WorldWideScience

Sample records for cellular response dna-damaging

  1. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  2. Cellular Responses to Cisplatin-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alakananda Basu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is one of the most effective anticancer agents widely used in the treatment of solid tumors. It is generally considered as a cytotoxic drug which kills cancer cells by damaging DNA and inhibiting DNA synthesis. How cells respond to cisplatin-induced DNA damage plays a critical role in deciding cisplatin sensitivity. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage activates various signaling pathways to prevent or promote cell death. This paper summarizes our current understandings regarding the mechanisms by which cisplatin induces cell death and the bases of cisplatin resistance. We have discussed various steps, including the entry of cisplatin inside cells, DNA repair, drug detoxification, DNA damage response, and regulation of cisplatin-induced apoptosis by protein kinases. An understanding of how various signaling pathways regulate cisplatin-induced cell death should aid in the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer.

  3. The DNA damage response in viral-induced cellular transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, P A; Luftig, M A

    2012-01-31

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has emerged as a critical tumour suppressor pathway responding to cellular DNA replicative stress downstream of aberrant oncogene over-expression. Recent studies have now implicated the DDR as a sensor of oncogenic virus infection. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which tumour viruses activate and also suppress the host DDR. The mechanism of tumour virus induction of the DDR is intrinsically linked to the need for these viruses to promote an S-phase environment to replicate their nucleic acid during infection. However, inappropriate expression of viral oncoproteins can also activate the DDR through various mechanisms including replicative stress, direct interaction with DDR components and induction of reactive oxygen species. Given the growth-suppressive consequences of activating the DDR, tumour viruses have also evolved mechanisms to attenuate these pathways. Aberrant expression of viral oncoproteins may therefore promote tumourigenesis through increased somatic mutation and aneuploidy due to DDR inactivation. This review will focus on the interplay between oncogenic viruses and the DDR with respect to cellular checkpoint control and transformation.

  4. p53-Mediated Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Cells with Replicative Hepatitis B Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puisieux, Alain; Ji, Jingwei; Guillot, Celine; Legros, Yann; Soussi, Thierry; Isselbacher, Kurt; Ozturk, Mehmet

    1995-02-01

    Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor gene by protecting cells from deleterious effects of genotoxic agents through the induction of a G_1/S arrest or apoptosis as a response to DNA damage. Transforming proteins of several oncogenic DNA viruses inactivate tumor suppressor activity of p53 by blocking this cellular response. To test whether hepatitis B virus displays a similar effect, we studied the p53-mediated cellular response to DNA damage in 2215 hepatoma cells with replicative hepatitis B virus. We demonstrate that hepatitis B virus replication does not interfere with known cellular functions of p53 protein.

  5. The involvement of XPC protein in the cisplatin DNA damaging treatment-mediated cellular response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan WANG; Alan DOMBKOWSKI; Lynn CHUANG; Xiao Xin S XU

    2004-01-01

    Recognition of DNA damage is a critical step for DNA damage-mediated cellular response. XPC is an important DNA damage recognition protein involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). We have studied the XPC protein in cisplatin DNA damaging treatment-mediated cellular response. Comparison of the microarray data from both normal and XPCdefective human fibroblasts identified 861 XPC-responsive genes in the cisplatin treatment (with minimum fold change≥1.5).The cell cycle and cell proliferation-related genes are the most affected genes by the XPC defect in the treatment. Many other cellular function genes, especially the DNA repair and signal transduction-related genes, were also affected by the XPC defect in the treatment. To validate the microarray data, the transcription levels of some microarray-identified genes were also determined by an RT-PCR based real time PCR assay. The real time PCR results are consistent with the microarray data for most of the tested genes, indicating the reliability of the microarray data. To further validate the microarray data, the cisplatin treatment-mediated caspase-3 activation was also determined. The Western blot hybridization results indicate that the XPC defect greatly attenuates the cisplatin treatment-mediated Caspase-3 activation. We elucidated the role of p53 protein in the XPC protein DNA damage recognition-mediated signaling process. The XPC defect reduces the cisplatin treatment-mediated p53 response. These results suggest that the XPC protein plays an important role in the cisplatin treatment-mediated cellular response. It may also suggest a possible mechanism of cancer cell drug resistance.

  6. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mediates cellular responses to DNA damage and aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitanovic, Ana [Institut fuer Pharmazie und Molekulare Biotechnologie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Woelfl, Stefan [Institut fuer Pharmazie und Molekulare Biotechnologie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: wolfl@uni-hd.de

    2006-02-22

    Response to DNA damage, lack of nutrients and other stress conditions is an essential property of living systems. The coordinate response includes DNA damage repair, activation of alternate biochemical pathways, adjustment of cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression as well as drastic measures like cellular suicide which prevents proliferation of severely damaged cells. Investigating the transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to low doses of the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) we observed induction of genes involved in glucose metabolism. RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of the key enzyme in gluconeogenesis fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1) was clearly up-regulated by MMS in glucose-rich medium. Interestingly, deletion of FBP1 led to reduced sensitivity to MMS, but not to other DNA-damaging agents, such as 4-NQO or phleomycin. Reintroduction of FBP1 in the knockout restored the wild-type phenotype while overexpression increased MMS sensitivity of wild-type, shortened life span and increased induction of RNR2 after treatment with MMS. Deletion of FBP1 reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to MMS treatment and in untreated aged cells, and increased the amount of cells able to propagate and to form colonies, but had no influence on the genotoxic effect of MMS. Our results indicate that FBP1 influences the connection between DNA damage, aging and oxidative stress through either direct signalling or an intricate adaptation in energy metabolism.0.

  7. The Yin-Yang of DNA Damage Response: Roles in Tumorigenesis and Cellular Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Senescent cells are relatively stable, lacking proliferation capacity yet retaining metabolic activity. In contrast, cancer cells are rather invasive and devastating, with uncontrolled proliferative capacity and resistance to cell death signals. Although tumorigenesis and cellular senescence are seemingly opposite pathological events, they are actually driven by a unified mechanism: DNA damage. Integrity of the DNA damage response (DDR network can impose a tumorigenesis barrier by navigating abnormal cells to cellular senescence. Compromise of DDR, possibly due to the inactivation of DDR components, may prevent cellular senescence but at the expense of tumor formation. Here we provide an overview of the fundamental role of DDR in tumorigenesis and cellular senescence, under the light of the Yin-Yang concept of Chinese philosophy. Emphasis is placed on discussing DDR outcome in the light of in vivo models. This information is critical as it can help make better decisions for clinical treatments of cancer patients.

  8. Transcriptomal profiling of the cellular response to DNA damage mediated by Slug (Snai2)

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Caro, M.; Bermejo-Rodríguez, C.; González-Herrero, I; Sánchez-Beato, M; Piris, M. A.; Sánchez-García, I

    2008-01-01

    Snai2-deficient cells are radiosensitive to DNA damage. The function of Snai2 in response to DNA damage seems to be critical for its function in normal development and cancer. Here, we applied a functional genomics approach that combined gene-expression profiling and computational molecular network analysis to obtain global dissection of the Snai2-dependent transcriptional response to DNA damage in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), which undergo p53-dependent growth arrest in respon...

  9. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 µg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by foci and pattern counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (?-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average foci counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profile of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in ?-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not significantly affect

  10. IFI16, an amplifier of DNA-damage response: Role in cellular senescence and aging-associated inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Divaker; Panchanathan, Ravichandran

    2016-07-01

    DNA-damage induces a DNA-damage response (DDR) in mammalian cells. The response, depending upon the cell-type and the extent of DNA-damage, ultimately results in cell death or cellular senescence. DDR-induced signaling in cells activates the ATM-p53 and ATM-IKKα/β-interferon (IFN)-β signaling pathways, thus leading to an induction of the p53 and IFN-inducible IFI16 gene. Further, upon DNA-damage, DNA accumulates in the cytoplasm, thereby inducing the IFI16 protein and STING-dependent IFN-β production and activation of the IFI16 inflammasome, resulting in the production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-1β and IL-18). Increased expression of IFI16 protein in a variety of cell-types promotes cellular senescence. However, reduced expression of IFI16 in cells promotes cell proliferation. Because expression of the IFI16 gene is induced by activation of DNA-damage response in cells and increased levels of IFI16 protein in cells potentiate the p53-mediated transcriptional activation of genes and p53 and pRb-mediated cell cycle arrest, we discuss how an improved understanding of the role of IFI16 protein in cellular senescence and associated inflammatory secretory phenotype is likely to identify the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the development of aging-associated human inflammatory diseases and a failure to cancer therapy.

  11. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Ramakrishna, Gayatri, E-mail: gayatrirama1@gmail.com [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Laboratory of Cancer Cell Biology, Department of Research, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, Delhi 110070 (India)

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  12. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Wu, Honglu; Karouia, Fathi; Stodieck, Louis; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 mg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by focus pattern and focus number counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (γg-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average focus counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profiles of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in γg-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not

  13. Activation of WIP1 phosphatase by HTLV-1 Tax mitigates the cellular response to DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajhal Dayaram

    Full Text Available Genomic instability stemming from dysregulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA damage response (DDR is a common feature of many cancers. The cancer adult T cell leukemia (ATL can occur in individuals infected with human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1, and ATL cells contain extensive chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting that they have defects in the recognition or repair of DNA damage. Since Tax is the transforming protein encoded by HTLV-1, we asked whether Tax can affect cell cycle checkpoints and the DDR. Using a combination of flow cytometry and DNA repair assays we showed that Tax-expressing cells exit G(1 phase and initiate DNA replication prematurely following damage. Reduced phosphorylation of H2AX (γH2AX and RPA2, phosphoproteins that are essential to properly initiate the DDR, was also observed in Tax-expressing cells. To determine the cause of decreased DDR protein phosphorylation in Tax-expressing cells, we examined the cellular phosphatase, WIP1, which is known to dephosphorylate γH2AX. We found that Tax can interact with Wip1 in vivo and in vitro, and that Tax-expressing cells display elevated levels of Wip1 mRNA. In vitro phosphatase assays showed that Tax can enhance Wip1 activity on a γH2AX peptide target by 2-fold. Thus, loss of γH2AX in vivo could be due, in part, to increased expression and activity of WIP1 in the presence of Tax. siRNA knockdown of WIP1 in Tax-expressing cells rescued γH2AX in response to damage, confirming the role of WIP1 in the DDR. These studies demonstrate that Tax can disengage the G(1/S checkpoint by enhancing WIP1 activity, resulting in reduced DDR. Premature G(1 exit of Tax-expressing cells in the presence of DNA lesions creates an environment that tolerates incorporation of random mutations into the host genome.

  14. DNA-damage response network at the crossroads of cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SCHMITT Estelle; PAQUET Claudie; BEAUCHEMIN Myriam; BERTRAND Richard

    2007-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires a carefully-orchestrated balance between cell proliferation,cellular senescence and cell death.Cells proliferate through a cell cycle that is tightly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase activities.Cellular senescence is a safeguard program limiting the proliferative competence of cells in living organisms.Apoptosis eliminates unwanted cells by the coordinated activity of gene products that regulate and effect cell death.The intimate link between the cell cycle,cellular senescence,apoptosis regulation,cancer development and tumor responses to cancer treatment has become eminently apparent.Extensive research on tumor suppressor genes,oncogenes,the cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory genes has revealed how the DNA damage-sensing and -signaling pathways,referred to as the DNA-damage response network,are tied to cell proliferation,cell-cycle arrest,cellular senescence and apoptosis.DNA-damage responses are complex,involving "sensor" proteins that sense the damage,and transmit signals to "transducer" proteins,which,in turn,convey the signals to numerous "effector" proteins implicated in specific cellular pathways,including DNA repair mechanisms,cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis.The Bcl-2 family of proteins stands among the most crucial regulators of apoptosis and performs vital functions in deciding whether a cell will live or die after cancer chemotherapy and irradiation.In addition,several studies have now revealed that members of the Bcl-2 family also interface with the cell cycle,DNA repair/recombination and cellular senescence,effects that are generally distinct from their function in apoptosis.In this review,we report progress in understanding the molecular networks that regulate cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis after DNA damage,and discuss the influence of some Bcl-2 family members on cell-cycle checkpoint regulation.

  15. Dynamic modeling of cellular response to DNA damage based on p53 stress response networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinpeng Qi; Yongsheng Ding; Shihuang Shao

    2009-01-01

    Under acute perturbations from the outside, cells can trigger self-defensive mechanisms to fight against genome stress. To investigate the cellular response to continuous ion radiation (IR), a dynamic model for p53 stress response networks at the cellular level is proposed. The model can successfully be used to simulate the dynamic processes of double-strand breaks (DSBs) generation and their repair, switch-like ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation, oscillations occurring in the p53-MDM2 feedback loop, as well as toxins elimination triggered by p53 stress response networks. Especially, the model can predict the plausible outcomes of cellular response under different IR dose regimes.

  16. Gene Expression Profile Changes and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Kidane, Yared; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. In addition, DNA in space can be damaged by toxic chemicals or reactive oxygen species generated due to increased levels of environmental and psychological stresses. Understanding the impact of spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, on cellular responses to DNA damage affects the accuracy of the radiation risk assessment for astronauts and the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and microgravity have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damage, confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) flown on the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB). Damages in the DNA were quantified by immunofluorescence staining for ?-H2AX, which showed similar percentages of different types of stained cells between flight and ground. However, there was a slight shift in the distribution of the ?-H2AX foci number in the flown cells with countable foci. Comparison of the cells in confluent and in exponential growth conditions indicated that the proliferation rate between flight and the ground may be responsible for such a shift. A microarray analysis of gene expressions in response to bleomycin treatment was also performed. Comparison of the responsive pathways between the flown and ground cells showed similar responses with the p53 network being the top upstream regulator. Similar responses at the RNA level between different gravity conditions were also observed with a PCR array analysis containing a set of genes involved in DNA damage signaling; with BBC3, CDKN1A, PCNA and PPM1D being significantly

  17. The interplay among chromatin dynamics, cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms modulates the cellular response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Federico; Giannattasio, Michele; Muzi-Falconi, Marco; Plevani, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    Cells are continuously under the assault of endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress that challenges the integrity of DNA. To cope with such a formidable task cells have evolved surveillance mechanisms, known as checkpoints, and a variety of DNA repair systems responding to different types of DNA lesions. These lesions occur in the context of the chromatin structure and, as expected for all DNA transactions, the cellular response to DNA damage is going to be influenced by the chromatin enviroment. In this review, we will discuss recent studies implicating chromatin remodelling factors and histone modifications in the response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and in checkpoint activation in response to UV lesions.

  18. CELLULAR RESPONSES TO DNA DAMAGE AND ONCOGENESIS BY THE p53 AND pRb/E2F PATHWAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to stress including DNA damage, show multiple options involving the mechanisms of growth arrest. DNA repair and programmed cell death or apoptosis. Failures in these mechanisms can result in oncogenesis or accelerated senescence. Much of the response is coordinated by p53, a nuclear phosphoprotein with a central role in the defences against physical, chemical and pathogenic agents which challenge the DNA integrity. The p53 pathways for mobilising the cellular defences are linked to the pRB/E2D pathways regulating the cell cycle progression. This paper aims to review the current understanding on the networks and main molecular machinery of these processes. In addition, the implications on cellular decision making for the defences as well as revolutionary aspects of these mechanisms are discussed in brief.

  19. The DNA damage response in mammalian oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eCarroll

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is one of the most common insults that challenge all cells. To cope, an elaborate molecular and cellular response has evolved to sense, respond to and correct the damage. This allows the maintenance of DNA fidelity essential for normal cell viability and the prevention of genomic instability that can lead to tumour formation. In the context of oocytes, the impact of DNA damage is not one of tumour formation but of the maintenance of fertility. Mammalian oocytes are particularly vulnerable to DNA damage because physiologically they may lie dormant in the ovary for many years (>40 in humans until they receive the stimulus to grow and acquire the competence to become fertilized. The implication of this is that in some organisms, such as humans, oocytes face the danger of cumulative genetic damage for decades. Thus, the ability to detect and repair DNA damage is essential to maintain the supply of oocytes necessary for reproduction. Therefore, failure to confront DNA damage in oocytes could cause serious anomalies in the embryo that may be propagated in the form of mutations to the next generation allowing the appearance of hereditary disease. Despite the potential impact of DNA damage on reproductive capacity and genetic fidelity of embryos, the mechanisms available to the oocyte for monitoring and repairing such insults have remained largely unexplored until recently. Here, we review the different aspects of the response to DNA damage in mammalian oocytes. Specifically, we address the oocyte DNA damage response from embryonic life to adulthood and throughout oocyte development.

  20. Autophagy in DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Czarny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR involves DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, but autophagy is also suggested to play a role in DDR. Autophagy can be activated in response to DNA-damaging agents, but the exact mechanism underlying this activation is not fully understood, although it is suggested that it involves the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. mTORC1 represses autophagy via phosphorylation of the ULK1/2–Atg13–FIP200 complex thus preventing maturation of pre-autophagosomal structures. When DNA damage occurs, it is recognized by some proteins or their complexes, such as poly(ADPribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1, Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN complex or FOXO3, which activate repressors of mTORC1. SQSTM1/p62 is one of the proteins whose levels are regulated via autophagic degradation. Inhibition of autophagy by knockout of FIP200 results in upregulation of SQSTM1/p62, enhanced DNA damage and less efficient damage repair. Mitophagy, one form of autophagy involved in the selective degradation of mitochondria, may also play role in DDR. It degrades abnormal mitochondria and can either repress or activate apoptosis, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. There is a need to clarify the role of autophagy in DDR, as this process may possess several important biomedical applications, involving also cancer therapy.

  1. The DNA damage response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2013-10-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed.

  2. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; Vugt, Marcel A.T.M. van, E-mail: m.vugt@umcg.nl

    2013-10-15

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed.

  3. Delineating the DNA damage response using systems biology approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stechow, Louise von

    2013-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA damage are highly variable and strongly depend on the cellular and organismic context. Studying the DNA damage response is crucial for a better understanding of cancer formation and ageing as well as genotoxic stress-induced cancer therapy. To do justice to the multifaceted

  4. DNA damage response in adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insinga, Alessandra; Cicalese, Angelo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    This review discusses the processes of DNA-damage-response and DNA-damage repair in stem and progenitor cells of several tissues. The long life-span of stem cells suggests that they may respond differently to DNA damage than their downstream progeny and, indeed, studies have begun to elucidate the unique stem cell response mechanisms to DNA damage. Because the DNA damage responses in stem cells and progenitor cells are distinctly different, stem and progenitor cells should be considered as two different entities from this point of view. Hematopoietic and mammary stem cells display a unique DNA-damage response, which involves active inhibition of apoptosis, entry into the cell-cycle, symmetric division, partial DNA repair and maintenance of self-renewal. Each of these biological events depends on the up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p21. Moreover, inhibition of apoptosis and symmetric stem cell division are the consequence of the down-regulation of the tumor suppressor p53, as a direct result of p21 up-regulation. A deeper understanding of these processes is required before these findings can be translated into human anti-aging and anti-cancer therapies. One needs to clarify and dissect the pathways that control p21 regulation in normal and cancer stem cells and define (a) how p21 blocks p53 functions in stem cells and (b) how p21 promotes DNA repair in stem cells. Is this effect dependent on p21s ability to inhibit p53? Such molecular knowledge may pave the way to methods for maintaining short-term tissue reconstitution while retaining long-term cellular and genomic integrity.

  5. Polyomavirus interaction with the DNA damage response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua; L.Justice; Brandy; Verhalen; Mengxi; Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that subvert cellular metabolism and pathways to mediate their own replication—normally at the expense of the host cell. Polyomaviruses are a group of small DNA viruses, which have long been studied as a model for eukaryotic DNA replication. Polyomaviruses manipulate host replication proteins, as well as proteins involved in DNA maintenance and repair, to serve as essential cofactors for productive infection. Moreover, evidence suggests that polyomavirus infection poses a unique genotoxic threat to the host cell. In response to any source of DNA damage, cells must initiate an effective DNA damage response(DDR) to maintain genomic integrity, wherein two protein kinases, ataxia telangiectasia mutated(ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related(ATR), are major regulators of DNA damage recognition and repair. Recent investigation suggests that these essential DDR proteins are required for productive polyomavirus infection. This review will focus on polyomaviruses and their interaction with ATMand ATR-mediated DNA damage responses and the effect of this interaction on host genomic stability.

  6. Transcriptional Regulation of the p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene in S-Phase of the Cell-Cycle and the Cellular Response to DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Reisman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor induces the transcription of genes that negatively regulate progression of the cell cycle in response to DNA damage or other cellular stressors and thus participates in maintaining genome stability. Numerous studies have demonstrated that p53 transcription is activated before or during early S-phase in cells progressing from G0/G1 into S-phase through the combined action of two DNA-binding factors RBP-Jκ and C/EBPβ-2. Here, we review evidence that this induction occurs to provide available p53 mRNA in order to prepare the cell for DNA damage in S-phase, this ensuring a rapid response to DNA damage before exiting this stage of the cell cycle.

  7. DNA damage response inhibition at dysfunctional telomeres by modulation of telomeric DNA damage response RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiello, Francesca; Aguado, Julio; Sepe, Sara; Iannelli, Fabio; Nguyen, Quan; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-02-27

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a set of cellular events that follows the generation of DNA damage. Recently, site-specific small non-coding RNAs, also termed DNA damage response RNAs (DDRNAs), have been shown to play a role in DDR signalling and DNA repair. Dysfunctional telomeres activate DDR in ageing, cancer and an increasing number of identified pathological conditions. Here we show that, in mammals, telomere dysfunction induces the transcription of telomeric DDRNAs (tDDRNAs) and their longer precursors from both DNA strands. DDR activation and maintenance at telomeres depend on the biogenesis and functions of tDDRNAs. Their functional inhibition by sequence-specific antisense oligonucleotides allows the unprecedented telomere-specific DDR inactivation in cultured cells and in vivo in mouse tissues. In summary, these results demonstrate that tDDRNAs are induced at dysfunctional telomeres and are necessary for DDR activation and they validate the viability of locus-specific DDR inhibition by targeting DDRNAs.

  8. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defence: Links and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Schumacher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signalling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signalling. We highlight evidence gained into (i which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signalling, (ii how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans.

  9. Protein kinase CK2 localizes to sites of DNA double-strand break regulating the cellular response to DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Birgitte B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK is a nuclear complex composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs and a heterodimeric DNA-targeting subunit Ku. DNA-PK is a major component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ repair mechanism, which is activated in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation, reactive oxygen species and radiomimetic drugs. We have recently reported that down-regulation of protein kinase CK2 by siRNA interference results in enhanced cell death specifically in DNA-PKcs-proficient human glioblastoma cells, and this event is accompanied by decreased autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at S2056 and delayed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Results In the present study, we show that CK2 co-localizes with phosphorylated histone H2AX to sites of DNA damage and while CK2 gene knockdown is associated with delayed DNA damage repair, its overexpression accelerates this process. We report for the first time evidence that lack of CK2 destabilizes the interaction of DNA-PKcs with DNA and with Ku80 at sites of genetic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CK2 regulates the phosphorylation levels of DNA-PKcs only in response to direct induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusions Taken together, these results strongly indicate that CK2 plays a prominent role in NHEJ by facilitating and/or stabilizing the binding of DNA-PKcs and, possibly other repair proteins, to the DNA ends contributing to efficient DNA damage repair in mammalian cells.

  10. DNA damage response and Autophagy: a meaningful partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARISTIDES G ELIOPOULOS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy and the DNA damage response (DDR are biological processes essential for cellular and organismal homeostasis. Herein we summarize and discuss emerging evidence linking DDR to autophagy. We highlight published data suggesting that autophagy is activated by DNA damage and is required for several functional outcomes of DDR signaling, including repair of DNA lesions, senescence, cell death, and cytokine secretion. Uncovering the mechanisms by which autophagy and DDR are intertwined provides novel insight into the pathobiology of conditions associated with accumulation of DNA damage, including cancer and aging, and novel concepts for the development of improved therapeutic strategies against these pathologies.

  11. SIRT participates at DNA damage response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Mi Yong; Joeng, Jae Min; Lee, Kee Ho [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gil Hong [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Sir2 maintains genomic stability in multiple ways in yeast. As a NAD{sup +}-dependent histone deacetylase, Sir2 has been reported to control chromatin silencing. In both budding yeast and Drosophila, overexpression of Sir2 extends life span. Previous reports have also demonstrated that Sir2 participate at DNA damage repair. A protein complex containing Sir2 has been reported to translocate to DNA double-strand breaks. Following DNA damage response, SIRT1 deacetylates p53 protein and attenuates its ability as a transcription factor. Consequently, SIRT1 over-expression increases cell survival under DNA damage inducing conditions. These previous observations mean a possibility that signals generated during the process of DNA repair are delivered through SIRT1 to acetylated p53. We present herein functional evidence for the involvement of SIRT1 in DNA repair response to radiation. In addition, this modulation of DNA repair activity may be connected to deacetylation of MRN proteins.

  12. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-10-29

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging.

  13. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Malgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance

  14. Chromatin modifications and the DNA damage response to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh, Mayank; Gupta, Arun; Misra, Hari S.; Albuquerque, Kevin; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2013-01-01

    In order to survive, cells have evolved highly effective repair mechanisms to deal with the potentially lethal DNA damage produced by exposure to endogenous as well as exogenous agents. Ionizing radiation exposure induces highly lethal DNA damage, especially DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), that is sensed by the cellular machinery and then subsequently repaired by either of two different DSB repair mechanisms: (1) non-homologous end joining, which re-ligates the broken ends of the DNA and (2) homologous recombination, that employs an undamaged identical DNA sequence as a template, to maintain the fidelity of DNA repair. Repair of DSBs must occur within the natural context of the cellular DNA which, along with specific proteins, is organized to form chromatin, the overall structure of which can impede DNA damage site access by repair proteins. The chromatin complex is a dynamic structure and is known to change as required for ongoing cellular processes such as gene transcription or DNA replication. Similarly, during the process of DNA damage sensing and repair, chromatin needs to undergo several changes in order to facilitate accessibility of the repair machinery. Cells utilize several factors to modify the chromatin in order to locally open up the structure to reveal the underlying DNA sequence but post-translational modification of the histone components is one of the primary mechanisms. In this review, we will summarize chromatin modifications by the respective chromatin modifying factors that occur during the DNA damage response. PMID:23346550

  15. MicroRNAs: new players in the DNA damage response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hailiang Hu; Richard A. Gatti

    2011-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a signal transduction pathway that decides the cell's fate either to repair DNA damage or to undergo apoptosis if there is too much damage. Post-translational modifications modulate the assembly and activity of protein complexes during the DDR pathways. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as a class of endogenous gene modulators that control protein levels, thereby adding a new layer of regulation to the DDR. In this review, we describe a new role for miRNAs in regulating the cellular response to DNA damage with a focus on DNA double-strand break damage. We also discuss the implications of miRNA's role in the DDR to stem cells, including embryonic stem cells and cancer stem cells, stressing the potential applications for miRNAs to be used as sensitizers for cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  16. Cellular responses to a prolonged delay in mitosis are determined by a DNA damage response controlled by Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Didier J; Hain, Karolina O; Allan, Lindsey A; Clarke, Paul R

    2015-03-01

    Anti-cancer drugs that disrupt mitosis inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, although the mechanisms of these responses are poorly understood. Here, we characterize a mitotic stress response that determines cell fate in response to microtubule poisons. We show that mitotic arrest induced by these drugs produces a temporally controlled DNA damage response (DDR) characterized by the caspase-dependent formation of γH2AX foci in non-apoptotic cells. Following exit from a delayed mitosis, this initial response results in activation of DDR protein kinases, phosphorylation of the tumour suppressor p53 and a delay in subsequent cell cycle progression. We show that this response is controlled by Mcl-1, a regulator of caspase activation that becomes degraded during mitotic arrest. Chemical inhibition of Mcl-1 and the related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL by a BH3 mimetic enhances the mitotic DDR, promotes p53 activation and inhibits subsequent cell cycle progression. We also show that inhibitors of DDR protein kinases as well as BH3 mimetics promote apoptosis synergistically with taxol (paclitaxel) in a variety of cancer cell lines. Our work demonstrates the role of mitotic DNA damage responses in determining cell fate in response to microtubule poisons and BH3 mimetics, providing a rationale for anti-cancer combination chemotherapies.

  17. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy. PMID:26427872

  18. Bidirectional coupling of splicing and ATM signaling in response to transcription-blocking DNA damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Tresini (Maria); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIn response to DNA damage cells activate intricate protein networks to ensure genomic fidelity and tissue homeostasis. DNA damage response signaling pathways coordinate these networks and determine cellular fates, in part, by modulating RNA metabolism. Here we discuss a replication-indep

  19. Dynamics of the human nuclear proteome in response to DNA damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirksen, Eef Hubert Cecil

    2006-01-01

    The genome is constantly challenged by factors that can induce DNA damage and thereby threaten the viability of the cell. If DNA damage remains unrepaired it can lead to the development of cancer. Although much is known about the role of proteins and protein complexes in the cellular response to DNA

  20. ATM kinase: Much more than a DNA damage responsive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleria, Ayushi; Chandna, Sudhir

    2016-03-01

    ATM, mutation of which causes Ataxia telangiectasia, has emerged as a cardinal multifunctional protein kinase during past two decades as evidenced by various studies from around the globe. Further to its well established and predominant role in DNA damage response, ATM has also been understood to help in maintaining overall functional integrity of cells; since its mutation, inactivation or deficiency results in a variety of pathological manifestations besides DNA damage. These include oxidative stress, metabolic syndrome, mitochondrial dysfunction as well as neurodegeneration. Recently, high throughput screening using proteomics, metabolomics and transcriptomic studies revealed several proteins which might be acting as substrates of ATM. Studies that can help in identifying effective regulatory controls within the ATM-mediated pathways/mechanisms can help in developing better therapeutics. In fact, more in-depth understanding of ATM-dependent cellular signals could also help in the treatment of variety of other disease conditions since these pathways seem to control many critical cellular functions. In this review, we have attempted to put together a detailed yet lucid picture of the present-day understanding of ATM's role in various pathophysiological conditions involving DNA damage and beyond.

  1. Profiling DNA damage response following mitotic perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    S Pedersen, Ronni; Karemore, Gopal; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2016-01-01

    that a broad spectrum of mitotic errors correlates with increased DNA breakage in daughter cells. Unexpectedly, we find that only a subset of these correlations are functionally linked. We identify the genuine mitosis-born DNA damage events and sub-classify them according to penetrance of the observed...

  2. Viruses and the DNA Damage Response: Activation and Antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luftig, Micah A

    2014-11-01

    Viruses must interact with their hosts in order to replicate; these interactions often provoke the evolutionarily conserved response to DNA damage, known as the DNA damage response (DDR). The DDR can be activated by incoming viral DNA, during the integration of retroviruses, or in response to the aberrant DNA structures generated upon replication of DNA viruses. Furthermore, DNA and RNA viral proteins can induce the DDR by promoting inappropriate S phase entry, by modifying cellular DDR factors directly, or by unintentionally targeting host DNA. The DDR may be antiviral, although viruses often require proximal DDR activation of repair and recombination factors to facilitate replication as well as downstream DDR signaling suppression to ensure cell survival. An unintended consequence of DDR attenuation during infection is the long-term survival and proliferation of precancerous cells. Therefore, the molecular basis for DDR activation and attenuation by viruses remains an important area of study that will likely provide key insights into how viruses have evolved with their hosts.

  3. Role of c-Abl in the DNA damage stress response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yosef SHAUL; Merav BEN-YEHOYADA

    2005-01-01

    c-Abl has been implicated in many cellular processes including differentiation, division, adhesion, death, and stress response. c-Abl is a latent tyrosine kinase that becomes activated in response to numerous extra- and intra-cellular stimuli. Here we briefly review the current knowledge about c-Abl involvement in the DNA-damage stress response and its implication on cell physiology.

  4. A human cellular sequence implicated in trk oncogene activation is DNA damage inducible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Scharf, R.; Sharon, R.; Kapten, I. (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel))

    1990-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which are deficient in the repair of UV light-induced DNA damage, have been used to clone DNA-damage-inducible transcripts in human cells. The cDNA clone designated pC-5 hybridizes on RNA gel blots to a 1-kilobase transcript, which is moderately abundant in nontreated cells and whose synthesis is enhanced in human cells following UV irradiation or treatment with several other DNA-damaging agents. UV-enhanced transcription of C-5 RNA is transient and occurs at lower fluences and to a greater extent in DNA-repair-deficient than in DNA-repair-proficient cells. Southern blot analysis indicates that the C-5 gene belongs to a multigene family. A cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence of C-5 was isolated. Sequence analysis revealed that it is homologous to a human cellular sequence encoding the amino-terminal activating sequence of the trk-2h chimeric oncogene. The presence of DNA-damage-responsive sequences at the 5' end of a chimeric oncogene could result in enhanced expression of the oncogene in response to carcinogens.

  5. Curcumin-Mediated HDAC Inhibition Suppresses the DNA Damage Response and Contributes to Increased DNA Damage Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Huei Wang

    Full Text Available Chemo- and radiotherapy cause multiple forms of DNA damage and lead to the death of cancer cells. Inhibitors of the DNA damage response are candidate drugs for use in combination therapies to increase the efficacy of such treatments. In this study, we show that curcumin, a plant polyphenol, sensitizes budding yeast to DNA damage by counteracting the DNA damage response. Following DNA damage, the Mec1-dependent DNA damage checkpoint is inactivated and Rad52 recombinase is degraded by curcumin, which results in deficiencies in double-stand break repair. Additive effects on damage-induced apoptosis and the inhibition of damage-induced autophagy by curcumin were observed. Moreover, rpd3 mutants were found to mimic the curcumin-induced suppression of the DNA damage response. In contrast, hat1 mutants were resistant to DNA damage, and Rad52 degradation was impaired following curcumin treatment. These results indicate that the histone deacetylase inhibitor activity of curcumin is critical to DSB repair and DNA damage sensitivity.

  6. Irreparable telomeric DNA damage and persistent DDR signalling as a shared causative mechanism of cellular senescence and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiello, Francesca; Herbig, Utz; Longhese, Maria Pia; Fumagalli, Marzia; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2014-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA repair and halts cell cycle. If damage is not resolved, cells can enter into an irreversible state of proliferative arrest called cellular senescence. Organismal ageing in mammals is associated with accumulation of markers of cellular senescence and DDR persistence at telomeres. Since the vast majority of the cells in mammals are non-proliferating, how do they age? Are telomeres involved? Also oncogene activation causes cellular senescence due to altered DNA replication and DDR activation in particular at the telomeres. Is there a common mechanism shared among apparently distinct types of cellular senescence? And what is the role of telomeric DNA damage?

  7. Parvovirus diversity and DNA damage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotmore, Susan F; Tattersall, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Parvoviruses have a linear single-stranded DNA genome, around 5 kb in length, with short imperfect terminal palindromes that fold back on themselves to form duplex hairpin telomeres. These contain most of the cis-acting information required for viral "rolling hairpin" DNA replication, an evolutionary adaptation of rolling-circle synthesis in which the hairpins create duplex replication origins, prime complementary strand synthesis, and act as hinges to reverse the direction of the unidirectional cellular fork. Genomes are packaged vectorially into small, rugged protein capsids ~260 Å in diameter, which mediate their delivery directly into the cell nucleus, where they await their host cell's entry into S phase under its own cell cycle control. Here we focus on genus-specific variations in genome structure and replication, and review host cell responses that modulate the nuclear environment.

  8. The DNA damage response pathways: at the crossroad of protein modifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael SY Huen; Junjie Chen

    2008-01-01

    Post-translational modifications play a crucial role in coordinating cellular response to DNA damage. Recent evidence suggests an interplay between multiple protein modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, acetylation and sumoylation, that combine to propagate the DNA damage signal to elicit cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis and senescence. Utility of specific post-translational modifiers allows temporal and spatial control over protein relo-calization and interactions, and may represent a means for trans-regulatory activation of protein activities. The abil-ity to recognize these specific modifiers also underscores the capacity for signal amplification, a crucial step for the maintenance of genomic stability and tumor prevention. Here we have summarized recent findings that highlight the complexity of post-translational modifications in coordinating the DNA damage response, with emphasis on the DNA damage signaling cascade.

  9. Chromatin Modifications and the DNA Damage Response to Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tej K Pandita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to survive, cells have evolved highly effective repair mechanisms to deal with the potentially lethal DNA damage produced by exposure to endogenous as well as exogenous agents. Ionizing radiation exposure induces highly lethal DNA damage, especially DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, that is sensed by the cellular machinery and then subsequently repaired by either of two different DSB repair mechanisms: 1 non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ, which re-ligates the broken ends of the DNA and 2 homologous recombination (HR, that employs an undamaged identical DNA sequence as a template, to maintain the fidelity of DNA repair. Repair of DSBs must occur within the natural context of the cellular DNA which, along with specific proteins, is organized to form chromatin, the overall structure of which can impede DNA damage site access by repair proteins. The chromatin complex is a dynamic structure and is known to change as required for ongoing cellular processes such as gene transcription or DNA replication. Similarly, during the process of DNA damage sensing and repair, chromatin needs to undergo several changes in order to facilitate accessibility of the repair machinery. Cells utilize several factors to modify the chromatin in order to locally open up the structure to reveal the underlying DNA sequence but posttranslational modification (PTMs of the histone components is one of the primary mechanisms. In this review, we will summarize chromatin modification by t

  10. Treacher Collins syndrome TCOF1 protein cooperates with NBS1 in the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccia, Alberto; Huang, Jen-Wei; Izhar, Lior; Sowa, Mathew E; Harper, J Wade; Elledge, Stephen J

    2014-12-30

    The signal transduction pathway of the DNA damage response (DDR) is activated to maintain genomic integrity following DNA damage. The DDR promotes genomic integrity by regulating a large network of cellular activities that range from DNA replication and repair to transcription, RNA splicing, and metabolism. In this study we define an interaction between the DDR factor NBS1 and TCOF1, a nucleolar protein that regulates ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription and is mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome. We show that NBS1 relocalizes to nucleoli after DNA damage in a manner dependent on TCOF1 and on casein kinase II and ATM, which are known to modify TCOF1 by phosphorylation. Moreover, we identify a putative ATM phosphorylation site that is required for NBS1 relocalization to nucleoli in response to DNA damage. Last, we report that TCOF1 promotes cellular resistance to DNA damaging agents. Collectively, our findings identify TCOF1 as a DDR factor that could cooperate with ATM and NBS1 to suppress inappropriate rDNA transcription and maintain genomic integrity after DNA damage.

  11. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xurui Zhang

    Full Text Available Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research.

  12. Activation of DNA damage response signaling by condensed chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Burman, Bharat; Kruhlak, Michael J; Misteli, Tom

    2014-12-11

    The DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in the context of chromatin, and architectural features of chromatin have been implicated in DNA damage signaling and repair. Whereas a role of chromatin decondensation in the DDR is well established, we show here that chromatin condensation is integral to DDR signaling. We find that, in response to DNA damage chromatin regions transiently expand before undergoing extensive compaction. Using a protein-chromatin-tethering system to create defined chromatin domains, we show that interference with chromatin condensation results in failure to fully activate DDR. Conversely, forced induction of local chromatin condensation promotes ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ATR-dependent activation of upstream DDR signaling in a break-independent manner. Whereas persistent chromatin compaction enhanced upstream DDR signaling from irradiation-induced breaks, it reduced recovery and survival after damage. Our results demonstrate that chromatin condensation is sufficient for activation of DDR signaling and is an integral part of physiological DDR signaling.

  13. Roles of RNA-Binding Proteins in DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihoko Kai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Living cells experience DNA damage as a result of replication errors and oxidative metabolism, exposure to environmental agents (e.g., ultraviolet light, ionizing radiation (IR, and radiation therapies and chemotherapies for cancer treatments. Accumulation of DNA damage can lead to multiple diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancers, immune deficiencies, infertility, and also aging. Cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms to deal with DNA damage. Networks of DNA damage response (DDR pathways are coordinated to detect and repair DNA damage, regulate cell cycle and transcription, and determine the cell fate. Upstream factors of DNA damage checkpoints and repair, “sensor” proteins, detect DNA damage and send the signals to downstream factors in order to maintain genomic integrity. Unexpectedly, we have discovered that an RNA-processing factor is involved in DNA repair processes. We have identified a gene that contributes to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM’s treatment resistance and recurrence. This gene, RBM14, is known to function in transcription and RNA splicing. RBM14 is also required for maintaining the stem-like state of GBM spheres, and it controls the DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ pathway by interacting with KU80. RBM14 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP with low complexity domains, called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs, and it also physically interacts with PARP1. Furthermore, RBM14 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs in a poly(ADP-ribose (PAR-dependent manner (unpublished data. DNA-dependent PARP1 (poly-(ADP ribose polymerase 1 makes key contributions in the DNA damage response (DDR network. RBM14 therefore plays an important role in a PARP-dependent DSB repair process. Most recently, it was shown that the other RBPs with intrinsically disordered domains are recruited to DNA damage sites in a PAR-dependent manner, and that these RBPs form liquid compartments (also known as

  14. Caveolar vesicles generate DNA damage and perpetuate cellular aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keith Wheaton

    2011-01-01

    @@ The replicative limit of human fibroblasts has long provided a model to assess the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular aging [1].In culture, fibroblasts which reach the end of their proliferative lifespan acquire profound molecular changes that limit their response to growth factors, and cause permanent exit from the cell cycle [2].

  15. When genome integrity and cell cycle decisions collide: roles of polo kinases in cellular adaptation to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Diego; D'Amours, Damien

    2014-09-01

    The drive to proliferate and the need to maintain genome integrity are two of the most powerful forces acting on biological systems. When these forces enter in conflict, such as in the case of cells experiencing DNA damage, feedback mechanisms are activated to ensure that cellular proliferation is stopped and no further damage is introduced while cells repair their chromosomal lesions. In this circumstance, the DNA damage response dominates over the biological drive to proliferate, and may even result in programmed cell death if the damage cannot be repaired efficiently. Interestingly, the drive to proliferate can under specific conditions overcome the DNA damage response and lead to a reactivation of the proliferative program in checkpoint-arrested cells. This phenomenon is known as adaptation to DNA damage and is observed in all eukaryotic species where the process has been studied, including normal and cancer cells in humans. Polo-like kinases (PLKs) are critical regulators of the adaptation response to DNA damage and they play key roles at the interface of cell cycle and checkpoint-related decisions in cells. Here, we review recent progress in defining the specific roles of PLKs in the adaptation process and how this conserved family of eukaryotic kinases can integrate the fundamental need to preserve genomic integrity with effective cellular proliferation.

  16. HCLK2 is required for activity of the DNA damage response kinase ATR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendtlew Danielsen, Jannie M; Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Schou, Kenneth Bødtker

    2008-01-01

    ATR is a protein kinase that orchestrates the cellular response to replication problems and DNA damage. HCLK2 has previously been reported to stabilize ATR and Chk1. Here we provide evidence that human HCLK2 acts at an early step in the ATR signaling pathway and contributes to full-scale activati...

  17. DNA damage and autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely [Redox Biology Center and School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Panayiotidis, Mihalis I. [School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Franco, Rodrigo, E-mail: rfrancocruz2@unl.edu [Redox Biology Center and School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  18. Ciliogenesis and the DNA damage response: a stressful relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Colin A; Collis, Spencer J

    2016-01-01

    Both inherited and sporadic mutations can give rise to a plethora of human diseases. Through myriad diverse cellular processes, sporadic mutations can arise through a failure to accurately replicate the genetic code or by inaccurate separation of duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. The human genome has therefore evolved to encode a large number of proteins that work together with regulators of the cell cycle to ensure that it remains error-free. This is collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR), and genome stability mechanisms involve a complex network of signalling and processing factors that ensure redundancy and adaptability of these systems. The importance of genome stability mechanisms is best illustrated by the dramatic increased risk of cancer in individuals with underlying disruption to genome maintenance mechanisms. Cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles present on most vertebrate cells, where they facilitate transduction of external signals into the cell. When not embedded within the specialised ciliary membrane, components of the primary cilium's basal body help form the microtubule organising centre that controls cellular trafficking and the mitotic segregation of chromosomes. Ciliopathies are a collection of diseases associated with functional disruption to cilia function through a variety of different mechanisms. Ciliopathy phenotypes can vary widely, and although some cellular overgrowth phenotypes are prevalent in a subset of ciliopathies, an increased risk of cancer is not noted as a clinical feature. However, recent studies have identified surprising genetic and functional links between cilia-associated proteins and genome maintenance factors. The purpose of this mini-review is to therefore highlight some of these discoveries and discuss their implications with regards to functional crosstalk between the DDR and ciliogenesis pathways, and how this may impact on the development of human disease.

  19. Retinoblastoma loss modulates DNA damage response favoring tumor progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Seoane

    Full Text Available Senescence is one of the main barriers against tumor progression. Oncogenic signals in primary cells result in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS, crucial for protection against cancer development. It has been described in premalignant lesions that OIS requires DNA damage response (DDR activation, safeguard of the integrity of the genome. Here we demonstrate how the cellular mechanisms involved in oncogenic transformation in a model of glioma uncouple OIS and DDR. We use this tumor type as a paradigm of oncogenic transformation. In human gliomas most of the genetic alterations that have been previously identified result in abnormal activation of cell growth signaling pathways and deregulation of cell cycle, features recapitulated in our model by oncogenic Ras expression and retinoblastoma (Rb inactivation respectively. In this scenario, the absence of pRb confers a proliferative advantage and activates DDR to a greater extent in a DNA lesion-independent fashion than cells that express only HRas(V12. Moreover, Rb loss inactivates the stress kinase DDR-associated p38MAPK by specific Wip1-dependent dephosphorylation. Thus, Rb loss acts as a switch mediating the transition between premalignant lesions and cancer through DDR modulation. These findings may have important implications for the understanding the biology of gliomas and anticipate a new target, Wip1 phosphatase, for novel therapeutic strategies.

  20. DICER, DROSHA and DNA damage response RNAs are necessary for the secondary recruitment of DNA damage response factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Sofia; Cabrini, Matteo; Matti, Valentina; Oldani, Amanda; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) plays a central role in preserving genome integrity. Recently, we reported that the endoribonucleases DICER and DROSHA contribute to DDR activation by generating small non-coding RNAs, termed DNA damage response RNA (DDRNA), carrying the sequence of the damaged locus. It is presently unclear whether DDRNAs act by promoting the primary recognition of DNA lesions or the secondary recruitment of DDR factors into cytologically detectable foci and consequent signal amplification. Here, we demonstrate that DICER and DROSHA are dispensable for primary recruitment of the DDR sensor NBS1 to DNA damage sites. Instead, the accumulation of the DDR mediators MDC1 and 53BP1 (also known as TP53BP1), markers of secondary recruitment, is reduced in DICER- or DROSHA-inactivated cells. In addition, NBS1 (also known as NBN) primary recruitment is resistant to RNA degradation, consistent with the notion that RNA is dispensable for primary recognition of DNA lesions. We propose that DICER, DROSHA and DDRNAs act in the response to DNA damage after primary recognition of DNA lesions and, together with γH2AX, are essential for enabling the secondary recruitment of DDR factors and fuel the amplification of DDR signaling.

  1. Phosphorylation of PTEN at STT motif is associated with DNA damage response

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    Misra, Sandip; Mukherjee, Ananda; Karmakar, Parimal, E-mail: pkarmakar_28@yahoo.co.in

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Phosphorylation PTEN at the C-terminal STT motif is necessary for DNA repair. • DNA damage induces phosphorylation of STT motif of PTEN. • Phospho-PTEN translocates to nucleus after DNA damage. • Phospho-PTEN forms nuclear foci after DNA damage which co localized with γH2AX. - Abstract: Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome Ten (PTEN), a tumor suppressor protein participates in multiple cellular activities including DNA repair. In this work we found a relationship between phosphorylation of carboxy (C)-terminal STT motif of PTEN and DNA damage response. Ectopic expression of C-terminal phospho-mutants of PTEN, in PTEN deficient human glioblastoma cells, U87MG, resulted in reduced viability and DNA repair after etoposide induced DNA damage compared to cells expressing wild type PTEN. Also, after etoposide treatment phosphorylation of PTEN increased at C-terminal serine 380 and threonine 382/383 residues in PTEN positive HEK293T cells and wild type PTEN transfected U87MG cells. One-step further, DNA damage induced phosphorylation of PTEN was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of total PTEN from cellular extract followed by immunobloting with phospho-specific PTEN antibodies. Additionally, phospho-PTEN translocated to nucleus after etoposide treatment as revealed by indirect immunolabeling. Further, phosphorylation dependent nuclear foci formation of PTEN was observed after ionizing radiation or etoposide treatment which colocalized with γH2AX. Additionally, etoposide induced γH2AX, Mre11 and Ku70 foci persisted for a longer period of times in U87MG cells after ectopic expression of PTEN C-terminal phospho-mutant constructs compared to wild type PTEN expressing cells. Thus, our findings strongly suggest that DNA damage induced phosphorylation of C-terminal STT motif of PTEN is necessary for DNA repair.

  2. Contribution of ATM and ATR kinase pathways to p53-mediated response in etoposide and methyl methanesulfonate induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bin; Ross, Susan M; Rowley, Sean; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Clewell, Rebecca A

    2017-03-01

    p53 is a key integrator of cellular response to DNA damage, supporting post-translational repair and driving transcription-mediated responses including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and repair. DNA damage sensing kinases recognize different types of DNA damage and initiate specific responses through various post-translational modifications of p53. This study evaluated chemical specificity of the p53 pathway response by manipulating p53 or its upstream kinases and assessing the effect on DNA damage and cellular responses to prototype chemicals: etoposide (ETP, topoisomerase II inhibitor) and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, alkylating agent). p53-deficient cells demonstrated reduced accumulation of the p53 target proteins MDM2, p21, and Wip1; reduced apoptotic response; and increased DNA damage (p-H2AX and micronuclei) with both chemicals. However, p53 was not essential for cell cycle arrest in HT1080 or HCT116 cells. The two chemicals induced different patterns of kinase activation, particularly in terms of Chk 1, Chk 2, p38, and ERK 1/2. However, inhibition of the ATM pathway showed a greater effect on p53 activtation, apoptosis, and accumulation of DNA damage than ATR-Chk 1 or the MAP kinases regardless of the chemical used. These results indicate that ATM is the predominant upstream kinase responsible for activation of the p53-mediated DNA damage response for both MMS and ETP, though the downstream kinase response is markedly different. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:72-83, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. P21-PARP-1 Pathway Is Involved in Cigarette Smoke-Induced Lung DNA Damage and Cellular Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sundar, Isaac K.; Gorbunova, Vera; Rahman, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage triggers cellular senescence, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced lung diseases. Both p21CDKN1A (p21) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) are involved in DNA damage and repair. However, the role of p21-PARP-1 axis in regulating CS-induced lung DNA damage and cellular senescence remains unknown. We hypothesized that CS causes DNA damage and cellular senescence through a p21-PARP-1 axis. To test this hypothesis, we determined the levels of γH2AX (a marker for DNA double-strand breaks) as well as non-homologous end joining proteins (Ku70 and Ku80) in lungs of mice exposed to CS. We found that the level of γH2AX was increased, whereas the level of Ku70 was reduced in lungs of CS-exposed mice. Furthermore, p21 deletion reduced the level of γH2AX, but augmented the levels of Ku70, Ku80, and PAR in lungs by CS. Administration of PARP-1 inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide increased CS-induced DNA damage, but lowered the levels of Ku70 and Ku80, in lungs of p21 knockout mice. Moreover, 3-aminobenzamide increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, but decreased the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in mouse lungs in response to CS. Interestingly, 3-aminobenzamide treatment had no effect on neutrophil influx into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by CS. These results demonstrate that the p21-PARP-1 pathway is involved in CS-induced DNA damage and cellular senescence. PMID:24244594

  4. P21-PARP-1 pathway is involved in cigarette smoke-induced lung DNA damage and cellular senescence.

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    Hongwei Yao

    Full Text Available Persistent DNA damage triggers cellular senescence, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke (CS-induced lung diseases. Both p21(CDKN1A (p21 and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 are involved in DNA damage and repair. However, the role of p21-PARP-1 axis in regulating CS-induced lung DNA damage and cellular senescence remains unknown. We hypothesized that CS causes DNA damage and cellular senescence through a p21-PARP-1 axis. To test this hypothesis, we determined the levels of γH2AX (a marker for DNA double-strand breaks as well as non-homologous end joining proteins (Ku70 and Ku80 in lungs of mice exposed to CS. We found that the level of γH2AX was increased, whereas the level of Ku70 was reduced in lungs of CS-exposed mice. Furthermore, p21 deletion reduced the level of γH2AX, but augmented the levels of Ku70, Ku80, and PAR in lungs by CS. Administration of PARP-1 inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide increased CS-induced DNA damage, but lowered the levels of Ku70 and Ku80, in lungs of p21 knockout mice. Moreover, 3-aminobenzamide increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, but decreased the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in mouse lungs in response to CS. Interestingly, 3-aminobenzamide treatment had no effect on neutrophil influx into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by CS. These results demonstrate that the p21-PARP-1 pathway is involved in CS-induced DNA damage and cellular senescence.

  5. SUMO-2 Orchestrates Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Treffers, Louise W; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty

    2015-01-01

    with the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). We have uncovered a dynamic set of 20 upregulated and 33 downregulated SUMO-2 conjugates, and 755 SUMO-2 sites, of which 362 were dynamic in response to MMS. In contrast to yeast, where a response is centered on homologous recombination, we identified......Small ubiquitin-like modifiers play critical roles in the DNA damage response (DDR). To increase our understanding of SUMOylation in the mammalian DDR, we employed a quantitative proteomics approach in order to identify dynamically regulated SUMO-2 conjugates and modification sites upon treatment...... dynamically SUMOylated interaction networks of chromatin modifiers, transcription factors, DNA repair factors, and nuclear body components. SUMOylated chromatin modifiers include JARID1B/KDM5B, JARID1C/KDM5C, p300, CBP, PARP1, SetDB1, and MBD1. Whereas SUMOylated JARID1B was ubiquitylated by the SUMO...

  6. Human longevity and variation in DNA damage response and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    others. Data were applied on 592 SNPs from 77 genes involved in nine sub-processes: DNA-damage response, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombinational repair (HRR), RecQ helicase activities (RECQ), telomere functioning......DNA-damage response and repair are crucial to maintain genetic stability, and are consequently considered central to aging and longevity. Here, we investigate whether this pathway overall associates to longevity, and whether specific sub-processes are more strongly associated with longevity than...... and mitochondrial DNA processes. The study population was 1089 long-lived and 736 middle-aged Danes. A self-contained set-based test of all SNPs displayed association with longevity (P-value=9.9 × 10-5), supporting that the overall pathway could affect longevity. Investigation of the nine sub-processes using...

  7. Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression—adding another layer of complexity to the DNA damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucas, Jorge; Riabinska, Arina; Jokic, Mladen; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Chen, Shuhua; Höpker, Katja; Reinhardt, H. Christian

    2012-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, cells activate a complex, kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and allow time for DNA repair, or, if the extend of damage is beyond repair capacity, induce apoptosis. This signaling network, which is collectively referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR), is primarily thought to consist of two components—a rapid phosphorylation-driven signaling cascade that results in immediate inhibition of Cdk/cyclin complexes and a delayed transcriptional response that promotes a prolonged cell cycle arrest through the induction of Cdk inhibitors, such as p21. In recent years a third layer of complexity has emerged that involves potent posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms that control the cellular response to DNA damage. Although much has been written on the relevance of the DDR in cancer and on the post-transcriptional role of microRNAs (miRs) in cancer, the post-transcriptional regulation of the DDR by non-coding RNAs and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) still remains elusive in large parts. Here, we review the recent developments in this exciting new area of research in the cellular response to genotoxic stress. We put specific emphasis on the role of RBPs and the control of their function through DNA damage-activated protein kinases. PMID:22936947

  8. Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression – adding another layer of complexity to the DNA damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge eBoucas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In response to DNA damage, cells activate a complex, kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and allow time for DNA repair, or, if the extend of damage is beyond repair capacity, induce apoptosis. This signaling network, which is collectively referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR, is primarily thought to consist of two components – a rapid phosphorylation-driven signaling cascade that results in immediate inhibition of Cdk/cyclin complexes and a delayed transcriptional response that promotes a prolonged cell cycle arrest through the induction of Cdk inhibitors, such as p21. In recent years a third layer of complexity has emerged that involves potent posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms that control the cellular response to DNA damage. Although much has been written on the relevance of the DDR in cancer and on the post-transcriptional role of microRNAs (miRs in cancer, the post-transcriptional regulation of the DDR by non-coding RNAs and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs still remains elusive in large parts. Here, we review the recent developments in this exciting new area of research in the cellular response to genotoxic stress. We put specific emphasis on the role of RNA-binding proteins and the control of their function through DNA damage-activated protein kinases.

  9. DNA damage response in nephrotoxic and ischemic kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mingjuan; Tang, Chengyuan; Ma, Zhengwei; Huang, Shuang; Dong, Zheng

    2016-10-27

    DNA damage activates specific cell signaling cascades for DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and/or cell death. Recent studies have demonstrated DNA damage response (DDR) in experimental models of acute kidney injury (AKI). In cisplatin-induced AKI or nephrotoxicity, the DDR pathway of ATR/Chk2/p53 is activated and contributes to renal tubular cell apoptosis. In ischemic AKI, DDR seems more complex and involves at least the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family, and p53; however, while ATM may promote DNA repair, p53 may trigger cell death. Targeting DDR for kidney protection in AKI therefore relies on a thorough elucidation of the DDR pathways in various forms of AKI.

  10. Breaking the DNA damage response to improve cervical cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Hylke W; van der Zee, Ate G J; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-01-01

    Every year, cervical cancer affects ∼500,000 women worldwide, and ∼275,000 patients die of this disease. The addition of platin-based chemotherapy to primary radiotherapy has increased 5-year survival of advanced-stage cervical cancer patients, which is, however, still only 66%. One of the factors thought to contribute to treatment failure is the ability of tumor cells to repair chemoradiotherapy-induced DNA damage. Therefore, sensitization of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy via inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) as a novel strategy to improve therapy effect, is currently studied pre-clinically as well as in the clinic. Almost invariably, cervical carcinogenesis involves infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), which inactivates part of the DNA damage response. This HPV-mediated partial inactivation of the DDR presents therapeutic targeting of the residual DDR as an interesting approach to achieve chemoradio-sensitization for cervical cancer. How the DDR can be most efficiently targeted, however, remains unclear. The fact that cisplatin and radiotherapy activate multiple signaling axes within the DDR further complicates a rational choice of therapeutic targets within the DDR. In this review, we provide an overview of the current preclinical and clinical knowledge about targeting the DDR in cervical cancer.

  11. Rho GTPases: Novel Players in the Regulation of the DNA Damage Response?

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    Gerhard Fritz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1 belongs to the family of Ras-homologous small GTPases. It is well characterized as a membrane-bound signal transducing molecule that is involved in the regulation of cell motility and adhesion as well as cell cycle progression, mitosis, cell death and gene expression. Rac1 also adjusts cellular responses to genotoxic stress by regulating the activity of stress kinases, including c-Jun-N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK and p38 kinases as well as related transcription factors. Apart from being found on the inner side of the outer cell membrane and in the cytosol, Rac1 has also been detected inside the nucleus. Different lines of evidence indicate that genotoxin-induced DNA damage is able to activate nuclear Rac1. The exact mechanisms involved and the biological consequences, however, are unclear. The data available so far indicate that Rac1 might integrate DNA damage independent and DNA damage dependent cellular stress responses following genotoxin treatment, thereby coordinating mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR that are related to DNA repair, survival and cell death.

  12. Catalytic and non-catalytic roles for the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase Arr in the mycobacterial DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Christina L; Chu, Linda; Li, Lucy X; Glickman, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the mycobacterial response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) differs substantially from previously characterized bacteria. These differences include the use of three DSB repair pathways (HR, NHEJ, SSA), and the CarD pathway, which integrates DNA damage with transcription. Here we identify a role for the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase Arr in the mycobacterial DNA damage response. Arr is transcriptionally induced following DNA damage and cellular stress. Although Arr is not required for induction of a core set of DNA repair genes, Arr is necessary for suppression of a set of ribosomal protein genes and rRNA during DNA damage, placing Arr in a similar pathway as CarD. Surprisingly, the catalytic activity of Arr is not required for this function, as catalytically inactive Arr was still able to suppress ribosomal protein and rRNA expression during DNA damage. In contrast, Arr substrate binding and catalytic activities were required for regulation of a small subset of other DNA damage responsive genes, indicating that Arr has both catalytic and noncatalytic roles in the DNA damage response. Our findings establish an endogenous cellular function for a mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase apart from its role in mediating Rifampin resistance.

  13. Catalytic and non-catalytic roles for the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase Arr in the mycobacterial DNA damage response.

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    Christina L Stallings

    Full Text Available Recent evidence indicates that the mycobacterial response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs differs substantially from previously characterized bacteria. These differences include the use of three DSB repair pathways (HR, NHEJ, SSA, and the CarD pathway, which integrates DNA damage with transcription. Here we identify a role for the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase Arr in the mycobacterial DNA damage response. Arr is transcriptionally induced following DNA damage and cellular stress. Although Arr is not required for induction of a core set of DNA repair genes, Arr is necessary for suppression of a set of ribosomal protein genes and rRNA during DNA damage, placing Arr in a similar pathway as CarD. Surprisingly, the catalytic activity of Arr is not required for this function, as catalytically inactive Arr was still able to suppress ribosomal protein and rRNA expression during DNA damage. In contrast, Arr substrate binding and catalytic activities were required for regulation of a small subset of other DNA damage responsive genes, indicating that Arr has both catalytic and noncatalytic roles in the DNA damage response. Our findings establish an endogenous cellular function for a mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase apart from its role in mediating Rifampin resistance.

  14. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Charlotte [Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XR (United Kingdom); Hayward, Richard L. [Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XR (United Kingdom); Breakthrough Research Unit, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XR (United Kingdom); Gilbert, Nick, E-mail: Nick.Gilbert@ed.ac.uk [Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XR (United Kingdom); Breakthrough Research Unit, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XR (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation ({gamma}H2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and {gamma}H2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by

  15. Viral oncogene-induced DNA damage response is activated in Kaposi sarcoma tumorigenesis.

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    Sonja Koopal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi sarcoma is a tumor consisting of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV-infected tumor cells that express endothelial cell (EC markers and viral genes like v-cyclin, vFLIP, and LANA. Despite a strong link between KSHV infection and certain neoplasms, de novo virus infection of human primary cells does not readily lead to cellular transformation. We have studied the consequences of expression of v-cyclin in primary and immortalized human dermal microvascular ECs. We show that v-cyclin, which is a homolog of cellular D-type cyclins, induces replicative stress in ECs, which leads to senescence and activation of the DNA damage response. We find that antiproliferative checkpoints are activated upon KSHV infection of ECs, and in early-stage but not late-stage lesions of clinical Kaposi sarcoma specimens. These are some of the first results suggesting that DNA damage checkpoint response also functions as an anticancer barrier in virally induced cancers.

  16. Highlighting the DNA damage response with ultrashort laser pulses in the near infrared and kinetic modeling

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    Elisa eFerrando-May

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the mechanisms governing the response to DNA damage in higher eucaryotes crucially depends on our ability to dissect the temporal and spatial organization of the cellular machinery responsible for maintaining genomic integrity. To achieve this goal, we need experimental tools to inflict DNA lesions with high spatial precision at pre-defined locations, and to visualize the ensuing reactions with adequate temporal resolution. Near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses focused through high-aperture objective lenses of advanced scanning microscopes offer the advantage of inducing DNA damage in a 3D-confined volume of subnuclear dimensions. This high spatial resolution results from the highly nonlinear nature of the excitation process. Here we review recent progress based on the increasing availability of widely tunable and user-friendly technology of ultrafast lasers in the near infrared. We present a critical evaluation of this approach for DNA microdamage as compared to the currently prevalent use of UV or VIS laser irradiation, the latter in combination with photosensitizers. Current and future applications in the field of DNA repair and DNA-damage dependent chromatin dynamics are outlined. Finally, we discuss the requirement for proper simulation and quantitative modeling. We focus in particular on approaches to measure the effect of DNA damage on the mobility of nuclear proteins and consider the pros and cons of frequently used analysis models for FRAP and photoactivation and their applicability to nonlinear photoperturbation experiments.

  17. Low Dose Iron Treatments Induce a DNA Damage Response in Human Endothelial Cells within Minutes.

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    Inês G Mollet

    Full Text Available Spontaneous reports from patients able to report vascular sequelae in real time, and recognition that serum non transferrin bound iron may reach or exceed 10μmol/L in the blood stream after iron tablets or infusions, led us to hypothesize that conventional iron treatments may provoke acute vascular injury. This prompted us to examine whether a phenotype could be observed in normal human endothelial cells treated with low dose iron.Confluent primary human endothelial cells (EC were treated with filter-sterilized iron (II citrate or fresh media for RNA sequencing and validation studies. RNA transcript profiles were evaluated using directional RNA sequencing with no pre-specification of target sequences. Alignments were counted for exons and junctions of the gene strand only, blinded to treatment types.Rapid changes in RNA transcript profiles were observed in endothelial cells treated with 10μmol/L iron (II citrate, compared to media-treated cells. Clustering for Gene Ontology (GO performed on all differentially expressed genes revealed significant differences in biological process terms between iron and media-treated EC, whereas 10 sets of an equivalent number of randomly selected genes from the respective EC gene datasets showed no significant differences in any GO terms. After 1 hour, differentially expressed genes clustered to vesicle mediated transport, protein catabolism, and cell cycle (Benjamini p = 0.0016, 0.0024 and 0.0032 respectively, and by 6 hours, to cellular response to DNA damage stimulus most significantly through DNA repair genes FANCG, BLM, and H2AFX. Comet assays demonstrated that 10μM iron treatment elicited DNA damage within 1 hour. This was accompanied by a brisk DNA damage response pulse, as ascertained by the development of DNA damage response (DDR foci, and p53 stabilization.These data suggest that low dose iron treatments are sufficient to modify the vascular endothelium, and induce a DNA damage response.

  18. Potential Relationship between Inadequate Response to DNA Damage and Development of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

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    Ting Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are responsible for the continuous regeneration of all types of blood cells, including themselves. To ensure the functional and genomic integrity of blood tissue, a network of regulatory pathways tightly controls the proliferative status of HSCs. Nevertheless, normal HSC aging is associated with a noticeable decline in regenerative potential and possible changes in other functions. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is an age-associated hematopoietic malignancy, characterized by abnormal blood cell maturation and a high propensity for leukemic transformation. It is furthermore thought to originate in a HSC and to be associated with the accrual of multiple genetic and epigenetic aberrations. This raises the question whether MDS is, in part, related to an inability to adequately cope with DNA damage. Here we discuss the various components of the cellular response to DNA damage. For each component, we evaluate related studies that may shed light on a potential relationship between MDS development and aberrant DNA damage response/repair.

  19. Ubiquitination of HTLV-I Tax in response to DNA damage regulates nuclear complex formation and nuclear export

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    Marriott Susan J

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HTLV-I oncoprotein, Tax, is a pleiotropic protein whose activity is partially regulated by its ability to interact with, and perturb the functions of, numerous cellular proteins. Tax is predominantly a nuclear protein that localizes to nuclear foci known as Tax Speckled Structures (TSS. We recently reported that the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins are altered in response to various forms of genotoxic and cellular stress. The level of cytoplasmic Tax increases in response to stress and this relocalization depends upon the interaction of Tax with CRM1. Cellular pathways and signals that regulate the subcellular localization of Tax remain to be determined. However, post-translational modifications including sumoylation and ubiquitination are known to influence the subcellular localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. The sumoylated form of Tax exists predominantly in the nucleus while ubiquitinated Tax exists predominantly in the cytoplasm. Therefore, we hypothesized that post-translational modifications of Tax that occur in response to DNA damage regulate the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. Results We found a significant increase in mono-ubiquitination of Tax in response to UV irradiation. Mutation of specific lysine residues (K280 and K284 within Tax inhibited DNA damage-induced ubiquitination. In contrast to wild-type Tax, which undergoes transient nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in response to DNA damage, the K280 and K284 mutants were retained in nuclear foci following UV irradiation and remained co-localized with the cellular TSS protein, sc35. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the localization of Tax, and its interactions with cellular proteins, are dynamic following DNA damage and depend on the post-translational modification status of Tax. Specifically, DNA damage induces the ubiquitination of Tax at K280 and K284

  20. Chromatin remodeling in the UV-induced DNA damage response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ö.Z. Aydin (Özge)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ DNA damage interferes with transcription and replication, causing cell death, chromosomal aberrations or mutations, eventually leading to aging and tumorigenesis (Hoeijmakers, 2009). The integrity of DNA is protected by a network of DNA repair and associated signalling

  1. The oxidative stress responsive transcription factor Pap1 confers DNA damage resistance on checkpoint-deficient fission yeast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Belfield

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells invoke mechanisms to promote survival when confronted with cellular stress or damage to the genome. The protein kinase Chk1 is an integral and conserved component of the DNA damage response pathway. Mutation or inhibition of Chk1 results in mitotic death when cells are exposed to DNA damage. Oxidative stress activates a pathway that results in nuclear accumulation of the bZIP transcription factor Pap1. We report the novel finding that fission yeast Pap1 confers resistance to drug- and non-drug-induced DNA damage even when the DNA damage checkpoint is compromised. Multi-copy expression of Pap1 restores growth to chk1-deficient cells exposed to camptothecin or hydroxyurea. Unexpectedly, increased Pap1 expression also promotes survival of chk1-deficient cells with mutations in genes encoding DNA ligase (cdc17 or DNA polymerase δ (cdc6, but not DNA replication initiation mutants. The ability of Pap1 to confer resistance to DNA damage was not specific to chk1 mutants, as it also improved survival of rad1- and rad9-deficient cells in the presence of CPT. To confer resistance to DNA damage Pap1 must localize to the nucleus and be transcriptionally active.

  2. The Role of Mms22p in DNA Damage Response in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lan; Xiong, Juan; Lu, Hui; Lv, Quan-zhen; Ma, Qian-yao; Côte, Pierre; Whiteway, Malcolm; Jiang, Yuan-ying

    2015-12-01

    To ensure correct DNA replication, eukaryotes have signaling pathways that respond to replication-associated DNA damage and trigger repair. In both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a complex of proteins, including the cullin protein Rtt101p and two adapter proteins Mms22p and Mms1p, is important for proper response to replication stress. We have investigated this system in Candida albicans. In this pathogen, Mms22p is important for recovery from DNA replication damage induced by agents including methylmethane sulfonate, camptothecin, and ionizing radiation. Although no clear ortholog of Mms1p has been identified in C. albicans, loss of either Mms22p or Rtt101p generates similar damage sensitivity, consistent with a common function. In S. cerevisiae, the Mrc1p-Csm3p-Tof1p complex stabilizes stalled replication forks and activates a replication checkpoint and interacts with Mms22p. A similar complex in S. pombe, consisting of the Tof1p and Csm3p orthologs Swi1p and Swi3p, along with the fission yeast Mrc1p, genetically also interacts with Mms22p. Intriguingly in C. albicans only Mrc1p and Csm3p appear involved in damage repair, and Mms22p is required for responding to DNA damage agents in MRC1 or CSM3 conditional mutants. In C. albicans, although the loss of RAD57 greatly impairs response in the pathogen to many DNA-damaging agents, lethality due to camptothecin damage requires concomitant loss of Rad57p and Mms22p, suggesting that Mms22p is only essential for homologous recombination induced by camptothecin. These results establish that although C. albicans uses conserved cellular modules to respond to DNA damage and replication blocks, the specific details of these modules differ significantly from the S. cerevisiae model.

  3. Proteomic investigations reveal a role for RNA processing factor THRAP3 in the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beli, Petra; Lukashchuk, Natalia; Wagner, Sebastian A

    2012-01-01

    The regulatory networks of the DNA damage response (DDR) encompass many proteins and posttranslational modifications. Here, we use mass spectrometry-based proteomics to analyze the systems-wide response to DNA damage by parallel quantification of the DDR-regulated phosphoproteome, acetylome, and ...

  4. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tangliang Li; Zhong-Wei Zhou; Zhenyu Ju; Zhao-Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employ-ing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically reg-ulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  5. BRCA1 in the DNA damage response and at telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliot Michael Rosen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Mutations of the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1 account for about 40-45% of hereditary breast cancer cases. Moreover, a significant fraction of sporadic (non-hereditary breast and ovarian cancers exhibit reduced or absent expression of the BRCA1 protein, suggesting an additional role for BRCA1 in sporadic cancers. BRCA1 follows the classic pattern of a highly penetrant Knudsen-type tumor suppressor gene in which one allele is inactivated through a germ-line mutation and the other is mutated or deleted within the tumor. BRCA1 is a multi-functional protein but it is not fully understood which function(s is (are most important for tumor suppression, nor is it clear why BRCA1 mutations confer a high risk for breast and ovarian cancers and not a broad spectrum of tumor types. Here, we will review BRCA1 functions in the DNA damage response (DDR, which are likely to contribute to tumor suppression. In the process, we will highlight some of the controversies and unresolved issues in the field. We will also describe a recently identified and under-investigated role for BRCA1 in the regulation of telomeres and the implications of this role in the DDR and cancer suppression.

  6. Host DNA damage response facilitates African swine fever virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Margarida; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2013-07-26

    Studies with different viral infection models on virus interactions with the host cell nucleus have opened new perspectives on our understanding of the molecular basis of these interactions in African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection. The present study aims to characterize the host DNA damage response (DDR) occurring upon in vitro infection with the ASFV-Ba71V isolate. We evaluated protein levels during ASFV time-course infection, of several signalling cascade factors belonging to DDR pathways involved in double strand break repair - Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM), ATM-Rad 3 related (ATR) and DNA dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). DDR inhibitory trials using caffeine and wortmannin and ATR inducible-expression cell lines were used to confirm specific pathway activation during viral infection. Our results show that ASFV specifically elicits ATR-mediated pathway activation from the early phase of infection with increased levels of H2AX, RPA32, p53, ATR and Chk1 phosphorylated forms. Viral p72 synthesis was abrogated by ATR kinase inhibitors and also in ATR-kd cells. Furthermore, a reduction of viral progeny was identified in these cells when compared to the outcome of infection in ATR-wt. Overall, our results strongly suggest that the ATR pathway plays an essential role for successful ASFV infection of host cells.

  7. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  8. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tangliang Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal and progenitor progenies (differentiation, which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  9. A dual role of Cdk2 in DNA damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaldis Philipp

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Once it was believed that Cdk2 was the master regulator of S phase entry. Gene knockout mouse studies of cell cycle regulators revealed that Cdk2 is dispensable for S phase initiation and progression whereby Cdk1 can compensate for the loss of Cdk2. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates that Cdk2 is involved in cell cycle independent functions such as DNA damage repair. Whether these properties are unique to Cdk2 or also being compensated by other Cdks in the absence of Cdk2 is under extensive investigation. Here we review the emerging new role of Cdk2 in DNA damage repair and also discuss how the loss of Cdk2 impacts the G1/S phase DNA damage checkpoint.

  10. A dual role of Cdk2 in DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Ande; Kaldis, Philipp

    2009-05-18

    Once it was believed that Cdk2 was the master regulator of S phase entry. Gene knockout mouse studies of cell cycle regulators revealed that Cdk2 is dispensable for S phase initiation and progression whereby Cdk1 can compensate for the loss of Cdk2. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates that Cdk2 is involved in cell cycle independent functions such as DNA damage repair. Whether these properties are unique to Cdk2 or also being compensated by other Cdks in the absence of Cdk2 is under extensive investigation. Here we review the emerging new role of Cdk2 in DNA damage repair and also discuss how the loss of Cdk2 impacts the G1/S phase DNA damage checkpoint.

  11. DNA-damage response associated with occupational exposure, age and chronic inflammation in workers in the automotive industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, Natalya V; Smal, Marharyta P; Kuzhir, Tatyana D; Ershova-Pavlova, Alla A; Goncharova, Roza I

    2012-10-09

    The evaluation of genome integrity in populations occupationally exposed to combine industrial factors is of medical importance. In the present study, the DNA-damage response was estimated by means of the alkaline comet assay in a sizeable cohort of volunteers recruited among workers in the automotive industry. For this purpose, freshly collected lymphocytes were treated with hydrogen peroxide (100μM, 1min, 4°C) in vitro, and the levels of basal and H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage, and the kinetics and efficiency of DNA repair were measured during a 180-min interval after exposure. The parameters studied in the total cohort of workers were in a range of values prescribed for healthy adult residents of Belarus. Based on the 95th percentiles, individuals possessing enhanced cellular sensitivity to DNA damage were present in different groups, but the frequency was significantly higher among elderly persons and among individuals with chronic inflammatory diseases. The results indicate that the inter-individual variations in DNA-damage response should be taken into account to estimate adequately the environmental genotoxic effects and to identify individuals with an enhanced DNA-damage response due to the influence of some external factors or intrinsic properties of the organism. Underling mechanisms need to be further explored.

  12. Uhrf2 is important for DNA damage response in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tao; Cui, Shijun; Bian, Chunjing; Yu, Xiaochun

    2013-11-08

    Emerging evidence shows that Uhrf1 plays an important role in DNA damage response for maintaining genomic stability. Interestingly, Uhrf1 has a paralog Uhrf2 in mammals. Uhrf1 and Uhrf2 share similar domain architectures. However, the role of Uhrf2 in DNA damage response has not been studied yet. During the analysis of the expression level of Uhrf2 in different tissues, we found that Uhrf2 is highly expressed in aorta and aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Thus, we studied the role of Uhrf2 in DNA damage response in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Using laser microirradiation, we found that like Uhrf1, Uhrf2 was recruited to the sites of DNA damage. We dissected the functional domains of Uhrf2 and found that the TTD, PHD and SRA domains are important for the relocation of Uhrf2 to the sites of DNA damage. Moreover, depletion of Uhrf2 suppressed DNA damage-induced H2AX phosphorylation and DNA damage repair. Taken together, our results demonstrate the function of Uhrf2 in DNA damage response.

  13. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Stephen P; Bartek, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    The prime objective for every life form is to deliver its genetic material, intact and unchanged, to the next generation. This must be achieved despite constant assaults by endogenous and environmental agents on the DNA. To counter this threat, life has evolved several systems to detect DNA damag...

  14. A Microscopic Study of the DNA Damage Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Dinant (Christoffel)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe integrity of the genome is continuously challenged by both endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. These damaging agents can induce a wide variety of lesions in the DNA, such as double strand breaks (DSB), single strand breaks (SSB), oxidative lesions and pyrimidine dimers. The

  15. ERK kinases modulate the activation of PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs) in DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Yan, Judy; Tang, Damu

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) is the critical surveillance mechanism in maintaining genome integrity. The mechanism activates checkpoints to prevent cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA lesions, and mediates lesion repair. DDR is coordinated by three apical PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs), including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-PKcs (the catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase). These kinases are activated in response to specific DNA damage or lesions, resulting in checkpoint activation and DNA lesion repair. While it is clear that the pathways of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK are the core components of DDR, there is accumulating evidence revealing the involvement of other cellular pathways in regulating DDR; this is in line with the concept that in addition to being a nuclear event DDR is also a cellular process. One of these pathways is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. ERK is a converging point of multiple signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adding to this list of pathways is the recent development of ERK in DDR. The ERK kinases (ERK1 and ERK2) contribute to the proper execution of DDR in terms of checkpoint activation and the repair of DNA lesions. This review summarizes the contributions of ERK to DDR with emphasis on the relationship of ERK kinases with the activation of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs.

  16. Microcephalin is a DNA damage response protein involved in regulation of CHK1 and BRCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xingzhi; Lee, Juhie; Stern, David F

    2004-08-13

    Microcephalin (MCPH1) is the first gene identified among at least six loci that contribute to the autosomal recessive disease, primary microcephaly. MCPH1, like NFBD1/MDC1, 53BP1, and BRCA1, encodes a protein with twin carboxyl-terminal BRCT domains (PTCB). Here, we report that Mcph1 forms ionizing radiation-induced foci. Down-regulation of Mcph1, like other PTCBs, by siRNA, impairs ionizing radiation-induced intra-S-phase and G(2)/M checkpoints. Inhibition of the expression of Mcph1 decreases both protein and transcript levels of endogenous Brca1 but not exogenous Brca1. Mcph1 inhibition also decreases both endogenous and heterologous Chk1 transcripts and protein. We conclude that Mcph1 is involved in DNA damage-induced cellular responses, and we propose that regulation of Brca1 and/or Chk1 by Mcph1 may contribute to these cellular responses.

  17. Site-specific DICER and DROSHA RNA products control the DNA-damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Sofia; Michelini, Flavia; Saxena, Alka; Tang, Dave; de Hoon, Michiel; Anelli, Viviana; Mione, Marina; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2012-08-09

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are involved in an increasingly recognized number of cellular events. Some ncRNAs are processed by DICER and DROSHA RNases to give rise to small double-stranded RNAs involved in RNA interference (RNAi). The DNA-damage response (DDR) is a signalling pathway that originates from a DNA lesion and arrests cell proliferation3. So far, DICER and DROSHA RNA products have not been reported to control DDR activation. Here we show, in human, mouse and zebrafish, that DICER and DROSHA, but not downstream elements of the RNAi pathway, are necessary to activate the DDR upon exogenous DNA damage and oncogene-induced genotoxic stress, as studied by DDR foci formation and by checkpoint assays. DDR foci are sensitive to RNase A treatment, and DICER- and DROSHA-dependent RNA products are required to restore DDR foci in RNase-A-treated cells. Through RNA deep sequencing and the study of DDR activation at a single inducible DNA double-strand break, we demonstrate that DDR foci formation requires site-specific DICER- and DROSHA-dependent small RNAs, named DDRNAs, which act in a MRE11–RAD50–NBS1-complex-dependent manner (MRE11 also known as MRE11A; NBS1 also known as NBN). DDRNAs, either chemically synthesized or in vitro generated by DICER cleavage, are sufficient to restore the DDR in RNase-A-treated cells, also in the absence of other cellular RNAs. Our results describe an unanticipated direct role of a novel class of ncRNAs in the control of DDR activation at sites of DNA damage.

  18. SIRT6 Depletion Suppresses Tumor Growth by Promoting Cellular Senescence Induced by DNA Damage in HCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namgyu; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kwon, Jung-Hee; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Sae Rom; Wang, Hee Jung; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2016-01-01

    The role of Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in liver cancer remains controversial. Thus, we identified the specific role of SIRT6 in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SIRT6 expression was significantly higher in HCC cell lines and HCC tissues from 138 patients than in an immortalized hepatocyte cell line, THLE-2 and non-tumor tissues, respectively. SIRT6 knockdown by shRNA suppressed the growth of HCC cells and inhibited HCC tumor growth in vivo. In addition, SIRT6 silencing significantly prevented the growth of HCC cell lines by inducing cellular senescence in the p16/Rb- and p53/p21-pathway independent manners. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of genes involved in nucleosome assembly was apparently altered in SIRT6-depleted Hep3B cells. SIRT6 knockdown promoted G2/M phase arrest and downregulation of genes encoding histone variants associated with nucleosome assembly, which could be attributed to DNA damage. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT6 acts as a tumor promoter by preventing DNA damage and cellular senescence, indicating that SIRT6 represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of HCC. PMID:27824900

  19. Nucleolar exit of RNF8 and BRCA1 in response to DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Mateo, Francesca; Franke, Kristin [Department of Cell Biology, Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB), CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, Helix Building, Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Huen, Michael S.Y. [Department of Anatomy, Centre for Cancer Research, The University of Hong Kong, L1, Laboratory Block, 21 Sassoon Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodriguez, Manuel S. [Proteomics Unit, CIC bioGUNE CIBERehd, ProteoRed, Technology Park of Bizkaia, Building 801A, 48160 Derio (Spain); Plans, Vanessa [Department of Cell Biology, Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB), CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, Helix Building, Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Thomson, Timothy M., E-mail: titbmc@ibmb.csic.es [Department of Cell Biology, Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB), CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, Helix Building, Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-11-01

    The induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) elicits a plethora of responses that redirect many cellular functions to the vital task of repairing the injury, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR). We have found that, in the absence of DNA damage, the DSB repair factors RNF8 and BRCA1 are associated with the nucleolus. Shortly after exposure of cells to {gamma}-radiation, RNF8 and BRCA1 translocated from the nucleolus to damage foci, a traffic that was reverted several hours after the damage. RNF8 interacted through its FHA domain with the ribosomal protein RPSA, and knockdown of RPSA caused a depletion of nucleolar RNF8 and BRCA1, suggesting that the interaction of RNF8 with RPSA is critical for the nucleolar localization of these DDR factors. Knockdown of RPSA or RNF8 impaired bulk protein translation, as did {gamma}-irradiation, the latter being partially countered by overexpression of exogenous RNF8. Our results suggest that RNF8 and BRCA1 are anchored to the nucleolus through reversible interactions with RPSA and that, in addition to its known functions in DDR, RNF8 may play a role in protein synthesis, possibly linking the nucleolar exit of this factor to the attenuation of protein synthesis in response to DNA damage. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNF8 and BRCA1 are associated with the nucleolus of undamaged cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon {gamma}-radiation, RNF8 and BRCA1 are translocated from the nucleolus to damage foci. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ribosomal protein RPSA anchors RNF8 to the nucleolus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNF8 may play previously unsuspected roles in protein synthesis.

  20. Estrogen signalling and the DNA damage response in hormone dependent breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Elizabeth Caldon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen is necessary for the normal growth and development of breast tissue, but high levels of estrogen are a major risk factor for breast cancer. One mechanism by which estrogen could contribute to breast cancer is via the induction of DNA damage. This perspective discusses the mechanisms by which estrogen alters the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair through the regulation of key effector proteins including ATM, ATR, CHK1, BRCA1 and p53 and the feedback on estrogen receptor signalling from these proteins. We put forward the hypothesis that estrogen receptor signalling converges to suppress effective DNA repair and apoptosis in favour of proliferation. This is important in hormone-dependent breast cancer as it will affect processing of estrogen-induced DNA damage, as well as other genotoxic insults. DDR and DNA repair proteins are frequently mutated or altered in estrogen responsive breast cancer which will further change the processing of DNA damage. Finally the action of estrogen signalling on DNA damage is also relevant to the therapeutic setting as the suppression of a DNA damage response by estrogen has the potential to alter the response of cancers to anti-hormone treatment or chemotherapy that induces DNA damage.

  1. The DNA damage checkpoint response to replication stress: A Game of Forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel eJossen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Conditions challenging replication fork progression, collectively referred to as replication stress, represent a major source of genomic instability and are associated to cancer onset. The replication checkpoint, a specialized branch of the DNA damage checkpoint, monitors fork problems and triggers a cellular response aimed at preserving genome integrity. Here, we review the mechanisms by which the replication checkpoint monitors and responds to replication stress, focusing on the checkpoint-mediated pathways contributing to protect replication fork integrity. We discuss how cells achieve checkpoint signaling inactivation once replication stress is overcome and how a failure to timely revert checkpoint-mediated changes in cellular physiology might impact on replication dynamics and genome integrity. We also highlight the checkpoint function as an anti-cancer barrier preventing cells malignant transformation following oncogene-induced replication stress.

  2. Increased oxidative stress in AOA3 cells disturbs ATM-dependent DNA damage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Junya; Saito, Yuichiro; Okui, Michiyo; Miwa, Noriko; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2015-04-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is caused by a mutation in the ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) gene; the condition is associated with hyper-radiosensitivity, abnormal cell-cycle checkpoints, and genomic instability. AT patients also show cerebellar ataxia, possibly due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) sensitivity in neural cells. The ATM protein is a key regulator of the DNA damage response. Recently, several AT-like disorders have been reported. The genes responsible for them are predicted to encode proteins that interact with ATM in the DNA-damage response. Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia types 1-3 (AOA1, 2, and 3) result in a neurodegenerative and cellular phenotype similar to AT; however, the basis of this phenotypic similarity is unclear. Here, we show that the cells of AOA3 patients display aberrant ATM-dependent phosphorylation and apoptosis following γ-irradiation. The ATM-dependent response to H2O2 treatment was abrogated in AOA3 cells. Furthermore, AOA3 cells had reduced ATM activity. Our results suggest that the attenuated ATM-related response is caused by an increase in endogenous ROS in AOA3 cells. Pretreatment of cells with pyocyanin, which induces endogenous ROS production, abolished the ATM-dependent response. Moreover, AOA3 cells had decreased homologous recombination (HR) activity, and pyocyanin pretreatment reduced HR activity in HeLa cells. These results indicate that excess endogenous ROS represses the ATM-dependent cellular response and HR repair in AOA3 cells. Since the ATM-dependent cell-cycle checkpoint is an important block to carcinogenesis, such inactivation of ATM may lead to tumorigenesis as well as neurodegeneration.

  3. Bmi1 regulates mitochondrial function and the DNA damage response pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Cao, Liu; Chen, Jichun; Song, Shiwei; Lee, In Hye; Quijano, Celia; Liu, Hongjun; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Chen, Haoqian; Cao, Long-Yue; Ahn, Bong-Hyun; Kumar, Neil G; Rovira, Ilsa I; Xu, Xiao-Ling; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Motoyama, Noboru; Deng, Chu-Xia; Finkel, Toren

    2009-05-21

    Mice deficient in the Polycomb repressor Bmi1 develop numerous abnormalities including a severe defect in stem cell self-renewal, alterations in thymocyte maturation and a shortened lifespan. Previous work has implicated de-repression of the Ink4a/Arf (also known as Cdkn2a) locus as mediating many of the aspects of the Bmi1(-/-) phenotype. Here we demonstrate that cells derived from Bmi1(-/-) mice also have impaired mitochondrial function, a marked increase in the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and subsequent engagement of the DNA damage response pathway. Furthermore, many of the deficiencies normally observed in Bmi1(-/-) mice improve after either pharmacological treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or genetic disruption of the DNA damage response pathway by Chk2 (also known as Chek2) deletion. These results demonstrate that Bmi1 has an unexpected role in maintaining mitochondrial function and redox homeostasis and indicate that the Polycomb family of proteins can coordinately regulate cellular metabolism with stem and progenitor cell function.

  4. Studies on DNA Damage Response in Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Wenyuan

    global reactions known as DNA damage response (DDR). In Bacteria and Eukaryotes, the global reactions include a series of transcription regulations and protein post-translation modifications, which can activate DNA repair machineries, suppress cell division and delay DNA replication, and induce...... scattered light, damaged cell membrane and electron-dense area. During NQO and MMS treatment, degradation of chromatin proteins was coincided with DNA-less cell formation, suggesting their roles in protecting genomic DNA from massive degradation. Further, HU inhibited NQO-induced DSB formation and DNA...... damage response, suggesting the crucial roles of DSB in triggering DNA damage response. Then, NQO-induced DNA-less formation was impaired in the culture with retarded cell cycle, suggesting that DNA replication played an important role in DNA damage response in Sulfolobus. We also investigated the roles...

  5. HAUSP-nucleolin interaction is regulated by p53-Mdm2 complex in response to DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Key-Hwan; Park, Jang-Joon; Gu, Bon-Hee; Kim, Jin-Ock; Park, Sang Gyu; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2015-08-04

    HAUSP (herpes virus-associated ubiquitin specific protease, known as ubiquitin specific protease 7), one of DUBs, regulates the dynamics of the p53 and Mdm2 network in response to DNA damage by deubiquitinating both p53 and its E3 ubiquitin ligase, Mdm2. Its concerted action increases the level of functional p53 by preventing proteasome-dependent degradation of p53. However, the protein substrates that are targeted by HAUSP to mediate DNA damage responses in the context of the HAUSP-p53-Mdm2 complex are not fully identified. Here, we identified nucleolin as a new substrate for HAUSP by proteomic analysis. Nucleolin has two HAUSP binding sites in its N- and C-terminal regions, and the mutation of HAUSP interacting peptides on nucleolin disrupts their interaction and it leads to the increased level of nucleolin ubiquitination. In addition, HAUSP regulates the stability of nucleolin by removing ubiquitin from nucleolin. Nucleolin exists as a component of the HAUSP-p53-Mdm2 complex, and both Mdm2 and p53 are required for the interaction between HAUSP and nucleolin. Importantly, the irradiation increases the HAUSP-nucleolin interaction, leading to nucleolin stabilization significantly. Taken together, this study reveals a new component of the HAUSP-p53-Mdm2 complex that governs dynamic cellular responses to DNA damage.

  6. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B. [Drug Sciences Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G. [Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P. [National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN-LNS), Catania (Italy); Manti, L. [Physics Science Department, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, and National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), Naples (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  7. Sex chromosome inactivation in germ cells: emerging roles of DNA damage response pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Ichijima, Yosuke; Sin, Ho-Su; Satoshi H Namekawa

    2012-01-01

    Sex chromosome inactivation in male germ cells is a paradigm of epigenetic programming during sexual reproduction. Recent progress has revealed the underlying mechanisms of sex chromosome inactivation in male meiosis. The trigger of chromosome-wide silencing is activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, which is centered on the mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), a binding partner of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX). This DDR pathway shares features with the somatic DDR p...

  8. DNA damage responses: mechanisms and roles in human disease: 2007 G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastan, Michael B

    2008-04-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in elucidating the molecular controls of cellular responses to DNA damage in mammalian cells. Much of our understanding of the mechanisms involved in cellular DNA damage response pathways has come from studies of human cancer susceptibility syndromes that are altered in DNA damage responses. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the gene mutated in the disorder ataxia-telangiectasia, codes for a protein kinase that is a central mediator of responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Once activated, ATM phosphorylates numerous substrates in the cell that modulate the response of the cell to the DNA damage. We recently developed a novel system to create DNA DSBs at defined endogenous sites in the human genome and used this system to detect protein recruitment and loss at and around these breaks by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Results from this system showed the functional importance of ATM kinase activity and phosphorylation in the response to DSBs and supported a model in which ordered chromatin structure changes that occur after DNA breakage and that depend on functional NBS1 and ATM facilitate DNA DSB repair. Insights about these pathways provide us with opportunities to develop new approaches to benefit patients. Examples and opportunities for developing inhibitors that act as sensitizers to chemotherapy or radiation therapy or activators that could improve responses to cellular stresses, such as oxidative damage, are discussed. Relevant to the latter, we have shown benefits of an ATM activator in disease settings ranging from metabolic syndrome to cancer prevention.

  9. The AID-induced DNA damage response in chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Nussenzweig, André

    2013-01-01

    with somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, chromatin must be made accessible for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated deamination of cytosines in DNA. These lesions are recognized and removed by various DNA repair pathways but, if not handled properly, can lead to formation......Chemical modifications to the DNA and histone protein components of chromatin can modulate gene expression and genome stability. Understanding the physiological impact of changes in chromatin structure remains an important question in biology. As one example, in order to generate antibody diversity...... of oncogenic chromosomal translocations. In this review, we focus the discussion on how chromatin-modifying activities and -binding proteins contribute to the native chromatin environment in which AID-induced DNA damage is targeted and repaired. Outstanding questions remain regarding the direct roles...

  10. Squalene Inhibits ATM-Dependent Signaling in γIR-Induced DNA Damage Response through Induction of Wip1 Phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatewaki, Naoto; Konishi, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yuki; Nishida, Miyako; Saito, Masafumi; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Sakamaki, Toshiyuki; Ikekawa, Nobuo; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase plays a crucial role as a master controller in the cellular DNA damage response. Inhibition of ATM leads to inhibition of the checkpoint signaling pathway. Hence, addition of checkpoint inhibitors to anticancer therapies may be an effective targeting strategy. A recent study reported that Wip1, a protein phosphatase, de-phosphorylates serine 1981 of ATM during the DNA damage response. Squalene has been proposed to complement anticancer therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy; however, there is little mechanistic information supporting this idea. Here, we report the inhibitory effect of squalene on ATM-dependent DNA damage signals. Squalene itself did not affect cell viability and the cell cycle of A549 cells, but it enhanced the cytotoxicity of gamma-irradiation (γIR). The in vitro kinase activity of ATM was not altered by squalene. However, squalene increased Wip1 expression in cells and suppressed ATM activation in γIR-treated cells. Consistent with the potential inhibition of ATM by squalene, IR-induced phosphorylation of ATM effectors such as p53 (Ser15) and Chk1 (Ser317) was inhibited by cell treatment with squalene. Thus, squalene inhibits the ATM-dependent signaling pathway following DNA damage through intracellular induction of Wip1 expression.

  11. Acute MUS81 depletion leads to replication fork slowing and a constitutive DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Meichun; Wang, Xiaohui; Palmai-Pallag, Timea;

    2015-01-01

    The MUS81 protein belongs to a conserved family of DNA structure-specific nucleases that play important roles in DNA replication and repair. Inactivation of the Mus81 gene in mice has no major deleterious consequences for embryonic development, although cancer susceptibility has been reported. We...... have investigated the role of MUS81 in human cells by acutely depleting the protein using shRNAs. We found that MUS81 depletion from human fibroblasts leads to accumulation of ssDNA and a constitutive DNA damage response that ultimately activates cellular senescence. Moreover, we show that MUS81...... is required for efficient replication fork progression during an unperturbed S-phase, and for recovery of productive replication following replication stalling. These results demonstrate essential roles for the MUS81 nuclease in maintenance of replication fork integrity....

  12. Response to DNA damage: why do we need to focus on protein phosphatases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midori eShimada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells are continuously threatened by unavoidable errors during normal DNA replication or various sources of genotoxic stresses that cause DNA damage or stalled replication. To maintain genomic integrity, cells have developed a coordinated signaling network, known as the DNA damage response (DDR. Following DNA damage, sensor molecules detect the presence of DNA damage and transmit signals to downstream transducer molecules. This in turn conveys the signals to numerous effectors, which initiate a large number of specific biological responses, including transient cell cycle arrest mediated by checkpoints, DNA repair, and apoptosis. It is recently becoming clear that dephosphorylation events are involved in keeping DDR factors inactive during normal cell growth. Moreover, dephosphorylation is required to shut off checkpoint arrest following DNA damage and has been implicated in the activation of the DDR. Spatial and temporal regulation of phosphorylation events is essential for the DDR, and fine-tuning of phosphorylation is partly mediated by protein phosphatases. While the role of kinases in the DDR has been well documented, the complex roles of protein dephosphorylation have only recently begun to be investigated. Therefore, it is important to focus on the role of phosphatases and to determine how their activity is regulated upon DNA damage. In this work, we summarize current knowledge on the involvement of serine/threonine phosphatases, especially the protein phosphatase 1, protein phosphatase 2A, and protein phosphatase Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent families, in the DDR.

  13. LEM-3 - A LEM domain containing nuclease involved in the DNA damage response in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Dittrich

    Full Text Available The small nematode Caenorhabditis elegans displays a spectrum of DNA damage responses similar to humans. In order to identify new DNA damage response genes, we isolated in a forward genetic screen 14 new mutations conferring hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. We present here our characterization of lem-3, one of the genes identified in this screen. LEM-3 contains a LEM domain and a GIY nuclease domain. We confirm that LEM-3 has DNase activity in vitro. lem-3(lf mutants are hypersensitive to various types of DNA damage, including ionizing radiation, UV-C light and crosslinking agents. Embryos from irradiated lem-3 hermaphrodites displayed severe defects during cell division, including chromosome mis-segregation and anaphase bridges. The mitotic defects observed in irradiated lem-3 mutant embryos are similar to those found in baf-1 (barrier-to-autointegration factor mutants. The baf-1 gene codes for an essential and highly conserved protein known to interact with the other two C. elegans LEM domain proteins, LEM-2 and EMR-1. We show that baf-1, lem-2, and emr-1 mutants are also hypersensitive to DNA damage and that loss of lem-3 sensitizes baf-1 mutants even in the absence of DNA damage. Our data suggest that BAF-1, together with the LEM domain proteins, plays an important role following DNA damage - possibly by promoting the reorganization of damaged chromatin.

  14. Trypanosomal histone γH2A and the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Lucy; Horn, David

    2012-05-01

    DNA damage and repair in trypanosomatids impacts virulence, drug resistance and antigenic variation but, currently, little is known about DNA damage responses or cell cycle checkpoints in these divergent protozoa. One of the earliest markers of DNA damage in eukaryotes is γH2A(X), a serine phosphorylated histone H2A (variant). Here, we report the identification and initial characterization of γH2A in Trypanosoma brucei. We identified Thr(130) within the replication-dependent histone H2A as a candidate phosphorylation site and found that the abundance of this trypanosomal γH2A increased in vivo in response to DNA damage. Nuclear γH2A foci mark the sites of putative natural replication fork stalling, sites of meganuclease-induced DNA double strand breaks and sites of methyl methanesulphonate-induced DNA damage. Naturally occurring and meganuclease-induced γH2A and RAD51 double-positive repair foci are typically found in S-phase or G(2) nuclei. The results link trypanosomal γH2A, with an unusual histone modification motif, to DNA damage sensing and mitotic checkpoint signaling.

  15. Smoking-promoted oxidative DNA damage response is highly correlated to lung carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chao; Lai, Tianwen; Li, Miao; Zhou, Hongbin; Lv, Dan; Deng, Zaichun; Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao

    2016-04-05

    Oxidative stress induced by tobacco smoking is one of the main causes of DNA damage and is known to be involved in various cancers. Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, while the role of cigarette smoke-induced oxidative DNA damage response during lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated oxidative DNA damage response levels in smoking and nonsmoking patients with lung cancer, and evaluated the potential diagnostic value of 8-OHdG for lung cancer. We observed a higher level of 8-OHdG expression and secretion in airways of lung cancer patients than that of noncancer controls. 8-OHdG expression was associated with the TNM stages. Additionally, cigarette smoke-induced oxidative DNA damage response was observed in bronchial epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. A statistical significance correlation was found between the levels of 8-OHdG and smoking index. With a cut-off value of 2.86 ng/ml, 8-OHdG showed a sensitivity and specificity of 70.0% and 73.7%, respectively, to identify a patient with lung cancer. These findings not only underscore the importance of smoking in oxidative DNA damage response of lung cancer patients, but also suggest 8-OHdG as a potential diagnostic biomarker for lung cancer.

  16. Baculoviruses modulate a proapoptotic DNA damage response to promote virus multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan K; Friesen, Paul D

    2012-12-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) initiates apoptosis in diverse insects through events triggered by virus DNA (vDNA) replication. To define the proapoptotic pathway and its role in antivirus defense, we investigated the link between the host's DNA damage response (DDR) and apoptosis. We report here that AcMNPV elicits a DDR in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. Replication of vDNA activated DDR kinases, as evidenced by ATM-driven phosphorylation of the Drosophila histone H2AX homolog (H2Av), a critical regulator of the DDR. Ablation or inhibition of ATM repressed H2Av phosphorylation and blocked virus-induced apoptosis. The DDR kinase inhibitors caffeine and KU55933 also prevented virus-induced apoptosis in cells derived from the permissive AcMNPV host, Spodoptera frugiperda. This block occurred at a step upstream of virus-mediated depletion of the cellular inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein, an event that initiates apoptosis in Spodoptera and Drosophila. Thus, the DDR is a conserved, proapoptotic response to baculovirus infection. DDR inhibition also repressed vDNA replication and reduced virus yields 100,000-fold, demonstrating that the DDR contributes to virus production, despite its recognized antivirus role. In contrast to virus-induced phosphorylation of Drosophila H2Av, AcMNPV blocked phosphorylation of the Spodoptera H2AX homolog (SfH2AX). Remarkably, AcMNPV also suppressed SfH2AX phosphorylation following pharmacologically induced DNA damage. These findings indicate that AcMNPV alters canonical DDR signaling in permissive cells. We conclude that AcMNPV triggers a proapoptotic DDR that is subsequently modified, presumably to stimulate vDNA replication. Thus, manipulation of the DDR to facilitate multiplication is an evolutionarily conserved strategy among DNA viruses of insects and mammals.

  17. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lans Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways.

  18. Chronic inflammation-related DNA damage response: a driving force of gastric cardia carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Runhua; Xiao, Dejun; Guo, Yi; Tian, Dongping; Yun, Hailong; Chen, Donglin; Su, Min

    2015-02-20

    Gastric cardia cancer (GCC) is a highly aggressive disease associated with chronic inflammation. To investigate the relationship between DNA damage response (DDR) and chronic inflammation, we collected 100 non-tumor gastric cardia specimens of Chaoshan littoral, a high-risk region for esophageal and gastric cardia cancer. A significantly higher proportion of severe chronic inflammation was found in dysplastic epithelia (80.9%) in comparison with that in non-dysplastic tissues (40.7%) (Pchronic inflammation degrees from normal to severe inflammation (Pchronic inflammation-related DNA damage response may be a driving force of gastric cardia carcinogenesis. Based on these findings, DNA damage response in non-malignant tissues may become a promising biomedical marker for predicting malignant transformation in the gastric cardia.

  19. Typical Cell Signaling Response to Ionizing Radiation:DNA Damage and Extranuclear Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Yu

    2012-01-01

    To treat many types of cancer,ionizing radiation (IR) is primarily used as external-beam radiotherapy,brachytherapy,and targeted radionuclide therapy.Exposure of tumor cells to IR can induce DNA damage as well as generation of reactiveoxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) which can cause non-DNA lesions or extracellular damage like lipid perioxidation.The initial radiation-induced cell responses to DNA damage and ROS like the proteolytic processing,as well as synthesis and releasing ligands (such as growth factors,cytokines,and hormone) can cause the delayed secondary responses in irradiated and unirradiated bystander cells through paracrine and autocrine pathways.

  20. DNA-damage response control of E2F7 and E2F8

    OpenAIRE

    Panagiotis Zalmas, L.; Zhao, Xiujie; Graham, Anne L; FISHER Rebecca; Reilly, Carmel; Coutts, Amanda S; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2008-01-01

    Here, we report that the two recently identified E2F subunits, E2F7 and E2F8, are induced in cells treated with DNA-damaging agents where they have an important role in dictating the outcome of the DNA-damage response. The DNA-damage-dependent induction coincides with the binding of E2F7 and E2F8 to the promoters of certain E2F-responsive genes, most notably that of the E2F1 gene, in which E2F7 and E2F8 coexist in a DNA-binding complex. As a consequence, E2F7 and E2F8 repress E2F target genes...

  1. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantuma, Nico P; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process.

  2. Alcohol metabolism in human cells causes DNA damage and activates the Fanconi anemia – breast cancer susceptibility (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jessy; Balbo, Silvia; Crabb, David; Brooks, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background We recently reported that exposure of human cells in vitro to acetaldehyde resulted in activation of the Fanconi anemia-breast cancer associated (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network. Methods To determine whether intracellular generation of acetaldehyde from ethanol metabolism can cause DNA damage and activate the FA-BRCA network, we engineered HeLa cells to metabolize alcohol by expression of human alcohol dehydrogenase 1B. Results Incubation of HeLa-ADH1B cells with ethanol (20 mM) resulted in acetaldehyde accumulation in the media which was prevented by co-incubation with 4-methyl pyrazole (4-MP), a specific inhibitor of ADH. Ethanol treatment of HeLa-ADH1B cells produced a 4-fold increase in the acetaldehyde-DNA adduct, N2-ethylidene-dGuo, and also resulted in activation of the Fanconi anemia -breast cancer susceptibility (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network, as indicated by a monoubiquitination of FANCD2, and phosphorylation of BRCA1. Ser 1524 was identified as one site of BRCA1 phosphorylation. The increased levels of DNA adducts, FANCD2 monoubiquitination, and BRCA1 phosphorylation were all blocked by 4-MP, indicating that acetaldehyde, rather than ethanol itself, was responsible for all three responses. Importantly, the ethanol concentration we used is within the range that can be attained in the human body during social drinking. Conclusions Our results indicate that intracellular metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde results in DNA damage which activates the FA-BRCA DNA damage response network. PMID:21919919

  3. To spread or not to spread - chromatin modifications in response to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, M.; Lukas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin modifications in response to DNA damage are vital for genome integrity. Multiple proteins and pathways required to generate specialized chromatin domains around DNA lesions have been identified and the increasing amount of information calls for unifying concepts that would allow us...... to grasp the ever-increasing complexity. This review aims at contributing to this trend by focusing on feed-forward and feedback mechanisms, which in mammalian cells determine the extent of chromatin modifications after DNA damage. We highlight the emerging notion that the nodal points of these highly...

  4. RNF111/Arkadia is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sara L; Hansen, Rebecca K; Wagner, Sebastian A

    2013-01-01

    )-induced SUMOylation and ubiquitylation. Moreover, we show that RNF111 facilitated NER by regulating the recruitment of XPC to UV-damaged DNA. Our findings establish RNF111 as a new STUbL that directly links nonproteolytic ubiquitylation and SUMOylation in the DNA damage response....... nonproteolytic, K63-linked ubiquitylation of SUMOylated target proteins. We demonstrate that RNF111 promoted ubiquitylation of SUMOylated XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum C) protein, a central DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair (NER) extensively regulated by ultraviolet (UV...

  5. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A;

    2014-01-01

    recruitment of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein 1 (NBS1), a central regulator of DNA damage responses, into the nucleoli. We further identify TCOF1 (also known as Treacle), a nucleolar factor implicated in ribosome biogenesis and mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome, as an interaction partner of NBS1...

  6. Polycomb protein EZH2 regulates cancer cell fate decision in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z; Lee, S T; Qiao, Y; Li, Z; Lee, P L; Lee, Y J; Jiang, X; Tan, J; Aau, M; Lim, C Z H; Yu, Q

    2011-11-01

    Polycomb protein histone methyltransferase enhancer of Zeste homologe 2 (EZH2) is frequently overexpressed in human malignancy and is implicated in cancer cell proliferation and invasion. However, it is largely unknown whether EZH2 has a role in modulating DNA damage response. Here, we show that EZH2 is an important determinant of cell fate decision in response to genotoxic stress. EZH2 depletion results in abrogation of both cell cycle G1 and G2/M checkpoints, directing DNA damage response toward predominant apoptosis in both p53-proficient and p53-deficient cancer cells, but not in normal cells. Mechanistically, EZH2 regulates DNA damage response in p53 wild-type cells mainly through transcriptional repression of FBXO32, which binds to and directs p21 for proteasome-mediated degradation, whereas it affects p53-deficient cells through regulating Chk1 activation by a distinct mechanism. Furthermore, pharmacological depletion of EZH2 phenocopies the effects of EZH2 knockdown on cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis. These data unravel a crucial role of EZH2 in determining the cancer cell outcome following DNA damage and suggest that therapeutic targeting oncogenic EZH2 might serve as a strategy for improving conventional chemotherapy in a given malignancy.

  7. MutS homologue hMSH5: role in cisplatin-induced DNA damage response

    OpenAIRE

    Tompkins Joshua D; Wu Xiling; Her Chengtao

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II), CDDP) and its analogues constitute an important class of anticancer drugs in the treatment of various malignancies; however, its effectiveness is frequently affected by mutations in genes involved in the repair and signaling of cisplatin-induced DNA damage. These observations necessitate a need for a better understanding of the molecular events governing cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Results Here, we show that hMSH5 mediat...

  8. Bacterial Genotoxins: Merging the DNA Damage Response into Infection Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Grasso

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial genotoxins are unique among bacterial toxins as their molecular target is DNA. The consequence of intoxication or infection is induction of DNA breaks that, if not properly repaired, results in irreversible cell cycle arrest (senescence or death of the target cells. At present, only three bacterial genotoxins have been identified. Two are protein toxins: the cytolethal distending toxin (CDT family produced by a number of Gram-negative bacteria and the typhoid toxin produced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. The third member, colibactin, is a peptide-polyketide genotoxin, produced by strains belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 of Escherichia coli. This review will present the cellular effects of acute and chronic intoxication or infection with the genotoxins-producing bacteria. The carcinogenic properties and the role of these effectors in the context of the host-microbe interaction will be discussed. We will further highlight the open questions that remain to be solved regarding the biology of this unusual family of bacterial toxins.

  9. The DNA damage response molecule MCPH1 in brain development and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqian Liu; Zhong-Wei Zhou; Zhao-Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Microcephalin (MCPH1) is identified as being responsible for the neurodevelopmental disorder primary microcephaly type 1,which is characterized by a smaller-than-normal brain size and mental retardation.MCPH1 has originally been identified as an important regulator of telomere integrity and of cell cycle control.Genetic and cellular studies show that MCPH1 controls neurogenesis by coordinating the cell cycle and the centrosome cycle and thereby regulating the division mode of neuroprogenitors to prevent the exhaustion of the progenitor pool and thereby microcephaly.In addition to its role in neurogenesis,MCPH1 plays a role in gonad development.MCPH1 also functions as a tumor suppressor in several human cancers as well as in mouse models.Here,we review the role of MCPH1 in DNA damage response,cell cycle control,chromosome condensation and chromatin remodeling.We also summarize the studies on the biological functions of MCPH1 in brain size determination and in pathologies,including infertility and cancer.

  10. Actin polymerization negatively regulates p53 function by impairing its nuclear import in response to DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available Actin, one of the most evolutionarily conservative proteins in eukaryotes, is distributed both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus, and its dynamics plays important roles in numerous cellular processes. Previous evidence has shown that actin interacts with p53 and this interaction increases in the process of p53 responding to DNA damage, but the physiological significance of their interaction remains elusive. Here, we show that DNA damage induces both actin polymerization and p53 accumulation. To further understand the implication of actin polymerization in p53 function, cells were treated with actin aggregation agent. We find that the protein level of p53 decrease. The change in p53 is a consequence of the polymeric actin anchoring p53 in the cytoplasm, thus impairing p53 nuclear import. Analysis of phosphorylation and ubiquitination of p53 reveals that actin polymerization promotes the p53 phosphorylation at Ser315 and reduces the stabilization of p53 by recruiting Aurora kinase A. Taken together, our results suggest that the actin polymerization serves as a negative modulator leading to the impairment of nuclear import and destabilization of p53. On the basis of our results, we propose that actin polymerization might be a factor participating in the process of orchestrating p53 function in response to DNA damage.

  11. Controlling the response to DNA damage by the APC/C-Cdh1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, H Rudolf; Guerrero Llobet, S; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-03-01

    Proper cell cycle progression is safeguarded by the oscillating activities of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complexes. An important player in the regulation of mitotic cyclins is the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase. Prior to entry into mitosis, the APC/C remains inactive, which allows the accumulation of mitotic regulators. APC/C activation requires binding to either the Cdc20 or Cdh1 adaptor protein, which sequentially bind the APC/C and facilitate targeting of multiple mitotic regulators for proteasomal destruction, including Securin and Cyclin B, to ensure proper chromosome segregation and mitotic exit. Emerging data have indicated that the APC/C, particularly in association with Cdh1, also functions prior to mitotic entry. Specifically, the APC/C-Cdh1 is activated in response to DNA damage in G2 phase cells. These observations are in line with in vitro and in vivo genetic studies, in which cells lacking Cdh1 expression display various defects, including impaired DNA repair and aberrant cell cycle checkpoints. In this review, we summarize the current literature on APC/C regulation in response to DNA damage, the functions of APC/C-Cdh1 activation upon DNA damage, and speculate how APC/C-Cdh1 can control cell fate in the context of persistent DNA damage.

  12. A novel role of the chromokinesin Kif4A in DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guikai; Zhou, Longen; Khidr, Lily; Guo, Xuning Emily; Kim, Wankee; Lee, Young Mi; Krasieva, Tatiana; Chen, Phang-Lang

    2008-07-01

    Chromokinesins are microtubule-motor molecules that possess chromatin binding activity and are important for mitotic and meiotic regulation. The chromokinesin-member Kif4A is unique in that it localizes to nucleus during interphase of the cell cycle. Kif4 deletion by gene targeting in mouse embryonic cells was known to associate with DNA damage response. However, its precise role in DNA damage or repair pathway is not clear. Here we report that Kif4A associates with BRCA2 in a biochemical identification and that the interaction is mediated by the Kif4A C-terminal cargo-binding domain and BRCA2 C-terminal conserved region. Upon nucleus-specific laser micro-irradiation, Kif4A was rapidly recruited to sites of DNA damage. Significantly, the depletion of Kif4A from cells by shRNA impaired the ionizing-radiation induced foci (IRIF) formation of Rad51, both quantitatively and qualitatively. In contrast, the IRIF of gamma-H2AX or NBS1 was largely intact. Moreover, Kif4A knockdown rendered cells hypersensitive to ionizing radiation in a colonogenic survival assay. We further demonstrated that Kif4A deficiency led to significantly decreased homologous recombination in an I-SceI endonuclease induced in vivo recombination assay. Together, our results suggest a novel role for a chromokinesin family member in the DNA damage response by modulating the BRCA2/Rad51 pathway.

  13. SOG1: a master regulator of the DNA damage response in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiyama, Kaoru Okamoto

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a critical mechanism to maintain the genome stability of an organism upon exposure to endogenous and exogenous DNA-damaging factors. The DDR system is particularly important for plants as these organisms, owing to their intrinsic immobility, are inevitably exposed to environmental stress factors, some of which induce DNA damage. Arabidopsis thaliana has orthologs of several DDR factors that are present in animals; however, some of the important animal regulators, such as the tumor suppressor p53 and the DDR kinases CHK1 and CHK2, have not been found in plants. These observations imply a unique DDR system in plants. The present review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the DDR in A. thaliana and, in particular, on the function and role of SUPPRESSOR OF GAMMA RESPONSE 1 (SOG1), a plant-specific transcription factor that regulates the DDR. The most obvious response to DNA damage in A. thaliana is a rapid and robust change in the transcriptional regulation of numerous genes, in which SOG1 is an essential regulatory factor. Mutation of SOG1 causes various defects in the activation of cell cycle arrest, programmed cell death, and endoreduplication in response to DNA damage. These observations indicate that SOG1 is a master regulator of the DDR. Phylogenetic analyses of SOG1 reveal that orthologs of this crucial transcription factor are present not only in angiosperms but also in gymnosperms, suggesting that the SOG1 system is conserved across spermatophytes. Finally, future prospects for SOG1 research are also discussed.

  14. Cellular target of UVB-induced DNA damage resulting in local suppression of contact hypersensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, A.A.; Shreedhar, V.; Roza, L.; Krutmann, J.; Kripke, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental data are reviewed that lend support to the hypothesis that formation of DNA damage is the initiation event of local suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiaton and that the antigen-presenting cell (APC) is an important traget for this DNA da

  15. Choreography of recombination proteins during the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2009-09-02

    Genome integrity is frequently challenged by DNA lesions from both endogenous and exogenous sources. A single DNA double-strand break (DSB) is lethal if unrepaired and may lead to loss of heterozygosity, mutations, deletions, genomic rearrangements and chromosome loss if repaired improperly. Such genetic alterations are the main causes of cancer and other genetic diseases. Consequently, DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) is an important process in all living organisms. DSBR is also the driving mechanism in most strategies of gene targeting, which has applications in both genetic and clinical research. Here we review the cell biological response to DSBs in mitotically growing cells with an emphasis on homologous recombination pathways in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in mammalian cells.

  16. Choreography of recombination proteins during the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2009-01-01

    Genome integrity is frequently challenged by DNA lesions from both endogenous and exogenous sources. A single DNA double-strand break (DSB) is lethal if unrepaired and may lead to loss of heterozygosity, mutations, deletions, genomic rearrangements and chromosome loss if repaired improperly....... Such genetic alterations are the main causes of cancer and other genetic diseases. Consequently, DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) is an important process in all living organisms. DSBR is also the driving mechanism in most strategies of gene targeting, which has applications in both genetic and clinical...... research. Here we review the cell biological response to DSBs in mitotically growing cells with an emphasis on homologous recombination pathways in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in mammalian cells....

  17. H2AX Phosphorylation: Its Role in DNA Damage Response and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Podhorecka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Double-strand breaks (DSBs are the most deleterious DNA lesions, which, if left unrepaired, may have severe consequences for cell survival, as they lead to chromosome aberrations, genomic instability, or cell death. Various physical, chemical, and biological factors are involved in DSB induction. Cells respond to DNA damage by activating the so-called DNA damage response (DDR, a complex molecular mechanism developed to detect and repair DNA damage. The formation of DSBs triggers activation of many factors, including phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX, producing γH2AX. Phosphorylation of H2AX plays a key role in DDR and is required for the assembly of DNA repair proteins at the sites containing damaged chromatin as well as for activation of checkpoints proteins which arrest the cell cycle progression. In general, analysis of γH2AX expression can be used to detect the genotoxic effect of different toxic substances. When applied to clinical samples from cancer patients, evaluation of γH2AX levels may allow not only to monitor the efficiency of anticancer treatment but also to predict of tumor cell sensitivity to DNA damaging anticancer agents and toxicity of anticancer treatment toward normal cells.

  18. Potentiation of tumor responses to DNA damaging therapy by the selective ATR inhibitor VX-970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Amy B; Newsome, Dave; Wang, Yuxin; Boucher, Diane M; Eustace, Brenda; Gu, Yong; Hare, Brian; Johnson, Mac A; Milton, Sean; Murphy, Cheryl E; Takemoto, Darin; Tolman, Crystal; Wood, Mark; Charlton, Peter; Charrier, Jean-Damien; Furey, Brinley; Golec, Julian; Reaper, Philip M; Pollard, John R

    2014-07-30

    Platinum-based DNA-damaging chemotherapy is standard-of-care for most patients with lung cancer but outcomes remain poor. This has been attributed, in part, to the highly effective repair network known as the DNA-damage response (DDR). ATR kinase is a critical regulator of this pathway, and its inhibition has been shown to sensitize some cancer, but not normal, cells in vitro to DNA damaging agents. However, there are limited in vivo proof-of-concept data for ATR inhibition. To address this we profiled VX-970, the first clinical ATR inhibitor, in a series of in vitro and in vivo lung cancer models and compared it with an inhibitor of the downstream kinase Chk1. VX-970 markedly sensitized a large proportion of a lung cancer cell line and primary tumor panel in vitro to multiple DNA damaging drugs with clear differences to Chk1 inhibition observed. In vivo VX-970 blocked ATR activity in tumors and dramatically enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin across a panel of patient derived primary lung xenografts. The combination led to complete tumor growth inhibition in three cisplatin-insensitive models and durable tumor regression in a cisplatin-sensitive model. These data provide a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of VX-970 in lung cancer patients.

  19. Characterisation of the histone methyltransferase SET8 in cell cycle progression and the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine

    2008-01-01

    component of the replication fork, further supporting the involvement of SET8 in replication, suggesting that SET8 may be required to support replication fork progression. Finally, we showed that SET8 was rapidly degraded by DNA damage such as UV and ionizing radiation (IR), which was accompanied...... by a decrease in H4K20me1. The removal of SET8 could be rescued by addition of a proteasomal inhibitor. Combined with data showing in vivo ubiquitylation of SET8, we suggest that the degradation of SET8 is mediated via the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway. Collectively, these data suggest that SET8, during normal...... cellular homeostasis, has a role in supporting the chromatin structure to facilitate DNA replication. However, when cells are challenged by DNA damage efficient repair may be dependent on rapid degradation of SET8 and a reduction of the monomethyl mark on histone H4 lysine 20....

  20. A novel NGR-conjugated peptide targets DNA damage responses for radiosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinlu; Zhang, Dan; Ying, Xia; Zhao, Ying; He, Chenchen; Zhu, Qing; Han, Suxia

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the important treatment strategies for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinomas. Developing novel sensitizers for radiotherapy is a key issue due to the low intrinsic radiosensitivity of hepatocellular carcinomas. It was reported the wild-type NBS1 inhibitory peptide (wtNIP) can increase radiosensitivity in several cancer cell lines by abrogating ATM-NBS1 interaction and interrupting cellular DNA damage response. Here, we developed a novel NGRconjugated peptide (NGR-sR9-wtNIP) through coupling the CNGRC angiogenic vessel-homing peptide NGR with the wtNIP peptide. Fusion peptide was tested for internalization, cytotoxicity in Hep3B cells and for tumor localization, and for toxicity in nude mice bearing human hepatocellular carcinomas xenografts. The radiosensitizing activity of NGR-sR9-wtNIP was investigated as well. We found that NGR-sR9-wtNIP can inhibit irradiation induced NBS1 phosphorylation and induce radiosensitization in Hep3B cells. When combined with IR, NGR-sR9-wtNIP suppressed tumor growth obviously in xenograft mice. In addition, the fusion peptide localized in tumor tissue specifically and barely led to any side effects on mice. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that NGRsR9- wtNIP has radiosensitizing potential for radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinomas.

  1. Anthracyclines Induce DNA Damage Response-Mediated Protection against Severe Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Nuno; Chora, Angelo; Raquel, Helena; Pejanovic, Nadja; Pereira, Pedro; Hartleben, Björn; Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Catarina; Pedroso, Dora; Pinto, Andreia; Marques, Sofia; Faridi, Hafeez; Costa, Paulo; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Zhao, Jimmy L.; Soares, Miguel P.; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Qingshuo; Döring, Gerd; Grompe, Markus; Simas, J. Pedro; Huber, Tobias B.; Baltimore, David; Gupta, Vineet; Green, Douglas R.; Ferreira, João A.; Moita, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Severe sepsis remains a poorly understood systemic inflammatory condition with high mortality rates and limited therapeutic options in addition to organ support measures. Here we show that the clinically approved group of anthracyclines acts therapeutically at a low dose regimen to confer robust protection against severe sepsis in mice. This salutary effect is strictly dependent on the activation of DNA damage response and autophagy pathways in the lung, as demonstrated by deletion of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) or the autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) specifically in this organ. The protective effect of anthracyclines occurs irrespectively of pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to severe sepsis. These findings demonstrate that DNA damage responses, including the ATM and Fancony Anemia pathways, are important modulators of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to inflammation-driven conditions, including severe sepsis. PMID:24184056

  2. The impact of SF3B1 mutations in CLL on the DNA-damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Te Raa, G D; Derks, I A M; Navrkalova, V;

    2015-01-01

    Mutations or deletions in TP53 or ATM are well-known determinants of poor prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), but only account for approximately 40% of chemo-resistant patients. Genome-wide sequencing has uncovered novel mutations in the splicing factor sf3b1, that were in part...... associated with ATM aberrations, suggesting functional synergy. We first performed detailed genetic analyses in a CLL cohort (n=110) containing ATM, SF3B1 and TP53 gene defects. Next, we applied a newly developed multiplex assay for p53/ATM target gene induction and measured apoptotic responses to DNA damage....... Interestingly, SF3B1 mutated samples without concurrent ATM and TP53 aberrations (sole SF3B1) displayed partially defective ATM/p53 transcriptional and apoptotic responses to various DNA-damaging regimens. In contrast, NOTCH1 or K/N-RAS mutated CLL displayed normal responses in p53/ATM target gene induction...

  3. Translational Control Protein 80 Stimulates IRES-Mediated Translation of p53 mRNA in Response to DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Jo Halaby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of the p53 tumor suppressor increases following DNA damage. This increase and subsequent activation of p53 are essential for the protection of normal cells against tumorigenesis. We previously discovered an internal ribosome entry site (IRES that is located at the 5′-untranslated region (UTR of p53 mRNA and found that the IRES activity increases following DNA damage. However, the mechanism underlying IRES-mediated p53 translation in response to DNA damage is still poorly understood. In this study, we discovered that translational control protein 80 (TCP80 has increased binding to the p53 mRNA in vivo following DNA damage. Overexpression of TCP80 also leads to increased p53 IRES activity in response to DNA damage. TCP80 has increased association with RNA helicase A (RHA following DNA damage and overexpression of TCP80, along with RHA, leads to enhanced expression of p53. Moreover, we found that MCF-7 breast cancer cells with decreased expression of TCP80 and RHA exhibit defective p53 induction following DNA damage and diminished expression of its downstream target PUMA, a proapoptotic protein. Taken together, our discovery of the function of TCP80 and RHA in regulating p53 IRES and p53 induction following DNA damage provides a better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate IRES-mediated p53 translation in response to genotoxic stress.

  4. Prediction of cellular radiosensitivity from DNA damage induced by gamma-rays and carbon ion irradiation in canine tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Seiichi; Van Khoa, Tran; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Tomoo; Ogihara, Kikumi; Ueno, Shunji; Ito, Nobuhiko

    2005-11-01

    Diseases of companion animals are shifting from infectious diseases to neoplasms (cancer), and since radiation therapy is one of the effective choices available for cancer treatment, the application of radiotherapy in veterinary medicine is likely to increase. However tumor tissues have different radiosensitivities, and therefore it is important to determine the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumors in individual patients in advance of radiotherapy. We have studied the relationship between the surviving cell fraction measured by a clonogenic assay and DNA double strand breaks detected by a comet assay under neutral conditions in three canine tumor cell lines, after gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation. In all the cell lines, cell death assessed by the clonogenic assay was much higher following irradiation with carbon ions than with gamma-rays. The initial and residual (4 hr) DNA damage due to gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation were higher in a radiosensitive cell line than in a radioresistant cell line. The surviving cell fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) showed a tendency for correlation with both the initial and residual DNA damage. In particular, the residual damage per Gy was significantly correlated with SF2, regardless of the type of radiation. This indicates that cellular radiosensitivity can be predicted by detection of radiation-induced residual DNA damage.

  5. Systems Biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Physiology and its DNA Damage Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro

    damage response (Chapter 5). When DNA damage is repaired, cells restart the cell cycle and resume growth. This process is called damage recovery. In S. cerevisiae, the molecular mechanism of recovery relies on dephosphorylation of Rad53 by protein phosphatases (PPs), that, in case of recovery from MMS......The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model organism in biology, being widely used in fundamental research, the first eukaryotic organism to be fully sequenced and the platform for the development of many genomics techniques. Therefore, it is not surprising that S. cerevisiae has also been widely...... used in the field of systems biology during the last decade. This thesis investigates S. cerevisiae growth physiology and DNA damage response by using a systems biology approach. Elucidation of the relationship between growth rate and gene expression is important to understand the mechanisms regulating...

  6. DNA damage response and repair data with pharmacological modulators of Tousled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Srinivasan Timiri Shanmugam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human Tousled kinase 1 (TLK1 plays an important role in chromatin remodeling, replication, and DNA damage response and repair. TLK1 activity is immediately, but transiently, downregulated after genotoxic insult, and its recovery is important for exit from checkpoint arrest and cell survival after radiation. The data in this article compliments research presented in the paper titled, “Tousled kinase activator, gallic acid, promotes DNA repair and suppresses radiation cytotoxicity in salivary gland cells” [1]. The identification of small molecule activators and inhibitors of TLK1 provided an opportunity to pharmacologically alter the protein׳s activity to elucidate its role in DNA damage response pathways. TLK1 effectors, gallic acid (GA and thioridazine (THD activate and inhibit the kinase, respectively, and the data report on the impact of these compounds and the significance of TLK1 to DNA break repair and the survival of human salivary acinar cells.

  7. Monitoring the Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway in a 3D Spheroid Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondesert, Odile; Frongia, Céline; Clayton, Olivia; Boizeau, Marie-Laure; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the DNA-Damage Response (DDR) activated pathway in multicellular tumor spheroid models is an important challenge as these 3D models have demonstrated their major relevance in pharmacological evaluation. Herein we present DDR-Act-FP, a fluorescent biosensor that allows detection of DDR activation through monitoring of the p21 promoter p53-dependent activation. We show that cells expressing the DDR-Act-FP biosensor efficiently report activation of the DDR pathway after DNA damage and its pharmacological manipulation using ATM kinase inhibitors. We also report the successful use of this assay to screen a small compound library in order to identify activators of the DDR response. Finally, using multicellular spheroids expressing the DDR-Act-FP we demonstrate that DDR activation and its pharmacological manipulation with inhibitory and activatory compounds can be efficiently monitored in live 3D spheroid model. This study paves the way for the development of innovative screening and preclinical evaluation assays.

  8. 14-3-3 Proteins, FHA Domains and BRCT Domains in the DNA Damage Response

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad, Duaa H.; Yaffe, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    The DNA damage response depends on the concerted activity of protein serine/threonine kinases and modular phosphoserine/threonine binding domains to relay the damage signal and recruit repair proteins. The PIKK family of protein kinases, which includes ATM/ATR/DNA-PK, preferentially phosphorylate Ser-Gln sites, while their basophilic downstream effecter kinases, Chk1/Chk2/MK2 preferentially phosphorylate hydrophobic-X-Arg-X-X-Ser/Thr-hydrophobic sites. A subset of tandem BRCT domains act as p...

  9. DNA damage responses in human induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Momcilovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells have the capability to undergo self-renewal and differentiation into all somatic cell types. Since they can be produced through somatic cell reprogramming, which uses a defined set of transcription factors, iPS cells represent important sources of patient-specific cells for clinical applications. However, before these cells can be used in therapeutic designs, it is essential to understand their genetic stability. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe DNA damage responses in human iPS cells. We observe hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents resulting in rapid induction of apoptosis after γ-irradiation. Expression of pluripotency factors does not appear to be diminished after irradiation in iPS cells. Following irradiation, iPS cells activate checkpoint signaling, evidenced by phosphorylation of ATM, NBS1, CHEK2, and TP53, localization of ATM to the double strand breaks (DSB, and localization of TP53 to the nucleus of NANOG-positive cells. We demonstrate that iPS cells temporary arrest cell cycle progression in the G(2 phase of the cell cycle, displaying a lack of the G(1/S cell cycle arrest similar to human embryonic stem (ES cells. Furthermore, both cell types remove DSB within six hours of γ-irradiation, form RAD51 foci and exhibit sister chromatid exchanges suggesting homologous recombination repair. Finally, we report elevated expression of genes involved in DNA damage signaling, checkpoint function, and repair of various types of DNA lesions in ES and iPS cells relative to their differentiated counterparts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: High degrees of similarity in DNA damage responses between ES and iPS cells were found. Even though reprogramming did not alter checkpoint signaling following DNA damage, dramatic changes in cell cycle structure, including a high percentage of cells in the S phase, increased radiosensitivity and loss of DNA damage-induced G(1/S cell cycle arrest, were

  10. Elements That Regulate the DNA Damage Response of Proteins Defective in Cockayne Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyama, Teruaki; Wilson, David M

    2016-01-16

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a premature aging disorder characterized by developmental defects, multisystem progressive degeneration and sensitivity to ultraviolet light. CS is divided into two primary complementation groups, A and B, with the CSA and CSB proteins presumably functioning in DNA repair and transcription. Using laser microirradiation and confocal microscopy, we characterized the nature and regulation of the CS protein response to oxidative DNA damage, double-strand breaks (DSBs), angelicin monoadducts and trioxsalen interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Our data indicate that CSB recruitment is influenced by the type of DNA damage and is most rapid and robust as follows: ICLs>DSBs>monoadducts>oxidative lesions. Transcription inhibition reduced accumulation of CSB at sites of monoadducts and ICLs, but it did not affect recruitment to (although slightly affected retention at) oxidative damage. Inhibition of histone deacetylation altered the dynamics of CSB assembly, suggesting a role for chromatin status in the response to DNA damage, whereas the proteasome inhibitor MG132 had no effect. The C-terminus of CSB and, in particular, its ubiquitin-binding domain were critical to recruitment, while the N-terminus and a functional ATPase domain played a minor role at best in facilitating protein accumulation. Although the absence of CSA had no effect on CSB recruitment, CSA itself localized at sites of ICLs, DSBs and monoadducts but not at oxidative lesions. Our results reveal molecular components of the CS protein response and point to a major involvement of complex lesions in the pathology of CS.

  11. Genomic instability and DNA damage responses in progeria arising from defective maturation of prelamin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Phillip R; Zou, Yue

    2009-01-01

    Progeria syndromes have in common a premature aging phenotype and increased genome instability. The susceptibility to DNA damage arises from a compromised repair system, either in the repair proteins themselves or in the DNA damage response pathways. The most severe progerias stem from mutations affecting lamin A production, a filamentous protein of the nuclear lamina. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) patients are heterozygous for aLMNA gene mutation while Restrictive Dermopathy (RD) individuals have a homozygous deficiency in the processing protease Zmpste24. These mutations generate the mutant lamin A proteins progerin and FC-lamina A, respectively, which cause nuclear deformations and chromatin perturbations. Genome instability is observed even though genome maintenance and repair genes appear normal. The unresolved question is what features of the DNA damage response pathways are deficient in HGPS and RD cells. Here we review and discuss recent findings which resolve some mechanistic details of how the accumulation of progerin/FC-lamin A proteins may disrupt DNA damage response pathways in HGPS and RD cells. As the mutant lamin proteins accumulate they sequester replication and repair factors, leading to stalled replication forks which collapse into DNA double-strand beaks (DSBs). In a reaction unique to HGPS and RD cells these accessible DSB termini bind Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) protein which excludes normal binding by DNA DSB repair proteins. The bound XPA also signals activation of ATM and ATR, arresting cell cycle progression, leading to arrested growth. In addition, the effective sequestration of XPA at these DSB damage sites makes HGPS and RD cells more sensitive to ultraviolet light and other mutagens normally repaired by the nucleotide excision repair pathway of which XPA is a necessary and specific component.

  12. Proteomics insights into DNA damage response and translating this knowledge to clinical strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Stechow, Louise; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability is a critical driver in the process of cancer formation. At the same time, inducing DNA damage by irradiation or genotoxic compounds constitutes a key therapeutic strategy to kill fast-dividing cancer cells. Sensing of DNA lesions initiates a complex set of signalling pathways...... Spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics emerged as method of choice for global studies of proteins and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). MS-based studies of the DDR have aided in delineating DNA damage-induced signalling responses. Those studies identified changes in abundance, interactions...... and modification of proteins in the context of genotoxic stress. Here we review ground-breaking MS-based proteomics studies, which analysed changes in protein abundance, protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation, SUMOylation and Poly(ADP-ribose)ylation (PARylation...

  13. Sex chromosome inactivation in germ cells: emerging roles of DNA damage response pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijima, Yosuke; Sin, Ho-Su; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2012-08-01

    Sex chromosome inactivation in male germ cells is a paradigm of epigenetic programming during sexual reproduction. Recent progress has revealed the underlying mechanisms of sex chromosome inactivation in male meiosis. The trigger of chromosome-wide silencing is activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, which is centered on the mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), a binding partner of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX). This DDR pathway shares features with the somatic DDR pathway recognizing DNA replication stress in the S phase. Additionally, it is likely to be distinct from the DDR pathway that recognizes meiosis-specific double-strand breaks. This review article extensively discusses the underlying mechanism of sex chromosome inactivation.

  14. DBC1 phosphorylation by ATM/ATR inhibits SIRT1 deacetylase in response to DNA damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laura Zannini; Giacomo Buscemi; Ja-Eun Kim; Enrico Fontanella; Domenico Delia

    2012-01-01

    Human DBC1 (deleted in breast cancer-1; KIAA1967) is a nuclear protein that,in response to DNA damage,competitively inhibits the NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1,a regulator of p53 apoptotic functions in response to genotoxic stress.DBC1 depletion in human cells increases SIRT1 activity,resulting in the deacetylation of p53 and protection from apoptosis.However,the mechanisms regulating this process have not yet been determined.Here,we report that,in human cell lines,DNA damage triggered the phosphorylation of DBC1 on Thr454 by ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) and ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related)kinases.Phosphorylated DBC1 bound to and inhibited SIRT1,resulting in the dissociation of the SIRT1-p53 complex and stimulating p53 acetylation and p53-dependent cell death.Indeed,DBC1-mediated genotoxicity,which was shown in knockdown experiments to be dependent on SIRT1 and p53 expression,was defective in cells expressing the phospho-mutant DBC1T454A.This study describes the first post-translational modification of DBC1 and provides new mechanistic insight linking ATM/ATR to the DBC1-SIRT1-p53 apoptotic axis triggered by DNA damage.

  15. DNA damage triggers a chronic auto-inflammatory response leading to fat depletion in NER progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakasilioti, Ismene; Kamileri, Irene; Chatzinikolaou, Georgia; Kosteas, Theodoros; Vergadi, Eleni; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Tsamardinos, Iannis; Rozgaja, Tania A; Siakouli, Sandra; Tsatsanis, Christos; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Garinis, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipodystrophies represent a group of heterogeneous disorders characterized by loss of fat tissue. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using mice carrying an ERCC1-XPF DNA repair defect systematically or in adipocytes, we show that DNA damage signaling triggers a chronic auto-inflammatory response leading to fat depletion. Ercc1−/− and aP2-Ercc1f/− fat depots show extensive gene expression similarities to lipodystrophic Pparγldi/+ animals along with focal areas of ruptured basement membrane, the reappearance of primary cilia, necrosis, fibrosis and a marked decrease in adiposity. We find that persistent DNA damage in aP2-Ercc1f/− fat depots and in adipocytes ex vivo trigger the induction of pro-inflammatory factors by promoting transcriptionally active histone marks and the dissociation of nuclear receptor co-repressor complexes from promoters; the response is cell-autonomous and requires ATM. Thus, persistent DNA damage-driven auto-inflammation plays a causative role in adipose tissue degeneration with important ramifications for progressive lipodystrophies and natural aging. PMID:24011075

  16. DNA damage triggers a chronic autoinflammatory response, leading to fat depletion in NER progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakasilioti, Ismene; Kamileri, Irene; Chatzinikolaou, Georgia; Kosteas, Theodoros; Vergadi, Eleni; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Tsamardinos, Iannis; Rozgaja, Tania A; Siakouli, Sandra; Tsatsanis, Christos; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Garinis, George A

    2013-09-03

    Lipodystrophies represent a group of heterogeneous disorders characterized by loss of fat tissue. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using mice carrying an ERCC1-XPF DNA repair defect systematically or in adipocytes, we show that DNA damage signaling triggers a chronic autoinflammatory response leading to fat depletion. Ercc1-/- and aP2-Ercc1F/- fat depots show extensive gene expression similarities to lipodystrophic Pparγ(ldi/+) animals, focal areas of ruptured basement membrane, the reappearance of primary cilia, necrosis, fibrosis, and a marked decrease in adiposity. We find that persistent DNA damage in aP2-Ercc1F/- fat depots and in adipocytes ex vivo triggers the induction of proinflammatory factors by promoting transcriptionally active histone marks and the dissociation of nuclear receptor corepressor complexes from promoters; the response is cell autonomous and requires ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Thus, persistent DNA damage-driven autoinflammation plays a causative role in adipose tissue degeneration, with important ramifications for progressive lipodystrophies and natural aging.

  17. Checkpoint Kinases Regulate a Global Network of Transcription Factors in Response to DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Jaehnig

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage activates checkpoint kinases that induce several downstream events, including widespread changes in transcription. However, the specific connections between the checkpoint kinases and downstream transcription factors (TFs are not well understood. Here, we integrate kinase mutant expression profiles, transcriptional regulatory interactions, and phosphoproteomics to map kinases and downstream TFs to transcriptional regulatory networks. Specifically, we investigate the role of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae checkpoint kinases (Mec1, Tel1, Chk1, Rad53, and Dun1 in the transcriptional response to DNA damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate. The result is a global kinase-TF regulatory network in which Mec1 and Tel1 signal through Rad53 to synergistically regulate the expression of more than 600 genes. This network involves at least nine TFs, many of which have Rad53-dependent phosphorylation sites, as regulators of checkpoint-kinase-dependent genes. We also identify a major DNA damage-induced transcriptional network that regulates stress response genes independently of the checkpoint kinases.

  18. DNA damage response and spindle assembly checkpoint function throughout the cell cycle to ensure genomic integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Lawrence

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Errors in replication or segregation lead to DNA damage, mutations, and aneuploidies. Consequently, cells monitor these events and delay progression through the cell cycle so repair precedes division. The DNA damage response (DDR, which monitors DNA integrity, and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, which responds to defects in spindle attachment/tension during metaphase of mitosis and meiosis, are critical for preventing genome instability. Here we show that the DDR and SAC function together throughout the cell cycle to ensure genome integrity in C. elegans germ cells. Metaphase defects result in enrichment of SAC and DDR components to chromatin, and both SAC and DDR are required for metaphase delays. During persistent metaphase arrest following establishment of bi-oriented chromosomes, stability of the metaphase plate is compromised in the absence of DDR kinases ATR or CHK1 or SAC components, MAD1/MAD2, suggesting SAC functions in metaphase beyond its interactions with APC activator CDC20. In response to DNA damage, MAD2 and the histone variant CENPA become enriched at the nuclear periphery in a DDR-dependent manner. Further, depletion of either MAD1 or CENPA results in loss of peripherally associated damaged DNA. In contrast to a SAC-insensitive CDC20 mutant, germ cells deficient for SAC or CENPA cannot efficiently repair DNA damage, suggesting that SAC mediates DNA repair through CENPA interactions with the nuclear periphery. We also show that replication perturbations result in relocalization of MAD1/MAD2 in human cells, suggesting that the role of SAC in DNA repair is conserved.

  19. Impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses following exposure to intensity modulated radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghita, Mihaela; Coffey, Caroline B.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    To limit toxicity to normal tissues adjacent to the target tumour volume, radiotherapy is delivered using fractionated regimes whereby the total prescribed dose is given as a series of sequential smaller doses separated by specific time intervals. The impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses was determined in AGO-1522 primary human fibroblasts and MCF-7 breast tumour cells using uniform and modulated exposures delivered using a 225 kVp x-ray source. Responses to fractionated schedules (two equal fractions delivered with time intervals from 4 h to 48 h) were compared to those following acute exposures. Cell survival and DNA damage repair measurements indicate that cellular responses to fractionated non-uniform exposures differ from those seen in uniform exposures for the investigated cell lines. Specifically, there is a consistent lack of repair observed in the out-of-field populations during intervals between fractions, confirming the importance of cell signalling to out-of-field responses in a fractionated radiation schedule, and this needs to be confirmed for a wider range of cell lines and conditions.

  20. EXO1 is critical for embryogenesis and the DNA damage response in mice with a hypomorphic Nbs1 allele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Katrin; Yanez, Diana A.; Terré, Berta; Palenzuela, Lluís; Aivio, Suvi; Wei, Kaichun; Edelmann, Winfried; Stark, Jeremy M.; Stracker, Travis H.

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of genome stability is critical for the suppression of diverse human pathologies that include developmental disorders, premature aging, infertility and predisposition to cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates the appropriate cellular responses following the detection of lesions to prevent genomic instability. The MRE11 complex is a sensor of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and plays key roles in multiple aspects of the DDR, including DNA end resection that is critical for signaling and DNA repair. The MRE11 complex has been shown to function both upstream and in concert with the 5′-3′ exonuclease EXO1 in DNA resection, but it remains unclear to what extent EXO1 influences DSB responses independently of the MRE11 complex. Here we examine the genetic relationship of the MRE11 complex and EXO1 during mammalian development and in response to DNA damage. Deletion of Exo1 in mice expressing a hypomorphic allele of Nbs1 leads to severe developmental impairment, embryonic death and chromosomal instability. While EXO1 plays a minimal role in normal cells, its loss strongly influences DNA replication, DNA repair, checkpoint signaling and damage sensitivity in NBS1 hypomorphic cells. Collectively, our results establish a key role for EXO1 in modulating the severity of hypomorphic MRE11 complex mutations. PMID:26160886

  1. Chromatin structure and DNA damage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinant Christoffel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of the genome is continuously challenged by both endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. These damaging agents can induce a wide variety of lesions in the DNA, such as double strand breaks, single strand breaks, oxidative lesions and pyrimidine dimers. The cell has evolved intricate DNA damage response mechanisms to counteract the genotoxic effects of these lesions. The two main features of the DNA damage response mechanisms are cell-cycle checkpoint activation and, at the heart of the response, DNA repair. For both damage signalling and repair, chromatin remodelling is most likely a prerequisite. Here, we discuss current knowledge on chromatin remodelling with respect to the cellular response to DNA damage, with emphasis on the response to lesions resolved by nucleotide excision repair. We will discuss the role of histone modifications as well as their displacement or exchange in nucleotide excision repair and make a comparison with their requirement in transcription and double strand break repair.

  2. Interplay between DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Karyn; Luftig, Micah A

    2013-01-01

    Viruses encounter many challenges within host cells in order to replicate their nucleic acid. In the case of DNA viruses, one challenge that must be overcome is recognition of viral DNA structures by the host DNA damage response (DDR) machinery. This is accomplished in elegant and unique ways by different viruses as each has specific needs and sensitivities dependent on its life cycle. In this review, we focus on three DNA tumor viruses and their interactions with the DDR. The viruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), and human papillomavirus (HPV) account for nearly all of the virus-associated human cancers worldwide. These viruses have also been excellent models for the study of oncogenic virus-mediated cell transformation. In this review, we will discuss how each of these viruses engage and subvert aspects of the host DDR. The first level of DDR engagement is a result of the genetic linkage between the oncogenic potential of these viruses and their ability to replicate. Namely, the promotion of cells from quiescence into the cell cycle to facilitate virus replication can be sensed through aberrant cellular DNA replication structures which activate the DDR and hinder cell transformation. DNA tumor viruses subvert this growth-suppressive DDR through changes in viral oncoprotein expression which ultimately facilitate virus replication. An additional level of DDR engagement is through direct detection of replicating viral DNA. These interactions parallel those observed in other DNA virus systems in that the need to subvert these intrinsic sensors of aberrant DNA structure in order to replicate must be in place. DNA tumor viruses are no exception. This review will cover the molecular features of DNA tumor virus interactions with the host DDR and the consequences for virus replication.

  3. Phosphorylation of Hdmx mediates its Hdm2- and ATM-dependent degradation in response to DNA damage

    OpenAIRE

    Pereg, Yaron; Shkedy, Dganit; de Graaf, Petra; Meulmeester, Erik; Edelson-Averbukh, Marina; Salek, Mogjiborahman; Biton, Sharon; Teunisse, Amina F.A.S.; Lehmann, Wolf D.; Jochemsen, Aart G.; Shiloh, Yosef

    2005-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic stability depends on the DNA damage response, an extensive signaling network that is activated by DNA lesions such as double-strand breaks (DSBs). The primary activator of the mammalian DSB response is the nuclear protein kinase ataxia–telangiectasia, mutated (ATM), which phosphorylates key players in various arms of this network. The activation and stabilization of the p53 protein play a major role in the DNA damage response and are mediated by ATM-dependent posttransl...

  4. Lovastatin prevents cisplatin-induced activation of pro-apoptotic DNA damage response (DDR) of renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Katharina; Ziegler, Verena; Hartmann, Christina; Henninger, Christian; Thomale, Jürgen; Schupp, Nicole; Fritz, Gerhard

    2016-02-01

    The platinating agent cisplatin (CisPt) is commonly used in the therapy of various types of solid tumors. The anticancer efficacy of CisPt largely depends on the formation of bivalent DNA intrastrand crosslinks, which stimulate mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR), thereby triggering checkpoint activation, gene expression and cell death. The clinically most relevant adverse effect associated with CisPt treatment is nephrotoxicity that results from damage to renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we addressed the question whether the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor lovastatin affects the DDR of renal cells by employing rat renal proximal tubular epithelial (NRK-52E) cells as in vitro model. The data show that lovastatin has extensive inhibitory effects on CisPt-stimulated DDR of NRK-52E cells as reflected on the levels of phosphorylated ATM, Chk1, Chk2, p53 and Kap1. Mitigation of CisPt-induced DDR by lovastatin was independent of the formation of DNA damage as demonstrated by (i) the analysis of Pt-(GpG) intrastrand crosslink formation by Southwestern blot analyses and (ii) the generation of DNA strand breaks as analyzed on the level of nuclear γH2AX foci and employing the alkaline comet assay. Lovastatin protected NRK-52E cells from the cytotoxicity of high CisPt doses as shown by measuring cell viability, cellular impedance and flow cytometry-based analyses of cell death. Importantly, the statin also reduced the level of kidney DNA damage and apoptosis triggered by CisPt treatment of mice. The data show that the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin extensively counteracts pro-apoptotic signal mechanisms of the DDR of tubular epithelial cells following CisPt injury.

  5. Human RECQ1 is a DNA damage responsive protein required for genotoxic stress resistance and suppression of sister chromatid exchanges.

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    Sudha Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA helicases are ubiquitous enzymes that unwind DNA in an ATP-dependent and directionally specific manner. Unwinding of double-stranded DNA is essential for the processes of DNA repair, recombination, transcription, and DNA replication. Five human DNA helicases sharing sequence similarity with the E. coli RecQ helicase have been identified. Three of the human RecQ helicases are implicated in hereditary diseases (Bloom syndrome, Werner syndrome, and Rothmund-Thomson syndrome which display clinical symptoms of premature aging and cancer. RECQ1 helicase is the most highly expressed of the human RecQ helicases; however, a genetic disease has yet not been linked to mutations in the RECQ1 gene, and the biological functions of human RECQ1 in cellular DNA metabolism are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we report that RECQ1 becomes phosphorylated upon DNA damage and forms irradiation-induced nuclear foci that associate with chromatin in human cells. Depletion of RECQ1 renders human cells sensitive to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation or the topoisomerase inhibitor camptothecin, and results in spontaneous gamma-H2AX foci and elevated sister chromatid exchanges, indicating aberrant repair of DNA breaks. Consistent with a role in homologous recombinational repair, endogenous RECQ1 is associated with the strand exchange protein Rad51 and the two proteins directly interact with high affinity. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, these results provide the first evidence for a role of human RECQ1 in the response to DNA damage and chromosomal stability maintenance and point to the vital importance of RECQ1 in genome homeostasis.

  6. DNA-Damage Response RNA-Binding Proteins (DDRBPs): Perspectives from a New Class of Proteins and Their RNA Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutertre, Martin; Vagner, Stéphan

    2016-09-29

    Upon DNA damage, cells trigger an early DNA-damage response (DDR) involving DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, and late responses involving gene expression regulation that determine cell fate. Screens for genes involved in the DDR have found many RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), while screens for novel RBPs have identified DDR proteins. An increasing number of RBPs are involved in early and/or late DDR. We propose to call this new class of actors of the DDR, which contain an RNA-binding activity, DNA-damage response RNA-binding proteins (DDRBPs). We then discuss how DDRBPs contribute not only to gene expression regulation in the late DDR but also to early DDR signaling, DNA repair, and chromatin modifications at DNA-damage sites through interactions with both long and short noncoding RNAs.

  7. Microgravity increases DNA damage response in Caenorhabditis elegans during Shenzhou-8 spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Sun, Yeqing; Xu, Dan; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Jiamin

    DNA damage response (DDR) plays an important role in genome maintenance through cell cycle arrest followed by DNA repair and/or apoptosis. Perturbing DDR may elicit genomic instability, carcinogenesis, even cell death. Space radiation and microgravity both have been reported to cause DDR in mammal cells,while, in the space environment, the interaction of space radiation and microgravity on DDR is still controversial. To clarify the interaction, dauer larva of Caenorhabditis elegans were employed in Shenzhou-8 space mission and suffered space synthetic environment (RM) and space radiation (R) during 16.5-day spaceflight. mRNA microarray, qPCR and miRNA microarray were performed individually to detect the differences of transcriptome and microRNome affected by two environments. The results showed that, two fold genes were regulated more significantly by RM than by R. These regulated genes were involved in different physiological activities from each environment, which mainly involve in protein metabolic and modification processes in RM, and energy metabolic process in R. 21 of 500 DDR genes were extracted as significantly different expression in two space environments. DNA repair and apoptosis were enhanced by microgravity, since 18 of 21 genes were altered by RM specifically, including six “Response to DNA damage stimulus” genes, four “DNA repair” genes and eight “apoptosis process” genes. miRNAome also showed changes in response to microgravity. miRNA-81, 82, 124 and 795 were predicted to respond to RM and regulate DDR in C.elegans for the first time. These results suggest that microgravity increases the physiological activities to the space environment, especially enhance DNA damage response on transcription and post-transcriptional regulation in metazoan. We expect the finding provides new informations on synergetic effects between microgravity and radiation, and may be helpful for space risk assessment.

  8. Mechanistic Modelling of DNA Repair and Cellular Survival Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-09-01

    Characterising and predicting the effects of ionising radiation on cells remains challenging, with the lack of robust models of the underlying mechanism of radiation responses providing a significant limitation to the development of personalised radiotherapy. In this paper we present a mechanistic model of cellular response to radiation that incorporates the kinetics of different DNA repair processes, the spatial distribution of double strand breaks and the resulting probability and severity of misrepair. This model enables predictions to be made of a range of key biological endpoints (DNA repair kinetics, chromosome aberration and mutation formation, survival) across a range of cell types based on a set of 11 mechanistic fitting parameters that are common across all cells. Applying this model to cellular survival showed its capacity to stratify the radiosensitivity of cells based on aspects of their phenotype and experimental conditions such as cell cycle phase and plating delay (correlation between modelled and observed Mean Inactivation Doses R2 > 0.9). By explicitly incorporating underlying mechanistic factors, this model can integrate knowledge from a wide range of biological studies to provide robust predictions and may act as a foundation for future calculations of individualised radiosensitivity.

  9. Bi-directional regulation between tyrosine kinase Etk/BMX and tumor suppressor p53 in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyun; Guo, Zhiyong; Dai, Bojie; Kang, Miyoung; Ann, David K; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Qiu, Yun

    2004-11-26

    Etk/Bmx, a member of the Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, has been implicated in the regulation of various cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, motility, and apoptosis. Here, we report the identification of Tec family kinases as the potential interacting proteins of the tumor suppressor p53 by an Src homology 3 domain array screening. Etk is physically associated with p53 through its Src homology 3 domain and the proline-rich domain of p53. Induction of p53 expression by DNA damage inhibits Etk activity in several cell types. Down-regulation of Etk expression by a specific small interfering RNA sensitizes prostate cancer cells to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis, suggesting that inhibition of Etk activity is required for apoptosis in response to DNA damage. We also show that Etk primarily interacts with p53 in the cytoplasm and that such interaction leads to bidirectional inhibition of the activities of both proteins. Overexpression of Etk in prostate cancer cells results in inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity and its interaction with the mitochondrial protein BAK and confers the resistance to doxorubicin. Therefore, we propose that the stoichiometry between p53 and the Tec family kinases in a given cell type may determine its sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs.

  10. DNA damage response (DDR) and senescence: shuttled inflamma-miRNAs on the stage of inflamm-aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Fabiola; Albertini, Maria Cristina; Orciani, Monia; Ceka, Artan; Cricca, Monica; Procopio, Antonio Domenico; Bonafè, Massimiliano

    2015-11-03

    A major issue in aging research is how cellular phenomena affect aging at the systemic level. Emerging evidence suggests that DNA damage response (DDR) signaling is a key mechanism linking DNA damage accumulation, cell senescence, and organism aging. DDR activation in senescent cells promotes acquisition of a proinflammatory secretory phenotype (SASP), which in turn elicits DDR and SASP activation in neighboring cells, thereby creating a proinflammatory environment extending at the local and eventually the systemic level. DDR activation is triggered by genomic lesions as well as emerging bacterial and viral metagenomes. Therefore, the buildup of cells with an activated DDR probably fuels inflamm-aging and predisposes to the development of the major age-related diseases (ARDs). Micro (mi)-RNAs - non-coding RNAs involved in gene expression modulation - are released locally and systemically by a variety of shuttles (exosomes, lipoproteins, proteins) that likely affect the efficiency of their biological effects. Here we suggest that some miRNAs, previously found to be associated with inflammation and senescence - miR-146, miR-155, and miR-21 - play a central role in the interplay among DDR, cell senescence and inflamm-aging. The identification of the functions of shuttled senescence-associated miRNAs is expected to shed light on the aging process and on how to delay ARD development.

  11. Toxic effect of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells through DNA damage response via Chk1-dependent G2/M checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchao Duan

    Full Text Available Silica nanoparticles have become promising carriers for drug delivery or gene therapy. Endothelial cells could be directly exposed to silica nanoparticles by intravenous administration. However, the underlying toxic effect mechanisms of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells are still poorly understood. In order to clarify the cytotoxicity of endothelial cells induced by silica nanoparticles and its mechanisms, cellular morphology, cell viability and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release were observed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs as assessing cytotoxicity, resulted in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Silica nanoparticles-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation caused oxidative damage followed by the production of malondialdehyde (MDA as well as the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px. Both necrosis and apoptosis were increased significantly after 24 h exposure. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP decreased obviously in a dose-dependent manner. The degree of DNA damage including the percentage of tail DNA, tail length and Olive tail moment (OTM were markedly aggravated. Silica nanoparticles also induced G2/M arrest through the upregulation of Chk1 and the downregulation of Cdc25C, cyclin B1/Cdc2. In summary, our data indicated that the toxic effect mechanisms of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells was through DNA damage response (DDR via Chk1-dependent G2/M checkpoint signaling pathway, suggesting that exposure to silica nanoparticles could be a potential hazards for the development of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (pmicrowave exposed groups (pmicrowave exposed animal (pmicrowave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (pmicrowave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect. The study also indicates that increased oxidative stress and inflammatory response might be the factors involved in DNA damage following low intensity microwave exposure.

  13. Human cytomegalovirus gene UL76 induces IL-8 expression through activation of the DNA damage response.

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    Helena Costa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, a β-herpesvirus, has evolved many strategies to subvert both innate and adaptive host immunity in order to ensure its survival and propagation within the host. Induction of IL-8 is particularly important during HCMV infection as neutrophils, primarily attracted by IL-8, play a key role in virus dissemination. Moreover, IL-8 has a positive effect in the replication of HCMV. This work has identified an HCMV gene (UL76, with the relevant property of inducing IL-8 expression at both transcriptional and protein levels. Up-regulation of IL-8 by UL76 results from activation of the NF-kB pathway as inhibition of both IKK-β activity or degradation of Ikβα abolishes the IL-8 induction and, concomitantly, expression of UL76 is associated with the translocation of p65 to the nucleus where it binds to the IL-8 promoter. Furthermore, the UL76-mediated induction of IL-8 requires ATM and is correlated with the phosphorylation of NEMO on serine 85, indicating that UL76 activates NF-kB pathway by the DNA Damage response, similar to the impact of genotoxic drugs. More importantly, a UL76 deletion mutant virus was significantly less efficient in stimulating IL-8 production than the wild type virus. In addition, there was a significant reduction of IL-8 secretion when ATM -/- cells were infected with wild type HCMV, thus, indicating that ATM is also involved in the induction of IL-8 by HCMV. In conclusion, we demonstrate that expression of UL76 gene induces IL-8 expression as a result of the DNA damage response and that both UL76 and ATM have a role in the mechanism of IL-8 induction during HCMV infection. Hence, this work characterizes a new role of the activation of DNA Damage response in the context of host-pathogen interactions.

  14. Protease activity of PprI facilitates DNA damage response: Mn2+-dependence and substrate sequence-specificity of the proteolytic reaction.

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    Yunguang Wang

    Full Text Available The extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extraordinary resistance to ionizing radiation. Previous studies established that a protein named PprI, which exists only in the Deinococcus-Thermus family, acts as a general switch to orchestrate the expression of a number of DNA damage response (DDR proteins involved in cellular radio-resistance. Here we show that the regulatory mechanism of PprI depends on its Mn(2+-dependent protease activity toward DdrO, a transcription factor that suppresses DDR genes' expression. Recognition sequence-specificity around the PprI cleavage site is essential for DNA damage repair in vivo. PprI and DdrO mediate a novel DNA damage response pathway differing from the classic LexA-mediated SOS response system found in radiation-sensitive bacterium Escherichia coli. This PprI-mediated pathway in D. radiodurans is indispensable for its extreme radio-resistance and therefore its elucidation significantly advances our understanding of the DNA damage repair mechanism in this amazing organism.

  15. The DNA damage checkpoint precedes activation of ARF in response to escalating oncogenic stress during tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelou, K; Bartkova, J; Kotsinas, A

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic stimuli trigger the DNA damage response (DDR) and induction of the alternative reading frame (ARF) tumor suppressor, both of which can activate the p53 pathway and provide intrinsic barriers to tumor progression. However, the respective timeframes and signal thresholds for ARF induction...... or p16INK4A, a tumor-suppressor gene overlapping with ARF. Analogous results were obtained in several human clinical settings, including early and progressive lesions of the urinary bladder, head and neck, skin and pancreas. Mechanistic analyses of epithelial and fibroblast cell models exposed...

  16. The DNA damage response at eroded telomeres and tethering to the nuclear pore complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khadaroo, Basheer; Teixeira, M Teresa; Luciano, Pierre;

    2009-01-01

    The ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes are protected by telomeres, which serve to ensure proper chromosome replication and to prevent spurious recombination at chromosome ends. In this study, we show by single cell analysis that in the absence of telomerase, a single short telomere is sufficient...... protein Rad52 into a single focus. Moreover, we show that eroded telomeres, although remaining at the nuclear periphery, move to the nuclear pore complex. Our results link the DNA damage response at eroded telomeres to changes in subnuclear localization and suggest the existence of collapsed replication...

  17. The DNA damage response induced by infection with human cytomegalovirus and other viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaofei, E; Kowalik, Timothy F

    2014-05-23

    Viruses use different strategies to overcome the host defense system. Recent studies have shown that viruses can induce DNA damage response (DDR). Many of these viruses use DDR signaling to benefit their replication, while other viruses block or inactivate DDR signaling. This review focuses on the effects of DDR and DNA repair on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication. Here, we review the DDR induced by HCMV infection and its similarities and differences to DDR induced by other viruses. As DDR signaling pathways are critical for the replication of many viruses, blocking these pathways may represent novel therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of certain infectious diseases. Lastly, future perspectives in the field are discussed.

  18. Inactivation of PNKP by mutant ATXN3 triggers apoptosis by activating the DNA damage-response pathway in SCA3.

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    Rui Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, also known as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD, is an untreatable autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease, and the most common such inherited ataxia worldwide. The mutation in SCA3 is the expansion of a polymorphic CAG tri-nucleotide repeat sequence in the C-terminal coding region of the ATXN3 gene at chromosomal locus 14q32.1. The mutant ATXN3 protein encoding expanded glutamine (polyQ sequences interacts with multiple proteins in vivo, and is deposited as aggregates in the SCA3 brain. A large body of literature suggests that the loss of function of the native ATNX3-interacting proteins that are deposited in the polyQ aggregates contributes to cellular toxicity, systemic neurodegeneration and the pathogenic mechanism in SCA3. Nonetheless, a significant understanding of the disease etiology of SCA3, the molecular mechanism by which the polyQ expansions in the mutant ATXN3 induce neurodegeneration in SCA3 has remained elusive. In the present study, we show that the essential DNA strand break repair enzyme PNKP (polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase interacts with, and is inactivated by, the mutant ATXN3, resulting in inefficient DNA repair, persistent accumulation of DNA damage/strand breaks, and subsequent chronic activation of the DNA damage-response ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM signaling pathway in SCA3. We report that persistent accumulation of DNA damage/strand breaks and chronic activation of the serine/threonine kinase ATM and the downstream p53 and protein kinase C-δ pro-apoptotic pathways trigger neuronal dysfunction and eventually neuronal death in SCA3. Either PNKP overexpression or pharmacological inhibition of ATM dramatically blocked mutant ATXN3-mediated cell death. Discovery of the mechanism by which mutant ATXN3 induces DNA damage and amplifies the pro-death signaling pathways provides a molecular basis for neurodegeneration due to PNKP inactivation in SCA3, and for the first time offers

  19. Differential roles of ATM- and Chk2-mediated phosphorylations of Hdmx in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereg, Yaron; Lam, Suzanne; Teunisse, Amina; Biton, Sharon; Meulmeester, Erik; Mittelman, Leonid; Buscemi, Giacomo; Okamoto, Koji; Taya, Yoichi; Shiloh, Yosef; Jochemsen, Aart G

    2006-09-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a major role in maintaining genomic stability. Its activation and stabilization in response to double strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA are regulated primarily by the ATM protein kinase. ATM mediates several posttranslational modifications on p53 itself, as well as phosphorylation of p53's essential inhibitors, Hdm2 and Hdmx. Recently we showed that ATM- and Hdm2-dependent ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of Hdmx following DSB induction are mediated by phosphorylation of Hdmx on S403, S367, and S342, with S403 being targeted directly by ATM. Here we show that S367 phosphorylation is mediated by the Chk2 protein kinase, a downstream kinase of ATM. This phosphorylation, which is important for subsequent Hdmx ubiquitination and degradation, creates a binding site for 14-3-3 proteins which controls nuclear accumulation of Hdmx following DSBs. Phosphorylation of S342 also contributed to optimal 14-3-3 interaction and nuclear accumulation of Hdmx, but phosphorylation of S403 did not. Our data indicate that binding of a 14-3-3 dimer and subsequent nuclear accumulation are essential steps toward degradation of p53's inhibitor, Hdmx, in response to DNA damage. These results demonstrate a sophisticated control by ATM of a target protein, Hdmx, which itself is one of several ATM targets in the ATM-p53 axis of the DNA damage response.

  20. Idelalisib and bendamustine combination is synergistic and increases DNA damage response in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Prexy; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Yang, Qingshan; Wierda, William G; Keating, Michael J; Gandhi, Varsha

    2017-02-07

    Idelalisib is a targeted agent that potently inhibits PI3Kδ which is exclusively expressed in hematological cells. Bendamustine is a well-tolerated cytotoxic alkylating agent which has been extensively used for treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Both these agents are FDA-approved for CLL. To increase the potency of idelalisib and bendamustine, we tested their combination in primary CLL lymphocytes. While each compound alone produced a moderate response, combination at several concentrations resulted in synergistic cytotoxicity. Idelalisib enhanced the bendamustine-mediated DNA damage/repair response, indicated by the phosphorylation of ATM, Chk2, and p53. Each drug alone activated γH2AX but combination treatment further increased the expression of this DNA damage marker. Compared with the control, idelalisib treatment decreased global RNA synthesis, resulting in a decline of early-response and short-lived MCL1 transcripts. In concert, there was a decline in total Mcl-1 protein in CLL lymphocytes. Isogenic mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking MCL1 had higher sensitivity to bendamustine alone or in combination compared to MCL1 proficient cells. Collectively, these data indicate that bendamustine and idelalisib combination therapy should be investigated for treating patients with CLL.

  1. Dysregulation of the DNA Damage Response and KMT2A Rearrangement in Fetal Liver Hematopoietic Cells.

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    Mai Nanya

    Full Text Available Etoposide, a topoisomerase 2 (TOP2 inhibitor, is associated with the development of KMT2A (MLL-rearranged infant leukemia. An epidemiological study suggested that in utero exposure to TOP2 inhibitors may be involved in generation of KMT2A (MLL rearrangement. The present study examined the mechanism underlying the development of KMT2A (MLL-rearranged infant leukemia in response to in utero exposure to etoposide in a mouse model. Fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells were more susceptible to etoposide than maternal bone marrow mononuclear cells. Etoposide-induced Kmt2a breakage was detected in fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells using a newly developed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. Assessment of etoposide-induced chromosomal translocation by next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq identified several chimeric fusion messenger RNAs that were generated by etoposide treatment. However, Kmt2a (Mll-rearranged fusion mRNA was detected in Atm-knockout mice, which are defective in the DNA damage response, but not in wild-type mice. The present findings suggest that in utero exposure to TOP2 inhibitors induces Kmt2a rearrangement when the DNA damage response is defective.

  2. Aberrant DNA damage response pathways may predict the outcome of platinum chemotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra T Stefanou

    Full Text Available Ovarian carcinoma (OC is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Despite the advances in the treatment of OC with combinatorial regimens, including surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, patients generally exhibit poor prognosis due to high chemotherapy resistance. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage response (DDR pathways are involved in resistance of OC patients to platinum chemotherapy. Selected DDR signals were evaluated in two human ovarian carcinoma cell lines, one sensitive (A2780 and one resistant (A2780/C30 to platinum treatment as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from OC patients, sensitive (n = 7 or resistant (n = 4 to subsequent chemotherapy. PBMCs from healthy volunteers (n = 9 were studied in parallel. DNA damage was evaluated by immunofluorescence γH2AX staining and comet assay. Higher levels of intrinsic DNA damage were found in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. Moreover, the intrinsic DNA damage levels were significantly higher in OC patients relative to healthy volunteers, as well as in platinum-sensitive patients relative to platinum-resistant ones (all P<0.05. Following carboplatin treatment, A2780 cells showed lower DNA repair efficiency than A2780/C30 cells. Also, following carboplatin treatment of PBMCs ex vivo, the DNA repair efficiency was significantly higher in healthy volunteers than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in platinum-sensitive ones (t1/2 for loss of γH2AX foci: 2.7±0.5h, 8.8±1.9h and 15.4±3.2h, respectively; using comet assay, t1/2 of platinum-induced damage repair: 4.8±1.4h, 12.9±1.9h and 21.4±2.6h, respectively; all P<0.03. Additionally, the carboplatin-induced apoptosis rate was higher in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. In PBMCs, apoptosis rates were inversely correlated with DNA repair efficiencies of these cells, being significantly higher in platinum-sensitive than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in healthy volunteers (all P<0.05. We conclude

  3. DNA damage response (DDR) via NKX3.1 expression in prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaykent-Tepedelen, Burcu; Karamil, Selda; Gonen-Korkmaz, Ceren; Korkmaz, Kemal S

    2014-05-01

    It has been reported that NKX3.1 an androgen-regulated homeobox gene restricted to prostate and testicular tissues, encodes a homeobox protein, which transcriptionally regulates oxidative damage responses and enhances topoisomerase I re-ligation by a direct interaction with the ATM protein in prostate cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of NKX3.1 in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. We demonstrate that the DNA damage induced by CPT-11 (irinotecan, a topo I inhibitor), doxorubicin (a topo II inhibitor), and H2O2 (a mediator of oxidative damage), but not by etoposide (another topo II inhibitor), is negatively influenced by NKX3.1 expression. We also examined γH2AX((S139)) foci formation and observed that the overexpression of NKX3.1 resulted a remarkable decrease in the formation of γH2AX((S139)) foci. Intriguingly, we observed in NKX3.1 silencing studies that the depletion of NKX3.1 correlated with a significant decrease in the levels of p-ATM((S1981)) and γH2AX((S139)). The data imply that the DNA damage response (DDR) can be altered, perhaps via a decrease in the topoisomerase I re-ligation function; this is consistent with the physical association of NKX3.1 with DDR mediators upon treatment of both PC-3 and LNCaP cells with CPT-11. Furthermore, the depletion of NKX3.1 resulted in a G1/S progression via the facilitation of an increase in E2F stabilization concurrent with the suppressed DDR. Thus, the topoisomerase I inhibitor-mediated DNA damage enhanced the physical association of NKX3.1 with γH2AX((S139)) on the chromatin in LNCaP cells, whereas NKX3.1 in the soluble fraction was associated with p-ATM((S1981)) and RAD50 in these cells. Overall, the data suggest that androgens and NKX3.1 expression regulate the progression of the cell cycle and concurrently activate the DDR. Therefore, androgen withdrawal may augment the development of an error-prone phenotype and, subsequently, the loss of DNA damage control during prostate cancer

  4. Disruption of DNA Damage-Response by Propyl Gallate and 9-Aminoacridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Shun; Matsuda, Yoko; Yanagisawa, Shin-Ya; Ikura, Masae; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Matsuda, Tomonari

    2016-06-01

    The DNA-damage response (DDR) protects the genome from various types of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage, and can itself be a target of certain chemicals that give rise to chromosomal aberrations. Here, we developed a screening method to detect inhibition of Mediator of DNA damage Checkpoint 1 (MDC1) foci formation (the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP)-MDC1 foci formation-inhibition assay) using EGFP-MDC1-expressing human cells. The assay identified propyl gallate (PG) and 9-aminoacridine (9-AA) as inhibitors of camptothecin (CPT)-induced MDC1 foci formation. We demonstrated that the inhibition of CPT-induced MDC1 foci formation by PG was caused by the direct suppression of histone H2AX phosphorylation at Ser139 (γH2AX), which is required for MDC1 foci formation, by quantifying γH2AX in cells and in vitro 9-AA also directly suppressed H2AX Ser139-phosphorylation in vitro but the concentration was much higher than that required to suppress CPT-induced MDC1 foci formation in cells. Consistent with these findings, PG and 9-AA both suppressed CPT-induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest and increased the number of abnormal nuclei. Our results suggest that early DDR-inhibitory effects of PG and 9-AA contribute to their chromosome-damaging potential, and that the EGFP-MDC1 foci formation-inhibition assay is useful for detection of and screening for H2AX Ser139-phosphorylation-inhibitory effects of chemicals.

  5. Keratin23 (KRT23) knockdown decreases proliferation and affects the DNA damage response of colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Hahn, Stephan; Mansilla, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    correlated with absent expression, while increased KRT23 expression in tumor samples correlated with promoter hypomethylation, as confirmed by bisulfite sequencing. Demethylation induced KRT23 expression in vitro. Expression profiling of shRNA mediated stable KRT23 knockdown in colon cancer cell lines showed...... response, mainly molecules of the double strand break repair homologous recombination pathway. KRT23 knockdown decreased the transcript and protein expression of key molecules as e.g. MRE11A, E2F1, RAD51 and BRCA1. Knockdown of KRT23 rendered colon cancer cells more sensitive to irradiation and reduced...... that KRT23 depletion affected molecules of the cell cycle and DNA replication, recombination and repair. In vitro analyses confirmed that KRT23 depletion significantly decreased the cellular proliferation of SW948 and LS1034 cells and markedly decreased the expression of genes involved in DNA damage...

  6. Senataxin plays an essential role with DNA damage response proteins in meiotic recombination and gene silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier J Becherel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Senataxin, mutated in the human genetic disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2, plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity by coordination of transcription, DNA replication, and the DNA damage response. We demonstrate that senataxin is essential for spermatogenesis and that it functions at two stages in meiosis during crossing-over in homologous recombination and in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI. Disruption of the Setx gene caused persistence of DNA double-strand breaks, a defect in disassembly of Rad51 filaments, accumulation of DNA:RNA hybrids (R-loops, and ultimately a failure of crossing-over. Senataxin localised to the XY body in a Brca1-dependent manner, and in its absence there was incomplete localisation of DNA damage response proteins to the XY chromosomes and ATR was retained on the axial elements of these chromosomes, failing to diffuse out into chromatin. Furthermore persistence of RNA polymerase II activity, altered ubH2A distribution, and abnormal XY-linked gene expression in Setx⁻/⁻ revealed an essential role for senataxin in MSCI. These data support key roles for senataxin in coordinating meiotic crossing-over with transcription and in gene silencing to protect the integrity of the genome.

  7. Senataxin plays an essential role with DNA damage response proteins in meiotic recombination and gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherel, Olivier J; Yeo, Abrey J; Stellati, Alissa; Heng, Evelyn Y H; Luff, John; Suraweera, Amila M; Woods, Rick; Fleming, Jean; Carrie, Dianne; McKinney, Kristine; Xu, Xiaoling; Deng, Chuxia; Lavin, Martin F

    2013-04-01

    Senataxin, mutated in the human genetic disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2), plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity by coordination of transcription, DNA replication, and the DNA damage response. We demonstrate that senataxin is essential for spermatogenesis and that it functions at two stages in meiosis during crossing-over in homologous recombination and in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Disruption of the Setx gene caused persistence of DNA double-strand breaks, a defect in disassembly of Rad51 filaments, accumulation of DNA:RNA hybrids (R-loops), and ultimately a failure of crossing-over. Senataxin localised to the XY body in a Brca1-dependent manner, and in its absence there was incomplete localisation of DNA damage response proteins to the XY chromosomes and ATR was retained on the axial elements of these chromosomes, failing to diffuse out into chromatin. Furthermore persistence of RNA polymerase II activity, altered ubH2A distribution, and abnormal XY-linked gene expression in Setx⁻/⁻ revealed an essential role for senataxin in MSCI. These data support key roles for senataxin in coordinating meiotic crossing-over with transcription and in gene silencing to protect the integrity of the genome.

  8. Real-time fluorescence imaging of the DNA damage repair response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Efimova, Elena V; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    The response to DNA damage during mitosis was visualized using real-time fluorescence imaging of focus formation by the DNA-damage repair (DDR) response protein 53BP1 linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (53BP1-GFP) in the MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) pancreatic cancer cell line. To observe 53BP1-GFP foci during mitosis, MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells were imaged every 30 min by confocal microscopy. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that 11.4 ± 2.1% of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells had increased focus formation over time. Non-mitotic cells did not have an increase in 53BP1-GFP focus formation over time. Some of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells with focus formation became apoptotic. The results of the present report suggest that DNA strand breaks occur during mitosis and undergo repair, which may cause some of the mitotic cells to enter apoptosis in a phenomenon possibly related to mitotic catastrophe.

  9. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibits DNA damage response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benada, Jan; Burdová, Kamila; Lidak, Tomáš; von Morgen, Patrick; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    In response to genotoxic stress, cells protect their genome integrity by activation of a conserved DNA damage response (DDR) pathway that coordinates DNA repair and progression through the cell cycle. Extensive modification of the chromatin flanking the DNA lesion by ATM kinase and RNF8/RNF168 ubiquitin ligases enables recruitment of various repair factors. Among them BRCA1 and 53BP1 are required for homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining, respectively. Whereas mechanisms of DDR are relatively well understood in interphase cells, comparatively less is known about organization of DDR during mitosis. Although ATM can be activated in mitotic cells, 53BP1 is not recruited to the chromatin until cells exit mitosis. Here we report mitotic phosphorylation of 53BP1 by Plk1 and Cdk1 that impairs the ability of 53BP1 to bind the ubiquitinated H2A and to properly localize to the sites of DNA damage. Phosphorylation of 53BP1 at S1618 occurs at kinetochores and in cytosol and is restricted to mitotic cells. Interaction between 53BP1 and Plk1 depends on the activity of Cdk1. We propose that activity of Cdk1 and Plk1 allows spatiotemporally controlled suppression of 53BP1 function during mitosis.

  10. DNA damage and cellular death in oral mucosa cells of children who have undergone panoramic dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelieri, Fernanda; Oliveira, Gabriela R. de [Sao Paulo Metodista University (UMESP), Department of Orthodontics, Sao Bernardo do Campo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sannomiya, Eduardo K. [Sao Paulo Metodista University (UMESP), Department of Dento-Maxillofacial Radiology, Sao Bernardo do Campo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ribeiro, Daniel A. [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Department of Health Sciences, Santos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Departamento de Ciencias da Saude, Santos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-06-15

    Despite wide use as a diagnostic tool in medical and dental practice, radiography can induce cytotoxic effects and genetic damage. To evaluate DNA damage (micronucleus) and cellular death (pyknosis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis) in exfoliated buccal mucosa cells taken from healthy children following exposure to radiation during dental radiography. A total of 17 children who had undergone panoramic dental radiography were included. We found no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) between micronucleated oral mucosa cells in children before and after exposure to radiation. On the other hand, radiation did cause other nuclear alterations closely related to cytotoxicity including karyorrhexis, pyknosis and karyolysis. Taken together, these results indicate that panoramic dental radiography might not induce chromosomal damage, but may be cytotoxic. Overall, the results reinforce the importance of evaluating the health side effects of radiography and contribute to the micronucleus database, which will improve our understanding and practice of this methodology in children. (orig.)

  11. Regulation of the DNA Damage Response by DNA-PKcs Inhibitory Phosphorylation of ATM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Jiang, Wenxia; Crowe, Jennie L; Zha, Shan; Paull, Tanya T

    2017-01-05

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) regulates the DNA damage response as well as DNA double-strand break repair through homologous recombination. Here we show that ATM is hyperactive when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is chemically inhibited or when the DNA-PKcs gene is deleted in human cells. Pre-incubation of ATM protein with active DNA-PKcs also significantly reduces ATM activity in vitro. We characterize several phosphorylation sites in ATM that are targets of DNA-PKcs and show that phospho-mimetic mutations at these residues significantly inhibit ATM activity and impair ATM signaling upon DNA damage. In contrast, phospho-blocking mutations at one cluster of sites increase the frequency of apoptosis during normal cell growth. DNA-PKcs, which is integral to the non-homologous end joining pathway, thus negatively regulates ATM activity through phosphorylation of ATM. These observations illuminate an important regulatory mechanism for ATM that also controls DNA repair pathway choice.

  12. DNA damage response regulation by microRNAs as a therapeutic target in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidinia, Maryam; Yousefi, Bahman

    2016-11-01

    The inability of cancer cells in taking care of DNA damages can lead to cancer development and/or progression. Due to the essential role of DNA repair in maintaining genomic stability, tightly controlled regulatory mechanism are required for these processes. Recent studies have shown a myriad of interactions among DNA damage response (DDR) components and miRNAs. While DDR modulates miRNA expression in transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels and affects miRNA degradation, miRNAs in turn, directly modulate the expression of multiple proteins in the DDR pathways, or indirectly fine-tune the expression of such proteins. A better understanding of DDR-miRNA interactions can facilitate the development of new anticancer agents targeting miRNAs involved in the DNA repair process. In this review, we provide a brief introduction about miRNA biogenesis and functions, DDR pathways, and recent findings about DDR-microRNA interactions. Finally, the therapeutic importance of miRNAs in modulation of DDR/DNA repair mechanisms will be discussed.

  13. The DNA damage response signaling cascade regulates proliferation of the phytopathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sena-Tomás, Carmen; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Holloman, William K; Pérez-Martín, José

    2011-04-01

    In the phytopathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis, the dikaryotic state dominates the period of growth occurring during the infectious phase. Dikaryons are cells in which two nuclei, one from each parent cell, share a single cytoplasm for a period of time without undergoing nuclear fusion. In fungal cells, maintenance of the dikaryotic state requires an intricate cell division process that often involves the formation of a structure known as the clamp connection as well as the sorting of one of the nuclei to this structure to ensure that each daughter dikaryon inherits a balance of each parental genome. Here, we describe an atypical role of the DNA damage checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Atr1 during pathogenic growth of U. maydis. We found that Chk1 and Atr1 collaborate to control cell cycle arrest during the induction of the virulence program in U. maydis and that Chk1 and Atr1 work together to control the dikaryon formation. These findings uncover a link between a widely conserved signaling cascade and the virulence program in a phytopathogen. We propose a model in which adjustment of the cell cycle by the Atr1-Chk1 axis controls fidelity in dikaryon formation. Therefore, Chk1 and Atr1 emerge as critical cell type regulators in addition to their roles in the DNA damage response.

  14. MKP1 phosphatase mediates G1-specific dephosphorylation of H3Serine10P in response to DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ajit K.; Khan, Shafqat A.; Sharda, Asmita; Reddy, Divya V; Gupta, Sanjay, E-mail: sgupta@actrec.gov.in

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Reversible reduction of H3S10 phosphorylation after DNA damage is G1 phase specific. • Dynamic balance between MAP kinases, MKP1 and MSK1 regulate H3S10P during DDR. • MKP1 associates with chromatin bearing γH2AX in response to DNA damage. • Inhibition of MKP1 activity with specific inhibitor promotes radiation-induced cell death. - Abstract: Histone mark, H3S10 phosphorylation plays a dual role in a cell by maintaining relaxed chromatin for active transcription in interphase and condensed chromatin state in mitosis. The level of H3S10P has also been shown to alter on DNA damage; however, its cell cycle specific behavior and regulation during DNA damage response is largely unexplored. In the present study, we demonstrate G1 cell cycle phase specific reversible loss of H3S10P in response to IR-induced DNA damage is mediated by opposing activities of phosphatase, MKP1 and kinase, MSK1 of the MAP kinase pathway. We also show that the MKP1 recruits to the chromatin in response to DNA damage and correlates with the decrease of H3S10P, whereas MKP1 is released from chromatin during recovery phase of DDR. Furthermore, blocking of H3S10 dephosphorylation by MKP1 inhibition impairs DNA repair process and results in poor survival of WRL68 cells. Collectively, our data proposes a pathway regulating G1 cell cycle phase specific reversible reduction of H3S10P on IR induced DNA damage and also raises the possibility of combinatorial modulation of H3S10P with specific inhibitors to target the cancer cells in G1-phase of cell cycle.

  15. Axitinib induces DNA damage response leading to senescence, mitotic catastrophe, and increased NK cell recognition in human renal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Amantini, Consuelo; Santoni, Matteo; Soriani, Alessandra; Nabissi, Massimo; Cardinali, Claudio; Santoni, Angela; Santoni, Giorgio

    2015-11-03

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) including axitinib have been introduced in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) because of their anti-angiogenic properties. However, no evidence are presently available on a direct cytotoxic anti-tumor activity of axitinib in RCC.Herein we reported by western blot analysis that axitinib treatment induces a DNA damage response (DDR) initially characterized by γ-H2AX phosphorylation and Chk1 kinase activation and at later time points by p21 overexpression in A-498 and Caki-2 RCC cells although with a different potency. Analysis by immunocytochemistry for the presence of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in cellular DNA and flow cytometry using the redox-sensitive fluorescent dye DCFDA, demonstrated that DDR response is accompanied by the presence of oxidative DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This response leads to G2/M cell cycle arrest and induces a senescent-like phenotype accompanied by enlargement of cells and increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, which are abrogated by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) pre-treatment. In addition, axitinib-treated cells undergo to cell death through mitotic catastrophe characterized by micronucleation and abnormal microtubule assembly as assessed by fluorescence microscopy.On the other hand, axitinib, through the DDR induction, is also able to increase the surface NKG2D ligand expression. Accordingly, drug treatment promotes NK cell recognition and degranulation in A-498 RCC cells in a ROS-dependent manner.Collectively, our results indicate that both cytotoxic and immunomodulatory effects on RCC cells can contribute to axitinib anti-tumor activity.

  16. Identification of BC005512 as a DNA damage responsive murine endogenous retrovirus of GLN family involved in cell growth regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Wu

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity assessment is of great significance in drug safety evaluation, and microarray is a useful tool widely used to identify genotoxic stress responsive genes. In the present work, by using oligonucleotide microarray in an in vivo model, we identified an unknown gene BC005512 (abbreviated as BC, official full name: cDNA sequence BC005512, whose expression in mouse liver was specifically induced by seven well-known genotoxins (GTXs, but not by non-genotoxins (NGTXs. Bioinformatics revealed that BC was a member of the GLN family of murine endogenous retrovirus (ERV. However, the relationship to genotoxicity and the cellular function of GLN are largely unknown. Using NIH/3T3 cells as an in vitro model system and quantitative real-time PCR, BC expression was specifically induced by another seven GTXs, covering diverse genotoxicity mechanisms. Additionally, dose-response and linear regression analysis showed that expression level of BC in NIH/3T3 cells strongly correlated with DNA damage, measured using the alkaline comet assay,. While in p53 deficient L5178Y cells, GTXs could not induce BC expression. Further functional studies using RNA interference revealed that down-regulation of BC expression induced G1/S phase arrest, inhibited cell proliferation and thus suppressed cell growth in NIH/3T3 cells. Together, our results provide the first evidence that BC005512, a member from GLN family of murine ERV, was responsive to DNA damage and involved in cell growth regulation. These findings could be of great value in genotoxicity predictions and contribute to a deeper understanding of GLN biological functions.

  17. Responses of genes involved in cell cycle control to diverse DNA damaging chemicals in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gooderham Nigel J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many anticancer agents and carcinogens are DNA damaging chemicals and exposure to such chemicals results in the deregulation of cell cycle progression. The molecular mechanisms of DNA damage-induced cell cycle alteration are not well understood. We have studied the effects of etoposide (an anticancer agent, cryptolepine (CLP, a cytotoxic alkaloid, benzo [a]pyrene (BaP, a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP, a cooked-meat derived carcinogen on the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes to understand the molecular mechanisms of the cell cycle disturbance. Results A549 cells were treated with DMSO or chemicals for up to 72 h and periodically sampled for cell cycle analysis, mRNA and protein expression. DMSO treated cells showed a dominant G1 peak in cell cycle at all times examined. Etoposide and CLP both induced G2/M phase arrest yet the former altered the expression of genes functioning at multiple phases, whilst the latter was more effective in inhibiting the expression of genes in G2-M transition. Both etoposide and CLP induced an accumulation of p53 protein and upregulation of p53 transcriptional target genes. Neither BaP nor PhIP had substantial phase-specific cell cycle effect, however, they induced distinctive changes in gene expression. BaP upregulated the expression of CYP1B1 at 6–24 h and downregulated many cell cycle regulatory genes at 48–72 h. By contrast, PhIP increased the expression of many cell cycle regulatory genes. Changes in the expression of key mRNAs were confirmed at protein level. Conclusion Our experiments show that DNA damaging agents with different mechanisms of action induced distinctive changes in the expression pattern of a panel of cell cycle regulatory genes. We suggest that examining the genomic response to chemical exposure provides an exceptional opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism involved in cellular

  18. Bacterial Intoxication Evokes Cellular Senescence with Persistent DNA Damage and Cytokine Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blazkova, Hana; Krejcikova, Katerina; Moudry, Pavel;

    2009-01-01

    to such intoxication are mechanistically incompletely understood. Here we show that both normal and cancer cells (BJ, IMR-90 and WI-38 fibroblasts, HeLa and U2-OS cell lines) that survive the acute phase of intoxication by Haemophilus ducreyi CDT possess the hallmarks of cellular senescence. This characteristic...

  19. EdU induces DNA damage response and cell death in mESC in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmeier, Fanni; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Jackson, Dean A

    2013-03-01

    Recently, a novel DNA replication precursor analogue called 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) has been widely used to monitor DNA synthesis as an alternative to bromodeoxyuridine. Use of EdU benefits from simplicity and reproducibility and the simple chemical detection systems allows excellent preservation of nuclear structure. However, the alkyne moiety is highly reactive, raising the possibility that incorporation might compromise genome stability. To assess the extent of possible DNA damage, we have analysed the effect of EdU incorporation into DNA during short- and long-term cell culture using a variety of cell lines. We show that EdU incorporation has no measurable impact on the rate of elongation of replication forks during synthesis. However, using different cell lines we find that during long-term cell culture variable responses to EdU incorporation are seen, which range from delayed cell cycle progression to complete cell cycle arrest. The most profound phenotypes were seen in mouse embryonic stem cells, which following incorporation of EdU accumulated in the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle before undergoing apoptosis. In long-term cell culture, EdU incorporation also triggered a DNA damage response in all cell types analysed. Our study shows that while EdU is extremely useful to tag sites of on-going replication, for long-term studies (i.e. beyond the cell cycle in which labelling is performed), a careful analysis of cell cycle perturbations must be performed in order to ensure that any conclusions made after EdU treatment are not a direct consequence of EdU-dependent activation of cell stress responses.

  20. The Molecular Crosstalk between the MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and the DNA Damage Response — Biological and Clinical Aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medová, Michaela, E-mail: michaela.medova@dkf.unibe.ch; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Zimmer, Yitzhak, E-mail: michaela.medova@dkf.unibe.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, DKF, MEM-E807, Murtenstrasse 35, 3010 Bern (Switzerland)

    2013-12-19

    Radiation therapy remains an imperative treatment modality for numerous malignancies. Enduring significant technical achievements both on the levels of treatment planning and radiation delivery have led to improvements in local control of tumor growth and reduction in healthy tissue toxicity. Nevertheless, resistance mechanisms, which presumably also involve activation of DNA damage response signaling pathways that eventually may account for loco-regional relapse and consequent tumor progression, still remain a critical problem. Accumulating data suggest that signaling via growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, which are aberrantly expressed in many tumors, may interfere with the cytotoxic impact of ionizing radiation via the direct activation of the DNA damage response, leading eventually to so-called tumor radioresistance. The aim of this review is to overview the current known data that support a molecular crosstalk between the hepatocyte growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase MET and the DNA damage response. Apart of extending well established concepts over MET biology beyond its function as a growth factor receptor, these observations directly relate to the role of its aberrant activity in resistance to DNA damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation, which are routinely used in cancer therapy and advocate tumor sensitization towards DNA damaging agents in combination with MET targeting.

  1. Effects of Antidepressants on DSP4/CPT-Induced DNA Damage Response in Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Hilton, Benjamin A; Cui, Kui; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-08-01

    DNA damage is a form of cell stress and injury. Increased systemic DNA damage is related to the pathogenic development of neurodegenerative diseases. Depression occurs in a relatively high percentage of patients suffering from degenerative diseases, for whom antidepressants are often used to relieve depressive symptoms. However, few studies have attempted to elucidate why different groups of antidepressants have similar effects on relieving symptoms of depression. Previously, we demonstrated that neurotoxins N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4)- and camptothecin (CPT) induced the DNA damage response in SH-SY5Y cells, and DSP4 caused cell cycle arrest which was predominately in the S-phase. The present study shows that CPT treatment also resulted in similar cell cycle arrest. Some classic antidepressants could reduce the DNA damage response induced by DSP4 or CPT in SH-SY5Y cells. Cell viability examination demonstrated that both DSP4 and CPT caused cell death, which was prevented by spontaneous administration of some tested antidepressants. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that a majority of the tested antidepressants protect cells from being arrested in S-phase. These results suggest that blocking the DNA damage response may be an important pharmacologic characteristic of antidepressants. Exploring the underlying mechanisms may allow for advances in the effort to improve therapeutic strategies for depression appearing in degenerative and psychiatric diseases.

  2. The role of hnRPUL1 involved in DNA damage response is related to PARP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehui Hong

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like 1 (hnRPUL1 -also known as adenovirus early region 1B-associated proteins 5 (E1B-AP5 - plays a role in RNA metabolism. Recently, hnRPUL1 has also been shown to be involved in DNA damage response, but the function of hnRPUL1 in response to DNA damage remains unclear. Here, we have demonstrated that hnRPUL1 is associated with PARP1 and recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs sites in a PARP1-mediated poly (ADP-ribosyl ation dependent manner. In turn, hnRPUL1 knockdown enhances the recruitment of PARP1 to DSBs sites. Specifically, we showed that hnRPUL1 is also implicated in the transcriptional regulation of PARP1 gene. Thus, we propose hnRPUL1 as a new component related to PARP1 in DNA damage response and repair.

  3. ARF: a versatile DNA damage response ally at the crossroads of development and tumorigenesis

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    Athanassios eKotsinas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available ARF is a tumor suppressor protein that senses oncogenic and other stressogenic signals. It can trigger p53-dependent and -independent responses with cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction being the most prominent ones. Other ARF activities, particularly p53-independent ones, that could help in understanding cancer development and provide potential therapeutic exploitation are underrated. Although ARF is generally not expressed in normal tissues, it is essential for ocular and male germ cells development. The underlying mechanism(s in these processes, while not clearly defined, point towards a functional link between ARF, DNA damage and angiogenesis. Based on a recent study from our group demonstrating a functional interplay between ATM and ARF during carcinogenesis, we discuss the role of ARF at the crossroads of cancer and developmental processes.

  4. Increased sensitivity of DNA damage response-deficient cells to stimulated microgravity-induced DNA lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    Full Text Available Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG. In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR defects.

  5. Gain of cellular adaptation due to prolonged p53 impairment leads to functional switchover from p53 to p73 during DNA damage in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Juni; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Ray, Pallab; Hossain, Dewan Md Sakib; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Adhikary, Arghya; Chattopadhyay, Sreya; Das, Tanya; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2010-10-22

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays the central role in regulating apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. From an evolutionary perspective, the activity of p53 has to be backed up by other protein(s) in case of any functional impairment of this protein, to trigger DNA damage-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. We adopted multiple experimental approaches to demonstrate that in p53-impaired cancer cells, DNA damage caused accumulation of p53 paralogue p73 via Chk-1 that strongly impacted Bax expression and p53-independent apoptosis. On the contrary, when p53 function was restored by ectopic expression, Chk-2 induced p53 accumulation that in turn overshadowed p73 activity, suggesting an antagonistic interaction between p53 family members. To understand such interaction better, p53-expressing cells were impaired differentially for p53 activity. In wild-type p53-expressing cancer cells that were silenced for p53 for several generations, p73 was activated, whereas no such trend was observed when p53 was transiently silenced. Prolonged p53 interference, even in functional p53 settings, therefore, leads to the "gain of cellular adaptation" in a way that alters the cellular microenvironment in favor of p73 activation by altering p73-regulatory proteins, e.g. Chk1 activation and dominant negative p73 down-regulation. These findings not only unveil a hitherto unexplained mechanism underlying the functional switchover from p53 to p73, but also validate p73 as a promising and potential target for cancer therapy in the absence of functional p53.

  6. A p53-independent role for the MDM2 antagonist Nutlin-3 in DNA damage response initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sonia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian DNA-damage response (DDR has evolved to protect genome stability and maximize cell survival following DNA-damage. One of the key regulators of the DDR is p53, itself tightly regulated by MDM2. Following double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs, mediators including ATM are recruited to the site of DNA-damage. Subsequent phosphorylation of p53 by ATM and ATM-induced CHK2 results in p53 stabilization, ultimately intensifying transcription of p53-responsive genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis. Methods In the current study, we investigated the stabilization and activation of p53 and associated DDR proteins in response to treatment of human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116p53+/+ with the MDM2 antagonist, Nutlin-3. Results Using immunoblotting, Nutlin-3 was observed to stabilize p53, and activate p53 target proteins. Unexpectedly, Nutlin-3 also mediated phosphorylation of p53 at key DNA-damage-specific serine residues (Ser15, 20 and 37. Furthermore, Nutlin-3 induced activation of CHK2 and ATM - proteins required for DNA-damage-dependent phosphorylation and activation of p53, and the phosphorylation of BRCA1 and H2AX - proteins known to be activated specifically in response to DNA damage. Indeed, using immunofluorescent labeling, Nutlin-3 was seen to induce formation of γH2AX foci, an early hallmark of the DDR. Moreover, Nutlin-3 induced phosphorylation of key DDR proteins, initiated cell cycle arrest and led to formation of γH2AX foci in cells lacking p53, whilst γH2AX foci were also noted in MDM2-deficient cells. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first solid evidence showing a secondary role for Nutlin-3 as a DDR triggering agent, independent of p53 status, and unrelated to its role as an MDM2 antagonist.

  7. Mechanistic Rationale to Target PTEN-Deficient Tumor Cells with Inhibitors of the DNA Damage Response Kinase ATM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Nuala; Hanna, Conor; Walker, Steven M; Gonda, David; Li, Jie; Wikstrom, Katarina; Savage, Kienan I; Butterworth, Karl T; Chen, Clark; Harkin, D Paul; Prise, Kevin M; Kennedy, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is an important signaling molecule in the DNA damage response (DDR). ATM loss of function can produce a synthetic lethal phenotype in combination with tumor-associated mutations in FA/BRCA pathway components. In this study, we took an siRNA screening strategy to identify other tumor suppressors that, when inhibited, similarly sensitized cells to ATM inhibition. In this manner, we determined that PTEN and ATM were synthetically lethal when jointly inhibited. PTEN-deficient cells exhibited elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, increased endogenous DNA damage, and constitutive ATM activation. ATM inhibition caused catastrophic DNA damage, mitotic cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis specifically in PTEN-deficient cells in comparison with wild-type cells. Antioxidants abrogated the increase in DNA damage and ATM activation in PTEN-deficient cells, suggesting a requirement for oxidative DNA damage in the mechanism of cell death. Lastly, the ATM inhibitor KU-60019 was specifically toxic to PTEN mutant cancer cells in tumor xenografts and reversible by reintroduction of wild-type PTEN. Together, our results offer a mechanistic rationale for clinical evaluation of ATM inhibitors in PTEN-deficient tumors.

  8. DNA Damage Response and DNA Repair in Skeletal Myocytes From a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayzullina, Saniya; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    We studied DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair capacities of skeletal muscle cells from a mouse model of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by loss-of-function mutation of survival of motor neuron (Smn). Primary myocyte cultures derived from skeletal muscle satellite cells of neonatal control and mutant SMN mice had similar myotube length, myonuclei, satellite cell marker Pax7 and differentiated myotube marker myosin, and acetylcholine receptor clustering. DNA damage was induced in differentiated skeletal myotubes by γ-irradiation, etoposide, and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Unexposed control and SMA myotubes had stable genome integrity. After γ-irradiation and etoposide, myotubes repaired most DNA damage equally. Control and mutant myotubes exposed to MMS exhibited equivalent DNA damage without repair. Control and SMA myotube nuclei contained DDR proteins phospho-p53 and phospho-H2AX foci that, with DNA damage, dispersed and then re-formed similarly after recovery. We conclude that mouse primary satellite cell-derived myotubes effectively respond to and repair DNA strand-breaks, while DNA alkylation repair is underrepresented. Morphological differentiation, genome stability, genome sensor, and DNA strand-break repair potential are preserved in mouse SMA myocytes; thus, reduced SMN does not interfere with myocyte differentiation, genome integrity, and DNA repair, and faulty DNA repair is unlikely pathogenic in SMA.

  9. DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees.

  10. Endogenous c-Myc is essential for p53-induced apoptosis in response to DNA damage in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phesse, T J; Myant, K B; Cole, A M; Ridgway, R A; Pearson, H; Muncan, V; van den Brink, G R; Vousden, K H; Sears, R; Vassilev, L T; Clarke, A R; Sansom, O J

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that C-MYC may be an excellent therapeutic cancer target and a number of new agents targeting C-MYC are in preclinical development. Given most therapeutic regimes would combine C-MYC inhibition with genotoxic damage, it is important to assess the importance of C-MYC function for DNA damage signalling in vivo. In this study, we have conditionally deleted the c-Myc gene in the adult murine intestine and investigated the apoptotic response of intestinal enterocytes to DNA damage. Remarkably, c-Myc deletion completely abrogated the immediate wave of apoptosis following both ionizing irradiation and cisplatin treatment, recapitulating the phenotype of p53 deficiency in the intestine. Consistent with this, c-Myc-deficient intestinal enterocytes did not upregulate p53. Mechanistically, this was linked to an upregulation of the E3 Ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which targets p53 for degradation in c-Myc-deficient intestinal enterocytes. Further, low level overexpression of c-Myc, which does not impact on basal levels of apoptosis, elicited sustained apoptosis in response to DNA damage, suggesting c-Myc activity acts as a crucial cell survival rheostat following DNA damage. We also identify the importance of MYC during DNA damage-induced apoptosis in several other tissues, including the thymus and spleen, using systemic deletion of c-Myc throughout the adult mouse. Together, we have elucidated for the first time in vivo an essential role for endogenous c-Myc in signalling DNA damage-induced apoptosis through the control of the p53 tumour suppressor protein.

  11. Comet assay measures of DNA damage as biomarkers of irinotecan response in colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Joanna P; Smith, Andrew J O; Bowman, Karen J; Thomas, Anne L; Jones, George D D

    2015-09-01

    The use of irinotecan to treat metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) is limited by unpredictable response and variable toxicity; however, no reliable clinical biomarkers are available. Here, we report a study to ascertain whether irinotecan-induced DNA damage measures are suitable/superior biomarkers of irinotecan effect. CRC-cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) were treated in vitro with irinotecan and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were isolated from patients before and after receiving irinotecan-based chemotherapy. Levels of in vitro-, in vivo-, and ex vivo-induced DNA damage were measured using the Comet assay; correlations between damage levels with in vitro cell survival and follow-up clinical data were investigated. Irinotecan-induced DNA damage was detectable in both CRC cell-lines in vitro, with higher levels of immediate and residual damage noted for the more sensitive HT-29 cells. DNA damage was not detected in vivo, but was measurable in PBLs upon mitogenic stimulation prior to ex vivo SN-38 treatment. Results showed that, following corrections for experimental error, those patients whose PBLs demonstrated higher levels of DNA damage following 10 h of SN-38 exposure ex vivo had significantly longer times to progression than those with lower damage levels (median 291 vs. 173 days, P = 0.014). To conclude, higher levels of irinotecan-induced initial and residual damage correlated with greater cell kill in vitro and a better clinical response. Consequently, DNA damage measures may represent superior biomarkers of irinotecan effect compared to the more often-studied genetic assays for differential drug metabolism.

  12. ATM-dependent MiR-335 targets CtIP and modulates the DNA damage response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T Martin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ATM plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. We describe a new ATM-mediated DSB-induced DNA damage response pathway involving microRNA (miRNA: irradiation (IR-induced DSBs activate ATM, which leads to the downregulation of miR-335, a miRNA that targets CtIP, which is an important trigger of DNA end resection in homologous recombination repair (HRR. We demonstrate that CREB is responsible for a large portion of miR-335 expression by binding to the promoter region of miR-335. CREB binding is greatly reduced after IR, corroborating with previous studies that IR-activated ATM phosphorylates CREB to reduce its transcription activity. Overexpression of miR-335 in HeLa cells resulted in reduced CtIP levels and post-IR colony survival and BRCA1 foci formation. Further, in two patient-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines with decreased post-IR colony survival, a "radiosensitive" phenotype, we demonstrated elevated miR-335 expression, reduced CtIP levels, and reduced BRCA1 foci formation. Colony survival, BRCA1 foci, and CtIP levels were partially rescued by miRNA antisense AMO-miR-335 treatment. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that an ATM-dependent CREB-miR-335-CtIP axis influences the selection of HRR for repair of certain DSB lesions.

  13. A conserved DNA damage response pathway responsible for coupling the cell division cycle to the circadian and metabolic cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng; McKnight, Steven L

    2007-12-01

    The circadian clock drives endogenous oscillations of cellular and physiological processes with a periodicity of approximately 24 h. Progression of the cell division cycle (CDC) has been found to be coupled to the circadian clock, and it has been postulated that gating of the CDC by the circadian cycle may have evolved to protect DNA from the mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light. When grown under nutrient-limiting conditions in a chemostat, prototrophic strains of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adopt a robust metabolic cycle of ultradian dimensions that temporally compartmentalizes essential cellular events. The CDC is gated by this yeast metabolic cycle (YMC), with DNA replication strictly segregated away from the oxidative phase when cells are actively respiring. Mutants impaired in such gating allow DNA replication to take place during the respiratory phase of the YMC and have been found to suffer significantly elevated rates of spontaneous mutation. Analogous to the circadian cycle, the YMC also employs the conserved DNA checkpoint kinase Rad53/Chk2 to facilitate coupling with the CDC. These studies highlight an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that seems to confine cell division to particular temporal windows to prevent DNA damage. We hypothesize that DNA damage itself might constitute a "zeitgeber", or time giver, for both the circadian cycle and the metabolic cycle. We discuss these findings in the context of a unifying theme underlying the circadian and metabolic cycles, and explore the relevance of cell cycle gating to human diseases including cancer.

  14. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-06-24

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo.

  15. Oxidative stress and DNA damage responses to phenanthrene exposure in the estuarine guppy Poecilia vivipara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Anderson Abel de Souza; Hoff, Mariana Leivas Müller; Klein, Roberta Daniele; Cordeiro, Gilson Junior; Lencina Avila, Jannine Marquez; Costa, Patrícia Gomes; Bianchini, Adalto

    2014-07-01

    Despite ubiquitous phenanthrene contamination in aquatic coastal areas, little is known regarding its potential effects on estuarine fishes. The present work evaluated the response of a large suite of oxidative stress- and DNA damage-related biomarkers to phenanthrene exposure (10, 20 and 200 μg L(-1), 96 h) using DMSO as the solvent in estuarine guppy Poecilia vivipara (salinity 24 psu). Phenanthrene affected oxidative stress-related parameters, and decreased antioxidant defenses and reactive oxygen species in the gills and muscle overall. Lipid peroxidation occurred in muscle at 200 μg L(-1) phenanthrene. Genotoxicity was increased at 20 μg L(-1), while 200 μg L(-1) caused a relative decrease in erythrocyte release into the bloodstream. These findings indicated that phenanthrene is genotoxic and can induce oxidative stress, depending on tissue and phenanthrene concentration analyzed. Thus, some of the biomarkers analyzed in the present study are sufficiently sensitive to monitor the exposure of the guppy P. vivipara to phenanthrene in salt water. However, further studies are required for a better interpretation of the dose-response patterns observed.

  16. Dynamics of p53 and NF-κB regulation in response to DNA damage and identification of target proteins suitable for therapeutic intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poltz Rainer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome is continuously attacked by a variety of agents that cause DNA damage. Recognition of DNA lesions activates the cellular DNA damage response (DDR, which comprises a network of signal transduction pathways to maintain genome integrity. In response to severe DNA damage, cells undergo apoptosis to avoid transformation into tumour cells, or alternatively, the cells enter permanent cell cycle arrest, called senescence. Most tumour cells have defects in pathways leading to DNA repair or apoptosis. In addition, apoptosis could be counteracted by nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, the main anti-apoptotic transcription factor in the DDR. Despite the high clinical relevance, the interplay of the DDR pathways is poorly understood. For therapeutic purposes DNA damage signalling processes are induced to induce apoptosis in tumour cells. However, the efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy is strongly hampered by cell survival pathways in tumour cells. In this study logical modelling was performed to facilitate understanding of the complexity of the signal transduction networks in the DDR and to provide cancer treatment options. Results Our comprehensive discrete logical model provided new insights into the dynamics of the DDR in human epithelial tumours. We identified new mechanisms by which the cell regulates the dynamics of the activation of the tumour suppressor p53 and NF-κB. Simulating therapeutic intervention by agents causing DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs or DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs we identified candidate target proteins for sensitization of carcinomas to therapeutic intervention. Further, we enlightened the DDR in different genetic diseases, and by failure mode analysis we defined molecular defects putatively contributing to carcinogenesis. Conclusion By logic modelling we identified candidate target proteins that could be suitable for radio- and chemotherapy, and contributes to the design of more effective

  17. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement.

  18. Systems Biology Model of Interactions between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucinotta, Francis A [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGFβ pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGFβ signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to crosstalk between the TGFβ and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental approaches

  19. Systems Biology Model of Interactions Between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFbeta and ATM Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Peter [University of Oxford; Anderson, Jennifer [University of Oxford

    2014-10-02

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGFβ pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGFβ signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to cross- talk between the TGFβ and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental

  20. Regulation of DNA Damage Response by Estrogen Receptor β-Mediated Inhibition of Breast Cancer Associated Gene 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hao Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that ubiquitin E3 ligases are involved in cancer development as their mutations correlate with genomic instability and genetic susceptibility to cancer. Despite significant findings of cancer-driving mutations in the BRCA1 gene, estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancers progress upon treatment with DNA damaging-cytotoxic therapies. In order to understand the underlying mechanism by which ER-positive breast cancer cells develop resistance to DNA damaging agents, we employed an estrogen receptor agonist, Erb-041, to increase the activity of ERβ and negatively regulate the expression and function of the estrogen receptor α (ERα in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Upon Erb-041-mediated ERα down-regulation, the transcription of an ERα downstream effector, BCA2 (Breast Cancer Associated gene 2, correspondingly decreased. The ubiquitination of chromatin-bound BCA2 was induced by ultraviolet C (UVC irradiation but suppressed by Erb-041 pretreatment, resulting in a blunted DNA damage response. Upon BCA2 silencing, DNA double-stranded breaks increased with Rad51 up-regulation and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM activation. Mechanistically, UV-induced BCA2 ubiquitination and chromatin binding were found to promote DNA damage response and repair via the interaction of BCA2 with ATM, γH2AX and Rad51. Taken together, this study suggests that Erb-041 potentiates BCA2 dissociation from chromatin and co-localization with Rad51, resulting in inhibition of homologous recombination repair.

  1. Biological function and regulation of histone and non-histone lysine methylation in response to DNA damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongcan Chen; Wei-Guo Zhu

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) signaling network is initiated to protect cells from various exogenous and endogenous damage resources.Timely and accurate regulation of DDR proteins is required for distinct DNA damage repair pathways.Post-translational modifications of histone and non-histone proteins play a vital role in the DDR factor foci formation and signaling pathway.Phosphorylation,ubiquitylation,SUMOylation,neddylation,poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation,acetylation,and methylation are all involved in the spatial-temporal regulation of DDR,among which phosphorylation and ubiquitylation are well studied.Studies in the past decade also revealed extensive roles of lysine methylation in response to DNA damage.Lysine methylation is finely regulated by plenty of lysine methyltransferases,lysine demethylases,and can be recognized by proteins with chromodomain,plant homeodomain,Tudor domain,malignant brain tumor domain,or prolinetryptophan-tryptophan-proline domain.In this review,we outline the dynamics and regulation of histone lysine methylation at canonical (H3K4,H3K9,H3K27,H3K36,H3K79,and H4K20) and non-canonical sites after DNA damage,and discuss their context-specific functions in DDR protein recruitment or extraction,chromatin environment establishment,and transcriptional regulation.We also present the emerging advances of lysine methylation in non-histone proteins during DDR.

  2. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Keating, Aileen F

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6μM) for 24 or 48h. Cell viability was reduced (Padduct was detected after 24h of 6μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response.

  3. The C. elegans gene pme-5: molecular cloning and role in the DNA-damage response of a tankyrase orthologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Catherine; Stergiou, Lilli; Gagnon, Steve N; Desnoyers, Serge

    2004-02-03

    Tankyrases are recently identified proteins characterized by ankyrin repeats and a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) signature motif. In vertebrates, tankyrases mediate protein-protein interactions via the ankyrin domain. Many partners have been identified that could function in telomere maintenance, signal transduction in vesicular transport, and cell death. To further our knowledge of tankyrases and to study their function in development, we sought and found a tankyrase-related gene in Caenorhabditis elegans that we named pme-5 (poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism enzyme-5). The protein encoded includes a large ankyrin domain and a catalytic PARP domain containing the well-conserved PARP signature sequence and the regulatory region. Unlike other tankyrases, PME-5 lacks a sterile-alpha module (SAM), but has a coiled coil domain which may mediate oligomerization. We also found that pme-5 mRNA is alternatively spliced at the fifth exon, producing a long (PME-5L) and a short (PME-5S) transcript. Both isoforms are constitutively expressed during the life cycle of C. elegans. We also show DNA damage increases expression of pme-5, a response that requires the DNA damage checkpoint gene hus-1. Moreover, DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis was slightly increased in pme-5(RNAi) hermaphrodites. Altogether, these data indicate that pme-5 is part of a DNA damage response pathway which leads to apoptosis in C. elegans.

  4. The fission yeast inhibitor of growth (ING) protein Png1p functions in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Qiang; Li, Yang; Pan, Xian; Lei, Bing-Kun; Chang, Cheng; Liu, Zheng-Xun; Lu, Hong

    2010-05-21

    In budding yeast and human cells, ING (inhibitor of growth) tumor suppressor proteins play important roles in response to DNA damage by modulating chromatin structure through collaborating with histone acetyltransferase or histone deacetylase complexes. However, the biological functions of ING family proteins in fission yeast are poorly defined. Here, we report that Png1p, a fission yeast ING homolog protein, is required for cell growth under normal and DNA-damaged conditions. Png1p was further confirmed to regulate histone H4 acetylation through collaboration with the MYST family histone acetyltransferase 1 (Mst1). Additionally, both fission yeast PNG1 and MST1 can functionally complement their budding yeast correspondence homologs YNG2 and ESA1, respectively. These results suggest that ING proteins in fission yeast might also conserve function, similar to ING proteins in budding yeast and human cells. We also showed that decreased acetylation in Deltapng1 cells resulted in genome-wide down-regulation of 756 open reading frames, including the central DNA repair gene RAD22. Overexpression of RAD22 partially rescued the png1 mutant phenotype under both normal and DNA-damaged conditions. Furthermore, decreased expression of RAD22 in Deltapng1 cells was confirmed to be caused by decreased H4 acetylation at its promoter. Altogether, these results indicate that Png1p is required for histone H4 acetylation and functions upstream of RAD22 in the DNA damage response pathway.

  5. The two different isoforms of the RSC chromatin remodeling complex play distinct roles in DNA damage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Anna L; Brownlee, Peter M; Durley, Samuel C; Beacham, Tracey; Kent, Nicholas A; Downs, Jessica A

    2012-01-01

    The RSC chromatin remodeling complex has been implicated in contributing to DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in a number of studies. Both survival and levels of H2A phosphorylation in response to damage are reduced in the absence of RSC. Importantly, there is evidence for two isoforms of this complex, defined by the presence of either Rsc1 or Rsc2. Here, we investigated whether the two isoforms of RSC provide distinct contributions to DNA damage responses. First, we established that the two isoforms of RSC differ in the presence of Rsc1 or Rsc2 but otherwise have the same subunit composition. We found that both rsc1 and rsc2 mutant strains have intact DNA damage-induced checkpoint activity and transcriptional induction. In addition, both strains show reduced non-homologous end joining activity and have a similar spectrum of DSB repair junctions, suggesting perhaps that the two complexes provide the same functions. However, the hypersensitivity of a rsc1 strain cannot be complemented with an extra copy of RSC2, and likewise, the hypersensitivity of the rsc2 strain remains unchanged when an additional copy of RSC1 is present, indicating that the two proteins are unable to functionally compensate for one another in DNA damage responses. Rsc1, but not Rsc2, is required for nucleosome sliding flanking a DNA DSB. Interestingly, while swapping the domains from Rsc1 into the Rsc2 protein does not compromise hypersensitivity to DNA damage suggesting they are functionally interchangeable, the BAH domain from Rsc1 confers upon Rsc2 the ability to remodel chromatin at a DNA break. These data demonstrate that, despite the similarity between Rsc1 and Rsc2, the two different isoforms of RSC provide distinct functions in DNA damage responses, and that at least part of the functional specificity is dictated by the BAH domains.

  6. TGF-β1 accelerates the DNA damage response in epithelial cells via Smad signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeeyong; Kim, Mi-Ra; Kim, Hyun-Ji; An, You Sun; Yi, Jae Youn

    2016-08-01

    The evidence suggests that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) regulates the DNA-damage response (DDR) upon irradiation, and we previously reported that TGF-β1 induced DNA ligase IV (Lig4) expression and enhanced the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway in irradiated cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of TGF-β1 on the irradiation-induced DDRs of A431 and HaCaT cells. Cells were pretreated with or without TGF-β1 and irradiated. At 30 min post-irradiation, DDRs were detected by immunoblotting of phospho-ATM, phospho-Chk2, and the presence of histone foci (γH2AX). The levels of all three factors were similar right after irradiation regardless of TGF-β1 pretreatment. However, they soon thereafter exhibited downregulation in TGF-β1-pretreated cells, indicating the acceleration of the DDR. Treatment with a TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor (SB431542) or transfections with siRNAs against Smad2/3 or DNA ligase IV (Lig4) reversed this acceleration of the DDR. Furthermore, the frequency of irradiation-induced apoptosis was decreased by TGF-β1 pretreatment in vivo, but this effect was abrogated by SB431542. These results collectively suggest that TGF-β1 could enhance cell survival by accelerating the DDR via Smad signaling and Lig4 expression.

  7. RNF8-dependent histone ubiquitination during DNA damage response and spermatogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teng Ma; Jennifer A.Keller; Xiaochun Yu

    2011-01-01

    Histone ubiquitination regulates the chromatin structure that is important for many biological processes. Recently,ubiquitination of histones was observed during the DNA damage response (DDR), and this modification is controlled by really interesting new gene (RING) domain E3 ligase, RNF8. Together with the E2 conjugating enzyme UBC13, RNF8 catalyzes ubiquitination of the histones H2A and H2AX during the DDR, thus facilitating downstream recruitment of DDR factors, such as p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) and breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1), to the damage site.Accordingly, the RNF8 knockout mice display phenotypes associated with failed DDR, including hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, V(D)J recombination deficiency, and a predisposition to cancer. In addition to the DDR phenotypes, RNF8 knockout mice fail to generate mature sperm during spermatogenesis, resulting in male sterility. The RNF8 knockout mice also have a drastic reduction in histone ubiquitination in the testes. These findings indicate that the role of histone ubiquitination during chromatin remodeling in two different biological events could be linked by an RNF8-dependent mechanism. Here, we review the molecular mechanism of RNF8-dependent histone ubiquitination both in DDR and spermatogenesis.

  8. DNA damage response (DDR) pathway engagement in cisplatin radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Catherine R; Cooney, Sean A; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Mendonca, Marc S; Turchi, John J

    2016-04-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are commonly treated with a platinum-based chemotherapy such as cisplatin (CDDP) in combination with ionizing radiation (IR). Although clinical trials have demonstrated that the combination of CDDP and IR appear to be synergistic in terms of therapeutic efficacy, the mechanism of synergism remains largely uncharacterized. We investigated the role of the DNA damage response (DDR) in CDDP radiosensitization using two NSCLC cell lines. Using clonogenic survival assays, we determined that the cooperative cytotoxicity of CDDP and IR treatment is sequence dependent, requiring administration of CDDP prior to IR (CDDP-IR). We identified and interrogated the unique time and agent-dependent activation of the DDR in NSCLC cells treated with cisplatin-IR combination therapy. Compared to treatment with CDDP or IR alone, CDDP-IR combination treatment led to persistence of γH2Ax foci, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), for up to 24h after treatment. Interestingly, pharmacologic inhibition of DDR sensor kinases revealed the persistence of γ-H2Ax foci in CDDP-IR treated cells is independent of kinase activation. Taken together, our data suggest that delayed repair of DSBs in NSCLC cells treated with CDDP-IR contributes to CDDP radiosensitization and that alterations of the DDR pathways by inhibition of specific DDR kinases can augment CDDP-IR cytotoxicity by a complementary mechanism.

  9. Gain of Cellular Adaptation Due to Prolonged p53 Impairment Leads to Functional Switchover from p53 to p73 during DNA Damage in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays the central role in regulating apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. From an evolutionary perspective, the activity of p53 has to be backed up by other protein(s) in case of any functional impairment of this protein, to trigger DNA damage-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. We adopted multiple experimental approaches to demonstrate that in p53-impaired cancer cells, DNA damage caused accumulation of p53 paralogue p73 via Chk-1 that strongly impacted Bax expressi...

  10. PARP2 Is the Predominant Poly(ADP-Ribose Polymerase in Arabidopsis DNA Damage and Immune Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqi Song

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Poly (ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs catalyze the transfer of multiple poly(ADP-ribose units onto target proteins. Poly(ADP-ribosylation plays a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes including, most prominently, auto-activation of PARP at sites of DNA breaks to activate DNA repair processes. In humans, PARP1 (the founding and most characterized member of the PARP family accounts for more than 90% of overall cellular PARP activity in response to DNA damage. We have found that, in contrast with animals, in Arabidopsis thaliana PARP2 (At4g02390, rather than PARP1 (At2g31320, makes the greatest contribution to PARP activity and organismal viability in response to genotoxic stresses caused by bleomycin, mitomycin C or gamma-radiation. Plant PARP2 proteins carry SAP DNA binding motifs rather than the zinc finger domains common in plant and animal PARP1 proteins. PARP2 also makes stronger contributions than PARP1 to plant immune responses including restriction of pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato growth and reduction of infection-associated DNA double-strand break abundance. For poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase (PARG enzymes, we find that Arabidopsis PARG1 and not PARG2 is the major contributor to poly(ADP-ribose removal from acceptor proteins. The activity or abundance of PARP2 is influenced by PARP1 and PARG1. PARP2 and PARP1 physically interact with each other, and with PARG1 and PARG2, suggesting relatively direct regulatory interactions among these mediators of the balance of poly(ADP-ribosylation. As with plant PARP2, plant PARG proteins are also structurally distinct from their animal counterparts. Hence core aspects of plant poly(ADP-ribosylation are mediated by substantially different enzymes than in animals, suggesting the likelihood of substantial differences in regulation.

  11. MRNIP/C5orf45 Interacts with the MRN Complex and Contributes to the DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Staples

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Through an RNAi-based screen for previously uncharacterized regulators of genome stability, we have identified the human protein C5orf45 as an important factor in preventing the accumulation of DNA damage in human cells. Here, we functionally characterize C5orf45 as a binding partner of the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN damage-sensing complex. Hence, we rename C5orf45 as MRNIP for MRN-interacting protein (MRNIP. We find that MRNIP is rapidly recruited to sites of DNA damage. Cells depleted of MRNIP display impaired chromatin loading of the MRN complex, resulting in reduced DNA end resection and defective ATM-mediated DNA damage signaling, a reduced ability to repair DNA breaks, and radiation sensitivity. Finally, we show that MRNIP phosphorylation on serine 115 leads to its nuclear localization, and this modification is required for MRNIP’s role in promoting genome stability. Collectively, these data reveal that MRNIP is an important component of the human DNA damage response.

  12. Keratin23 (KRT23 knockdown decreases proliferation and affects the DNA damage response of colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Birkenkamp-Demtröder

    Full Text Available Keratin 23 (KRT23 is strongly expressed in colon adenocarcinomas but absent in normal colon mucosa. Array based methylation profiling of 40 colon samples showed that the promoter of KRT23 was methylated in normal colon mucosa, while hypomethylated in most adenocarcinomas. Promoter methylation correlated with absent expression, while increased KRT23 expression in tumor samples correlated with promoter hypomethylation, as confirmed by bisulfite sequencing. Demethylation induced KRT23 expression in vitro. Expression profiling of shRNA mediated stable KRT23 knockdown in colon cancer cell lines showed that KRT23 depletion affected molecules of the cell cycle and DNA replication, recombination and repair. In vitro analyses confirmed that KRT23 depletion significantly decreased the cellular proliferation of SW948 and LS1034 cells and markedly decreased the expression of genes involved in DNA damage response, mainly molecules of the double strand break repair homologous recombination pathway. KRT23 knockdown decreased the transcript and protein expression of key molecules as e.g. MRE11A, E2F1, RAD51 and BRCA1. Knockdown of KRT23 rendered colon cancer cells more sensitive to irradiation and reduced proliferation of the KRT23 depleted cells compared to irradiated control cells.

  13. Role of Inositol Phosphosphingolipid Phospholipase C1, the Yeast Homolog of Neutral Sphingomyelinases in DNA Damage Response and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushlendra Tripathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids play a very crucial role in many diseases and are well-known as signaling mediators in many pathways. Sphingolipids are produced during the de novo process in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum from the nonsphingolipid precursor and comprise both structural and bioactive lipids. Ceramide is the central core of the sphingolipid pathway, and its production has been observed following various treatments that can induce several different cellular effects including growth arrest, DNA damage, apoptosis, differentiation, and senescence. Ceramides are generally produced through the sphingomyelin hydrolysis and catalyzed by the enzyme sphingomyelinase (SMase in mammals. Presently, there are many known SMases and they are categorized into three groups acid SMases (aSMases, alkaline SMases (alk-SMASES, and neutral SMases (nSMases. The yeast homolog of mammalians neutral SMases is inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C. Yeasts generally have inositol phosphosphingolipids instead of sphingomyelin, which may act as a homolog of mammalian sphingomyelin. In this review, we shall explain the structure and function of inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C1, its localization inside the cells, mechanisms, and its roles in various cell responses during replication stresses and diseases. This review will also give a new basis for our understanding for the mechanisms and nature of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C1/nSMase.

  14. Persistent activation of DNA damage signaling in response to complex mixtures of PAHs in air particulate matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, Ian W.H., E-mail: Ian.Jarvis@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Bergvall, Christoffer, E-mail: Christoffer.Bergvall@anchem.su.se [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 16, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Bottai, Matteo, E-mail: Matteo.Bottai@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Westerholm, Roger, E-mail: Roger.Westerholm@anchem.su.se [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 16, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Stenius, Ulla, E-mail: Ulla.Stenius@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Dreij, Kristian, E-mail: Kristian.Dreij@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in air particulate matter (PM) and have been associated with many adverse human health effects including cancer and respiratory disease. However, due to their complexity, the risk of exposure to mixtures is difficult to estimate. In the present study the effects of binary mixtures of benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and complex mixtures of PAHs in urban air PM extracts on DNA damage signaling was investigated. Applying a statistical model to the data we observed a more than additive response for binary mixtures of BP and DBP on activation of DNA damage signaling. Persistent activation of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) was observed at significantly lower BP equivalent concentrations in air PM extracts than BP alone. Activation of DNA damage signaling was also more persistent in air PM fractions containing PAHs with more than four aromatic rings suggesting larger PAHs contribute a greater risk to human health. Altogether our data suggests that human health risk assessment based on additivity such as toxicity equivalency factor scales may significantly underestimate the risk of exposure to complex mixtures of PAHs. The data confirms our previous findings with PAH-contaminated soil (Niziolek-Kierecka et al., 2012) and suggests a possible role for Chk1 Ser317 phosphorylation as a biological marker for future analyses of complex mixtures of PAHs. -- Highlights: ► Benzo[a]pyrene (BP), dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and air PM PAH extracts were compared. ► Binary mixture of BP and DBP induced a more than additive DNA damage response. ► Air PM PAH extracts were more potent than toxicity equivalency factor estimates. ► Larger PAHs (> 4 rings) contribute more to the genotoxicity of PAHs in air PM. ► Chk1 is a sensitive marker for persistent activation of DNA damage signaling from PAH mixtures.

  15. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu; Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.

  16. Bisbenzamidine derivative, pentamidine represses DNA damage response through inhibition of histone H2A acetylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohba Reiko

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MRE11 is an important nuclease which functions in the end-resection step of homologous recombination (HR repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. As MRE11-deficient ATLD cells exhibit hyper radio-sensitivity and impaired DSB repair, MRE11 inhibitors could possibly function as potent radio-sensitizers. Therefore, we investigated whether a bisbenzamidine derivative, pentamidine, which can inhibit endoexonuclease activity, might influence DSB-induced damage responses via inhibition of MRE11. Results We first clarified that pentamidine inhibited MRE11 nuclease activity and also reduced ATM kinase activity in vitro. Pentamidine increased the radio-sensitivity of HeLa cells, suggesting that this compound could possibly influence DNA damage response factors in vivo. Indeed, we found that pentamidine reduced the accumulation of γ-H2AX, NBS1 and phospho-ATM at the sites of DSBs. Furthermore, pentamidine decreased HR activity in vivo. Pentamidine was found to inhibit the acetylation of histone H2A which could contribute both to inhibition of IR-induced focus formation and HR repair. These results suggest that pentamidine might exert its effects by inhibiting histone acetyltransferases. We found that pentamidine repressed the activity of Tip60 acetyltransferase which is known to acetylate histone H2A and that knockdown of Tip60 by siRNA reduced HR activity. Conclusion These results indicate that inhibition of Tip60 as well as hMRE11 nuclease by pentamidine underlies the radiosensitizing effects of this compound making it an excellent sensitizer for radiotherapy or chemotherapy.

  17. Nuclear dynamics of RAD52 group homologous recombination proteins in response to DNA damage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Essers (Jeroen); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); L.R. van Veelen (Lieneke); C. Paulusma (Coen); A.L. Nigg (Alex); A. Pastink (Albert); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractRecombination between homologous DNA molecules is essential for the proper maintenance and duplication of the genome, and for the repair of exogenously induced DNA damage such as double-strand breaks. Homologous recombination requires the RAD52 group proteins, including Rad51, Rad52 and

  18. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lans (Hannes); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired prope

  19. The FHA domain determines Drosophila Chk2/Mnk localization to key mitotic structures and is essential for early embryonic DNA damage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Saeko; Collins, Eric R; Kurahashi, Kayo

    2015-05-15

    DNA damage responses, including mitotic centrosome inactivation, cell-cycle delay in mitosis, and nuclear dropping from embryo cortex, maintain genome integrity in syncytial Drosophila embryos. A conserved signaling kinase, Chk2, known as Mnk/Loki, is essential for the responses. Here we demonstrate that functional EGFP-Mnk expressed from a transgene localizes to the nucleus, centrosomes, interkinetochore/centromere region, midbody, and pseudocleavage furrows without DNA damage and in addition forms numerous foci/aggregates on mitotic chromosomes upon DNA damage. We expressed EGFP-tagged Mnk deletion or point mutation variants and investigated domain functions of Mnk in vivo. A triple mutation in the phosphopeptide-binding site of the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain disrupted normal Mnk localization except to the nucleus. The mutation also disrupted Mnk foci formation on chromosomes upon DNA damage. FHA mutations and deletion of the SQ/TQ-cluster domain (SCD) abolished Mnk transphosphorylations and autophosphorylations, indicative of kinase activation after DNA damage. A potent NLS was found at the C-terminus, which is required for normal Mnk function. We propose that the FHA domain in Mnk plays essential dual functions in mediating embryonic DNA damage responses by means of its phosphopeptide-binding ability: activating Mnk in the nucleus upon DNA damage and recruiting Mnk to multiple subcellular structures independently of DNA damage.

  20. Phosphorylation of Hdmx mediates its Hdm2- and ATM-dependent degradation in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereg, Yaron; Shkedy, Dganit; de Graaf, Petra; Meulmeester, Erik; Edelson-Averbukh, Marina; Salek, Mogjiborahman; Biton, Sharon; Teunisse, Amina F A S; Lehmann, Wolf D; Jochemsen, Aart G; Shiloh, Yosef

    2005-04-05

    Maintenance of genomic stability depends on the DNA damage response, an extensive signaling network that is activated by DNA lesions such as double-strand breaks (DSBs). The primary activator of the mammalian DSB response is the nuclear protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated (ATM), which phosphorylates key players in various arms of this network. The activation and stabilization of the p53 protein play a major role in the DNA damage response and are mediated by ATM-dependent posttranslational modifications of p53 and Mdm2, a ubiquitin ligase of p53. p53's response to DNA damage also depends on Mdm2-dependent proteolysis of Mdmx, a homologue of Mdm2 that represses p53's transactivation function. Here we show that efficient damage-induced degradation of human Hdmx depends on functional ATM and at least three sites on the Hdmx that are phosphorylated in response to DSBs. One of these sites, S403, is a direct ATM target. Accordingly, each of these sites is important for Hdm2-mediated ubiquitination of Hdmx after DSB induction. These results demonstrate a sophisticated mechanism whereby ATM fine-tunes the optimal activation of p53 by simultaneously modifying each player in the process.

  1. Mathematical modelling of p53 basal dynamics and DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Ket Hing; Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Kulasiri, Don

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor protein is a transcription factor that activates genes that result in cell cycle arrest, DNA damage repair, senescence or apoptosis. Recent individual cell studies have indicated that p53 activation is highly regulated in response to stressed conditions and non-stressed (normal proliferating) conditions in cells. The aim of this research is to investigate the design principles behind the precise regulation of p53 activation, under normal and stressed conditions. We extended the Sun et al. (2011) mathematical model of delay differential equations by incorporating the most recently found molecular interactions and hypotheses. In particular, we found that the core regulatory network consists of ATM, Mdm2, MdmX, Wip1 and p53. Our model of the p53 core regulatory feedback mechanisms can reproduce a series of repeated pulses in stressed conditions with appropriate induction of cell cycle arrest, and one or two spontaneous pulses (basal dynamics) in non-stressed conditions and these are consistent with the recent experimental findings. Our results show that the p53 spontaneous pulses are due to intrinsic DNA double strand breaks in normal proliferating cells, and p53 auto-regulation (positive feedback loop) allows threshold activation of p53 in generating these pulses. It also shows that the p53 dynamics are excitable; bifurcation analysis revealed a spectrum of p53 behaviour under stressed and non-stressed (normal) conditions on the basis of stress signal activation rate, and characterised p53 dynamics as Type II excitability. Additionally, the model makes testable predictions on pharmacological intervention to reactivate p53. Importantly, we reveal novel findings on the mechanism of threshold activation of p53 pulsatile and oscillatory dynamics that are important for its physiological function as the guardian of the genome.

  2. A Novel Aspect of Tumorigenesis—BMI1 Functions in Regulating DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozeng Lin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BMI1 plays critical roles in maintaining the self-renewal of hematopoietic, neural, intestinal stem cells, and cancer stem cells (CSCs for a variety of cancer types. BMI1 promotes cell proliferative life span and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. Upregulation of BMI1 occurs in multiple cancer types and is associated with poor prognosis. Mechanistically, BMI1 is a subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1, and binds the catalytic RING2/RING1b subunit to form a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase. Through mono-ubiquitination of histone H2A at lysine 119 (H2A-K119Ub, BMI1 represses multiple gene loci; among these, the INK4A/ARF locus has been most thoroughly investigated. The locus encodes the p16INK4A and p14/p19ARF tumor suppressors that function in the pRb and p53 pathways, respectively. Its repression contributes to BMI1-derived tumorigenesis. BMI1 also possesses other oncogenic functions, specifically its regulative role in DNA damage response (DDR. In this process, BMI1 ubiquitinates histone H2A and γH2AX, thereby facilitating the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs through stimulating homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. Additionally, BMI1 compromises DSB-induced checkpoint activation independent of its-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. We review the emerging role of BMI1 in DDR regulation and discuss its impact on BMI1-derived tumorigenesis.

  3. Cellular concentrations of DDB2 regulate dynamic binding of DDB1 at UV-induced DNA damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alekseev, S.; Luijsterburg, M.S.; Pines, A.; Geverts, B.; Mari, P.-O.; Giglia-Mari, G.; Lans, H.; Houtsmuller, A.B.; Mullenders, L.H.F.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Vermeulen, W.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the principal pathway for counteracting cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of UV irradiation. To provide insight into the in vivo regulation of the DNA damage recognition step of global genome NER (GG-NER), we constructed cell lines expressing fluorescently tagged da

  4. Protein kinase C{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Hai, Naama; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Shahaf, Galit [The Shraga Segal Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, The Cancer Research Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel); Gopas, Jacob [The Shraga Segal Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, The Cancer Research Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel); The Department of Oncology, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Livneh, Etta, E-mail: etta@bgu.ac.il [The Shraga Segal Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, The Cancer Research Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Protein kinase C-eta (PKC{eta}) is an upstream regulator of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway. {yields} PKC{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in non-stressed conditions and in response to DNA damage. {yields} PKC{eta} regulates NF-{kappa}B by activating I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and inducing I{kappa}B degradation. -- Abstract: The nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-{kappa}B in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-{kappa}B regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKC{eta}) regulates NF-{kappa}B upstream signaling by activating the I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and the degradation of I{kappa}B. Furthermore, PKC{eta} enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-{kappa}B under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKC{eta} confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKC{eta} is involved in NF-{kappa}B signaling leading to drug resistance.

  5. Suppression of the DNA damage response in acute myeloid leukemia versus myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehrer, S; Adès, L; Tajeddine, N; Hofmann, W K; Kriener, S; Bug, G; Ottmann, O G; Ruthardt, M; Galluzzi, L; Fouassier, C; Tailler, M; Olaussen, K A; Gardin, C; Eclache, V; de Botton, S; Thepot, S; Fenaux, P; Kroemer, G

    2009-06-04

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the evolution from the preleukemic entities of low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) to the less favorable forms of high-risk MDS, as well as those enabling transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML), are still incompletely understood. Abundant evidence from solid tumors demonstrates that preneoplastic lesions activate signaling pathways of a DNA damage response (DDR), which functions as an 'anticancer barrier' hindering tumorigenesis. Testing the hypothesis that subgroups of MDS and AML differ with respect to DDR, we first assessed markers of DDR (phosphorylation of ATM, Chk-1, Chk-2 and H2AX) in cell lines representing different entities of MDS (P39, MOLM-13) and AML (MV4-11, KG-1) before and after gamma-irradiation. Although gamma-irradiation induced apoptosis and G(2)/M arrest and a concomitant increase in the phosphorylation of ATM, Chk-1 and H2AX in MDS-derived cell lines, this radiation response was attenuated in the AML-derived cell lines. It is noteworthy that KG-1, but not P39 cells exhibit signs of an endogenous activation of the DDR. Similarly, we found that the frequency of P-ATM(+) cells detectable in bone marrow (BM) biopsies increased in samples from patients with AML as compared with high-risk MDS samples and significantly correlated with the percentage of BM blasts. In contrast, the frequency of gamma-H2AX(+) cells was heterogeneous in all subgroups of AML and MDS. Whereas intermediate-1 MDS samples contained as little P-Chk-1 and P-Chk-2 as healthy controls, staining for both checkpoint kinases increased in intermediate-2 and high-risk MDS, yet declined to near-to-background levels in AML samples. Thus the activation of Chk-1 and Chk-2 behaves in accord with the paradigm established for solid tumors, whereas ATM is activated during and beyond transformation. In conclusion, we demonstrate the heterogeneity of the DDR response in MDS and AML and provide evidence for its selective suppression in AML

  6. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixin Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague–Dawley (SD rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1 and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR, ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo.

  7. Targeting Werner syndrome protein sensitizes U-2 OS osteosarcoma cells to selenium-induced DNA damage response and necrotic death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Wu, Ryan T Y; Wu, Min;

    2012-01-01

    in mouse models of cancer. To test the hypothesis that targeting WRN can potentiate selenium toxicity in cancer cells, isogenic WRN small hairpin RNA (shRNA) and control shRNA U-2 OS osteosarcoma cells were treated with MSeA for 2d, followed by recovery for up to 7d. WRN deficiency sensitized U-2 OS cells......Mutations in the Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a caretaker of the genome, result in Werner syndrome, which is characterized by premature aging phenotypes and cancer predisposition. Methylseleninic acid (MSeA) can activate DNA damage responses and is a superior compound to suppress tumorigenesis......, but promoted recovery from the MSeA-induced DNA damage. Taken together, WRN protects U-2 OS osteosarcoma cells against MSeA-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting that oxidative DNA repair pathway is a promising target for improving the efficacy of selenium on tumor suppression....

  8. Malfunctioning DNA damage response (DDR) leads to the degeneration of nigro-striatal pathway in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Michal; Galron, Ronit; Frenkel, Dan; Mandelbaum, Gil; Shiloh, Yosef; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Barzilai, Ari

    2012-03-01

    Pronounced neuropathology is a feature of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), which are both genomic instability syndromes. The Nbs1 protein, which is defective in NBS, is a component of the Mre11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) complex. This complex plays a major role in the early phase of the cellular response to double strand breaks (DSBs) in the DNA. Among others, MRN is required for timely activation of the protein kinase ATM (A-T mutated), which is disrupted in patients with A-T. Earlier reports show that Atm-deficient mice exhibit severe degeneration of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive dopaminergic nigro-striatal neurons and their terminals in the striatum. This cell loss is accompanied by a large reduction in immunoreactivity for the dopamine transporter protein (DAT) in the striatum. To test whether Nbs1 inactivation also affects the integrity of the nigro-striatal pathway, we examined this pathway in a murine model with conditional inactivation of the Nbs1 gene in central nervous system (Nbs1-CNS-Δ). We report that this model has a reduction in TH-positive cells in the substantia nigra. This phenomenon was seen at very early age, while Atm-/- mice showed a progressive age-dependent reduction. Furthermore, we observed an age-dependent increase in the level of TH in the striatum of Atm-/- and Nbs1-CNS-Δ mice. In addition to the altered expression of TH, we also found a reduction of DAT in the striatum of both Atm-/- and Nbs1-CNS-Δ mice at 60 days of age. Finally, microglial recruitment and alterations in the levels of various neurotrophic factors were also observed. These results indicate that malfunctioning DNA damage response severely affects the integrity of the nigro-striatal pathway and suggest a new neurodegenerative pathway in Parkinsonian syndromes.

  9. Impact of tributyltin on antioxidant and DNA damage response in spermatozoa of freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, K Umaa; Musthafa, M Saiyad; War, Mehrajuddin; Al-Sadoon, Mohammad K; Paray, Bilal Ahmad; Shareef, T H Mohamed Ahadhu; Nawas, P Mohideen Askar

    2015-12-01

    Effects of tributyltin (TBT) on antioxidant [total superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR)] and DNA damage levels in the spermatozoa were studied and reported here for the first time in the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Three groups of (n = 10 in each group) fishes were exposed to three different nominal concentrations of TBT viz., 1, 2, and 4 mg L(-1) along with control group for 90 days. Significant decrease of antioxidant and increased DNA damage levels were seen at higher doses of 2 and 4 mg L(-1). In prawn, the antioxidant level plays a vital role in sperm protection, activation, differential functions related to the physiology, and reproductive behavior. This study serves as a biomonitoring tool to assess the TBT effects on reproductive behavior of aquatic biota.

  10. A distinct response to endogenous DNA damage in the development of Nbs1-deficient cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Li; Yun-Gui Yang; Yunzhou Gao; Zhao-Qi Wang; Wei-Min Tong

    2012-01-01

    Microcephaly is a clinical characteristic for human nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS,mutated in NBS1 gene),a chromosomal instability syndrome.However,the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains elusive.In the present study,we demonstrate that neuronal disruption ofNBS (Nbn in mice) causes microcephaly characterized by the reduction of cerebral cortex and corpus cailosum,recapitulating neuronal anomalies in human NBS.Nbs1-deficient neocortex shows accumulative endogenous DNA damage and defective activation ofAtaxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR)-Chk1 pathway upon DNA damage.Notably,in contrast to massive apoptotic cell death in Nbs1-deficient cerebella,activation of p53 leads to a defective neuroprogenitor proliferation in neocortex,likely via specific persistent induction of hematopoietic zinc finger (Hzf) that preferentially promotes p53-mediated cell cycle arrest whilst inhibiting apoptosis.Moreover,Trp53 mutations substantially rescue the microcephaly in Nbs1-deficient mice.Thus,the present results reveal the first clue that developing neurons at different regions of brain selectively respond to endogenous DNA damage,and underscore an important role for Nbs1 in neurogenesis.

  11. DNA Damage Signaling Is Induced in the Absence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic DNA Replication and in Response to Expression of ZEBRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang'ondu, Ruth; Teal, Stuart; Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV), like other oncogenic viruses, modulates the activity of cellular DNA damage responses (DDR) during its life cycle. Our aim was to characterize the role of early lytic proteins and viral lytic DNA replication in activation of DNA damage signaling during the EBV lytic cycle. Our data challenge the prevalent hypothesis that activation of DDR pathways during the EBV lytic cycle occurs solely in response to large amounts of exogenous double stranded DNA products generated during lytic viral DNA replication. In immunofluorescence or immunoblot assays, DDR activation markers, specifically phosphorylated ATM (pATM), H2AX (γH2AX), or 53BP1 (p53BP1), were induced in the presence or absence of viral DNA amplification or replication compartments during the EBV lytic cycle. In assays with an ATM inhibitor and DNA damaging reagents in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, γH2AX induction was necessary for optimal expression of early EBV genes, but not sufficient for lytic reactivation. Studies in lytically reactivated EBV-positive cells in which early EBV proteins, BGLF4, BGLF5, or BALF2, were not expressed showed that these proteins were not necessary for DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle. Expression of ZEBRA, a viral protein that is necessary for EBV entry into the lytic phase, induced pATM foci and γH2AX independent of other EBV gene products. ZEBRA mutants deficient in DNA binding, Z(R183E) and Z(S186E), did not induce foci of pATM. ZEBRA co-localized with HP1β, a heterochromatin associated protein involved in DNA damage signaling. We propose a model of DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle in which ZEBRA induces ATM kinase phosphorylation, in a DNA binding dependent manner, to modulate gene expression. ATM and H2AX phosphorylation induced prior to EBV replication may be critical for creating a microenvironment of viral and cellular gene expression that enables lytic cycle progression.

  12. Robust DNA Damage Response and Elevated Reactive Oxygen Species in TINF2-Mutated Dyskeratosis Congenita Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Pereboeva

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis Congenita (DC is an inherited multisystem premature aging disorder with characteristic skin and mucosal findings as well as a predisposition to cancer and bone marrow failure. DC arises due to gene mutations associated with the telomerase complex or telomere maintenance, resulting in critically shortened telomeres. The pathogenesis of DC, as well as several congenital bone marrow failure (BMF syndromes, converges on the DNA damage response (DDR pathway and subsequent elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Historically, DC patients have had poor outcomes following bone marrow transplantation (BMT, perhaps as a consequence of an underlying DNA hypersensitivity to cytotoxic agents. Previously, we demonstrated an activated DDR and increased ROS, augmented by chemotherapy and radiation, in somatic cells isolated from DC patients with a mutation in the RNA component of telomerase, TERC. The current study was undertaken to determine whether previous findings related to ROS and DDR in TERC patients' cells could be extended to other DC mutations. Of particular interest was whether an antioxidant approach could counter increased ROS and decrease DC pathologies. To test this, we examined lymphocytes from DC patients from different DC mutations (TERT, TINF2, and TERC for the presence of an active DDR and increased ROS. All DC mutations led to increased steady-state p53 (2-fold to 10-fold and ROS (1.5-fold to 2-fold. Upon exposure to ionizing radiation (XRT, DC cells increased in both DDR and ROS to a significant degree. Exposing DC cells to hydrogen peroxide also revealed that DC cells maintain a significant oxidant burden compared to controls (1.5-fold to 3-fold. DC cell culture supplemented with N-acetylcysteine, or alternatively grown in low oxygen, afforded significant proliferative benefits (proliferation: maximum 2-fold increase; NAC: 5-fold p53 decrease; low oxygen: maximum 3.5-fold p53 decrease. Together, our data supports a

  13. DNA-damage response gene GADD45A induces differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells without inhibiting cell cycle or survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Susanne; Thalheimer, Frederic B; Haetscher, Nadine; Rehage, Maike; Schroeder, Timm; Rieger, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood cell production life-long by their unique abilities of self-renewal and differentiation into all blood cell lineages. Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is induced by genotoxic stress in HSCs. GADD45A has been implicated in cell cycle control, cell death and senescence, as well as in DNA-damage repair. In general, GADD45A provides cellular stability by either arresting the cell cycle progression until DNA damage is repaired or, in cases of fatal damage, by inducing apoptosis. However, the function of GADD45A in hematopoiesis remains controversial. We revealed the changes in murine HSC fate control orchestrated by the expression of GADD45A at single cell resolution. In contrast to other cellular systems, GADD45A expression did not cause a cell cycle arrest or an alteration in the decision between cell survival and apoptosis in HSCs. Strikingly, GADD45A strongly induced and accelerated the differentiation program in HSCs. Continuous tracking of individual HSCs and their progeny via time-lapse microscopy elucidated that once GADD45A was expressed, HSCs differentiate into committed progenitors within 29 hours. GADD45A-expressing HSCs failed to long-term reconstitute the blood of recipients by inducing multilineage differentiation in vivo. Importantly, γ-irradiation of HSCs induced their differentiation by upregulating endogenous GADD45A. The differentiation induction by GADD45A was transmitted by activating p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and allowed the generation of megakaryocytic-erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages. These data indicate that genotoxic stress-induced GADD45A expression in HSCs prevents their fatal transformation by directing them into differentiation and thereby clearing them from the system.

  14. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2016-05-11

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence) in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress) DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E₂, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional "repair and survive, or die" hypothesis.

  15. The DNA damage response induces inflammation and senescence by inhibiting autophagy of GATA4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, Chanhee; Xu, Qikai; Martin, Timothy D; Li, Mamie Z; Demaria, Marco; Aron, Liviu; Lu, Tao; Yankner, Bruce A; Campisi, Judith; Elledge, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a terminal stress-activated program controlled by the p53 and p16(INK4a) tumor suppressor proteins. A striking feature of senescence is the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), a pro-inflammatory response linked to tumor promotion and aging. We have identified the

  16. Bone marrow failure in Fanconi anemia is triggered by an exacerbated p53/p21 DNA damage response that impairs hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccaldi, Raphael; Parmar, Kalindi; Mouly, Enguerran; Delord, Marc; Kim, Jung Min; Regairaz, Marie; Pla, Marika; Vasquez, Nadia; Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Pondarre, Corinne; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Gluckman, Eliane; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Leblanc, Thierry; Larghero, Jérôme; Grompe, Markus; Socié, Gérard; D'Andrea, Alan D; Soulier, Jean

    2012-07-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited DNA repair deficiency syndrome. FA patients undergo progressive bone marrow failure (BMF) during childhood, which frequently requires allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The pathogenesis of this BMF has been elusive to date. Here we found that FA patients exhibit a profound defect in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) that is present before the onset of clinical BMF. In response to replicative stress and unresolved DNA damage, p53 is hyperactivated in FA cells and triggers a late p21(Cdkn1a)-dependent G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest. Knockdown of p53 rescued the HSPC defects observed in several in vitro and in vivo models, including human FA or FA-like cells. Taken together, our results identify an exacerbated p53/p21 "physiological" response to cellular stress and DNA damage accumulation as a central mechanism for progressive HSPC elimination in FA patients, and have implications for clinical care.

  17. Cu(II)-vitamin D interaction leads to free radical-mediated cellular DNA damage: a novel putative mechanism for its selective cytotoxic action against malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Asim; Chibber, Sandesh; Naseem, Imrana

    2015-03-01

    Vitamin D (vit D) is a known anticancer molecule, and cancer cells are reported to have elevated levels of Cu(II) ions. In this study, we show that interaction of vit D and Cu(II) leads to the formation of hydroxyl free radicals, superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, which causes severe oxidative stress, selectively in malignant cells. We show that the production of these reactive oxygen species causes cellular DNA fragmentation which may cause cell death. A novel putative chemical mechanism explaining how vit D causes cell death by DNA damage, selectively in malignant cells, is proposed.

  18. CRN13 candidate effectors from plant and animal eukaryotic pathogens are DNA-binding proteins which trigger host DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Garcés, Diana; Camborde, Laurent; Pel, Michiel J C; Jauneau, Alain; Martinez, Yves; Néant, Isabelle; Leclerc, Catherine; Moreau, Marc; Dumas, Bernard; Gaulin, Elodie

    2016-04-01

    To successfully colonize their host, pathogens produce effectors that can interfere with host cellular processes. Here we investigated the function of CRN13 candidate effectors produced by plant pathogenic oomycetes and detected in the genome of the amphibian pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (BdCRN13). When expressed in Nicotiana, AeCRN13, from the legume root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, increases the susceptibility of the leaves to the oomycete Phytophthora capsici. When transiently expressed in amphibians or plant cells, AeCRN13 and BdCRN13 localize to the cell nuclei, triggering aberrant cell development and eventually causing cell death. Using Förster resonance energy transfer experiments in plant cells, we showed that both CRN13s interact with nuclear DNA and trigger plant DNA damage response (DDR). Mutating key amino acid residues in a predicted HNH-like endonuclease motif abolished the interaction of AeCRN13 with DNA, the induction of DDR and the enhancement of Nicotiana susceptibility to P. capsici. Finally, H2AX phosphorylation, a marker of DNA damage, and enhanced expression of genes involved in the DDR were observed in A. euteiches-infected Medicago truncatula roots. These results show that CRN13 from plant and animal eukaryotic pathogens promotes host susceptibility by targeting nuclear DNA and inducing DDR.

  19. Systems biology approach identifies the kinase Csnk1a1 as a regulator of the DNA damage response in embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carreras Puigvert, Jordi; von Stechow, Louise; Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah

    2013-01-01

    In pluripotent stem cells, DNA damage triggers loss of pluripotency and apoptosis as a safeguard to exclude damaged DNA from the lineage. An intricate DNA damage response (DDR) signaling network ensures that the response is proportional to the severity of the damage. We combined an RNA interference...... screen targeting all kinases, phosphatases, and transcription factors with global transcriptomics and phosphoproteomics to map the DDR in mouse embryonic stem cells treated with the DNA cross-linker cisplatin. Networks derived from canonical pathways shared in all three data sets were implicated in DNA...... damage repair, cell cycle and survival, and differentiation. Experimental probing of these networks identified a mode of DNA damage-induced Wnt signaling that limited apoptosis. Silencing or deleting the p53 gene demonstrated that genotoxic stress elicited Wnt signaling in a p53-independent manner...

  20. Ubiquitin Accumulation on Disease Associated Protein Aggregates Is Correlated with Nuclear Ubiquitin Depletion, Histone De-Ubiquitination and Impaired DNA Damage Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Yehuda, Adi; Risheq, Marwa; Novoplansky, Ofra; Bersuker, Kirill; Kopito, Ron R.; Goldberg, Michal; Brandeis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Deposition of ubiquitin conjugates on inclusion bodies composed of protein aggregates is a definitive cytopathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases. We show that accumulation of ubiquitin on polyQ IB, associated with Huntington’s disease, is correlated with extensive depletion of nuclear ubiquitin and histone de-ubiquitination. Histone ubiquitination plays major roles in chromatin regulation and DNA repair. Accordingly, we observe that cells expressing IB fail to respond to radiomimetic DNA damage, to induce gamma-H2AX phosphorylation and to recruit 53BP1 to damaged foci. Interestingly ubiquitin depletion, histone de-ubiquitination and impaired DNA damage response are not restricted to PolyQ aggregates and are associated with artificial aggregating luciferase mutants. The longevity of brain neurons depends on their capacity to respond to and repair extensive ongoing DNA damage. Impaired DNA damage response, even modest one, could thus lead to premature neuron aging and mortality. PMID:28052107

  1. Regulation of ATM-Dependent DNA Damage Responses in Breast Cancer by the RhoGEF Net1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0014 TITLE: Regulation of ATM -Dependent DNA Damage Responses in Breast Cancer by the RhoGEF Net1 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...signaling in breast cancer. Body Task 1: Determine the role of Net1 in ATM -mediated DNA repair (Months 24-27). In the previous reporting period of...the fellowship, we observed that knockdown of Net1A dramatically decreased activation of ATM and its downstream targets Chk2 and H2AX in MCF7 cells

  2. Regulation of ATM-Dependent DNA Damage Responses in Breast Cancer by the RhoGEF Net1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    DSBs (Months 19-21). MDC1 is an ATM substrate and mediates the accumulation of many DDR factors at the sites of DSBs, including the ATM, the MRN...to IR. Task 2b: Determine the role of Net1 in ATM-mediated DNA repair (Months 13-24). The DNA damage response ( DDR ) is a signal transduction...pathway leading to transient cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and elimination of damaged cells by apoptosis (12). DDR is primarily mediated by the

  3. Identification and analysis of new proteins involved in the DNA damage response network of Fanconi anemia and Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rong; Xu, Dongyi; Wang, Weidong

    2009-05-01

    The use of co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) to purify multi-protein complexes has contributed greatly to our understanding of the DNA damage response network associated with Fanconi anemia (FA), Bloom syndrome (BS) and breast cancer. Four new FA genes and two new protein partners for the Bloom syndrome gene product have been identified by co-IP. Here, we discuss our experience in using co-IP and other techniques to isolate and characterize new FA and BS-related proteins.

  4. NKX3.1 contributes to S phase entry and regulates DNA damage response (DDR) in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaykent-Tepedelen, Burcu; Ozmen, Besra; Varisli, Lokman; Gonen-Korkmaz, Ceren; Debelec-Butuner, Bilge; Muhammed Syed, Hamid; Yilmazer-Cakmak, Ozgur; Korkmaz, Kemal Sami

    2011-10-14

    NKX3.1 is an androgen-regulated homeobox gene that encodes a tissue-restricted transcription factor, which plays an important role in the differentiation of the prostate epithelium. Thus, the role of NKX3.1 as a functional topoisomerase I activity enhancer in cell cycle regulation and the DNA damage response (DDR) was explored in prostate cancer cell lines. As an early response to DNA damage following CPT-11 treatment, we found that there was an increase in the γH2AX(S139) foci number and that total phosphorylation levels were reduced in PC-3 cells following ectopic NKX3.1 expression as well as in LNCaP cells following androgen administration. Furthermore, upon drug treatment, the increase in ATM(S1981) phosphorylation was reduced in the presence of NKX3.1 expression, whereas DNA-PKcs expression was increased. Additionally, phosphorylation of CHK2(T68) and NBS1(S343) was abrogated by ectopic NKX3.1 expression, compared with the increasing levels in control PC-3 cells in a time-course experiment. Finally, NKX3.1 expression maintained a high cyclin D1 expression level regardless of drug treatment, while total γH2AX(S139) phosphorylation remained depleted in PC-3, as well as in LNCaP, cells. Thus, we suggest that androgen regulated NKX3.1 maintains an active DDR at the intra S progression and contributes to the chemotherapeutic resistance of prostate cancer cells to DNA damaging compounds.

  5. Protein expression of DNA damage repair proteins dictates response to topoisomerase and PARP inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Boerner

    Full Text Available Patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC have a poor prognosis. New approaches for the treatment of TNBC are needed to improve patient survival. The concept of synthetic lethality, brought about by inactivating complementary DNA repair pathways, has been proposed as a promising therapeutic option for these tumors. The TNBC tumor type has been associated with BRCA mutations, and inhibitors of Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, a family of proteins that facilitates DNA repair, have been shown to effectively kill BRCA defective tumors by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to a loss of cell viability and clonogenic survival. Here we present preclinical efficacy results of combining the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888, with CPT-11, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. CPT-11 binds to topoisomerase I at the replication fork, creating a bulky adduct that is recognized as damaged DNA. When DNA damage was stimulated with CPT-11, protein expression of the nucleotide excision repair enzyme ERCC1 inversely correlated with cell viability, but not clonogenic survival. However, 4 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by cell viability and 5 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by clonogenic survival to the combination of ABT-888 and CPT-11. In vivo, the BRCA mutant cell line MX-1 treated with CPT-11 alone demonstrated significant decreased tumor growth; this decrease was enhanced further with the addition of ABT-888. Decrease in tumor growth correlated with an increase in double strand DNA breaks as measured by γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, inhibiting two arms of the DNA repair pathway simultaneously in TNBC cell lines, independent of BRCA mutation status, resulted in un-repairable DNA damage and subsequent cell death.

  6. Prolonged mitotic arrest induces a caspase-dependent DNA damage response at telomeres that determines cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Karolina O; Colin, Didier J; Rastogi, Shubhra; Allan, Lindsey A; Clarke, Paul R

    2016-05-27

    A delay in the completion of metaphase induces a stress response that inhibits further cell proliferation or induces apoptosis. This response is thought to protect against genomic instability and is important for the effects of anti-mitotic cancer drugs. Here, we show that mitotic arrest induces a caspase-dependent DNA damage response (DDR) at telomeres in non-apoptotic cells. This pathway is under the control of Mcl-1 and other Bcl-2 family proteins and requires caspase-9, caspase-3/7 and the endonuclease CAD/DFF40. The gradual caspase-dependent loss of the shelterin complex protein TRF2 from telomeres promotes a DDR that involves DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Suppression of mitotic telomere damage by enhanced expression of TRF2, or the inhibition of either caspase-3/7 or DNA-PK during mitotic arrest, promotes subsequent cell survival. Thus, we demonstrate that mitotic stress is characterised by the sub-apoptotic activation of a classical caspase pathway, which promotes telomere deprotection, activates DNA damage signalling, and determines cell fate in response to a prolonged delay in mitosis.

  7. Choreography of the DNA damage response: spatiotemporal relationships among checkpoint and repair proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisby, Michael; Barlow, Jacqueline H; Burgess, Rebecca C; Rothstein, Rodney

    2004-09-17

    DNA repair is an essential process for preserving genome integrity in all organisms. In eukaryotes, recombinational repair is choreographed by multiprotein complexes that are organized into centers (foci). Here, we analyze the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and replication stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mre11 nuclease and the ATM-related Tel1 kinase are the first proteins detected at DSBs. Next, the Rfa1 single-strand DNA binding protein relocalizes to the break and recruits other key checkpoint proteins. Later and only in S and G2 phase, the homologous recombination machinery assembles at the site. Unlike the response to DSBs, Mre11 and recombination proteins are not recruited to hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks unless the forks collapse. The cellular response to DSBs and DNA replication stress is likely directed by the Mre11 complex detecting and processing DNA ends in conjunction with Sae2 and by RP-A recognizing single-stranded DNA and recruiting additional checkpoint and repair proteins.

  8. The Response to Oxidative DNA Damage in Neurons: Mechanisms and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Narciso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence indicating that the mechanisms that control genome stability are of key importance in the development and function of the nervous system. The major threat for neurons is oxidative DNA damage, which is repaired by the base excision repair (BER pathway. Functional mutations of enzymes that are involved in the processing of single-strand breaks (SSB that are generated during BER have been causally associated with syndromes that present important neurological alterations and cognitive decline. In this review, the plasticity of BER during neurogenesis and the importance of an efficient BER for correct brain function will be specifically addressed paying particular attention to the brain region and neuron-selectivity in SSB repair-associated neurological syndromes and age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Retinoblastoma pathway defects show differential ability to activate the constitutive DNA damage response in human tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tort, F.; Bartkova, J.; Sehested, M.

    2006-01-01

    Loss of G(1)-S control and aberrations of the p16(Ink4a)-cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4(6)-pRb-E2F-cyclin E/CDK2 pathway are common in human cancer. Previous studies showed that oncogene-induced aberrant proliferation, such as on cyclin E overexpression, causes DNA damage and checkpoint...... culture models with differential defects of retinoblastoma pathway components, as overexpression of cyclin D1 or lack of p16(Ink4a), either alone or combined, did not elicit detectable DDR. In contrast, inactivation of pRb, the key component of the pathway, activated the DDR in cultured human or mouse...... cells, analogous to elevated cyclin E. These results highlight differential effect of diverse oncogenic events on driving the 'cancer cell cycles' and their ability to deregulate the replication-driving CDK2 kinase and to alarm the DDR as a potential anticancer barrier in accordance...

  10. Necdin regulates p53 acetylation via Sirtuin1 to modulate DNA damage response in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2008-08-27

    Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a mammalian homolog of yeast Sir2, deacetylates the tumor suppressor protein p53 and attenuates p53-mediated cell death. Necdin, a p53-interacting protein expressed predominantly in postmitotic neurons, is a melanoma antigen family protein that promotes neuronal differentiation and survival. In mammals, the necdin gene (Ndn) is maternally imprinted, and mutant mice carrying mutated paternal Ndn show abnormalities of neuronal development. Here we report that necdin regulates the acetylation status of p53 via Sirt1 to suppress p53-dependent apoptosis in postmitotic neurons. Double-immunostaining analysis demonstrated that necdin colocalizes with Sirt1 in postmitotic neurons of mouse embryonic forebrain in vivo. Coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro binding analyses revealed that necdin interacts with both p53 and Sirt1 to potentiate Sirt1-mediated p53 deacetylation by facilitating their association. Primary cortical neurons prepared from paternal Ndn-deficient mice have high p53 acetylation levels and are sensitive to the DNA-damaging compounds camptothecin and hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, DNA transfection per se increases p53 acetylation and apoptosis in paternal Ndn-deficient neurons, whereas small interfering RNA-mediated p53 knockdown completely blocks these changes. However, Sirt1 knockdown increases both acetylated p53 level and apoptosis in wild-type neurons but fails to affect them in paternal Ndn-deficient neurons. In organotypic forebrain slice cultures treated with hydrogen peroxide, p53 is accumulated and colocalized with necdin and Sirt1 in cortical neurons. These results suggest that necdin downregulates p53 acetylation levels by forming a stable complex with p53 and Sirt1 to protect neurons from DNA damage-induced apoptosis.

  11. Regulation of RAD54- and RAD52-lacZ gene fusions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, G.M.; Schild, D.; Lovett, S.T.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1987-03-01

    The RAD52 and RAD54 genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are involved in both DNA repair and DNA recombination. RAD54 has recently been shown to be inducible by X-rays, while RAD52 is not. To further investigate the regulation of these genes, we constructed gene fusions using 5' regions upstream of the RAD52 and RAD54 genes and a 3'-terminal fragment of the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene. Yeast transformants with either an integrated or an autonomously replicating plasmid containing these fusions expressed beta-galactosidase activity constitutively. In addition, the RAD54 gene fusion was inducible in both haploid and diploid cells in response to the DNA-damaging agents X-rays, UV light, and methyl methanesulfonate, but not in response to heat shock. The RAD52-lacZ gene fusion showed little or no induction in response to X-ray or UV radiation nor methyl methanesulfonate. Typical induction levels for RAD54 in cells exposed to such agents were from 3- to 12-fold, in good agreement with previous mRNA analyses. When MATa cells were arrested in G1 with alpha-factor, RAD54 was still inducible after DNA damage, indicating that the observed induction is independent of the cell cycle. Using a yeast vector containing the EcoRI structural gene fused to the GAL1 promoter, we showed that double-strand breaks alone are sufficient in vivo for induction of RAD54.

  12. DNA damage response in renal ischemia-reperfusion and ATP-depletion injury of renal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhengwei; Wei, Qingqing; Dong, Guie; Huo, Yuqing; Dong, Zheng

    2014-07-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion leads to acute kidney injury (AKI) that is characterized pathologically by tubular damage and cell death, followed by tubular repair, atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Recent work suggested the possible presence of DNA damage response (DDR) in AKI. However, the evidence is sketchy and the role and regulation of DDR in ischemic AKI remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated the induction of phosphorylation of ATM, H2AX, Chk2 and p53 during renal ischemia-reperfusion in mice, suggesting DDR in kidney tissues. DDR was also induced in vitro during the recovery or "reperfusion" of renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) after ATP depletion. DDR in RPTCs was abrogated by supplying glucose to maintain ATP via glycolysis, indicating that the DDR depends on ATP depletion. The DDR was also suppressed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD and the overexpression of Bcl-2, supporting a role of apoptosis-associated DNA damage in the DDR. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, suppressed the phosphorylation of ATM and p53 and, to a less extent, Chk2, but NAC increased the phosphorylation and nuclear foci formation of H2AX. Interestingly, NAC increased apoptosis, which may account for the observed H2AX activation. Ku55933, an ATM inhibitor, blocked ATM phosphorylation and ameliorated the phosphorylation of Chk2 and p53, but it increased H2AX phosphorylation and nuclear foci formation. Ku55933 also increased apoptosis in RPTCs following ATP depletion. The results suggest that DDR occurs during renal ischemia-reperfusion in vivo and ATP-depletion injury in vitro. The DDR is partially induced by apoptosis and oxidative stress-related DNA damage. ATM, as a sensor in the DDR, may play a cytoprotective role against tubular cell injury and death.

  13. Methylated H3K4, a transcription-associated histone modification, is involved in the DNA damage response pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Faucher

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes are associated with a number of proteins such as histones that constitute chromatin. Post-translational histone modifications are associated with regulatory aspects executed by chromatin and all transactions on genomic DNA are dependent on them. Thus, it will be relevant to understand how histone modifications affect genome functions. Here we show that the mono ubiquitylation of histone H2B and the tri-methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4 (H3K4me3, both known for their involvement in transcription, are also important for a proper response of budding yeast cells to DNA damaging agents and the passage through S-phase. Cells that cannot methylate H3K4 display a defect in double-strand break (DSB repair by non-homologous end joining. Furthermore, if such cells incur DNA damage or encounter a stress during replication, they very rapidly lose viability, underscoring the functional importance of the modification. Remarkably, the Set1p methyltransferase as well as the H3K4me3 mark become detectable on a newly created DSB. This recruitment of Set1p to the DSB is dependent on the presence of the RSC complex, arguing for a contribution in the ensuing DNA damage repair process. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Set1p and its substrate H3K4me3, which has been reported to be important for the transcription of active genes, also plays an important role in genome stability of yeast cells. Given the high degree of conservation for the methyltransferase and the histone mark in a broad variety of organisms, these results could have similar implications for genome stability mechanisms in vertebrate and mammalian cells.

  14. Methylated H3K4, a transcription-associated histone modification, is involved in the DNA damage response pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, David; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2010-08-26

    Eukaryotic genomes are associated with a number of proteins such as histones that constitute chromatin. Post-translational histone modifications are associated with regulatory aspects executed by chromatin and all transactions on genomic DNA are dependent on them. Thus, it will be relevant to understand how histone modifications affect genome functions. Here we show that the mono ubiquitylation of histone H2B and the tri-methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4 (H3K4me3), both known for their involvement in transcription, are also important for a proper response of budding yeast cells to DNA damaging agents and the passage through S-phase. Cells that cannot methylate H3K4 display a defect in double-strand break (DSB) repair by non-homologous end joining. Furthermore, if such cells incur DNA damage or encounter a stress during replication, they very rapidly lose viability, underscoring the functional importance of the modification. Remarkably, the Set1p methyltransferase as well as the H3K4me3 mark become detectable on a newly created DSB. This recruitment of Set1p to the DSB is dependent on the presence of the RSC complex, arguing for a contribution in the ensuing DNA damage repair process. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Set1p and its substrate H3K4me3, which has been reported to be important for the transcription of active genes, also plays an important role in genome stability of yeast cells. Given the high degree of conservation for the methyltransferase and the histone mark in a broad variety of organisms, these results could have similar implications for genome stability mechanisms in vertebrate and mammalian cells.

  15. Mitosis, double strand break repair, and telomeres: a view from the end: how telomeres and the DNA damage response cooperate during mitosis to maintain genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare, Anthony J

    2014-11-01

    Double strand break (DSB) repair is suppressed during mitosis because RNF8 and downstream DNA damage response (DDR) factors, including 53BP1, do not localize to mitotic chromatin. Discovery of the mitotic kinase-dependent mechanism that inhibits DSB repair during cell division was recently reported. It was shown that restoring mitotic DSB repair was detrimental, resulting in repair dependent genome instability and covalent telomere fusions. The telomere DDR that occurs naturally during cellular aging and in cancer is known to be refractory to G2/M checkpoint activation. Such DDR-positive telomeres, and those that occur as part of the telomere-dependent prolonged mitotic arrest checkpoint, normally pass through mitosis without covalent ligation, but result in cell growth arrest in G1 phase. The discovery that suppressing DSB repair during mitosis may function primarily to protect DDR-positive telomeres from fusing during cell division reinforces the unique cooperation between telomeres and the DDR to mediate tumor suppression.

  16. Modulation of the E2F1-driven cancer cell fate by the DNA damage response machinery and potential novel E2F1 targets in osteosarcomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liontos, Michalis; Niforou, Katerina; Velimezi, Georgia

    2009-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone cancer. Mutations of the RB gene represent the most frequent molecular defect in this malignancy. A major consequence of this alteration is that the activity of the key cell cycle regulator E2F1 is unleashed from the inhibitory effects of pRb. Studies...... in animal models and in human cancers have shown that deregulated E2F1 overexpression possesses either "oncogenic" or "oncosuppressor" properties, depending on the cellular context. To address this issue in osteosarcomas, we examined the status of E2F1 relative to cell proliferation and apoptosis....... Surprisingly, induction of p73, an established E2F1 target, was also DNA damage response-dependent. Furthermore, a global proteome analysis associated with bioinformatics revealed novel E2F1-regulated genes and potential E2F1-driven signaling networks that could provide useful targets in challenging...

  17. Mdb1, a fission yeast homolog of human MDC1, modulates DNA damage response and mitotic spindle function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wei

    Full Text Available During eukaryotic DNA damage response (DDR, one of the earliest events is the phosphorylation of the C-terminal SQ motif of histone H2AX (H2A in yeasts. In human cells, phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX is recognized by MDC1, which serves as a binding platform for the accumulation of a myriad of DDR factors on chromatin regions surrounding DNA lesions. Despite its important role in DDR, no homolog of MDC1 outside of metazoans has been described. Here, we report the characterization of Mdb1, a protein from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which shares significant sequence homology with human MDC1 in their C-terminal tandem BRCT (tBRCT domains. We show that in vitro, recombinant Mdb1 protein binds a phosphorylated H2A (γH2A peptide, and the phospho-specific binding requires two conserved phospho-binding residues in the tBRCT domain of Mdb1. In vivo, Mdb1 forms nuclear foci at DNA double strand breaks (DSBs induced by the HO endonuclease and ionizing radiation (IR. IR-induced Mdb1 focus formation depends on γH2A and the phospho-binding residues of Mdb1. Deleting the mdb1 gene does not overtly affect DNA damage sensitivity in a wild type background, but alters the DNA damage sensitivity of cells lacking another γH2A binder Crb2. Overexpression of Mdb1 causes severe DNA damage sensitivity in a manner that requires the interaction between Mdb1 and γH2A. During mitosis, Mdb1 localizes to spindles and concentrates at spindle midzones at late mitosis. The spindle midzone localization of Mdb1 requires its phospho-binding residues, but is independent of γH2A. Loss of Mdb1 or mutating its phospho-binding residues makes cells more resistant to the microtubule depolymerizing drug thiabendazole. We propose that Mdb1 performs dual roles in DDR and mitotic spindle regulation.

  18. Cleavage Factor I Links Transcription Termination to DNA Damage Response and Genome Integrity Maintenance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Hélène; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    During transcription, the nascent pre-mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps before being exported to the cytoplasm. The 3′-end processing machinery involves different proteins, this function being crucial to cell growth and viability in eukaryotes. Here, we found that the rna14-1, rna15-1, and hrp1-5 alleles of the cleavage factor I (CFI) cause sensitivity to UV-light in the absence of global genome repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unexpectedly, CFI mutants were proficient in UV-lesion repair in a transcribed gene. DNA damage checkpoint activation and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) degradation in response to UV were delayed in CFI-deficient cells, indicating that CFI participates in the DNA damage response (DDR). This is further sustained by the synthetic growth defects observed between rna14-1 and mutants of different repair pathways. Additionally, we found that rna14-1 suffers severe replication progression defects and that a functional G1/S checkpoint becomes essential in avoiding genetic instability in those cells. Thus, CFI function is required to maintain genome integrity and to prevent replication hindrance. These findings reveal a new function for CFI in the DDR and underscore the importance of coordinating transcription termination with replication in the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:24603480

  19. Cleavage factor I links transcription termination to DNA damage response and genome integrity maintenance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Gaillard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During transcription, the nascent pre-mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps before being exported to the cytoplasm. The 3'-end processing machinery involves different proteins, this function being crucial to cell growth and viability in eukaryotes. Here, we found that the rna14-1, rna15-1, and hrp1-5 alleles of the cleavage factor I (CFI cause sensitivity to UV-light in the absence of global genome repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unexpectedly, CFI mutants were proficient in UV-lesion repair in a transcribed gene. DNA damage checkpoint activation and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII degradation in response to UV were delayed in CFI-deficient cells, indicating that CFI participates in the DNA damage response (DDR. This is further sustained by the synthetic growth defects observed between rna14-1 and mutants of different repair pathways. Additionally, we found that rna14-1 suffers severe replication progression defects and that a functional G1/S checkpoint becomes essential in avoiding genetic instability in those cells. Thus, CFI function is required to maintain genome integrity and to prevent replication hindrance. These findings reveal a new function for CFI in the DDR and underscore the importance of coordinating transcription termination with replication in the maintenance of genomic stability.

  20. Regulation of plant MSH2 and MSH6 genes in the UV-B-induced DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lario, Luciana D; Ramirez-Parra, Elena; Gutierrez, Crisanto; Casati, Paula; Spampinato, Claudia P

    2011-05-01

    Deleterious effects of UV-B radiation on DNA include the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs). These lesions must be repaired to maintain the integrity of DNA and provide genetic stability. Of the several repair systems involved in the recognition and removal of UV-B-induced lesions in DNA, the focus in the present study was on the mismatch repair system (MMR). The contribution of MutSα (MSH2-MSH6) to UV-induced DNA lesion repair and cell cycle regulation was investigated. MSH2 and MSH6 genes in Arabidopsis and maize are up-regulated by UV-B, indicating that MMR may have a role in UV-B-induced DNA damage responses. Analysis of promoter sequences identified MSH6 as a target of the E2F transcription factors. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, MSH6 was experimentally validated as an E2F target gene, suggesting an interaction between MMR genes and the cell cycle control. Mutations in MSH2 or MSH6 caused an increased accumulation of CPDs relative to wild-type plants. In addition, msh2 mutant plants showed a different expression pattern of cell cycle marker genes after the UV-B treatment when compared with wild-type plants. Taken together, these data provide evidence that plant MutSα is involved in a UV-B-induced DNA damage response pathway.

  1. The role of the cancer stem cell marker CD271 in DNA damage response and drug resistance of melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmer, T; Walz, I; Klinger, B; Khouja, S; Welte, Y; Schäfer, R; Regenbrecht, C

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have suggested that stemness and acquired resistance to targeted inhibitors or chemotherapeutics are mechanistically linked. Here we observed high cell surface and total levels of nerve growth factor receptor/CD271, a marker of melanoma-initiating cells, in sub-populations of chemoresistant cell lines. CD271 expression was increased in drug-sensitive cells but not resistant cells in response to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics etoposide, fotemustine and cisplatin. Comparative analysis of melanoma cells engineered to stably express CD271 or a targeting short hairpin RNA by expression profiling provided numerous genes regulated in a CD271-dependent manner. In-depth analysis of CD271-responsive genes uncovered the association of CD271 with regulation of DNA repair components. In addition, gene set enrichment analysis revealed enrichment of CD271-responsive genes in drug-resistant cells, among them DNA repair components. Moreover, our comparative screen identified the fibroblast growth factor 13 (FGF13) as a target of CD271, highly expressed in chemoresistant cells. Further we show that levels of CD271 determine drug response. Knock-down of CD271 in fotemustine-resistant cells decreased expression of FGF13 and at least partly restored sensitivity to fotemustine. Together, we demonstrate that expression of CD271 is responsible for genes associated with DNA repair and drug response. Further, we identified 110 CD271-responsive genes predominantly expressed in melanoma metastases, among them were NEK2, TOP2A and RAD51AP1 as potential drivers of melanoma metastasis. In addition, we provide mechanistic insight in the regulation of CD271 in response to drugs. We found that CD271 is potentially regulated by p53 and in turn is needed for a proper p53-dependent response to DNA-damaging drugs. In summary, we provide for the first time insight in a CD271-associated signaling network connecting CD271 with DNA repair, drug response and metastasis. PMID

  2. The RecA-Dependent SOS Response Is Active and Required for Processing of DNA Damage during Bacillus subtilis Sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Guadiana, Fernando H; Barajas-Ornelas, Rocío Del Carmen; Corona-Bautista, Saúl U; Setlow, Peter; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The expression of and role played by RecA in protecting sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis from DNA damage has been determined. Results showed that the DNA-alkylating agent Mitomycin-C (M-C) activated expression of a PrecA-gfpmut3a fusion in both sporulating cells' mother cell and forespore compartments. The expression levels of a recA-lacZ fusion were significantly lower in sporulating than in growing cells. However, M-C induced levels of ß-galactosidase from a recA-lacZ fusion ~6- and 3-fold in the mother cell and forespore compartments of B. subtilis sporangia, respectively. Disruption of recA slowed sporulation and sensitized sporulating cells to M-C and UV-C radiation, and the M-C and UV-C sensitivity of sporangia lacking the transcriptional repair-coupling factor Mfd was significantly increased by loss of RecA. We postulate that when DNA damage is encountered during sporulation, RecA activates the SOS response thus providing sporangia with the repair machinery to process DNA lesions that may compromise the spatio-temporal expression of genes that are essential for efficient spore formation.

  3. New Insights into p53 Signaling and Cancer Cell Response to DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razmik Mirzayans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the p53 signaling pathway by DNA-damaging agents was originally proposed to result either in cell cycle checkpoint activation to promote survival or in apoptotic cell death. This model provided the impetus for numerous studies focusing on the development of p53-based cancer therapies. According to recent evidence, however, most p53 wild-type human cell types respond to ionizing radiation by undergoing stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS and not apoptosis. SIPS is a sustained growth-arrested state in which cells remain viable and secrete factors that may promote cancer growth and progression. The p21WAF1 (hereafter p21 protein has emerged as a key player in the p53 pathway. In addition to its well-studied role in cell cycle checkpoints, p21 regulates p53 and its upstream kinase (ATM, controls gene expression, suppresses apoptosis, and induces SIPS. Herein, we review these and related findings with human solid tumor-derived cell lines, report new data demonstrating dynamic behaviors of p53 and p21 in the DNA damage response, and examine the gain-of-function properties of cancer-associated p53 mutations. We point out obstacles in cancer-therapeutic strategies that are aimed at reactivating the wild-type p53 function and highlight some alternative approaches that target the apoptotic threshold in cancer cells with differing p53 status.

  4. The RecA-Dependent SOS Response Is Active and Required for Processing of DNA Damage during Bacillus subtilis Sporulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando H Ramírez-Guadiana

    Full Text Available The expression of and role played by RecA in protecting sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis from DNA damage has been determined. Results showed that the DNA-alkylating agent Mitomycin-C (M-C activated expression of a PrecA-gfpmut3a fusion in both sporulating cells' mother cell and forespore compartments. The expression levels of a recA-lacZ fusion were significantly lower in sporulating than in growing cells. However, M-C induced levels of ß-galactosidase from a recA-lacZ fusion ~6- and 3-fold in the mother cell and forespore compartments of B. subtilis sporangia, respectively. Disruption of recA slowed sporulation and sensitized sporulating cells to M-C and UV-C radiation, and the M-C and UV-C sensitivity of sporangia lacking the transcriptional repair-coupling factor Mfd was significantly increased by loss of RecA. We postulate that when DNA damage is encountered during sporulation, RecA activates the SOS response thus providing sporangia with the repair machinery to process DNA lesions that may compromise the spatio-temporal expression of genes that are essential for efficient spore formation.

  5. The interplay between DNA damage response and RNA processing: the unexpected role of splicing factors as gatekeepers of genome stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eNaro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome integrity is constantly threatened by endogenous and exogenous factors. However its preservation is ensured by a network of pathways that prevent and/or repair the lesion, which constitute the DNA damage response (DDR. Expression of the key proteins involved in the DDR is controlled by numerous post-transcriptional mechanisms, among which pre-mRNA splicing stands out. Intriguingly, several splicing factors have been recently shown to play direct functions in DNA damage prevention and repair, which go beyond their expected splicing activity. At the same time, evidence is emerging that DNA repair proteins (DRPs can actively sustain the DDR by acting as post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression, in addition to their well-known role in the mechanisms of signaling and repair of the lesion. Herein, we will review these non-canonical functions of both splicing factors and DRPs, which suggest the existence of a tight interplay between splicing regulation and canonical DNA safeguard mechanisms ensuring genome stability.

  6. Construction of DNA damage response gene pprI function-deficient and function-complementary mutants in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Guanjun; LU Huiming; HUANG Lifen; HUA Yuejin

    2005-01-01

    PprI, a DNA damage response factor from the extraordinary radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, plays a central regulatory role in multiple DNA damage repair. In this study, a fusion DNA fragment carrying kanamycin resistance gene with the D. Radiodurans groEL promoter was cloned by PCR amplification and reversely inserted into the pprI locus in the genome of the wild-type strain R1. The resulting pprI-deficient strain, designated YR1, was very sensitive to ionizing radiation. Meanwhile, the re- combinant DNA fragment was cloned into the shuttle vector pRADZ3, and resulted in plasmid pRADK with kanamycin resistance in D. Radiodurans. The fragments containing complete pprI gene and 3'-terminal deletion pprI△ were cloned into plasmid pRADK. The resulted plasmids designated pRADKpprI and pRADKpprI△ were then transformed to YR1. Results show that YR1 carrying pRADKpprI was able to fully restore the extreme radioresistance to the same level as the wild-type D. Raiodurans R1, whereas YR1 pRADKpprI△ failed to do so. Construction of DNA repair switch PprI function-deficient and function-complementary mutants in D. Radiodurans is not only useful to elucidating the relationship between domains and functions of PprI protein, but also opens the door to the further studies of the biological functions of PprI protein in vivo.

  7. Impact of the Circadian Clock on UV-Induced DNA Damage Response and Photocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakup, Panshak; Gaddameedhi, Shobhan

    2017-01-01

    The skin is in constant exposure to various external environmental stressors, including solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Various wavelengths of UV light are absorbed by the DNA and other molecules in the skin to cause DNA damage and induce oxidative stress. The exposure to excessive ultraviolet (UV) radiation and/or accumulation of damage over time can lead to photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. The nucleotide excision repair (NER) system is the sole mechanism for removing UV photoproduct damage from DNA, and genetic disruption of this repair pathway leads to the photosensitive disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). Interestingly, recent work has shown that NER is controlled by the circadian clock, the body's natural time-keeping mechanism, through regulation of the rate-limiting repair factor xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA). Studies have shown reduced UV-induced skin cancer after UV exposure in the evening compared to the morning, which corresponds with times of high and low repair capacities, respectively. However, most studies of the circadian clock-NER connection have utilized murine models, and it is therefore important to translate these findings to humans to improve skin cancer prevention and chronotherapy.

  8. Genetic Control or Repair and Adaptive Response to Low-Level DNA Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. Haber

    2009-10-05

    Research was focused on how a single double-strand break - a model of low-dose ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage - could be studied in a simple model system, budding yeast. Breaks were induced in several different ways. We used the site-specific HO endonuclease to create a single DSB in all cells of the population so that its fate could be extensively analyzed genetically and molecularly. We also used two heterologous systems, the plant DS element and the Rag1/Rag2 proteins, to generate different types of DSBs, these containing hairpin ends that needed to be cleaved open before end-joining could take place. All three approaches yielded important new findings. We also extended our analysis of the Mre11 protein that plays key roles in both NHEJ and in homologous recombination. Finally we analyzed the poorly understood recombination events that were independent of the key recombination protein, Rad52. This line of inquiry was strongly motivated by the fact that vertebrate cells do not rely strongly on Rad52 for homologous recombination, so that some clues about alternative mechanisms could be gained by understanding how Rad52-independent recombination occurred. We found that the Mre11 complex was the most important element in Rad52-independent recombination.

  9. CDK2 and PKA mediated-sequential phosphorylation is critical for p19INK4d function in the DNA damage response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela C Marazita

    Full Text Available DNA damage triggers a phosphorylation-based signaling cascade known as the DNA damage response. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK4/6 inhibitors, has been reported to participate in the DNA damage response promoting DNA repair and cell survival. Here, we provide mechanistic insight into the activation mechanism of p19INK4d linked to the response to DNA damage. Results showed that p19INK4d becomes phosphorylated following UV radiation, β-amyloid peptide and cisplatin treatments. ATM-Chk2/ATR-Chk1 signaling pathways were found to be differentially involved in p19INK4d phosphorylation depending on the type of DNA damage. Two sequential phosphorylation events at serine 76 and threonine 141 were identified using p19INK4d single-point mutants in metabolic labeling assays with (32P-orthophosphate. CDK2 and PKA were found to participate in p19INK4d phosphorylation process and that they would mediate serine 76 and threonine 141 modifications respectively. Nuclear translocation of p19INK4d induced by DNA damage was shown to be dependent on serine 76 phosphorylation. Most importantly, both phosphorylation sites were found to be crucial for p19INK4d function in DNA repair and cell survival. In contrast, serine 76 and threonine 141 were dispensable for CDK4/6 inhibition highlighting the independence of p19INK4d functions, in agreement with our previous findings. These results constitute the first description of the activation mechanism of p19INK4d in response to genotoxic stress and demonstrate the functional relevance of this activation following DNA damage.

  10. Cell type-dependent induction of DNA damage by 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields does not result in significant cellular dysfunctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although IARC clarifies radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF as possible human carcinogen, the debate on its health impact continues due to the inconsistent results. Genotoxic effect has been considered as a golden standard to determine if an environmental factor is a carcinogen, but the currently available data for RF-EMF remain controversial. As an environmental stimulus, the effect of RF-EMF on cellular DNA may be subtle. Therefore, more sensitive method and systematic research strategy are warranted to evaluate its genotoxicity. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether RF-EMF does induce DNA damage and if the effect is cell-type dependent by adopting a more sensitive method γH2AX foci formation; and to investigate the biological consequences if RF-EMF does increase γH2AX foci formation. METHODS: Six different types of cells were intermittently exposed to GSM 1800 MHz RF-EMF at a specific absorption rate of 3.0 W/kg for 1 h or 24 h, then subjected to immunostaining with anti-γH2AX antibody. The biological consequences in γH2AX-elevated cell type were further explored with comet and TUNEL assays, flow cytometry, and cell growth assay. RESULTS: Exposure to RF-EMF for 24 h significantly induced γH2AX foci formation in Chinese hamster lung cells and Human skin fibroblasts (HSFs, but not the other cells. However, RF-EMF-elevated γH2AX foci formation in HSF cells did not result in detectable DNA fragmentation, sustainable cell cycle arrest, cell proliferation or viability change. RF-EMF exposure slightly but not significantly increased the cellular ROS level. CONCLUSIONS: RF-EMF induces DNA damage in a cell type-dependent manner, but the elevated γH2AX foci formation in HSF cells does not result in significant cellular dysfunctions.

  11. Activation of the DNA Damage Response Is a Conserved Function of HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr That Is Independent of SLX4 Recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver I. Fregoso

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There has been extraordinary progress in understanding the roles of lentiviral accessory proteins in antagonizing host antiviral defense proteins. However, the precise primary function of the accessory gene Vpr remains elusive. Here we suggest that engagement with the DNA damage response is an important function of primate lentiviral Vpr proteins because of its conserved function among diverse lentiviral lineages. In contrast, we show that, for HIV-1, HIV-2, and related Vpr isolates and orthologs, there is a lack of correlation between DNA damage response activation and interaction with the host SLX4 protein complex of structure specific endonucleases; some Vpr proteins are able to interact with SLX4, but the majority are not. Using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9 method to knock out SLX4, we formally showed that HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr orthologs can still activate the DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest in the absence of SLX4. Together, our data suggest that activation of the DNA damage response, but not SLX4 interaction, is conserved and therefore indicative of an important function of Vpr. Our data also indicate that Vpr activates the DNA damage response through an SLX4-independent mechanism that remains uncharacterized.

  12. Patterns of DNA damage response in intracranial germ cell tumors versus glioblastomas reflect cell of origin rather than brain environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Krizova, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) machinery becomes commonly activated in response to oncogenes and during early stages of development of solid malignancies, with an exception of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). The active DDR signaling evokes cell death or senescence but this anti-tumor barrier...... can be breached by defects in DDR factors, such as the ATM-Chk2-p53 pathway, thereby allowing tumor progression. The DDR barrier is strongly activated in brain tumors, particularly gliomas, due to oxidative damage and replication stress. Here, we took advantage of rare human primary intracranial germ...... cell tumors (PIGCTs), to address the roles of cell-intrinsic factors including cell of origin, versus local tissue environment, in the constitutive DDR activation in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis of 7 biomarkers on a series of 21 PIGCTs (germinomas and other subtypes), 20 normal brain specimens...

  13. The anti-apoptotic factor Che-1/AATF links transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control, and DNA damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanciulli Maurizio

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Che-1 is a RNA polymerase II binding protein involved in the transcriptional regulation of E2F target genes and in cell proliferation. Recently, it has been shown that Che-1 accumulates in cells responding to genotoxic agents such as Doxorubicin and ionizing radiation. The DNA damage-activated checkpoint kinases ATM and Chk2 interact with and phosphorylate Che-1, enhancing its accumulation and stability, and promoting Che-1-mediated transcription of p53-responsive genes and of p53 itself, as evidenced by microarray analysis. This transcriptional response is suppressed by expression of a Che-1 mutant lacking ATM and Chk2 phosphorylation amino acid residues, or by depletion of Che-1 by RNA silencing. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis has shown that Che-1 is released from E2F target genes and recruited to the p21 and p53 promoters after DNA damage. Che-1 contributes to the maintenance of the G2/M checkpoint in response to genotoxic stress. These findings identify a new mechanism by which the checkpoint kinases regulate, via the novel effector Che-1, the p53 pathway. Lastly, increasing evidence suggests that Che-1 may be involved in apoptotic signaling in neural tissues. In cortical neurons, Che-1 exhibits anti-apoptotic activity, protecting cells from neuronal damage induced by amyloid β-peptide. In cerebellar granule neurons, Che-1 interacts with Tau in the cytoplasmic compartment and this interaction is modulated during neuronal apoptosis. Finally, Che-1 directly interacts with the neuronal cell-death inducer "NRAGE" which downregulates endogenous Che-1 by targeting it for proteasome-dependent degradation. These findings identify Che-1 as a novel cytoprotective factor against apoptotic insults and suggest that Che-1 may represent a potential target for therapeutic application.

  14. ATM and ATR:Sensing DNA damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Yang; Zheng-Ping Xu; Yun Huang; Hope E. Hamrick; Penelope J. Duerksen-Hughes; Ying-Nian Yu

    2004-01-01

    Cellular response to genotoxic stress is a very complex process, and it usually starts with the "sensing" or "detection" of the DNA damage, followed by a series of events that include signal transduction and activation of transcription factors. The activated transcription factors induce expressions of many genes which are involved in cellular functions such as DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, and cell death. There have been extensive studies from multiple disciplines exploring the mechanisms of cellular genotoxic responses, which have resulted in the identification of many cellular components involved in this process, including the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) cascade. Although the initial activation of protein kinase cascade is not fully understood,human protein kinases ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) are emerging as potential sensors of DNA damage. Current progresses in ATM/ATR research and related signaling pathways are discussed in this review, in an effort to facilitate a better understanding of genotoxic stress response.

  15. A quantitative 14-3-3 interaction screen connects the nuclear exosome targeting complex to the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasius, Melanie; Wagner, Sebastian A; Choudhary, Chuna Ram

    2014-01-01

    RNA metabolism is altered following DNA damage, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Through a 14-3-3 interaction screen for DNA damage-induced protein interactions in human cells, we identified protein complexes connected to RNA biology. These include the nuclear exosome...

  16. Regulated expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD7 in response to DNA damage and during sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J S; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1990-06-11

    The RAD7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affects the proficiency of excision repair of DNA damaged by UV light. Here, we report our studies on the regulation of the RAD7 gene in response to UV irradiation and during sporulation. RAD7 transcript levels increased 6-fold within 40 min of exposure of cells to 37 J/m2 of UV light. Higher UV doses also elicited rapid increases in the level of RAD7 mRNA. RAD7 mRNA levels increased in sporulating MATa/MAT alpha diploid cells, but not in the asporogenous MATa/MATa strain exposed to sporulation conditions. The increase in RAD7 mRNA level in MATa/MAT alpha cells was 15-fold after 6 h and 9-fold after 7 h in sporulation medium; thereafter, RAD7 mRNA levels declined. Periodic transcription of RAD7 during sporulation suggests a role for RAD7 in this process.

  17. Partial sleep deprivation activates the DNA damage response (DDR) and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in aged adult humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Judith E; Cole, Steven W; Seeman, Teresa E; Breen, Elizabeth C; Witarama, Tuff; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Ma, Jeffrey; Irwin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Age-related disease risk has been linked to short sleep duration and sleep disturbances; however, the specific molecular pathways linking sleep loss with diseases of aging are poorly defined. Key cellular events seen with aging, which are thought to contribute to disease, may be particularly sensitive to sleep loss. We tested whether one night of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) would increase leukocyte gene expression indicative of DNA damage responses (DDR), the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), and senescence indicator p16(INK4a) in older adult humans, who are at increased risk for cellular senescence. Community-dwelling older adults aged 61-86years (n=29; 48% male) underwent an experimental partial sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol over 4 nights, including adaptation, an uninterrupted night of sleep, partial sleep deprivation (sleep restricted 3-7AM), and a subsequent full night of sleep. Blood samples were obtained each morning to assess peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression using Illumina HT-12 arrays. Analyses of microarray results revealed that SASP (psleep deprivation activates PBMC gene expression patterns consistent with biological aging in this older adult sample. PSD enhanced the SASP and increased the accumulation of damage that initiates cell cycle arrest and promotes cellular senescence. These findings causally link sleep deprivation to the molecular processes associated with biological aging.

  18. Role of swi7H4 mutant allele of DNA polymerase α in the DNA damage checkpoint response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saman; Ahmed, Shakil

    2015-01-01

    Besides being a mediator of initiation of DNA replication, DNA polymerase α plays a key role in chromosome maintenance. Swi7H4, a novel temperature sensitive mutant of DNA polymerase α was shown to be defective in transcriptional silencing at the mating type centromere and telomere loci. It is also required for the establishment of chromatin state that can recruit the components of the heterochromatin machinery at these regions. Recently the role of DNA polymerase α in the S-phase alkylation damage response in S. pombe has also been studied. Here we investigate whether defects generated by swi7H4, a mutant allele of DNA polymerase α can activate a checkpoint response. We show that swi7H4 exhibit conditional synthetic lethality with chk1 null mutant and the double mutant of swi7H4 with chk1 deletion aggravate the chromosome segregation defects. More importantly swi7H4 mutant cells delay the mitotic progression at non permissive temperature that is mediated by checkpoint protein kinase Chk1. In addition we show that, in the swi7H4 mutant background, cells accumulate DNA damage at non permissive temperature activating the checkpoint kinase protein Chk1. Further, we observed synthetic lethality between swi7H4 and a number of genes involved in DNA repair pathway at semi permissive temperature. We summarize that defects in swi7H4 mutant results in DNA damage that delay mitosis in a Chk1 dependent manner that also require the damage repair pathway for proper recovery.

  19. Role of swi7H4 mutant allele of DNA polymerase α in the DNA damage checkpoint response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Khan

    Full Text Available Besides being a mediator of initiation of DNA replication, DNA polymerase α plays a key role in chromosome maintenance. Swi7H4, a novel temperature sensitive mutant of DNA polymerase α was shown to be defective in transcriptional silencing at the mating type centromere and telomere loci. It is also required for the establishment of chromatin state that can recruit the components of the heterochromatin machinery at these regions. Recently the role of DNA polymerase α in the S-phase alkylation damage response in S. pombe has also been studied. Here we investigate whether defects generated by swi7H4, a mutant allele of DNA polymerase α can activate a checkpoint response. We show that swi7H4 exhibit conditional synthetic lethality with chk1 null mutant and the double mutant of swi7H4 with chk1 deletion aggravate the chromosome segregation defects. More importantly swi7H4 mutant cells delay the mitotic progression at non permissive temperature that is mediated by checkpoint protein kinase Chk1. In addition we show that, in the swi7H4 mutant background, cells accumulate DNA damage at non permissive temperature activating the checkpoint kinase protein Chk1. Further, we observed synthetic lethality between swi7H4 and a number of genes involved in DNA repair pathway at semi permissive temperature. We summarize that defects in swi7H4 mutant results in DNA damage that delay mitosis in a Chk1 dependent manner that also require the damage repair pathway for proper recovery.

  20. ATM-dependent E2F1 accumulation in the nucleolus is an indicator of ribosomal stress in early response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ya-Qiong; An, Guo-Shun; Ni, Ju-Hua; Li, Shu-Yan; Jia, Hong-Ti

    2014-01-01

    The nucleolus plays a major role in ribosome biogenesis. Most genotoxic agents disrupt nucleolar structure and function, which results in the stabilization/activation of p53, inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. Likewise, transcription factor E2F1 as a DNA damage responsive protein also plays roles in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, or apoptosis in response to DNA damage through transcriptional response and protein-protein interaction. Furthermore, E2F1 is known to be involved in regulating rRNA transcription. However, how E2F1 displays in coordinating DNA damage and nucleolar stress is unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that ATM-dependent E2F1 accumulation in the nucleolus is a characteristic feature of nucleolar stress in early response to DNA damage. We found that at the early stage of DNA damage, E2F1 accumulation in the nucleolus was an ATM-dependent and a common event in p53-suficient and -deficient cells. Increased nucleolar E2F1 was sequestered by the nucleolar protein p14ARF, which repressed E2F1-dependent rRNA transcription initiation, and was coupled with S phase. Our data indicate that early accumulation of E2F1 in the nucleolus is an indicator for nucleolar stress and a component of ATM pathway, which presumably buffers elevation of E2F1 in the nucleoplasm and coordinates the diversifying mechanisms of E2F1 acts in cell cycle progression and apoptosis in early response to DNA damage.

  1. DNA damage response (DDR) induced by topoisomerase II poisons requires nuclear function of the small GTPase Rac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartlick, Friedrich; Bopp, Anita; Henninger, Christian; Fritz, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    Here, we investigated the influence of Rac family small GTPases on mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR) stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons. To this end, we examined the influence of the Rac-specific small molecule inhibitor EHT1864 on Ser139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX, a widely used marker of the DDR triggered by DNA double-strand breaks. EHT1864 attenuated the doxorubicin-stimulated DDR in a subset of cell lines tested, including HepG2 hepatoma cells. EHT1864 reduced the level of DNA strand breaks and increased viability following treatment of HepG2 cells with topo II poisons. Protection by EHT1864 was observed in both p53 wildtype (HepG2) and p53 deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cells and, furthermore, remained unaffected upon pharmacological inhibition of p53 in HepG2. Apparently, the impact of Rac on the DDR is independent of p53. Protection from doxorubicin-induced DNA damage by EHT1864 comprises both S and G2 phase cells. The inhibitory effect of EHT1864 on doxorubicin-stimulated DDR was mimicked by pharmacological inhibition of various protein kinases, including JNK, ERK, PI3K, PAK and CK1. EHT1864 and protein kinase inhibitors also attenuated the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Moreover, EHT1864 mitigated the constitutive phosphorylation of topoisomerase IIα at positions S1106, S1213 and S1247. Doxorubicin transport, nuclear import/export of topoisomerase II and Hsp90-related mechanisms are likely not of relevance for doxorubicin-stimulated DDR impaired by EHT1864. We suggest that multiple kinase-dependent but p53- and heat shock protein-independent Rac-regulated nuclear mechanisms are required for activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II poisons.

  2. Modulation of DNA damage response and induction of apoptosis mediates synergism between doxorubicin and a new imidazopyridine derivative in breast and lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Awady, Raafat A; Semreen, Mohammad H; Saber-Ayad, Maha M; Cyprian, Farhan; Menon, Varsha; Al-Tel, Taleb H

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage response machinery (DDR) is an attractive target of cancer therapy. Modulation of DDR network may alter the response of cancer cells to DNA damaging anticancer drugs such as doxorubicin. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of a newly developed imidazopyridine (IAZP) derivative on the DDR after induction of DNA damage in cancer cells by doxorubicin. Cytotoxicity sulphrhodamine-B assay showed a weak anti-proliferative effect of IAZP alone on six cancer cell lines (MCF7, A549, A549DOX11, HepG2, HeLa and M8) and a normal fibroblast strain. Combination of IAZP with doxorubicin resulted in synergism in lung (A549) and breast (MCF7) cancer cells but neither in the other cancer cell lines nor in normal fibroblasts. Molecular studies revealed that synergism is mediated by modulation of DNA damage response and induction of apoptosis. Using constant-field gel electrophoresis and immunofluorescence detection of γ-H2AX foci, IAZP was shown to inhibit the repair of doxorubicin-induced DNA damage in A549 and MCF7 cells. Immunoblot analysis showed that IAZP suppresses the phosphorylation of the ataxia lelangiectasia and Rad3 related (ATR) protein, which is an important player in the response of cancer cells to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage. Moreover, IAZP augmented the doxorubicin-induced degradation of p21, activation of p53, CDK2, caspase 3/7 and phosphorylation of Rb protein. These effects enhanced doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in both cell lines. Our results indicate that IAZP is a promising agent that may enhance the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin on some cancer cells through targeting the DDR. It is a preliminary step toward the clinical application of IAZP in combination with anticancer drugs and opens the avenue for the development of compounds targeting the DDR pathway that might improve the therapeutic index of anticancer drugs and enhance their cure rate.

  3. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage and repair responses: The activations of NHEJ, BER and NER via ATM-p53 signaling axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hui; Shi, Qiong; Song, Xiufang; Fu, Juanli; Hu, Lihua; Xu, Demei; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang, E-mail: songyangwenrong@hotmail.com

    2015-07-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone induced oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. To promote genomic integrity, DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates cell-cycle transitions, DNA repair and apoptosis. PCB quinone-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis have been documented, however, whether PCB quinone insult induce DNA repair signaling is still unknown. In this study, we identified the activation of DDR and corresponding signaling events in HepG2 cells upon the exposure to a synthetic PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ. Our data illustrated that PCB29-pQ induces the phosphorylation of p53, which was mediated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase. The observed phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and the elevation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) indicated that DDR was stimulated by PCB29-pQ treatment. Additionally, we found PCB29-pQ activates non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) signalings. However, these repair pathways are not error-free processes and aberrant repair of DNA damage may cause the potential risk of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. - Highlights: • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. • The elevation of γ-H2AX and 8-OHdG indicates the activation of DNA damage response. • ATM-p53 signaling acts as the DNA damage sensor and effector. • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone activates NHEJ, BER and NER signalings.

  4. Characterisation of Human Keratinocytes by Measuring Cellular Repair Capacity of UVB-Induced DNA Damage and Monitoring of Cytogenetic Changes in Melanoma Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greinert, R.; Breibart, E.W.; Mitchell, D.; Smida, J.; Volkmer, B

    2000-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms for UV-induced photocarcinogenesis are far from being understood in detail, especially in the case of malignant melanoma of the skin. Nevertheless, it is known that deficiencies in cellular repair processes of UV-induced DNA damage (e.g. in the case of Xeroderma pigmentosum) represent important aetiological factors in the multistep development of skin cancer. The repair kinetics have therefore been studied of an established skin cell line (HaCaT), primary human keratinocytes, melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Our data show a high degree of interindividual variability in cellular repair capacity for UV-induced DNA lesions, which might be due to individual differences in the degree of tolerable damage and/or the onsets of saturation of the enzymatic repair system. The cytogenetic analysis of melanoma cell lines, using spectral karyotyping (SKY) furthermore proves that malignant melanoma of the skin are characterised by high numbers of chromosomal aberrations. (author)

  5. Heterochromatin marks HP1γ, HP1α and H3K9me3, and DNA damage response activation in human testis development and germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, J; Moudry, P; Hodny, Z;

    2011-01-01

    -stage-associated patterns of key heterochromatin marks: histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 9 (H3K9me3) and heterochromatic adaptor proteins HP1α and HP1γ, compared with the γH2AX marker of endogenously activated DNA damage response (DDR) and proliferation markers in normal human foetal (n=4) and adult (n=29) testes, pre...

  6. ZTF-8 interacts with the 9-1-1 complex and is required for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair in the C. elegans germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Min Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in DNA repair genes are linked to tumor progression. Furthermore, failure in either activating a DNA damage checkpoint or repairing programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs can impair chromosome segregation. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis for DNA damage response (DDR and DSB repair (DSBR within the germline is highly important. Here we define ZTF-8, a previously uncharacterized protein conserved from worms to humans, as a novel factor involved in the repair of both mitotic and meiotic DSBs as well as in meiotic DNA damage checkpoint activation in the C. elegans germline. ztf-8 mutants exhibit specific sensitivity to γ-irradiation and hydroxyurea, mitotic nuclear arrest at S-phase accompanied by activation of the ATL-1 and CHK-1 DNA damage checkpoint kinases, as well as accumulation of both mitotic and meiotic recombination intermediates, indicating that ZTF-8 functions in DSBR. However, impaired meiotic DSBR progression partially fails to trigger the CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint in late pachytene, also supporting a role for ZTF-8 in meiotic DDR. ZTF-8 partially co-localizes with the 9-1-1 DDR complex and interacts with MRT-2/Rad1, a component of this complex. The human RHINO protein rescues the phenotypes observed in ztf-8 mutants, suggesting functional conservation across species. We propose that ZTF-8 is involved in promoting repair at stalled replication forks and meiotic DSBs by transducing DNA damage checkpoint signaling via the 9-1-1 pathway. Our findings define a conserved function for ZTF-8/RHINO in promoting genomic stability in the germline.

  7. DNA damage response and evasion from immunosurveillance in CLL: New options for NK cell-based immunotherpies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Shatnyeva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most prominent B cell malignancy among adults in the Western world and characterized by a clonal expansion of B cells. The patients suffer from severe immune defects resulting in increased susceptibility to infections and failure to generate an antitumor immune response. Defects in both, DNA damage response (DDR pathway and crosstalk with the tissue microenvironment have been reported to play a crucial role for the survival of CLL cells, therapy resistance and impaired immune response. To this end, major advances over the past years have highlighted several T cell immune evasion mechanisms in CLL. Here, we discuss the consequences of an impaired DDR pathway for detection and elimination of CLL cells by Natural killer (NK cells. NK cells are considered to be a major component of the immunosurveillance in leukemia but NK cell activity is impaired in CLL. Restoration of NK cell activity using immunoligands and immunoconstructs in combination with the conventional chemotherapy may provide a future perspective for CLL treatment.

  8. Acetylation dynamics of human nuclear proteins during the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennetzen, Martin; Andersen, J.S.; Lasen, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    -dependent posttranslational modifications (PT Ms). To complement our previous analysis of IR-induced temporal dynamics of nuclear phosphoproteome, we now identify a range of human nuclear proteins that are dynamically regulated by acetylation, and predominantly deacetylation, during IR-induced DDR by using mass spectrometry......-based proteomic approaches. Apart from cataloging acetylation sites through SILAC proteomic analyses before IR and at 5 and 60 min after IR exposure of U2OS cells, we report that: (1) key components of the transcriptional machinery, such as EP 300 and CREBBP, are dynamically acetylated; (2) that nuclear...... to assess lysine acetylation status and thereby validate the mass spectrometry data. We thus present evidence that nuclear proteins, including those known to regulate cellular functions via epigenetic modifications of histones, are regulated by (de)acetylation in a timely manner upon cell's exposure...

  9. The immune receptor Trem1 cooperates with diminished DNA damage response to induce preleukemic stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, W; Amarachintha, S; Wilson, A; Pang, Q

    2017-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with extremely high risk of leukemic transformation. Here we investigate the relationship between DNA damage response (DDR) and leukemogenesis using the Fanca knockout mouse model. We found that chronic exposure of the Fanca(-/-) hematopoietic stem cells to DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C in vivo leads to diminished DDR, and the emergence/expansion of pre-leukemia stem cells (pre-LSCs). Surprisingly, although genetic correction of Fanca deficiency in the pre-LSCs restores DDR and reduces genomic instability, but fails to prevent pre-LSC expansion or delay leukemia development in irradiated recipients. Furthermore, we identified transcription program underlying dysregulated DDR and cell migration, myeloid proliferation, and immune response in the Fanca(-/-) pre-LSCs. Forced expression of the downregulated DNA repair genes, Rad51c or Trp53i13, in the Fanca(-/-) pre-LSCs partially rescues DDR but has no effect on leukemia, whereas shRNA knockdown of the upregulated immune receptor genes Trem1 or Pilrb improves leukemia-related survival, but not DDR or genomic instability. Furthermore, Trem1 cooperates with diminished DDR in vivo to promote Fanca(-/-) pre-LSC expansion and leukemia development. Our study implicates diminishing DDR as a root cause of FA leukemogenesis, which subsequently collaborates with other signaling pathways for leukemogenic transformation.

  10. Positive effect of Mdm2 on p53 expression explains excitability of p53 in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliaš, Ján

    2017-04-07

    Most of the existing biological models consider Mdm2 as a dominant negative regulator of p53 appearing in several negative feedback loops. However, in addition to targeting p53 for degradation, Mdm2 in tight cooperation with MdmX can control expression levels of p53 through enhanced induction of p53 synthesis in response to DNA damage. Whilst ATM-dependent phosphorylation of p53 is not observed to be important in this enhanced synthesis, ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Mdm2 (as well as MdmX) is essential for its dual role, which is accompanied with widely oscillating p53. In the light of these new observations we formulate a novel molecular mechanism which, in silico, is capable of triggering p53 oscillations. The mechanism that is based on Mdm2's dual regulation of p53 can provide mechanistic insights into an excitability of the p53 network, thus it contributes to understanding of variability of p53 dynamics in response to single and double strand breaks.

  11. p18(Hamlet) mediates different p53-dependent responses to DNA-damage inducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarga, Vanesa; Cuadrado, Ana; Nebreda, Angel R

    2007-10-01

    Cells organize appropriate responses to environmental cues by activating specific signaling networks. Two proteins that play key roles in coordinating stress responses are the kinase p38alpha (MAPK14) and the transcription factor p53 (TP53). Depending on the nature and the extent of the stress-induced damage, cells may respond by arresting the cell cycle or by undergoing cell death, and these responses are usually associated with the phosphorylation of particular substrates by p38alpha as well as the activation of specific target genes by p53. We recently characterized a new p38alpha substrate, named p18(Hamlet) (ZNHIT1), which mediates p53-dependent responses to different genotoxic stresses. Thus, cisplatin or UV light induce stabilization of the p18(Hamlet) protein, which then enhances the ability of p53 to bind to and activate the promoters of pro-apoptotic genes such as NOXA and PUMA leading to apoptosis induction. In a similar way, we report here that p18(Hamlet) can also mediate the cell cycle arrest induced in response to gamma-irradiation, by participating in the p53-dependent upregulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1) (CDKN1A).

  12. Human C6orf211 Encodes Armt1, a Protein Carboxyl Methyltransferase that Targets PCNA and Is Linked to the DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jefferson P. Perry

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence supports the presence of an L-glutamyl methyltransferase(s in eukaryotic cells, but this enzyme class has been defined only in certain prokaryotic species. Here, we characterize the human C6orf211 gene product as “acidic residue methyltransferase-1” (Armt1, an enzyme that specifically targets proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in breast cancer cells, predominately methylating glutamate side chains. Armt1 homologs share structural similarities with the SAM-dependent methyltransferases, and negative regulation of activity by automethylation indicates a means for cellular control. Notably, shRNA-based knockdown of Armt1 expression in two breast cancer cell lines altered survival in response to genotoxic stress. Increased sensitivity to UV, adriamycin, and MMS was observed in SK-Br-3 cells, while in contrast, increased resistance to these agents was observed in MCF7 cells. Together, these results lay the foundation for defining the mechanism by which this post-translational modification operates in the DNA damage response (DDR.

  13. Ubiquitin-SUMO Circuitry Controls Activated Fanconi Anemia ID Complex Dosage in Response to DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Rajendra, Eeson

    2015-01-01

    We show that central components of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, the tumor suppressor proteins FANCI and FANCD2 (the ID complex), are SUMOylated in response to replication fork stalling. The ID complex is SUMOylated in a manner that depends on the ATR kinase, the FA ubiquitin ligase...

  14. Role of H2AX in DNA damage response and human cancers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srivastava, N.; Gochhait, S.; Boer, P. de; Bamezai, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    H2AX, the evolutionarily conserved variant of histone H2A, has been identified as one of the key histones to undergo various post-translational modifications in response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By virtue of these modifications, that include acetylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination

  15. Prophage induction and differential RecA and UmuDAb transcriptome regulation in the DNA damage responses of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle M Hare

    Full Text Available The SOS response to DNA damage that induces up to 10% of the prokaryotic genome requires RecA action to relieve LexA transcriptional repression. In Acinetobacter species, which lack LexA, the error-prone polymerase accessory UmuDAb is instead required for ddrR induction after DNA damage, suggesting it might be a LexA analog. RNA-Seq experiments defined the DNA damage transcriptome (mitomycin C-induced of wild type, recA and umuDAb mutant strains of both A. baylyi ADP1 and A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Of the typical SOS response genes, few were differentially regulated in these species; many were repressed or absent. A striking 38.4% of all ADP1 genes, and 11.4% of all 17978 genes, were repressed under these conditions. In A. baylyi ADP1, 66 genes (2.0% of the genome, including a CRISPR/Cas system, were DNA damage-induced, and belonged to four regulons defined by differential use of recA and umuDAb. In A. baumannii ATCC 17978, however, induction of 99% of the 152 mitomycin C-induced genes depended on recA, and only 28 of these genes required umuDAb for their induction. 90% of the induced A. baumannii genes were clustered in three prophage regions, and bacteriophage particles were observed after mitomycin C treatment. These prophages encoded esvI, esvK1, and esvK2, ethanol-stimulated virulence genes previously identified in a Caenorhabditis elegans model, as well as error-prone polymerase alleles. The induction of all 17978 error-prone polymerase alleles, whether prophage-encoded or not, was recA dependent, but only these DNA polymerase V-related genes were de-repressed in the umuDAb mutant in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that both species possess a robust and complex DNA damage response involving both recA-dependent and recA-independent regulons, and further demonstrates that although umuDAb has a specialized role in repressing error-prone polymerases, additional regulators likely participate in these species' transcriptional

  16. No DNA damage response and negligible genome-wide transcriptional changes in human embryonic stem cells exposed to terahertz radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomazova, A N; Vassina, E M; Goryachkovskaya, T N; Popik, V M; Sokolov, A S; Kolchanov, N A; Lagarkova, M A; Kiselev, S L; Peltek, S E

    2015-01-13

    Terahertz (THz) radiation was proposed recently for use in various applications, including medical imaging and security scanners. However, there are concerns regarding the possible biological effects of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation in the THz range on cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are extremely sensitive to environmental stimuli, and we therefore utilised this cell model to investigate the non-thermal effects of THz irradiation. We studied DNA damage and transcriptome responses in hESCs exposed to narrow-band THz radiation (2.3 THz) under strict temperature control. The transcription of approximately 1% of genes was subtly increased following THz irradiation. Functional annotation enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed 15 functional classes, which were mostly related to mitochondria. Terahertz irradiation did not induce the formation of γH2AX foci or structural chromosomal aberrations in hESCs. We did not observe any effect on the mitotic index or morphology of the hESCs following THz exposure.

  17. DNA Damage Response and SUMO Modification%SUMO化修饰在DNA损伤响应中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋华东; 李钰

    2012-01-01

    物理或化学等多种因素均可以引起DNA损伤.为维持机体基因组的稳定性,机体形成了精确完整的机制来修复损伤的DNA. SUMO(small ubiquitin-related modifier,SUMO)化修饰与其他蛋白翻译后修饰一样,具有多种生物学功能.近年来的研究表明,其在DNA损伤修复中也具有非常重要的作用.该文就DNA损伤修复、SUMO化修饰系统及其二者关系的最新研究进展作了较为全面的介绍和总结.%DNA damage can be produced widely in our body by physical and/or chemical factors. Therefore, in order to maintain the genomic integrity, DNA must be protected from DNA damage and repaired correctly by forming accurate mechanism if DNA damage happened. SUMOylation has multiple biological functions like other post-translation modification. Emerging evidence has showed that SUMOs play vital roles in DNA damage repair. This review focuses on the newly research about DNA damage, SUMOylation and the relationship between them and provides a complete introducing and summarization.

  18. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Akari; Kobayashi, Yume; Tada, Shusuke; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi

    2014-09-12

    WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH(-/-)) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.

  19. Association between DNA damage response and repair genes and risk of invasive serous ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joellen M Schildkraut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We analyzed the association between 53 genes related to DNA repair and p53-mediated damage response and serous ovarian cancer risk using case-control data from the North Carolina Ovarian Cancer Study (NCOCS, a population-based, case-control study. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis was restricted to 364 invasive serous ovarian cancer cases and 761 controls of white, non-Hispanic race. Statistical analysis was two staged: a screen using marginal Bayes factors (BFs for 484 SNPs and a modeling stage in which we calculated multivariate adjusted posterior probabilities of association for 77 SNPs that passed the screen. These probabilities were conditional on subject age at diagnosis/interview, batch, a DNA quality metric and genotypes of other SNPs and allowed for uncertainty in the genetic parameterizations of the SNPs and number of associated SNPs. Six SNPs had Bayes factors greater than 10 in favor of an association with invasive serous ovarian cancer. These included rs5762746 (median OR(odds ratio(per allele = 0.66; 95% credible interval (CI = 0.44-1.00 and rs6005835 (median OR(per allele = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.53-0.91 in CHEK2, rs2078486 (median OR(per allele = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.21-2.25 and rs12951053 (median OR(per allele = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.20-2.26 in TP53, rs411697 (median OR (rare homozygote = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.35 - 0.79 in BACH1 and rs10131 (median OR( rare homozygote = not estimable in LIG4. The six most highly associated SNPs are either predicted to be functionally significant or are in LD with such a variant. The variants in TP53 were confirmed to be associated in a large follow-up study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our findings, further follow-up of the DNA repair and response pathways in a larger dataset is warranted to confirm these results.

  20. DNA damage response signaling in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells following gamma and carbon beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Somnath [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Narang, Himanshi, E-mail: himinarang@gmail.com [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sarma, Asitikantha [Radiation Biology Laboratory, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Krishna, Malini [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-11-01

    Carbon beams (5.16 MeV/u, LET = 290 keV/{mu}m) are high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation characterized by higher relative biological effectiveness than low LET radiation. The aim of the current study was to determine the signaling differences between {gamma}-rays and carbon ion-irradiation. A549 cells were irradiated with 1 Gy carbon or {gamma}-rays. Carbon beam was found to be three times more cytotoxic than {gamma}-rays despite the fact that the numbers of {gamma}-H2AX foci were same. Percentage of cells showing ATM/ATR foci were more with {gamma}-rays however number of foci per cell were more in case of carbon irradiation. Large BRCA1 foci were found in all carbon irradiated cells unlike {gamma}-rays irradiated cells and prosurvival ERK pathway was activated after {gamma}-rays irradiation but not carbon. The noteworthy finding of this study is the early phase apoptosis induction by carbon ions. In the present study in A549 lung adenocarcinoma, authors conclude that despite activation of same repair molecules such as ATM and BRCA1, differences in low and high LET damage responses might be due to their distinct macromolecular complexes rather than their individual activation and the activation of cytoplasmic pathways such as ERK, whether it applies to all the cell lines need to be further explored.

  1. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Induce DNA Damage-Dependent Interferon Responses Circumventing Ebola Virus Immune Evasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Priya; Aguirre, Sebastian; Yen, Benjamin C.; Pietzsch, Colette A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Maria T.; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Morlock, Lorraine K.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Leung, Daisy W.; Williams, Noelle S.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebola virus (EBOV) protein VP35 inhibits production of interferon alpha/beta (IFN) by blocking RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways, thereby promoting virus replication and pathogenesis. A high-throughput screening assay, developed to identify compounds that either inhibit or bypass VP35 IFN-antagonist function, identified five DNA intercalators as reproducible hits from a library of bioactive compounds. Four, including doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are anthracycline antibiotics that inhibit topoisomerase II and are used clinically as chemotherapeutic drugs. These compounds were demonstrated to induce IFN responses in an ATM kinase-dependent manner and to also trigger the DNA-sensing cGAS-STING pathway of IFN induction. These compounds also suppress EBOV replication in vitro and induce IFN in the presence of IFN-antagonist proteins from multiple negative-sense RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into signaling pathways activated by important chemotherapy drugs and identify a novel therapeutic approach for IFN induction that may be exploited to inhibit RNA virus replication. PMID:28377530

  2. WRNIP1 functions upstream of DNA polymerase η in the UV-induced DNA damage response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Akari, E-mail: akari_yo@stu.musashino-u.ac.jp [Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo-shi, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yume [Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo-shi, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan); Tada, Shusuke [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi-shi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Seki, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry, Tohoku Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1 Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 981-8558 (Japan); Enomoto, Takemi [Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo-shi, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan)

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • The UV sensitivity of POLH{sup −/−} cells was suppressed by disruption of WRNIP1. • In WRNIP1{sup −/−/−}/POLH{sup −/−} cells, mutation frequencies and SCE after irradiation reduced. • WRNIP1 defect recovered rate of fork progression after irradiation in POLH{sup −/−} cells. • WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the translesion DNA synthesis pathway. - Abstract: WRNIP1 (WRN-interacting protein 1) was first identified as a factor that interacts with WRN, the protein that is defective in Werner syndrome (WS). WRNIP1 associates with DNA polymerase η (Polη), but the biological significance of this interaction remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the functional interaction between WRNIP1 and Polη by generating knockouts of both genes in DT40 chicken cells. Disruption of WRNIP1 in Polη-disrupted (POLH{sup −/−}) cells suppressed the phenotypes associated with the loss of Polη: sensitivity to ultraviolet light (UV), delayed repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), elevated frequency of mutation, elevated levels of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and reduced rate of fork progression after UV irradiation. These results suggest that WRNIP1 functions upstream of Polη in the response to UV irradiation.

  3. Nanoscale histone localization in live cells reveals reduced chromatin mobility in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Lelièvre, Sophie A; Irudayaraj, Joseph M K

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear functions including gene expression, DNA replication and genome maintenance intimately rely on dynamic changes in chromatin organization. The movements of chromatin fibers might play important roles in the regulation of these fundamental processes, yet the mechanisms controlling chromatin mobility are poorly understood owing to methodological limitations for the assessment of chromatin movements. Here, we present a facile and quantitative technique that relies on photoactivation of GFP-tagged histones and paired-particle tracking to measure chromatin mobility in live cells. We validate the method by comparing live cells to ATP-depleted cells and show that chromatin movements in mammalian cells are predominantly energy dependent. We also find that chromatin diffusion decreases in response to DNA breaks induced by a genotoxic drug or by the ISceI meganuclease. Timecourse analysis after cell exposure to ionizing radiation indicates that the decrease in chromatin mobility is transient and precedes subsequent increased mobility. Future applications of the method in the DNA repair field and beyond are discussed.

  4. Microtubule Affinity-Regulating Kinase 2 is associated with DNA damage response and cisplatin resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubaux, Roland; Thu, Kelsie L.; Vucic, Emily A.; Pikor, Larissa A.; Kung, Sonia H.Y.; Martinez, Victor D.; Mosslemi, Mitra; Becker-Santos, Daiana D.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Lam, Stephen; Lam, Wan L.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARKs) are involved in several cellular functions but few studies have correlated MARK kinase expression with cancer, and none have explored their role in lung cancer. In this study, we identified MARK2 as frequently disrupted by DNA hypomethylation and copy gain, resulting in concordant overexpression in independent lung tumor cohorts and we demonstrate a role for MARK2 in lung tumor biology. Manipulation of MARK2 in lung cell lines revealed its involvement in cell viability and anchorage-independent growth. Analyses of both manipulated cell lines and clinical tumor specimens identified a potential role for MARK2 in cell cycle activation and DNA repair. Associations between MARK2 and the E2F, Myc/Max, and NF-κB pathways were identified by luciferase assays and in-depth assessment of the NF-κB pathway suggests a negative association between MARK2 expression and NF-κB due to activation of non-canonical NF-κB signaling. Finally, we show that high MARK2 expression levels correlate with resistance to cisplatin, a standard first line chemotherapy for lung cancer. Collectively, our work supports a role for MARK2 in promoting malignant phenotypes of lung cancer and potentially modulating response to the DNA damaging chemotherapeutic, cisplatin. PMID:25907283

  5. Cellular signal adaptation with damage control at low doses versus the predominance of DNA damage at high doses; Perturbation de la signalisation cellulaire apres irradiation a faible dose contre la predominance des lesions de l'ADN a dose elevee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. [Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Bond, V.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States). Research Faculty; Sondhaus, Ch.A. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Control Office; Altman, K.I. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    1999-03-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to potentially interfere with cellular functions at all levels of cell organization and induces DNA lesions apparently with an incidence linearly related to D, also at low doses. On the other hand, low doses have also been observed to initiate a slowly appearing temporary protection against causation and accumulation of DNA lesions, involving the radical detoxification system, DNA repair and removal of DNA damage. This protection apparently does not operate at high doses; it has been described to be nonlinear, increasing initially with D, beginning to decrease when D exceeds approximately 0.1-0.2 Gy and eventually disappearing at higher D. The various adaptive responses have been shown to last individually from hours to weeks in different cell types and resemble responses to oxidative stress. Damage to DNA is continuously and endogenously produced mainly by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in a normal oxidative metabolism. This endogenous DNA damage quantitatively exceeds DNA damage from low-dose irradiation, by several orders of magnitude. Thus, the protective responses following acute low-dose irradiation may be presumed to mainly counteract the endogenous DNA damage. Accordingly, the model described here uses two dose-effect functions, a linear one for causing and a nonlinear one for protecting against DNA damage from whatever cause in the irradiated cells and tissues. The resulting net dose-risk function strongly suggests that the incidence of cancer versus dose in the irradiated tissues is much less likely to be linear than to exhibit a threshold. The observed cancer incidence may even fall below the spontaneous incidence, when D to cells is below approximately 0.2 Gy. However incomplete, these data support a reexamination of the LNT hypothesis. (authors)

  6. Wnt/β-catenin signaling induces the aging of mesenchymal stem cells through the DNA damage response and the p53/p21 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-yong Zhang

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of cellular extrinsic factors in the aging of adult stem cells. However, the effects of an aged cell-extrinsic environment on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC aging and the factors involved remain unclear. In the current study, we examine the effects of old rat serum (ORS on the aging of MSCs, and explore the effects and mechanisms of Wnt/β-catenin signaling on MSC aging induced by ORS treatment. Senescence-associated changes in the cells are examined with SA-β-galactosidase staining and ROS staining. The proliferation ability is detected by MTT assay. The surviving and apoptotic cells are determined using AO/EB staining. The results suggest that ORS promotes MSC senescence and reduces the proliferation and survival of cells. The immunofluorescence staining shows that the expression of β-catenin increases in MSCs of old rats. To identify the effects of Wnt/β-catenin signaling on MSC aging induced with ORS, the expression of β-catenin, GSK-3β, and c-myc are detected. The results show that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the cells is activated after ORS treatment. Then we examine the aging, proliferation, and survival of MSCs after modulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The results indicate that the senescence and dysfunction of MSCs in the medium containing ORS is reversed by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor DKK1 or by β-catenin siRNA. Moreover, the expression of γ-H2A.X, a molecular marker of DNA damage response, p16(INK4a, p53, and p21 is increased in senescent MSCs induced with ORS, and is also reversed by DKK1 or by β-catenin siRNA. In summary, our study indicates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling may play a critical role in MSC aging induced by the serum of aged animals and suggests that the DNA damage response and p53/p21 pathway may be the main mediators of MSC aging induced by excessive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  7. Exome capture reveals ZNF423 and CEP164 mutations, linking renal ciliopathies to DNA damage response signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaki, Moumita; Airik, Rannar; Ghosh, Amiya K;

    2012-01-01

    Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies (NPHP-RC) are degenerative recessive diseases that affect kidney, retina, and brain. Genetic defects in NPHP gene products that localize to cilia and centrosomes defined them as "ciliopathies." However, disease mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we......, known to activate ATM at sites of DNA damage. We show that knockdown of CEP164 or ZNF423 causes sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and that cep164 knockdown in zebrafish results in dysregulated DDR and an NPHP-RC phenotype. Our findings link degenerative diseases of the kidney and retina, disorders...

  8. Human Noxin is an anti-apoptotic protein in response to DNA damage of A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Kyoung-Jae; Im, Joo-Young; Yun, Chae-Ok; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Kim, Young Joo; Lee, Jung-Sun; Jung, Young-Jin; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Song, Kyung Bin; Kim, Young-Ho; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Jung, Kyeong Eun; Kim, Moon-Hee; Won, Misun

    2014-06-01

    Human Noxin (hNoxin, C11Orf82), a homolog of mouse noxin, is highly expressed in colorectal and lung cancer tissues. hNoxin contains a DNA-binding C-domain in RPA1, which mediates DNA metabolic processes, such as DNA replication and DNA repair. Expression of hNoxin is associated with S phase in cancer cells and in normal cells. Expression of hNoxin was induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Knockdown of hNoxin caused growth inhibition of colorectal and lung cancer cells. The comet assay and western blot analysis revealed that hNoxin knockdown induced apoptosis through activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/p53 in non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells. Furthermore, simultaneous hNoxin knockdown and treatment with DNA-damaging agents, such as camptothecin (CPT) and UV irradiation, enhanced apoptosis, whereas Trichostatin A (TSA) did not. However, transient overexpression of hNoxin rescued cells from DNA damage-induced apoptosis but did not block apoptosis in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that hNoxin may be associated with inhibition of apoptosis in response to DNA damage. An adenovirus expressing a short hairpin RNA against hNoxin transcripts significantly suppressed the growth of A549 tumor xenografts, indicating that hNoxin knockdown has in vivo anti-tumor efficacy. Thus, hNoxin is a DNA damage-induced anti-apoptotic protein and potential therapeutic target in cancer.

  9. Prostate cancer stem-like cells proliferate slowly and resist etoposide-induced cytotoxicity via enhancing DNA damage response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Judy [Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Juravinski Innovation Tower, Room T3310, St. Joseph' s Hospital, 50 Charlton Ave East, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Father Sean O' Sullivan Research Institute, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 (Canada); The Hamilton Centre for Kidney Research (HCKR), St. Joseph' s Hamilton Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 (Canada); Tang, Damu, E-mail: damut@mcmaster.ca [Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Juravinski Innovation Tower, Room T3310, St. Joseph' s Hospital, 50 Charlton Ave East, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Father Sean O' Sullivan Research Institute, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 (Canada); The Hamilton Centre for Kidney Research (HCKR), St. Joseph' s Hamilton Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 (Canada)

    2014-10-15

    Despite the development of chemoresistance as a major concern in prostate cancer therapy, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this report, we demonstrate that DU145-derived prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs) progress slowly with more cells accumulating in the G1 phase in comparison to DU145 non-PCSCs. Consistent with the important role of the AKT pathway in promoting G1 progression, DU145 PCSCs were less sensitive to growth factor-induced activation of AKT in comparison to non-PCSCs. In response to etoposide (one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs), DU145 PCSCs survived significantly better than non-PCSCs. In addition to etoposide, PCSCs demonstrated increased resistance to docetaxel, a taxane drug that is commonly used to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer. Etoposide produced elevated levels of γH2AX and triggered a robust G2/M arrest along with a coordinated reduction of the G1 population in PCSCs compared to non-PCSCs, suggesting that elevated γH2AX plays a role in the resistance of PCSCs to etoposide-induced cytotoxicity. We have generated xenograft tumors from DU145 PCSCs and non-PCSCs. Consistent with the knowledge that PCSCs produce xenograft tumors with more advanced features, we were able to demonstrate that PCSC-derived xenograft tumors displayed higher levels of γH2AX and p-CHK1 compared to non-PCSC-produced xenograft tumors. Collectively, our research suggests that the elevation of DNA damage response contributes to PCSC-associated resistance to genotoxic reagents. - Highlights: • Increased survival in DU145 PCSCs following etoposide-induced cytotoxicity. • PCSCs exhibit increased sensitivity to etoposide-induced DDR. • Resistance to cytotoxicity may be due to slower proliferation in PCSCs. • Reduced kinetics to growth factor induced activation of AKT in PCSCs.

  10. Neurotoxin-induced DNA damage is persistentin SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Musich, Phillip R.; Cui, Kui; Zou, Yue; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of the noradrenergic neurons has been reported in the brain of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. However, their pathologic characteristics during the neurodegenerative course and underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we used the neurotoxincamptothecin (CPT)to induce the DNA damage response in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, normal fibroblast cells, and primarily cultured LC and raphe neurons to examine cellular responses and repair capabilities after neurotoxin exposure. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to show that noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and deficientin DNA repair, as compared to fibroblast cells. Furthermore, similar to SH-SY5Y cells, primarily cultured LC neurons are more sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and show a deficiency in repairing this damage. Moreover, while N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) exposure also results in DNA damage in cultured LC neurons, neither CPT nor DSP4 induce DNA damage in neuronal cultures from the raphe nuclei. Taken together, noradrenergic SH-SY5Y cells and LC neurons are sensitive to CPT-induced DNA damage and exhibit a repair deficiency, providing a mechanistic explanation for the pathologic characteristics of LC degeneration when facing endogenous and environmental DNA-damaging insultsin vivo. PMID:25724887

  11. Identification of intermediate-size non-coding RNAs involved in the UV-induced DNA damage response in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqian Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A network of DNA damage response (DDR mechanisms functions coordinately to maintain genome integrity and prevent disease. The Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER pathway is known to function in the response to UV-induced DNA damage. Although numbers of coding genes and miRNAs have been identified and reported to participate in UV-induced DNA damage response (UV-DDR, the precise role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs in UV-DDR remains largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used high-throughput RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq to discover intermediate-size (70-500 nt ncRNAs (is-ncRNAs in C. elegans, using the strains of L4 larvae of wild-type (N2, UV-irradiated (N2/UV100 and NER-deficient mutant (xpa-1, and 450 novel non-coding transcripts were initially identified. A customized microarray assay was then applied to examine the expression profiles of both novel transcripts and known is-ncRNAs, and 57 UV-DDR-related is-ncRNA candidates showed expression variations at different levels between UV irradiated strains and non- irradiated strains. The top ranked is-ncRNA candidates with expression differences were further validated by qRT-PCR analysis, of them, 8 novel is-ncRNAs were significantly up-regulated after UV irradiation. Knockdown of two novel is-ncRNAs, ncRNA317 and ncRNA415, by RNA interference, resulted in higher UV sensitivity and significantly decreased expression of NER-related genes in C. elegans. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The discovery of above two novel is-ncRNAs in this study indicated the functional roles of is-ncRNAs in the regulation of UV-DDR network, and aided our understanding of the significance of ncRNA involvement in the UV-induced DNA damage response.

  12. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Piersanti

    Full Text Available Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2 are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR.

  13. Metformin and the ATM DNA damage response (DDR): accelerating the onset of stress-induced senescence to boost protection against cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A; Cufí, Sílvia; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Vellon, Luciano; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro

    2011-11-01

    By activating the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated DNA Damage Response (DDR), the AMPK agonist metformin might sensitize cells against further damage, thus mimicking the precancerous stimulus that induces an intrinsic barrier against carcinogenesis. Herein, we present the new hypothesis that metformin might function as a tissue sweeper of pre-malignant cells before they gain stem cell/tumor initiating properties. Because enhanced glycolysis (the Warburg effect) plays a causal role in the gain of stem-like properties of tumor-initiating cells by protecting them from the pro-senescent effects of mitochondrial respiration-induced oxidative stress, metformin's ability to disrupt the glycolytic metabotype may generate a cellular phenotype that is metabolically protected against immortalization. The bioenergetic crisis imposed by metformin, which may involve enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative stress, can lower the threshold for cellular senescence by pre-activating an ATM-dependent pseudo-DDR. This allows an accelerated onset of cellular senescence in response to additional oncogenic stresses. By pushing cancer cells to use oxidative phosphorylation instead of glycolysis, metformin can rescue cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) expression that is downregulated by oncogenic transformation, a crucial adaptation of tumor cells to avoid the adaptive immune response by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs). Aside from restoration of tumor immunosurveillance at the cell-autonomous level, metformin can activate a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) to reinforce senescence growth arrest, which might trigger an immune-mediated clearance of the senescent cells in a non-cell-autonomous manner. By diminishing the probability of escape from the senescence anti-tumor barrier, the net effect of metformin should be a significant decrease in the accumulation of dysfunctional, pre-malignant cells in tissues, including those with the

  14. Insights into dynamic mitotic chromatin organization through the NIMA kinase suppressor SonC, a chromatin-associated protein involved in the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jennifer R; Facemyer, Eric M; Shen, Kuo-Fang; Ukil, Leena; Osmani, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex proteins SonA and SonB, the orthologs of mammalian RAE1 and NUP98, respectively, were identified in Aspergillus nidulans as cold-sensitive suppressors of a temperature-sensitive allele of the essential mitotic NIMA kinase (nimA1). Subsequent analyses found that sonB1 mutants exhibit temperature-dependent DNA damage sensitivity. To understand this pathway further, we performed a genetic screen to isolate additional conditional DNA damage-sensitive suppressors of nimA1. We identified two new alleles of SonA and four intragenic nimA mutations that suppress the temperature sensitivity of the nimA1 mutant. In addition, we identified SonC, a previously unstudied binuclear zinc cluster protein involved with NIMA and the DNA damage response. Like sonA and sonB, sonC is an essential gene. SonC localizes to nuclei and partially disperses during mitosis. When the nucleolar organizer region (NOR) undergoes mitotic condensation and removal from the nucleolus, nuclear SonC and histone H1 localize in a mutually exclusive manner with H1 being removed from the NOR region and SonC being absent from the end of the chromosome beyond the NOR. This region of chromatin is adjacent to a cluster of nuclear pore complexes to which NIMA localizes last during its progression around the nuclear envelope during initiation of mitosis. The results genetically extend the NIMA regulatory system to include a protein with selective large-scale chromatin location observed during mitosis. The data suggest a model in which NIMA and SonC, its new chromatin-associated suppressor, might help to orchestrate global chromatin states during mitosis and the DNA damage response.

  15. The MAPK pathway signals telomerase modulation in response to isothiocyanate-induced DNA damage of human liver cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Lamy

    Full Text Available 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC, an aliphatic, sulphuric compound from Brassica vegetables, possesses in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity. Recently we demonstrated the potent growth inhibitory potential of the DNA damaging agent MTBITC in human liver cancer cells. Here we now show that MTBITC down regulates telomerase which sensitizes cells to apoptosis induction. This is mediated by MAPK activation but independent from production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Within one hour, MTBITC induced DNA damage in cancer cells correlating to a transient increase in hTERT mRNA expression which then turned into telomerase suppression, evident at mRNA as well as enzyme activity level. To clarify the role of MAPK for telomerase regulation, liver cancer cells were pre-treated with MAPK-specific inhibitors prior to MTBITC exposure. This clearly showed that transient elevation of hTERT mRNA expression was predominantly mediated by the MAPK family member JNK. In contrast, activated ERK1/2 and P38, but not JNK, signalled to telomerase abrogation and consequent apoptosis induction. DNA damage by MTBITC was also strongly abolished by MAPK inhibition. Oxidative stress, as analysed by DCF fluorescence assay, electron spin resonance spectroscopy and formation of 4-hydroxynonenal was found as not relevant for this process. Furthermore, N-acetylcysteine pre-treatment did not impact MTBITC-induced telomerase suppression or depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential as marker for apoptosis. Our data therefore imply that upon DNA damage by MTBITC, MAPK are essential for telomerase regulation and consequent growth impairment in liver tumor cells and this detail probably plays an important role in understanding the potential chemotherapeutic efficacy of ITC.

  16. DNA-damaging agents in cancer chemotherapy: serendipity and chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung-Ong, Kahlin; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2013-05-23

    DNA-damaging agents have a long history of use in cancer chemotherapy. The full extent of their cellular mechanisms, which is essential to balance efficacy and toxicity, is often unclear. In addition, the use of many anticancer drugs is limited by dose-limiting toxicities as well as the development of drug resistance. Novel anticancer compounds are continually being developed in the hopes of addressing these limitations; however, it is essential to be able to evaluate these compounds for their mechanisms of action. This review covers the current DNA-damaging agents used in the clinic, discusses their limitations, and describes the use of chemical genomics to uncover new information about the DNA damage response network and to evaluate novel DNA-damaging compounds.

  17. Systematic Analysis of the Crosstalk between Mitosis and DNA Damage by a Live Cell siRNA Screen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronni Sølvhøi

    Recent research has shown, that the biological processes of DNA replication, DNA damage, cell cycle and mitosis cannot be considered as isolated cellular functions but are mechanistically linked in many ways. For instance, when cells are exposed to replication stress and enter mitosis...... propose that this strong p53 response, which often occurs without detectable increase in DNA damage, is caused by the acute increase in chromosomal aneuploidy. Finally, our systematic approach to the DNA damage-mitosis crosstalk reveals widespread cell death in response to mitotic pertubations, showing...

  18. Dynamic alteration in H3 serine 10 phosphorylation is G1-phase specific during ionization radiation induced DNA damage response in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ajit K.; Bhattacharya, Saikat; Khan, Shafqat A.; Khade, Bharat; Gupta, Sanjay, E-mail: sgupta@actrec.gov.in

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Loss of H3S10P in response to DNA damage is a universal phenomenon from G1 cells. • The loss happens predominantly from histone H3.3, a transcription activation mark. • Compaction of chromatin occurs during repair stage of DDR. • The alteration of H3S10P shows an inverse correlation with γH2AX. - Abstract: Chromatin acts as a natural barrier in DNA-damage recognition and repair. Histones undergo differential post-translational modification(s) to facilitate DNA damage response (DDR). Importance of modifications like phosphorylation of histone variant H2A.X in DNA repair is very well understood, however, ambiguous results exist in literature regarding the levels of certain histone modifications and their possible role in repair. In the present study, we have investigated in depth the alteration in the level of the highly dynamic histone mark H3S10P as it plays a dual role in different phases of the cell cycle. We show here that H3S10P decreases specifically from irradiated G1-enriched cells irrespective of the damaging agent or the cell line used in the study. Interestingly, the loss occurs predominantly from H3.3 variant which is a transcription activation mark like H3S10P itself, suggesting that the alteration might be implicated in transcription repression. The decrease in other transcription marks like H3K9Ac, H3K14Ac, H3K56Ac and H3S28P along with the occurrence of chromatin condensation in response to DNA damage in G1 phase strengthens the hypothesis. In addition, the alteration in the level of H3S10P shows an inverse correlation with that of γH2AX in a dose-dependent manner and probably occurs from the same mononucleosome. We propose that the drop in the levels of histone H3S10 phosphorylation is a universal phenomenon in response to DNA damage and is a trigger to induce transcription repressive state to facilitate repair.

  19. MicroRNAs regulate p21(Waf1/Cip1) protein expression and the DNA damage response in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezalova, Dasa; Mraz, Marek; Barta, Tomas; Plevova, Karla; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Holubcova, Zuzana; Jaros, Josef; Dvorak, Petr; Pospisilova, Sarka; Hampl, Ales

    2012-07-01

    Studies of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) commonly describe the nonfunctional p53-p21 axis of the G1/S checkpoint pathway with subsequent relevance for cell cycle regulation and the DNA damage response (DDR). Importantly, p21 mRNA is clearly present and upregulated after the DDR in hESCs, but p21 protein is not detectable. In this article, we provide evidence that expression of p21 protein is directly regulated by the microRNA (miRNA) pathway under standard culture conditions and after DNA damage. The DDR in hESCs leads to upregulation of tens of miRNAs, including hESC-specific miRNAs such as those of the miR-302 family, miR-371-372 family, or C19MC miRNA cluster. Most importantly, we show that the hESC-enriched miRNA family miR-302 (miR-302a, miR-302b, miR-302c, and miR-302d) directly contributes to regulation of p21 expression in hESCs and, thus, demonstrate a novel function for miR-302s in hESCS. The described mechanism elucidates the role of miRNAs in regulation of important molecular pathway governing the G1/S transition checkpoint before as well as after DNA damage.

  20. Experimental study of oxidative DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, S; Deng, Xiaohong; Tuo, J

    1998-01-01

    of dative DNA damage and tumour formation. In principle the level of oxidative DNA damage in an organ or cell may be studied by measurement of modified bases in extracted DNA by immunohistochemical visualisation, and from assays of strand breakage before and after treatment with repair enzymes. However......Animal experiments allow the study of oxidative DNA damage in target organs and the elucidation of dose-response relationships of carcinogenic and other harmful chemicals and conditions as well as the study of interactions of several factors. So far the effects of more than 50 different chemical...... to induce oxidative DNA damage in experimental animals. The hepatocarcinogen 2-nitropropane induces up to 10-fold increases in 8-oxodG levels in rat liver DNA. The level of 8-oxodG is also increased in kidneys and bone marrow but not in the testis. By means of 2-nitropropane we have shown correspondence...

  1. Low-dose DNA damage and replication stress responses quantified by optimized automated single-cell image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mistrik, Martin; Oplustilova, Lenka; Lukas, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    by environmental or metabolic genotoxic insults is critical for contemporary biomedicine. The available physical, flow cytometry and sophisticated scanning approaches to DNA damage estimation each have some drawbacks such as insufficient sensitivity, limitation to analysis of cells in suspension, or high costs...... sensitive, quantitative, rapid and simple fluorescence image analysis in thousands of adherent cells per day. Sensitive DNA breakage estimation through analysis of phosphorylated histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and homologous recombination (HR) assessed by a new RPA/Rad51 dual-marker approach illustrate...

  2. Critical functions of Rpa3/Ssb3 in S-phase DNA damage responses in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Cavero

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Replication Protein A (RPA is a heterotrimeric, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA-binding complex required for DNA replication and repair, homologous recombination, DNA damage checkpoint signaling, and telomere maintenance. Whilst the larger RPA subunits, Rpa1 and Rpa2, have essential interactions with ssDNA, the molecular functions of the smallest subunit Rpa3 are unknown. Here, we investigate the Rpa3 ortholog Ssb3 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and find that it is dispensable for cell viability, checkpoint signaling, RPA foci formation, and meiosis. However, increased spontaneous Rad11Rpa1 and Rad22Rad52 nuclear foci in ssb3Δ cells indicate genome maintenance defects. Moreover, Ssb3 is required for resistance to genotoxins that disrupt DNA replication. Genetic interaction studies indicate that Ssb3 has a close functional relationship with the Mms1-Mms22 protein complex, which is required for survival after DNA damage in S-phase, and with the mitotic functions of Mus81-Eme1 Holliday junction resolvase that is required for recovery from replication fork collapse. From these studies we propose that Ssb3 plays a critical role in mediating RPA functions that are required for repair or tolerance of DNA lesions in S-phase. Rpa3 orthologs in humans and other species may have a similar function.

  3. The cycad genotoxin MAM modulates brain cellular pathways involved in neurodegenerative disease and cancer in a DNA damage-linked manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisby, Glen E; Fry, Rebecca C; Lasarev, Michael R; Bammler, Theodor K; Beyer, Richard P; Churchwell, Mona; Doerge, Daniel R; Meira, Lisiane B; Palmer, Valerie S; Ramos-Crawford, Ana-Luiza; Ren, Xuefeng; Sullivan, Robert C; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Samson, Leona D; Zarbl, Helmut; Spencer, Peter S

    2011-01-01

    Methylazoxymethanol (MAM), the genotoxic metabolite of the cycad azoxyglucoside cycasin, induces genetic alterations in bacteria, yeast, plants, insects and mammalian cells, but adult nerve cells are thought to be unaffected. We show that the brains of adult C57BL6 wild-type mice treated with a single systemic dose of MAM acetate display DNA damage (O⁶-methyldeoxyguanosine lesions, O⁶-mG) that remains constant up to 7 days post-treatment. By contrast, MAM-treated mice lacking a functional gene encoding the DNA repair enzyme O⁶-mG DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) showed elevated O⁶-mG DNA damage starting at 48 hours post-treatment. The DNA damage was linked to changes in the expression of genes in cell-signaling pathways associated with cancer, human neurodegenerative disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. These data are consistent with the established developmental neurotoxic and carcinogenic properties of MAM in rodents. They also support the hypothesis that early-life exposure to MAM-glucoside (cycasin) has an etiological association with a declining, prototypical neurodegenerative disease seen in Guam, Japan, and New Guinea populations that formerly used the neurotoxic cycad plant for food or medicine, or both. These findings suggest environmental genotoxins, specifically MAM, target common pathways involved in neurodegeneration and cancer, the outcome depending on whether the cell can divide (cancer) or not (neurodegeneration). Exposure to MAM-related environmental genotoxins may have relevance to the etiology of related tauopathies, notably, Alzheimer's disease.

  4. The cycad genotoxin MAM modulates brain cellular pathways involved in neurodegenerative disease and cancer in a DNA damage-linked manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen E Kisby

    Full Text Available Methylazoxymethanol (MAM, the genotoxic metabolite of the cycad azoxyglucoside cycasin, induces genetic alterations in bacteria, yeast, plants, insects and mammalian cells, but adult nerve cells are thought to be unaffected. We show that the brains of adult C57BL6 wild-type mice treated with a single systemic dose of MAM acetate display DNA damage (O⁶-methyldeoxyguanosine lesions, O⁶-mG that remains constant up to 7 days post-treatment. By contrast, MAM-treated mice lacking a functional gene encoding the DNA repair enzyme O⁶-mG DNA methyltransferase (MGMT showed elevated O⁶-mG DNA damage starting at 48 hours post-treatment. The DNA damage was linked to changes in the expression of genes in cell-signaling pathways associated with cancer, human neurodegenerative disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. These data are consistent with the established developmental neurotoxic and carcinogenic properties of MAM in rodents. They also support the hypothesis that early-life exposure to MAM-glucoside (cycasin has an etiological association with a declining, prototypical neurodegenerative disease seen in Guam, Japan, and New Guinea populations that formerly used the neurotoxic cycad plant for food or medicine, or both. These findings suggest environmental genotoxins, specifically MAM, target common pathways involved in neurodegeneration and cancer, the outcome depending on whether the cell can divide (cancer or not (neurodegeneration. Exposure to MAM-related environmental genotoxins may have relevance to the etiology of related tauopathies, notably, Alzheimer's disease.

  5. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, statins, induce phosphorylation of Mdm2 and attenuate the p53 response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pääjärvi, Gerd; Roudier, Emilie; Crisby, Milita; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2005-03-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, statins, are widely used cholesterol-lowering drugs and have been shown to have anticancer effects in many models. We have investigated the effect of statins on Mdm2, a p53-specific ubiquitin ligase. It was found that pravastatin induced Mdm2 phosphorylation at Ser166 and at 2A10 antibody-specific epitopes in HepG2 cells, while mRNA levels were unchanged. Furthermore, pravastatin was found to induce phosphorylation of mTOR at Ser2448. Ser166 phosphorylation of Mdm2 was abrogated by an inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin, but not by the PI3-kinase inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin. Ser166 phosphorylation of Mdm2 has been associated to active Mdm2 and has been shown to increase its ubiquitin ligase activity and lead to increased p53 degradation. Our data show that statins attenuated the p53 response to DNA damage. Thus, in HepG2 cells pravastatin and simvastatin pretreatment attenuated the p53 response to DNA damage induced by 5-fluorouracil and benzo(a)pyrene. Similar attenuation was induced when p53 stabilization was induced by the inhibitor of nuclear export, leptomycin B. Furthermore, in the DNA-damaged cells, half-lives of Mdm2 and p53 were decreased by statins, indicating a more rapid formation of p53/Mdm2 complexes and facilitated p53 degradation. The induction of p53 responsive genes and apoptosis was attenuated. Mdm2 and p53 were also studied in vivo in rat liver employing immunohistochemistry, and it was found that constitutive Mdm2 expression was changed in livers of pravastatin-treated rats. We also show that the p53 response to a challenging dose of diethylnitrosamine was attenuated in hepatocytes in situ and in primary cultures of hepatocytes by pravastatin pretreatment. Taken together, these data indicate that statins induce an mTOR-dependent Ser166 phosphorylation of Mdm2, and this effect may attenuate the duration and intensity of the p53 response to DNA damage in hepatocytes.

  6. Chronic exposure to MDMA (ecstasyinduces DNA damage, impairs functional antioxidant cellular defenses, enhances the lipid peroxidation process and alters testes histopathology in male rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Gamal Zaki, ** Laila Abdel Kawy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background : 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy" is consumed mainly by young population. For this reason, it is especially relevant to take into consideration the effects on the reproductive system. The influence of MDMA on the fertility and reproduction of the male rat was assessed in this study. Material and methods: MDMA was administered orally at 0 mg/kg (control, 10 and 30 mg/kg to male rats for 15,30,45 consecutive days followed by 15 days withdrawal. Hormonal, biochemical, histological and testicular were evaluated in the rats. The present study aimed to investigate if daily oral administration of ecstasy at low doses(10mg for 45 days has any deleterious effects on reproductive functions of male rats. Animals were randomly divided into four groups of ten rats each, assigned as control rats, or(0mg ecstasy, rats treated with 10mg ecstasy for, (15,30,45 days, rats treated with 30mg/kg body weight ecstasy for(,15,30,45days by oral gavage. The third group(45 days was followed by 15 withdrawal period(W15. Results: The activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in testicular homogenate were decreased while the levels of lipid peroxidation increased significantly in the treated rats as compared with the corresponding group of control animals. In group 30mg, only, arachidonic acid was significantly elevated in the testicular homogenate while linoleic acid was decresed when compared to control. Testis DNA fragmentation was observed in 30mg group, but not 10.mg. It is concluded that low doses of ecstasy exposure(10 mg/Kg had moderate detrimental effects on reproductive organ system and more severe effects are likely to be observed at higher dose levels. These results indicate that ecstasy is directly toxic to primary Leydig cells, and that the decreased percentage of normal cells and the increased level of DNA damage in ecstasy -exposed Leydig cells may be responsible for

  7. Oxidative stress disassembles the p38/NPM/PP2A complex, which leads to modulation of nucleophosmin-mediated signaling to DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillonneau, Maëva; Paris, François; Dutoit, Soizic; Estephan, Hala; Bénéteau, Elise; Huot, Jacques; Corre, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress is a leading cause of endothelial dysfunction. The p38 MAPK pathway plays a determinant role in allowing cells to cope with oxidative stress and is tightly regulated by a balanced interaction between p38 protein and its interacting partners. By using a proteomic approach, we identified nucleophosmin (NPM) as a new partner of p38 in HUVECs. Coimmunoprecipitation and microscopic analyses confirmed the existence of a cytosolic nucleophosmin (NPM)/p38 interaction in basal condition. Oxidative stress, which was generated by exposure to 500 µM H2O2, induces a rapid dephosphorylation of NPM at T199 that depends on phosphatase PP2A, another partner of the NPM/p38 complex. Blocking PP2A activity leads to accumulation of NPM-pT199 and to an increased association of NPM with p38. Concomitantly to its dephosphorylation, oxidative stress promotes translocation of NPM to the nucleus to affect the DNA damage response. Dephosphorylated NPM impairs the signaling of oxidative stress-induced DNA damage via inhibition of the phosphorylation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit. Overall, these results suggest that the p38/NPM/PP2A complex acts as a dynamic sensor, allowing endothelial cells to react rapidly to acute oxidative stress.-Guillonneau, M., Paris, F., Dutoit, S., Estephan, H., Bénéteau, E., Huot, J., Corre, I. Oxidative stress disassembles the p38/NPM/PP2A complex, which leads to modulation of nucleophosmin-mediated signaling to DNA damage response.

  8. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.; Bond, V.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Sondhaus, C.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Control Office; Altman, K.I. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts.

  9. Pleiotropic effects of spongean alkaloids on mechanisms of cell death, cell cycle progression and DNA damage response (DDR) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhldreier, Fabian; Kassel, Stefanie; Schumacher, Lena; Wesselborg, Sebastian; Proksch, Peter; Fritz, Gerhard

    2015-05-28

    We investigated cytotoxic mechanisms evoked by the spongean alkaloids aaptamine (Aa) and aeroplysinin-1 (Ap), applied alone and in combination with daunorubicin, employing acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Aa and Ap reduced the viability of AML cells in a dose dependent manner with IC50 of 10-20 µM. Ap triggered apoptotic cell death more efficiently than Aa. Both alkaloids increased the protein level of S139-phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), which however was independent of the induction of DNA damage. Expression of the senescence markers p21 and p16 was increased, while the phosphorylation level of p-Chk-2 was reduced following Aa treatment. As a function of dose, Aa and Ap protected or sensitized AML cells against daunorubicin. Protection by Aa was paralleled by reduced formation of ROS and lower level of DNA damage. Both Aa and Ap attenuated daunorubicin-stimulated activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) as reflected on the levels of γH2AX, p-Kap-1 and p-Chk-1. Specifically Ap restored the decrease in S10 phosphorylation of histone H3 resulting from daunorubicin treatment. The cytoprotective effects of Aa and Ap were independent of daunorubicin import/export. Both Aa and Ap abrogated daunorubicin-induced accumulation of cells in S-phase. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was specific for Ap. The data show that Aa and Ap have both congruent and agent-specific pleiotropic effects that are preferential for anticancer drugs. Since Ap showed a broader spectrum of anticancer activities, this compound is suggested as novel lead compound for forthcoming in vivo studies elucidating the usefulness of spongean alkaloids in AML therapy.

  10. Spartan/C1orf124, a reader of PCNA ubiquitylation and a regulator of UV-induced DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centore, Richard C; Yazinski, Stephanie A; Tse, Alice; Zou, Lee

    2012-06-08

    PCNA is a key component of DNA replication and repair machineries. DNA damage-induced PCNA ubiquitylation serves as a molecular mark to orchestrate postreplication repair. Here, we have identified and characterized Spartan, a protein that specifically recognizes ubiquitylated PCNA and plays an important role in cellular resistance to UV radiation. In vitro, Spartan engages ubiquitylated PCNA via both a PIP box and a UBZ domain. In cells, Spartan is recruited to sites of UV damage in a manner dependent upon the PIP box, the UBZ domain, and PCNA ubiquitylation. Furthermore, Spartan colocalizes and interacts with Rad18, the E3 ubiquitin ligase that modifies PCNA. Surprisingly, while Spartan is recruited by ubiquitylated PCNA, knockdown of Spartan compromised chromatin association of Rad18, monoubiquitylation of PCNA, and localization of Pol η to UV damage. Thus, as a "reader" of ubiquitylated PCNA, Spartan promotes an unexpected feed-forward loop to enhance PCNA ubiquitylation and translesion DNA synthesis.

  11. Increased sister chromatid cohesion and DNA damage response factor localization at an enzyme-induced DNA double-strand break in vertebrate cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dodson, Helen

    2009-10-01

    The response to DNA damage in vertebrate cells involves successive recruitment of DNA signalling and repair factors. We used light microscopy to monitor the genetic dependencies of such localization to a single, induced DNA double strand break (DSB) in vertebrate cells. We used an inducible version of the rare-cutting I-SceI endonuclease to cut a chromosomally integrated I-SceI site beside a Tet operator array that was visualized by binding a Tet repressor-GFP fusion. Formation of gamma-H2AX foci at a single DSB was independent of ATM or Ku70. ATM-deficient cells showed normal kinetics of 53Bp1 recruitment to DSBs, but Rad51 localization was retarded. 53Bp1 and Rad51 foci formation at a single DSB was greatly reduced in H2AX-null DT40 cells. We also observed decreased inter-sister chromatid distances after DSB induction, suggesting that cohesin loading at DSBs causes elevated sister chromatid cohesion. Loss of ATM reduced DSB-induced cohesion, consistent with cohesin being an ATM target in the DSB response. These data show that the same genetic pathways control how cells respond to single DSBs and to multiple lesions induced by whole-cell DNA damage.

  12. Cellular Response to Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bo; YAN Shi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    To explore the nonlinear activities of the cellular signaling system composed of one transcriptional arm and one protein-interaction arm, we use an irradiation-response module to study the dynamics of stochastic interactions.It is shown that the oscillatory behavior could be described in a unified way when the radiation-derived signal and noise are incorporated.

  13. Site-specific phosphorylation of the DNA damage response mediator rad9 by cyclin-dependent kinases regulates activation of checkpoint kinase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Manuela Abreu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The mediators of the DNA damage response (DDR are highly phosphorylated by kinases that control cell proliferation, but little is known about the role of this regulation. Here we show that cell cycle phosphorylation of the prototypical DDR mediator Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad9 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK complexes. We find that a specific G2/M form of Cdc28 can phosphorylate in vitro the N-terminal region of Rad9 on nine consensus CDK phosphorylation sites. We show that the integrity of CDK consensus sites and the activity of Cdc28 are required for both the activation of the Chk1 checkpoint kinase and its interaction with Rad9. We have identified T125 and T143 as important residues in Rad9 for this Rad9/Chk1 interaction. Phosphorylation of T143 is the most important feature promoting Rad9/Chk1 interaction, while the much more abundant phosphorylation of the neighbouring T125 residue impedes the Rad9/Chk1 interaction. We suggest a novel model for Chk1 activation where Cdc28 regulates the constitutive interaction of Rad9 and Chk1. The Rad9/Chk1 complex is then recruited at sites of DNA damage where activation of Chk1 requires additional DDR-specific protein kinases.

  14. A bacterial cytotoxin identifies the RhoA exchange factor Net1 as a key effector in the response to DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Guerra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure of adherent cells to DNA damaging agents, such as the bacterial cytolethal distending toxin (CDT or ionizing radiations (IR, activates the small GTPase RhoA, which promotes the formation of actin stress fibers and delays cell death. The signalling intermediates that regulate RhoA activation and promote cell survival are unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate that the nuclear RhoA-specific Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF Net1 becomes dephosphorylated at a critical inhibitory site in cells exposed to CDT or IR. Expression of a dominant negative Net1 or Net1 knock down by iRNA prevented RhoA activation, inhibited the formation of stress fibers, and enhanced cell death, indicating that Net1 activation is required for this RhoA-mediated responses to genotoxic stress. The Net1 and RhoA-dependent signals involved activation of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase p38 and its downstream target MAPK-activated protein kinase 2. SIGNIFICANCE: Our data highlight the importance of Net1 in controlling RhoA and p38 MAPK mediated cell survival in cells exposed to DNA damaging agents and illustrate a molecular pathway whereby chronic exposure to a bacterial toxin may promote genomic instability.

  15. Transcriptional profile of the homologous recombination machinery and characterization of the EhRAD51 recombinase in response to DNA damage in Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Camarillo César

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, homologous recombination is an accurate mechanism to generate genetic diversity, and it is also used to repair DNA double strand-breaks. RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in recombinational DNA repair, including mre11, rad50, nsb1/xrs2, rad51, rad51c/rad57, rad51b/rad55, rad51d, xrcc2, xrcc3, rad52, rad54, rad54b/rdh54 and rad59 genes, have been studied in human and yeast cells. Notably, the RAD51 recombinase catalyses strand transfer between a broken DNA and its undamaged homologous strand, to allow damaged region repair. In protozoan parasites, homologous recombination generating antigenic variation and genomic rearrangements is responsible for virulence variation and drug resistance. However, in Entamoeba histolytica the protozoan parasite responsible for human amoebiasis, DNA repair and homologous recombination mechanisms are still unknown. Results In this paper, we initiated the study of the mechanism for DNA repair by homologous recombination in the primitive eukaryote E. histolytica using UV-C (150 J/m2 irradiated trophozoites. DNA double strand-breaks were evidenced in irradiated cells by TUNEL and comet assays and evaluation of the EhH2AX histone phosphorylation status. In E. histolytica genome, we identified genes homologous to yeast and human RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in DNA double strand-breaks repair by homologous recombination. Interestingly, the E. histolytica RAD52 epistasis group related genes were differentially expressed before and after UV-C treatment. Next, we focused on the characterization of the putative recombinase EhRAD51, which conserves the typical architecture of RECA/RAD51 proteins. Specific antibodies immunodetected EhRAD51 protein in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Moreover, after DNA damage, EhRAD51 was located as typical nuclear foci-like structures in E. histolytica trophozoites. Purified recombinant EhRAD51 exhibited DNA binding

  16. The DNA damage response: a common pathway in the regulation of NKG2D and DNAM-1 ligand expression in normal, infected and cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eCerboni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available NKG2D and DNAM-1 are two activating receptors, present on the surface of NK cells and other cells of the immune system. Their ligands – MICA, MICB, ULBP1-6 for NKG2D, PVR/CD155 and Nectin-2/CD112 for DNAM-1 - can be constitutively expressed at low levels in some normal cells, but they are more often defined as stress-induced, since different stimuli can positively regulate their expression. In this review, we describe the molecular mechanisms involved in the up-regulation of NKG2D and DNAM-1 ligands under different physiological and pathological stress conditions, including mitosis, viral infections, and cancer. We will focus on the DNA damage response, as recent advances in the field have uncovered its important role as a common signaling pathway in the regulation of both NKG2D and DNAM-1 ligand expression in response to very diverse conditions and stimuli.

  17. The kinase ABL phosphorylates the microprocessor subunit DGCR8 to stimulate primary microRNA processing in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chi-Chiang; Zhong, Yan; Nguyen, Louis; Tsai, Aaron; Sridevi, Priya; Tarn, Woan-Yuh; Wang, Jean Y J

    2015-06-30

    The DNA damage response network stimulates microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis to coordinate repair, cell cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis. The multistep process of miRNA biogenesis involves the cleavage of primary miRNAs by the microprocessor complex composed of the ribonuclease Drosha and the RNA binding protein DGCR8. We found that the tyrosine kinase ABL phosphorylated DGCR8, a modification that was required for the induction of a subset of miRNAs after DNA damage. Focusing on the miR-34 family, ABL stimulated the production of miR-34c, but not miR-34a, through Drosha/DGCR8-dependent processing of primary miR-34c (pri-miR-34c). This miRNA-selective effect of ABL required the sequences flanking the precursor miR-34c (pre-miR-34c) stem-loop. In pri-miRNA processing, DGCR8 binds the pre-miR stem-loop and recruits Drosha to the miRNA. RNA cross-linking assays showed that DGCR8 and Drosha interacted with pri-miR-34c, but we found an inverse correlation between ABL-stimulated processing and DGCR8 association with pri-miR-34c. When coexpressed in HEK293T cells, ABL phosphorylated DGCR8 at Tyr(267). Ectopic expression of a Y267F-DGCR8 mutant reduced the recruitment of Drosha to pri-miR-34c and prevented ABL or Drosha from stimulating the processing of pri-miR-34c. In mice engineered to express a nuclear import-defective mutant of ABL, miR-34c, but not miR-34a, expression was reduced in the kidney, and apoptosis of the renal epithelial cells was impaired in response to cisplatin. These results reveal a new pathway in the DNA damage response wherein ABL-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of DGCR8 stimulates the processing of selective primary miRNAs.

  18. A transposable element within the Non-canonical telomerase RNA of Arabidopsis thaliana modulates telomerase in response to DNA damage [corrected].

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    Hengyi Xu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have emerged as critical factors in many biological processes, but little is known about how their regulatory functions evolved. One of the best-studied lncRNAs is TER, the essential RNA template for telomerase reverse transcriptase. We previously showed that Arabidopsis thaliana harbors three TER isoforms: TER1, TER2 and TER2S. TER1 serves as a canonical telomere template, while TER2 is a novel negative regulator of telomerase activity, induced in response to double-strand breaks (DSBs. TER2 contains a 529 nt intervening sequence that is removed along with 36 nt at the RNA 3' terminus to generate TER2S, an RNA of unknown function. Here we investigate how A. thaliana TER2 acquired its regulatory function. Using data from the 1,001 Arabidopsis genomes project, we report that the intervening sequence within TER2 is derived from a transposable element termed DSB responsive element (DRE. DRE is found in the TER2 loci of most but not all A. thaliana accessions. By analyzing accessions with (TER2 and without DRE (TER2Δ we demonstrate that this element is responsible for many of the unique properties of TER2, including its enhanced binding to TERT and telomerase inhibitory function. We show that DRE destabilizes TER2, and further that TER2 induction by DNA damage reflects increased RNA stability and not increased transcription. DRE-mediated changes in TER2 stability thus provide a rapid and sensitive switch to fine-tune telomerase enzyme activity. Altogether, our data shows that invasion of the TER2 locus by a small transposon converted this lncRNA into a DNA damage sensor that modulates telomerase enzyme activity in response to genome assault.

  19. Investigation of DNA damage response and apoptotic gene methylation pattern in sporadic breast tumors using high throughput quantitative DNA methylation analysis technology

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    Prakash Neeraj

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Sporadic breast cancer like many other cancers is proposed to be a manifestation of abnormal genetic and epigenetic changes. For the past decade our laboratory has identified genes involved in DNA damage response (DDR, apoptosis and immunesurvelliance pathways to influence sporadic breast cancer risk in north Indian population. Further to enhance our knowledge at the epigenetic level, we performed DNA methylation study involving 17 gene promoter regions belonging to DNA damage response (DDR and death receptor apoptotic pathway in 162 paired normal and cancerous breast tissues from 81 sporadic breast cancer patients, using a high throughput quantitative DNA methylation analysis technology. Results- The study identified five genes with statistically significant difference between normal and tumor tissues. Hypermethylation of DR5 (P = 0.001, DCR1 (P = 0.00001, DCR2 (P = 0.0000000005 and BRCA2 (P = 0.007 and hypomethylation of DR4 (P = 0.011 in sporadic breast tumor tissues suggested a weak/aberrant activation of the DDR/apoptotic pathway in breast tumorigenesis. Negative correlation was observed between methylation status and transcript expression levels for TRAIL, DR4, CASP8, ATM, CHEK2, BRCA1 and BRCA2 CpG sites. Categorization of the gene methylation with respect to the clinicopathological parameters showed an increase in aberrant methylation pattern in advanced tumors. These uncharacteristic methylation patterns corresponded with decreased death receptor apoptosis (P = 0.047 and DNA damage repair potential (P = 0.004 in advanced tumors. The observation of BRCA2 -26 G/A 5'UTR polymorphism concomitant with the presence of methylation in the promoter region was novel and emerged as a strong candidate for susceptibility to sporadic breast tumors. Conclusion- Our study indicates that methylation of DDR-apoptotic gene promoters in sporadic breast cancer is not a random phenomenon. Progressive epigenetic alterations in advancing

  20. p38γ regulates UV-induced checkpoint signaling and repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Cheng; Wu, Xiaohua; Han, Jiahuai; Sun, Peiqing

    2010-06-01

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA damage triggers activation of checkpoint signaling pathways that coordinate cell cycle arrest and repair of damaged DNA. These DNA damage responses serve to maintain genome stability and prevent accumulation of genetic mutations and development of cancer. The p38 MAPK was previously implicated in cellular responses to several types of DNA damage. However, the role of each of the four p38 isoforms and the mechanism for their involvement in DNA damage responses remained poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that p38γ, but not the other p38 isoforms, contributes to the survival of UV-treated cells. Deletion of p38γ sensitizes cells to UV exposure, accompanied by prolonged S phase cell cycle arrest and increased rate of apoptosis. Further investigation reveal that p38γ is essential for the optimal activation of the checkpoint signaling caused by UV, and for the efficient repair of UV-induced DNA damage. These findings have established a novel role of p38γ in UV-induced DNA damage responses, and suggested that p38γ contributes to the ability of cells to cope with UV exposure by regulating the checkpoint signaling pathways and the repair of damaged DNA.

  1. Parallel In Vivo and In Vitro Melanoma RNAi Dropout Screens Reveal Synthetic Lethality between Hypoxia and DNA Damage Response Inhibition

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    Patricia A. Possik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To identify factors preferentially necessary for driving tumor expansion, we performed parallel in vitro and in vivo negative-selection short hairpin RNA (shRNA screens. Melanoma cells harboring shRNAs targeting several DNA damage response (DDR kinases had a greater selective disadvantage in vivo than in vitro, indicating an essential contribution of these factors during tumor expansion. In growing tumors, DDR kinases were activated following hypoxia. Correspondingly, depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of DDR kinases was toxic to melanoma cells, including those that were resistant to BRAF inhibitor, and this could be enhanced by angiogenesis blockade. These results reveal that hypoxia sensitizes melanomas to targeted inhibition of the DDR and illustrate the utility of in vivo shRNA dropout screens for the identification of pharmacologically tractable targets.

  2. Moderate and high amounts of tamoxifen in αMHC-MerCreMer mice induce a DNA damage response, leading to heart failure and death

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    Kevin Bersell

    2013-11-01

    Numerous mouse models have utilized Cre-loxP technology to modify gene expression. Adverse effects of Cre recombinase activity have been reported, including in the heart. However, the mechanisms associated with cardiac Cre toxicity are largely unknown. Here, we show that expression of Cre in cardiomyocytes induces a DNA damage response, resulting in cardiomyocyte apoptosis, cardiac fibrosis and cardiac dysfunction. In an effort to increase the recombination efficiency of a widely used tamoxifen-sensitive Cre transgene under control of the α-myosin-heavy-chain promoter (αMHC-MerCreMer, we observed myocardial dysfunction and decreased survival, which were dependent on the dose of tamoxifen injected. After excluding a Cre-independent contribution by tamoxifen, we found that Cre induced myocardial fibrosis, activation of pro-fibrotic genes and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Examination of the molecular mechanisms showed activation of DNA damage response signaling and p53 stabilization in the absence of loxP sites, suggesting that Cre induced illegitimate DNA breaks. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was also induced by expressing Cre using adenoviral transduction, indicating that the effect was not dependent on genomic integration of the transgene. Cre-mediated homologous recombination at loxP sites was dose-dependent and had a ceiling effect at ∼80% of cardiomyocytes showing recombination. By titrating the amount of tamoxifen to maximize recombination while minimizing animal lethality, we determined that 30 μg tamoxifen/g body weight/day injected on three consecutive days is the optimal condition for the αMHC-MerCreMer system to induce recombination in the Rosa26-lacZ strain. Our results further highlight the importance of experimental design, including the use of appropriate genetic controls for Cre expression.

  3. Human longevity and variation in DNA damage response and repair: study of the contribution of sub-processes using competitive gene-set analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike; Dato, Serena; Mengel-From, Jonas; Stevnsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Kruse, Torben A; Schreiber, Stefan; Nebel, Almut; Christensen, Kaare; Tan, Qihua; Christiansen, Lene

    2014-09-01

    DNA-damage response and repair are crucial to maintain genetic stability, and are consequently considered central to aging and longevity. Here, we investigate whether this pathway overall associates to longevity, and whether specific sub-processes are more strongly associated with longevity than others. Data were applied on 592 SNPs from 77 genes involved in nine sub-processes: DNA-damage response, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombinational repair (HRR), RecQ helicase activities (RECQ), telomere functioning and mitochondrial DNA processes. The study population was 1089 long-lived and 736 middle-aged Danes. A self-contained set-based test of all SNPs displayed association with longevity (P-value=9.9 × 10(-5)), supporting that the overall pathway could affect longevity. Investigation of the nine sub-processes using the competitive gene-set analysis by Wang et al indicated that BER, HRR and RECQ associated stronger with longevity than the respective remaining genes of the pathway (P-values=0.004-0.048). For HRR and RECQ, only one gene contributed to the significance, whereas for BER several genes contributed. These associations did, however, generally not pass correction for multiple testing. Still, these findings indicate that, of the entire pathway, variation in BER might influence longevity the most. These modest sized P-values were not replicated in a German sample. This might, though, be due to differences in genotyping procedures and investigated SNPs, potentially inducing differences in the coverage of gene regions. Specifically, five genes were not covered at all in the German data. Therefore, investigations in additional study populations are needed before final conclusion can be drawn.

  4. Association of oxidative DNA damage, protein oxidation and antioxidant function with oxidative stress induced cellular injury in pre-eclamptic/eclamptic mothers during fetal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Reena; Pande, Deepti; Karki, Kanchan; Kumar, Ashok; Khanna, Ranjana S; Khanna, Hari D

    2014-02-05

    Pre-eclampsia is a devastating multi system syndrome and a major cause of maternal, fetal, neonatal morbidity and mortality. Pre-eclampsia is associated with oxidative stress in the maternal circulation. To have an insight on the effect of pre-eclampsia/eclampsia on the neonates, the study was made to explore the oxidative status by quantification of byproducts generated during protein oxidation and oxidative DNA damage and deficient antioxidant activity in umbilical cord blood of pre-eclamptic/eclamptic mothers during fetal circulation. Umbilical cord blood during delivery from neonates born to 19 pre-eclamptic mothers, 14 eclamptic mothers and 18 normotensive mothers (uncomplicated pregnancy) as control cases was collected. 8-OHdG (8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine), protein carbonyl, nitrite, catalase, non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin A, E, C), total antioxidant status and iron status were determined. Significant elevation in the levels of 8-OHdG, protein carbonyl, nitrite and iron along with decreased levels of catalase, vitamin A, E, C, total antioxidant status were observed in the umbilical cord blood of pre-eclamptic and eclamptic pregnancies. These parameters might be influential variables for the risk of free radical damage in infants born to pre-eclamptic/eclamptic pregnancies. Increased oxidative stress causes oxidation of DNA and protein which alters antioxidant function. Excess iron level and decreased unsaturated iron binding capacity may be the important factor associated with oxidative stress and contribute in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia/eclampsia which is reflected in fetal circulation.

  5. Kinetic Modeling Reveals the Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and DNA Repair Processes in Shaping the Dose-Response Curve of KBrO₃-Induced DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassova, Maria A; Miller, David J; Nikolov, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a kinetic model to investigate how DNA repair processes and scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect the dose-response shape of prooxidant induced DNA damage. We used as an example chemical KBrO3 which is activated by glutathione and forms reactive intermediates that directly interact with DNA to form 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts (8-OH-dG). The single strand breaks (SSB) that can result from failed base excision repair of these adducts were considered as an effect downstream from 8-OH-dG. We previously demonstrated that, in the presence of effective base excision repair, 8-OH-dG can exhibit threshold-like dose-response dependence, while the downstream SSB can still exhibit a linear dose-response. Here we demonstrate that this result holds for a variety of conditions, including low levels of GSH, the presence of additional SSB repair mechanisms, or a scavenger. It has been shown that melatonin, a terminal scavenger, inhibits KBrO3-caused oxidative damage. Our modeling revealed that sustained exposure to KBrO3 can lead to fast scavenger exhaustion, in which case the dose-response shapes for both endpoints are not substantially affected. The results are important to consider when forming conclusions on a chemical's toxicity dose dependence based on the dose-response of early genotoxic events.

  6. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppedè, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.coppede@med.unipi.it; Migliore, Lucia, E-mail: lucia.migliore@med.unipi.it

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in the neurodegenerative process. • The mitochondrial DNA is more vulnerable to oxidative attack than the nuclear DNA. • Cytogenetic damage has been largely documented in Alzheimer's disease patients. • The question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of neurodegeneration is still open. • Increasing evidence links DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena. - Abstract: Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease

  7. The nuclear retention of transcription factor FOXO3a correlates with a DNA damage response and increased glutamine synthetase expression by astrocytes suggesting a neuroprotective role in the ageing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluteau, Adeline; Ince, Paul G; Minett, Thais; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol; Garwood, Claire J; Ratcliffe, Laura E; Morgan, Sarah; Heath, Paul R; Shaw, Pamela J; Wharton, Stephen B; Simpson, Julie E

    2015-11-16

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species leading to oxidative damage and cell death plays an important role in a number of neurodegenerative disorders. FOXO3a, the main isoform of FOXO transcription factors, mediates the cellular response to oxidative stress by regulating the expression of genes involved in DNA repair and glutamine metabolism, including glutamine synthetase (GS). Immunohistochemical investigation of the population-based neuropathology cohort of the Medical Research Council's Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC CFAS) demonstrates that nuclear retention of FOXO3a significantly correlates with a DNA damage response and with GS expression by astrocytes. Furthermore, we show that GS expression correlates with increasing Alzheimer-type pathology in this ageing cohort. Our findings suggest that in response to oxidative stress, the nuclear retention of FOXO3a in astrocytes upregulates expression of GS as a neuroprotective mechanism. However, the activity of GS may be compromised by increasing levels of oxidative stress in the ageing brain resulting in dysfunctional enzyme activity, neuronal excitotoxic damage and cognitive impairment.

  8. Comprehensive SNP scan of DNA repair and DNA damage response genes reveal multiple susceptibility loci conferring risk to tobacco associated leukoplakia and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pinaki; Datta, Sayantan; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Baral, Aradhita; Jha, Ganga Nath; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roy, Bidyut; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of DNA repair and damage response genes play major role in carcinogenesis. These variants are suspected as predisposition factors to Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). For identification of susceptible variants affecting OSCC development in Indian population, the "maximally informative" method of SNP selection from HapMap data to non-HapMap populations was applied. Three hundred twenty-five SNPs from 11 key genes involved in double strand break repair, mismatch repair and DNA damage response pathways were genotyped on a total of 373 OSCC, 253 leukoplakia and 535 unrelated control individuals. The significantly associated SNPs were validated in an additional cohort of 144 OSCC patients and 160 controls. The rs12515548 of MSH3 showed significant association with OSCC both in the discovery and validation phases (discovery P-value: 1.43E-05, replication P-value: 4.84E-03). Two SNPs (rs12360870 of MRE11A, P-value: 2.37E-07 and rs7003908 of PRKDC, P-value: 7.99E-05) were found to be significantly associated only with leukoplakia. Stratification of subjects based on amount of tobacco consumption identified SNPs that were associated with either high or low tobacco exposed group. The study reveals a synergism between associated SNPs and lifestyle factors in predisposition to OSCC and leukoplakia.

  9. The interrelations between malfunctioning DNA damage response (DDR) and the functionality of the neuro-glio-vascular unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilai, Ari

    2013-08-01

    A hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases is impairment of certain aspects of "brain functionality". Brain functionality is defined as the total input and output of the brain's neural circuits and networks. A given brain degenerative disorder does not deregulate total brain functionality but rather the activity of specific circuits in a given network, affecting their organization and topology, their cell numbers, their cellular functionality, and the interactions between neural circuits. Similarly, our concept of neurodegenerative diseases, which for many years revolved around neural survival or death, has now been extended to emphasize the role of glia. In particular, the role of glial cells in neuro-vascular communication is now known to be central to the effect of insults to the nervous system. In addition, a malfunctioning vascular system likely plays a role in the etiology of certain neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, the symptoms of neurodegenerative or more correctly brain degenerative disease are, to a very large extent, a result of impairment in glial cells that lead to pathological neuro-vascular interactions that, in turn, generate a rather "hostile" environment in which the neurons fail to function. These events lead to systematic neural cell death on a scale that appears to be proportional to the severity of the neurological deficit.

  10. Evaluation of the Comet Assay for Assessing the Dose-Response Relationship of DNA Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dose- and time-response curves were combined to assess the potential of the comet assay in radiation biodosimetry. The neutral comet assay was used to detect DNA double-strand breaks in lymphocytes caused by γ-ray irradiation. A clear dose-response relationship with DNA double-strand breaks using the comet assay was found at different times after irradiation (p < 0.001. A time-response relationship was also found within 72 h after irradiation (p < 0.001. The curves for DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair in vitro of human lymphocytes presented a nice model, and a smooth, three-dimensional plane model was obtained when the two curves were combined.

  11. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppedè, Fabio; Migliore, Lucia

    2015-06-01

    Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, which represent three of the most common neurodegenerative pathologies in humans.

  12. Environmental concentrations of benz[a]anthracene induce developmental defects and DNA damage and impair photomotor response in Japanese medaka larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihanic, Florane; Sommard, Vivien; Perrine, de Lansalut; Pichon, Anaïk; Grasset, Julie; Berrada, Saadia; Budzinski, Hélène; Cousin, Xavier; Morin, Bénédicte; Cachot, Jérôme

    2015-03-01

    Benz[a]anthracene (BaA) is a ubiquitous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon found in numerous aquatic ecosystems. However, ecotoxicological data in aquatic organisms are scarce. To remedy this lack of data, Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos were exposed to BaA and toxic effects were investigated at multiple toxicological endpoints. Japanese medaka embryos were incubated onto BaA-spiked artificial sediment for 9 days at low or moderate environmental concentrations ranging from 0.9 to 12 µgg(-1) dw. BaA-exposed embryos exhibited significant tachycardia. BaA exposure was also shown to increase CYP1A activity in the hepato-biliary tissue as well as craniofacial deformities and DNA damage in pro-larvae. The photomotor response of BaA-exposed larvae was reduced in comparison to the control group. According to this set of tests, the lowest tested and observed effect concentration (LOEC) for Japanese medaka early life stages was equivalent to 0.92 µgg(-1) dw of BaA. This concentration fall into the range of concentrations frequently encountered in sediments of polluted aquatic ecosystems. Taking into consideration these results, BaA represents a threat for fish early life stages in particular those developing onto or into contaminated sediments.

  13. Dual inhibition of ATR and ATM potentiates the activity of trabectedin and lurbinectedin by perturbing the DNA damage response and homologous recombination repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Michelle; Bouzid, Hana; Soares, Daniele G; Selle, Frédéric; Morel, Claire; Galmarini, Carlos M; Henriques, João A P; Larsen, Annette K; Escargueil, Alexandre E

    2016-05-03

    Trabectedin (Yondelis®, ecteinascidin-743, ET-743) is a marine-derived natural product approved for treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma and relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Lurbinectedin is a novel anticancer agent structurally related to trabectedin. Both ecteinascidins generate DNA double-strand breaks that are processed through homologous recombination repair (HRR), thereby rendering HRR-deficient cells particularly sensitive. We here characterize the DNA damage response (DDR) to trabectedin and lurbinectedin in HeLa cells. Our results show that both compounds activate the ATM/Chk2 (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/checkpoint kinase 2) and ATR/Chk1 (ATM and RAD3-related/checkpoint kinase 1) pathways. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of Chk1/2, ATR or ATM is not accompanied by any significant improvement of the cytotoxic activity of the ecteinascidins while dual inhibition of ATM and ATR strongly potentiates it. Accordingly, concomitant inhibition of both ATR and ATM is an absolute requirement to efficiently block the formation of γ-H2AX, MDC1, BRCA1 and Rad51 foci following exposure to the ecteinascidins. These results are not restricted to HeLa cells, but are shared by cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian carcinoma cells. Together, our data identify ATR and ATM as central coordinators of the DDR to ecteinascidins and provide a mechanistic rationale for combining these compounds with ATR and ATM inhibitors.

  14. Molecular Analysis of a Multistep Lung Cancer Model Induced by Chronic Inflammation Reveals Epigenetic Regulation of p16 and Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, David; Vicent, Silvestre; Fraga, Mario F; Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio; Freire, Javier; Lujambio, Amaia; Esteller, Manel; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Pio, Ruben; Lecanda, Fernando; Montuenga, Luis M

    2007-01-01

    The molecular hallmarks of inflammation-mediated lung carcinogenesis have not been fully clarified, mainly due to the scarcity of appropriate animal models. We have used a silica-induced multistep lung carcinogenesis model driven by chronic inflammation to study the evolution of molecular markers and genetic alterations. We analyzed markers of DNA damage response (DDR), proliferative stress, and telomeric stress: γ-H2AX, p16, p53, and TERT. Lung cancer-related epigenetic and genetic alterations, including promoter hypermethylation status of p16(CDKN2A), APC, CDH13, Rassf1, and Nore1A, as well as mutations of Tp53, epidermal growth factor receptor, K-ras, N-ras, and c-H-ras, have been also studied. Our results showed DDR pathway activation in preneoplastic lesions, in association with inducible nitric oxide synthase and p53 induction. p16 was also induced in early tumorigenic progression and was inactivated in bronchiolar dysplasias and tumors. Remarkably, lack of mutations of Ras and epidermal growth factor receptor, and a very low frequency of Tp53 mutations suggest that they are not required for tumorigenesis in this model. In contrast, epigenetic alterations in p16(CDKN2A), CDH13, and APC, but not in Rassf1 and Nore1A, were clearly observed. These data suggest the existence of a specific molecular signature of inflammation-driven lung carcinogenesis that shares some, but not all, of the molecular landmarks of chemically induced lung cancer. PMID:17971904

  15. DNA damage in Populus tremuloides clones exposed to elevated O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, Helen H., E-mail: helen.tai@agr.gc.c [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Potato Research Centre, P.O. Box 20280, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 4Z7 (Canada); Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service - Atlantic Forestry Centre, 1350 Regent Street S., Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5P7 (Canada); Percy, Kevin E. [Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service - Atlantic Forestry Centre, 1350 Regent Street S., Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5P7 (Canada); Karnosky, David F. [School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The effects of elevated concentrations of atmospheric tropospheric ozone (O{sub 3}) on DNA damage in five trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) clones growing in a free-air enrichment experiment in the presence and absence of elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) were examined. Growing season mean hourly O{sub 3} concentrations were 36.3 and 47.3 ppb for ambient and elevated O{sub 3} plots, respectively. The 4th highest daily maximum 8-h ambient and elevated O{sub 3} concentrations were 79 and 89 ppb, respectively. Elevated CO{sub 2} averaged 524 ppm (+150 ppm) over the growing season. Exposure to O{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} in combination with O{sub 3} increased DNA damage levels above background as measured by the comet assay. Ozone-tolerant clones 271 and 8L showed the highest levels of DNA damage under elevated O{sub 3} compared with ambient air; whereas less tolerant clone 216 and sensitive clones 42E and 259 had comparably lower levels of DNA damage with no significant differences between elevated O{sub 3} and ambient air. Clone 8L was demonstrated to have the highest level of excision DNA repair. In addition, clone 271 had the highest level of oxidative damage as measured by lipid peroxidation. The results suggest that variation in cellular responses to DNA damage between aspen clones may contribute to O{sub 3} tolerance or sensitivity. - Ozone tolerant clones and sensitive Populus tremuloides clones show differences in DNA damage and repair.

  16. Phosphorylation of eIF4E Confers Resistance to Cellular Stress and DNA-Damaging Agents through an Interaction with 4E-T: A Rationale for Novel Therapeutic Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Martínez

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E is associated with malignant progression and poor cancer prognosis. Accordingly, here we have analyzed the association between eIF4E phosphorylation and cellular resistance to oxidative stress, starvation, and DNA-damaging agents in vitro. Using immortalized and cancer cell lines, retroviral expression of a phosphomimetic (S209D form of eIF4E, but not phospho-dead (S209A eIF4E or GFP control, significantly increased cellular resistance to stress induced by DNA-damaging agents (cisplatin, starvation (glucose+glutamine withdrawal, and oxidative stress (arsenite. De novo accumulation of eIF4E-containing cytoplasmic bodies colocalizing with the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-T was observed after expression of phosphomimetic S209D, but not S209A or wild-type eIF4E. Increased resistance to cellular stress induced by eIF4E-S209D was lost upon knockdown of endogenous 4E-T or use of an eIF4E-W73A-S209D mutant unable to bind 4E-T. Cancer cells treated with the Mnk1/2 inhibitor CGP57380 to prevent eIF4E phosphorylation and mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Mnk1/2 knockout mice were also more sensitive to arsenite and cisplatin treatment. Polysome analysis revealed an 80S peak 2 hours after arsenite treatment in cells overexpressing phosphomimetic eIF4E, indicating translational stalling. Nonetheless, a selective increase was observed in the synthesis of some proteins (cyclin D1, HuR, and Mcl-1. We conclude that phosphorylation of eIF4E confers resistance to various cell stressors and that a direct interaction or regulation of 4E-T by eIF4E is required. Further delineation of this process may identify novel therapeutic avenues for cancer treatment, and these results support the use of modern Mnk1/2 inhibitors in conjunction with standard therapy.

  17. Quantifying murine bone marrow and blood radiation dose response following {sup 18}F-FDG PET with DNA damage biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, Grainne [Biological Effects Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom); Taylor, Kristina [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Finnon, Paul [Biological Effects Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom); Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Badie, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.badie@phe.gov.uk [Biological Effects Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Mice received either a range of {sup 18}F-FDG activities or whole body X-ray doses. • Blood samples were collected at 24 and 43 h for MN-RET and QPCR analysis. • Regression analysis showed that both types of exposure produced a linear response. • BM doses of 33 mGy ({sup 18}F-FDG) and 25 mGy X-rays were significantly higher than controls. • No significant difference between internal ({sup 18}F-FDG) and external (X-ray) was found. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to quantify the poorly understood radiation doses to murine bone marrow and blood from whole-body fluorine 18 ({sup 18}F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), by using specific biomarkers and comparing with whole body external low dose exposures. Groups of 3–5 mice were randomly assigned to 10 groups, each receiving either a different activity of {sup 18}F-FDG: 0–37 MBq or whole body irradiated with corresponding doses of 0–300 mGy X-rays. Blood samples were collected at 24 h and at 43 h for reticulocyte micronucleus assays and QPCR analysis of gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes. Blood and bone marrow dose estimates were calculated from injected activities of {sup 18}F-FDG and were based on a recommended ICRP model. Doses to the bone marrow corresponding to 33.43 mGy and above for internal {sup 18}F-FDG exposure and to 25 mGy and above for external X-ray exposure, showed significant increases in radiation-induced MN-RET formation relative to controls (P < 0.05). Regression analysis showed that both types of exposure produced a linear response with linear regression analysis giving R{sup 2} of 0.992 and 0.999 for respectively internal and external exposure. No significant difference between the two data sets was found with a P-value of 0.493. In vivo gene expression dose–responses at 24 h for Bbc3 and Cdkn1 were similar for {sup 18}F-FDG and X-ray exposures, with significant modifications occurring for doses over 300 mGy for Bbc3

  18. Effect of Gold Nanorod Surface Chemistry on Cellular Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Recombi - nation DNA Repair Network for Targeted Cancer Therapy. World J. Clin. Oncol. 2011, 2, 73–79. 36. Higashi, H.; Vallb€ohmer, D.; Warnecke-Eberz, U...cellular morphology, mitochondrial function, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), intracellular calcium levels, DNA damage-related gene expression, and of...observed in the MMP and Ca++ levels, up or down regulation of DNA damage related gene expression suggested a differential cell death mechanism based on

  19. DNA damage checkpoint recovery and cancer development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haiyong [First affiliated hospital, Zhejiang University, School of medicine, Cancer Center, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Zhang, Xiaoshan [Department of Genetics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Genetics Unit 1010, 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Teng, Lisong, E-mail: lsteng@zju.edu.cn [First affiliated hospital, Zhejiang University, School of medicine, Cancer Center, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Legerski, Randy J., E-mail: rlegersk@mdanderson.org [Department of Genetics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Genetics Unit 1010, 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    Cell cycle checkpoints were initially presumed to function as a regulator of cell cycle machinery in response to different genotoxic stresses, and later found to play an important role in the process of tumorigenesis by acting as a guard against DNA over-replication. As a counterpart of checkpoint activation, the checkpoint recovery machinery is working in opposition, aiming to reverse the checkpoint activation and resume the normal cell cycle. The DNA damage response (DDR) and oncogene induced senescence (OIS) are frequently found in precancerous lesions, and believed to constitute a barrier to tumorigenesis, however, the DDR and OIS have been observed to be diminished in advanced cancers of most tissue origins. These findings suggest that when progressing from pre-neoplastic lesions to cancer, DNA damage checkpoint barriers are overridden. How the DDR checkpoint is bypassed in this process remains largely unknown. Activated cytokine and growth factor-signaling pathways were very recently shown to suppress the DDR and to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation in the context of oncovirus infection. In recent decades, data from cell line and tumor models showed that a group of checkpoint recovery proteins function in promoting tumor progression; data from patient samples also showed overexpression of checkpoint recovery proteins in human cancer tissues and a correlation with patients' poor prognosis. In this review, the known cell cycle checkpoint recovery proteins and their roles in DNA damage checkpoint recovery are reviewed, as well as their implications in cancer development. This review also provides insight into the mechanism by which the DDR suppresses oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and tumor progression. - Highlights: • DNA damage checkpoint works as a barrier to cancer initiation. • DDR machinary response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress in similar way. • Checkpoint recovery pathways provide active signaling in cell cycle control. • Checkpoint

  20. The RIDDLE syndrome protein mediates a ubiquitin-dependent signaling cascade at sites of DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Grant S.; Panier, Stephanie; Townsend, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    for such disorders is Ataxia-Telangiectasia caused by biallelic mutation in ATM, a central component of the DNA damage response. Here, we report that the ubiquitin ligase RNF168 is mutated in the RIDDLE syndrome, a recently discovered immunodeficiency and radiosensitivity disorder. We show that RNF168 is recruited...... the accumulation of 53BP1 and BRCA1 to DNA lesions, and their loss is the likely cause of the cellular and developmental phenotypes associated with RIDDLE syndrome....

  1. DVC1 (C1orf124) is a DNA damage-targeting p97 adaptor that promotes ubiquitin-dependent responses to replication blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Anna; Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Kagias, Konstantinos;

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated processes orchestrate critical DNA-damage signaling and repair pathways. We identify human DVC1 (C1orf124; Spartan) as a cell cycle-regulated anaphase-promoting complex (APC) substrate that accumulates at stalled replication forks. DVC1 recruitment to sites of replication stress...... synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase η (Pol η) from monoubiquitylated PCNA. DVC1 knockdown enhances UV light-induced mutagenesis, and depletion of human DVC1 or the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog DVC-1 causes hypersensitivity to replication stress-inducing agents. Our findings establish DVC1 as a DNA damage...

  2. DNA damage in stem cells activates p21, inhibits p53, and induces symmetric self-renewing divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insinga, Alessandra; Cicalese, Angelo; Faretta, Mario; Gallo, Barbara; Albano, Luisa; Ronzoni, Simona; Furia, Laura; Viale, Andrea; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    DNA damage leads to a halt in proliferation owing to apoptosis or senescence, which prevents transmission of DNA alterations. This cellular response depends on the tumor suppressor p53 and functions as a powerful barrier to tumor development. Adult stem cells are resistant to DNA damage-induced apoptosis or senescence, however, and how they execute this response and suppress tumorigenesis is unknown. We show that irradiation of hematopoietic and mammary stem cells up-regulates the cell cycle inhibitor p21, a known target of p53, which prevents p53 activation and inhibits p53 basal activity, impeding apoptosis and leading to cell cycle entry and symmetric self-renewing divisions. p21 also activates DNA repair, limiting DNA damage accumulation and self-renewal exhaustion. Stem cells with moderate DNA damage and diminished self-renewal persist after irradiation, however. These findings suggest that stem cells have evolved a unique, p21-dependent response to DNA damage that leads to their immediate expansion and limits their long-term survival.

  3. Human parvovirus B19 DNA replication induces a DNA damage response that is dispensable for cell cycle arrest at phase G2/M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Sai; Luo, Yong; Cheng, Fang; Huang, Qinfeng; Shen, Weiran; Kleiboeker, Steve; Tisdale, John F; Liu, Zhengwen; Qiu, Jianming

    2012-10-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection is highly restricted to human erythroid progenitor cells, in which it induces a DNA damage response (DDR). The DDR signaling is mainly mediated by the ATR (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related) pathway, which promotes replication of the viral genome; however, the exact mechanisms employed by B19V to take advantage of the DDR for virus replication remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the initiators of the DDR and the role of the DDR in cell cycle arrest during B19V infection. We examined the role of individual viral proteins, which were delivered by lentiviruses, in triggering a DDR in ex vivo-expanded primary human erythroid progenitor cells and the role of DNA replication of the B19V double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome in a human megakaryoblastoid cell line, UT7/Epo-S1 (S1). All the cells were cultured under hypoxic conditions. The results showed that none of the viral proteins induced phosphorylation of H2AX or replication protein A32 (RPA32), both hallmarks of a DDR. However, replication of the B19V dsDNA genome was capable of inducing the DDR. Moreover, the DDR per se did not arrest the cell cycle at the G(2)/M phase in cells with replicating B19V dsDNA genomes. Instead, the B19V nonstructural 1 (NS1) protein was the key factor in disrupting the cell cycle via a putative transactivation domain operating through a p53-independent pathway. Taken together, the results suggest that the replication of the B19V genome is largely responsible for triggering a DDR, which does not perturb cell cycle progression at G(2)/M significantly, during B19V infection.

  4. Amphetamines promote mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage in pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin-I; Cao, Aiqin; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tojais, Nancy F.; Hennigs, Jan K.; Li, Caiyun G.; Sweeney, Nathaly M.; Inglis, Audrey S.; Wang, Lingli; Li, Dan; Ye, Matthew; Feldman, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) or methamphetamine (METH) abuse can cause oxidative damage and is a risk factor for diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from AMPH-associated-PAH patients show DNA damage as judged by γH2AX foci and DNA comet tails. We therefore hypothesized that AMPH induces DNA damage and vascular pathology by interfering with normal adaptation to an environmental perturbation causing oxidative stress. Consistent with this, we found that AMPH alone does not cause DNA damage in normoxic PAECs, but greatly amplifies DNA damage in hypoxic PAECs. The mechanism involves AMPH activation of protein phosphatase 2A, which potentiates inhibition of Akt. This increases sirtuin 1, causing deacetylation and degradation of HIF1α, thereby impairing its transcriptional activity, resulting in a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 and impaired cytochrome c oxidase 4 isoform switch. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is inappropriately enhanced and, as a result of impaired electron transport and mitochondrial ROS increase, caspase-3 is activated and DNA damage is induced. In mice given binge doses of METH followed by hypoxia, HIF1α is suppressed and pulmonary artery DNA damage foci are associated with worse pulmonary vascular remodeling. Thus, chronic AMPH/METH can induce DNA damage associated with vascular disease by subverting the adaptive responses to oxidative stress. PMID:28138562

  5. DNA damage and carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelow, R B

    1980-01-01

    Although cancer may arise as a result of many different types of molecular changes, there is little reason to doubt that changes to DNA are one of the more important ones in cancer initiation. Although DNA repair mechanisms seem able to eliminate a very large fraction of deleterious changes to DNA, we not only have little insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in such repair, but have a negligible amount of information to permit us to estimate the shape of dose response relations at low doses. The case of skin cancer is a special one, in that the average population is exposed to sufficient solar uv so that the effects of small increments in uv dose may be estimated. An approximate 85% reduction in DNA repair increases skin cancer incidence 10/sup 4/ fold.

  6. p53 shapes genome-wide and cell type-specific changes in microRNA expression during the human DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Janky, Rekin's; Nietfeld, Wilfried; Aerts, Stein; Madan Babu, M; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2014-01-01

    The human DNA damage response (DDR) triggers profound changes in gene expression, whose nature and regulation remain uncertain. Although certain micro-(mi)RNA species including miR34, miR-18, miR-16 and miR-143 have been implicated in the DDR, there is as yet no comprehensive description of genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs triggered by DNA breakage in human cells. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS), combined with rigorous integrative computational analyses, to describe genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs during the human DDR. The changes affect 150 of 1523 miRNAs known in miRBase v18 from 4-24 h after the induction of DNA breakage, in cell-type dependent patterns. The regulatory regions of the most-highly regulated miRNA species are enriched in conserved binding sites for p53. Indeed, genome-wide changes in miRNA expression during the DDR are markedly altered in TP53-/- cells compared to otherwise isogenic controls. The expression levels of certain damage-induced, p53-regulated miRNAs in cancer samples correlate with patient survival. Our work reveals genome-wide and cell type-specific alterations in miRNA expression during the human DDR, which are regulated by the tumor suppressor protein p53. These findings provide a genomic resource to identify new molecules and mechanisms involved in the DDR, and to examine their role in tumor suppression and the clinical outcome of cancer patients.

  7. Purine analog-like properties of bendamustine underlie rapid activation of DNA damage response and synergistic effects with pyrimidine analogues in lymphoid malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuya Hiraoka

    Full Text Available Bendamustine has shown considerable clinical activity against indolent lymphoid malignancies as a single agent or in combination with rituximab, but combination with additional anti-cancer drugs may be required for refractory and/or relapsed cases as well as other intractable tumors. In this study, we attempted to determine suitable anti-cancer drugs to be combined with bendamustine for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, aggressive lymphomas and multiple myeloma, all of which are relatively resistant to this drug, and investigated the mechanisms underlying synergism. Isobologram analysis revealed that bendamustine had synergistic effects with alkylating agents (4-hydroperoxy-cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil and melphalan and pyrimidine analogues (cytosine arabinoside, gemcitabine and decitabine in HBL-2, B104, Namalwa and U266 cell lines, which represent the above entities respectively. In cell cycle analysis, bendamustine induced late S-phase arrest, which was enhanced by 4-hydroperoxy-cyclophosphamide, and potentiated early S-phase arrest by cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C, followed by a robust increase in the size of sub-G1 fractions. Bendamustine was able to elicit DNA damage response and subsequent apoptosis faster and with shorter exposure than other alkylating agents due to rapid intracellular incorporation via equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs. Furthermore, bendamustine increased the expression of ENT1 at both mRNA and protein levels and enhanced the uptake of Ara-C and subsequent increase in Ara-C triphosphate (Ara-CTP in HBL-2 cells to an extent comparable with the purine analog fludarabine. These purine analog-like properties of bendamustine may underlie favorable combinations with other alkylators and pyrimidine analogues. Our findings may provide a theoretical basis for the development of more effective bendamustine-based combination therapies.

  8. Attenuation of the DNA Damage Response by Transforming Growth Factor-Beta Inhibitors Enhances Radiation Sensitivity of Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Shisuo; Bouquet, Sophie; Lo, Chen-Hao; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Bolourchi, Shiva [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Parry, Renate [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen, E-mail: mhbarcellos-hoff@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inhibition increases the response to radiation therapy in human and mouse non–small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: TGF-β–mediated growth response and pathway activation were examined in human NSCLC NCI-H1299, NCI-H292, and A549 cell lines and murine Lewis lung cancer (LLC) cells. Cells were treated in vitro with LY364947, a small-molecule inhibitor of the TGF-β type 1 receptor kinase, or with the pan-isoform TGF-β neutralizing monoclonal antibody 1D11 before radiation exposure. The DNA damage response was assessed by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) or Trp53 protein phosphorylation, γH2AX foci formation, or comet assay in irradiated cells. Radiation sensitivity was determined by clonogenic assay. Mice bearing syngeneic subcutaneous LLC tumors were treated with 5 fractions of 6 Gy and/or neutralizing or control antibody. Results: The NCI-H1299, A549, and LLC NSCLC cell lines pretreated with LY364947 before radiation exposure exhibited compromised DNA damage response, indicated by decreased ATM and p53 phosphorylation, reduced γH2AX foci, and increased radiosensitivity. The NCI-H292 cells were unresponsive. Transforming growth factor-β signaling inhibition in irradiated LLC cells resulted in unresolved DNA damage. Subcutaneous LLC tumors in mice treated with TGF-β neutralizing antibody exhibited fewer γH2AX foci after irradiation and significantly greater tumor growth delay in combination with fractionated radiation. Conclusions: Inhibition of TGF-β before radiation attenuated DNA damage recognition and increased radiosensitivity in most NSCLC cells in vitro and promoted radiation-induced tumor control in vivo. These data support the rationale for concurrent TGF-β inhibition and RT to provide therapeutic benefit in NSCLC.

  9. Effects of DNA damage on oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryonic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen YIN,Junyu MA,Wei SHEN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is one of the most common threats to meiotic cells. It has the potential to induce infertility and genetic abnormalities that may be passed to the embryo. Here, we reviewed exogenous factors which could induce DNA damage. Specially, we addressed the different effects of DNA damage on mouse oocytes and embryonic development. Complex DNA damage, double-strand breaks, represents a more difficult repair process and involves various repair pathways. Understanding the mechanisms involved in DNA damage responses may improve therapeutic strategies for ovarian cancer and fertility preservation.

  10. Mechanism of DNA damage tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin; Bi

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage may compromise genome integrity and lead to cell death. Cells have evolved a variety of processes to respond to DNA damage including damage repair and tolerance mechanisms, as well as damage checkpoints. The DNA damage tolerance(DDT) pathway promotes the bypass of single-stranded DNA lesions encountered by DNA polymerases during DNA replication. This prevents the stalling of DNA replication. Two mechanistically distinct DDT branches have been characterized. One is translesion synthesis(TLS) in which a replicative DNA polymerase is temporarily replaced by a specialized TLS polymerase that has the ability to replicate across DNA lesions. TLS is mechanistically simple and straightforward, but it is intrinsically error-prone. The other is the error-free template switching(TS) mechanism in which the stalled nascent strand switches from the damaged template to the undamaged newly synthesized sister strand for extension past the lesion. Error-free TS is a complex but preferable process for bypassing DNA lesions. However, our current understanding of this pathway is sketchy. An increasing number of factors are being found to participate or regulate this important mechanism, which is the focus of this editorial.

  11. Aging of hematopoietic stem cells: DNA damage and mutations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Bettina M; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Aging in the hematopoietic system and the stem cell niche contributes to aging-associated phenotypes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including leukemia and aging-associated immune remodeling. Among others, the DNA damage theory of aging of HSCs is well established, based on the detection of a significantly larger amount of γH2AX foci and a higher tail moment in the comet assay, both initially thought to be associated with DNA damage in aged HSCs compared with young cells, and bone marrow failure in animals devoid of DNA repair factors. Novel data on the increase in and nature of DNA mutations in the hematopoietic system with age, the quality of the DNA damage response in aged HSCs, and the nature of γH2AX foci question a direct link between DNA damage and the DNA damage response and aging of HSCs, and rather favor changes in epigenetics, splicing-factors or three-dimensional architecture of the cell as major cell intrinsic factors of HSCs aging. Aging of HSCs is also driven by a strong contribution of aging of the niche. This review discusses the DNA damage theory of HSC aging in the light of these novel mechanisms of aging of HSCs.

  12. ZRBA1, a Mixed EGFR/DNA Targeting Molecule, Potentiates Radiation Response Through Delayed DNA Damage Repair Process in a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heravi, Mitra [Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Kumala, Slawomir [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Rachid, Zakaria; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J. [Cancer Drug Research Laboratory, McGill University Health Center, Montreal (Canada); Radzioch, Danuta [Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Muanza, Thierry M., E-mail: tmuanza@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: ZRBA1 is a combi-molecule designed to induce DNA alkylating lesions and to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) TK domain. Inasmuch as ZRBA1 downregulates the EGFR TK-mediated antisurvival signaling and induces DNA damage, we postulated that it might be a radiosensitizer. The aim of this study was to further investigate the potentiating effect of ZRBA1 in combination with radiation and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of interaction between these 2 treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: The triple negative human breast MDA-MB-468 cancer cell line and mouse mammary cancer 4T1 cell line were used in this study. Clonogenic assay, Western blot analysis, and DNA damage analysis were performed at multiple time points after treatment. To confirm our in vitro findings, in vivo tumor growth delay assay was performed. Results: Our results show that a combination of ZRBA1 and radiation increases the radiation sensitivity of both cell lines significantly with a dose enhancement factor of 1.56, induces significant numbers of DNA strand breaks, prolongs higher DNA damage up to 24 hours after treatment, and significantly increases tumor growth delay in a syngeneic mouse model. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the higher efficacy of this combination could be partially due to increased DNA damage and delayed DNA repair process and to the inhibition of EGFR. The encouraging results of this combination demonstrated a significant improvement in treatment efficiency and therefore could be applicable in early clinical trial settings.

  13. Characterizing the DNA Damage Response by Cell Tracking Algorithms and Cell Features Classification Using High-Content Time-Lapse Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Georgescu

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the kinetics of DNA repair have been estimated using immunocytochemistry by labeling proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR with fluorescent markers in a fixed cell assay. However, detailed knowledge of DDR dynamics across multiple cell generations cannot be obtained using a limited number of fixed cell time-points. Here we report on the dynamics of 53BP1 radiation induced foci (RIF across multiple cell generations using live cell imaging of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A expressing histone H2B-GFP and the DNA repair protein 53BP1-mCherry. Using automatic extraction of RIF imaging features and linear programming techniques, we were able to characterize detailed RIF kinetics for 24 hours before and 24 hours after exposure to low and high doses of ionizing radiation. High-content-analysis at the single cell level over hundreds of cells allows us to quantify precisely the dose dependence of 53BP1 protein production, RIF nuclear localization and RIF movement after exposure to X-ray. Using elastic registration techniques based on the nuclear pattern of individual cells, we could describe the motion of individual RIF precisely within the nucleus. We show that DNA repair occurs in a limited number of large domains, within which multiple small RIFs form, merge and/or resolve with random motion following normal diffusion law. Large foci formation is shown to be mainly happening through the merging of smaller RIF rather than through growth of an individual focus. We estimate repair domain sizes of 7.5 to 11 µm2 with a maximum number of ~15 domains per MCF10A cell. This work also highlights DDR which are specific to doses larger than 1 Gy such as rapid 53BP1 protein increase in the nucleus and foci diffusion rates that are significantly faster than for spontaneous foci movement. We hypothesize that RIF merging reflects a "stressed" DNA repair process that has been taken outside physiological conditions when

  14. DDR-mediated crosstalk between DNA-damaged cells and their microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaquin, Nicolas; Carrier-Leclerc, Audrey; Dessureault, Mireille; Rodier, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is an evolutionarily conserved signaling cascade that senses and responds to double-strand DNA breaks by organizing downstream cellular events, ranging from appropriate DNA repair to cell cycle checkpoints. In higher organisms, the DDR prevents neoplastic transformation by directly protecting the information contained in the genome and by regulating cell fate decisions, like apoptosis and senescence, to ensure the removal of severely damaged cells. In addition to these well-studied cell-autonomous effects, emerging evidence now shows that the DDR signaling cascade can also function in a paracrine manner, thus influencing the biology of the surrounding cellular microenvironment. In this context, the DDR plays an emerging role in shaping the damaged tumor microenvironment through the regulation of tissue repair and local immune responses, thereby providing a promising avenue for novel therapeutic interventions. Additionally, while DDR-mediated extracellular signals can convey information to surrounding, undamaged cells, they can also feedback onto DNA-damaged cells to reinforce selected signaling pathways. Overall, these extracellular DDR signals can be subdivided into two time-specific waves: a rapid bystander effect occurring within a few hours of DNA damage; and a late, delayed, senescence-associated secretory phenotype generally requiring multiple days to establish. Here, we highlight and discuss examples of rapid and late DDR-mediated extracellular alarm signals.

  15. Coordination between p21 and DDB2 in the cellular response to UV radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 guides the cellular response to DNA damage mainly by regulating expression of target genes. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, which is induced by p53, can both arrest the cell cycle and inhibit apoptosis. Interestingly, p53-inducible DDB2 (damaged-DNA binding protein 2 promotes apoptosis by mediating p21 degradation after ultraviolet (UV-induced DNA damage. Here, we developed an integrated model of the p53 network to explore how the UV-irradiated cell makes a decision between survival and death and how the activities of p21 and DDB2 are modulated. By numerical simulations, we found that p53 is activated progressively and the promoter selectivity of p53 depends on its concentration. For minor DNA damage, p53 settles at an intermediate level. p21 is induced by p53 to arrest the cell cycle via inhibiting E2F1 activity, allowing for DNA repair. The proapoptotic genes are expressed at low levels. For severe DNA damage, p53 undergoes a two-phase behavior and accumulates to high levels in the second phase. Consequently, those proapoptotic proteins accumulate remarkably. Bax activates the release of cytochrome c, while DDB2 promotes the degradation of p21, which leads to activation of E2F1 and induction of Apaf-1. Finally, the caspase cascade is activated to trigger apoptosis. We revealed that the downregulation of p21 is necessary for apoptosis induction and PTEN promotes apoptosis by amplifying p53 activation. This work demonstrates that how the dynamics of the p53 network can be finely regulated through feed-forward and feedback loops within the network and emphasizes the importance of p21 regulation in the DNA damage response.

  16. Ellipticine induces apoptosis in T-cell lymphoma via oxidative DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savorani, Cecilia; Manfé, Valentina; Biskup, Edyta;

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is often mutated in human cancers. Restoring its antitumor activity has been shown to be a promising therapeutic approach for cancer treatment. Here we analyzed the activity and mechanism of a p53 reactivator, ellipticine, in a cellular model of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma ....... Our results provide evidence that ellipticine-induced apoptosis is exerted through DNA damage and does not require p53 activation in T-cell lymphoma....... the transcriptional activity of (G245S)p53 in SeAx. However, p53 siRNA knockdown experiments revealed that p53 was not required for ellipticine-induced apoptosis in CTCL. The lipophilic antioxidant α-tocopherol inhibited ellipticine-dependent apoptosis and we linked the apoptotic response to the oxidative DNA damage...

  17. DNA damage-induced translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus regulates cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulbricht Tobias

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins are able to react in response to distinct stress stimuli by alteration of their subcellular distribution. The stress-responsive protein S100A11 belongs to the family of multifunctional S100 proteins which have been implicated in several key biological processes. Previously, we have shown that S100A11 is directly involved in DNA repair processes at damaged chromatin in the nucleus. To gain further insight into the underlying mechanism subcellular trafficking of S100A11 in response to DNA damage was analyzed. Results We show that DNA damage induces a nucleolin-mediated translocation of S100A11 from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. This translocation is impeded by inhibition of the phosphorylation activity of PKCα. Translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus correlates with an increased cellular p21 protein level. Depletion of nucleolin by siRNA severely impairs translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus resulting in a decreased p21 protein level. Additionally, cells lacking nucleolin showed a reduced colony forming capacity. Conclusions These observations suggest that regulation of the subcellular distribution of S100A11 plays an important role in the DNA damage response and p21-mediated cell cycle control.

  18. Mechanisms of action of DNA-damaging anticancer drugs in treatment of carcinomas: is acute apoptosis an "off-target" effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelka, Aleksandra Mandic; Berndtsson, Maria; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Shoshan, Maria C; Linder, Stig

    2007-10-01

    DNA damage induces apoptosis of cells of hematological origin. Apoptosis is also widely believed to be the major antiproliferative mechanism of DNA damaging anticancer drugs in other cell types, and a large number of laboratories have studied drug-induced acute apoptosis (within 24 hours) of carcinoma cells. It is, however, often overlooked that induction of apoptosis of carcinoma cells generally requires drug concentrations that are at least one order of magnitude higher than those required for loss of clonogenicity. This is true for different DNA damaging drugs such as cisplatin, doxorubicin and camptothecin. We here discuss apoptosis induction by DNA damaging agents using cisplatin as an example. Recent studies have shown that cisplatin induces caspase activation in enucleated cells (cytoplasts lacking a cell nucleus). Cisplatin-induced apoptosis in both cells and cytoplasts is associated with rapid induction of cellular reactive oxygen species and increases in [Ca(2+)](i). Cisplatin has also been reported to induce clustering of Fas/CD95 in the plasma membrane. Available data suggest that the primary responses to cisplatin-induced DNA damage are induction of long-term growth arrest ("premature cell senescence") and mitotic catastrophe, whereas acute apoptosis may be due to "off-target effects" not necessarily involving DNA damage.

  19. Response of thyroid follicular cells to gamma irradiation compared to proton irradiation. I. Initial characterization of DNA damage, micronucleus formation, apoptosis, cell survival, and cell cycle phase redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Bant, A. M.; Kazarians, G.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Tran, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    The RBE of protons has been assumed to be equivalent to that of photons. The objective of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced DNA and chromosome damage, apoptosis, cell killing and cell cycling in organized epithelial cells was influenced by radiation quality. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-dependent Fischer rat thyroid cells, established as follicles, were exposed to gamma rays or proton beams delivered acutely over a range of physical doses. Gamma-irradiated cells were able to repair DNA damage relatively rapidly so that by 1 h postirradiation they had approximately 20% fewer exposed 3' ends than their counterparts that had been irradiated with proton beams. The persistence of free ends of DNA in the samples irradiated with the proton beam implies that either more initial breaks or a quantitatively different type of damage had occurred. These results were further supported by an increased frequency of chromosomal damage as measured by the presence of micronuclei. Proton-beam irradiation induced micronuclei at a rate of 2.4% per gray, which at 12 Gy translated to 40% more micronuclei than in comparable gamma-irradiated cultures. The higher rate of micronucleus formation and the presence of larger micronuclei in proton-irradiated cells was further evidence that a qualitatively more severe class of damage had been induced than was induced by gamma rays. Differences in the type of damage produced were detected in the apoptosis assay, wherein a significant lag in the induction of apoptosis occurred after gamma irradiation that did not occur with protons. The more immediate expression of apoptotic cells in the cultures irradiated with the proton beam suggests that the damage inflicted was more severe. Alternatively, the cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms required for recovery from such damage might not have been invoked. Differences based on radiation quality were also evident in the alpha components of cell survival curves (0.05 Gy(-1) for gamma rays, 0

  20. Using DNA damage to monitor water environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    DNA damage of aquatic organisms living in polluted environments can be used as a biomarker of the genotoxicity of toxic agents to organisms. This technique has been playing an important role in ecotoxicological study and environmental risk assessment. In this article, main types of DNA damage caused by pollutants in water environments were reviewed; methods of detecting DNA damage were also documented for water environmental monitoring.

  1. Identification of novel gene targets and functions of p21-activated kinase 1 during DNA damage by gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Motwani

    Full Text Available P21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1, a serine/threonine protein kinase, modulates many cellular processes by phosphorylating its downstream substrates. In addition to its role in the cytoplasm, PAK1 also affects gene transcription due to its nuclear localization and association with chromatin. It is now recognized that PAK1 kinase activity and its nuclear translocation are rapidly stimulated by ionizing radiation (IR, and that PAK1 activation is a component of the DNA damage response. Owing to the role of PAK1 in the cell survival, its association with the chromatin, and now, stimulation by ionizing radiation, we hypothesize that PAK1 may be contributing to modulation of genes with roles in cellular processes that might be important in the DNA damage response. The purpose of this study was to identify new PAK1 targets in response to ionizing radiation with putative role in the DNA damage response. We examined the effect of IR on the gene expression patterns in the murine embryonic fibroblasts with or without Pak1 using microarray technology. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified using Gene Spring GX 10.0.2. Pathway, network, functional analyses and gene family classification were carried out using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG, Ingenuity Pathway, Gene Ontology and PANTHER respectively. Selective targets of PAK1 were validated by RT-qPCR. For the first time, we provide a genome-wide analysis of PAK1 and identify its targets with potential roles in the DNA damage response. Gene Ontology analysis identified genes in the IR-stimulated cells that were involved in cell cycle arrest and cell death. Pathway analysis revealed p53 pathway being most influenced by IR responsive, PAK1 targets. Gene family of transcription factors was over represented and gene networks involved in DNA replication, repair and cellular signaling were identified. In brief, this study identifies novel PAK1 dependent IR responsive genes which reveal new

  2. Reshaping chromatin after DNA damage: the choreography of histone proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Sophie E

    2015-02-13

    DNA damage signaling and repair machineries operate in a nuclear environment where DNA is wrapped around histone proteins and packaged into chromatin. Understanding how chromatin structure is restored together with the DNA sequence during DNA damage repair has been a topic of intense research. Indeed, chromatin integrity is central to cell functions and identity. However, chromatin shows remarkable plasticity in response to DNA damage. This review presents our current knowledge of chromatin dynamics in the mammalian cell nucleus in response to DNA double strand breaks and UV lesions. I provide an overview of the key players involved in regulating histone dynamics in damaged chromatin regions, focusing on histone chaperones and their concerted action with histone modifiers, chromatin remodelers and repair factors. I also discuss how these dynamics contribute to reshaping chromatin and, by altering the chromatin landscape, may affect the maintenance of epigenetic information.

  3. Inactivation of ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint promotes androgen induced chromosomal instability in prostate epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Tuen Chiu

    Full Text Available The ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint functions in the maintenance of genetic stability and some missense variants of the ATM gene have been shown to confer a moderate increased risk of prostate cancer. However, whether inactivation of this checkpoint contributes directly to prostate specific cancer predisposition is still unknown. Here, we show that exposure of non-malignant prostate epithelial cells (HPr-1AR to androgen led to activation of the ATM/ATR DNA damage response and induction of cellular senescence. Notably, knockdown of the ATM gene expression in HPr-1AR cells can promote androgen-induced TMPRSS2: ERG rearrangement, a prostate-specific chromosome translocation frequently found in prostate cancer cells. Intriguingly, unlike the non-malignant prostate epithelial cells, the ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint appears to be defective in prostate cancer cells, since androgen treatment only induced a partial activation of the DNA damage response. This mechanism appears to preserve androgen induced autophosphorylation of ATM and phosphorylation of H2AX, lesion processing and repair pathway yet restrain ATM/CHK1/CHK2 and p53 signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrate that ATM/ATR inactivation is a crucial step in promoting androgen-induced genomic instability and prostate carcinogenesis.

  4. Interaction of proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA with c-Abl in cell proliferation and response to DNA damages in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajun Zhao

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation in primary and metastatic tumors is a fundamental characteristic of advanced breast cancer. Further understanding of the mechanism underlying enhanced cell growth will be important in identifying novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. Here we demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a critical event in growth regulation of breast cancer cells. We found that phosphorylation of PCNA at tyrosine 211 (Y211 enhanced its association with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl. We further demonstrated that c-Abl facilitates chromatin association of PCNA and is required for nuclear foci formation of PCNA in cells stressed by DNA damage as well as in unperturbed cells. Targeting Y211 phosphorylation of PCNA with a cell-permeable peptide inhibited the phosphorylation and reduced the PCNA-Abl interaction. These results show that PCNA signal transduction has an important impact on the growth regulation of breast cancer cells.

  5. Protection of DNA damage by radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, In Gyu; Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kug Chan; Oh, Tae Jung

    1998-12-01

    The SOS response of Escherichia coli is positively regulated by RecA. To examine the effects of polyamines on The SOS response of E. Coli, we investigated the expression of recA gene in polyamine-deficient mutant and wild type carrying recA'::lacZ fusion gene. As a result, recA expression by mitomycin C is higher in wild type than that of polyamine-deficient mutant, but recA expression by UV radiation is higher in wild type than of mutant. We also found that exogenous polyamines restored the recA expression in the polyamine-deficient mutant to the wild type level. These results proposed that polyamines play an important role in mechanism of intracellular DNA protection by DNA damaging agents.

  6. Guarding chromosomes from oxidative DNA damage to the very end

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Tan; Li Lan

    2016-01-01

    The ends of each chromosome are capped by the telomere assembly to protect chromosomal integrity from telomere attrition and DNA damage.In response to DNA damage,DNA repair factors are enriched at damage sites by a sophisticated signaling and recruitment cascade.However,DNA damage response at telomeres is different from non-telomeric region of genomic DNA due to specialized sequences and structures of the telomeres.In the course of normal DNA replication or DNA damage repair,both the telomere shelterin protein complex and the condensed telomeric chromatin structure in mammalian cells are modified to protect telomeres from exposing free DNA ends which are subject to both telemere shortening and chromosome end fusion.Initiation of either homologous recombination or non-homologous end joint repair at telomeres requires disassembling andaor post-translational modifications of the shelterin complex and telomeric chromatin.In addition,cancer cells utilize distinct mechanisms to maintain telomere length and cell survival upon damage.In this review,we summarize current studies that focus on telomere end protection and telomere DNA repair using different methodologies to model telomere DNA damage and disruption.These include genetic ablation of sheltering proteins,targeting endonuclease to telomeres,and delivering oxidative damage directly.These different approaches,when combined,offer better understanding of the mechanistic differences in DNA damage response between telomeric and genomic DNA,which will provide new hope to identify potential cancer therapeutic targets to curtail cancer cell proliferation via induction of telomere dysfunctions.

  7. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  8. Can graphene quantum dots cause DNA damage in cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Zhu, Lin; Chen, Jian-Feng; Dai, Liming

    2015-05-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted tremendous attention for biological applications. We report the first study on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of GQDs to fibroblast cell lines (NIH-3T3 cells). The NIH-3T3 cells treated with GQDs at dosages over 50 μg mL-1 showed no significant cytotoxicity. However, the GQD-treated NIH-3T3 cells exhibited an increased expression of proteins (p53, Rad 51, and OGG1) related to DNA damage compared with untreated cells, indicating the DNA damage caused by GQDs. The GQD-induced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was demonstrated to be responsible for the observed DNA damage. These findings should have important implications for future applications of GQDs in biological systems.Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted tremendous attention for biological applications. We report the first study on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of GQDs to fibroblast cell lines (NIH-3T3 cells). The NIH-3T3 cells treated with GQDs at dosages over 50 μg mL-1 showed no significant cytotoxicity. However, the GQD-treated NIH-3T3 cells exhibited an increased expression of proteins (p53, Rad 51, and OGG1) related to DNA damage compared with untreated cells, indicating the DNA damage caused by GQDs. The GQD-induced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was demonstrated to be responsible for the observed DNA damage. These findings should have important implications for future applications of GQDs in biological systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01734c

  9. The insect cellular immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael R. Strand

    2008-01-01

    The innate immune system of insects is divided into humoral defenses that include the production of soluble effector molecules and cellular defenses like phagocytosis and encapsulation that are mediated by hemocytes. This review summarizes current understanding of the cellular immune response. Insects produce several terminally differentiated types of hemocytes that are distinguished by morphology, molecular and antigenic markers, and function. The differentiated hemocytes that circulate in larval or nymphal stage insects arise from two sources: progenitor cells produced during embryogenesis and mesodermally derived hematopoietic organs. Regulation of hematopoiesis and hemocyte differentiation also involves several different signaling pathways. Phagocytosis and encapsulation require that hemocytes first recognize a given target as foreign followed by activation of downstream signaling and effector responses. A number of humoral and cellular receptors have been identified that recognize different microbes and multicellular parasites. In turn, activation of these receptors stimulates a number of signaling pathways that regulate different hemocyte functions. Recent studies also identify hemocytes as important sources of a number of humoral effector molecules required for killing different foreign invaders.

  10. Response of arsenic-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage, and metal imbalance to combined administration of DMSA and monoisoamyl-DMSA during chronic arsenic poisoning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadauria, S; Flora, S J S

    2007-03-01

    Arsenic and its compounds cause adverse health effects in humans. Current treatment employs administration of thiol chelators, such as meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane 1-sulfonate (DMPS), which facilitate its excretion from the body. However, these chelating agents are compromised by number of limitations due to their lipophobic nature, particularly in case of chronic poisoning. Combination therapy is a new approach to ensure enhanced removal of metal from the body, reduced doses of potentially toxic chelators, and no redistribution of metal from one organ to another, following chronic metal exposure. The present study attempts to investigate dose-related effects of two thiol chelators, DMSA and one of its new analogues, monoisoamyl dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA), when administered in combination with the aim of achieving normalization of altered biochemical parameters suggestive of oxidative stress and depletion of inorganic arsenic following chronic arsenic exposure. Twenty-five adult male Wistar rats were given 25 ppm arsenic for 10 weeks followed by chelation therapy with the above chelating agents at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg (orally) when administered individually or 0.15 mmol/kg and 0.3 mmol/kg (once daily for 5 consecutive days), respectively, when administered in combination. Arsenic exposure led to the inhibition of blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity and depletion of glutathione (GSH) level. These changes were accompanied by significant depletion of hemoglobin, RBC and Hct as well as blood superoxide dismutase (SOD) acitivity. There was an increase in hepatic and renal levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, while GSH:GSSG ratio decreased significantly, accompanied by a significant increase in metallothionein (MT) in hepatocytes. DNA damage based on denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed significant loss in the integrity of DNA extracted from the liver of arsenic

  11. DNA-Damage-Induced Type I Interferon Promotes Senescence and Inhibits Stem Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiujing Yu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Expression of type I interferons (IFNs can be induced by DNA-damaging agents, but the mechanisms and significance of this regulation are not completely understood. We found that the transcription factor IRF3, activated in an ATM-IKKα/β-dependent manner, stimulates cell-autonomous IFN-β expression in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. Cells and tissues with accumulating DNA damage produce endogenous IFN-β and stimulate IFN signaling in vitro and in vivo. In turn, IFN acts to amplify DNA-damage responses, activate the p53 pathway, promote senescence, and inhibit stem cell function in response to telomere shortening. Inactivation of the IFN pathway abrogates the development of diverse progeric phenotypes and extends the lifespan of Terc knockout mice. These data identify DNA-damage-response-induced IFN signaling as a critical mechanism that links accumulating DNA damage with senescence and premature aging.

  12. DNA Damage Following Pulmonary Exposure by Instillation to Low Doses of Carbon Black (Printex 90) Nanoparticles in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Saber, Anne T.;

    2015-01-01

    of 0.67, 2, 6, and 162 mu g Printex 90 NPCB and vehicle. Cellular composition and protein concentration was evaluated in BAL fluid as markers of inflammatory response and cell damage. DNA strand breaks in BAL cells, lung, and liver tissue were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. The pulmonary......We previously observed genotoxic effects of carbon black nanoparticles at low doses relative to the Danish Occupational Exposure Limit (3.5 mg/m3). Furthermore, DNA damage occurred in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in the absence of inflammation, indicating that inflammation is not required...... the comet assay. We interpret the increased DNA strand breaks occurring following these low exposure doses of NPCB as DNA damage caused by primary genotoxicity in the absence of substantial inflammation, cell damage, and acute phase response. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 56:41-49, 2015. (c) 2014 The Authors...

  13. Relationship between DNA damage response, initiated by camptothecin or oxidative stress, and DNA replication, analyzed by quantitative 3D image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berniak, K; Rybak, P; Bernas, T; Zarębski, M; Biela, E; Zhao, H; Darzynkiewicz, Z; Dobrucki, J W

    2013-10-01

    A method of quantitative analysis of spatial (3D) relationship between discrete nuclear events detected by confocal microscopy is described and applied in analysis of a dependence between sites of DNA damage signaling (γH2AX foci) and DNA replication (EdU incorporation) in cells subjected to treatments with camptothecin (Cpt) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cpt induces γH2AX foci, likely reporting formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), almost exclusively at sites of DNA replication. This finding is consistent with the known mechanism of induction of DSBs by DNA topoisomerase I (topo1) inhibitors at the sites of collisions of the moving replication forks with topo1-DNA "cleavable complexes" stabilized by Cpt. Whereas an increased level of H2AX histone phosphorylation is seen in S-phase of cells subjected to H2O2, only a minor proportion of γH2AX foci coincide with DNA replication sites. Thus, the increased level of H2AX phosphorylation induced by H2O2 is not a direct consequence of formation of DNA lesions at the sites of moving DNA replication forks. These data suggest that oxidative stress induced by H2O2 and formation of the primary H2O2-induced lesions (8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) inhibits replication globally and triggers formation of γH2AX at various distances from replication forks. Quantitative analysis of a frequency of DNA replication sites and γH2AX foci suggests also that stalling of replicating forks by Cpt leads to activation of new DNA replication origins. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  14. Analysis of spatial correlations between patterns of DNA damage response and DNA replication in nuclei of cells subjected to replication stress or oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernas, Tytus; Berniak, Krzysztof; Rybak, Paulina; Zarębski, Mirosław; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Dobrucki, Jerzy W

    2013-10-01

    Sites of DNA replication (EdU incorporation) and DNA damage signaling (γH2AX) induced by camptothecin (Cpt) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) form characteristic patterns of foci in cell nuclei. The overlap between these patterns is a function of the number of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) formed in replication sites. The goal of this study was to optimize a method of quantitative assessment of a degree of correlation between these two patterns. Such a correlation can be used to estimate a probability of inducing damage in sections of replicating DNA. The damage and replication foci are imaged in 3D with confocal microscopy and their respective positions within nuclei are determined with adaptive image segmentation. Using correlation functions spatial proximity of the resultant point patterns is quantified over the range of distances in cells in early-, mid- and late S-phase. As the numbers (and nuclear densities) of γH2AX and replication foci differ significantly in the subsequent substages of S phase, the detected association values were corrected for the expected random overlap between both classes of foci. Thus, the probability of their nonrandom association was estimated. Moreover, self association (clustering) of DNA replication sites in different stages of S-phase of the cell cycle was detected and accounted for. While the analysis revealed a strong correlation between the γH2AX foci and the sites of DNA replication in cells treated with Cpt, only a low correlation was apparent in cells exposed to H2O2. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  15. The effect of aging on the DNA damage and repair capacity in 2BS cells undergoing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Ling; Wang, Pei-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with a reduction in the DNA repair capacity under oxidative stress. However, whether the DNA damage and repair capacity can be a biomarker of aging remains controversial. In this study, we demonstrated two cause-and-effect relationships, the one is between the DNA damage and repair capacity and the cellular age, another is between DNA damage and repair capacity and the level of oxidative stress in human embryonic lung fibroblasts (2BS) exposed to different doses of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). To clarify the mechanisms of the age-related reduction in DNA damage and repair capacity, we preliminarily evaluated the expressions of six kinds of pivotal enzymes involved in the two classical DNA repair pathways. The DNA repair capacity was observed in human fibroblasts cells using the comet assay; the age-related DNA repair enzymes were selected by RT-PCR and then verified by Western blot in vitro. Results showed that the DNA repair capacity was negatively and linearly correlated with (i) cumulative population doubling (PD) levels only in the group of low concentration of hydrogen peroxide treatment, (ii) with the level of oxidative stress only in the group of young PD cells. The mRNA expression of DNA polymerase δ1 decreased substantially in senescent cells and showed negative linear-correlation with PD levels; the protein expression level was well consistent with the mRNA level. Taken together, DNA damage and repair capacity can be a biomarker of aging. Reduced expression of DNA polymerase δ1 may be responsible for the decrease of DNA repair capacity in senescent cells.

  16. DNA damage after intracerebroventricular injection of ouabain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jornada, Luciano K; Valvassori, Samira S; Arent, Camila O; Leffa, Daniela; Damiani, Adriani A; Hainzenreder, Giana; Ferreira, Camila L; Moretti, Morgana; Andrade, Vanessa M; Quevedo, João

    2010-02-26

    There is an emerging body of data suggesting that bipolar disorder is associated with DNA damage. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of ouabain in rats results in manic-like alterations. We evaluated DNA damage of peripheral blood, cerebrospinal fluid and hippocampus of rats after i.c.v. ouabain injection. Ouabain-induced hyperlocomotion was examined in an open field. Additionally, we used single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) to measure early transient damage in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), hippocampus and blood; and the micronucleus test to measure persistent damage in total blood samples of rats after ouabain administration. Our findings demonstrated that ouabain induced hyperlocomotion in rats, and this response remained up to 7 days following a single i.c.v. injection. In addition, we observed that the persistent increase in the rat spontaneous locomotion is associated with increased hippocampal and peripheral index of early DNA damage in rats. No significant alterations were observed in the micronucleus frequency in total blood samples of the rats after the ouabain i.c.v. injection. These results suggest that ouabain may induce peripheral and central early DNA damage, but this early damage may be repaired.

  17. p53 isoform Δ113p53/Δ133p53 promotes DNA double-strand break repair to protect cell from death and senescence in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lu; Gong, Hongjian; Pan, Xiao; Chang, Changqing; Ou, Zhao; Ye, Shengfan; Yin, Le; Yang, Lina; Tao, Ting; Zhang, Zhenhai; Liu, Cong; Lane, David P; Peng, Jinrong; Chen, Jun

    2015-03-01

    The inhibitory role of p53 in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair seems contradictory to its tumor-suppressing property. The p53 isoform Δ113p53/Δ133p53 is a p53 target gene that antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity. However, information on its functions in DNA damage repair is lacking. Here we report that Δ113p53 expression is strongly induced by γ-irradiation, but not by UV-irradiation or heat shock treatment. Strikingly, Δ113p53 promotes DNA DSB repair pathways, including homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining and single-strand annealing. To study the biological significance of Δ113p53 in promoting DNA DSB repair, we generated a zebrafish Δ113p53(M/M) mutant via the transcription activator-like effector nuclease technique and found that the mutant is more sensitive to γ-irradiation. The human ortholog, Δ133p53, is also only induced by γ-irradiation and functions to promote DNA DSB repair. Δ133p53-knockdown cells were arrested at the G2 phase at the later stage in response to γ-irradiation due to a high level of unrepaired DNA DSBs, which finally led to cell senescence. Furthermore, Δ113p53/Δ133p53 promotes DNA DSB repair via upregulating the transcription of repair genes rad51, lig4 and rad52 by binding to a novel type of p53-responsive element in their promoters. Our results demonstrate that Δ113p53/Δ133p53 is an evolutionally conserved pro-survival factor for DNA damage stress by preventing apoptosis and promoting DNA DSB repair to inhibit cell senescence. Our data also suggest that the induction of Δ133p53 expression in normal cells or tissues provides an important tolerance marker for cancer patients to radiotherapy.

  18. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Modulates DNA Damage Response and the Expression of the VEGF-A and MKI67 Genes in ARPE-19 Cells Subjected to Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Paulina; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka Wanda; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2016-06-14

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by the progressive degradation of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. ARPE-19 is an RPE cell line established as an in vitro model for the study of AMD pathogenesis. Oxidative stress is an AMD pathogenesis factor that induces DNA damage. Thus, the oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) of ARPE-19 cells can be important in AMD pathogenesis. The metabolism of retinoids-which regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and the visual cycle in the retina-was reported to be disturbed in AMD patients. In the present work, we studied the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, a retinoid) on DDR in ARPE-19 cells subjected to oxidative stress. We observed that ATRA increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), alkali-labile sites in DNA, DNA single-strand breaks, and cell death evoked by oxidative stress. ATRA did not modulate DNA repair or the distribution of cells in cell cycle in the response of ARPE-19 cells to oxidative stress. ATRA induced autophagy in the absence of oxidative stress, but had no effect on this process in the stress. ATRA induced over-expression of proliferation marker MKI67 and neovascularization marker VEGF-A. In conclusion, ATRA increased oxidative stress in ARPE-19 cells, resulting in more lesions to their DNA and cell death. Moreover, ATRA can modulate some properties of these cells, including neovascularization, which is associated with the exudative form of AMD. Therefore, ATRA can be important in the prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of AMD.

  19. Apoptosis and DNA damage in human spermatozoa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R John Aitken; Adam J Koppers

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage is frequently encountered in spermatozoa of subfertile males and is correlated with a range of adverse clinical outcomes including impaired fertilization, disrupted preimplantation embryonic development, increased rates of miscarriage and an enhanced risk of disease in the progeny. The etiology of DNA fragmentation in human spermatozoa is closely correlated with the appearance of oxidative base adducts and evidence of impaired spermiogenesis. We hypothesize that oxidative stress impedes spermiogenesis,resulting in the generation of spermatozoa with poorly remodelled chromatin. These defective cells have a tendency to default to an apoptotic pathway associated with motility loss, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine exteriorization and the activation of free radical generation by the mitochondria. The latter induces lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage, which then leads to DNA fragmentation and cell death. The physical architecture of spermatozoa prevents any nucleases activated as a result of this apoptotic process from gaining access to the nuclear DNA and inducing its fragmentation. It is for this reason that a majority of the DNA damage encountered in human spermatozoa seems to be oxidative. Given the important role that oxidative stress seems to have in the etiology of DNA damage, there should be an important role for antioxidants in the treatment of this condition. If oxidative DNA damage in spermatozoa is providing a sensitive readout of systemic oxidative stress, the implications of these findings could stretch beyond our immediate goal of trying to minimize DNA damage in spermatozoa as a prelude to assisted conception therapy.

  20. Inducible repair of oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demple, B; Halbrook, J

    Hydrogen peroxide is lethal to many cell types, including the bacterium Escherichia coli. Peroxides yield transient radical species that can damage DNA and cause mutations. Such partially reduced oxygen species are occasionally released during cellular respiration and are generated by lethal and mutagenic ionizing radiation. Because cells live in an environment where the threat of oxidative DNA damage is continual, cellular mechanisms may have evolved to avoid and repair this damage. Enzymes are known which evidently perform these functions. We report here that resistance to hydrogen peroxide toxicity can be induced in E. coli, that this novel induction is specific and occurs, in part, at the level of DNA repair.

  1. Kinetic Modeling Reveals the Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and DNA Repair Processes in Shaping the Dose-Response Curve of KBrO3-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Spassova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a kinetic model to investigate how DNA repair processes and scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS can affect the dose-response shape of prooxidant induced DNA damage. We used as an example chemical KBrO3 which is activated by glutathione and forms reactive intermediates that directly interact with DNA to form 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts (8-OH-dG. The single strand breaks (SSB that can result from failed base excision repair of these adducts were considered as an effect downstream from 8-OH-dG. We previously demonstrated that, in the presence of effective base excision repair, 8-OH-dG can exhibit threshold-like dose-response dependence, while the downstream SSB can still exhibit a linear dose-response. Here we demonstrate that this result holds for a variety of conditions, including low levels of GSH, the presence of additional SSB repair mechanisms, or a scavenger. It has been shown that melatonin, a terminal scavenger, inhibits KBrO3-caused oxidative damage. Our modeling revealed that sustained exposure to KBrO3 can lead to fast scavenger exhaustion, in which case the dose-response shapes for both endpoints are not substantially affected. The results are important to consider when forming conclusions on a chemical’s toxicity dose dependence based on the dose-response of early genotoxic events.

  2. DNA Damage: A Main Determinant of Vascular Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Niño, Paula K; Portilla-Fernandez, Eliana; Vaughan, Douglas E; Danser, A H Jan; Roks, Anton J M

    2016-05-18

    Vascular aging plays a central role in health problems and mortality in older people. Apart from the impact of several classical cardiovascular risk factors on the vasculature, chronological aging remains the single most important determinant of cardiovascular problems. The causative mechanisms by which chronological aging mediates its impact, independently from classical risk factors, remain to be elucidated. In recent years evidence has accumulated that unrepaired DNA damage may play an important role. Observations in animal models and in humans indicate that under conditions during which DNA damage accumulates in an accelerated rate, functional decline of the vasculature takes place in a similar but more rapid or more exaggerated way than occurs in the absence of such conditions. Also epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between DNA maintenance and age-related cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, mouse models of defective DNA repair are means to study the mechanisms involved in biological aging of the vasculature. We here review the evidence of the role of DNA damage in vascular aging, and present mechanisms by which genomic instability interferes with regulation of the vascular tone. In addition, we present potential remedies against vascular aging induced by genomic instability. Central to this review is the role of diverse types of DNA damage (telomeric, non-telomeric and mitochondrial), of cellular changes (apoptosis, senescence, autophagy), mediators of senescence and cell growth (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)/senescence-messaging secretome (SMS), insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling), the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) axis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) vs. endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c

  3. DNA Damage: A Main Determinant of Vascular Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula K. Bautista-Niño

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular aging plays a central role in health problems and mortality in older people. Apart from the impact of several classical cardiovascular risk factors on the vasculature, chronological aging remains the single most important determinant of cardiovascular problems. The causative mechanisms by which chronological aging mediates its impact, independently from classical risk factors, remain to be elucidated. In recent years evidence has accumulated that unrepaired DNA damage may play an important role. Observations in animal models and in humans indicate that under conditions during which DNA damage accumulates in an accelerated rate, functional decline of the vasculature takes place in a similar but more rapid or more exaggerated way than occurs in the absence of such conditions. Also epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between DNA maintenance and age-related cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, mouse models of defective DNA repair are means to study the mechanisms involved in biological aging of the vasculature. We here review the evidence of the role of DNA damage in vascular aging, and present mechanisms by which genomic instability interferes with regulation of the vascular tone. In addition, we present potential remedies against vascular aging induced by genomic instability. Central to this review is the role of diverse types of DNA damage (telomeric, non-telomeric and mitochondrial, of cellular changes (apoptosis, senescence, autophagy, mediators of senescence and cell growth (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP/senescence-messaging secretome (SMS, insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 signaling, the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR-nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB axis, reactive oxygen species (ROS vs. endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS-cyclic guanosine monophosphate

  4. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G., E-mail: lhudson@salud.unm.edu

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the Hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low levels of arsenite enhance UV-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes. • UV-initiated HPRT mutation frequency is enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc supplementation offsets DNA damage and mutation frequency enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc-dependent reduction of arsenite enhanced DNA damage is confirmed in vivo.

  5. DNA damage-induced cell death: lessons from the central nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena Lobo Borges; Rafael Linden; Jean YJ Wang

    2008-01-01

    DNA damage can, but does not always, induce cell death. While several pathways linking DNA damage signals to mitochondria-dependent and -independent death machineries have been elucidated, the connectivity of these pathways is subject to regulation by multiple other factors that are not well understood. We have proposed two conceptual models to explain the delayed and variable cell death response to DNA damage: integrative surveillance versus autonomous pathways. In this review, we discuss how these two models may explain the in vivo regulation of cell death induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in the developing central nervous system, where the death response is regulated by radiation dose, cell cycle status and neuronal development.

  6. Genotoxic Anti-Cancer Agents and Their Relationship to DNA Damage, Mitosis, and Checkpoint Adaptation in Proliferating Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy H. Swift

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available When a human cell detects damaged DNA, it initiates the DNA damage response (DDR that permits it to repair the damage and avoid transmitting it to daughter cells. Despite this response, changes to the genome occur and some cells, such as proliferating cancer cells, are prone to genome instability. The cellular processes that lead to genomic changes after a genotoxic event are not well understood. Our research focuses on the relationship between genotoxic cancer drugs and checkpoint adaptation, which is the process of mitosis with damaged DNA. We examine the types of DNA damage induced by widely used cancer drugs and describe their effects upon proliferating cancer cells. There is evidence that cell death caused by genotoxic cancer drugs in some cases includes exiting a DNA damage cell cycle arrest and entry into mitosis. Furthermore, some cells are able to survive this process at a time when the genome is most susceptible to change or rearrangement. Checkpoint adaptation is poorly characterised in human cells; we predict that increasing our understanding of this pathway may help to understand genomic instability in cancer cells and provide insight into methods to improve the efficacy of current cancer therapies.

  7. Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated-Rad3-related DNA damage checkpoint signaling pathway triggered by hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Zhao; Qing-Jun Ma; Hui Zhong; Ning-Bo Hou; Xiao-Li Yang; Xiang He; Yu Liu; Yan-Hong Zhang; Cong-Wen Wei; Ting Song; Li Li

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore whether acute cellular DNA damage response is induced upon hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and the effects of the HBV infection. METHODS: We incubated HL7702 hepatocytes with HBV-positive serum, mimicking a natural HBV infection process. We used immunoblotting to evaluate protein expression levels in HBV-infected cells or in non-infected cells; immunofluorescence to show ATR foci ands Chk1 phosphorylation loci formation; flow cytometry to analyze the cell cycle and apoptosis; ultraviolet (UV) radiation and ionizing radiation (IR)-treated cells to mimic DNA damage; and Trypan blue staining to count the viable cells.RESULTS: We found that HBV infection induced an increased steady state of ATR protein and increased phosphorylation of multiple downstream targets including Chkl, p53 and H2AX. In contrast to ATR and its target, the phosphorylated form of ATM at Ser-1981 and its downstream substrate Chk2 phosphorylation at Thr-68 did not visibly increase upon infection. However, the level of Mre11 and p21 were reduced beginning at 0.5 h after HBV-positive serum addition. Also, HBV infection led to transient cell cycle arrest in the S and the G2 phases without accompanying increased apoptosis. Research on cell survival changes upon radiation following HBV infection showed that survival of UV-treated host cells was greatly increased by HBV infection, owing to the reduced apoptosis. Meanwhile, survival of IR-treated host cells was reduced by HBV infection. CONCLUSION: HBV infection activates ATR DNA damage response to replication stress and abrogates the checkpoint signaling controlled by DNA damage response.

  8. Deregulation upon DNA damage revealed by joint analysis of context-specific perturbation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biecek Przemysław

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deregulation between two different cell populations manifests itself in changing gene expression patterns and changing regulatory interactions. Accumulating knowledge about biological networks creates an opportunity to study these changes in their cellular context. Results We analyze re-wiring of regulatory networks based on cell population-specific perturbation data and knowledge about signaling pathways and their target genes. We quantify deregulation by merging regulatory signal from the two cell populations into one score. This joint approach, called JODA, proves advantageous over separate analysis of the cell populations and analysis without incorporation of knowledge. JODA is implemented and freely available in a Bioconductor package 'joda'. Conclusions Using JODA, we show wide-spread re-wiring of gene regulatory networks upon neocarzinostatin-induced DNA damage in Human cells. We recover 645 deregulated genes in thirteen functional clusters performing the rich program of response to damage. We find that the clusters contain many previously characterized neocarzinostatin target genes. We investigate connectivity between those genes, explaining their cooperation in performing the common functions. We review genes with the most extreme deregulation scores, reporting their involvement in response to DNA damage. Finally, we investigate the indirect impact of the ATM pathway on the deregulated genes, and build a hypothetical hierarchy of direct regulation. These results prove that JODA is a step forward to a systems level, mechanistic understanding of changes in gene regulation between different cell populations.

  9. The potential value of the neutral comet assay and the expression of genes associated with DNA damage in assessing the radiosensitivity of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Bhilwade, Hari N; Pandey, Badri N; Sandur, Santosh K; Chaubey, Ramesh C

    2012-10-09

    The assessment of tumor radiosensitivity would be particularly useful in optimizing the radiation dose during radiotherapy. Therefore, the degree of correlation between radiation-induced DNA damage, as measured by the alkaline and the neutral comet assays, and the clonogenic survival of different human tumor cells was studied. Further, tumor radiosensitivity was compared with the expression of genes associated with the cellular response to radiation damage. Five different human tumor cell lines were chosen and the radiosensitivity of these cells was established by clonogenic assay. Alkaline and neutral comet assays were performed in γ-irradiated cells (2-8Gy; either acute or fractionated). Quantitative PCR was performed to evaluate the expression of DNA damage response genes in control and irradiated cells. The relative radiosensitivity of the cell lines assessed by the extent of DNA damage (neutral comet assay) immediately after irradiation (4Gy or 6Gy) was in agreement with radiosensitivity pattern obtained by the clonogenic assay. The survival fraction of irradiated cells showed a better correlation with the magnitude of DNA damage measured by the neutral comet assay (r=-0.9; Pcomet assay (r=-0.73; Pcomet assay was better than alkaline comet assay for assessment of radiosensitivities of tumor cells after acute or fractionated doses of irradiation.

  10. ERCC2/XPD Lys751Gln alter DNA repair efficiency of platinum-induced DNA damage through P53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guopei; Guan, Yangyang; Zhao, Yuejiao; van der Straaten, Tahar; Xiao, Sha; Xue, Ping; Zhu, Guolian; Liu, Qiufang; Cai, Yuan; Jin, Cuihong; Yang, Jinghua; Wu, Shengwen; Lu, Xiaobo

    2017-02-01

    Platinum-based treatment causes Pt-DNA adducts which lead to cell death. The platinum-induced DNA damage is recognized and repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) system of which ERCC2/XPD is a critical enzyme. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in ERCC2/XPD have been found to be associated with platinum resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether ERCC2/XPD Lys751Gln (rs13181) polymorphism is causally related to DNA repair capacity of platinum-induced DNA damage. First, cDNA clones expressing different genotypes of the polymorphism was transfected to an ERCC2/XPD defective CHO cell line (UV5). Second, all cells were treated with cisplatin. Cellular survival rate were investigated by MTT growth inhibition assay, DNA damage levels were investigated by comet assay and RAD51 staining. The distribution of cell cycle and the change of apoptosis rates were detected by a flow cytometric method (FCM). Finally, P53mRNA and phospho-P53 protein levels were further investigated in order to explore a possible explanation. As expected, there was a significantly increased in viability of UV5(ERCC2 (AA)) as compared to UV5(ERCC2 (CC)) after cisplatin treatment. The DNA damage level of UV5(ERCC2 (AA)) was significant decreased compared to UV5(ERCC2 (CC)) at 24 h of treatment. Mutation of ERCC2rs13181 AA to CC causes a prolonged S phase in cell cycle. UV5(ERCC2 (AA)) alleviated the apoptosis compared to UV5(ERCC2 (CC)), meanwhile P53mRNA levels in UV(ERCC2 (AA)) was also lower when compared UV5(ERCC2 (CC)). It co-incides with a prolonged high expression of phospho-P53, which is relevant for cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and the DNA damage response (DDR). We concluded that ERCC2/XPD rs13181 polymorphism is possibly related to the DNA repair capacity of platinum-induced DNA damage. This functional study provides some clues to clarify the relationship between cisplatin resistance and ERCC2/XPDrs13181 polymorphism.

  11. Methacryloxylethyl Cetyl Ammonium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis in Human Dental Pulp Cells via Generation of Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Wang, Yirong; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Sun, Jinlong; Chen, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    The polymerizable antibacterial monomer methacryloxylethyl cetyl ammonium chloride (DMAE-CB) has provided an effective strategy to combat dental caries. However, the application of such material raises the question about the biological safety and the question remains open. The mechanism of this toxic action, however, is not yet clearly understood. The present study aims at providing novel insight into the possible causal link between cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as apoptosis in human dental pulp cells exposed to DMAE-CB. The enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of glutathione, as well as differential changes in activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in DMAE-CB-treated cells indicated oxidative stress. By using substances that can alter GSH synthesis, we found that GSH was the key component in the regulation of cell response towards oxidative stress induced by DMAE-CB. The increase in oxidative stress-sensitive 8-Oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content, formation of γ-H2AX and cell cycle G1 phase arrest indicated that DNA damage occurred as a result of the interaction between DNA base and ROS beyond the capacities of antioxidant mechanisms in cells exposed to DMAE-CB. Such oxidative DNA damage thus triggers the activation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signaling, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and destruction of mitochondrial morphology and function.

  12. PGC-1α Modulates Telomere Function and DNA Damage in Protecting against Aging-Related Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqin Xiong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence and organismal aging predispose age-related chronic diseases, such as neurodegenerative, metabolic, and cardiovascular disorders. These diseases emerge coincidently from elevated oxidative/electrophilic stress, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage, and telomere dysfunction and shortening. Mechanistic linkages are incompletely understood. Here, we show that ablation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α accelerates vascular aging and atherosclerosis, coinciding with telomere dysfunction and shortening and DNA damage. PGC-1α deletion reduces expression and activity of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT and increases p53 levels. Ectopic expression of PGC-1α coactivates TERT transcription and reverses telomere malfunction and DNA damage. Furthermore, alpha lipoic acid (ALA, a non-dispensable mitochondrial cofactor, upregulates PGC-1α-dependent TERT and the cytoprotective Nrf-2-mediated antioxidant/electrophile-responsive element (ARE/ERE signaling cascades, and counteracts high-fat-diet-induced, age-dependent arteriopathy. These results illustrate the pivotal importance of PGC-1α in ameliorating senescence, aging, and associated chronic diseases, and may inform novel therapeutic approaches involving electrophilic specificity.

  13. Activation of p53 in Human and Murine Cells by DNA-Damaging Agents Differentially Regulates Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Liu, Hongzhu; Choubey, Divaker

    2015-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates multiple cellular processes. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) can activate AhR-mediated transcription of target genes. Because DOX in cells activates a DNA damage response involving ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-mediated activation of p53, we investigated whether the activation of the p53 in cells by DNA-damaging agents such as DOX or bleomycin could regulate the AhR levels. Here we report that activation of p53 by DNA-damaging agents in human cells increased levels of AhR through a posttranscriptional mechanism. Accordingly, fibroblasts from ATM patients, which are defective in p53 activation, expressed reduced constitutive levels of AhR and treatment of cells with bleomycin did not appreciably increase the AhR levels. Further, activation of p53 in cells stimulated the expression of AhR target genes. In murine cells, activation of p53 reduced the levels of AhR messenger RNA and protein and reduced the expression of AhR target genes. Our observations revealed that activation of p53 in human and murine cells differentially regulates AhR levels.

  14. Differential role of nonhomologous end joining factors in the generation, DNA damage response, and myeloid differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgentreff, Kerstin; Du, Likun; Weinacht, Katja G; Dobbs, Kerry; Bartish, Margarita; Giliani, Silvia; Schlaeger, Thorsten; DeVine, Alexander; Schambach, Axel; Woodbine, Lisa J; Davies, Graham; Baxi, Sachin N; van der Burg, Mirjam; Bleesing, Jack; Gennery, Andrew; Manis, John; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2014-06-17

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a key pathway for efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and V(D)J recombination. NHEJ defects in humans cause immunodeficiency and increased cellular sensitivity to ionizing irradiation (IR) and are variably associated with growth retardation, microcephaly, and neurodevelopmental delay. Repair of DNA DSBs is important for reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). To compare the specific contribution of DNA ligase 4 (LIG4), Artemis, and DNA-protein kinase catalytic subunit (PKcs) in this process and to gain insights into phenotypic variability associated with these disorders, we reprogrammed patient-derived fibroblast cell lines with NHEJ defects. Deficiencies of LIG4 and of DNA-PK catalytic activity, but not Artemis deficiency, were associated with markedly reduced reprogramming efficiency, which could be partially rescued by genetic complementation. Moreover, we identified increased genomic instability in LIG4-deficient iPSCs. Cell cycle synchronization revealed a severe defect of DNA repair and a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, particularly in LIG4- and DNA-PK catalytically deficient iPSCs. Impaired myeloid differentiation was observed in LIG4-, but not Artemis- or DNA-PK-mutated iPSCs. These results indicate a critical importance of the NHEJ pathway for somatic cell reprogramming, with a major role for LIG4 and DNA-PKcs and a minor, if any, for Artemis.

  15. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  16. Phorate-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage and transcriptional activation of p53 and caspase genes in male Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saquib, Quaiser [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Attia, Sabry M. [Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Siddiqui, Maqsood A. [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Aboul-Soud, Mourad A.M. [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, 12613 Giza (Egypt); Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A. [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Giesy, John P. [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biomedical and Veterinary Biosciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 5B3 (Canada); Zoology Department and Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824 (United States); Musarrat, Javed, E-mail: musarratj1@yahoo.com [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, AMU, Aligarh (India)

    2012-02-15

    Male Wistar rats exposed to a systemic organophosphorus insecticide, phorate [O,O-diethyl S-[(ethylthio) methyl] phosphorothioate] at varying oral doses of 0.046, 0.092 or 0.184 mg phorate/kg bw for 14 days, exhibited substantial oxidative stress, cellular DNA damage and activation of apoptosis-related p53, caspase 3 and 9 genes. The histopathological changes including the pyknotic nuclei, inflammatory leukocyte infiltrations, renal necrosis, and cardiac myofiber degeneration were observed in the liver, kidney and heart tissues. Biochemical analysis of catalase and glutathione revealed significantly lesser activities of antioxidative enzymes and lipid peroxidation in tissues of phorate exposed rats. Furthermore, generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential in bone marrow cells confirmed phorate-induced oxidative stress. Significant DNA damage was measured through comet assay in terms of the Olive tail moment in bone marrow cells of treated animals as compared to control. Cell cycle analysis also demonstrated the G{sub 2}/M arrest and appearance of a distinctive SubG{sub 1} peak, which signified induction of apoptosis. Up-regulation of tumor suppressor p53 and caspase 3 and 9 genes, determined by quantitative real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, elucidated the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways in response to cellular stress. Overall, the results suggest that phorate induces genetic alterations and cellular toxicity, which can adversely affect the normal cellular functioning in rats. -- Highlights: ► This is the first report on molecular toxicity of phorate in an in vivo test system. ► Phorate induces biochemical and histological changes in liver, kidney and heart. ► Rats treated with phorate exhibited DNA damage in bone marrow cells. ► Phorate induces apoptosis, oxidative stress and alters mitochondrial fluorescence. ► Phorate induces transcriptional changes and enhanced

  17. PM-07LOSS OF ATRX DECREASES SURVIVAL AND IMPROVES RESPONSE TO DNA DAMAGING AGENTS IN A NOVEL MOUSE MODEL OF GLIOBLASTOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Alexandra; Thomas, Daniel; Kamran, Neha; Nunez-Aguilera, Felipe; Dzaman, Marta; Lemons, Rosie; Li, Youping; Roh, Haeji; Lowenstein, Pedro; Castro, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric glioblastoma (GBM) remains one of the most difficult childhood tumors to treat. ATRX is a histone chaperone protein that is mutated primarily in younger patients with GBM. No previous animal model has demonstrated the effect of ATRX loss on GBM formation. We cloned an ATRX knockdown sequence into a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase-responsive plasmid (shATRX) for insertion into host genomic DNA. Glioblastomas were induced in mice by injecting plasmids encoding SB transposase/ lucifer...

  18. Ellipticine induces apoptosis in T-cell lymphoma via oxidative DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savorani, Cecilia; Manfé, Valentina; Biskup, Edyta; Gniadecki, Robert

    2015-03-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is often mutated in human cancers. Restoring its antitumor activity has been shown to be a promising therapeutic approach for cancer treatment. Here we analyzed the activity and mechanism of a p53 reactivator, ellipticine, in a cellular model of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), a disease that is progressive, chemoresistant and refractory to treatment. We tested the effect of ellipticine in three cell lines with different p53 status: MyLa2000 (p53(wt/wt)), SeAx ((G245S)p53) and Hut-78 ((R196Stop)p53). Ellipticine caused apoptosis in MyLa2000 and SeAx and restored the transcriptional activity of (G245S)p53 in SeAx. However, p53 siRNA knockdown experiments revealed that p53 was not required for ellipticine-induced apoptosis in CTCL. The lipophilic antioxidant α-tocopherol inhibited ellipticine-dependent apoptosis and we linked the apoptotic response to the oxidative DNA damage. Our results provide evidence that ellipticine-induced apoptosis is exerted through DNA damage and does not require p53 activation in T-cell lymphoma.

  19. Translocation of human ribosomal protein S3 to sites of DNA damage is dependant on ERK-mediated phosphorylation following genotoxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadavilli, Sridevi; Hegde, Vijay; Deutsch, Walter A

    2007-10-01

    Besides its role in translation and ribosome maturation, human ribosomal protein S3 (hS3) is implicated in DNA damage recognition as reflected by its affinity for abasic sites and 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) residues in DNA in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that hS3 is capable of carrying out both roles by its ex vivo translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus as a consequence of genotoxic stress. The translocation of hS3 is dependent on ERK1/2-mediated phosphorylation of a threonine residue (T42) of hS3. Two different ectopically expressed site-directed mutants of T42 failed to respond to conditions of genotoxic stress, thus providing a link between DNA damage and ERK1/2 dependent phosphorylation of hS3. Lastly, hS3 was traced in exposed cells to its co-localization with 8-oxoG foci, raising the possibility that hS3 is a member of a cellular DNA damage response pathway that results in its interaction with sites of DNA damage.

  20. Studying S-phase DNA Damage Checkpoints using the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Nicholas; Rhind, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Slowing of replication in response to DNA damage is a universal response to DNA damage during S-phase. Originally discovered to be defective in checkpoint mutant cells in metazoans, this S-phase DNA damage checkpoint response has been extensively studied in yeast. Unlike other checkpoints that completely arrest cell cycle, the S-phase DNA damage checkpoint slows but does not completely halt replication in response to DNA damage. An analysis of mutants defective in the slowing response requires a sensitive assay to measure this quantitative effect. The use of centrifugal elutriation to synchronize cells and improved techniques in preparing cells for flow cytometry allow for more sensitive and accurate measurement of cells’ ability to slow replication in the presence of DNA damage. This chapter describes the use of transient cdc10-M17 temperature sensitive allele arrest and release combined with centrifugal elutriation to synchronize cells in G1. The S-phase progression of these cells is then assayed by flow cytometry of isolated nuclei, which allows sensitive determination of replication kinetics. PMID:21870281

  1. 基因转录后调控在DNA损伤反应中的重要功能%The post-transcriptional regulation of the DNA damage response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林德玲; 罗瑛; 宋宜

    2014-01-01

    DNA损伤发生时,细胞会激活一系列复杂的信号网络来调控细胞周期检查,完成DNA损伤修复或当损伤超过修复能力时诱导凋亡,这一信号网络被称为DNA损伤反应(DNA damage response,DDR).以往DDR信号网络的研究主要集中于基因转录调控和蛋白共价修饰对功能分子的稳定性和活性调控.近年来,mRNA稳定性调控和mRNA翻译调控等基因转录后调控机制在DDR中的重要作用引起研究者越来越多的关注.研究证明:多种microRNAs和RNA结合蛋白(RNA-binding proteins,RBPs)在转录后水平调控诸多重要功能蛋白的表达,在DDR信号网络中起着不可或缺的作用.文章针对DDR反应中转录后调控的研究进展以及参与其中的microRNAs和RBPs进行阐述和讨论.

  2. Inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain function abrogates quartz induced DNA damage in lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hui [Institut fuer umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF) at the Heinrich-Heine-University, Auf' m Hennekamp 50, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Haberzettl, Petra [Institut fuer umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF) at the Heinrich-Heine-University, Auf' m Hennekamp 50, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Albrecht, Catrin [Institut fuer umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF) at the Heinrich-Heine-University, Auf' m Hennekamp 50, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Hoehr, Doris [Institut fuer umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF) at the Heinrich-Heine-University, Auf' m Hennekamp 50, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Knaapen, Ad M. [Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM), University of Maastricht (Netherlands); Borm, Paul J.A. [Institut fuer umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF) at the Heinrich-Heine-University, Auf' m Hennekamp 50, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Hogeschool Zuyd Heerlen (Netherlands); Schins, Roel P.F. [Institut fuer umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF) at the Heinrich-Heine-University, Auf' m Hennekamp 50, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)]. E-mail: roel.schins@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2007-04-01

    Respirable quartz dust has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the mechanisms of DNA damage by DQ12 quartz in RLE-6TN rat lung epithelial type II cells (RLE). Transmission electron microscopy and flow-cytometry analysis showed a rapid particle uptake (30 min to 4 h) of quartz by the RLE cells, but particles were not found within the cell nuclei. This suggests that DNA strand breakage and induction of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine - as also observed in these cells during these treatment intervals - did not result from direct physical interactions between particles and DNA, or from short-lived particle surface-derived reactive oxygen species. DNA damage by quartz was significantly reduced in the presence of the mitochondrial inhibitors rotenone and antimycin-A. In the absence of quartz, these inhibitors did not affect DNA damage, but they reduced cellular oxygen consumption. No signs of apoptosis were observed by quartz. Flow-cytometry analysis indicated that the reduced DNA damage by rotenone was not due to a possible mitochondria-mediated reduction of particle uptake by the RLE cells. Further proof of concept for the role of mitochondria was shown by the failure of quartz to elicit DNA damage in mitochondria-depleted 143B (rho-0) osteosarcoma cells, at concentrations where it elicited DNA damage in the parental 143B cell line. In conclusion, our data show that respirable quartz particles can elicit oxidative DNA damage in vitro without entering the nuclei of type II cells, which are considered to be important target cells in quartz carcinogenesis. Furthermore, our observations indicate that such indirect DNA damage involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain function, by an as-yet-to-be elucidated mechanism.

  3. Application of bifurcation theory and siRNA-based control signal to restore the proper response of cancer cells to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowska, Emilia; Puszynski, Krzysztof

    2016-11-07

    Many diseases with a genetic background such as some types of cancer are caused by damage in the p53 signaling pathway. The damage changes the system dynamics providing cancer cells with resistance to therapy such as radiation therapy. The change can be observed as the difference in bifurcation diagrams and equilibria type and location between normal and damaged cells, and summarized as the changes of the mathematical model parameters and following changes of the eigenvalues of Jacobian matrix. Therefore a change in other model parameters, such as mRNA degradation rates, may restore the proper eigenvalues and by that proper system dynamics. From the biological point of view, the change of mRNA degradation rate can be achieved by application of the small interfering RNA (siRNA). Here, we propose a general mathematical framework based on the bifurcation theory and siRNA-based control signal in order to study how to restore the proper response of cells with damaged p53 signaling pathway to therapy by using ionizing radiation (IR) therapy as an example. We show the difference between the cells with normal p53 signaling pathway and cells with abnormalities in the negative (as observed in SJSA-1 cell line) or positive (as observed in MCF-7 or PNT1a cell lines) feedback loop. Then we show how the dynamics of these cells can be restored to normal cell dynamics by using selected siRNA.

  4. mTOR regulates the expression of DNA damage response enzymes in long-lived Snell dwarf, GHRKO, and PAPPA-KO mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Graham; Bowman, Jacqueline; Li, Xinna; Miller, Richard A; Garcia, Gonzalo G

    2017-02-01

    Studies of the mTOR pathway have prompted speculation that diminished mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1) function may be involved in controlling the aging process. Our previous studies have shown diminished mTORC1 activity in tissues of three long-lived mutant mice: Snell dwarf mice, growth hormone receptor gene disrupted mice (GHRKO), and in this article, mice deficient in the pregnancy-associated protein-A (PAPPA-KO). The ways in which lower mTOR signals slow aging and age-related diseases are, however, not well characterized. Here, we show that Snell, GHKRO, and PAPPA-KO mice express high levels of two proteins involved in DNA repair, O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1). Furthermore, we report that lowering mTOR enhances MGMT and NDRG1 protein expression via post-transcriptional mechanisms. We show that the CCR4-NOT complex, a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression, is downstream of the mTORC1 pathway and may be responsible for the upregulation of MGMT and NDRG1 in all three varieties of long-lived mice. Our data thus suggest a novel link between DNA repair and mTOR signaling via post-transcriptional regulation involving specific alteration in the CCR4-NOT complex, whose modulation could control multiple aspects of the aging process.

  5. ATR- and ATM-Mediated DNA Damage Response Is Dependent on Excision Repair Assembly during G1 but Not in S Phase of Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Alo; Blevins, Chessica; Wani, Gulzar; Wani, Altaf A

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint is mediated by ATR and ATM kinases, as a prompt early response to a variety of DNA insults, and culminates in a highly orchestrated signal transduction cascade. Previously, we defined the regulatory role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors, DDB2 and XPC, in checkpoint and ATR/ATM-dependent repair pathway via ATR and ATM phosphorylation and recruitment to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced damage sites. Here, we have dissected the molecular mechanisms of DDB2- and XPC- mediated regulation of ATR and ATM recruitment and activation upon UVR exposures. We show that the ATR and ATM activation and accumulation to UVR-induced damage not only depends on DDB2 and XPC, but also on the NER protein XPA, suggesting that the assembly of an active NER complex is essential for ATR and ATM recruitment. ATR and ATM localization and H2AX phosphorylation at the lesion sites occur as early as ten minutes in asynchronous as well as G1 arrested cells, showing that repair and checkpoint-mediated by ATR and ATM starts early upon UV irradiation. Moreover, our results demonstrated t