; Lezama-Palacios, Ruth; Franco-Colin, Margarita; Ortiz-Butron, Rocio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a protective effect from hypothyroidism in acute liver failure resulted from reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes to the redox environment. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided in four groups: (1) euthyroid (sham surgery), (2) hypothyroid, (3) euthyroid (sham surgery)+thioacetamide and (4) hypothyroid+thioacetamide. Hypothyroidism was confirmed two weeks after thyroidectomy, and thioacetamide (TAA) (400mg/kg, ip) was administrated to the appropriate groups for three days with supportive therapy. Grades of encephalopathy in all animals were determined using behavioral tests. Animals were decapitated and their blood was obtained to assess liver function. The liver was dissected: the left lobe was used for histology and the right lobe was frozen for biochemical assays. Body weight, rectal temperature and T4 concentration were lower in hypothyroid groups. When measurements of oxidative stress markers, redox environment, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione-S-transferase were determined, we observed that hypothyroid animals with TAA compensated better with oxidative damage than euthyroid animals treated with TAA. Furthermore, we measured reduced expressions of GADD34, caspase-12 and GRP78 and subsequently less hypothyroidism-induced cellular damage in hypothyroid animals. We conclude that hypothyroidism protects against hepatic damage caused by TAA because it reduces endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes to the redox environment. PMID:26238033

  7. The movement of radionuclides past a redox front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is assumed that radiolysis of water in a penetrated canister containig spent fuel has occured. Radionuclides and oxidizing agents are diffusing from the corroded canister and out through the clay barrier. A concentration front of radionuclides as well as of oxidizing agents is developed in the water that is flowing past the repository. The front propagates in a plane fissure with infinite extension. In the undisturbed bedrock reducing conditions normally prevail. The oxidizing agents are consumed by oxidation of the reducing components of the bedrock (primarily Fe(II)), and an oxidized region is developed. A redox front develops between the oxidizing and reduzing regions. Some of the nuclides are much more soluble in an oxidizing environment than in a reducing. These nuclides will precipitate when they reach the redox front. The redox front moves much slower than the nuclides and can be assumed to be stationary at every moment. The movement of radionuclides in the flowing water up to and past the redox front have been computed. In the computations the transverse diffusion and precipitation at the redox front are accounted for. That part of the nuclides wich is not precipitated at the passage of the redox front has be0 en computed for different solubility ratios and at various distances downstream from the canister. The solubility ratio indicates the solubility of a nuclide in a reducing environment divided by the solubility in an oxidizing environment. (Forf)

  8. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  9. Maternal Inflammation Contributes to Brain Overgrowth and Autism-Associated Behaviors through Altered Redox Signaling in Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janel E. Le Belle

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A period of mild brain overgrowth with an unknown etiology has been identified as one of the most common phenotypes in autism. Here, we test the hypothesis that maternal inflammation during critical periods of embryonic development can cause brain overgrowth and autism-associated behaviors as a result of altered neural stem cell function. Pregnant mice treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide at embryonic day 9 had offspring with brain overgrowth, with a more pronounced effect in PTEN heterozygotes. Exposure to maternal inflammation also enhanced NADPH oxidase (NOX-PI3K pathway signaling, stimulated the hyperproliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells, increased forebrain microglia, and produced abnormal autism-associated behaviors in affected pups. Our evidence supports the idea that a prenatal neuroinflammatory dysregulation in neural stem cell redox signaling can act in concert with underlying genetic susceptibilities to affect cellular responses to environmentally altered cellular levels of reactive oxygen species.

  10. Maternal inflammation contributes to brain overgrowth and autism-associated behaviors through altered redox signaling in stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Belle, Janel E; Sperry, Jantzen; Ngo, Amy; Ghochani, Yasmin; Laks, Dan R; López-Aranda, Manuel; Silva, Alcino J; Kornblum, Harley I

    2014-11-11

    A period of mild brain overgrowth with an unknown etiology has been identified as one of the most common phenotypes in autism. Here, we test the hypothesis that maternal inflammation during critical periods of embryonic development can cause brain overgrowth and autism-associated behaviors as a result of altered neural stem cell function. Pregnant mice treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide at embryonic day 9 had offspring with brain overgrowth, with a more pronounced effect in PTEN heterozygotes. Exposure to maternal inflammation also enhanced NADPH oxidase (NOX)-PI3K pathway signaling, stimulated the hyperproliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells, increased forebrain microglia, and produced abnormal autism-associated behaviors in affected pups. Our evidence supports the idea that a prenatal neuroinflammatory dysregulation in neural stem cell redox signaling can act in concert with underlying genetic susceptibilities to affect cellular responses to environmentally altered cellular levels of reactive oxygen species.

  11. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordgren, Kendra K.S., E-mail: knordgre@d.umn.edu; Wallace, Kendall B., E-mail: kwallace@d.umn.edu

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  12. Metabolic network modeling of redox balancing and biohydrogen production in purple nonsulfur bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grammel Hartmut

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purple nonsulfur bacteria (PNSB are facultative photosynthetic bacteria and exhibit an extremely versatile metabolism. A central focus of research on PNSB dealt with the elucidation of mechanisms by which they manage to balance cellular redox under diverse conditions, in particular under photoheterotrophic growth. Results Given the complexity of the central metabolism of PNSB, metabolic modeling becomes crucial for an integrated analysis of the accumulated biological knowledge. We reconstructed a stoichiometric model capturing the central metabolism of three important representatives of PNSB (Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Using flux variability analysis, the model reveals key metabolic constraints related to redox homeostasis in these bacteria. With the help of the model we can (i give quantitative explanations for non-intuitive, partially species-specific phenomena of photoheterotrophic growth of PNSB, (ii reproduce various quantitative experimental data, and (iii formulate several new hypotheses. For example, model analysis of photoheterotrophic growth reveals that - despite a large number of utilizable catabolic pathways - substrate-specific biomass and CO2 yields are fixed constraints, irrespective of the assumption of optimal growth. Furthermore, our model explains quantitatively why a CO2 fixing pathway such as the Calvin cycle is required by PNSB for many substrates (even if CO2 is released. We also analyze the role of other pathways potentially involved in redox metabolism and how they affect quantitatively the required capacity of the Calvin cycle. Our model also enables us to discriminate between different acetate assimilation pathways that were proposed recently for R. sphaeroides and R. rubrum, both lacking the isocitrate lyase. Finally, we demonstrate the value of the metabolic model also for potential biotechnological applications: we examine the theoretical

  13. A carbon-free lithium-ion solid dispersion redox couple with low viscosity for redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhaoxiang; Koenig, Gary M.

    2016-08-01

    A new type of non-aqueous redox couple without carbon additives for flow batteries is proposed and the target anolyte chemistry is demonstrated. The so-called "Solid Dispersion Redox Couple" incorporates solid electroactive materials dispersed in organic lithium-ion battery electrolyte as its flowing suspension. In this work, a unique and systematic characterization approach has been used to study the flow battery redox couple in half cell demonstrations relative to a lithium electrode. An electrolyte laden with Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) has been characterized in multiple specially designed lithium half cell configurations. The flow battery redox couple described in this report has relatively low viscosity, especially in comparison to other flow batteries with solid active materials. The lack of carbon additive allows characterization of the electrochemical properties of the electroactive material in flow without the complication of conductive additives and unambiguous observation of the electrorheological coupling in these dispersed particle systems.

  14. Aging, cellular senescence, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  15. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  16. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  17. Cellular senescence in aging primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Utz; Ferreira, Mark; Condel, Laura; Carey, Dee; Sedivy, John M

    2006-03-01

    The aging of organisms is characterized by a gradual functional decline of all organ systems. Mammalian somatic cells in culture display a limited proliferative life span, at the end of which they undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as replicative senescence. Whether cellular senescence contributes to organismal aging has been controversial. We investigated telomere dysfunction, a recently discovered biomarker of cellular senescence, and found that the number of senescent fibroblasts increases exponentially in the skin of aging baboons, reaching >15% of all cells in very old individuals. In addition, the same cells contain activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase and heterochromatinized nuclei, confirming their senescent status. PMID:16456035

  18. Simultaneous quantitation of oxidized and reduced glutathione via LC-MS/MS: An insight into the redox state of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dustin; Howard, Diana; Zhu, Haining; Paumi, Christian M; Vore, Mary; Bondada, Subbarao; Liang, Ying; Wang, Chi; St Clair, Daret K

    2016-08-01

    Cellular redox balance plays a significant role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem-progenitor cell (HSC/MPP) self-renewal and differentiation. Unregulated changes in cellular redox homeostasis are associated with the onset of most hematological disorders. However, accurate measurement of the redox state in stem cells is difficult because of the scarcity of HSC/MPPs. Glutathione (GSH) constitutes the most abundant pool of cellular antioxidants. Thus, GSH metabolism may play a critical role in hematological disease onset and progression. A major limitation to studying GSH metabolism in HSC/MPPs has been the inability to measure quantitatively GSH concentrations in small numbers of HSC/MPPs. Current methods used to measure GSH levels not only rely on large numbers of cells, but also rely on the chemical/structural modification or enzymatic recycling of GSH and therefore are likely to measure only total glutathione content accurately. Here, we describe the validation of a sensitive method used for the direct and simultaneous quantitation of both oxidized and reduced GSH via liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in HSC/MPPs isolated from bone marrow. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was determined to be 5.0ng/mL for GSH and 1.0ng/mL for GSSG with lower limits of detection at 0.5ng/mL for both glutathione species. Standard addition analysis utilizing mouse bone marrow shows that this method is both sensitive and accurate with reproducible analyte recovery. This method combines a simple extraction with a platform for the high-throughput analysis, allows for efficient determination of GSH/GSSG concentrations within the HSC/MPP populations in mouse, chemotherapeutic treatment conditions within cell culture, and human normal/leukemia patient samples. The data implicate the importance of the modulation of GSH/GSSG redox couple in stem cells related diseases. PMID:27212018

  19. Redox potential - field measurements - meassured vs. expected values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavělová, Monika; Kovář, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation and reduction (redox) potential is an important and theoretically very well defined parameter and can be calculated accurately. Its value is determinative for management of many electrochemical processes, chemical redox technologies as well as biotechnologies. To measure the redox value that would correspond with the accuracy level of theoretical calculations in field or operational conditions is however nearly impossible. Redox is in practice measured using combined argentochloride electrode with subsequent value conversion to standard hydrogen electrode (EH). Argentochloride electrode does not allow for precise calibration. Prior to the measurement the accuracy of measurement of particular electrode can only be verified in comparative/control solution with value corresponding with oxic conditions (25°C: +220 mV argentochloride electrode, i.e.. +427 mV after conversion to EH). A commercial product of stabile comparative solution for anoxic conditions is not available and therefore not used in every day practice - accuracy of negative redox is not verified. In this presentation results of two tests will be presented: a) monitoring during dynamic groundwater sampling from eight monitoring wells at a site contaminated by chlorinated ethenes (i.e. post-oxic to anoxic conditions) and b) laboratory test of groundwater contaminated by arsenic from two sites during reaction with highly oxidized compounds of iron (ferrates) - i.e. strongly oxic conditions. In both tests a simultaneous measurement by four argentochloride electrodes was implemented - all four electrodes were prior to the test maintained expertly. The redox values of testing electrodes in a comparative solution varied by max. 6 mV. The redox values measured by four electrodes in both anoxic and oxic variant varied by tens to a hundred mV, while with growing time of test the variance of measured redox values increased in both oxic and anoxic variant. Therefore the interpretation of measured redox

  20. Redox-controllable amphiphilic [2]rotaxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Vignon, Scott A; Celestre, Paul C; Perkins, Julie; Jeppesen, Jan O; Di Fabio, Alberto; Ballardini, Roberto; Gandolfi, M Teresa; Venturi, Margherita; Balzani, Vincenzo; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2004-01-01

    With the fabrication of molecular electronic devices (MEDs) and the construction of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMSs) as incentives, two constitutionally isomeric, redox-controllable [2]rotaxanes have been synthesized and characterized in solution. Therein, they both behave as near-perfect molecular switches, that is, to all intents and purposes, these two rotaxanes can be switched precisely by applying appropriate redox stimuli between two distinct chemomechanical states. Their dumbbell-shaped components are composed of polyether chains interrupted along their lengths by i) two pi-electron rich recognition sites-a tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) unit and a 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) moiety-with ii) a rigid terphenylene spacer placed between the two recognition sites, and then terminated by iii) a hydrophobic tetraarylmethane stopper at one end and a hydrophilic dendritic stopper at the other end of the dumbbells, thus conferring amphiphilicity upon these molecules. A template-directed protocol produces a means to introduce the tetracationic cyclophane, cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)), which contains two pi-electron accepting bipyridinium units, mechanically interlocked around the dumbbell-shaped components. Both the TTF unit and the DNP moiety are potential stations for CBPQT(4+), since they can establish charge-transfer and hydrogen bonding interactions with the bipyridinium units of the cyclophane, thereby introducing bistability into the [2]rotaxanes. In both constitutional isomers, (1)H NMR and absorption spectroscopies, together with electrochemical investigations, reveal that the CBPQT(4+) ring is predominantly located on the TTF unit, leading to the existence of a single translational isomer (co-conformation) in both cases. In addition, a model [2]rotaxane, incorporating hydrophobic tetraarylmethane stoppers at both ends of its dumbbell-shaped component, has also been synthesized as a point of reference. Molecular synthetic approaches were used to

  1. Redox behaviour of uranium with iron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An option investigated for the management of long-term nuclear waste is a repository in deep geological formations. It is generally admitted that the release of radionuclides from the spent fuel in the geosphere could occur several thousand years after the beginning of the storage. Therefore, to assess the safety of the long-term disposal, it is important to consider the phenomena that can reduce the migration, and in particular the migration of uranium. The aim of this work is to study if siderite, an iron compound present both in the near - and far -field, can limit this migration as well as the role played by the redox process. Siderite thin layers have been obtained by electrochemistry. The layers are adherent and homogeneous. Their thickness is about 1 μm and they are composed of spherical grains. Analytical characterizations performed show that siderite is free of any impurity and does not exhibit any trace of oxidation. The interactions between siderite and uranium (VI) have been carried out in solutions considered as representative of environmental waters, in terms of pH and carbonate concentration. The retention of uranium on the thin layer is important since, after 24 hours of interaction, it corresponds to retention capacities of several hundreds of uranium micro-moles per gram of siderite. XPS analysis show that, in any studied condition, part of uranium present on the thin layer is reduced into an over stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The process of interaction differs depending on the considered environment, specially on the stability of siderite. (author)

  2. Regulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression by the alteration of redox status in HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wu-kui

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 has been considered as a critical transcriptional factor in response to hypoxia. It can increase P-glycoprotein (P-Gp thus generating the resistant effect to chemotherapy. At present, the mechanism regulating HIF-1α is still not fully clear in hypoxic tumor cells. Intracellular redox status is closely correlated with hypoxic micro-environment, so we investigate whether alterations in the cellular redox status lead to the changes of HIF-1α expression. HepG2 cells were exposed to Buthionine sulphoximine (BSO for 12 h prior to hypoxia treatment. The level of HIF-1α expression was measured by Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. Reduce glutathione (GSH concentrations in hypoxic cells were determined using glutathione reductase/5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrob-enzoic acid (DTNB recycling assay. To further confirm the effect of intracellular redox status on HIF-1α expression, N-acetylcysteine (NAC was added to culture cells for 8 h before the hypoxia treatment. The levels of multidrug resistance gene-1 (MDR-1 and erythropoietin (EPO mRNA targeted by HIF-1α in hypoxic cells were further determined with RT-PCR, and then the expression of P-Gp protein was observed by Western blotting. The results showed that BSO pretreatment down-regulated HIF-1α and the effect was concentration-dependent, on the other hand, the increases of intracellular GSH contents by NAC could partly elevate the levels of HIF-1α expression. The levels of P-Gp (MDR-1 and EPO were concomitant with the trend of HIF-1α expression. Therefore, our data indicate that the changes of redox status in hypoxic cells may regulate HIF-1α expression and provide valuable information on tumor chemotherapy.

  3. The anabolic androgenic steroid nandrolone decanoate disrupts redox homeostasis in liver, heart and kidney of male Wistar rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan P Frankenfeld

    Full Text Available The abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS may cause side effects in several tissues. Oxidative stress is linked to the pathophysiology of most of these alterations, being involved in fibrosis, cellular proliferation, tumorigenesis, amongst others. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the impact of supraphysiological doses of nandrolone decanoate (DECA on the redox balance of liver, heart and kidney. Wistar male rats were treated with intramuscular injections of vehicle or DECA (1 mg.100 g(-1 body weight once a week for 8 weeks. The activity and mRNA levels of NADPH Oxidase (NOX, and the activity of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx and total superoxide dismutase (SOD, as well as the reduced thiol and carbonyl residue proteins, were measured in liver, heart and kidney. DECA treatment increased NOX activity in heart and liver, but NOX2 mRNA levels were only increased in heart. Liver catalase and SOD activities were decreased in the DECA-treated group, but only catalase activity was decreased in the kidney. No differences were detected in GPx activity. Thiol residues were decreased in the liver and kidney of treated animals in comparison to the control group, while carbonyl residues were increased in the kidney after the treatment. Taken together, our results show that chronically administered DECA is able to disrupt the cellular redox balance, leading to an oxidative stress state.

  4. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment Induces Anti-Proliferative Effects in Prostate Cancer Cells by Redox and Apoptotic Signaling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Weiss

    Full Text Available One of the promising possibilities of the clinical application of cold plasma, so-called cold atmospheric plasma (CAP, is its application on malignant cells and cancer tissue using its anti-neoplastic effects, primarily through the delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS. In this study, we investigated the impact of CAP on cellular proliferation and consecutive molecular response mechanisms in established prostate cancer (PC cell lines. PC cells showed a significantly reduced cell growth following CAP treatment as a result of both an immediate increase of intracellular peroxide levels and through the induction of apoptosis indicated by annexin V assay, TUNEL assay, and the evaluation of changes in nuclear morphology. Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH. Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth. In summary, relatively short treatments with CAP of 10 seconds were sufficient to induce a significant inhibition of cancer proliferation, as observed for the first time in urogenital cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand the mode of CAP related cell death and clarify and optimize CAP as cancer therapy. Increased levels of peroxides can alter redox-regulated signaling pathways and can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment.

  5. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment Induces Anti-Proliferative Effects in Prostate Cancer Cells by Redox and Apoptotic Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Martin; Gümbel, Denis; Hanschmann, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Robert; Gelbrich, Nadine; Zimmermann, Uwe; Walther, Reinhard; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Sckell, Axel; Kramer, Axel; Burchardt, Martin; Lillig, Christopher H; Stope, Matthias B

    2015-01-01

    One of the promising possibilities of the clinical application of cold plasma, so-called cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), is its application on malignant cells and cancer tissue using its anti-neoplastic effects, primarily through the delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS). In this study, we investigated the impact of CAP on cellular proliferation and consecutive molecular response mechanisms in established prostate cancer (PC) cell lines. PC cells showed a significantly reduced cell growth following CAP treatment as a result of both an immediate increase of intracellular peroxide levels and through the induction of apoptosis indicated by annexin V assay, TUNEL assay, and the evaluation of changes in nuclear morphology. Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH). Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth. In summary, relatively short treatments with CAP of 10 seconds were sufficient to induce a significant inhibition of cancer proliferation, as observed for the first time in urogenital cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand the mode of CAP related cell death and clarify and optimize CAP as cancer therapy. Increased levels of peroxides can alter redox-regulated signaling pathways and can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment.

  6. IGF-I regulates redox status in breast cancer cells by activating the amino acid transport molecule xC-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuzhe; Yee, Douglas

    2014-04-15

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) stimulate cell growth in part by increasing amino acid uptake. xCT (SLC7A11) encodes the functional subunit of the cell surface transport system xC(-), which mediates cystine uptake, a pivotal step in glutathione synthesis and cellular redox control. In this study, we show that IGF-I regulates cystine uptake and cellular redox status by activating the expression and function of xCT in estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer cells by a mechanism that relies on the IGF receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Breast cancer cell proliferation mediated by IGF-I was suppressed by attenuating xCT expression or blocking xCT activity with the pharmacologic inhibitor sulfasalazine (SASP). Notably, SASP sensitized breast cancer cells to inhibitors of the type I IGF receptor (IGF-IR) in a manner reversed by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Thus, IGF-I promoted the proliferation of ER(+) breast cancer cells by regulating xC(-) transporter function to protect cancer cells from ROS in an IRS-1-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that inhibiting xC(-) transporter function may synergize with modalities that target the IGF-IR to heighten their therapeutic effects.

  7. Repaglinide at a cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard Thomsen, M; Bokvist, K; Høy, M;

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the hormonal and cellular selectivity of the prandial glucose regulators, we have undertaken a series of experiments, in which we characterised the effects of repaglinide and nateglinide on ATP-sensitive potassium ion (KATP) channel activity, membrane potential and exocytosis in ra...

  8. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Meng, Gang; Zijm, Henk; Ommeren, van Jan-Kees

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handli

  9. Cellular uptake of metallated cobalamins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, MQT; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian H.;

    2016-01-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates was estimated via detection of their metal constituents (Co, Pt, and Re) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Vitamin B12 (cyano-cob(iii)alamin) and aquo-cob(iii)alamin [Cbl-OH2](+), which differ in the β-axial ligands (CN(-...

  10. High resolution redox potential measurements: techniques, interpretation and value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing improvement of techniques for the in situ measurement of redox potentials has led to a large number of studies on redox variability in various environments. These studies originate from a wide array of scientific disciplines, amongst which ecology (sediment biogeochemistry), environmental chemistry (degradation studies) and archaeology (in situ preservation). To gain insight in the potential applications, this paper presents three examples of studies in which a newly developed measurement technique was used in soils and where spatial and temporal variation plays an important role. The first one is a microcosm study on the effects of biota on the dynamics of redox conditions in the toplayer of aquatic sediments, showing that the presence of microbiota has a direct influence on biogeochemical parameters. The second is the study of the redox potential in the world heritage site of Bryggen (Bergen, NO) that is under threat of oxidation. The oxidation, caused by a lowered groundwater table, causes soil degradation and unstable conditions for the monumental buildings of the Medieval site. The third study shows variability in a sandy flood plain in Bangladesh, where redox processes dictate the environmental behaviour of Arsenic. This toxic metal is present in many wells used for drinking water, but shows very local variation in dissolution dynamics. In these three studies, continuous measurements of (changes in) redox conditions revealed a strong variability in these systems and consequences for the interpretation of single point measurements or low frequency sampling campaigns are discussed. In these and many other cases, the continuous measurement of the redox potential in soil media will aid in the understanding of the system under study.

  11. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin eLee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554 in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression – including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding and degradation steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes.

  12. Redox properties and activity of iron-citrate complexes: evidence for redox cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Fatima I; Bounds, Patricia L; Kissner, Reinhard; Koppenol, Willem H

    2015-04-20

    Iron in iron overload disease is present as non-transferrin-bound iron, consisting of iron, citrate, and albumin. We investigated the redox properties of iron citrate by electrochemistry, by the kinetics of its reaction with ascorbate, by ESR, and by analyzing the products of reactions of ascorbate with iron citrate complexes in the presence of H2O2 with 4-hydroxybenzoic acid as a reporter molecule for hydroxylation. We report -0.03 V +0.01 V for the (Fe(3+)-cit/Fe(2+)-cit) couple. The first step in the reaction of iron citrate with ascorbate is the rapid formation of mixed complexes of iron with citrate and ascorbate, followed by slow reduction to Fe(2+)-citrate with k = ca. 3 M(-1) s(-1). The ascorbyl radical is formed by iron citrate oxidation of Hasc(-) with k = ca. 0.02 M(-1) s(-1); the majority of the ascorbyl radical formed is sequestered by complexation with iron and remains EPR silent. The hydroxylation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid driven by the Fenton reduction of iron citrate by ascorbate in the presence of H2O2 proceeds in three phases: the first phase, which is independent of the presence of O2, is revealed as a nonzero intercept that reflects the rapid reaction of accumulated Fe(2+) with H2O2; the intermediate oxygen-dependent phase fits a first-order accumulation of product with k = 5 M(-1) s(-1) under aerobic and k = 13 M(-1) s(-1) under anaerobic conditions; the slope of the final linear phase is ca. k = 5 × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1) under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Product yields under aerobic conditions are greater than predicted from the initial concentration of iron, but they are less than predicted for continuous redox cycling in the presence of excess ascorbate. The ongoing formation of hydroxylated product supports slow redox cycling by iron citrate. Thus, when H2O2 is available, iron-citrate complexes may contribute to pathophysiological manifestations of iron overload diseases. PMID:25654270

  13. Lipid peroxidation triggers neurodegeneration: a redox proteomics view into the Alzheimer disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Rukhsana; Perluigi, Marzia; Allan Butterfield, D

    2013-09-01

    Lipid peroxidation involves a cascade of reactions in which production of free radicals occurs selectively in the lipid components of cellular membranes. Polyunsaturated fatty acids easily undergo lipid peroxidation chain reactions, which, in turn, lead to the formation of highly reactive electrophilic aldehydes. Among these, the most abundant aldehydes are 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and malondialdehyde, while acrolein is the most reactive. Proteins are susceptible to posttranslational modifications caused by aldehydes binding covalently to specific amino acid residues, in a process called Michael adduction, and these types of protein adducts, if not efficiently removed, may be, and generally are, dangerous for cellular homeostasis. In the present review, we focused the discussion on the selective proteins that are identified, by redox proteomics, as selective targets of HNE modification during the progression and pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). By comparing results obtained at different stages of the AD, it may be possible to identify key biochemical pathways involved and ideally identify therapeutic targets to prevent, delay, or treat AD.

  14. Label-free and redox proteomic analyses of the triacylglycerol-accumulating Rhodococcus jostii RHA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila Costa, José Sebastián; Herrero, O Marisa; Alvarez, Héctor M; Leichert, Lars

    2015-03-01

    The bacterium Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 synthesizes large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAGs) under conditions of nitrogen starvation. To better understand the molecular mechanisms behind this process, we performed proteomic studies in this oleaginous bacterium. Upon nitrogen starvation, we observed a re-routing of the carbon flux towards the formation of TAGs. Under these conditions, the cellular lipid content made up more than half of the cell's dry weight. On the proteome level, this coincided with a shift towards non-glycolytic carbohydrate-metabolizing pathways. These pathways (Entner-Doudoroff and pentose-phosphate shunt) contribute NADPH and precursors of glycerol 3-phosphate and acetyl-CoA to lipogenesis. The expression of proteins involved in the degradation of branched-chain amino acids and the methylmalonyl-CoA pathway probably provided propionyl-CoA for the biosynthesis of odd-numbered fatty acids, which make up almost 30 % of RHA1 fatty acid composition. Additionally, lipolytic and glycerol-degrading enzymes increased in abundance, suggesting a dynamic cycling of cellular lipids. Conversely, abundance of proteins involved in consuming intermediates of lipogenesis decreased. Furthermore, we identified another level of lipogenesis regulation through redox-mediated thiol modification in R. jostii. Enzymes affected included acetyl-CoA carboxylase and a β-ketoacyl-[acyl-carrier protein] synthase II (FabF). An integrative metabolic model for the oleaginous RHA1 strain is proposed on the basis of our results. PMID:25564499

  15. Ca2+ signalling in the myocardium by (redox regulation of PKA/CaMKII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S Johnston

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic cardiac function is maintained by a complex network of interdependent signaling pathways which become compromised during disease progression. Excitation-contraction-coupling, the translation of an electrical signal to a contractile response is critically dependent on a tightly controlled sequence of events culminating in a rise in intracellular Ca2+ and subsequent contraction of the myocardium. Dysregulation of this Ca2+ handling system as well as increases in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS are two major contributing factors to myocardial disease progression. ROS, generated by cellular oxidases and by-products of cellular metabolism, are highly reactive oxygen derivatives that function as key secondary messengers within the heart and contribute to normal homeostatic function. However, excessive production of ROS, as in disease, can directly interact with kinases critical for Ca2+ regulation. This post-translational oxidative modification therefore links changes in the redox status of the myocardium to phospho-regulated pathways essential for its function. This review aims to describe the oxidative regulation of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA, and the subsequent impact this has on Ca2+ handling within the myocardium. Elucidating the impact of alterations in intracellular ROS production on Ca2+ dynamics through oxidative modification of key ROS sensing kinases, may provide novel therapeutic targets for preventing myocardial disease progression.

  16. Dihydroxybenzene/benzoquinone-containing polymers: organic redox polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulay, S. [Universite de Blida, Lab. de Chimie-Physique Macromoleculaire, Institut de Chimie Industrielle (Algeria)

    2000-08-01

    Polymers containing hydroquinone, catechol or their corresponding benzoquinones are a special class of redox polymers. Three pathways of their syntheses are possible: condensation polymerization of suitable monomers, addition polymerization of vinyl monomers containing redox moiety, and chemical attachment of redox unit onto pre-made polymeric matrix. A range of functionalized matrices have been employed such as polyethers, polyesters, polycarbonates, polyurethanes, polyamides and others. Protection of their phenolic functionality has conducted to chemically interesting redox polymer precursors. The presence of a redox moiety coupled with the extant functionalization of the polymer matrix makes the materials very valuable, of wide properties and consequently of vast applicability. For instance, in the oil field, some polymers such as carboxy-methyl-cellulose (CMC) are often applied as to bring about a viscosity improvement and therefore to facilitate the oil drilling. In this regard, Patel evaluated sulfo-alkylated polymeric catechol, namely sulfo-methylated and sulfo-ethylated resins. Indeed, polymeric catechol chemically modified as such exhibited a marked ability to control the viscosity, the gel strength, as well as the filtrate loss of aqueous oil drilling fluids.

  17. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltsatou, Antonia; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS) production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD. PMID:27563376

  18. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulianiti, Konstantina P; Kaltsatou, Antonia; Mitrou, Georgia I; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Maridaki, Maria; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K; Karatzaferi, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS) production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD. PMID:27563376

  19. TEMPOL increases NAD+ and improves redox imbalance in obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Yamato

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous energy conversion is controlled by reduction–oxidation (redox processes. NAD+ and NADH represent an important redox couple in energy metabolism. 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL is a redox-cycling nitroxide that promotes the scavenging of several reactive oxygen species (ROS and is reduced to hydroxylamine by NADH. TEMPOL is also involved in NAD+ production in the ascorbic acid–glutathione redox cycle. We utilized the chemical properties of TEMPOL to investigate the effects of antioxidants and NAD+/NADH modulators on the metabolic imbalance in obese mice. Increases in the NAD+/NADH ratio by TEMPOL ameliorated the metabolic imbalance when combined with a dietary intervention, changing from a high-fat diet to a normal diet. Plasma levels of the superoxide marker dihydroethidium were higher in mice receiving the dietary intervention compared with a control diet, but were normalized with TEMPOL consumption. These findings provide novel insights into redox regulation in obesity.

  20. TEMPOL increases NAD(+) and improves redox imbalance in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Mayumi; Kawano, Kimika; Yamanaka, Yuki; Saiga, Misako; Yamada, Ken-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Continuous energy conversion is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) processes. NAD(+) and NADH represent an important redox couple in energy metabolism. 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) is a redox-cycling nitroxide that promotes the scavenging of several reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is reduced to hydroxylamine by NADH. TEMPOL is also involved in NAD(+) production in the ascorbic acid-glutathione redox cycle. We utilized the chemical properties of TEMPOL to investigate the effects of antioxidants and NAD(+)/NADH modulators on the metabolic imbalance in obese mice. Increases in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio by TEMPOL ameliorated the metabolic imbalance when combined with a dietary intervention, changing from a high-fat diet to a normal diet. Plasma levels of the superoxide marker dihydroethidium were higher in mice receiving the dietary intervention compared with a control diet, but were normalized with TEMPOL consumption. These findings provide novel insights into redox regulation in obesity. PMID:26942863

  1. Cellular solidification of transparent monotectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulker, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding how liquid phase particles are engulfed or pushed during freezing of a monotectic is addressed. The additional complication is that the solid-liquid interface is nonplanar due to constitutional undercooling. Some evidence of particle pushing where the particles are the liquid phase of the montectic was already observed. Cellular freezing of the succinonitrile-glycerol system also occurred. Only a few compositions were tested at that time. The starting materials were not especially pure so that cellular interface observed was likely due to the presence of unkown impurities, the major portion of which was water. Topics addressed include: the effort of modeling the particle pushing process using the computer, establishing an apparatus for the determination of phase diagrams, and the measurement of the temperature gradients with a specimen which will solidify on the temperature gradient microscope stage.

  2. Reversibly assembled cellular composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2013-09-13

    We introduce composite materials made by reversibly assembling a three-dimensional lattice of mass-produced carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite parts with integrated mechanical interlocking connections. The resulting cellular composite materials can respond as an elastic solid with an extremely large measured modulus for an ultralight material (12.3 megapascals at a density of 7.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter). These materials offer a hierarchical decomposition in modeling, with bulk properties that can be predicted from component measurements and deformation modes that can be determined by the placement of part types. Because site locations are locally constrained, structures can be produced in a relative assembly process that merges desirable features of fiber composites, cellular materials, and additive manufacturing.

  3. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Meng, Gang; Zijm, Henk; Ommeren, van, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handling set-up times as well as transfer and process batch size information of multiple products that flow through the system. It is assumed that two sets of discrete material handling devices are used fo...

  4. Identification of Nonstationary Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AndrewI.Adamatzky

    1992-01-01

    The principal feature of nonstationary cellular automata(NCA) is that a local transitiol rule of each cell is changed at each time step depending on neighborhood configuration at previous time step.The identification problem for NCA is extraction of local transition rules and the establishment of mechanism for changing these rules using sequence of NCA configurations.We present serial and parallel algorithms for identification of NCA.

  5. The Origins of Cellular Life

    OpenAIRE

    Schrum, Jason P.; Zhu, Ting F.; SZOSTAK, JACK W.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the origin of cellular life on Earth requires the discovery of plausible pathways for the transition from complex prebiotic chemistry to simple biology, defined as the emergence of chemical assemblies capable of Darwinian evolution. We have proposed that a simple primitive cell, or protocell, would consist of two key components: a protocell membrane that defines a spatially localized compartment, and an informational polymer that allows for the replication and inheritance of fun...

  6. Stochastic Nature in Cellular Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘波; 刘圣君; 王祺; 晏世伟; 耿轶钊; SAKATA Fumihiko; GAO Xing-Fa

    2011-01-01

    The importance of stochasticity in cellular processes is increasingly recognized in both theoretical and experimental studies. General features of stochasticity in gene regulation and expression are briefly reviewed in this article, which include the main experimental phenomena, classification, quantization and regulation of noises. The correlation and transmission of noise in cascade networks are analyzed further and the stochastic simulation methods that can capture effects of intrinsic and extrinsic noise are described.

  7. CELLULAR FETAL MICROCHIMERISM IN PREECLAMPSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Gammill, Hilary S; Aydelotte, Tessa M.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Nkwopara, Evangelyn C.; Nelson, J. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown elevated concentrations of free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid and erythroblasts in maternal circulation in preeclampsia compared with normal pregnancy. Pluripotent and immunocompetent fetal cells also transfer to the maternal circulation during pregnancy, but whether concentrations of fetal mononuclear cells also differed in preeclampsia was unknown. We sought to quantify cellular fetal microchimerism in maternal circulation in women with preeclampsia and healthy con...

  8. Cellular reactions to patterned biointerfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, Vera Antonie

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is to study cellular reactions to topographically, mechanically and biochemically tunable polymeric biomaterials. Different aspects of in vitro cell-biomaterial interactions were systematically studied with the murine fibroblast cell line NIH L929 and primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Besides a general cytocompatibility assessment of the applied materials and the quantification of cell adhesion per se, cell morphological changes (e.g. cell spreading) and intr...

  9. CELLULAR INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY GLYCONECTIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, O.; Sumanovski, L. T.; I. Checiu; Elisabeta Popescu; G. N. Misevic

    1999-01-01

    Cellular interactions involve many types of cell surface molecules and operate via homophilic and/or heterophilic protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate binding. Our investigations in different model-systems (marine invertebrates and mammals) have provided direct evidence that a novel class of primordial proteoglycans, named by us gliconectins, can mediate cell adhesion via a new alternative molecular mechanism of polyvalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate binding. Biochemical characterization of...

  10. Chloride supporting electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soowhan; Vijayakumar, M; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianlu; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Feng; Hu, Jianzhi; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-28

    This paper examines vanadium chloride solutions as electrolytes for an all-vanadium redox flow battery. The chloride solutions were capable of dissolving more than 2.3 M vanadium at varied valence states and remained stable at 0-50 °C. The improved stability appeared due to the formation of a vanadium dinuclear [V(2)O(3)·4H(2)O](4+) or a dinuclear-chloro complex [V(2)O(3)Cl·3H(2)O](3+) in the solutions over a wide temperature range. The all-vanadium redox flow batteries with the chloride electrolytes demonstrated excellent reversibility and fairly high efficiencies. Only negligible, if any, gas evolution was observed. The improved energy capacity and good performance, along with the ease in heat management, would lead to substantial reduction in capital cost and life-cycle cost, making the vanadium chloride redox flow battery a promising candidate for stationary applications. PMID:21922094

  11. Novel vanadium chloride/polyhalide redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    This paper describes a novel redox flow cell which employs a polyhalide solution in the positive half-cell electrolyte and a vanadium(II)/vanadium(III) chloride redox couple as the negative half-cell electrolyte. During charging, the bromide ions in the positive half-cell are considered to undergo oxidation to the polyhalide ion Br 2Cl -; the formal potential of this couple is about 0.8 V versus the saturated calomel electrode (SCE). When combined with a formal potential of around -0.5 V versus SCE for the V(III)/V(III) coupled in the chloride supporting electrolyte, an overall cell potential of approximately 1.3 V would be expected for the vanadium chloride/polyhalide redox flow cell.

  12. Chloride supporting electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soowhan; Vijayakumar, M; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianlu; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Feng; Hu, Jianzhi; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-28

    This paper examines vanadium chloride solutions as electrolytes for an all-vanadium redox flow battery. The chloride solutions were capable of dissolving more than 2.3 M vanadium at varied valence states and remained stable at 0-50 °C. The improved stability appeared due to the formation of a vanadium dinuclear [V(2)O(3)·4H(2)O](4+) or a dinuclear-chloro complex [V(2)O(3)Cl·3H(2)O](3+) in the solutions over a wide temperature range. The all-vanadium redox flow batteries with the chloride electrolytes demonstrated excellent reversibility and fairly high efficiencies. Only negligible, if any, gas evolution was observed. The improved energy capacity and good performance, along with the ease in heat management, would lead to substantial reduction in capital cost and life-cycle cost, making the vanadium chloride redox flow battery a promising candidate for stationary applications.

  13. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  14. Redox-Switchable Surface Wrinkling on Polyaniline Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jixun; Zong, Chuanyong; Han, Xue; Ji, Haipeng; Wang, Juanjuan; Yang, Xiu; Lu, Conghua

    2016-04-01

    Here the redox-driven switch between the wrinkled and dewrinkled states on poly-aniline (PANI) film is reported. This switch is derived from the reversible transition in different intrinsic redox states of polyaniline (e.g., between emeraldine salt (ES) and leucoemeraldine base (LEB) or between ES and pernigraniline base (PB)) that are involved in the redox reaction, coupled with the corresponding volume expansion/shrinkage. Interestingly, the as-wrinkled ES film becomes deswollen and dewrinkled when reduced to the LEB state or oxidized to the PB state. Conversely, oxidation of the LEB film or reduction of the PB film into the swollen ES film leads to the reoccurrence of surface wrinkling. Furthermore, the reducibility of the dewrinkled LEB film and the oxidizability of the dewrinkled PB film are well utilized respectively to yield various wrinkled PANI-based composite films.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide and central redox theory for aerobic life: A tribute to Helmut Sies: Scout, trailblazer, and redox pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P

    2016-04-01

    When Rafael Radi and I wrote about Helmut Sies for the Redox Pioneer series, I was disappointed that the Editor restricted us to the use of "Pioneer" in the title. My view is that Helmut was always ahead of the pioneers: He was a scout discovering paths for exploration and a trailblazer developing strategies and methods for discovery. I have known him for nearly 40 years and greatly enjoyed his collegiality as well as brilliance in scientific scholarship. He made monumental contributions to 20th century physiological chemistry beginning with his first measurement of H2O2 in rat liver. While continuous H2O2 production is dogma today, the concept of H2O2 production in mammalian tissues was largely buried for half a century. He continued this leadership in research on oxidative stress, GSH, selenium, and singlet oxygen, during the timeframe when physiological chemistry and biochemistry transitioned to contemporary 21st century systems biology. His impact has been extensive in medical and health sciences, especially in nutrition, aging, toxicology and cancer. I briefly summarize my interactions with Helmut, stressing our work together on the redox code, a set of principles to link mitochondrial respiration, bioenergetics, H2O2 metabolism, redox signaling and redox proteomics into central redox theory. PMID:27095208

  16. Progress of cellular dedifferentiation research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hu-xian; HU Da-hai; JIA Chi-yu; FU Xiao-bing

    2006-01-01

    Differentiation, the stepwise specialization of cells, and transdifferentiation, the apparent switching of one cell type into another, capture much of the stem cell spotlight. But dedifferentiation, the developmental reversal of a cell before it reinvents itself, is an important process too. In multicellular organisms, cellular dedifferentiation is the major process underlying totipotency, regeneration and formation of new stem cell lineages. In humans,dedifferentiation is often associated with carcinogenesis.The study of cellular dedifferentiation in animals,particularly early events related to cell fate-switch and determination, is limited by the lack of a suitable,convenient experimental system. The classic example of dedifferentiation is limb and tail regeneration in urodele amphibians, such as salamanders. Recently, several investigators have shown that certain mammalian cell types can be induced to dedifferentiate to progenitor cells when stimulated with the appropriate signals or materials. These discoveries open the possibility that researchers might enhance the endogenous regenerative capacity of mammals by inducing cellular dedifferentiation in vivo.

  17. The insect cellular immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael R. Strand

    2008-01-01

    The innate immune system of insects is divided into humoral defenses that include the production of soluble effector molecules and cellular defenses like phagocytosis and encapsulation that are mediated by hemocytes. This review summarizes current understanding of the cellular immune response. Insects produce several terminally differentiated types of hemocytes that are distinguished by morphology, molecular and antigenic markers, and function. The differentiated hemocytes that circulate in larval or nymphal stage insects arise from two sources: progenitor cells produced during embryogenesis and mesodermally derived hematopoietic organs. Regulation of hematopoiesis and hemocyte differentiation also involves several different signaling pathways. Phagocytosis and encapsulation require that hemocytes first recognize a given target as foreign followed by activation of downstream signaling and effector responses. A number of humoral and cellular receptors have been identified that recognize different microbes and multicellular parasites. In turn, activation of these receptors stimulates a number of signaling pathways that regulate different hemocyte functions. Recent studies also identify hemocytes as important sources of a number of humoral effector molecules required for killing different foreign invaders.

  18. Redox status in mammalian cells and stem cells during culture in vitro: Critical roles of Nrf2 and cystine transporter activity in the maintenance of redox balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Ishii

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Culturing cells and tissues in vitro has provided valuable insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating redox signaling in cells with implications for medicine. However, standard culture techniques maintain mammalian cells in vitro under an artificial physicochemical environment such as ambient air and 5% CO2. Oxidative stress is caused by the rapid oxidation of cysteine to cystine in culture media catalyzed by transition metals, leading to diminished intracellular cysteine and glutathione (GSH pools. Some cells, such as fibroblasts and macrophages, express cystine transport activity, designated as system xc−, which enables cells to maintain these pools to counteract oxidative stress. Additionally, many cells have the ability to activate the redox sensitive transcription factor Nrf2, a master regulator of cellular defenses against oxidative stress, and to upregulate xCT, the subunit of the xc− transport system leading to increases in cellular GSH. In contrast, some cells, including lymphoid cells, embryonic stem cells and iPS cells, express relatively low levels of xCT and cannot maintain cellular cysteine and GSH pools. Thus, fibroblasts have been used as feeder cells for the latter cell types based on their ability to supply cysteine. Other key Nrf2 regulated gene products include heme oxygenase 1, peroxiredoxin 1 and sequestosome1. In macrophages, oxidized LDL activates Nrf2 and upregulates the scavenger receptor CD36 forming a positive feedback loop to facilitate removal of the oxidant from the vascular microenvironment. This review describes cell type specific responses to oxygen derived stress, and the key roles that activation of Nrf2 and membrane transport of cystine and cysteine play in the maintenance and proliferation of mammalian cells in culture.

  19. WATER TABLE AND REDOX CONDITIONS IN DEEP TROPICAL PEAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hajah Dulima Jali

    2007-01-01

    Redox potential in the well developed tropical peat swamp in Brunei was studied for a year. Generally the redox potential measurements showed a large variation, ranging from -234 mV to 727 mV. The expected rise in redox values did not take place following the drop of water table during the dry months of June to September. The redox value at 100 cm depth indicated that the soil remained reduced throughout the year in spite of the lowering of water table below 150 cm in all sites during dry period. Similarly the redox values did not decrease rapidly following flooding when the water table rose to the surface. This phenomenon could be attributed to the topography of the peat dome which facilitated the fast lateral movement of water and thus promoted oxygen supply down the peat profile, though not great enough to reach the 100 cm depth. The rapid lateral flow of water in the outer Alan batu site facilitated aeration, but in the inner sites remained which was reduced because of the slower water movement. The slower initiation of the reducing condition was likely due to the presence of nitrate which has accumulated as a result of ammonium oxidation during the relatively long aerobic period. Differences in the distribution of redox potential with depth are possibly explained by the different permeability of peat affecting flow patterns and residence time of water. The nature and compactibility of the peat might have slowed the diffusion rates of O2 into the lower layer. Though the bulk density of the peat was low, the composition of the peat might influence the peat permeability and hydraulic conductivity. The tree trunks are not decomposed or large branches must have lowered permeability compared to the other peat material.

  20. Mechanism of CuA assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Luciano A Abriata; Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Gkazonis, Petros; Spyroulias, Georgios A.; Alejandro J. Vila; Wang, Shenlin

    2008-01-01

    Copper is essential for proper functioning of cytochrome c oxidases, and therefore for cellular respiration in eukaryotes and many bacteria. Here we show that a new periplasmic protein (PCuAC) selectively inserts Cu(I) ions into subunit II of Thermus thermophilus ba3 oxidase to generate a native CuA site. The purported metallochaperone Sco1 is unable to deliver copper ions; instead, it works as a thiol-disulfide reductase to maintain the correct oxidation state of the CuA cysteine ligands.

  1. Cellular communications a comprehensive and practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Even as newer cellular technologies and standards emerge, many of the fundamental principles and the components of the cellular network remain the same. Presenting a simple yet comprehensive view of cellular communications technologies, Cellular Communications provides an end-to-end perspective of cellular operations, ranging from physical layer details to call set-up and from the radio network to the core network. This self-contained source forpractitioners and students represents a comprehensive survey of the fundamentals of cellular communications and the landscape of commercially deployed

  2. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics - Lessons learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-01-01

    is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original......, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine...

  3. Nitrotyrosine-modified SERCA2: a cellular sensor of reactive nitrogen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.

    2009-01-19

    The SERCA2 isoform of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase is sensitive to cellular conditions of inflammation and oxidative stress as evidenced by the common appearance of 3-nitrotyrosine modified forms of SERCA2 in aging and disease in both striated and smooth muscle of humans and several rodent models. Structural-functional studies of nitrated SERCA2 in aging heart and skeletal muscle demonstrate stoichiometric nitration of vicinal tyrosines, Tyr-294 and Tyr-295, on the lumenal side of the membrane-spanning helix, M4 that correlates with partial inhibition of its Ca2+-ATPase activity suggesting a possible regulatory function in down-regulating mitochondrial energy production and the associated generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. This review discusses recent work regarding the nitrative and redox sensitivity of SERCA2 in muscle with respect to general cellular mechanisms of turnover and repair of modified proteins.

  4. Health and Cellular Impacts of Air Pollutants: From Cytoprotection to Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Andreau

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution as one of the ravages of our modern societies is primarily linked to urban centers, industrial activities, or road traffic. These atmospheric pollutants have been incriminated in deleterious health effects by numerous epidemiological and in vitro studies. Environmental air pollutants are a heterogeneous mixture of particles suspended into a liquid and gaseous phase which trigger the disruption of redox homeostasis—known under the term of cellular oxidative stress—in relation with the establishment of inflammation and cell death via necrosis, apoptosis, or autophagy. Activation or repression of the apoptotic process as an adaptative response to xenobiotics might lead to either acute or chronic toxicity. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the central role of oxidative stress induced by air pollutants and to focus on the subsequent cellular impacts ranging from cytoprotection to cytotoxicity by decreasing or stimulating apoptosis, respectively.

  5. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe2NiO(Piv)6 (Piv=O2CC(CH3)3) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)(H2O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N2 and H2 adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)(H2O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics

  6. Skin Redox Balance Maintenance: The Need for an Nrf2-Activator Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Ben-Yehuda Greenwald

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The skin, being the largest organ of the body, functions as a barrier between our body and the environment. It is consistently exposed to various exogenous and endogenous stressors (e.g., air pollutants, ionizing and non-ionizing irradiation, toxins, mitochondrial metabolism, enzyme activity, inflammatory process, etc. producing reactive oxygen species (ROS and physical damage (e.g., wounds, sunburns also resulting in reactive oxygen species production. Although skin is equipped with an array of defense mechanisms to counteract reactive oxygen species, augmented exposure and continued reactive oxygen species might result in excessive oxidative stress leading to many skin disorders including inflammatory diseases, pigmenting disorders and some types of cutaneous malignancy. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is an emerging regulator of cellular resistance and of defensive enzymes such as the phase II enzymes. Induction of the Keap1–Nrf2 pathway may have a beneficial effect in the treatment of a large number of skin disorders by stimulating an endogenous defense mechanism. However, prolonged and enhanced activation of this pathway is detrimental and, thus, limits the therapeutic potential of Keap1–Nrf2 modulators. Here, we review the consequences of oxidative stress to the skin, and the defense mechanisms that skin is equipped with. We describe the challenges of maintaining skin redox balance and its impact on skin status and function. Finally, we suggest a novel strategy for maintenance of skin redox homeostasis by modulating the Keap1–Nrf2 pathway using nanotechnology-based delivery systems.

  7. Antimutagenic and redox regulatory activities of curcumin in whole body γ - irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the aim of the current study is understanding the redox regulatory activity ( pro- and anti-oxidant properties) and mutagenic burden following whole body -irradiation with special reference to its control by curcumin in mice. the antimutagenic effects of curcumin; diferuloylmethane ( C21 H20 O6) were evaluated in vitro using chromosomal aberration assay in male mice,induced after-exposure to 3 Gy γ-rays that is a known mutagenic and carcinogenic agent, when curcumin was given at a dose of 400 mmol/kg body wt through gastric intubation for 5 following days either before-, after-or both before and after-exposure, the incidence of aberrant cells and aberration types (mostly chromatids, breaks and fragments) reduced with curcumin dosage as compared to irradiated group. the cellular biochemical changes were estimated using liver tissue damage marker enzymes: alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and γ -glutamyl transferase (GGT), pro-oxidant: xanthine oxidase (XO), lipid per oxidative indices: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydroperoxide (HP. the non-enzymatic antioxidant : glutathione (GSH) and the enzymatic antioxidants: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). TBARS ,HP,XO and liver marker enzymes were increased significantly , whereas the levels of GSH and the enzymatic antioxidants were significantly depleted in -irradiated groups. curcumin-treatment either before-, after-or both before and after -irradiation has attenuated the liver toxic effects of radiation obvious by reducing the levels of tbars and HP and diminished the increases of the activity of XO and liver marker enzymes. it has also re sued the depletion of the non enzymatic -and the enzymatic-antioxidant status.conclusion:curcumin has anti-oxidant potential against -rays-induced chromosomal mutations and redox imbalance regulatory status

  8. Characterization of quinone derived protein adducts and their selective identification using redox cycling based chemiluminescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgawish, Mohamed Saleh; Kishikawa, Naoya; Ohyama, Kaname; Kuroda, Naotaka

    2015-07-17

    The cytotoxic mechanism of many quinones has been correlated to covalent modification of cellular proteins. However, the identification of relevant proteins targets is essential but challenging goals. To better understand the quinones cytotoxic mechanism, human serum albumin (HSA) was incubated in vitro with different concentration of menadione (MQ). In this respect, the initial nucleophilic addition of proteins to quinone converts the conjugates to redox-cycling quinoproteins with altered conformation and secondary structure and extended life span than the short lived, free quinones. The conjugation of MQ with nucleophilic sites likewise, free cysteine as well as ɛ-amino group of lysine residue of HSA has been found to be in concentration dependent manner. The conventional methods for modified proteins identification in complex mixtures are complicated and time consuming. Herein, we describe a highly selective, sensitive, simple, and fast strategy for quinoproteins identification. The suggested strategy exploited the unique redox-cycling capability of quinoproteins in presence of a reductant, dithiothreitol (DTT), to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that gave sufficient chemiluminescence (CL) when mixed with luminol. The CL approach is highly selective and sensitive to detect the quinoproteins in ten-fold molar excess of native proteins without adduct enrichment. The approach was also coupled with gel filtration chromatography (GFC) and used to identify adducts in complex mixture of proteins in vitro as well as in rat plasma after MQ administration. Albumin was identified as the main protein in human and rat plasma forming adduct with MQ. Overall, the identification of quinoproteins will encourage further studies of toxicological impact of quinones on human health. PMID:26044383

  9. Cellular host responses to gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Najbauer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive type of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Molecular and genetic analysis has advanced our understanding of glioma biology, however mapping the cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment is crucial for understanding the pathology of this dreaded brain cancer. In this study we identified major cell populations attracted by glioma using orthotopic rodent models of human glioma xenografts. Marker-specific, anatomical and morphological analyses revealed a robust influx of host cells into the main tumor bed and tumor satellites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human glioma cell lines and glioma spheroid orthotopic implants were used in rodents. In both models, the xenografts recruited large numbers of host nestin-expressing cells, which formed a 'network' with glioma. The host nestin-expressing cells appeared to originate in the subventricular zone ipsilateral to the tumor, and were clearly distinguishable from pericytes that expressed smooth muscle actin. These distinct cell populations established close physical contact in a 'pair-wise' manner and migrated together to the deeper layers of tumor satellites and gave rise to tumor vasculature. The GBM biopsy xenografts displayed two different phenotypes: (a low-generation tumors (first in vivo passage in rats were highly invasive and non-angiogenic, and host nestin-positive cells that infiltrated into these tumors displayed astrocytic or elongated bipolar morphology; (b high-generation xenografts (fifth passage had pronounced cellularity, were angiogenic with 'glomerulus-like' microvascular proliferations that contained host nestin-positive cells. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 were highly expressed in and around glioma xenografts, suggesting their role in glioma progression and invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate a robust migration of nestin-expressing host cells to glioma, which

  10. Estimation in Cellular Radio Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Blom, Jonas; Gunnarsson, Fredrik; Gustafsson, Fredrik

    1999-01-01

    The problem to track time-varying parameters in cellular radio systems is studied, and the focus is on estimation based only on the signals that are readily available. Previous work have demonstrated very good performance, but were relying on analog measurement that are not available. Most of the information is lost due to quantization and sampling at a rate that might be as low as 2 Hz (GSM case). For that matter a maximum likelihood estimator have been designed and exemplified in the case o...

  11. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  12. Cellular automata a parallel model

    CERN Document Server

    Mazoyer, J

    1999-01-01

    Cellular automata can be viewed both as computational models and modelling systems of real processes. This volume emphasises the first aspect. In articles written by leading researchers, sophisticated massive parallel algorithms (firing squad, life, Fischer's primes recognition) are treated. Their computational power and the specific complexity classes they determine are surveyed, while some recent results in relation to chaos from a new dynamic systems point of view are also presented. Audience: This book will be of interest to specialists of theoretical computer science and the parallelism challenge.

  13. Game of Life Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1960s, British mathematician John Conway invented a virtual mathematical machine that operates on a two-dimensional array of square cell. Each cell takes two states, live and dead. The cells' states are updated simultaneously and in discrete time. A dead cell comes to life if it has exactly three live neighbours. A live cell remains alive if two or three of its neighbours are alive, otherwise the cell dies. Conway's Game of Life became the most programmed solitary game and the most known cellular automaton. The book brings together results of forty years of study into computational

  14. Protein accounting in the cellular economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the copy number of cellular proteins is critical for understanding cell physiology. By being able to measure the absolute synthesis rates of the majority of cellular proteins, Li et al. (2014) gain insights into key aspects of translation regulation and fundamental principles of cellular strategies to adjust protein synthesis according to the needs. PMID:24766801

  15. Towards a thermally regenerative all-copper redox flow battery

    OpenAIRE

    Peljo, Pekka; Lloyd, David; Nguyet, Doan; Majaneva, Marko; Kontturi, Kyosti

    2014-01-01

    An all-copper redox flow battery based on strong complexation of Cu+ with acetonitrile is demonstrated, exhibiting reasonable battery performance. More interestingly, the battery can be charged by heat sources of 100 degrees C, by distilling off the acetonitrile. This destabilizes the Cu+ complex, leading to recovery of the starting materials.

  16. A new redox-active coordination polymer with cobalticinium dicarboxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Mitsuru; Hayakawa, Yuri; Miyazawa, Makoto; Oyama, Aiko; Unoura, Kei; Kawaguchi, Hiroyuki; Naito, Tetsuyoshi; Maeda, Kenji; Uchida, Fumio

    2004-09-20

    A new two-dimensional coordination polymer with cobalticinium 1,1'-dicarboxylate (ccdc) incorporated in the framework has been prepared, the ccdc functioning as unique monoanionic dicarboxylate ligands. The compound shows a high redox activity based on the ccdc units.

  17. Redox zones of a landfill leachate pollution plume (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngkilde, John; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    Downgradient from an old municipal landfill allowing leachate, rich in dissolved organic carbon, to enter a shallow sandy aerobic aquifer, a sequence of redoxe zones is identified from groundwater chemical analysis. Below the landfill, methanogenic conditions prevail, followed by sulfidogenic, fe...... the fate of reactive pollutants leached from the landfill....

  18. Design Strategies for Redox Active Metalloenzymes: Applications in Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcala-Torano, R; Sommer, D J; Bahrami Dizicheh, Z; Ghirlanda, G

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen an increased interest in finding alternative means to produce renewable fuels in order to satisfy the growing energy demands and to minimize environmental impact. Nature can serve as an inspiration for development of these methodologies, as enzymes are able to carry out a wide variety of redox processes at high efficiency, employing a wide array of earth-abundant transition metals to do so. While it is well recognized that the protein environment plays an important role in tuning the properties of the different metal centers, the structure/function relationships between amino acids and catalytic centers are not well resolved. One specific approach to study the role of proteins in both electron and proton transfer is the biomimetic design of redox active peptides, binding organometallic clusters in well-understood protein environments. Here we discuss different strategies for the design of peptides incorporating redox active FeS clusters, [FeFe]-hydrogenase organometallic mimics, and porphyrin centers into different peptide and protein environments in order to understand natural redox enzymes. PMID:27586342

  19. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics--Lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-12-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original research articles published since 2010 and analysed them considering the following parameters, (i) resolution of modification site, (ii) quantitative information, including correction of modification levels by protein abundance changes and determination of modification site occupancy, (iii) throughput, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine oxoforms. PMID:26282677

  20. Redox Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate in the Fluorous Triphasic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Zhen CHEN; Yun Peng BAI; Zhao Long LI

    2006-01-01

    Methyl methacrylate (MMA) was polymerized by using of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and N, N-dimethylaniline (DMA) as an redox initiator in fluorous triphasic system at room temperature.The polymerization was occurred in both initiator layer and monomer layer in a U-tube. It was found that PMMA obtained from the initiator layer with relatively narrow polydispersity.(PDI =1.38)

  1. S-Glutathionylation and Redox Protein Signaling in Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womersley, Jacqueline S; Uys, Joachim D

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that comes at a high cost to individuals and society. Therefore understanding the mechanisms by which drugs exert their effects is of prime importance. Drugs of abuse increase the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species resulting in oxidative stress. This change in redox homeostasis increases the conjugation of glutathione to protein cysteine residues; a process called S-glutathionylation. Although traditionally regarded as a protective mechanism against irreversible protein oxidation, accumulated evidence suggests a more nuanced role for S-glutathionylation, namely as a mediator in redox-sensitive protein signaling. The reversible modification of protein thiols leading to alteration in function under different physiologic/pathologic conditions provides a mechanism whereby change in redox status can be translated into a functional response. As such, S-glutathionylation represents an understudied means of post-translational protein modification that may be important in the mechanisms underlying drug addiction. This review will discuss the evidence for S-glutathionylation as a redox-sensing mechanism and how this may be involved in the response to drug-induced oxidative stress. The function of S-glutathionylated proteins involved in neurotransmission, dendritic spine structure, and drug-induced behavioral outputs will be reviewed with specific reference to alcohol, cocaine, and heroin. PMID:26809999

  2. Nitrate bioreduction in redox-variable low permeability sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Sen; Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Liang; Shang, Jianying; Shan, Huimei; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kennedy, David W.; Resch, Charles T.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Fansler, Sarah J.

    2015-09-09

    Denitrification is a microbial process that reduces nitrate and nitrite to nitrous oxide (N2O) or dinitrogen (N2) with a strong implication to global nitrogen cycling and climate change. This paper reports the effect of sediment redox conditions on the rate and end product of denitrification. The sediments were collected from a redox transition zone consisting of oxic and reduced layers at US Department of Energy’s Hanford Site where N2O was locally accumulated in groundwater. The results revealed that denitrification rate and end product varied significantly with initial sediment redox state. The denitrification rate was relatively faster, limited by organic carbon content and bioavailability in the oxic sediment. In contrast, the rate was much slower in the reduced sediment, limited by biomass and microbial function. A significant amount of N2O was accumulated in the reduced sediment; while in the oxic sediment, N2O was further reduced to N2. RT-PCR analysis revealed that nosZ, the gene that codes for N2O reductase, was below detection in the reduced sediment. The results implied that redox transition zones can be important sinks or sources of N2O depending on local biogeochemical and microbial conditions, and are important systems for understanding and modeling denitrification in subsurface environments.

  3. Redox-active Crosslinkable Poly(ionic liquid)s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sui, Xiaofeng; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of a new class of cross-linkable redox-responsive poly(ferrocenylsilane)-based poly(ionic liquid)s (PFS-PILs) is reported. PFS-PILs self-cross-link at low concentrations into nanogels or form macroscopic hydrogel networks at higher concentrations. PFS-PILs proved to be efficient disper

  4. Reductant-dependent electron distribution among redox sites of laccase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Goldberg, M; Wherland, S;

    1978-01-01

    Rhus laccase (monophenol monooxygenase, monophenol,dihydroxyphenylalanine:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.18.1) an O2/H2O oxidoreductase containing four copper ions bound to three redox sites (type 1, type 2, and type 3 Cu pair), was titrated anaerobically with several reductants having various ch...

  5. Self-affine roughness influence on redox reaction charge admittance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G

    2005-01-01

    In this work we investigate the influence of self-affine electrode roughness on the admittance of redox reactions during facile charge transfer kinetics. The self-affine roughness is characterized by the rms roughness amplitude w, the correlation length xi and the roughness exponent H (0

  6. A zeolite ion exchange membrane for redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi; Michos, Ioannis; Wang, Xuerui; Yang, Ruidong; Gu, Xuehong; Dong, Junhang

    2014-03-01

    The zeolite-T membrane was discovered to have high proton permselectivity against vanadium ions and exhibit low electrical resistance in acidic electrolyte solutions because of its enormous proton concentration and small thickness. The zeolite membrane was demonstrated to be an efficient ion exchange membrane in vanadium redox flow batteries. PMID:24396857

  7. Electrochemical biosensor based on immobilized enzymes and redox polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotheim, Terje A.; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Hale, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to an electrochemical enzyme biosensor for use in liquid mixtures of components for detecting the presence of, or measuring the amount of, one or more select components. The enzyme electrode of the present invention is comprised of an enzyme, an artificial redox compound covalently bound to a flexible polymer backbone and an electron collector.

  8. Organometallic polymeric carriers for redox triggered release of molecular payloads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janczewski, D.; Song, J.; Csanyi, E.; Kiss, L.; Blazso, P.; Katona, R.L.; Deli, M.A.; Gros, G.; Xu, J.; Vancso, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a novel redox responsive comb-copolymer consisting of a poly(ferrocenylsilane) backbone and N-dimethylethyl ammonium and N-dimethyldecyl ammonium substituents are reported. Due to the presence of the side groups featuring cationic amine as well as decyl hydrocar

  9. Chemical Principles Revisited. Redox Reactions and the Electropotential Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Alfred J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper suggests a nontraditional pedagogic approach to the subject of redox reactions and electrode potentials suitable for freshman chemistry. Presented is a method for the representation of galvanic cells without the introduction of the symbology and notation of conventional cell diagrams. (CW)

  10. The Redox Potential of Hot Springs in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Fu Chen and Menghau Sung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientists began acquiring the basic of geology, occurrence, water temperature and chemistry of hot springs in Tai wan over a century ago. However, data regarding redox potential and important redox couples still remains limited. This study explores the redox status of hot springs in Taiwan by measuring Eh in the field and by determining the concentrations of commonly found redox couples, i.e., O2/H2O, NO3 -/NH4 +, and HS-/SO4 -2. Water samples were collected at hot spring discharge pools or the heads of water wells using a pump. A total of 11 hot springs located at 9 different locations across Taiwan were surveyed. The measured values of Eh ranging from -23 to -277 mV indicate reducing conditions. Most of the water samples from the hot spring sources contained sulfide and ammonium. In the Tatun Volcano Group, hot springs originating from a mixture of fumarolic gas and stream water contained high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide as the dominant reducing agent. Ammonium, with concentrations ranging from 1 to 55 mg L-1, is another important electron donor. The finding revealed that there were negative Eh measured-values for dissolved oxy gen-contained waters, both in the field and in the laboratory. The presence of sulfide or ammonium was also detected in the samples. These results confirm that the Eh sensor displayed a more height ened sensitivity to sulfide and ammonium than dissolved oxygen and nitrate. Hot springs with deep circulations (Samples S1-S4 and M1-M4 lack in oxygen gas and may re act with mineral reducers such that they will consequently be in a reducing state rather than oxidizing. Hot spring waters containing dissolved ox y gen (S2, S4, and M2 and nitrate (S3, S4, and M2-M4 most likely have mixed with shallow groundwaters. Discussions reveal implications for redox potentials and redox couples for arsenic speciation, disinfection of ammonium-containing hot springs for the spa industry as well as the possibility of using redox

  11. Redox chemistry and natural organic matter (NOM): Geochemists' dream, analytical chemists' nightmare

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAlady, Donald L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is an inherently complex mixture of polyfunctional organic molecules. Because of their universality and chemical reversibility, oxidation/reductions (redox) reactions of NOM have an especially interesting and important role in geochemistry. Variabilities in NOM composition and chemistry make studies of its redox chemistry particularly challenging, and details of NOM-mediated redox reactions are only partially understood. This is in large part due to the analytical difficulties associated with NOM characterization and the wide range of reagents and experimental systems used to study NOM redox reactions. This chapter provides a summary of the ongoing efforts to provide a coherent comprehension of aqueous redox chemistry involving NOM and of techniques for chemical characterization of NOM. It also describes some attempts to confirm the roles of different structural moieties in redox reactions. In addition, we discuss some of the operational parameters used to describe NOM redox capacities and redox states, and describe nomenclature of NOM redox chemistry. Several relatively facile experimental methods applicable to predictions of the NOM redox activity and redox states of NOM samples are discussed, with special attention to the proposed use of fluorescence spectroscopy to predict relevant redox characteristics of NOM samples.

  12. Cellular uptake of metallated cobalamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Mai Thanh Quynh; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian Henry; Gammelgaard, Bente; Furger, Evelyne; Alberto, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates was estimated via detection of their metal constituents (Co, Pt, and Re) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Vitamin B12 (cyano-cob(iii)alamin) and aquo-cob(iii)alamin [Cbl-OH2](+), which differ in the β-axial ligands (CN(-) and H2O, respectively), were included as control samples. The results indicated that B12 derivatives delivered cisplatin to both cellular cytosol and nuclei with an efficiency of one third compared to the uptake of free cisplatin cis-[Pt(II)Cl2(NH3)2]. In addition, uptake of charged B12 derivatives including [Cbl-OH2](+), [{Co}-CN-{cis-PtCl(NH3)2}](+), [{Re}-{Co}-CN-{cis-PtCl(NH3)2}](+), and [{Co}-CN-{trans-Pt(Cyt)(NH3)2}](2+) (Cyt = cytarabin) was high compared to neutral B12, which implied the existence of an additional internalization pathway for charged B12 vitamin analogs. The affinities of the charged B12 derivatives to the B12 transporters HC, IF and TC were similar to that of native vitamin B12. PMID:26739575

  13. Cellular Therapy for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J; Schwarz, Nisha; Toledo-Flores, Deborah; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF) is underpinned by complex changes at subcellular, cellular and extracellular levels in the ventricular myocardium. For all of the gains that conventional treatments for HF have brought to mortality and morbidity, they do not adequately address the loss of cardiomyocyte numbers in the remodeling ventricle. Originally conceived to address this problem, cellular transplantation for HF has already gone through several stages of evolution over the past two decades. Various cell types and delivery routes have been implemented to positive effect in preclinical models of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy, with pleiotropic benefits observed in terms of myocardial remodeling, systolic and diastolic performance, perfusion, fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and electrophysiology. To a large extent, these salubrious effects are now attributed to the indirect, paracrine capacity of transplanted stem cells to facilitate endogenous cardiac repair processes. Promising results have also followed in early phase human studies, although these have been relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent. This review details the preclinical and clinical evidence currently available regarding the use of pluripotent stem cells and adult-derived progenitor cells for cardiomyopathy and HF. It outlines the important lessons that have been learned to this point in time, and balances the promise of this exciting field against the key challenges and questions that still need to be addressed at all levels of research, to ensure that cell therapy realizes its full potential by adding to the armamentarium of HF management. PMID:27280304

  14. Cellular automata modelling of SEIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Quan-Xing; Jin Zhen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the SEIRS epidemic spread is analysed, and a two-dimensional probability cellular automata model for SEIRS is presented. Each cellular automation cell represents a part of the population that may be found in one of five states of individuals: susceptible, exposed (or latency), infected, immunized (or recovered) and death. Here studied are the effects of two cases on the epidemic spread. i.e. the effects of non-segregation and segregation on the latency and the infected of population. The conclusion is reached that the epidemic will persist in the case of non-segregation but it will decrease in the case of segregation. The proposed model can serve as a basis for the development of algorithms to simulate real epidemics based on real data. Last we find the density series of the exposed and the infected will fluctuate near a positive equilibrium point, when the constant for the immunized is less than its corresponding constant τ0. Our theoretical results are verified by numerical simulations.

  15. Cellular functions of the microprocessor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Sara; Cordiner, Ross A; Cáceres, Javier F

    2013-08-01

    The microprocessor is a complex comprising the RNase III enzyme Drosha and the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 gene) that catalyses the nuclear step of miRNA (microRNA) biogenesis. DGCR8 recognizes the RNA substrate, whereas Drosha functions as an endonuclease. Recent global analyses of microprocessor and Dicer proteins have suggested novel functions for these components independent of their role in miRNA biogenesis. A HITS-CLIP (high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation) experiment designed to identify novel substrates of the microprocessor revealed that this complex binds and regulates a large variety of cellular RNAs. The microprocessor-mediated cleavage of several classes of RNAs not only regulates transcript levels, but also modulates alternative splicing events, independently of miRNA function. Importantly, DGCR8 can also associate with other nucleases, suggesting the existence of alternative DGCR8 complexes that may regulate the fate of a subset of cellular RNAs. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of the diverse functional roles of the microprocessor.

  16. Universal map for cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Morales, V., E-mail: vmorales@ph.tum.de [Institute for Advanced Study – Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 2a, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-08-20

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CAs) containing no freely adjustable parameters and valid for any alphabet size and any neighborhood range (including non-symmetrical neighborhoods). The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and to arbitrary order in time. Specific CA maps for the famous Conway's Game of Life and Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs are given. An induction method for CAs, based in the universal map, allows mathematical expressions for the orbits of a wide variety of elementary CAs to be systematically derived. -- Highlights: ► A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CA). ► The map is generalized to 2D for Von Neumann, Moore and hexagonal neighborhoods. ► A map for all Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs is derived. ► A map for Conway's “Game of Life” is obtained.

  17. Melanoma screening with cellular phones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Massone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mobile teledermatology has recently been shown to be suitable for teledermatology despite limitations in image definition in preliminary studies. The unique aspect of mobile teledermatology is that this system represents a filtering or triage system, allowing a sensitive approach for the management of patients with emergent skin diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigated the feasibility of teleconsultation using a new generation of cellular phones in pigmented skin lesions. 18 patients were selected consecutively in the Pigmented Skin Lesions Clinic of the Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria. Clinical and dermoscopic images were acquired using a Sony Ericsson with a built-in two-megapixel camera. Two teleconsultants reviewed the images on a specific web application (http://www.dermahandy.net/default.asp where images had been uploaded in JPEG format. Compared to the face-to-face diagnoses, the two teleconsultants obtained a score of correct telediagnoses of 89% and of 91.5% reporting the clinical and dermoscopic images, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present work is the first study performing mobile teledermoscopy using cellular phones. Mobile teledermatology has the potential to become an easy applicable tool for everyone and a new approach for enhanced self-monitoring for skin cancer screening in the spirit of the eHealth program of the European Commission Information for Society and Media.

  18. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  19. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H., E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu

    2012-01-15

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  20. Reductive stress after exercise: The issue of redox individuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Margaritelis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise has been consistently used as an oxidant stimulus in redox biology studies. However, previous studies have focused on group differences and did not examine individual differences. As a result, it remains untested whether all individuals experience oxidative stress after acute exercise. Therefore, the main aim of the present study was to investigate whether some individuals exhibit unexpected responses after an acute eccentric (i.e., muscle-damaging exercise session. Ninety eight (N = 98 young men performed an isokinetic eccentric exercise bout with the knee extensors. Plasma, erythrocytes and urine samples were collected immediately before and 2 days post-exercise. Three commonly used redox biomarkers (F2-isoprostanes, protein carbonyls and glutathione were assayed. As expected, the two oxidant biomarkers (F2-isoprostanes and protein carbonyls significantly increased 2 days after exercise (46% and 61%, respectively; whereas a significant decrease in glutathione levels (by −21% was observed after exercise. A considerable number of the participants exhibited changes in the levels of biomarkers in the opposite, unexpected direction than the group average. More specifically, 13% of the participants exhibited a decrease in F2-isoprostanes and protein carbonyls and 10% of the participants exhibited an increase in glutathione levels. Furthermore, more than 1 out of 3 individuals exhibited either unexpected or negligible (from 0% to ± 5% responses to exercise in at least one redox biomarker. It was also observed that the initial values of redox biomarkers are important predictors of the responses to exercise. In conclusion, although exercise induces oxidative stress in the majority of individuals, it can induce reductive stress or negligible stress in a considerable number of people. The data presented herein emphasize that the mean response to a redox stimulus can be very misleading. We believe that the wide variability (including the

  1. Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin is a novel structural component of human erythrocytes and a biomarker of cellular stress and senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna H Antonelou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Secretory Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin (sCLU is a ubiquitously expressed chaperone that has been functionally implicated in several pathological conditions of increased oxidative injury, including aging. Nevertheless, the biological role of sCLU in red blood cells (RBCs remained largely unknown. In the current study we identified sCLU as a component of human RBCs and we undertook a detailed analysis of its cellular topology. Moreover, we studied the erythrocytic membrane sCLU content during organismal aging, in conditions of increased organismal stress and accelerated RBCs senescence, as well as during physiological in vivo cellular senescence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a combination of molecular, biochemical and high resolution microscopical methods we found that sCLU is a novel structural component of RBCs extra- and intracellular plasma membrane and cytosol. We observed that the RBCs membrane-associated sCLU decreases during organismal aging or exposure to acute stress (e.g. smoking, in patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, as well as during RBCs in vivo senescence. In all cases, sCLU reduction paralleled the expression of typical cellular senescence, redox imbalance and erythrophagocytosis markers which are also indicative of the senescence- and oxidative stress-mediated RBCs membrane vesiculation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that sCLU at the mature RBCs is not a silent remnant of the erythroid precursors, but an active component being functionally implicated in the signalling mechanisms of cellular senescence and oxidative stress-responses in both healthy and diseased organism. The reduced sCLU protein levels in the RBCs membrane following cell exposure to various endogenous or exogenous stressors closely correlates to the levels of cellular senescence and redox imbalance markers, suggesting the usefulness of sCLU as a sensitive biomarker of senescence and cellular stress.

  2. Distinct Redox Profiles of Selected Human Prostate Carcinoma Cell Lines: Implications for Rational Design of Redox Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of several cancer chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation are mediated, at least in part, by oxidative stress. To better understand this process, we analyzed certain biochemical properties affecting reduction-oxidation (redox) balance in normal prostate epithelial cells and several prostate cancer cell lines. Highly aggressive androgen-independent prostate cancer PC3 cells demonstrated significantly higher levels of total antioxidant capacity (AC) and intra- and extracellular glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratios when compared with normal prostate epithelial PrEC cells. WPE1-NB26 cells, a prostate cancer cell line derived from immortalized RWPE1 human prostate epithelial cells, demonstrated significantly higher levels of total AC and intra- and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratios, but lower levels of intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and lipid peroxidation compared with RWPE1 cells. LNCaP-C4-2 cells, a more aggressive prostate cancer derived from less aggressive androgen-responsive LNCaP cells, exhibited higher levels of AC and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratio when compared to LNCaP cells. Specific cell types showed distinct cytotoxic responses to redox-modulating compounds. WPE1-NB26 cells were more sensitive to phenethyl isothiocyanate and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) than RWPE1 cells, while PC3 cells were more sensitive to TNF than PrEC cells. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that cancer cell redox state may modulate responses to redox-modulating therapeutic regimens

  3. Distinct Redox Profiles of Selected Human Prostate Carcinoma Cell Lines: Implications for Rational Design of Redox Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiswing, Luksana [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Ave., WIMR 7168, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Zhong, Weixiong; Oberley, Terry D., E-mail: toberley@wisc.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Ave., WIMR 7168, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Service, William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Rm A-35, 2500 Overlook Terrace, Madison, WI 53705 (United States)

    2011-09-13

    The effects of several cancer chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation are mediated, at least in part, by oxidative stress. To better understand this process, we analyzed certain biochemical properties affecting reduction-oxidation (redox) balance in normal prostate epithelial cells and several prostate cancer cell lines. Highly aggressive androgen-independent prostate cancer PC3 cells demonstrated significantly higher levels of total antioxidant capacity (AC) and intra- and extracellular glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratios when compared with normal prostate epithelial PrEC cells. WPE1-NB26 cells, a prostate cancer cell line derived from immortalized RWPE1 human prostate epithelial cells, demonstrated significantly higher levels of total AC and intra- and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratios, but lower levels of intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and lipid peroxidation compared with RWPE1 cells. LNCaP-C4-2 cells, a more aggressive prostate cancer derived from less aggressive androgen-responsive LNCaP cells, exhibited higher levels of AC and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratio when compared to LNCaP cells. Specific cell types showed distinct cytotoxic responses to redox-modulating compounds. WPE1-NB26 cells were more sensitive to phenethyl isothiocyanate and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) than RWPE1 cells, while PC3 cells were more sensitive to TNF than PrEC cells. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that cancer cell redox state may modulate responses to redox-modulating therapeutic regimens.

  4. Distinct Redox Profiles of Selected Human Prostate Carcinoma Cell Lines: Implications for Rational Design of Redox Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luksana Chaiswing

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of several cancer chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation are mediated, at least in part, by oxidative stress. To better understand this process, we analyzed certain biochemical properties affecting reduction-oxidation (redox balance in normal prostate epithelial cells and several prostate cancer cell lines. Highly aggressive androgen-independent prostate cancer PC3 cells demonstrated significantly higher levels of total antioxidant capacity (AC and intra- and extracellular glutathione (GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG ratios when compared with normal prostate epithelial PrEC cells. WPE1-NB26 cells, a prostate cancer cell line derived from immortalized RWPE1 human prostate epithelial cells, demonstrated significantly higher levels of total AC and intra- and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratios, but lower levels of intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and lipid peroxidation compared with RWPE1 cells. LNCaP-C4-2 cells, a more aggressive prostate cancer derived from less aggressive androgen-responsive LNCaP cells, exhibited higher levels of AC and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratio when compared to LNCaP cells. Specific cell types showed distinct cytotoxic responses to redox-modulating compounds. WPE1-NB26 cells were more sensitive to phenethyl isothiocyanate and tumor necrosis factor (TNF than RWPE1 cells, while PC3 cells were more sensitive to TNF than PrEC cells. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that cancer cell redox state may modulate responses to redox-modulating therapeutic regimens.

  5. Characteristics and cellular effects of ambient particulate matter from Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro tests using human adenocarcinomic alveolar epithelial cell line A549 and small mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line J774A.1 were conducted to test toxicity of six PM (particulate matter) samples from Beijing. The properties of the samples differ significantly. The production of inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α for J774A.1) and chemokine (IL-8 for A549) and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were used as endpoints. There was a positive correlation between water soluble organic carbon and DTT-based redox activity. Both cell types produced increased levels of inflammatory mediators and had higher level of intracelllar ROS, indicating the presence of PM-induced inflammatory response and oxidative stress, which were dose-dependent and significantly different among the samples. The releases of IL-8 from A549 and TNF-α from J774A.1 were significantly correlated to PM size, Zeta potential, endotoxin, major metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. No correlation between ROS and these properties was identified. - Highlights: • Six PMs from Beijing were tested for toxicity using A549 and J774A.1 cell lines. • The properties of the PM samples differ significantly. • Dose-dependent inflammatory response and oxidative stress were found. • The release of inflammatory cytokine was significantly correlated to PM properties. • No correlation between ROS and PM properties was identified. - Cellular toxicity of PM2.5 from Beijing depends on their properties

  6. Single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet tolerance and glutathione redox system significance assessment in faba bean (Vicia faba L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjum, Naser A. [University of Aveiro, Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) and Department of Chemistry (Portugal); Singh, Neetu; Singh, Manoj K. [University of Aveiro, Center for Mechanical Technology and Automation (TEMA) and Department of Mechanical Engineering (Portugal); Shah, Zahoor A. [University of Toledo, Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States); Duarte, Armando C.; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal, E-mail: ahmadr@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) and Department of Chemistry (Portugal)

    2013-07-15

    Adsorbents based on single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet (hereafter termed 'graphene oxide') are widely used in contaminated environments cleanup which may easily open the avenues for their entry to different environmental compartments, exposure to organisms and their subsequent transfer to human/animal food chain. Considering a common food crop-faba bean (Vicia faba L.) germinating seedlings as a model plant system, this study assesses the V. faba-tolerance to different concentrations (0, 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1600 mg L{sup -1}) of graphene oxide (0.5-5 {mu}m) and evaluates glutathione ({gamma}-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine) redox system significance in this context. The results showed significantly increased V. faba sensitivity under three graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 1,600 > 200 > 100 mg graphene oxide L{sup -1}), which was accompanied by decreased glutathione redox (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione) ratio, reduced glutathione pool, as well as significant and equally elevated activities of glutathione-regenerating (glutathione reductase) and glutathione-metabolizing (glutathione peroxidase; glutathione sulfo-transferase) enzymes. Contrarily, the two graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 800 > 400 graphene oxide mg L{sup -1}) yielded promising results; where, significant improvements in V. faba health status (measured as increased graphene oxide tolerance) were clearly perceptible with increased ratio of the reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione, reduced glutathione pool and glutathione reductase activity but decreased activities of glutathione-metabolizing enzymes. It is inferred that V. faba seedlings-sensitivity and/or tolerance to graphene oxide concentrations depends on both the cellular redox state (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione ratio) and the reduced glutathione pool which in turn are controlled by a finely tuned modulation of the coordination between glutathione-regenerating and

  7. Cellular Delivery of RNA Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlea, Lorena; Puri, Anu; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Bindewald, Eckart; Zakrevsky, Paul; Satterwhite, Emily; Joseph, Kenya; Afonin, Kirill A; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2016-09-12

    RNA nanostructures can be programmed to exhibit defined sizes, shapes and stoichiometries from naturally occurring or de novo designed RNA motifs. These constructs can be used as scaffolds to attach functional moieties, such as ligand binding motifs or gene expression regulators, for nanobiology applications. This review is focused on four areas of importance to RNA nanotechnology: the types of RNAs of particular interest for nanobiology, the assembly of RNA nanoconstructs, the challenges of cellular delivery of RNAs in vivo, and the delivery carriers that aid in the matter. The available strategies for the design of nucleic acid nanostructures, as well as for formulation of their carriers, make RNA nanotechnology an important tool in both basic research and applied biomedical science. PMID:27509068

  8. Discrete geodesics and cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a dynamical notion of discrete geodesics, understood as straightest trajectories in discretized curved spacetime. The notion is generic, as it is formulated in terms of a general deviation function, but readily specializes to metric spaces such as discretized pseudo-riemannian manifolds. It is effective: an algorithm for computing these geodesics naturally follows, which allows numerical validation---as shown by computing the perihelion shift of a Mercury-like planet. It is consistent, in the continuum limit, with the standard notion of timelike geodesics in a pseudo-riemannian manifold. Whether the algorithm fits within the framework of cellular automata is discussed at length. KEYWORDS: Discrete connection, parallel transport, general relativity, Regge calculus.

  9. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Corby eKistler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g. amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH, enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported.

  10. Thermomechanical characterisation of cellular rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, H.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2016-09-01

    This contribution discusses an experimental possibility to characterise a cellular rubber in terms of the influence of multiaxiality, rate dependency under environmental temperature and its behaviour under hydrostatic pressure. In this context, a mixed open and closed cell rubber based on an ethylene propylene diene monomer is investigated exemplarily. The present article intends to give a general idea of the characterisation method and the considerable effects of this special type of material. The main focus lies on the experimental procedure and the used testing devices in combination with the analysis methods such as true three-dimensional digital image correlation. The structural compressibility is taken into account by an approach for a material model using the Theory of Porous Media with additional temperature dependence.

  11. Novel Materials for Cellular Nanosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi

    modifications for electrochemical nanosensors for the detection of analytes released from cells. Two type of materials were investigated, each pertaining to the two different aspects of such devices: peptide nanostructures were studied for the creation of cellular sensing substrates that mimic in vivo surfaces......' functionalization with biomolecules, metal nanoparticles and chemical functional groups such as thiols, showing the versatility and flexibility of this material's applications. A technique for the patterning of these nanostructures using soft lithography was also developed and tested for suitable cell sensing....... An in vivo investigation also gave evidence of how the peptide nanowires can be used as surface modification in implantable electrodes for neurological measurements. Conducting polymers were utilized in electrode modifications for electrochemical sensor surfaces. Both chemical and electrochemical deposition...

  12. Novel Perspectives in Redox Biology and Pathophysiology of Failing Myocytes: Modulation of the Intramyocardial Redox Milieu for Therapeutic Interventions—A Review Article from the Working Group of Cardiac Cell Biology, Italian Society of Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaro, Alessia; Pirozzi, Flora; Angelini, Annalisa; Chimenti, Cristina; Crotti, Lia; Giordano, Carla; Mancardi, Daniele; Torella, Daniele; Tocchetti, Carlo G.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure (HF) is still increasing worldwide, with enormous human, social, and economic costs, in spite of huge efforts in understanding pathogenetic mechanisms and in developing effective therapies that have transformed this syndrome into a chronic disease. Myocardial redox imbalance is a hallmark of this syndrome, since excessive reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can behave as signaling molecules in the pathogenesis of hypertrophy and heart failure, leading to dysregulation of cellular calcium handling, of the contractile machinery, of myocardial energetics and metabolism, and of extracellular matrix deposition. Recently, following new interesting advances in understanding myocardial ROS and RNS signaling pathways, new promising therapeutical approaches with antioxidant properties are being developed, keeping in mind that scavenging ROS and RNS tout court is detrimental as well, since these molecules also play a role in physiological myocardial homeostasis. PMID:26881035

  13. Non-coding RNAs' partitioning in the evolution of photosynthetic organisms via energy transduction and redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotakis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Ars longa, vita brevis -Hippocrates Chloroplasts and mitochondria are genetically semi-autonomous organelles inside the plant cell. These constructions formed after endosymbiosis and keep evolving throughout the history of life. Experimental evidence is provided for active non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in these prokaryote-like structures, and a possible functional imprinting on cellular electrophysiology by those RNA entities is described. Furthermore, updated knowledge on RNA metabolism of organellar genomes uncovers novel inter-communication bridges with the nucleus. This class of RNA molecules is considered as a unique ontogeny which transforms their biological role as a genetic rheostat into a synchronous biochemical one that can affect the energetic charge and redox homeostasis inside cells. A hypothesis is proposed where such modulation by non-coding RNAs is integrated with genetic signals regulating gene transfer. The implications of this working hypothesis are discussed, with particular reference to ncRNAs involvement in the organellar and nuclear genomes evolution since their integrity is functionally coupled with redox signals in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25826417

  14. Maintenance of Macrophage Redox Status by ChREBP Limits Inflammation and Apoptosis and Protects against Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Sarrazy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced glucose utilization can be visualized in atherosclerotic lesions and may reflect a high glycolytic rate in lesional macrophages, but its causative role in plaque progression remains unclear. We observe that the activity of the carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein ChREBP is rapidly downregulated upon TLR4 activation in macrophages. ChREBP inactivation refocuses cellular metabolism to a high redox state favoring enhanced inflammatory responses after TLR4 activation and increased cell death after TLR4 activation or oxidized LDL loading. Targeted deletion of ChREBP in bone marrow cells resulted in accelerated atherosclerosis progression in Ldlr−/− mice with increased monocytosis, lesional macrophage accumulation, and plaque necrosis. Thus, ChREBP-dependent macrophage metabolic reprogramming hinders plaque progression and establishes a causative role for leukocyte glucose metabolism in atherosclerosis.

  15. Breaking the relay in deregulated cellular signal transduction as a rationale for chemoprevention with anti-inflammatory phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar [National Research Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Surh, Young-Joon [National Research Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: surh@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-12-11

    Center to the cancer biology is disrupted intracellular signaling network, which transmits improper signals resulting in abnormal cellular functioning. Therefore, modulation of inappropriate cell signaling cascades might be a rational approach in achieving chemoprevention. Inflammation has long been suspected to contribute to carcinogenesis. A new horizon in chemoprevention research is the recent discovery of molecular links between inflammation and cancer. Components of the cell signaling network, especially those converge on redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor-{kappa}B involved in mediating inflammatory response, have been implicated in carcinogenesis. Intracellular signaling through another redox-sensitive transcription factor AP-1 and that transmitted via a more recently identified oncoprotein {beta}-catenin are also considered to be crucial for inflammation-associated cancer. Epidemiological and experimental studies have revealed that a wide variety of phytochemicals present in our daily diet are potential chemopreventive agents that can alter or correct undesired cellular functions caused by abnormal pro-inflammatory signal transmission. Modulation of cellular signaling involved in chronic inflammatory response by anti-inflammatory phytochemicals may comprise a rational and pragmatic strategy in molecular target-based chemoprevention.

  16. Characterization of the Redox reaction of V(V) in Ammonia Buffers with Square-Wave Voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Mirceski, Valentin; Gulaboski, Rubin; Petrovska-Jovanovic, Simka; Stojanova, Kornelija

    2001-01-01

    The redox reaction of V(V) in ammonia buffers solution with pH = 8.60 was studied by means of square-wave and cyclic voltammetry. The redox reaction studied exhibits properties of a surface redox process in which both the reactant and the product of the redox reaction are immobilized on the electrode surface.

  17. High-resolution imaging of redox signaling in live cells through an oxidation-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Labate, Valentina; Mele, Marina;

    2008-01-01

    quantitation of the distribution of fluorescence by confocal microscopy, allows us to draw real-time "redox maps" of adherent cells and to score subtle changes in the intracellular redox state, such as those induced by overexpression of redox-active proteins. This strategy for in vivo imaging of redox...

  18. Chiral cyclopentadienylruthenium sulfoxide catalysts for asymmetric redox bicycloisomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael C; Rao, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Summary A full account of our efforts toward an asymmetric redox bicycloisomerization reaction is presented in this article. Cyclopentadienylruthenium (CpRu) complexes containing tethered chiral sulfoxides were synthesized via an oxidative [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction between an alkyne and an allylruthenium complex. Sulfoxide complex 1 containing a p-anisole moiety on its sulfoxide proved to be the most efficient and selective catalyst for the asymmetric redox bicycloisomerization of 1,6- and 1,7-enynes. This complex was used to synthesize a broad array of [3.1.0] and [4.1.0] bicycles. Sulfonamide- and phosphoramidate-containing products could be deprotected under reducing conditions. Catalysis performed with enantiomerically enriched propargyl alcohols revealed a matched/mismatched effect that was strongly dependent on the nature of the solvent. PMID:27559366

  19. Ocean redox change at the Permian-Triassic mass extinction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhl, Micha; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Canfield, Donald Eugene;

    2013-01-01

    and marine (mass) ex¬tinction. The geographic and temporal extend and the intensity (ferruginous vs. euxinic) of anoxic con¬ditions is, however, strongly debated and not well constraint. This complicates understanding of close coupling between Earth’s physical, chemical and bi¬ological processes. We studied...... ocean redox change over the largest mass extinction event in Earth history, at the Permian-Tri¬assic boundary (at ~252 Ma). This event is marked by a major perturbation in the global exogenic carbon cycle (and associated major negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE)), likely initiated by carbon...... (anoxic but not euxinic) coinciding with the main extinction event. Molybdenum enrichments, often indicative for freely available sulfide in the water-column, only occur dur¬ing the second phase of euxinia. This pattern of ocean redox-change in Svalbard direct¬ly reflects similar trends in Greenland...

  20. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Heppner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway.

  1. Insights into redox sensing metalloproteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chim, Nicholas; Johnson, Parker M; Goulding, Celia W

    2014-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the pathogen that causes tuberculosis, has evolved sophisticated mechanisms for evading assault by the human host. This review focuses on M. tuberculosis regulatory metalloproteins that are sensitive to exogenous stresses attributed to changes in the levels of gaseous molecules (i.e., molecular oxygen, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide) to elicit an intracellular response. In particular, we highlight recent developments on the subfamily of Whi proteins, redox sensing WhiB-like proteins that contain iron-sulfur clusters, sigma factors and their cognate anti-sigma factors of which some are zinc-regulated, and the dormancy survival regulon DosS/DosT-DosR heme sensory system. Mounting experimental evidence suggests that these systems contribute to a highly complex and interrelated regulatory network that controls M. tuberculosis biology. This review concludes with a discussion of strategies that M. tuberculosis has developed to maintain redox homeostasis, including mechanisms to regulate endogenous nitric oxide and carbon monoxide levels.

  2. A mathematical model for the iron/chromium redox battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedkiw, P. S.; Watts, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to describe the isothermal operation of a single anode-separator-cathode unit cell in a redox-flow battery and has been applied to the NASA iron/chromium system. The model, based on porous electrode theory, incorporates redox kinetics, mass transfer, and ohmic effects as well as the parasitic hydrogen reaction which occurs in the chromium electrode. A numerical parameter study was carried out to predict cell performance to aid in the rational design, scale-up, and operation of the flow battery. The calculations demonstrate: (1) an optimum electrode thickness and electrolyte flow rate exist; (2) the amount of hydrogen evolved and, hence, cycle faradaic efficiency, can be affected by cell geometry, flow rate, and charging procedure; (3) countercurrent flow results in enhanced cell performance over cocurrent flow; and (4) elevated temperature operation enhances cell performance.

  3. Shunt current loss of the vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Feng; Zhang, Huamin; Ma, Xiangkun

    The shunt current loss is one of main factors to affect the performance of the vanadium redox flow battery, which will shorten the cycle life and decrease the energy transfer efficiency. In this paper, a stack-level model based on the circuit analog method is proposed to research the shunt current loss of the vanadium redox flow battery, in which the SOC (state of charge) of electrolyte is introduced. The distribution of shunt current is described in detail. The sensitive analysis of shunt current is reported. The shunt current loss in charge/discharge cycle is predicted with the given experimental data. The effect of charge/discharge pattern on the shunt current loss is studied. The result shows that the reduction of the number of single cells in series, the decrease of the resistances of manifold and channel and the increase of the power of single cell will be the further development for the VRFB stack.

  4. Non-aqueous manganese acetylacetonate electrolyte for redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleightholme, Alice E. S.; Shinkle, Aaron A.; Liu, Qinghua; Li, Yongdan; Monroe, Charles W.; Thompson, Levi T.

    A single-metal redox flow battery employing manganese(III) acetylacetonate in tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate and acetonitrile has been investigated. Cyclic voltammetry was used to evaluate electrode kinetics and reaction thermodynamics. The Mn II/Mn III and Mn III/Mn IV redox couples appeared to be quasi-reversible. A cell potential of 1.1 V was measured for the one-electron disproportionation of the neutral Mn III complex. The diffusion coefficient for manganese acetylacetonate in the supporting electrolyte solution was estimated to be in the range of 3-5 × 10 -6 cm 2 s -1 at room temperature. The charge-discharge characteristics of this system were evaluated in an H-type glass cell. Coulombic efficiencies increased with cycling suggesting an irreversible side reaction. Energy efficiencies for this unoptimized system were ∼21%, likely due to the high cell-component overpotentials.

  5. Metabolic impact of redox cofactor perturbations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Lages, Nuno; Oldiges, M.;

    2009-01-01

    Redox cofactors play a pivotal role in coupling catabolism with anabolism and energy generation during metabolism. There exists a delicate balance in the intracellular level of these cofactors to ascertain an optimal metabolic output. Therefore, cofactors are emerging to be attractive targets...... to induce widespread changes in metabolism. We present a detailed analysis of the impact of perturbations in redox cofactors in the cytosol or mitochondria on glucose and energy metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to aid metabolic engineering decisions that involve cofactor engineering. We enhanced NADH...... production, while decreasing mitochondrial NADH lowered ethanol production. However, when these reactions were coupled with NADPH production, the metabolic changes were more moderated. The direct consequence of these perturbations could be seen in the shift of the intracellular concentrations...

  6. Redox Imbalance in T Cell-Mediated Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveria Pastore

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The skin is permanently exposed to physical, chemical, and biological aggression by the environment. In addition, acute and chronic inflammatory events taking place in the skin are accompanied by abnormal release of pro-oxidative mediators. In this paper, we will briefly overview the homeostatic systems active in the skin to maintain the redox balance and also to counteract abnormal oxidative stress. We will concentrate on the evidence that a local and/or systemic redox dysregulation accompanies the chronic inflammatory disorder events associated to psoriasis, contact dermatitis, and atopic dermatitis. We will also discuss the fact that several well-established treatments for the therapy of chronic inflammatory skin disorders are based on the application of strong physical or chemical oxidants onto the skin, indicating that, in selected conditions, a further increase of the oxidative imbalance may lead to a beneficial outcome.

  7. Redox flow batteries based on supporting solutions containing chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianlu; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Xia, Guanguang

    2014-01-14

    Redox flow battery systems having a supporting solution that contains Cl.sup.- ions can exhibit improved performance and characteristics. Furthermore, a supporting solution having mixed SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions can provide increased energy density and improved stability and solubility of one or more of the ionic species in the catholyte and/or anolyte. According to one example, a vanadium-based redox flow battery system is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in a supporting solution and a catholyte having V.sup.4+ and V.sup.5+ in a supporting solution. The supporting solution can contain Cl.sup.- ions or a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions.

  8. Redox flow batteries based on supporting solutions containing chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Jianlu; Xia, Guanguang

    2015-07-07

    Redox flow battery systems having a supporting solution that contains Cl.sup.- ions can exhibit improved performance and characteristics. Furthermore, a supporting solution having mixed SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions can provide increased energy density and improved stability and solubility of one or more of the ionic species in the catholyte and/or anolyte. According to one example, a vanadium-based redox flow battery system is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in a supporting solution and a catholyte having V.sup.4+ and V.sup.5+ in a supporting solution. The supporting solution can contain Cl.sup.- ions or a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions.

  9. Redox flow batteries based on supporting solutions containing chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Jianlu; Xia, Guanguang

    2015-09-01

    Redox flow battery systems having a supporting solution that contains Cl.sup.- ions can exhibit improved performance and characteristics. Furthermore, a supporting solution having mixed SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions can provide increased energy density and improved stability and solubility of one or more of the ionic species in the catholyte and/or anolyte. According to one example, a vanadium-based redox flow battery system is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in a supporting solution and a catholyte having V.sup.4+ and V.sup.5+ in a supporting solution. The supporting solution can contain Cl.sup.- ions or a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions.

  10. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytvynenko, Anton S. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Kiskin, Mikhail A., E-mail: mkiskin@igic.ras.ru [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dorofeeva, Victoria N.; Mishura, Andrey M.; Titov, Vladimir E.; Kolotilov, Sergey V. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Eremenko, Igor L.; Novotortsev, Vladimir M. [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6} (Piv=O{sub 2}CC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics.

  11. Redox- and non-redox-metal-induced formation of free radicals and their role in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valko, Marian; Jomova, Klaudia; Rhodes, Christopher J; Kuča, Kamil; Musílek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal ions are key elements of various biological processes ranging from oxygen formation to hypoxia sensing, and therefore, their homeostasis is maintained within strict limits through tightly regulated mechanisms of uptake, storage and secretion. The breakdown of metal ion homeostasis can lead to an uncontrolled formation of reactive oxygen species, ROS (via the Fenton reaction, which produces hydroxyl radicals), and reactive nitrogen species, RNS, which may cause oxidative damage to biological macromolecules such as DNA, proteins and lipids. An imbalance between the formation of free radicals and their elimination by antioxidant defense systems is termed oxidative stress. Most vulnerable to free radical attack is the cell membrane which may undergo enhanced lipid peroxidation, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal and other exocyclic DNA adducts. While redox-active iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) undergo redox-cycling reactions, for a second group of redox-inactive metals such as arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd), the primary route for their toxicity is depletion of glutathione and bonding to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. While arsenic is known to bind directly to critical thiols, other mechanisms, involving formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions, have been proposed. Redox-inert zinc (Zn) is the most abundant metal in the brain and an essential component of numerous proteins involved in biological defense mechanisms against oxidative stress. The depletion of zinc may enhance DNA damage by impairing DNA repair mechanisms. Intoxication of an organism by arsenic and cadmium may lead to metabolic disturbances of redox-active copper and iron, with the occurrence of oxidative stress induced by the enhanced formation of ROS/RNS. Oxidative stress occurs when excessive formation of ROS overwhelms the antioxidant defense system, as is maintained by antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, alpha

  12. Redox- and non-redox-metal-induced formation of free radicals and their role in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valko, Marian; Jomova, Klaudia; Rhodes, Christopher J; Kuča, Kamil; Musílek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal ions are key elements of various biological processes ranging from oxygen formation to hypoxia sensing, and therefore, their homeostasis is maintained within strict limits through tightly regulated mechanisms of uptake, storage and secretion. The breakdown of metal ion homeostasis can lead to an uncontrolled formation of reactive oxygen species, ROS (via the Fenton reaction, which produces hydroxyl radicals), and reactive nitrogen species, RNS, which may cause oxidative damage to biological macromolecules such as DNA, proteins and lipids. An imbalance between the formation of free radicals and their elimination by antioxidant defense systems is termed oxidative stress. Most vulnerable to free radical attack is the cell membrane which may undergo enhanced lipid peroxidation, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal and other exocyclic DNA adducts. While redox-active iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) undergo redox-cycling reactions, for a second group of redox-inactive metals such as arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd), the primary route for their toxicity is depletion of glutathione and bonding to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. While arsenic is known to bind directly to critical thiols, other mechanisms, involving formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions, have been proposed. Redox-inert zinc (Zn) is the most abundant metal in the brain and an essential component of numerous proteins involved in biological defense mechanisms against oxidative stress. The depletion of zinc may enhance DNA damage by impairing DNA repair mechanisms. Intoxication of an organism by arsenic and cadmium may lead to metabolic disturbances of redox-active copper and iron, with the occurrence of oxidative stress induced by the enhanced formation of ROS/RNS. Oxidative stress occurs when excessive formation of ROS overwhelms the antioxidant defense system, as is maintained by antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, alpha

  13. Cellular phones: are they detrimental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Osama E; Abou El Naga, Randa M

    2004-01-01

    The issue of possible health effects of cellular phones is very much alive in the public's mind where the rapid increase in the number of the users of cell phones in the last decade has increased the exposure of people to the electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Health consequences of long term use of mobile phones are not known in detail but available data indicates the development of non specific annoying symptoms on acute exposure to mobile phone radiations. In an attempt to determine the prevalence of such cell phones associated health manifestations and the factors affecting their occurrence, a cross sectional study was conducted in five randomly selected faculties of Alexandria University. Where, 300 individuals including teaching staff, students and literate employee were equally allocated and randomly selected among the five faculties. Data about mobile phone's users and their medical history, their pattern of mobile usage and the possible deleterious health manifestations associated with cellular phone use was collected. The results revealed 68% prevalence of mobile phone usage, nearly three quarters of them (72.5%) were complainers of the health manifestations. They suffered from headache (43%), earache (38.3%), sense of fatigue (31.6%), sleep disturbance (29.5%), concentration difficulty (28.5%) and face burning sensation (19.2%). Both univariate and multivariate analysis were consistent in their findings. Symptomatic users were found to have significantly higher frequency of calls/day, longer call duration and longer total duration of mobile phone usage/day than non symptomatic users. For headache both call duration and frequency of calls/day were the significant predicting factors for its occurrence (chi2 = 18.208, p = 0.0001). For earache, in addition to call duration, the longer period of owning the mobile phone were significant predictors (chi2 = 16.996, p = 0.0002). Sense of fatigue was significantly affected by both call duration and age of the user

  14. The evolution of the oceanic redox state through Precambrian times

    OpenAIRE

    Kurzweil, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The oceanic redox state distinctly changed during the Precambrian eon. Entirely anoxic oceans in earliest Earth history first became mildly oxygenated in some shallow marine areas during the late Archean. The areal extension of such ‘oxygen oases’ may have triggered atmospheric oxygenation during the subsequent Great Oxidation Event around 2.4 billion years ago. In the aftermath of the Great Oxidation Event and the proposed oxygen ‘overshoot’ during the following Lumagundi Jatuli Event oxygen...

  15. Rewiring hydrogenase-dependent redox circuits in cyanobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Ducat, Daniel C.; Sachdeva, Gairik; Silver, Pamela A

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible reaction 2H+ + 2e-↔H2 with an equilibrium constant that is dependent on the reducing potential of electrons carried by their redox partner. To examine the possibility of increasing the photobiological production of hydrogen within cyanobacterial cultures, we expressed the [FeFe] hydrogenase, HydA, from Clostridium acetobutylicum in the non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus sp. 7942. We demonstrate that the heterologously expressed hydr...

  16. S-Glutathionylation and Redox Protein Signaling in Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Womersley, Jacqueline S.; Uys, Joachim D.

    2015-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that comes at a high cost to individuals and society. Therefore understanding the mechanisms by which drugs exert their effects is of prime importance. Drugs of abuse increase the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species resulting in oxidative stress. This change in redox homeostasis increases the conjugation of glutathione to protein cysteine residues; a process called S-glutathionylation. Although traditionally regarded as a protectiv...

  17. Redox-active media for permeable reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, three classes of redox-active media are described and evaluated in terms of their long-term effectiveness in treating TCE-contaminated groundwater in permeable reactive zones. Zero-valent iron, in the form of recycled cast iron filings, the first class, has received considerable attention as a reactive media and has been used in about a dozen pilot- and full-scale subsurface wall installations. Criteria used in selecting commercial sources of granular iron, will be discussed. Two other classes of redox-active media that have not yet seen wide use in pilot- or full-scale installations will also be described: Fe(II) minerals and bimetallic systems. Fe(II) minerals, including magnetite (Fe3O4), and ferrous sulfide (troilite, FeS), are redox-active and afford TCE reduction rates and product distributions that suggest that they react via a reductive mechanism similar to that which operates in the FeO system. Fe(II) species within the passive oxide layer coating the iron metal may act as electron transfer mediators, with FeO serving as the bulk reductant. Bimetallic systems, the third class of redox-active media, are commonly prepared by plating a second metal onto zero-valent iron (e.g., Ni/Fe and Pd/Fe) and have been shown to accelerate solvent degradation rates relative to untreated iron metal. The long-term effectiveness of this approach, however, has not yet been determined in groundwater treatability tests. The results of a Ni-plated iron column study using site groundwater indicate that a change in reduction mechanism (to catalytic dehydrohalogenation/hydrogenation) accounts for the observed rate enhancement. A significant loss in media reactivity was observed over time, attributable to Ni catalyst deactivation or poisoning. Zero-valent iron systems have not shown similar losses in reactivity in long-term laboratory, pilot or field investigations

  18. Cortisol promotes endoplasmic glucose production via pyridine nucleotide redox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zengmin; Mick, Gail J; Xie, Rongrong; Wang, Xudong; Xie, Xuemei; Li, Guimei; McCormick, Kenneth L

    2016-04-01

    Both increased adrenal and peripheral cortisol production, the latter governed by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), contribute to the maintenance of fasting blood glucose. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the pyridine nucleotide redox state (NADP/NADPH) is dictated by the concentration of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and the coordinated activities of two enzymes, hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH) and 11β-HSD1. However, luminal G6P may similarly serve as a substrate for hepatic glucose-6-phophatase (G6Pase). A tacit belief is that the G6P pool in the ER is equally accessible to both H6PDH and G6Pase. Based on our inhibition studies and kinetic analysis in isolated rat liver microsomes, these two aforesaid luminal enzymes do share the G6P pool in the ER, but not equally. Based on the kinetic modeling of G6P flux, the ER transporter for G6P (T1) preferentially delivers this substrate to G6Pase; hence, the luminal enzymes do not share G6P equally. Moreover, cortisol, acting through 11β-HSD1, begets a more reduced pyridine redox ratio. By altering this luminal redox ratio, G6P flux through H6PDH is restrained, allowing more G6P for the competing enzyme G6Pase. And, at low G6P concentrations in the ER lumen, which occur during fasting, this acute cortisol-induced redox adjustment promotes glucose production. This reproducible cortisol-driven mechanism has been heretofore unrecognized. PMID:26860459

  19. Optimization of a Vanadium Redox Flow Battery with Hydrogen generation

    OpenAIRE

    Wrang, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We consider the modelling and optimal control of energy storage systems, in this study a Vanadium Redox Flow Battery. Such a battery can be introduced in the electrical grid to be charged when demand is low and discharged when demand is high, increasing the overall efficiency of the network while reducing costs and emission of greenhouse gases. The model of the battery proposed in this study is less complex than the majority of models on batteries and energy storage systems found in literatur...

  20. Determining the Limiting Current Density of Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Jen-Yu Chen; Chin-Lung Hsieh; Ning-Yih Hsu; Yi-Sin Chou; Yong-Song Chen

    2014-01-01

    All-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) are used as energy storage systems for intermittent renewable power sources. The performance of VRFBs depends on materials of key components and operating conditions, such as current density, electrolyte flow rate and electrolyte composition. Mass transfer overpotential is affected by the electrolyte flow rate and electrolyte composition, which is related to the limiting current density. In order to investigate the effect of operating conditions on ma...

  1. Modelling and simulation of all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Fetlawi, Hassan Abdul-Zehra Abdul-Yima

    2011-01-01

    Properties and applications of all-vanadium redox flow batteries are discussed and a two-dimensional model is developed. The model, which is based on a comprehensive description of mass, charge, energy and momentum transport and conservation, is combined with a global kinetic model for reactions involving vanadium species. Gas evolving reactions are then incorporated into the modelling frame work. Bubble formation as a result of evolution at the negative/positive electrode is included in the ...

  2. Recent Development of Nanocomposite Membranes for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Sang-Ho Cha

    2015-01-01

    The vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) has received considerable attention due to its long cycle life, flexible design, fast response time, deep-discharge capability, and low pollution emissions in large-scale energy storage. The key component of VRB is an ion exchange membrane that prevents cross mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes by separating two electrolyte solutions, while allowing the conduction of ions. This review summarizes efforts in developing nanocomposite membranes w...

  3. Modeling and Optimal Control of a Redox Flow Battery

    OpenAIRE

    Wrang, Daniel; Faulwasser, Timm; Billeter, Julien; Amstutz, Véronique; Vrubel, Heron; Battistel, Alberto; Girault, Hubert; Bonvin, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries (VRFB) can be used as energy storage device, for example to account for wind or solar power fluctuations. In VRFBs charge is stored in two tanks containing two different vanadium solutions. This approach decouples the storage capacity and the power supply which is dependent only on the number and size of the cells [1]. A control specific model of a VRFB is proposed, which captures the essential dynamic properties of the battery while ignoring all fluid mechanica...

  4. Neural Network Predictive Control for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery

    OpenAIRE

    Hai-Feng Shen; Xin-Jian Zhu; Meng Shao; Hong-fei Cao

    2013-01-01

    The vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) is a nonlinear system with unknown dynamics and disturbances. The flowrate of the electrolyte is an important control mechanism in the operation of a VRB system. Too low or too high flowrate is unfavorable for the safety and performance of VRB. This paper presents a neural network predictive control scheme to enhance the overall performance of the battery. A radial basis function (RBF) network is employed to approximate the dynamics of the VRB system. The...

  5. A conserved haem redox and trafficking pathway for cofactor attachment

    OpenAIRE

    Richard-Fogal, Cynthia L; Frawley, Elaine R.; Bonner, Eric R.; Zhu, Huifen; San Francisco, Brian; Kranz, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    A pathway for cytochrome c maturation (Ccm) in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes (mitochondria) requires the genes encoding eight membrane proteins (CcmABCDEFGH). The CcmABCDE proteins are proposed to traffic haem to the cytochrome c synthetase (CcmF/H) for covalent attachment to cytochrome c by unknown mechanisms. For the first time, we purify pathway complexes with trapped haem to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of haem binding, trafficking and redox control. We discovered an early step i...

  6. Redox transformations in peroxidases studied by pulse radiolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebicka, L.; Gebicki, J.L. (Lodz Univ. (Poland))

    1992-01-01

    By means of pulse radiolysis technique, redox processes in two heme enzymes, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) have been studied. It has been found that both hydrated electron and hydroxyl radical reduce HRP and LPO to their ferrous forms. The formation of compound III (an oxyform of the heme enzyme) in a two-step reaction of LPO and HRP with superoxide anion has been proposed. (author).

  7. Aqueous extract of Securidaca longepedunculata root induce redox imbalance in male rat liver and kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiboye, T O; Salau, A K; Yakubu, M T; Oladiji, A T; Akanji, M A; Okogun, J I

    2010-08-01

    The effect of aqueous extract of Securidaca longepedunculata root on redox homeostasis in male rat liver and kidney was investigated. Rats were grouped into four: A, B, C and D, where A (the control) received orally 1 mL of distilled water; B, C and D (test groups) received orally 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight of the extract, respectively, for 28 days. Extract administration significantly reduced (p .05) in the serum acid phosphatase activity. There was also significant decrease (p < .05) in the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in the liver and kidney. Liver and kidney levels of GSH, vitamins C and E were also significantly reduced (p < .05). Serum malonidialdehyde and lipid hydroperoxide increased significantly (p < .05) in all the extract-treated groups. The available data from this study revealed that aqueous extract of S. longepedunculata root exerted its toxicity in the animals by depleting the antioxidant systems. This may consequently expose the cells and cellular macromolecules to oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species generated either from the metabolism of the extract or other in vivo means. PMID:20144964

  8. Redox nanoparticle increases the chemotherapeutic efficiency of pioglitazone and suppresses its toxic side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavel, Sindhu; Yoshitomi, Toru; Sakharkar, Meena Kishore; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-08-01

    Pioglitazone is a widely used anti-diabetic drug that induces cytotoxicity in cancer cells; however, its clinical use is questioned due to its associated liver toxicity caused by increased oxidative stress. We therefore employed nitroxide-radical containing nanoparticle, termed redox nanoparticle (RNP(N)) which is an effective scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a drug carrier. RNP(N) encapsulation increased pioglitazone solubility, thus increasing cellular uptake of encapsulated pioglitazone which reduced the dose required to induce toxicity in prostate cancer cell lines. Investigation of in vitro molecular mechanism of pioglitazone revealed that both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were involved in tumor cell death. In addition, intravenously administered pioglitazone-loaded RNP(N) produced significant tumor volume reduction in vivo due to enhanced permeation and retention effect. Most importantly, oxidative damage caused by pioglitazone in the liver was significantly suppressed by pioglitazone-loaded RNP(N) due to the presence of nitroxide radicals. It is interesting to note that oral administration of encapsulated pioglitazone, and co-administration of RNP(N) and pioglitazone, i.e., no encapsulation of pioglitazone in RNP(N) also significantly contributed to suppression of the liver injury. Therefore, use of RNP(N) either as an adjuvant or as a carrier for drugs with severe side effects is a promising chemotherapeutic strategy. PMID:27235996

  9. Effect of Redox Modulating NRF2 Activators on Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-hyun Choi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is featured by a progressive decline of kidney function and is mainly caused by chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension. CKD is a complex disease due to cardiovascular complications and high morbidity; however, there is no single treatment to improve kidney function in CKD patients. Since biological markers representing oxidative stress are significantly elevated in CKD patients, oxidative stress is receiving attention as a contributing factor to CKD pathology. Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (NRF2 is a predominant transcription factor that regulates the expression of a wide array of genes encoding antioxidant proteins, thiol molecules and their generating enzymes, detoxifying enzymes, and stress response proteins, all of which can counteract inflammatory and oxidative damages. There is considerable experimental evidence suggesting that NRF2 signaling plays a protective role in renal injuries that are caused by various pathologic conditions. In addition, impaired NRF2 activity and consequent target gene repression have been observed in CKD animals. Therefore, a pharmacological intervention activating NRF2 signaling can be beneficial in protecting against kidney dysfunction in CKD. This review article provides an overview of the role of NRF2 in experimental CKD models and describes current findings on the renoprotective effects of naturally occurring NRF2 activators, including sulforaphane, resveratrol, curcumin, and cinnamic aldehyde. These experimental results, coupled with recent clinical experiences with a synthetic triterpenoid, bardoxolone methyl, have brought a light of hope for ameliorating CKD progression by preventing oxidative stress and maintaining cellular redox homeostasis.

  10. Redox modulation of mitochondriogenesis in exercise. Does antioxidant supplementation blunt the benefits of exercise training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Cabo, Helena; Ferrando, Beatriz; Viña, Jose

    2015-09-01

    Physical exercise increases the cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in muscle, liver, and other organs. This is unlikely due to increased mitochondrial production but rather to extramitochondrial sources such as NADPH oxidase or xanthine oxidase. We have reported a xanthine oxidase-mediated increase in ROS production in many experimental models from isolated cells to humans. Originally, ROS were considered as detrimental and thus as a likely cause of cell damage associated with exhaustion. In the past decade, evidence showing that ROS act as signals has been gathered and thus the idea that antioxidant supplementation in exercise is always recommendable has proved incorrect. In fact, we proposed that exercise itself can be considered as an antioxidant because training increases the expression of classical antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and, in general, lowering the endogenous antioxidant enzymes by administration of antioxidant supplements may not be a good strategy when training. Antioxidant enzymes are not the only ones to be activated by training. Mitochondriogenesis is an important process activated in exercise. Many redox-sensitive enzymes are involved in this process. Important signaling molecules like MAP kinases, NF-κB, PGC-1α, p53, heat shock factor, and others modulate muscle adaptation to exercise. Interventions aimed at modifying the production of ROS in exercise must be performed with care as they may be detrimental in that they may lower useful adaptations to exercise. PMID:25889822

  11. Playing with cardiac "redox switches": the "HNO way" to modulate cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchetti, Carlo G; Stanley, Brian A; Murray, Christopher I; Sivakumaran, Vidhya; Donzelli, Sonia; Mancardi, Daniele; Pagliaro, Pasquale; Gao, Wei Dong; van Eyk, Jennifer; Kass, David A; Wink, David A; Paolocci, Nazareno

    2011-05-01

    The nitric oxide (NO(•)) sibling, nitroxyl or nitrosyl hydride (HNO), is emerging as a molecule whose pharmacological properties include providing functional support to failing hearts. HNO also preconditions myocardial tissue, protecting it against ischemia-reperfusion injury while exerting vascular antiproliferative actions. In this review, HNO's peculiar cardiovascular assets are discussed in light of its unique chemistry that distinguish HNO from NO(•) as well as from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species such as the hydroxyl radical and peroxynitrite. Included here is a discussion of the possible routes of HNO formation in the myocardium and its chemical targets in the heart. HNO has been shown to have positive inotropic/lusitropic effects under normal and congestive heart failure conditions in animal models. The mechanistic intricacies of the beneficial cardiac effects of HNO are examined in cellular models. In contrast to β-receptor/cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A-dependent enhancers of myocardial performance, HNO uses its "thiophylic" nature as a vehicle to interact with redox switches such as cysteines, which are located in key components of the cardiac electromechanical machinery ruling myocardial function. Here, we will briefly review new features of HNO's cardiovascular effects that when combined with its positive inotropic/lusitropic action may render HNO donors an attractive addition to the current therapeutic armamentarium for treating patients with acutely decompensated congestive heart failure.

  12. Radiation, nitric oxide and cellular death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of radiation induced cellular death constitute an objective of research ever since the first biological effects of radiation were first observed. The explosion of information produced in the last 20 years calls for a careful analysis due to the apparent contradictory data related to the cellular system studied and the range of doses used. This review focuses on the role of the active oxygen species, in particular the nitric oxides, in its relevance as potential mediator of radiation induced cellular death

  13. Autophagy and mitophagy in cellular damage control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy and mitophagy are important cellular processes that are responsible for breaking down cellular contents, preserving energy and safeguarding against accumulation of damaged and aggregated biomolecules. This graphic review gives a broad summary of autophagy and discusses examples where autophagy is important in controlling protein degradation. In addition we highlight how autophagy and mitophagy are involved in the cellular responses to reactive species and mitochondrial dysfunction. The key signaling pathways for mitophagy are described in the context of bioenergetic dysfunction.

  14. Glutathione Redox System in β-Thalassemia/Hb E Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchaneekorn W. Kalpravidh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available β-thalassemia/Hb E is known to cause oxidative stress induced by iron overload. The glutathione system is the major endogenous antioxidant that protects animal cells from oxidative damage. This study aimed to determine the effect of disease state and splenectomy on redox status expressed by whole blood glutathione (GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG and also to evaluate glutathione-related responses to oxidation in β-thalassemia/Hb E patients. Twenty-seven normal subjects and 25 β-thalassemia/Hb E patients were recruited and blood was collected. The GSH/GSSG ratio, activities of glutathione-related enzymes, hematological parameters, and serum ferritin levels were determined in individuals. Patients had high iron-induced oxidative stress, shown as significantly increased serum ferritin, a decreased GSH/GSSG ratio, and increased activities of glutathione-related enzymes. Splenectomy increased serum ferritin levels and decreased GSH levels concomitant with unchanged glutathione-related enzyme activities. The redox ratio had a positive correlation with hemoglobin levels and negative correlation with levels of serum ferritin. The glutathione system may be the body’s first-line defense used against oxidative stress and to maintain redox homeostasis in thalassemic patients based on the significant correlations between the GSH/GSSH ratio and degree of anemia or body iron stores.

  15. Cysteine-based redox regulation and signalling in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy eCouturier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms are subjected to oxidative stress conditions which are characterized by the production of reactive oxygen (ROS, nitrogen (RNS and sulfur (RSS species. In plants as in other organisms, many of these compounds have a dual function as they damage different types of macromolecules but they also likely fulfil an important role as secondary messengers. Owing to the reactivity of their thiol groups, some protein cysteine residues are particularly prone to oxidation by these molecules. In the past years, besides their recognized catalytic and regulatory functions, the modification of cysteine thiol group was increasingly viewed as either protective or redox signalling mechanisms. The most physiologically relevant reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs are disulfide bonds, sulfenic acids, S-glutathionylated adducts, S-nitrosothiols and to a lesser extent S-sulfenylamides, thiosulfinates and S-persulfides. These redox PTMs are mostly controlled by two oxidoreductase families, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. This review focuses on recent advances highlighting the variety and physiological roles of these PTMs and the proteomic strategies used for their detection.

  16. Monitoring and validating active site redox states in protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Hough, Michael A

    2011-06-01

    High resolution protein crystallography using synchrotron radiation is one of the most powerful tools in modern biology. Improvements in resolution have arisen from the use of X-ray beamlines with higher brightness and flux and the development of advanced detectors. However, it is increasingly recognised that the benefits brought by these advances have an associated cost, namely deleterious effects of X-ray radiation on the sample (radiation damage). In particular, X-ray induced reduction and damage to redox centres has been shown to occur much more rapidly than other radiation damage effects, such as loss of resolution or damage to disulphide bridges. Selection of an appropriate combination of in-situ single crystal spectroscopies during crystallographic experiments, such as UV-visible absorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAFS), allows for effective monitoring of redox states in protein crystals in parallel with structure determination. Such approaches are also essential in cases where catalytic intermediate species are generated by exposure to the X-ray beam. In this article, we provide a number of examples in which multiple single crystal spectroscopies have been key to understanding the redox status of Fe and Cu centres in crystal structures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Structure and Function in the Crystalline State.

  17. Online monitoring of Mezcal fermentation based on redox potential measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante-Minakata, P; Ibarra-Junquera, V; Rosu, H C; De León-Rodríguez, A; González-García, R

    2009-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the continuous monitoring of the biomass and ethanol concentrations as well as the growth rate in the Mezcal fermentation process. The algorithm performs its task having available only the online measurements of the redox potential. The procedure combines an artificial neural network (ANN) that relates the redox potential to the ethanol and biomass concentrations with a nonlinear observer-based algorithm that uses the ANN biomass estimations to infer the growth rate of this fermentation process. The results show that the redox potential is a valuable indicator of the metabolic activity of the microorganisms during Mezcal fermentation. In addition, the estimated growth rate can be considered as a direct evidence of the presence of mixed culture growth in the process. Usually, mixtures of microorganisms could be intuitively clear in this kind of processes; however, the total biomass data do not provide definite evidence by themselves. In this paper, the detailed design of the software sensor as well as its experimental application is presented at the laboratory level.

  18. Numerical modeling of an all vanadium redox flow battery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, Jonathan R.; Brunini, Victor E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Martinez, Mario J.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a capability to simulate reduction-oxidation (redox) flow batteries in the Sierra Multi-Mechanics code base. Specifically, we focus on all-vanadium redox flow batteries; however, the capability is general in implementation and could be adopted to other chemistries. The electrochemical and porous flow models follow those developed in the recent publication by [28]. We review the model implemented in this work and its assumptions, and we show several verification cases including a binary electrolyte, and a battery half-cell. Then, we compare our model implementation with the experimental results shown in [28], with good agreement seen. Next, a sensitivity study is conducted for the major model parameters, which is beneficial in targeting specific features of the redox flow cell for improvement. Lastly, we simulate a three-dimensional version of the flow cell to determine the impact of plenum channels on the performance of the cell. Such channels are frequently seen in experimental designs where the current collector plates are borrowed from fuel cell designs. These designs use a serpentine channel etched into a solid collector plate.

  19. High Performance Hybrid Energy Storage with Potassium Ferricyanide Redox Electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhan; Choudhury, Soumyadip; Weingarth, Daniel; Kim, Daekyu; Presser, Volker

    2016-09-14

    We demonstrate stable hybrid electrochemical energy storage performance of a redox-active electrolyte, namely potassium ferricyanide in aqueous media in a supercapacitor-like setup. Challenging issues associated with such a system are a large leakage current and high self-discharge, both stemming from ion redox shuttling through the separator. The latter is effectively eliminated when using an ion exchange membrane instead of a porous separator. Other critical factors toward the optimization of a redox-active electrolyte system, especially electrolyte concentration and volume of electrolyte, have been studied by electrochemical methods. Finally, excellent long-term stability is demonstrated up to 10 000 charge/discharge cycles at 1.2 and 1.8 V, with a broad maximum stability window of up to 1.8 V cell voltage as determined via cyclic voltammetry. An energy capacity of 28.3 Wh/kg or 11.4 Wh/L has been obtained from such cells, taking the nonlinearity of the charge-discharge profile into account. The power performance of our cell has been determined to be 7.1 kW/kg (ca. 2.9 kW/L or 1.2 kW/m(2)). These ratings are higher compared to the same cell operated in aqueous sodium sulfate. This hybrid electrochemical energy storage system is believed to find a strong foothold in future advanced energy storage applications.

  20. Redox, disproportionation, and complex formation reactions of neptunium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction-oxidation, complex formation, and disproportionation reactions of neptunium ions in various aqueous media were investigated by electrochemical method in combination with the spectrophotometric measurement. By flow-coulometry with multi-step column electrodes, electrolytic redox potentials, number of electrons involved in the electrode processes, and reversibilities of the processes were determined, from which the complex formation of neptunium ions and the species participating in the reactions were discussed. Based on the characteristics of the redox behavior of neptunium in sulfuric acid media, the procedure for the flow-coulometric determination and differentiation of neptunium ions was developed. The redox potentials of neptunium in concentrated carbonate solutions were determined by means of controlled-potential electrolysis and spectrophotometry, and formations of NpO2(CO3)35- and NpO2(CO3)34- complexes were evaluated. The disproportionation rate of NpO2+ in concentrated acid solutions with and without such complexing agents as SO42- and Cl- was measured and the reaction mechanism was predicted. (author)