WorldWideScience

Sample records for cellular energy metabolism

  1. A Cellular Perspective on Brain Energy Metabolism and Functional Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy demands of the brain are high: they account for at least 20% of the body\\'s energy consumption. Evolutionary studies indicate that the emergence of higher cognitive functions in humans is associated with an increased glucose utilization and expression of energy metabolism genes. Functional brain imaging techniques such as fMRI and PET, which are widely used in human neuroscience studies, detect signals that monitor energy delivery and use in register with neuronal activity. Recent technological advances in metabolic studies with cellular resolution have afforded decisive insights into the understanding of the cellular and molecular bases of the coupling between neuronal activity and energy metabolism and pointat a key role of neuron-astrocyte metabolic interactions. This article reviews some of the most salient features emerging from recent studies and aims at providing an integration of brain energy metabolism across resolution scales. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

  2. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F.; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states. PMID:27483987

  3. Signals for the lysosome: a control center for cellular clearance and energy metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Settembre, Carmine; Fraldi, Alessandro; Medina, Diego L.; Ballabio, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    For a long time lysosomes were considered merely to be cellular “incinerators” involved in the degradation and recycling of cellular waste. However, there is now compelling evidence indicating that lysosomes have a much broader function and that they are involved in fundamental processes such as secretion, plasma membrane repair, signaling and energy metabolism. Furthermore, the essential role of lysosomes in the autophagic pathway puts these organelles at the crossroads of several cellular p...

  4. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation.......Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...

  5. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  6. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research.

  8. Short- and medium-chain fatty acids in energy metabolism: the cellular perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Peter; Wojtczak, Lech

    2016-06-01

    Short- and medium-chain fatty acids (SCFAs and MCFAs), independently of their cellular signaling functions, are important substrates of the energy metabolism and anabolic processes in mammals. SCFAs are mostly generated by colonic bacteria and are predominantly metabolized by enterocytes and liver, whereas MCFAs arise mostly from dietary triglycerides, among them milk and dairy products. A common feature of SCFAs and MCFAs is their carnitine-independent uptake and intramitochondrial activation to acyl-CoA thioesters. Contrary to long-chain fatty acids, the cellular metabolism of SCFAs and MCFAs depends to a lesser extent on fatty acid-binding proteins. SCFAs and MCFAs modulate tissue metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids, as manifested by a mostly inhibitory effect on glycolysis and stimulation of lipogenesis or gluconeogenesis. SCFAs and MCFAs exert no or only weak protonophoric and lytic activities in mitochondria and do not significantly impair the electron transport in the respiratory chain. SCFAs and MCFAs modulate mitochondrial energy production by two mechanisms: they provide reducing equivalents to the respiratory chain and partly decrease efficacy of oxidative ATP synthesis. PMID:27080715

  9. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  10. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Corby eKistler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g. amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH, enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported.

  11. Cellular pathways of energy metabolism in the brain: is glucose used by neurons or astrocytes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehlig, Astrid; Coles, Jonathan A

    2007-09-01

    Most techniques presently available to measure cerebral activity in humans and animals, i.e. positron emission tomography (PET), autoradiography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging, do not record the activity of neurons directly. Furthermore, they do not allow the investigator to discriminate which cell type is using glucose, the predominant fuel provided to the brain by the blood. Here, we review the experimental approaches aimed at determining the percentage of glucose that is taken up by neurons and by astrocytes. This review is integrated in an overview of the current concepts on compartmentation and substrate trafficking between astrocytes and neurons. In the brain in vivo, about half of the glucose leaving the capillaries crosses the extracellular space and directly enters neurons. The other half is taken up by astrocytes. Calculations suggest that neurons consume more energy than do astrocytes, implying that astrocytes transfer an intermediate substrate to neurons. Experimental approaches in vitro on the honeybee drone retina and on the isolated vagus nerve also point to a continuous transfer of intermediate metabolites from glial cells to neurons in these tissues. Solid direct evidence of such transfer in the mammalian brain in vivo is still lacking. PET using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose reflects in part glucose uptake by astrocytes but does not indicate to which step the glucose taken up is metabolized within this cell type. Finally, the sequence of metabolic changes occurring during a transient increase of electrical activity in specific regions of the brain remains to be clarified. PMID:17659529

  12. Alterations in cellular energy metabolism associated with the antiproliferative effects of the ATM inhibitor KU-55933 and with metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakikhani, Mahvash; Bazile, Miguel; Hashemi, Sina; Javeshghani, Shiva; Avizonis, Daina; St Pierre, Julie; Pollak, Michael N

    2012-01-01

    KU-55933 is a specific inhibitor of the kinase activity of the protein encoded by Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important tumor suppressor gene with key roles in DNA repair. Unexpectedly for an inhibitor of a tumor suppressor gene, KU-55933 reduces proliferation. In view of prior preliminary evidence suggesting defective mitochondrial function in cells of patients with Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT), we examined energy metabolism of cells treated with KU-55933. The compound increased AMPK activation, glucose uptake and lactate production while reducing mitochondrial membrane potential and coupled respiration. The stimulation of glycolysis by KU-55933 did not fully compensate for the reduction in mitochondrial functions, leading to decreased cellular ATP levels and energy stress. These actions are similar to those previously described for the biguanide metformin, a partial inhibitor of respiratory complex I. Both compounds decreased mitochondrial coupled respiration and reduced cellular concentrations of fumarate, malate, citrate, and alpha-ketogluterate. Succinate levels were increased by KU-55933 levels and decreased by metformin, indicating that the effects of ATM inhibition and metformin are not identical. These observations suggest a role for ATM in mitochondrial function and show that both KU-55933 and metformin perturb the TCA cycle as well as oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:23185347

  13. Alterations in cellular energy metabolism associated with the antiproliferative effects of the ATM inhibitor KU-55933 and with metformin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahvash Zakikhani

    Full Text Available KU-55933 is a specific inhibitor of the kinase activity of the protein encoded by Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM, an important tumor suppressor gene with key roles in DNA repair. Unexpectedly for an inhibitor of a tumor suppressor gene, KU-55933 reduces proliferation. In view of prior preliminary evidence suggesting defective mitochondrial function in cells of patients with Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT, we examined energy metabolism of cells treated with KU-55933. The compound increased AMPK activation, glucose uptake and lactate production while reducing mitochondrial membrane potential and coupled respiration. The stimulation of glycolysis by KU-55933 did not fully compensate for the reduction in mitochondrial functions, leading to decreased cellular ATP levels and energy stress. These actions are similar to those previously described for the biguanide metformin, a partial inhibitor of respiratory complex I. Both compounds decreased mitochondrial coupled respiration and reduced cellular concentrations of fumarate, malate, citrate, and alpha-ketogluterate. Succinate levels were increased by KU-55933 levels and decreased by metformin, indicating that the effects of ATM inhibition and metformin are not identical. These observations suggest a role for ATM in mitochondrial function and show that both KU-55933 and metformin perturb the TCA cycle as well as oxidative phosphorylation.

  14. Alterations in Cellular Energy Metabolism Associated with the Antiproliferative Effects of the ATM Inhibitor KU-55933 and with Metformin

    OpenAIRE

    Zakikhani, Mahvash; Bazile, Miguel; Hashemi, Sina; Javeshghani, Shiva; Avizonis, Daina; Pierre, Julie St; Pollak, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    KU-55933 is a specific inhibitor of the kinase activity of the protein encoded by Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important tumor suppressor gene with key roles in DNA repair. Unexpectedly for an inhibitor of a tumor suppressor gene, KU-55933 reduces proliferation. In view of prior preliminary evidence suggesting defective mitochondrial function in cells of patients with Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT), we examined energy metabolism of cells treated with KU-55933. The compound increased AM...

  15. SIRT1 and energy metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoling Li

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is the most conserved mammalian NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that has emerged as a key metabolic sensor in various metabolic tissues.In response to different environmental stimuli,SIRT1 directly links the cellular metabolic status to the chromatin structure and the regulation of gene expression,thereby modulating a variety of cellular processes such as energy metabolism and stress response.Recent studies have shown that SIRT1 controls both glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver,promotes fat mobilization and stimulates brown remodeling of the white fat in white adipose tissue,controls insulin secretion in the pancreas,senses nutrient availability in the hypothalamus,influences obesityinduced inflammation in macrophages,and modulates the activity of circadian clock in metabolic tissues.This review focuses on the role of SIRT1 in regulating energy metabolism at different metabolic tissues.

  16. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular metabolic deficiency in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Mei Gu; Han-Chang Huang; Zhao-Feng Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder.The pathology of AD includes amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits in neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau,as well as neuronal loss in specific brain regions.Increasing epidemiological and functional neuroimaging evidence indicates that global and regional disruptions in brain metabolism are involved in the pathogenesis of this disease.Aβ precursor protein is cleaved to produce both extracellular and intracellular Aβ,accumulation of which might interfere with the homeostasis of cellular metabolism.Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that not only supply the main energy to the cell but also regulate apoptosis.Mitochondrial dysfunction might contribute to Aβ neurotoxicity.In this review,we summarize the pathways of Aβ generation and its potential neurotoxic effects on cellular metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  18. Translation Factors Specify Cellular Metabolic State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of Cell Reports, Shah et al. present evidence that a subcomplex of the eIF3 translation initiation factor regulates translation of mRNAs encoding components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and glycolytic enzymes, thus linking translational control with energy metabolism.

  19. Astrocyte glycogenolysis is triggered by store-operated calcium entry and provides metabolic energy for cellular calcium homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Margit S; Fox, Rebecca; Schousboe, Arne;

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic glycogen, the only storage form of glucose in the brain, has been shown to play a fundamental role in supporting learning and memory, an effect achieved by providing metabolic support for neurons. We have examined the interplay between glycogenolysis and the bioenergetics of astrocytic...... cultures of murine cerebellar and cortical astrocytes, and determined glycogen content to investigate the effects of SOCE on glycogen metabolism. By blocking glycogenolysis, we tested energetic dependency of SOCE-related Ca(2+) dynamics on glycogenolytic ATP. Our results show that SOCE triggers astrocytic...... glycogenolysis. Upon inhibition of adenylate cyclase with 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, glycogen content was no longer significantly different from that in unstimulated control cells, indicating that SOCE triggers astrocytic glycogenolysis in a cAMP-dependent manner. When glycogenolysis was inhibited in cortical...

  20. Quantitation of cellular metabolic fluxes of methionine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlomi, Tomer; Fan, Jing; Tang, Baiqing; Kruger, Warren D; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2014-02-01

    Methionine is an essential proteogenic amino acid. In addition, it is a methyl donor for DNA and protein methylation and a propylamine donor for polyamine biosynthesis. Both the methyl and propylamine donation pathways involve metabolic cycles, and methods are needed to quantitate these cycles. Here, we describe an analytical approach for quantifying methionine metabolic fluxes that accounts for the mixing of intracellular and extracellular methionine pools. We observe that such mixing prevents isotope tracing experiments from reaching the steady state due to the large size of the media pools and hence precludes the use of standard stationary metabolic flux analysis. Our approach is based on feeding cells with (13)C methionine and measuring the isotope-labeling kinetics of both intracellular and extracellular methionine by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). We apply this method to quantify methionine metabolism in a human fibrosarcoma cell line and study how methionine salvage pathway enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), frequently deleted in cancer, affects methionine metabolism. We find that both transmethylation and propylamine transfer fluxes amount to roughly 15% of the net methionine uptake, with no major changes due to MTAP deletion. Our method further enables the quantification of flux through the pro-tumorigenic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase, and this flux increases 2-fold following MTAP deletion. The analytical approach used to quantify methionine metabolic fluxes is applicable for other metabolic systems affected by mixing of intracellular and extracellular metabolite pools.

  1. Computational model of cellular metabolic dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yanjun; Solomon, Thomas; Haus, Jacob M;

    2010-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms by which insulin regulates glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle is critical to understanding the etiology of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Our knowledge of these mechanisms is limited by the difficulty of obtaining in vivo intracellular data. To quantitatively...... cytosol and mitochondria. The model simulated skeletal muscle metabolic responses to insulin corresponding to human hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies. Insulin-mediated rate of glucose disposal was the primary model input. For model validation, simulations were compared with experimental data...... type 2 diabetes....

  2. Hypoxia. 2. Hypoxia regulates cellular metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wheaton, William W.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptation to lowering oxygen levels (hypoxia) requires coordinated downregulation of metabolic demand and supply to prevent a mismatch in ATP utilization and production that might culminate in a bioenergetic collapse. Hypoxia diminishes ATP utilization by downregulating protein translation and the activity of the Na-K-ATPase. Hypoxia diminishes ATP production in part by lowering the activity of the electron transport chain through activation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible fact...

  3. In vivo monitoring of cellular energy metabolism using SoNar, a highly responsive sensor for NAD(+)/NADH redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuzheng; Wang, Aoxue; Zou, Yejun; Su, Ni; Loscalzo, Joseph; Yang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    NADH and its oxidized form NAD(+) have a central role in energy metabolism, and their concentrations are often considered to be among the most important readouts of metabolic state. Here, we present a detailed protocol to image and monitor NAD(+)/NADH redox state in living cells and in vivo using a highly responsive, genetically encoded fluorescent sensor known as SoNar (sensor of NAD(H) redox). The chimeric SoNar protein was initially developed by inserting circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) into the NADH-binding domain of Rex protein from Thermus aquaticus (T-Rex). It functions by binding to either NAD(+) or NADH, thus inducing protein conformational changes that affect its fluorescent properties. We first describe steps for how to establish SoNar-expressing cells, and then discuss how to use the system to quantify the intracellular redox state. This approach is sensitive, accurate, simple and able to report subtle perturbations of various pathways of energy metabolism in real time. We also detail the application of SoNar to high-throughput chemical screening of candidate compounds targeting cell metabolism in a microplate-reader-based assay, along with in vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenografts expressing SoNar in mice. Typically, the approximate time frame for fluorescence imaging of SoNar is 30 min for living cells and 60 min for living mice. For high-throughput chemical screening in a 384-well-plate assay, the whole procedure generally takes no longer than 60 min to assess the effects of 380 compounds on cell metabolism.

  4. Peroxisomes: a Nexus for Lipid Metabolism and Cellular Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Lodhi, Irfan J.; Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes are often dismissed as the cellular hoi polloi, relegated to cleaning up reactive oxygen chemical debris discarded by other organelles. However, their functions extend far beyond hydrogen peroxide metabolism. Peroxisomes are intimately associated with lipid droplets and mitochondria, and their ability to carry out fatty acid oxidation and lipid synthesis, especially the production of ether lipids, may be critical for generating cellular signals required for normal physiology. Here...

  5. ATM Couples Replication Stress and Metabolic Reprogramming during Cellular Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M. Aird

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Replication stress induced by nucleotide deficiency plays an important role in cancer initiation. Replication stress in primary cells typically activates the cellular senescence tumor-suppression mechanism. Senescence bypass correlates with development of cancer, a disease characterized by metabolic reprogramming. However, the role of metabolic reprogramming in the cellular response to replication stress has been little explored. Here, we report that ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM plays a central role in regulating the cellular response to replication stress by shifting cellular metabolism. ATM inactivation bypasses senescence induced by replication stress triggered by nucleotide deficiency. This was due to restoration of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate (dNTP levels through both upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway via increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD activity and enhanced glucose and glutamine consumption. These phenotypes were mediated by a coordinated suppression of p53 and upregulation of c-MYC downstream of ATM inactivation. Our data indicate that ATM status couples replication stress and metabolic reprogramming during senescence.

  6. Apelin and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal eBertrand

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of adipokines identified over the past years has allowed considering white adipose tissue as a secretory organ closely integrated into overall physiological and metabolic control. Apelin, an ubiquitous peptide was known to exert different physiological effects mainly on the cardiovascular system and the regulation of fluid homeostasis until its identification as an adipokine. This has increased its broad range of action and apelin now appears clearly as a new player in energy metabolism alongside leptin and adiponectin. Apelin has been shown to act on glucose and lipid metabolism but also to modulate insulin secretion. Moreover, different studies in both animals and humans have shown that plasma apelin concentrations are usually increased during obesity and type 2 diabetes. This mini-review will focus on the various systemic apelin effects on energy metabolism by addressing its mechanisms of action. The advances concerning the role of apelin in metabolic diseases in relation with the recent reports on apelin concentrations in obese and/or diabetic subjects will also be discussed.

  7. Cellular metabolic and autophagic pathways: traffic control by redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-10-01

    It has been established that the key metabolic pathways of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are intimately related to redox biology through control of cell signaling. Under physiological conditions glucose metabolism is linked to control of the NADH/NAD redox couple, as well as providing the major reductant, NADPH, for thiol-dependent antioxidant defenses. Retrograde signaling from the mitochondrion to the nucleus or cytosol controls cell growth and differentiation. Under pathological conditions mitochondria are targets for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and are critical in controlling apoptotic cell death. At the interface of these metabolic pathways, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway functions to maintain mitochondrial quality and generally serves an important cytoprotective function. In this review we will discuss the autophagic response to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are generated from perturbations of cellular glucose metabolism and bioenergetic function.

  8. 'Biomoleculas': cellular metabolism didactic software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menghi, M L [Chair of Physiology and Biophysics, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, CC 57 Suc 3, Parana 3100, Entre Rios (Argentina); Novella, L P [Chair of Physiology and Biophysics, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, CC 57 Suc 3, Parana 3100, Entre Rios (Argentina); Siebenlist, M R [Chair of Physiology and Biophysics, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, CC 57 Suc 3, Parana 3100, Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    'Biomoleculas' is a software that deals with topics such as the digestion, cellular metabolism and excretion of nutrients. It is a pleasant, simple and didactic guide, made by and for students. In this program, each biomolecule (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins) is accompanied until its degradation and assimilation by crossing and interrelating the different metabolic channels to finally show the destination of the different metabolites formed and the way in which these are excreted. It is used at present as a teaching-learning process tool by the chair of Physiology and Biophysics at the Facultad de Ingenieria - Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios.

  9. "Biomoléculas": cellular metabolism didactic software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menghi, M. L.; Novella, L. P.; Siebenlist, M. R.

    2007-11-01

    "Biomoléculas" is a software that deals with topics such as the digestion, cellular metabolism and excretion of nutrients. It is a pleasant, simple and didactic guide, made by and for students. In this program, each biomolecule (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins) is accompanied until its degradation and assimilation by crossing and interrelating the different metabolic channels to finally show the destination of the different metabolites formed and the way in which these are excreted. It is used at present as a teaching-learning process tool by the chair of Physiology and Biophysics at the Facultad de Ingeniería - Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos.

  10. Ubiquitin Metabolism Affects Cellular Response to Volatile Anesthetics in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfe, Darren; Reiner, Thomas; Keeley, Jessica L.; Pizzini, Mark; Keil, Ralph L.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of action of volatile anesthetics, we are studying mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that have altered sensitivity to isoflurane, a widely used clinical anesthetic. Several lines of evidence from these studies implicate a role for ubiquitin metabolism in cellular response to volatile anesthetics: (i) mutations in the ZZZ1 gene render cells resistant to isoflurane, and the ZZZ1 gene is identical to BUL1 (binds ubiquitin ligase), which appears to be invo...

  11. The plasticizer benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) alters the ecdysone hormone pathway, the cellular response to stress, the energy metabolism, and several detoxication mechanisms in Chironomus riparius larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Óscar; Planelló, Rosario; Morcillo, Gloria

    2015-06-01

    Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) has been extensively used worldwide as a plasticizer in the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) industry and the manufacturing of many other products, and its presence in the aquatic environment is expected for decades. In the present study, the toxicity of BBP was investigated in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae. The effects of acute 24-h and 48-h exposures to a wide range of BBP doses were evaluated at the molecular level by analysing changes in genes related to the stress response, the endocrine system, the energy metabolism, and detoxication pathways, as well as in the enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase. BBP caused a dose and time-dependent toxicity in most of the selected biomarkers. 24-h exposures to high doses affected larval survival and lead to a significant response of several heat-shock genes (hsp70, hsp40, and hsp27), and to a clear endocrine disrupting effect by upregulating the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR). Longer treatments with low doses triggered a general repression of transcription and GST activity. Furthermore, delayed toxicity studies were specially relevant, since they allowed us to detect unpredictable toxic effects, not immediately manifested after contact with the phthalate. This study provides novel and interesting results on the toxic effects of BBP in C. riparius and highlights the suitability of this organism for ecotoxicological risk assessment, especially in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25725395

  12. Integrating cellular metabolism into a multiscale whole-body model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Krauss

    Full Text Available Cellular metabolism continuously processes an enormous range of external compounds into endogenous metabolites and is as such a key element in human physiology. The multifaceted physiological role of the metabolic network fulfilling the catalytic conversions can only be fully understood from a whole-body perspective where the causal interplay of the metabolic states of individual cells, the surrounding tissue and the whole organism are simultaneously considered. We here present an approach relying on dynamic flux balance analysis that allows the integration of metabolic networks at the cellular scale into standardized physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models at the whole-body level. To evaluate our approach we integrated a genome-scale network reconstruction of a human hepatocyte into the liver tissue of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of a human adult. The resulting multiscale model was used to investigate hyperuricemia therapy, ammonia detoxification and paracetamol-induced toxication at a systems level. The specific models simultaneously integrate multiple layers of biological organization and offer mechanistic insights into pathology and medication. The approach presented may in future support a mechanistic understanding in diagnostics and drug development.

  13. Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism and Thyroid Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junguee; Chang, Joon Young; Kang, Yea Eun; Yi, Shinae; Lee, Min Hee; Joung, Kyong Hye; Kim, Kun Soon; Shong, Minho

    2015-06-01

    Primary thyroid cancers including papillary, follicular, poorly differentiated, and anaplastic carcinomas show substantial differences in biological and clinical behaviors. Even in the same pathological type, there is wide variability in the clinical course of disease progression. The molecular carcinogenesis of thyroid cancer has advanced tremendously in the last decade. However, specific inhibition of oncogenic pathways did not provide a significant survival benefit in advanced progressive thyroid cancer that is resistant to radioactive iodine therapy. Accumulating evidence clearly shows that cellular energy metabolism, which is controlled by oncogenes and other tumor-related factors, is a critical factor determining the clinical phenotypes of cancer. However, the role and nature of energy metabolism in thyroid cancer remain unclear. In this article, we discuss the role of cellular energy metabolism, particularly mitochondrial energy metabolism, in thyroid cancer. Determining the molecular nature of metabolic remodeling in thyroid cancer may provide new biomarkers and therapeutic targets that may be useful in the management of refractory thyroid cancers. PMID:26194071

  14. Sodium signaling and astrocyte energy metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2016-03-31

    The Na+ gradient across the plasma membrane is constantly exploited by astrocytes as a secondary energy source to regulate the intracellular and extracellular milieu, and discard waste products. One of the most prominent roles of astrocytes in the brain is the Na+-dependent clearance of glutamate released by neurons during synaptic transmission. The intracellular Na+ load collectively generated by these processes converges at the Na,K-ATPase pump, responsible for Na+ extrusion from the cell, which is achieved at the expense of cellular ATP. These processes represent pivotal mechanisms enabling astrocytes to increase the local availability of metabolic substrates in response to neuronal activity. This review presents basic principles linking the intracellular handling of Na+ following activity-related transmembrane fluxes in astrocytes and the energy metabolic pathways involved. We propose a role of Na+ as an energy currency and as a mediator of metabolic signals in the context of neuron-glia interactions. We further discuss the possible impact of the astrocytic syncytium for the distribution and coordination of the metabolic response, and the compartmentation of these processes in cellular microdomains and subcellular organelles. Finally, we illustrate future avenues of investigation into signaling mechanisms aimed at bridging the gap between Na+ and the metabolic machinery. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Sodium signaling and astrocyte energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, Jean-Yves; Magistretti, Pierre J; Barros, L Felipe

    2016-10-01

    The Na(+) gradient across the plasma membrane is constantly exploited by astrocytes as a secondary energy source to regulate the intracellular and extracellular milieu, and discard waste products. One of the most prominent roles of astrocytes in the brain is the Na(+) -dependent clearance of glutamate released by neurons during synaptic transmission. The intracellular Na(+) load collectively generated by these processes converges at the Na,K-ATPase pump, responsible for Na(+) extrusion from the cell, which is achieved at the expense of cellular ATP. These processes represent pivotal mechanisms enabling astrocytes to increase the local availability of metabolic substrates in response to neuronal activity. This review presents basic principles linking the intracellular handling of Na(+) following activity-related transmembrane fluxes in astrocytes and the energy metabolic pathways involved. We propose a role of Na(+) as an energy currency and as a mediator of metabolic signals in the context of neuron-glia interactions. We further discuss the possible impact of the astrocytic syncytium for the distribution and coordination of the metabolic response, and the compartmentation of these processes in cellular microdomains and subcellular organelles. Finally, we illustrate future avenues of investigation into signaling mechanisms aimed at bridging the gap between Na(+) and the metabolic machinery. GLIA 2016;64:1667-1676. PMID:27027636

  16. FIH Regulates Cellular Metabolism through Hydroxylation of the Deubiquitinase OTUB1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten C Scholz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The asparagine hydroxylase, factor inhibiting HIF (FIH, confers oxygen-dependence upon the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, a master regulator of the cellular adaptive response to hypoxia. Studies investigating whether asparagine hydroxylation is a general regulatory oxygen-dependent modification have identified multiple non-HIF targets for FIH. However, the functional consequences of this outside of the HIF pathway remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the deubiquitinase ovarian tumor domain containing ubiquitin aldehyde binding protein 1 (OTUB1 is a substrate for hydroxylation by FIH on N22. Mutation of N22 leads to a profound change in the interaction of OTUB1 with proteins important in cellular metabolism. Furthermore, in cultured cells, overexpression of N22A mutant OTUB1 impairs cellular metabolic processes when compared to wild type. Based on these data, we hypothesize that OTUB1 is a target for functional hydroxylation by FIH. Additionally, we propose that our results provide new insight into the regulation of cellular energy metabolism during hypoxic stress and the potential for targeting hydroxylases for therapeutic benefit.

  17. Nicotinamide prevents ultraviolet radiation-induced cellular energy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joohong; Halliday, Gary M; Surjana, Devita; Damian, Diona L

    2010-01-01

    UV radiation is carcinogenic by causing mutations in the skin and also by suppressing cutaneous antitumor immunity. We previously found nicotinamide (vitamin B3) to be highly effective at reducing UV-induced immunosuppression in human volunteers, with microarray studies on in vivo irradiated human skin suggesting that nicotinamide normalizes subsets of apoptosis, immune function and energy metabolism-related genes that are downregulated by UV exposure. Using human adult low calcium temperature keratinocytes, we further investigated nicotinamide's effects on cellular energy metabolism. We found that nicotinamide prevented UV-induced cellular ATP loss and protected against UV-induced glycolytic blockade. To determine whether nicotinamide alters the effects of UV-induced oxidative stress posttranslationally, we also measured UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nicotinamide had no effect on ROS formation, and at the low UV doses used in these studies, equivalent to ambient daily sun exposure, there was no evidence of apoptosis. Hence, nicotinamide appears to exert its UV protective effects on the skin via its role in cellular energy pathways.

  18. Reprogramming of energy metabolism as a driver of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhaoyang; Hanson, Richard W; Berger, Nathan A; Trubitsyn, Alexander

    2016-03-29

    Aging is characterized by progressive loss of cellular function and integrity. It has been thought to be driven by stochastic molecular damage. However, genetic and environmental maneuvers enhancing mitochondrial function or inhibiting glycolysis extend lifespan and promote healthy aging in many species. In post-fertile Caenorhabditis elegans, a progressive decline in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase with age, and a reciprocal increase in pyruvate kinase shunt energy metabolism from oxidative metabolism to anaerobic glycolysis. This reduces the efficiency and total of energy generation. As a result, energy-dependent physical activity and other cellular functions decrease due to unmatched energy demand and supply. In return, decrease in physical activity accelerates this metabolic shift, forming a vicious cycle. This metabolic event is a determinant of aging, and is retarded by caloric restriction to counteract aging. In this review, we summarize these and other evidence supporting the idea that metabolic reprogramming is a driver of aging. We also suggest strategies to test this hypothesis. PMID:26919253

  19. C. elegans Metabolic Gene Regulatory Networks Govern the Cellular Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Emma; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Diet greatly impacts metabolism in health and disease. In response to the presence or absence of specific nutrients, metabolic gene regulatory networks sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate metabolic flux accordingly, for instance by the transcriptional control of metabolic enzymes. Here we discuss recent insights regarding metazoan metabolic regulatory networks using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, including the modular organization of metabolic gene regulatory networks, the prominent impact of diet on the transcriptome and metabolome, specialized roles of nuclear hormone receptors in responding to dietary conditions, regulation of metabolic genes and metabolic regulators by microRNAs, and feedback between metabolic genes and their regulators. PMID:24731597

  20. Multiphoton microscopy for skin wound healing study in terms of cellular metabolism and collagen regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Okano, Kazunori; Wu, Wei-Wen; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy was employed to study normal skin wound healing in live rats noninvasively. Wound healing is a process involving series of biochemical events. This study evaluates the regeneration of collagen and change in cellular metabolic activity during wound healing in rats, with second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), respectively. In eukaryotic cells ATP is the molecule that holds the energy for cellular functioning. Whereas NADH is an electron donor in the metabolic pathways, required to generate ATP. Fluorescence lifetime of NADH free to protein bound ratio was evaluated to determine the relative metabolic activity. The FLIM data were acquired by a TCSPC system using SPCM software and analyzed by SPCImage software. Additionally, polarization resolved SHG signals were also collected to observe the changes in optical birefringence and hence the anisotropy of regenerated collagens from rat wound biopsy samples. Mat lab programming was used to process the data to construct the anisotropy images. Results indicated that, cells involved in healing had higher metabolic activity during the first week of healing, which decreases gradually and become equivalent to normal skin upon healing completes. A net degradation of collagen during the inflammatory phase and net regeneration starting from day 5 were observed in terms of SHG signal intensity change. Polarization resolved SHG imaging of the wound biopsy sample indicates higher value of anisotropy in proliferative phase, from day 4th to 8th, of wound formation; however the anisotropy decreases upon healing.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA Replication Defects Disturb Cellular dNTP Pools and Remodel One-Carbon Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkanen, Joni; Forsström, Saara; Euro, Liliya; Paetau, Ilse; Kohnz, Rebecca A; Wang, Liya; Chilov, Dmitri; Viinamäki, Jenni; Roivainen, Anne; Marjamäki, Päivi; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Ahola, Sofia; Buzkova, Jana; Terzioglu, Mügen; Khan, Nahid A; Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Paetau, Anders; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Sajantila, Antti; Isohanni, Pirjo; Tyynismaa, Henna; Nomura, Daniel K; Battersby, Brendan J; Velagapudi, Vidya; Carroll, Christopher J; Suomalainen, Anu

    2016-04-12

    Mitochondrial dysfunction affects cellular energy metabolism, but less is known about the consequences for cytoplasmic biosynthetic reactions. We report that mtDNA replication disorders caused by TWINKLE mutations-mitochondrial myopathy (MM) and infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA)-remodel cellular dNTP pools in mice. MM muscle shows tissue-specific induction of the mitochondrial folate cycle, purine metabolism, and imbalanced and increased dNTP pools, consistent with progressive mtDNA mutagenesis. IOSCA-TWINKLE is predicted to hydrolyze dNTPs, consistent with low dNTP pools and mtDNA depletion in the disease. MM muscle also modifies the cytoplasmic one-carbon cycle, transsulfuration, and methylation, as well as increases glucose uptake and its utilization for de novo serine and glutathione biosynthesis. Our evidence indicates that the mitochondrial replication machinery communicates with cytoplasmic dNTP pools and that upregulation of glutathione synthesis through glucose-driven de novo serine biosynthesis contributes to the metabolic stress response. These results are important for disorders with primary or secondary mtDNA instability and offer targets for metabolic therapy. PMID:26924217

  2. Creatine transporter deficiency leads to increased whole body and cellular metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Marla K; Kokenge, Amanda N; Miles, Keila N; Udobi, Kenea C; Clark, Joseph F; Pyne-Geithman, Gail J; Khuchua, Zaza; Skelton, Matthew R

    2016-08-01

    Creatine (Cr) is a guanidino compound required for rapid replenishment of ATP in cells with a high-energy demand. In humans, mutations in the Cr transporter (CRT;SLC6A8) prevent Cr entry into tissue and result in a significant intellectual impairment, epilepsy, and aphasia. The lack of Cr on both the whole body and cellular metabolism was evaluated in Crt knockout (Crt (-/y) ) mice, a high-fidelity model of human CRT deficiency. Crt (-/y) mice have reduced body mass and, however, show a twofold increase in body fat. There was increased energy expenditure in a home cage environment and during treadmill running in Crt (-/y) mice. Consistent with the increases in the whole-body metabolic function, Crt (-/y) mice show increased cellular metabolism as well. Mitochondrial respiration increased in skeletal muscle fibers and hippocampal lysates from Crt (-/y) mice. In addition, Crt (-/y) mice had increased citrate synthase activity, suggesting a higher number of mitochondria instead of an increase in mitochondrial activity. To determine if the increase in respiration was due to increased mitochondrial numbers, we measured oxygen consumption in an equal number of mitochondria from Crt (+/y) and Crt (-/y) mice. There were no changes in mitochondrial respiration when normalized to mitochondrial number, suggesting that the increase in respiration observed could be to higher mitochondrial content in Crt (-/y) mice. PMID:27401086

  3. Energy metabolism in the acquisition and maintenance of stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folmes, Clifford D L; Terzic, Andre

    2016-04-01

    Energy metabolism is traditionally considered a reactive homeostatic system addressing stage-specific cellular energy needs. There is however growing appreciation of metabolic pathways in the active control of vital cell functions. Case in point, the stem cell lifecycle--from maintenance and acquisition of stemness to lineage commitment and specification--is increasingly recognized as a metabolism-dependent process. Indeed, metabolic reprogramming is an early contributor to the orchestrated departure from or reacquisition of stemness. Recent advances in metabolomics have helped decipher the identity and dynamics of metabolic fluxes implicated in fueling cell fate choices by regulating the epigenetic and transcriptional identity of a cell. Metabolic cues, internal and/or external to the stem cell niche, facilitate progenitor pool restitution, long-term tissue renewal or ensure adoption of cytoprotective behavior. Convergence of energy metabolism with stem cell fate regulation opens a new avenue in understanding primordial developmental biology principles with future applications in regenerative medicine practice. PMID:26868758

  4. Natural Products as Tools for Defining How Cellular Metabolism Influences Cellular Immune and Inflammatory Function during Chronic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica S. Lovelace

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic viral infections like those caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV cause disease that establishes an ongoing state of chronic inflammation. While there have been tremendous improvements towards curing HCV with directly acting antiviral agents (DAA and keeping HIV viral loads below detection with antiretroviral therapy (ART, there is still a need to control inflammation in these diseases. Recent studies indicate that many natural products like curcumin, resveratrol and silymarin alter cellular metabolism and signal transduction pathways via enzymes such as adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, and these pathways directly influence cellular inflammatory status (such as NF-κB and immune function. Natural products represent a vast toolkit to dissect and define how cellular metabolism controls cellular immune and inflammatory function.

  5. Mitochondrial proteomics on human fibroblasts for identification of metabolic imbalance and cellular stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bross Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial proteins are central to various metabolic activities and are key regulators of apoptosis. Disturbance of mitochondrial proteins is therefore often associated with disease. Large scale protein data are required to capture the mitochondrial protein levels and mass spectrometry based proteomics is suitable for generating such data. To study the relative quantities of mitochondrial proteins in cells from cultivated human skin fibroblasts we applied a proteomic method based on nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of iTRAQ-labeled peptides. Results When fibroblast cultures were exposed to mild metabolic stress – by cultivation in galactose medium- the amount of mitochondria appeared to be maintained whereas the levels of individual proteins were altered. Proteins of respiratory chain complex I and IV were increased together with NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase of the citric acid cycle illustrating cellular strategies to cope with altered energy metabolism. Furthermore, quantitative protein data, with a median standard error below 6%, were obtained for the following mitochondrial pathways: fatty acid oxidation, citric acid cycle, respiratory chain, antioxidant systems, amino acid metabolism, mitochondrial translation, protein quality control, mitochondrial morphology and apoptosis. Conclusion The robust analytical platform in combination with a well-defined compendium of mitochondrial proteins allowed quantification of single proteins as well as mapping of entire pathways. This enabled characterization of the interplay between metabolism and stress response in human cells exposed to mild stress.

  6. Adenosine, Energy Metabolism, and Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Porkka-Heiskanen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available While the exact function of sleep remains unknown, it is evident that sleep was developed early in phylogenesis and represents an ancient and vital strategy for survival. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the function of sleep is associated with energy metabolism, saving of energy, and replenishment of energy stores. Prolonged wakefulness induces signs of energy depletion in the brain, while experimentally induced, local energy depletion induces increase in sleep, similarly as would a period of prolonged wakefulness. The key molecule in the induction of sleep appears to be adenosine, which induces sleep locally in the basal forebrain.

  7. Redox Modulation of Cellular Signaling and Metabolism Through Reversible Oxidation of Methionine Sensors in Calcium Regulatory Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2005-01-17

    Adaptive responses associated with environmental stressors are critical to cell survival. These involve the modulation of central signaling protein functions through site-specific and enzymatically reversible oxidative modifications of methionines to coordinate cellular metabolism, energy utilization, and calcium signaling. Under conditions when cellular redox and antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, the selective oxidation of critical methionines within selected protein sensors functions to down-regulate energy metabolism and the further generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mechanistically, these functional changes within protein sensors take advantage of the helix-breaking character of methionine sulfoxide. Thus, depending on either the ecological niche of the organism or the cellular milieu of different organ systems, cellular metabolism can be fine-tuned to maintain optimal function in the face of variable amounts of collateral oxidative damage. The sensitivity of several calcium regulatory proteins to oxidative modification provides cellular sensors that link oxidative stress to cellular response and recovery. Calmodulin (CaM) is one such critical calcium regulatory protein, which is functionally sensitive to methionine oxidation. Helix destabilization resulting from the oxidation of either Met{sup 144} or Met{sup 145} results in the nonproductive association between CaM and target proteins. The ability of oxidized CaM to stabilize its target proteins in an inhibited state with an affinity similar to that of native (unoxidized) CaM permits this central regulatory protein to function as a cellular rheostat that down-regulates energy metabolism in response to oxidative stress. Likewise, oxidation of a methionine within a critical switch region of the regulatory protein phospholamban is expected to destabilize the phosphorylationdependent helix formation necessary for the release of enzyme inhibition, resulting in a down-regulation of the Ca-ATPase in

  8. Metabolic evolution of energy-conserving pathways for succinate production in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xueli; Jantama, Kaemwich; Moore, Jonathan C.; Jarboe, Laura R.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.; Lonnie O. Ingram

    2009-01-01

    During metabolic evolution to improve succinate production in Escherichia coli strains, significant changes in cellular metabolism were acquired that increased energy efficiency in two respects. The energy-conserving phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase (pck), which normally functions in the reverse direction (gluconeogenesis; glucose repressed) during the oxidative metabolism of organic acids, evolved to become the major carboxylation pathway for succinate production. Both PCK enzyme acti...

  9. III. Cellular ultrastructures in situ as key to understanding tumor energy metabolism: biological significance of the Warburg effect [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/a0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Witkiewicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the universality of metabolic pathways, malignant cells were found to have their metabolism reprogrammed to generate energy by glycolysis even under normal oxygen concentrations (the Warburg effect. Therefore, the pathway energetically 18 times less efficient than oxidative phosphorylation was implicated to match increased energy requirements of growing tumors. The paradox was explained by an abnormally high rate of glucose uptake, assuming unlimited availability of substrates for tumor growth in vivo. However, ultrastructural analysis of tumor vasculature morphogenesis showed that the growing tissue regions did not have continuous blood supply and intermittently depended on autophagy for survival. Erythrogenic autophagy, and resulting ATP generation by glycolysis, appeared critical to initiating vasculature formation where it was missing. This study focused on ultrastructural features that reflected metabolic switch from aerobic to anaerobic. Morphological differences between and within different types of cells were evident in tissue sections. In cells undergoing nucleo-cytoplasmic conversion into erythrosomes (erythrogenesis, gradual changes led to replacing mitochondria with peroxisomes, through an intermediate form connected to endoplasmic reticulum. Those findings related to the issue of peroxisome biogenesis and to the phenomenon of hemogenic endothelium. Mitochondria were compacted also during mitosis. In vivo, cells that lost and others that retained capability to use oxygen coexisted side-by-side; both types were important for vasculature morphogenesis and tissue growth. Once passable, the new vasculature segment could deliver external oxygen and nutrients. Nutritional and redox status of microenvironment had similar effect on metabolism of malignant and non-malignant cells demonstrating the necessity to maintain structure-energy equivalence in all living cells. The role of glycolysis in initiating vasculature formation, and in

  10. Quantitative on-line monitoring of cellular glucose and lactate metabolism in vitro with slow perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leegsma-Vogt, G; Venema, K; Brouwer, N; Gramsbergen, JB; Copray, S; Korf, J

    2004-01-01

    An on-line in vitro perfusion technique is described that allows the continuous quantification of cellular glucose metabolism in vitro. Using biosensor technology, we measure glucose and lactate metabolism at a minute-to-minute time resolution for periods up to several days. The application of our p

  11. The anticancer plant triterpenoid, avicin D, regulates glucocorticoid receptor signaling: implications for cellular metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valsala Haridas

    Full Text Available Avicins, a family of apoptotic triterpene electrophiles, are known to regulate cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis, by targeting the mitochondria. Having evolved from "ancient hopanoids," avicins bear a structural resemblance with glucocorticoids (GCs, which are the endogenous regulators of metabolism and energy balance. These structural and functional similarities prompted us to compare the mode of action of avicin D with dexamethasone (Dex, a prototypical GC. Using cold competition assay, we show that Avicin D competes with Dex for binding to the GC receptor (GR, leading to its nuclear translocation. In contrast to Dex, avicin-induced nuclear translocation of GR does not result in transcriptional activation of GC-dependent genes. Instead we observe a decrease in the expression of GC-dependent metabolic proteins such as PEPCK and FASN. However, like Dex, avicin D treatment does induce a transrepressive effect on the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. While avicin's ability to inhibit NF-κB and its downstream targets appear to be GR-dependent, its pro-apoptotic effects were independent of GR expression. Using various deletion mutants of GR, we demonstrate the requirement of both the DNA and ligand binding domains of GR in mediating avicin D's transrepressive effects. Modeling of avicin-GR interaction revealed that avicin molecule binds only to the antagonist confirmation of GR. These findings suggest that avicin D has properties of being a selective GR modulator that separates transactivation from transrepression. Since the gene-activating properties of GR are mainly linked to its metabolic effects, and the negative interference with the activity of transcription factors to its anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effects, the identification of such a dissociated GR ligand could have great potential for therapeutic use.

  12. The anticancer plant triterpenoid, avicin D, regulates glucocorticoid receptor signaling: implications for cellular metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Valsala; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Kitchen, Doug; Jiang, Anna; Michels, Peter; Gutterman, Jordan U

    2011-01-01

    Avicins, a family of apoptotic triterpene electrophiles, are known to regulate cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis, by targeting the mitochondria. Having evolved from "ancient hopanoids," avicins bear a structural resemblance with glucocorticoids (GCs), which are the endogenous regulators of metabolism and energy balance. These structural and functional similarities prompted us to compare the mode of action of avicin D with dexamethasone (Dex), a prototypical GC. Using cold competition assay, we show that Avicin D competes with Dex for binding to the GC receptor (GR), leading to its nuclear translocation. In contrast to Dex, avicin-induced nuclear translocation of GR does not result in transcriptional activation of GC-dependent genes. Instead we observe a decrease in the expression of GC-dependent metabolic proteins such as PEPCK and FASN. However, like Dex, avicin D treatment does induce a transrepressive effect on the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. While avicin's ability to inhibit NF-κB and its downstream targets appear to be GR-dependent, its pro-apoptotic effects were independent of GR expression. Using various deletion mutants of GR, we demonstrate the requirement of both the DNA and ligand binding domains of GR in mediating avicin D's transrepressive effects. Modeling of avicin-GR interaction revealed that avicin molecule binds only to the antagonist confirmation of GR. These findings suggest that avicin D has properties of being a selective GR modulator that separates transactivation from transrepression. Since the gene-activating properties of GR are mainly linked to its metabolic effects, and the negative interference with the activity of transcription factors to its anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effects, the identification of such a dissociated GR ligand could have great potential for therapeutic use.

  13. Interactions between mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cellular glucose metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liemburg-Apers, D.C.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Grefte, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and detoxification are tightly balanced. Shifting this balance enables ROS to activate intracellular signaling and/or induce cellular damage and cell death. Increased mitochondrial ROS production is observed in a number of pathological condit

  14. Cellular metabolism regulates contact sites between vacuoles and mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hönscher, Carina; Mari, Muriel; Auffarth, Kathrin; Bohnert, Maria; Griffith, Janice; Geerts, Willie; van der Laan, Martin; Cabrera, Margarita; Reggiori, Fulvio; Ungermann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that contact sites between different organelles form central hubs in the coordination of cellular physiology. Although recent work has emphasized the crucial role of the endoplasmic reticulum in interorganellar crosstalk, the cooperative behavior of other organelles is lar

  15. Action of Selenium Compounds on the Cellular Metabolism by Microcalorimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new method is introduced to study the action between biomaterials and organism.By using an LKB-2277 bioactivity monitor and ampoule method,the fundamental thermogenesis curves of the metabolic process of pk-15 and the toxic effect of three kinds of selenomorpholine compounds on it were studied at 37℃.From the thermogenesis curves,the heat released by pk-15 metabolism was calculated.The results show that the selenium compounds all have toxic action on the metabolism process of pk-15 at the range of experimental concentrations.The sequence of the toxic action of selenium compounds is:Na2SeO3>β-(N-selenomorpholine)-ethyl phenylketone hydrochloride>selenomorpholine.

  16. An association of metabolic syndrome constellation with cellular membrane caveolae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-zheng Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that can predispose an individual to a greater risk of developing type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The cluster includes abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia – all of which are risk factors to public health. While searching for a link among the aforementioned malaises, clues have been focused on the cell membrane domain caveolae, wherein the MetS-associated active molecules are colocalized and interacted with to carry out designated biological activities. Caveola disarray could induce all of those individual metabolic abnormalities to be present in animal models and humans, providing a new target for therapeutic strategy in the management of MetS.

  17. Cellular oxidative damage is more sensitive to biosynthetic rate than to metabolic rate: A test of the theoretical model on hornworms (Manduca sexta larvae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amunugama, Kaushalya; Jiao, Lihong; Olbricht, Gayla R; Walker, Chance; Huang, Yue-Wern; Nam, Paul K; Hou, Chen

    2016-09-01

    We develop a theoretical model from an energetic viewpoint for unraveling the entangled effects of metabolic and biosynthetic rates on oxidative cellular damage accumulation during animal's growth, and test the model by experiments in hornworms. The theoretical consideration suggests that most of the cellular damages caused by the oxidative metabolism can be repaired by the efficient maintenance mechanisms, if the energy required by repair is unlimited. However, during growth a considerable amount of energy is allocated to the biosynthesis, which entails tradeoffs with the requirements of repair. Thus, the model predicts that cellular damage is more influenced by the biosynthetic rate than the metabolic rate. To test the prediction, we induced broad variations in metabolic and biosynthetic rates in hornworms, and assayed the lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl. We found that the increase in the cellular damage was mainly caused by the increase in biosynthetic rate, and the variations in metabolic rate had negligible effect. The oxidative stress hypothesis of aging suggests that high metabolism leads to high cellular damage and short lifespan. However, some empirical studies showed that varying biosynthetic rate, rather than metabolic rate, changes animal's lifespan. The conflicts between the empirical evidence and the hypothesis are reconciled by this study. PMID:27296440

  18. Daily magnesium fluxes regulate cellular timekeeping and energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Kevin A; Hansen, Louise L; Putker, Marrit; Olivares-Yañez, Consuelo; Day, Jason; Eades, Lorna J; Larrondo, Luis F; Hoyle, Nathaniel P; O'Neill, John S; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2016-04-21

    Circadian clocks are fundamental to the biology of most eukaryotes, coordinating behaviour and physiology to resonate with the environmental cycle of day and night through complex networks of clock-controlled genes. A fundamental knowledge gap exists, however, between circadian gene expression cycles and the biochemical mechanisms that ultimately facilitate circadian regulation of cell biology. Here we report circadian rhythms in the intracellular concentration of magnesium ions, [Mg(2+)]i, which act as a cell-autonomous timekeeping component to determine key clock properties both in a human cell line and in a unicellular alga that diverged from each other more than 1 billion years ago. Given the essential role of Mg(2+) as a cofactor for ATP, a functional consequence of [Mg(2+)]i oscillations is dynamic regulation of cellular energy expenditure over the daily cycle. Mechanistically, we find that these rhythms provide bilateral feedback linking rhythmic metabolism to clock-controlled gene expression. The global regulation of nucleotide triphosphate turnover by intracellular Mg(2+) availability has potential to impact upon many of the cell's more than 600 MgATP-dependent enzymes and every cellular system where MgNTP hydrolysis becomes rate limiting. Indeed, we find that circadian control of translation by mTOR is regulated through [Mg(2+)]i oscillations. It will now be important to identify which additional biological processes are subject to this form of regulation in tissues of multicellular organisms such as plants and humans, in the context of health and disease.

  19. Cellular metabolic rate is influenced by life-history traits in tropical and temperate birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gabriela Jimenez

    Full Text Available In general, tropical birds have a "slow pace of life," lower rates of whole-animal metabolism and higher survival rates, than temperate species. A fundamental challenge facing physiological ecologists is the understanding of how variation in life-history at the whole-organism level might be linked to cellular function. Because tropical birds have lower rates of whole-animal metabolism, we hypothesized that cells from tropical species would also have lower rates of cellular metabolism than cells from temperate species of similar body size and common phylogenetic history. We cultured primary dermal fibroblasts from 17 tropical and 17 temperate phylogenetically-paired species of birds in a common nutritive and thermal environment and then examined basal, uncoupled, and non-mitochondrial cellular O2 consumption (OCR, proton leak, and anaerobic glycolysis (extracellular acidification rates [ECAR], using an XF24 Seahorse Analyzer. We found that multiple measures of metabolism in cells from tropical birds were significantly lower than their temperate counterparts. Basal and uncoupled cellular metabolism were 29% and 35% lower in cells from tropical birds, respectively, a decrease closely aligned with differences in whole-animal metabolism between tropical and temperate birds. Proton leak was significantly lower in cells from tropical birds compared with cells from temperate birds. Our results offer compelling evidence that whole-animal metabolism is linked to cellular respiration as a function of an animal's life-history evolution. These findings are consistent with the idea that natural selection has uniquely fashioned cells of long-lived tropical bird species to have lower rates of metabolism than cells from shorter-lived temperate species.

  20. Alkalizing reactions streamline cellular metabolism in acidogenic microorganisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Arioli

    Full Text Available An understanding of the integrated relationships among the principal cellular functions that govern the bioenergetic reactions of an organism is necessary to determine how cells remain viable and optimise their fitness in the environment. Urease is a complex enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbonic acid. While the induction of urease activity by several microorganisms has been predominantly considered a stress-response that is initiated to generate a nitrogen source in response to a low environmental pH, here we demonstrate a new role of urease in the optimisation of cellular bioenergetics. We show that urea hydrolysis increases the catabolic efficiency of Streptococcus thermophilus, a lactic acid bacterium that is widely used in the industrial manufacture of dairy products. By modulating the intracellular pH and thereby increasing the activity of β-galactosidase, glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase, urease increases the overall change in enthalpy generated by the bioenergetic reactions. A cooperative altruistic behaviour of urease-positive microorganisms on the urease-negative microorganisms within the same environment was also observed. The physiological role of a single enzymatic activity demonstrates a novel and unexpected view of the non-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that govern the bioenergetics of a bacterial cell, highlighting a new role for cytosol-alkalizing biochemical pathways in acidogenic microorganisms.

  1. Alkalizing Reactions Streamline Cellular Metabolism in Acidogenic Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arioli, Stefania; Ragg, Enzio; Scaglioni, Leonardo; Fessas, Dimitrios; Signorelli, Marco; Karp, Matti; Daffonchio, Daniele; De Noni, Ivano; Mulas, Laura; Oggioni, Marco; Guglielmetti, Simone; Mora, Diego

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the integrated relationships among the principal cellular functions that govern the bioenergetic reactions of an organism is necessary to determine how cells remain viable and optimise their fitness in the environment. Urease is a complex enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbonic acid. While the induction of urease activity by several microorganisms has been predominantly considered a stress-response that is initiated to generate a nitrogen source in response to a low environmental pH, here we demonstrate a new role of urease in the optimisation of cellular bioenergetics. We show that urea hydrolysis increases the catabolic efficiency of Streptococcus thermophilus, a lactic acid bacterium that is widely used in the industrial manufacture of dairy products. By modulating the intracellular pH and thereby increasing the activity of β-galactosidase, glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase, urease increases the overall change in enthalpy generated by the bioenergetic reactions. A cooperative altruistic behaviour of urease-positive microorganisms on the urease-negative microorganisms within the same environment was also observed. The physiological role of a single enzymatic activity demonstrates a novel and unexpected view of the non-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that govern the bioenergetics of a bacterial cell, highlighting a new role for cytosol-alkalizing biochemical pathways in acidogenic microorganisms. PMID:21152088

  2. Differential contribution of key metabolic substrates and cellular oxygen in HIF signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhdanov, Alexander V., E-mail: a.zhdanov@ucc.ie [School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, University College Cork, Cavanagh Pharmacy Building, College Road, Cork (Ireland); Waters, Alicia H.C. [School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, University College Cork, Cavanagh Pharmacy Building, College Road, Cork (Ireland); Golubeva, Anna V. [Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Bioscience Institute, Western Road, Cork (Ireland); Papkovsky, Dmitri B. [School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, University College Cork, Cavanagh Pharmacy Building, College Road, Cork (Ireland)

    2015-01-01

    Changes in availability and utilisation of O{sub 2} and metabolic substrates are common in ischemia and cancer. We examined effects of substrate deprivation on HIF signalling in PC12 cells exposed to different atmospheric O{sub 2}. Upon 2–4 h moderate hypoxia, HIF-α protein levels were dictated by the availability of glutamine and glucose, essential for deep cell deoxygenation and glycolytic ATP flux. Nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α dramatically decreased upon inhibition of glutaminolysis or glutamine deprivation. Elevation of HIF-2α levels was transcription-independent and associated with the activation of Akt and Erk1/2. Upon 2 h anoxia, HIF-2α levels strongly correlated with cellular ATP, produced exclusively via glycolysis. Without glucose, HIF signalling was suppressed, giving way to other regulators of cell adaptation to energy crisis, e.g. AMPK. Consequently, viability of cells deprived of O{sub 2} and glucose decreased upon inhibition of AMPK with dorsomorphin. The capacity of cells to accumulate HIF-2α decreased after 24 h glucose deprivation. This effect, associated with increased AMPKα phosphorylation, was sensitive to dorsomorphin. In chronically hypoxic cells, glutamine played no major role in HIF-2α accumulation, which became mainly glucose-dependent. Overall, the availability of O{sub 2} and metabolic substrates intricately regulates HIF signalling by affecting cell oxygenation, ATP levels and pathways involved in production of HIF-α. - Highlights: • Gln and Glc regulate HIF levels in hypoxic cells by maintaining low O{sub 2} and high ATP. • HIF-α levels under anoxia correlate with cellular ATP and critically depend on Glc. • Gln and Glc modulate activity of Akt, Erk and AMPK, regulating HIF production. • HIF signalling is differentially inhibited by prolonged Glc and Gln deprivation. • Unlike Glc, Gln plays no major role in HIF signalling in chronically hypoxic cells.

  3. Optimizing Cellular Networks Enabled with Renewal Energy via Strategic Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insoo Sohn

    Full Text Available An important issue in the cellular industry is the rising energy cost and carbon footprint due to the rapid expansion of the cellular infrastructure. Greening cellular networks has thus attracted attention. Among the promising green cellular network techniques, the renewable energy-powered cellular network has drawn increasing attention as a critical element towards reducing carbon emissions due to massive energy consumption in the base stations deployed in cellular networks. Game theory is a branch of mathematics that is used to evaluate and optimize systems with multiple players with conflicting objectives and has been successfully used to solve various problems in cellular networks. In this paper, we model the green energy utilization and power consumption optimization problem of a green cellular network as a pilot power selection strategic game and propose a novel distributed algorithm based on a strategic learning method. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm achieves correlated equilibrium of the pilot power selection game, resulting in optimum green energy utilization and power consumption reduction.

  4. Optimizing Cellular Networks Enabled with Renewal Energy via Strategic Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Insoo; Liu, Huaping; Ansari, Nirwan

    2015-01-01

    An important issue in the cellular industry is the rising energy cost and carbon footprint due to the rapid expansion of the cellular infrastructure. Greening cellular networks has thus attracted attention. Among the promising green cellular network techniques, the renewable energy-powered cellular network has drawn increasing attention as a critical element towards reducing carbon emissions due to massive energy consumption in the base stations deployed in cellular networks. Game theory is a branch of mathematics that is used to evaluate and optimize systems with multiple players with conflicting objectives and has been successfully used to solve various problems in cellular networks. In this paper, we model the green energy utilization and power consumption optimization problem of a green cellular network as a pilot power selection strategic game and propose a novel distributed algorithm based on a strategic learning method. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm achieves correlated equilibrium of the pilot power selection game, resulting in optimum green energy utilization and power consumption reduction. PMID:26167934

  5. Carnosine: can understanding its actions on energy metabolism and protein homeostasis inform its therapeutic potential?

    OpenAIRE

    Hipkiss, Alan R; Cartwright, Stephanie P.; Bromley, Clare; Gross, Stephane R.; Bill, Roslyn M.

    2013-01-01

    The dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) has contrasting but beneficial effects on cellular activity. It delays cellular senescence and rejuvenates cultured senescent mammalian cells. However, it also inhibits the growth of cultured tumour cells. Based on studies in several organisms, we speculate that carnosine exerts these apparently opposing actions by affecting energy metabolism and/or protein homeostasis (proteostasis). Specific effects on energy metabolism include the dipeptide’s ...

  6. GIM3E: Condition-specific Models of Cellular Metabolism Developed from Metabolomics and Expression Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Brian; Ebrahim, Ali; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernard O.; Hyduke, Daniel R.

    2013-11-15

    Motivation: Genome-scale metabolic models have been used extensively to investigate alterations in cellular metabolism. The accuracy of these models to represent cellular metabolism in specific conditions has been improved by constraining the model with omics data sources. However, few practical methods for integrating metabolomics data with other omics data sources into genome-scale models of metabolism have been reported. Results: GIMMME (Gene Inactivation Moderated by Metabolism, Metabolomics, and Expression) is an algorithm that enables the development of condition-specific models based on an objective function, transcriptomics, and intracellular metabolomics data. GIMMME establishes metabolite utilization requirements with metabolomics data, uses model-paired transcriptomics data to find experimentally supported solutions, and also provides calculations of the turnover (production / consumption) flux of metabolites. GIMMME was employed to investigate the effects of integrating additional omics datasets to create increasingly constrained solution spaces of Salmonella Typhimurium metabolism during growth in both rich and virulence media. This integration proved to be informative and resulted in a requirement of additional active reactions (12 in each case) or metabolites (26 or 29, respectively). The addition of constraints from transcriptomics also impacted the allowed solution space, and the cellular metabolites with turnover fluxes that were necessarily altered by the change in conditions increased from 118 to 271 of 1397. Availability: GIMMME has been implemented in Python and requires a COBRApy 0.2.x. The algorithm and sample data described here are freely available at: http://opencobra.sourceforge.net/

  7. Energy management in wireless cellular and ad-hoc networks

    CERN Document Server

    Imran, Muhammad; Qaraqe, Khalid; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim; Vasilakos, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    This book investigates energy management approaches for energy efficient or energy-centric system design and architecture and presents end-to-end energy management in the recent heterogeneous-type wireless network medium. It also considers energy management in wireless sensor and mesh networks by exploiting energy efficient transmission techniques and protocols. and explores energy management in emerging applications, services and engineering to be facilitated with 5G networks such as WBANs, VANETS and Cognitive networks. A special focus of the book is on the examination of the energy management practices in emerging wireless cellular and ad hoc networks. Considering the broad scope of energy management in wireless cellular and ad hoc networks, this book is organized into six sections covering range of Energy efficient systems and architectures; Energy efficient transmission and techniques; Energy efficient applications and services. .

  8. Cellular uptake and metabolism of curcuminoids in monocytes/macrophages: regulatory effects on lipid accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    We previously showed that curcumin (CUR) may increase lipid accumulation in cultured THP-1 monocytes/macrophages, but tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), an in vivo metabolite of CUR, had no such effect. In the present study, we have hypothesized that different cellular uptake and/or metabolism of CUR and THC...

  9. The lysosome as a command-and-control center for cellular metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun-Yan; Zoncu, Roberto

    2016-09-12

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles found in every eukaryotic cell. They are widely known as terminal catabolic stations that rid cells of waste products and scavenge metabolic building blocks that sustain essential biosynthetic reactions during starvation. In recent years, this classical view has been dramatically expanded by the discovery of new roles of the lysosome in nutrient sensing, transcriptional regulation, and metabolic homeostasis. These discoveries have elevated the lysosome to a decision-making center involved in the control of cellular growth and survival. Here we review these recently discovered properties of the lysosome, with a focus on how lysosomal signaling pathways respond to external and internal cues and how they ultimately enable metabolic homeostasis and cellular adaptation. PMID:27621362

  10. Adaptation of chondrocytes to low oxygen tension: relationship between hypoxia and cellular metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpurohit, R; Koch, C J; Tao, Z; Teixeira, C M; Shapiro, I M

    1996-08-01

    In endochondral bone, the growth cartilage is the site of rapid growth. Since the vascular supply to the cartilage is limited, it is widely assumed that cells of the cartilage are hypoxic and that limitations in the oxygen supply regulate the energetic state of the maturing cells. In this report, we evaluate the effects of oxygen tension on chondrocyte energy metabolism, thiol status, and expression of transcription elements, HIF and AP-1. Imposition of an hypoxic environment on cultured chondrocytes caused a proportional increase in glucose utilization and elevated levels of lactate synthesis. Although we observed a statistical increase in the activities of phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase after exposure to lowered oxygen concentrations, the effect was small. The cultured cells exhibited a decreased utilization of glutamine, possibly due to down regulation of mitochondrial function and inhibition of oxidative deamination. With respect to total energy generation, we noted that these cells are quite capable of maintaining the energy charge of the cell at low oxygen tensions. Indeed, no changes in the absolute quantity of adenine nucleotides or the energy charge ratio was observed. Hypoxia caused a decrease in the glutathione content of cultured chondrocytes and a concomitant rise in cell and medium cysteine levels. It is likely that the fall in cell glutathione level is due to decreased synthesis of the tripeptide under reduced oxygen stress and the limited supply of glutamate. The observed rise in cellular and medium cysteine levels probably reflects an increase in the rate of degradation of glutathione and a decrease in synthesis of the peptide. To explore how cells transduce these metabolic effects, gel retardation assays were used to study chondrocyte HIF and AP-1 binding activities. Chondrocyte nuclear preparations bound an HIF-oligonucleotide; however, at low oxygen tensions, no increase in HIF binding was

  11. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Relays Metabolic Signals to Promote Cellular Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Fanny L

    2016-01-01

    While sensing the cell environment, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) interacts with different pathways involved in cellular homeostasis. This review summarizes evidence suggesting that cellular regeneration in the context of aging and diseases can be modulated by AHR signaling on stem cells. New insights connect orphaned observations into AHR interactions with critical signaling pathways such as WNT to propose a role of this ligand-activated transcription factor in the modulation of cellular regeneration by altering pathways that nurture cellular expansion such as changes in the metabolic efficiency rather than by directly altering cell cycling, proliferation, or cell death. Targeting the AHR to promote regeneration might prove to be a useful strategy to avoid unbalanced disruptions of homeostasis that may promote disease and also provide biological rationale for potential regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:27563312

  12. Dissecting Leishmania infantum Energy Metabolism - A Systems Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Subramanian

    Full Text Available Leishmania infantum, causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis in humans, illustrates a complex lifecycle pertaining to two extreme environments, namely, the gut of the sandfly vector and human macrophages. Leishmania is capable of dynamically adapting and tactically switching between these critically hostile situations. The possible metabolic routes ventured by the parasite to achieve this exceptional adaptation to its varying environments are still poorly understood. In this study, we present an extensively reconstructed energy metabolism network of Leishmania infantum as an attempt to identify certain strategic metabolic routes preferred by the parasite to optimize its survival in such dynamic environments. The reconstructed network consists of 142 genes encoding for enzymes performing 237 reactions distributed across five distinct model compartments. We annotated the subcellular locations of different enzymes and their reactions on the basis of strong literature evidence and sequence-based detection of cellular localization signal within a protein sequence. To explore the diverse features of parasite metabolism the metabolic network was implemented and analyzed as a constraint-based model. Using a systems-based approach, we also put forth an extensive set of lethal reaction knockouts; some of which were validated using published data on Leishmania species. Performing a robustness analysis, the model was rigorously validated and tested for the secretion of overflow metabolites specific to Leishmania under varying extracellular oxygen uptake rate. Further, the fate of important non-essential amino acids in L. infantum metabolism was investigated. Stage-specific scenarios of L. infantum energy metabolism were incorporated in the model and key metabolic differences were outlined. Analysis of the model revealed the essentiality of glucose uptake, succinate fermentation, glutamate biosynthesis and an active TCA cycle as driving forces for parasite

  13. Inhibition of HIV by Legalon-SIL is independent of its effect on cellular metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, Janela [Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Margineantu, Daciana H. [Department of Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Sweet, Ian R. [Department of Medicine (Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Nutrition), University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Polyak, Stephen J., E-mail: polyak@uw.edu [Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-01-20

    In this report, we further characterized the effects of silibinin (SbN), derived from milk thistle extract, and Legalon-SIL (SIL), a water-soluble derivative of SbN, on T cell metabolism and HIV infection. We assessed the effects of SbN and SIL on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and CEM-T4 cells in terms of cellular growth, ATP content, metabolism, and HIV infection. SIL and SbN caused a rapid and reversible (upon removal) decrease in cellular ATP levels, which was associated with suppression of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis. SbN, but not SIL inhibited glucose uptake. Exposure of T cells to SIL (but not SbN or metabolic inhibitors) during virus adsorption blocked HIV infection. Thus, both SbN and SIL rapidly perturb T cell metabolism in vitro, which may account for its anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects that arise with prolonged exposure of cells. However, the metabolic effects are not involved in SIL's unique ability to block HIV entry. - Highlights: • Silibinin (SbN) and Legalon-SIL (SIL) are cytoprotective mixtures of natural products. • SbN and SIL reduce T cell oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis in vitro. • SIL but not SbN blocks entry of multiple HIV isolates into T cells in vitro. • SIL's suppression of HIV appears independent of its effects on T cell metabolism. • Metabolic effects of SIL and SbN may be relevant in inflammatory diseases.

  14. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  15. Mitochondria in Cancer Energy Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Aekyong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a disease characterized by uncontrolled growth. Metabolic demands to sustain rapid proliferation must be compelling since aerobic glycolysis is the first as well as the most commonly shared characteristic of cancer. During the last decade, the significance of metabolic reprogramming of cancer has been at the center of attention. Nonetheless, despite all the knowledge gained on cancer biology, the field is not able to reach agreement on the issue of mitochondria: Are damaged mitochon...

  16. Multiple steady states with distinct cellular metabolism in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Europa, A F; Gambhir, A; Fu, P C; Hu, W S

    2000-01-01

    Mammalian cells have the ability to proliferate under different nutrient environments by utilizing different combinations of the nutrients, especially glucose and the amino acids. Under the conditions often used in in vitro cultivation, the cells consume glucose and amino acids in great excess of what is needed for making up biomass and products. They also produce large amounts of metabolites with lactate, ammonia, and some non-essential amino acids such as alanine as the most dominant ones. By controlling glucose and glutamine at low levels, cellular metabolism can be altered and can result in reduced glucose and glutamine consumption as well as in reduced metabolite formation. Using a fed-batch reactor to manipulate glucose at a low level (as compared to a typical batch culture), cell metabolism was altered to a state with substantially reduced lactate production. The culture was then switched to a continuous mode and allowed to reach a steady-state. At this steady-state, the concentrations of cells and antibody were substantially higher than a control culture that was initiated from a batch culture without first altering cellular metabolism. The lactate and other metabolite concentrations were also substantially reduced as compared to the control culture. This newly observed steady-state was achieved at the same dilution rate and feed medium as the control culture. The paths leading to the two steady-states, however, were different. These results demonstrate steady-state multiplicity. At this new steady-state, not only was glucose metabolism altered, but the metabolism of amino acids was altered as well. The amino acid metabolism in the new steady-state was more balanced, and the excretion of non-essential amino acids and ammonia was substantially lower. This approach of reaching a more desirable steady-state with higher concentrations of cells and product opens a new avenue for high-density- and high-productivity-cell culture.

  17. Cerebral energy metabolism during induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Bindslev, TT; Pedersen, S M;

    2013-01-01

    In patients with traumatic brain injury as well as stroke, impaired cerebral oxidative energy metabolism may be an important factor contributing to the ultimate degree of tissue damage. We hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction can be diagnosed bedside by comparing the simultaneous changes...... in brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) and cerebral cytoplasmatic redox state. The study describes cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by sevoflurane in piglets....

  18. Effects of hyperammonemia on brain energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Leke, Renata;

    2014-01-01

    The literature related to the effects of elevated plasma ammonia levels on brain energy metabolism is abundant, but heterogeneous in terms of the conclusions. Thus, some studies claim that ammonia has a direct, inhibitory effect on energy metabolism whereas others find no such correlation...... but related to the fact that hepatic encephalopathy is always associated with reduced brain activity, a condition clearly characterized by a decreased CMRO2. Whether this may be related to changes in GABAergic function remains to be elucidated....

  19. Leptin regulates energy metabolism in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquer-Rosselló, Maria del Mar; Oliver, Jordi; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Valle, Adamo; Roca, Pilar

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is known to be a poorer prognosis factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Among the diverse endocrine factors associated to obesity, leptin has received special attention since it promotes breast cancer cell growth and invasiveness, processes which force cells to adapt their metabolism to satisfy the increased demands of energy and biosynthetic intermediates. Taking this into account, our aim was to explore the effects of leptin in the metabolism of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Polarographic analysis revealed that leptin increased oxygen consumption rate and cellular ATP levels were more dependent on mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in leptin-treated cells compared to the more glycolytic control cells. Experiments with selective inhibitors of glycolysis (2-DG), fatty acid oxidation (etomoxir) or aminoacid deprivation showed that ATP levels were more reliant on fatty acid oxidation. In agreement, levels of key proteins involved in lipid catabolism (FAT/CD36, CPT1, PPARα) and phosphorylation of the energy sensor AMPK were increased by leptin. Regarding glucose, cellular uptake was not affected by leptin, but lactate release was deeply repressed. Analysis of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate carboxylase (PC) together with the pentose-phosphate pathway enzyme glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) revealed that leptin favors the use of glucose for biosynthesis. These results point towards a role of leptin in metabolic reprogramming, consisting of an enhanced use of glucose for biosynthesis and lipids for energy production. This metabolic adaptations induced by leptin may provide benefits for MCF-7 growth and give support to the reverse Warburg effect described in breast cancer. PMID:26772821

  20. Role of SUMO-specific protease 2 in reprogramming cellular glucose metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Tang

    Full Text Available Most cancer cells exhibit a shift in glucose metabolic strategy, displaying increased glycolysis even with adequate oxygen supply. SUMO-specific proteases (SENPs de-SUMOylate substrates including HIF1α and p53,two key regulators in cancer glucose metabolism, to regulate their activity, stability and subcellular localization. However, the role of SENPs in tumor glucose metabolism remains unclear. Here we report that SUMO-specific protease 2 (SENP2 negatively regulates aerobic glycolysis in MCF7 and MEF cells. Over-expression of SENP2 reduces the glucose uptake and lactate production, increasing the cellular ATP levels in MCF7 cells, while SENP2 knockout MEF cells show increased glucose uptake and lactate production along with the decreased ATP levels. Consistently, the MCF7 cells over-expressing SENP2 exhibit decreased expression levels of key glycolytic enzymes and an increased rate of glucose oxidation compared with control MCF7 cells, indicating inhibited glycolysis but enhanced oxidative mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, SENP2 over-expressing MCF7 cells demonstrated a reduced amount of phosphorylated AKT, whereas SENP2 knockout MEFs exhibit increased levels of phosphorylated AKT. Furthermore, inhibiting AKT phosphorylation by LY294002 rescued the phenotype induced by SENP2 deficiency in MEFs. In conclusion, SENP2 represses glycolysis and shifts glucose metabolic strategy, in part through inhibition of AKT phosphorylation. Our study reveals a novel function of SENP2 in regulating glucose metabolism.

  1. A novel alkyne cholesterol to trace cellular cholesterol metabolism and localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Kristina; Thiele, Christoph; Schött, Hans-Frieder; Gaebler, Anne; Schoene, Mario; Kiver, Yuriy; Friedrichs, Silvia; Lütjohann, Dieter; Kuerschner, Lars

    2014-03-01

    Cholesterol is an important lipid of mammalian cells and plays a fundamental role in many biological processes. Its concentration in the various cellular membranes differs and is tightly regulated. Here, we present a novel alkyne cholesterol analog suitable for tracing both cholesterol metabolism and localization. This probe can be detected by click chemistry employing various reporter azides. Alkyne cholesterol is accepted by cellular enzymes from different biological species (Brevibacterium, yeast, rat, human) and these enzymes include cholesterol oxidases, hydroxylases, and acyl transferases that generate the expected metabolites in in vitro and in vivo assays. Using fluorescence microscopy, we studied the distribution of cholesterol at subcellular resolution, detecting the lipid in the Golgi and at the plasma membrane, but also in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. In summary, alkyne cholesterol represents a versatile, sensitive, and easy-to-use tool for tracking cellular cholesterol metabolism and localization as it allows for manifold detection methods including mass spectrometry, thin-layer chromatography/fluorography, and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24334219

  2. Current concepts in chronic inflammatory diseases: Interactions between microbes, cellular metabolism, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garn, Holger; Bahn, Sabine; Baune, Bernhard T; Binder, Elisabeth B; Bisgaard, Hans; Chatila, Talal A; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Culmsee, Carsten; Dannlowski, Udo; Gay, Steffen; Gern, James; Haahtela, Tari; Kircher, Tilo; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Neurath, Markus F; Preissner, Klaus T; Reinhardt, Christoph; Rook, Graham; Russell, Shannon; Schmeck, Bernd; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Steinhoff, Ulrich; van Os, Jim; Weiss, Scott; Zemlin, Michael; Renz, Harald

    2016-07-01

    Recent research indicates that chronic inflammatory diseases, including allergies and autoimmune and neuropsychiatric diseases, share common pathways of cellular and molecular dysregulation. It was the aim of the International von-Behring-Röntgen Symposium (October 16-18, 2014, in Marburg, Germany) to discuss recent developments in this field. These include a concept of biodiversity; the contribution of urbanization, lifestyle factors, and nutrition (eg, vitamin D); and new mechanisms of metabolic and immune dysregulation, such as extracellular and intracellular RNAs and cellular and mitochondrial stress. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute further to altered gene expression and therefore to the development of chronic inflammation. These novel findings provide the foundation for further development of preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27373325

  3. Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology of Cysteine Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most versatile molecules in biology, taking over such different functions as catalysis, structure, regulation and electron transport during evolution. Research on Arabidopsis has contributed decisively to the understanding of cysteine synthesis and its role in the assimilatory pathways of S, N and C in plants. The multimeric cysteine synthase complex is present in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria and forms the centre of a unique metabolic sensing and signaling system. Its association is reversible, rendering the first enzyme of cysteine synthesis active and the second one inactive, and vice-versa. Complex formation is triggered by the reaction intermediates of cysteine synthesis in response to supply and demand and gives rise to regulation of genes of sulfur metabolism to adjust cellular sulfur homeostasis. Combinations of biochemistry, forward and reverse genetics, structural- and cell-biology approaches using Arabidopsis have revealed new enzyme functions and the unique pattern of spatial distribution of cysteine metabolism in plant cells. These findings place the synthesis of cysteine in the centre of the network of primary metabolism. PMID:22303278

  4. Adenylate Kinase and AMP Signaling Networks: Metabolic Monitoring, Signal Communication and Body Energy Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Terzic

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Adenylate kinase and downstream AMP signaling is an integrated metabolic monitoring system which reads the cellular energy state in order to tune and report signals to metabolic sensors. A network of adenylate kinase isoforms (AK1-AK7 are distributed throughout intracellular compartments, interstitial space and body fluids to regulate energetic and metabolic signaling circuits, securing efficient cell energy economy, signal communication and stress response. The dynamics of adenylate kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer regulates multiple intracellular and extracellular energy-dependent and nucleotide signaling processes, including excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, cell and ciliary motility, nuclear transport, energetics of cell cycle, DNA synthesis and repair, and developmental programming. Metabolomic analyses indicate that cellular, interstitial and blood AMP levels are potential metabolic signals associated with vital functions including body energy sensing, sleep, hibernation and food intake. Either low or excess AMP signaling has been linked to human disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recent studies indicate that derangements in adenylate kinase-mediated energetic signaling due to mutations in AK1, AK2 or AK7 isoforms are associated with hemolytic anemia, reticular dysgenesis and ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, hormonal, food and antidiabetic drug actions are frequently coupled to alterations of cellular AMP levels and associated signaling. Thus, by monitoring energy state and generating and distributing AMP metabolic signals adenylate kinase represents a unique hub within the cellular homeostatic network.

  5. Cellular Metabolic Activity and the Oxygen and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Intracellular Water and Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer-Martin, H. W.; Hegg, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular water is an important pool of oxygen and hydrogen atoms for biosynthesis. Intracellular water is usually assumed to be isotopically identical to extracellular water, but an unexpected experimental result caused us to question this assumption. Heme O isolated from Escherichia coli cells grown in 95% H218O contained only a fraction of the theoretical value of labeled oxygen at a position where the O atom was known to be derived from water. In fact, fewer than half of the oxygen atoms were labeled. In an effort to explain this surprising result, we developed a method to determine the isotope ratios of intracellular water in cultured cells. The results of our experiments showed that during active growth, up to 70% of the oxygen atoms and 50% of the hydrogen atoms in the intracellular water of E. coli are generated during metabolism and can be isotopically distinct from extracellular water. The fraction of isotopically distinct atoms was substantially less in stationary phase and chilled cells, consistent with our hypothesis that less metabolically-generated water would be present in cells with lower metabolic activity. Our results were consistent with and explained the result of the heme O labeling experiment. Only about 40% of the O atoms on the heme O molecule were labeled because, presumably, only about 40% of the water inside the cells was 18O water that had diffused in from the culture medium. The rest of the intracellular water contained 16O atoms derived from either nutrients or atmospheric oxygen. To test whether we could also detect metabolically-derived hydrogen atoms in cellular constituents, we isolated fatty acids from log-phase and stationary phase E. coli and determined the H isotope ratios of individual fatty acids. The results of these experiments showed that environmental water contributed more H atoms to fatty acids isolated in stationary phase than to the same fatty acids isolated from log-phase cells. Stable isotope analyses of

  6. Controlled cellular energy conversion in brown adipose tissue thermogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Plant, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue serves as a model system for nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) since a) it has as a primary physiological function the conversion of chemical energy to heat; and b) preliminary data from other tissues involved in NST (e.g., muscle) indicate that parallel mechanisms may be involved. Now that biochemical pathways have been proposed for brown fat thermogenesis, cellular models consistent with a thermodynamic representation can be formulated. Stated concisely, the thermogenic mechanism in a brown fat cell can be considered as an energy converter involving a sequence of cellular events controlled by signals over the autonomic nervous system. A thermodynamic description for NST is developed in terms of a nonisothermal system under steady-state conditions using network thermodynamics. Pathways simulated include mitochondrial ATP synthesis, a Na+/K+ membrane pump, and ionic diffusion through the adipocyte membrane.

  7. Metabolic Discrimination of Select List Agents by Monitoring Cellular Responses in a Multianalyte Microphysiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Wikswo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Harnessing the potential of cells as complex biosensors promises the potential to create sensitive and selective detectors for discrimination of biodefense agents. Here we present toxin detection and suggest discrimination using cells in a multianalyte microphysiometer (MMP that is capable of simultaneously measuring flux changes in four extracellular analytes (acidification rate, glucose uptake, oxygen uptake, and lactate production in real-time. Differential short-term cellular responses were observed between botulinum neurotoxin A and ricin toxin with neuroblastoma cells, alamethicin and anthrax protective antigen with RAW macrophages, and cholera toxin, muscarine, 2,4-dinitro-phenol, and NaF with CHO cells. These results and the post exposure dynamics and metabolic recovery observed in each case suggest the usefulness of cell-based detectors to discriminate between specific analytes and classes of compounds in a complex matrix, and furthermore to make metabolic inferences on the cellular effects of the agents. This may be particularly valuable for classifying unknown toxins.

  8. Mechanistic modeling of aberrant energy metabolism in human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet eSangar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction in energy metabolism—including in pathways localized to the mitochondria—has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide array of disorders, ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases to type II diabetes. The inherent complexities of energy and mitochondrial metabolism present a significant obstacle in the effort to understand the role that these molecular processes play in the development of disease. To help unravel these complexities, systems biology methods have been applied to develop an array of computational metabolic models, ranging from mitochondria-specific processes to genome-scale cellular networks. These constraint-based models can efficiently simulate aspects of normal and aberrant metabolism in various genetic and environmental conditions. Development of these models leverages—and also provides a powerful means to integrate and interpret—information from a wide range of sources including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and enzyme kinetics. Here, we review a variety of mechanistic modeling studies that explore metabolic functions, deficiency disorders, and aberrant biochemical pathways in mitochondria and related regions in the cell.

  9. Dynamics of uptake and metabolism of small molecules in cellular response systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Werner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proper cellular function requires uptake of small molecules from the environment. In response to changes in extracellular conditions cells alter the import and utilization of small molecules. For a wide variety of small molecules the cellular response is regulated by a network motif that combines two feedback loops, one which regulates the transport and the other which regulates the subsequent metabolism. RESULTS: We analyze the dynamic behavior of two widespread but logically distinct two-loop motifs. These motifs differ in the logic of the feedback loop regulating the uptake of the small molecule. Our aim is to examine the qualitative features of the dynamics of these two classes of feedback motifs. We find that the negative feedback to transport is accompanied by overshoot in the intracellular amount of small molecules, whereas a positive feedback to transport removes overshoot by boosting the final steady state level. On the other hand, the negative feedback allows for a rapid initial response, whereas the positive feedback is slower. We also illustrate how the dynamical deficiencies of one feedback motif can be mitigated by an additional loop, while maintaining the original steady-state properties. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis emphasizes the core of the regulation found in many motifs at the interface between the metabolic network and the environment of the cell. By simplifying the regulation into uptake and the first metabolic step, we provide a basis for elaborate studies of more realistic network structures. Particularly, this theoretical analysis predicts that FeS cluster formation plays an important role in the dynamics of iron homeostasis.

  10. Effects of acclimation temperature and cadmium exposure on cellular energy budgets in the marine mollusk Crassostrea virginica: linking cellular and mitochondrial responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkasov, Anton S; Biswas, Pradip K; Ridings, Daisy M; Ringwood, Amy H; Sokolova, Inna M

    2006-04-01

    In order to understand the role of metabolic regulation in environmental stress tolerance, a comprehensive analysis of demand-side effects (i.e. changes in energy demands for basal maintenance) and supply-side effects (i.e. metabolic capacity to provide ATP to cover the energy demand) of environmental stressors is required. We have studied the effects of temperature (12, 20 and 28 degrees C) and exposure to a trace metal, cadmium (50 microg l(-1)), on the cellular energy budget of a model marine poikilotherm, Crassostrea virginica (eastern oysters), using oxygen demand for ATP turnover, protein synthesis, mitochondrial proton leak and non-mitochondrial respiration in isolated gill and hepatopancreas cells as demand-side endpoints and mitochondrial oxidation capacity, abundance and fractional volume as supply-side endpoints. Cadmium exposure and high acclimation temperatures resulted in a strong increase of oxygen demand in gill and hepatopancreas cells of oysters. Cd-induced increases in cellular energy demand were significant at 12 and 20 degrees C but not at 28 degrees C, possibly indicating a metabolic capacity limitation at the highest temperature. Elevated cellular demand in cells from Cd-exposed oysters was associated with a 2-6-fold increase in protein synthesis and, at cold acclimation temperatures, with a 1.5-fold elevated mitochondrial proton leak. Cellular aerobic capacity, as indicated by mitochondrial oxidation capacity, abundance and volume, did not increase in parallel to compensate for the elevated energy demand. Mitochondrial oxidation capacity was reduced in 28 degrees C-acclimated oysters, and mitochondrial abundance decreased in Cd-exposed oysters, with a stronger decrease (by 20-24%) in warm-acclimated oysters compared with cold-acclimated ones (by 8-13%). These data provide a mechanistic basis for synergism between temperature and cadmium stress on metabolism of marine poikilotherms. Exposure to combined temperature and cadmium stress may

  11. Energy Cost Minimization in Heterogeneous Cellular Networks with Hybrid Energy Supplies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ever increasing data demand has led to the significant increase of energy consumption in cellular mobile networks. Recent advancements in heterogeneous cellular networks and green energy supplied base stations provide promising solutions for cellular communications industry. In this article, we first review the motivations and challenges as well as approaches to address the energy cost minimization problem for such green heterogeneous networks. Owing to the diversities of mobile traffic and renewable energy, the energy cost minimization problem involves both temporal and spatial optimization of resource allocation. We next present a new solution to illustrate how to combine the optimization of the temporal green energy allocation and spatial mobile traffic distribution. The whole optimization problem is decomposed into four subproblems, and correspondingly our proposed solution is divided into four parts: energy consumption estimation, green energy allocation, user association, and green energy reallocation. Simulation results demonstrate that our proposed algorithm can significantly reduce the total energy cost.

  12. A Laboratory Experiment on Muscular Metabolism and Fatigue Using the Isolated Frog Muscle Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianuzzo, C. David; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment which demonstrates the association of particular metabolic biochemical changes and muscular fatigue. Highlights applications related to cellular energy metabolism, metabolic regulation, and muscle energetics. (ML)

  13. Regulation of energy metabolism during exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, AJW; Benthem, L; Steffens, AB; Zijlstra, WG

    1996-01-01

    This review deals with the peripheral sympathetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of energy substrate homeostasis during exercise. We have developed an experimental model for assessing sympathetic influences on metabolic processes in the awake and exercising rat. The data in this survey partic

  14. Energy metabolism of young, unadapted calves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrama, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Calves reared for veal or other meat production are usually purchased before 2 weeks of age. The first weeks at the rearing unit represent a critical phase regarding their health. During this period calves are fed at a very low level. In this thesis, the energy metabolism of young, newly purchased c

  15. Pareto optimality in organelle energy metabolism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angione, Claudio; Carapezza, Giovanni; Costanza, Jole; Lió, Pietro; Nicosia, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    In low and high eukaryotes, energy is collected or transformed in compartments, the organelles. The rich variety of size, characteristics, and density of the organelles makes it difficult to build a general picture. In this paper, we make use of the Pareto-front analysis to investigate the optimization of energy metabolism in mitochondria and chloroplasts. Using the Pareto optimality principle, we compare models of organelle metabolism on the basis of single- and multiobjective optimization, approximation techniques (the Bayesian Automatic Relevance Determination), robustness, and pathway sensitivity analysis. Finally, we report the first analysis of the metabolic model for the hydrogenosome of Trichomonas vaginalis, which is found in several protozoan parasites. Our analysis has shown the importance of the Pareto optimality for such comparison and for insights into the evolution of the metabolism from cytoplasmic to organelle bound, involving a model order reduction. We report that Pareto fronts represent an asymptotic analysis useful to describe the metabolism of an organism aimed at maximizing concurrently two or more metabolite concentrations.

  16. Involvement of cellular metabolism in age-related LTP modifications in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Fajdasz, Dominika; Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-06-10

    Recent studies emphasized crucial role of astrocytic glycogen metabolism in regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity in young animals. However, the interplay between age-related synaptic plasticity impairments and changes in energetic metabolism remains obscure. To address this issue, we investigated, in hippocampal slices of young (one month) and aged rats (20-22-months), the impact of glycogen degradation inhibition on LTP, mRNA expression for glycogen metabolism enzymes and morphology of dendritic spines. We show that, whereas in young hippocampi, inhibition of glycogen phosphorolysis disrupts the late phase of LTP in the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pathway, in aged rats, blockade of glycogen phosphorylase tends to enhance it. Gene expression for key energy metabolism enzymes, such as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase and glutamine synthetase showed marked differences between young and aged groups and changes in expression of these enzymes preceded plasticity phenomena. Interestingly, in the aged group, a prominent expression of these enzymes was found also in neurons. Concluding, we show that LTP in the considered pathway is differentially modulated by metabolic processes in young and aging animals, indicating a novel venue of studies aiming at preventing cognitive decline during aging. PMID:26101857

  17. A systemic approach to explore the flexibility of energy stores at the cellular scale: Examples from muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; van Milgen, Jaap; Gondret, Florence

    2016-09-01

    Variations in energy storage and expenditure are key elements for animals adaptation to rapidly changing environments. Because of the multiplicity of metabolic pathways, metabolic crossroads and interactions between anabolic and catabolic processes within and between different cells, the flexibility of energy stores in animal cells is difficult to describe by simple verbal, textual or graphic terms. We propose a mathematical model to study the influence of internal and external challenges on the dynamic behavior of energy stores and its consequence on cell energy status. The role of the flexibility of energy stores on the energy equilibrium at the cellular level is illustrated through three case studies: variation in eating frequency (i.e., glucose input), level of physical activity (i.e., ATP requirement), and changes in cell characteristics (i.e., maximum capacity of glycogen storage). Sensitivity analysis has been performed to highlight the most relevant parameters of the model; model simulations have then been performed to illustrate how variation in these key parameters affects cellular energy balance. According to this analysis, glycogen maximum accumulation capacity and homeostatic energy demand are among the most important parameters regulating muscle cell metabolism to ensure its energy equilibrium. PMID:27338303

  18. Ets-1 regulates energy metabolism in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan L Verschoor

    Full Text Available Cancer cells predominantly utilize glycolysis for ATP production even in the presence of abundant oxygen, an environment that would normally result in energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. Although the molecular mechanism for this metabolic switch to aerobic glycolysis has not been fully elucidated, it is likely that mitochondrial damage to the electron transport chain and the resulting increased production of reactive oxygen species are significant driving forces. In this study, we have investigated the role of the transcription factor Ets-1 in the regulation of mitochondrial function and metabolism. Ets-1 was over-expressed using a stably-incorporated tetracycline-inducible expression vector in the ovarian cancer cell line 2008, which does not express detectable basal levels of Ets-1 protein. Microarray analysis of the effects of Ets-1 over-expression in these ovarian cancer cells shows that Ets-1 up-regulates key enzymes involved in glycolysis and associated feeder pathways, fatty acid metabolism, and antioxidant defense. In contrast, Ets-1 down-regulates genes involved in the citric acid cycle, electron transport chain, and mitochondrial proteins. At the functional level, we have found that Ets-1 expression is directly correlated with cellular oxygen consumption whereby increased expression causes decreased oxygen consumption. Ets-1 over-expression also caused increased sensitivity to glycolytic inhibitors, as well as growth inhibition in a glucose-depleted culture environment. Collectively our findings demonstrate that Ets-1 is involved in the regulation of cellular metabolism and response to oxidative stress in ovarian cancer cells.

  19. Erythropoietin, a novel versatile player regulating energy metabolism beyond the erythroid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Di, Lijun; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), the required cytokine for promoting the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid cells to stimulate erythropoiesis, has been reported to act as a pleiotropic cytokine beyond hematopoietic system. The various activities of EPO are determined by the widespread distribution of its cell surface EPO receptor (EpoR) in multiple tissues including endothelial, neural, myoblasts, adipocytes and other cell types. EPO activity has been linked to angiogenesis, neuroprotection, cardioprotection, stress protection, anti-inflammation and especially the energy metabolism regulation that is recently revealed. The investigations of EPO activity in animals and the expression analysis of EpoR provide more insights on the potential of EPO in regulating energy metabolism and homeostasis. The findings of crosstalk between EPO and some important energy sensors and the regulation of EPO in the cellular respiration and mitochondrial function further provide molecular mechanisms for EPO activity in metabolic activity regulation. In this review, we will summarize the roles of EPO in energy metabolism regulation and the activity of EPO in tissues that are tightly associated with energy metabolism. We will also discuss the effects of EPO in regulating oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial function, the interactions between EPO and important energy regulation factors, and the protective role of EPO from stresses that are related to metabolism, providing a brief overview of previously less appreciated EPO biological function in energy metabolism and homeostasis. PMID:25170305

  20. PGC-1 coactivators: inducible regulators of energy metabolism in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Finck, Brian N; Kelly, Daniel P.

    2006-01-01

    Members of the PPARγ coactivator-1 (PGC-1) family of transcriptional coactivators serve as inducible coregulators of nuclear receptors in the control of cellular energy metabolic pathways. This Review focuses on the biologic and physiologic functions of the PGC-1 coactivators, with particular emphasis on striated muscle, liver, and other organ systems relevant to common diseases such as diabetes and heart failure.

  1. Monitoring intra-cellular lipid metabolism in macrophages by Raman- and CARS-microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, Christian; Bergner, Gero; Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Lorkowski, Stefan; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-04-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages play a key role in lipid metabolism in vessel wall tissues. Macrophages can take up lipids by various mechanisms. As phagocytes, macrophages are important for the decomposition of lipid plaques within arterial walls that contribute to arteriosclerosis. Of special interest are uptake dynamics and intra-cellular fate of different individual types of lipids as, for example, fatty acids, triglycerides or free and esterified cholesterol. Here we utilize Raman microscopy to image the metabolism of such lipids and follow subsequent storage or degradation patterns. The combination of optical microscopy with Raman spectroscopy allows visualization at the diffraction limit of the employed laser light and biochemical characterization through the associated spectral information. Relatively long measuring times, due to the weakness of Raman scattering can be overcome by non-linear effects such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). With this contribution we introduce first results to monitor the incorporation of lipid components into individual cells employing Raman and CARS microscopy.

  2. Enzyme oscillation can enhance the thermodynamic efficiency of cellular metabolism: Consequence of anti-phase coupling between reaction flux and affinity

    CERN Document Server

    Himeoka, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Cells generally convert nutrient resources to useful products via energy transduction. Accordingly, the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion process is one of the most essential characteristics of living organisms. However, although these processes occur under conditions of dynamic metabolism, most studies of cellular thermodynamic efficiency have been restricted to examining steady states; thus, the relevance of dynamics to this efficiency has not yet been elucidated. Here, we develop a simple model of metabolic reactions with anabolism-catabolism coupling catalysed by enzymes. Through application of external oscillation in the enzyme abundances, the thermodynamic efficiency of metabolism was found to be improved. This result is in strong contrast with that observed in the oscillatory input, in which the efficiency always decreased with oscillation. This improvement was effectively achieved by separating the anabolic and catabolic reactions, which tend to disequilibrate each other, and taking advantag...

  3. Metabolically active portion of fat-free mass: a cellular body composition level modeling analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, ZiMian; Heshka, Stanley; Wang, Jack; Gallagher, Dympna; Deurenberg, Paul; Chen, Zhao; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2006-01-01

    The proportion of fat-free mass (FFM) as body cell mass (BCM) is highly related to whole body resting energy expenditure. However, the magnitude of BCM/FFM may have been underestimated in previous studies. This is because Moore’s equation [BCM (kg) =0.00833 × total body potassium (in mmol)], which was used to predict BCM, underestimates BCM by ~ %. The aims of the present study were to develop a theoretical BCM/FFM model at the cellular level and to explore the influences of sex, age, and adi...

  4. DIFFERENTIAL-EFFECTS OF METABOLIC-INHIBITORS ON CELLULAR AND MITOCHONDRIAL UPTAKE OF ORGANIC CATIONS IN RAT-LIVER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEEN, H; MARING, JG; MEIJER, DKF

    1992-01-01

    The effects of several metabolic inhibitors on the uptake of tri-n-butylmethylammonium (TBuMA) were studied in isolated rat liver mitochondria, isolated rat hepatocytes and isolated perfused rat livers, in order to characterize further the mechanisms for carrier-Mediated uptake and cellular accumula

  5. Neural networks and cellular automata in experimental high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the past few years, two novel computing techniques, cellular automata and neural networks, have shown considerable promise in the solution of problems of a very high degree of complexity, such as turbulent fluid flow, image processing, and pattern recognition. Many of the problems faced in experimental high energy physics are also of this nature. Track reconstruction in wire chambers and cluster finding in cellular calorimeters, for instance, involve pattern recognition and high combinatorial complexity since many combinations of hits or cells must be considered in order to arrive at the final tracks or clusters. Here we examine in what way connective network methods can be applied to some of the problems of experimental high physics. It is found that such problems as track and cluster finding adapt naturally to these approaches. When large scale hardwired connective networks become available, it will be possible to realize solutions to such problems in a fraction of the time required by traditional methods. For certain types of problems, faster solutions are already possible using model networks implemented on vector or other massively parallel machines. It should also be possible, using existing technology, to build simplified networks that will allow detailed reconstructed event information to be used in fast trigger decisions

  6. Ocean warming alters cellular metabolism and induces mortality in fish early life stages: A proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, D; Araújo, J E; Vitorino, R; Capelo, J L; Vinagre, C; Diniz, M S

    2016-07-01

    Climate change has pervasive effects on marine ecosystems, altering biodiversity patterns, abundance and distribution of species, biological interactions, phenology, and organisms' physiology, performance and fitness. Fish early life stages have narrow thermal windows and are thus more vulnerable to further changes in water temperature. The aim of this study was to address the sensitivity and underlying molecular changes of larvae of a key fisheries species, the sea bream Sparus aurata, towards ocean warming. Larvae were exposed to three temperatures: 18°C (control), 24°C (warm) and 30°C (heat wave) for seven days. At the end of the assay, i) survival curves were plotted for each temperature treatment and ii) entire larvae were collected for proteomic analysis via 2D gel electrophoresis, image analysis and mass spectrometry. Survival decreased with increasing temperature, with no larvae surviving at 30°C. Therefore, proteomic analysis was only carried out for 18°C and 24°C. Larvae up-regulated protein folding and degradation, cytoskeletal re-organization, transcriptional regulation and the growth hormone while mostly down-regulating cargo transporting and porphyrin metabolism upon exposure to heat stress. No changes were detected in proteins related to energetic metabolism suggesting that larval fish may not have the energetic plasticity needed to sustain cellular protection in the long-term. These results indicate that despite proteome modulation, S. aurata larvae do not seem able to fully acclimate to higher temperatures as shown by the low survival rates. Consequently, elevated temperatures seem to have bottleneck effects during fish early life stages, and future ocean warming can potentially compromise recruitment's success of key fisheries species. PMID:27062348

  7. Circulating follistatin in relation to energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jakob Schiøler; Plomgaard, Peter

    2016-09-15

    Recently, substantial evidence has emerged that the liver contributes significantly to the circulating levels of follistatin and that circulating follistatin is tightly regulated by the glucagon-to-insulin ratio. Both observations are based on investigations of healthy subjects. These novel findings challenge the present view of circulating follistatin in human physiology, being that circulating follistatin is a result of spill-over from para/autocrine actions in various tissues and cells. Follistatin as a liver-derived protein under the regulation of glucagon-to-insulin ratio suggests a relation to energy metabolism. In this narrative review, we attempt to reconcile the existing findings on circulating follistatin with the novel concept that circulating follistatin is a liver-derived molecule regulated by the glucagon-to-insulin ratio. The picture emerging is that conditions associated with elevated levels of circulating follistatin have a metabolic denominator with decreased insulin sensitivity and/or hyperglucagoneimia. PMID:27264073

  8. Glycolysis in energy metabolism during seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng Yang; Jiongxing Wu; Ren Guo; Yufen Peng; Wen Zheng; Ding Liu; Zhi Song

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that glycolysis increases during seizures, and that the glycolytic metabolite lactic acid can be used as an energy source. However, how lactic acid provides energy for seizures and how it can participate in the termination of seizures remains unclear. We reviewed possible mechanisms of glycolysis involved in seizure onset. Results showed that lactic acid was involved in seizure onset and provided energy at early stages. As seizures progress, lactic acid reduces the pH of tissue and induces metabolic acidosis, which terminates the seizure. The specific mechanism of lactic acid-induced acidosis involves several aspects, which include lactic acid-induced inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme 6-diphosphate kinase-1, inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, activation of the acid-sensitive 1A ion channel, strengthening of the receptive mechanism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid, and changes in the intra- and extracellular environment.

  9. Experimental ocean acidification alters the allocation of metabolic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, T-C Francis; Applebaum, Scott L; Manahan, Donal T

    2015-04-14

    Energy is required to maintain physiological homeostasis in response to environmental change. Although responses to environmental stressors frequently are assumed to involve high metabolic costs, the biochemical bases of actual energy demands are rarely quantified. We studied the impact of a near-future scenario of ocean acidification [800 µatm partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2)] during the development and growth of an important model organism in developmental and environmental biology, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Size, metabolic rate, biochemical content, and gene expression were not different in larvae growing under control and seawater acidification treatments. Measurements limited to those levels of biological analysis did not reveal the biochemical mechanisms of response to ocean acidification that occurred at the cellular level. In vivo rates of protein synthesis and ion transport increased ∼50% under acidification. Importantly, the in vivo physiological increases in ion transport were not predicted from total enzyme activity or gene expression. Under acidification, the increased rates of protein synthesis and ion transport that were sustained in growing larvae collectively accounted for the majority of available ATP (84%). In contrast, embryos and prefeeding and unfed larvae in control treatments allocated on average only 40% of ATP to these same two processes. Understanding the biochemical strategies for accommodating increases in metabolic energy demand and their biological limitations can serve as a quantitative basis for assessing sublethal effects of global change. Variation in the ability to allocate ATP differentially among essential functions may be a key basis of resilience to ocean acidification and other compounding environmental stressors.

  10. The Changes of Energy Interactions between Nucleus Function and Mitochondria Functions Causing Transmutation of Chronic Inflammation into Cancer Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponizovskiy, Michail R

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions induce the mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy according to the first law of thermodynamics in able-bodied cells and changes the mechanisms of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy creating a transition stationary state of ablebodied cells into quasi-stationary pathologic states of acute inflammation transiting then into chronic inflammation and then transmuting into cancer metabolism. The mechanisms' influences of intruding etiologic pathologic agents (microbe, virus, etc.) lead to these changes of energy interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions causing general acute inflammation, then passing into local chronic inflammation, and reversing into cancer metabolism transmutation. Interactions between biochemical processes and biophysical processes of cellular capacitors' operations create a supplementary mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy in the norm and in pathology. Discussion of some scientific works eliminates doubts of the authors of these works. PMID:27480780

  11. The SCFA receptor GPR43 and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuo eKimura

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Free fatty acids (FFAs are essential nutrients and act as signaling molecules in various cellular processes via binding with FFA receptors. Of these receptors, GPR43 is activated by short chain fatty acids (SCFAs; e.g., acetate, propionate, and butyrate. During feeding, SCFAs are produced by microbial fermentation of dietary fiber in the gut, and these SCFAs become important energy sources for the host. The gut microbiota affects nutrient acquisition and energy regulation of the host and can influence the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. Recently, GPR43 has been reported to regulate host energy homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract and adipose tissues. Hence, GPR43 is also thought to be a potential drug target for metabolic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes. In this review, we summarize the identification, structure, and activities of GPR43, with a focus on host energy regulation, and present an essential overview of our current understanding of its physiological roles in host energy regulation that is mediated by gut microbiota. We also discuss the potential for GPR43 as a therapeutic target.

  12. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Anna Busiello

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the metabolic factors that contribute to energy metabolism (EM is critical for the development of new treatments for obesity and related diseases. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is not perfectly coupled to ATP synthesis, and the process of proton-leak plays a crucial role. Proton-leak accounts for a significant part of the resting metabolic rate and therefore enhancement of this process represents a potential target for obesity treatment. Since their discovery, uncoupling proteins have stimulated great interest due to their involvement in mitochondrial-inducible proton-leak. Despite the widely accepted uncoupling/thermogenic effect of uncoupling protein one (UCP1, which was the first in this family to be discovered, the reactions catalyzed by its homologue UCP3 and the physiological role remain under debate.This review provides an overview of the role played by UCP1 and UCP3 in mitochondrial uncoupling/functionality as well as EM and suggests that they are a potential therapeutic target for treating obesity and its related diseases such as type II diabetes mellitus.

  13. Energy Efficient Resource Allocation for Phantom Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-04-01

    Multi-tier heterogeneous networks have become an essential constituent for next generation cellular networks. Meanwhile, energy efficiency (EE) has been considered a critical design criterion along with the traditional spectral efficiency (SE) metric. In this context, we study power and spectrum allocation for the recently proposed two-tier network architecture known as phantom cellular networks. The optimization framework includes both EE and SE. First, we consider sparsely deployed cells experiencing negligible interference and assume perfect channel state information (CSI). For this setting, we propose an algorithm that finds the SE and EE resource allocation strategies. Then, we compare the performance of both design strategies versus number of users, and phantom cells share of the total available resource units (RUs). We aim to investigate the effect of some system parameters to achieve improved SE performance at a non-significant loss in EE performance, or vice versa. It is found that increasing phantom cells share of RUs decreases the SE performance loss due to EE optimization when compared with the optimized SE performance. Second, we consider the densely deployed phantom cellular networks and model the EE optimization problem having into consideration the inevitable interference and imperfect channel estimation. To this end, we propose three resource allocation strategies aiming at optimizing the EE performance metric of this network. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of changing some of the system parameters on the performance of the proposed strategies, such as phantom cells share of RUs, number of deployed phantom cells within a macro cell coverage, number of pilots and the maximum power available for transmission by the phantom cells BSs. It is found that increasing the number of pilots deteriorates the EE performance of the whole setup, while increasing maximum power available for phantom cells transmissions reduces the EE of the whole setup in a

  14. Response of C2C12 Myoblasts to Hypoxia: The Relative Roles of Glucose and Oxygen in Adaptive Cellular Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oxygen and glucose are two important nutrients for mammalian cell function. In this study, the effect of glucose and oxygen concentrations on C2C12 cellular metabolism was characterized with an emphasis on detecting whether cells show oxygen conformance (OC in response to hypoxia. Methods. After C2C12 cells being cultured in the levels of glucose at 0.6 mM (LG, 5.6 mM (MG, or 23.3 mM(HG under normoxic or hypoxic (1% oxygen condition, cellular oxygen consumption, glucose consumption, lactate production, and metabolic status were determined. Short-term oxygen consumption was measured with a novel oxygen biosensor technique. Longer-term measurements were performed with standard glucose, lactate, and cell metabolism assays. Results. It was found that oxygen depletion in normoxia is dependent on the glucose concentration in the medium. Cellular glucose uptake and lactate production increased significantly in hypoxia than those in normoxia. In hypoxia the cellular response to the level of glucose was different to that in normoxia. The metabolic activities decreased while glucose concentration increased in normoxia, while in hypoxia, metabolic activity was reduced in LG and MG, but unchanged in HG condition. The OC phenomenon was not observed in the present study. Conclusions. Our findings suggested that a combination of low oxygen and low glucose damages the viability of C2C12 cells more seriously than low oxygen alone. In addition, when there is sufficient glucose, C2C12 cells will respond to hypoxia by upregulating anaerobic respiration, as shown by lactate production.

  15. Biosorption and degradation of decabromodiphenyl ether by Brevibacillus brevis and the influence of decabromodiphenyl ether on cellular metabolic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linlin; Tang, Litao; Wang, Ran; Wang, Xiaoya; Ye, Jinshao; Long, Yan

    2016-03-01

    There is global concern about the effects of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) on environmental and public health. The molecular properties, biosorption, degradation, accumulation, and cellular metabolic effects of BDE209 were investigated in this study to identify the mechanisms involved in the aerobic biodegradation of BDE209. BDE209 is initially absorbed by wall teichoic acid and N-acetylglucosamine side chains in peptidoglycan, and then, BDE209 is transported and debrominated through three pathways, giving tri-, hepta-, octa-, and nona-bromodiphenyl ethers. The C-C bond energies decrease as the number of bromine atoms on the diphenyl decreases. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) inhibit protein expression or accelerate protein degradation and increase membrane permeability and the release of Cl(-), Na(+), NH4 (+), arabinose, proteins, acetic acid, and oxalic acid. However, PBDEs increase the amounts of K(+), Mg(2+), PO4 (3-), SO4 (2-), and NO3 (-) assimilated. The biosorption, degradation, accumulation, and removal efficiencies when Brevibacillus brevis (1 g L(-1)) was exposed to BDE209 (0.5 mg L(-1)) for 7 days were 7.4, 69.5, 16.3, and 94.6 %, respectively. PMID:26555880

  16. Altered Metabolic Homeostasis in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Mechanisms of Energy Imbalance and Contribution to Disease Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, Zara A; Ngo, Shyuan T; Henderson, Robert D; McCombe, Pamela A; Steyn, Frederik J

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the death of motor neurones, which leads to paralysis and death in an average of 3 years following diagnosis. The cause of ALS is unknown, but there is substantial evidence that metabolic factors, including nutritional state and body weight, affect disease progression and survival. This review provides an overview of the characteristics of metabolic dysregulation in ALS focusing on mechanisms that lead to disrupted energy supply (at a whole-body and cellular level) and altered energy expenditure. We discuss how a decrease in energy supply occurs in parallel with an increase in energy demand and leads to a state of chronic energy deficit which has a negative impact on disease outcome in ALS. We conclude by presenting potential and tested strategies to compensate for, or correct this energy imbalance, and speculate on promising areas for further research. PMID:27400276

  17. Energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along the crypt-villus axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huansheng; Wang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Xia; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells continuously migrate and mature along crypt-villus axis (CVA), while the changes in energy metabolism during maturation are unclear in neonates. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells would be changed during maturation along CVA in neonates. Eight 21-day-old suckling piglets were used. Intestinal epithelial cells were isolated sequentially along CVA, and proteomics was used to analyze the changes in proteins expression in epithelial cells along CVA. The identified differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in cellular process, metabolic process, biological regulation, pigmentation, multicellular organizational process and so on. The energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells of piglets was increased from the bottom of crypt to the top of villi. Moreover, the expression of proteins related to the metabolism of glucose, most of amino acids, and fatty acids was increased in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA, while the expression of proteins related to glutamine metabolism was decreased from crypt to villus tip. The expression of proteins involved in citrate cycle was also increased intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA. Moreover, dietary supplementation with different energy sources had different effects on intestinal structure of weaned piglets. PMID:27558220

  18. Enzyme oscillation can enhance the thermodynamic efficiency of cellular metabolism: consequence of anti-phase coupling between reaction flux and affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeoka, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-04-01

    Cells generally convert nutrient resources to products via energy transduction. Accordingly, the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion process is one of the most essential characteristics of living organisms. However, although these processes occur under conditions of dynamic metabolism, most studies of cellular thermodynamic efficiency have been restricted to examining steady states; thus, the relevance of dynamics to this efficiency has not yet been elucidated. Here, we develop a simple model of metabolic reactions with anabolism-catabolism coupling catalyzed by enzymes. Through application of external oscillation in the enzyme abundances, the thermodynamic efficiency of metabolism was found to be improved. This result is in strong contrast with that observed in the oscillatory input, in which the efficiency always decreased with oscillation. This improvement was effectively achieved by separating the anabolic and catabolic reactions, which tend to disequilibrate each other, and taking advantage of the temporal oscillations so that each of the antagonistic reactions could progress near equilibrium. In this case, anti-phase oscillation between the reaction flux and chemical affinity through oscillation of enzyme abundances is essential. This improvement was also confirmed in a model capable of generating autonomous oscillations in enzyme abundances. Finally, the possible relevance of the improvement in thermodynamic efficiency is discussed with respect to the potential for manipulation of metabolic oscillations in microorganisms.

  19. Inborn Errors of Energy Metabolism Associated with Myopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Anibh M.; Ulrike Steuerwald; Sabine Illsinger

    2010-01-01

    Inherited neuromuscular disorders affect approximately one in 3,500 children. Structural muscular defects are most common; however functional impairment of skeletal and cardiac muscle in both children and adults may be caused by inborn errors of energy metabolism as well. Patients suffering from metabolic myopathies due to compromised energy metabolism may present with exercise intolerance, muscle pain, reversible or progressive muscle weakness, and myoglobinuria. In this review, the physiolo...

  20. Respiration, respiratory metabolism and energy consumption under weightless conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasyan, I. I.; Makarov, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    Changes in the physiological indices of respiration, respiratory metabolism and energy consumption in spacecrews under weightlessness conditions manifest themselves in increased metabolic rates, higher pulmonary ventilation volume, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide elimination, energy consumption levels in proportion to reduction in neuroemotional and psychic stress, adaptation to weightlessness and work-rest cycles, and finally in a relative stabilization of metabolic processes due to hemodynamic shifts.

  1. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  2. The effect of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid on energy metabolism: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Oudman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Creatine kinase plays a key role in cellular energy transport. The enzyme transfers high-energy phosphoryl groups from mitochondria to subcellular sites of ATP hydrolysis, where it buffers ADP concentration by catalyzing the reversible transfer of the high-energy phosphate moiety (P between creatine and ADP. Cellular creatine uptake is competitively inhibited by beta-guanidinopropionic acid. This substance is marked as safe for human use, but the effects are unclear. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the effect of beta-guanidinopropionic acid on energy metabolism and function of tissues with high energy demands. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and searched the electronic databases Pubmed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and LILACS from their inception through March 2011. Furthermore, we searched the internet and explored references from textbooks and reviews. RESULTS: After applying the inclusion criteria, we retrieved 131 publications, mainly considering the effect of chronic oral administration of beta-guanidinopropionic acid (0.5 to 3.5% on skeletal muscle, the cardiovascular system, and brain tissue in animals. Beta-guanidinopropionic acid decreased intracellular creatine and phosphocreatine in all tissues studied. In skeletal muscle, this effect induced a shift from glycolytic to oxidative metabolism, increased cellular glucose uptake and increased fatigue tolerance. In heart tissue this shift to mitochondrial metabolism was less pronounced. Myocardial contractility was modestly reduced, including a decreased ventricular developed pressure, albeit with unchanged cardiac output. In brain tissue adaptations in energy metabolism resulted in enhanced ATP stability and survival during hypoxia. CONCLUSION: Chronic beta-guanidinopropionic acid increases fatigue tolerance of skeletal muscle and survival during ischaemia in animal studies, with modestly reduced myocardial contractility. Because it is marked as safe for human

  3. Interactions between vertebrate hemoglobins and red cell proteins: Possible roles in regulating cellular metabolism and rheology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) play a vital role in vertebrate metabolism. Tissue O2 delivery depends on their O2 transporting properties and rheology, an integral determinant of tissue perfusion. The mechanical characteristics and key metabolic characteristics of RBCs (such as glycolysis rate, pentose...

  4. Effects of in vitro Brevetoxin Exposure on Apoptosis and Cellular Metabolism in a Leukemic T Cell Line (Jurkat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Sleasman

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms (HABs of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce red tide toxins, or brevetoxins. Significant health effects associated with red tide toxin exposure have been reported in sea life and in humans, with brevetoxins documented within immune cells from many species. The objective of this research was to investigate potential immunotoxic effects of brevetoxins using a leukemic T cell line (Jurkat as an in vitro model system. Viability, cell proliferation, and apoptosis assays were conducted using brevetoxin congeners PbTx-2, PbTx-3, and PbTx-6. The effects of in vitro brevetoxin exposure on cell viability and cellular metabolism or proliferation were determined using trypan blue and MTT (1-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-3,5- diphenylformazan, respectively. Using MTT, cellular metabolic activity was decreased in Jurkat cells exposed to 5 - 10 μg/ml PbTx-2 or PbTx-6. After 3 h, no significant effects on cell viability were observed with any toxin congener in concentrations up to 10 μg/ml. Viability decreased dramatically after 24 h in cells treated with PbTx-2 or -6. Apoptosis, as measured by caspase-3 activity, was significantly increased in cells exposed to PbTx-2 or PbTx-6. In summary, brevetoxin congeners varied in effects on Jurkat cells, with PbTx-2 and PbTx-6 eliciting greater cellular effects compared to PbTx-3.

  5. Polyethylenimine architecture-dependent metabolic imprints and perturbation of cellular redox homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Arnaldur; Parhamifar, Ladan; Lange, Marina Krarup;

    2015-01-01

    demonstrate that the central mechanisms of PEI architecture- and size-dependent perturbations of integrated cellular metabolomics involve destabilization of plasma membrane and mitochondrial membranes with consequences on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), glycolytic flux and redox homeostasis...

  6. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Kreft

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.

  7. Actions of juglone on energy metabolism in the rat liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saling, Simoni Cristina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Mito, Marcio Shigueaki; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar, E-mail: adebracht@uol.com.br

    2011-12-15

    Juglone is a phenolic compound used in popular medicine as a phytotherapic to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, it also acts as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated liver mitochondria and, thus, may interfere with the hepatic energy metabolism. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of juglone on several metabolic parameters in the isolated perfused rat liver. Juglone, in the concentration range of 5 to 50 {mu}M, stimulated glycogenolysis, glycolysis and oxygen uptake. Gluconeogenesis from both lactate and alanine was inhibited with half-maximal effects at the concentrations of 14.9 and 15.7 {mu}M, respectively. The overall alanine transformation was increased by juglone, as indicated by the stimulated release of ammonia, urea, L-glutamate, lactate and pyruvate. A great increase (9-fold) in the tissue content of {alpha}-ketoglutarate was found, without a similar change in the L-glutamate content. The tissue contents of ATP were decreased, but those of ADP and AMP were increased. Experiments with isolated mitochondria fully confirmed previous notions about the uncoupling action of juglone. It can be concluded that juglone is active on metabolism at relatively low concentrations. In this particular it resembles more closely the classical uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. Ingestion of high doses of juglone, thus, presents the same risks as the ingestion of 2,4-dinitrophenol which comprise excessive compromising of ATP production, hyperthermia and even death. Low doses, i.e., moderate consumption of natural products containing juglone, however, could be beneficial to health if one considers recent reports about the consequences of chronic mild uncoupling. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated how juglone acts on liver metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The actions on hepatic gluconeogenesis, glycolysis and ureogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Juglone stimulates glycolysis and ureagenesis and

  8. Understanding Cellular Respiration in Terms of Matter & Energy within Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joshua S.; Maskiewicz, April C.

    2014-01-01

    Using a design-based research approach, we developed a data-rich problem (DRP) set to improve student understanding of cellular respiration at the ecosystem level. The problem tasks engage students in data analysis to develop biological explanations. Several of the tasks and their implementation are described. Quantitative results suggest that…

  9. Depletion of reduction potential and key energy generation metabolic enzymes underlies tellurite toxicity in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaganti, Narasimha; Basu, Bhakti; Gupta, Alka; Joseph, Daisy; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress resistant Deinococcus radiodurans surprisingly exhibited moderate sensitivity to tellurite induced oxidative stress (LD50 = 40 μM tellurite, 40 min exposure). The organism reduced 70% of 40 μM potassium tellurite within 5 h. Tellurite exposure significantly modulated cellular redox status. The level of ROS and protein carbonyl contents increased while the cellular reduction potential substantially decreased following tellurite exposure. Cellular thiols levels initially increased (within 30 min) of tellurite exposure but decreased at later time points. At proteome level, tellurite resistance proteins (TerB and TerD), tellurite reducing enzymes (pyruvate dehydrogense subunits E1 and E3), ROS detoxification enzymes (superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductase), and protein folding chaperones (DnaK, EF-Ts, and PPIase) displayed increased abundance in tellurite-stressed cells. However, remarkably decreased levels of key metabolic enzymes (aconitase, transketolase, 3-hydroxy acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein alpha, and beta) involved in carbon and energy metabolism were observed upon tellurite stress. The results demonstrate that depletion of reduction potential in intensive tellurite reduction with impaired energy metabolism lead to tellurite toxicity in D. radiodurans.

  10. Adaptations in the energy metabolism of parasites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grinsven, K.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    For this thesis fundamental research was performed on the metabolic adaptations found in parasites. Studying the adaptations in parasite metabolisms leads to a better understanding of parasite bioenergetics and can also result in the identification of new anti-parasitic drug targets. We focussed on

  11. ABCC6 : a new player in cellular cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism?

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzaj, Patricia; Kuhn, Joachim; Dabisch-Ruthe, Mareike; Faust, Isabel; Götting, Christian; Knabbe, Cornelius; Hendig, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysregulations in cholesterol and lipid metabolism have been linked to human diseases like hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis or the metabolic syndrome. Many ABC transporters are involved in trafficking of metabolites derived from these pathways. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), an autosomal-recessive disease caused by ABCC6 mutations, is characterized by atherogenesis and soft tissue calcification. Methods In this study we investigated the regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis ...

  12. Metabolism as a tool for understanding human brain evolution: lipid energy metabolism as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu Pei; Yang, Hao; Wu, Jiang Wei; Gauthier, Nicolas; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Mitchell, Grant A

    2014-12-01

    Genes and the environment both influence the metabolic processes that determine fitness. To illustrate the importance of metabolism for human brain evolution and health, we use the example of lipid energy metabolism, i.e. the use of fat (lipid) to produce energy and the advantages that this metabolic pathway provides for the brain during environmental energy shortage. We briefly describe some features of metabolism in ancestral organisms, which provided a molecular toolkit for later development. In modern humans, lipid energy metabolism is a regulated multi-organ pathway that links triglycerides in fat tissue to the mitochondria of many tissues including the brain. Three important control points are each suppressed by insulin. (1) Lipid reserves in adipose tissue are released by lipolysis during fasting and stress, producing fatty acids (FAs) which circulate in the blood and are taken up by cells. (2) FA oxidation. Mitochondrial entry is controlled by carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1). Inside the mitochondria, FAs undergo beta oxidation and energy production in the Krebs cycle and respiratory chain. (3) In liver mitochondria, the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) pathway produces ketone bodies for the brain and other organs. Unlike most tissues, the brain does not capture and metabolize circulating FAs for energy production. However, the brain can use ketone bodies for energy. We discuss two examples of genetic metabolic traits that may be advantageous under most conditions but deleterious in others. (1) A CPT1A variant prevalent in Inuit people may allow increased FA oxidation under nonfasting conditions but also predispose to hypoglycemic episodes. (2) The thrifty genotype theory, which holds that energy expenditure is efficient so as to maximize energy stores, predicts that these adaptations may enhance survival in periods of famine but predispose to obesity in modern dietary environments.

  13. Cellular metabolic, stress, and histological response on exposure to acute toxicity of endosulfan in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Sharma, Rupam; Tripathi, Gayatri; Kumar, Kundan; Dalvi, Rishikesh S; Krishna, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Endosulfan is one of the most hazardous organochlorines pesticides responsible for environmental pollution, as it is very persistent and shows bio-magnification. This study evaluated the impact of acute endosulfan toxicity on metabolic enzymes, lysozyme activities, heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 expression, and histopathology in Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Among the indicators that were induced in dose dependent manner were the enzymes of amino acid metabolism (serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase), carbohydrate metabolism (serum lactate dehydrogenase), pentose phosphate pathway (Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) as well as lysozyme and Hsp70 in liver and gill, while liver and gill Isocitrate dehydrogenase (TCA cycle enzyme) and marker of general energetics (Total adenosine triphosphatase) were inhibited. Histopathological alterations in gill were clubbing of secondary gill lamellae, marked hyperplasia, complete loss of secondary lamellae and atrophy of primary gill filaments. Whereas in liver, swollen hepatocyte, and degeneration with loss of cellular boundaries were distinctly noticed. Overall results clearly demonstrated the unbalanced metabolism and damage of the vital organs like liver and gill in Tilapia due to acute endosulfan exposure.

  14. Impact of Ocean Acidification on Energy Metabolism of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas—Changes in Metabolic Pathways and Thermal Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bock

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Climate change with increasing temperature and ocean acidification (OA poses risks for marine ecosystems. According to Pörtner and Farrell [1], synergistic effects of elevated temperature and CO2-induced OA on energy metabolism will narrow the thermal tolerance window of marine ectothermal animals. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of an acute temperature rise on energy metabolism of the oyster, Crassostrea gigas chronically exposed to elevated CO2 levels (partial pressure of CO2 in the seawater ~0.15 kPa, seawater pH ~ 7.7. Within one month of incubation at elevated PCO2 and 15 °C hemolymph pH fell (pHe = 7.1 ± 0.2 (CO2-group vs. 7.6 ± 0.1 (control and PeCO2 values in hemolymph increased (0.5 ± 0.2 kPa (CO2-group vs. 0.2 ± 0.04 kPa (control. Slightly but significantly elevated bicarbonate concentrations in the hemolymph of CO2-incubated oysters ([HCO-3]e = 1.8 ± 0.3 mM (CO2-group vs. 1.3 ± 0.1 mM (control indicate only minimal regulation of extracellular acid-base status. At the acclimation temperature of 15 °C the OA-induced decrease in pHe did not lead to metabolic depression in oysters as standard metabolism rates (SMR of CO2-exposed oysters were similar to controls. Upon acute warming SMR rose in both groups, but displayed a stronger increase in the CO2-incubated group. Investigation in isolated gill cells revealed a similar temperature-dependence of respiration between groups. Furthermore, the fraction of cellular energy demand for ion regulation via Na+/K+-ATPase was not affected by chronic hypercapnia or temperature. Metabolic profiling using 1H-NMR spectroscopy revealed substantial changes in some tissues following OA exposure at 15 °C. In mantle tissue alanine and ATP levels decreased significantly whereas an increase in succinate levels was observed in gill tissue. These findings suggest shifts in metabolic pathways following OA-exposure. Our study confirms that OA affects energy metabolism in oysters and

  15. Decoding the dynamics of cellular metabolism and the action of 3-bromopyruvate and 2-deoxyglucose using pulsed stable isotope-resolved metabolomics

    OpenAIRE

    Mudrich Epouse Dorosz, Susann Antonia; Pietzke, Matthias; Zasada, Christin

    2014-01-01

    Background Cellular metabolism is highly dynamic and continuously adjusts to the physiological program of the cell. The regulation of metabolism appears at all biological levels: (post-) transcriptional, (post-) translational, and allosteric. This regulatory information is expressed in the metabolome, but in a complex manner. To decode such complex information, new methods are needed in order to facilitate dynamic metabolic characterization at high resolution. Results Here, we descri...

  16. Decoding the dynamics of cellular metabolism and the action of 3-bromopyruvate and 2-deoxyglucose using pulsed stable isotope-resolved metabolomics

    OpenAIRE

    Pietzke, M.; Zasada, C.; Mudrich, S.; Kempa, S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cellular metabolism is highly dynamic and continuously adjusts to the physiological program of the cell. The regulation of metabolism appears at all biological levels: (post-) transcriptional, (post-) translational, and allosteric. This regulatory information is expressed in the metabolome, but in a complex manner. To decode such complex information, new methods are needed in order to facilitate dynamic metabolic characterization at high resolution. RESULTS: Here, we describe pul...

  17. Bactericidal Antibiotics Induce Toxic Metabolic Perturbations that Lead to Cellular Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Belenky

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how antibiotics impact bacterial metabolism may provide insight into their mechanisms of action and could lead to enhanced therapeutic methodologies. Here, we profiled the metabolome of Escherichia coli after treatment with three different classes of bactericidal antibiotics (β-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones. These treatments induced a similar set of metabolic changes after 30 min that then diverged into more distinct profiles at later time points. The most striking changes corresponded to elevated concentrations of central carbon metabolites, active breakdown of the nucleotide pool, reduced lipid levels, and evidence of an elevated redox state. We examined potential end-target consequences of these metabolic perturbations and found that antibiotic-treated cells exhibited cytotoxic changes indicative of oxidative stress, including higher levels of protein carbonylation, malondialdehyde adducts, nucleotide oxidation, and double-strand DNA breaks. This work shows that bactericidal antibiotics induce a complex set of metabolic changes that are correlated with the buildup of toxic metabolic by-products.

  18. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S;

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pat......-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.......Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy...

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by frataxin deficiency is associated with cellular senescence and abnormal calcium metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantxa eBolinches-Amorós

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia is considered a neurodegenerative disorder involving both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG are the major target tissue structures. This neuropathy is caused by mutations in the FXN gene that encodes frataxin. Here, we investigated the mitochondrial and cell consequences of frataxin depletion in a cellular model based on frataxin silencing in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, a cell line that has been used widely as in vitro models for studies on neurological diseases. We showed that the reduction of frataxin induced mitochondrial dysfunction due to a bioenergetic deficit and abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in the mitochondria that were associated with oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses. The depletion of frataxin did not cause cell death but increased autophagy, which may have a cytoprotective effect against cellular insults such as oxidative stress. Frataxin silencing provoked slow cell growth associated with cellular senescence, as demonstrated by increased SA-βgal activity and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. We postulate that cellular senescence might be related to a hypoplastic defect in the DRG during neurodevelopment, as suggested by necropsy studies.

  20. Identification of Circular RNAs from the Parental Genes Involved in Multiple Aspects of Cellular Metabolism in Barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbani, Behrooz; Noeparvar, Shahin; Borg, Søren

    2016-01-01

    RNA circularization made by head-to-tail back-splicing events is involved in the regulation of gene expression from transcriptional to post-translational levels. By exploiting RNA-Seq data and down-stream analysis, we shed light on the importance of circular RNAs in plants. The results introduce circular RNAs as novel interactors in the regulation of gene expression in plants and imply the comprehensiveness of this regulatory pathway by identifying circular RNAs for a diverse set of genes. These genes are involved in several aspects of cellular metabolism as hormonal signaling, intracellular protein sorting, carbohydrate metabolism and cell-wall biogenesis, respiration, amino acid biosynthesis, transcription and translation, and protein ubiquitination. Additionally, these parental loci of circular RNAs, from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, encode for different transcript classes including protein coding transcripts, microRNA, rRNA, and long non-coding/microprotein coding RNAs. The results shed light on the mitochondrial exonic circular RNAs and imply the importance of circular RNAs for regulation of mitochondrial genes. Importantly, we introduce circular RNAs in barley and elucidate their cellular-level alterations across tissues and in response to micronutrients iron and zinc. In further support of circular RNAs' functional roles in plants, we report several cases where fluctuations of circRNAs do not correlate with the levels of their parental-loci encoded linear transcripts. PMID:27375638

  1. Identification of Circular RNAs From the Parental Genes Involved in Multiple Aspects of Cellular Metabolism in Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz eDarbani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RNA circularization made by head-to-tail back-splicing events is involved in the regulation of gene expression from transcriptional to post-translational levels. By exploiting RNA-Seq data and down-stream analysis, we shed light on the importance of circular RNAs in plants. The results introduce circular RNAs as novel interactors in the regulation of gene expression in plants and imply the comprehensiveness of this regulatory pathway by identifying circular RNAs for a diverse set of genes. These genes are involved in several aspects of cellular metabolism as hormonal signaling, intracellular protein sorting, carbohydrate metabolism and cell-wall biogenesis, respiration, amino acid biosynthesis, transcription and translation, and protein ubiquitination. Additionally, these parental loci of circular RNAs, from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, encode for different transcript classes including protein coding transcripts, microRNA, rRNA, and long non-coding/microprotein coding RNAs. The results shed light on the mitochondrial exonic circular RNAs and imply the importance of circular RNAs for regulation of mitochondrial genes. Importantly, we introduce circular RNAs in barley and elucidate their cellular-level alterations across tissues and in response to micronutrients iron and zinc. In further support of circular RNAs' functional roles in plants, we report several cases where fluctuations of circRNAs do not correlate with the levels of their parental-loci encoded linear transcripts.Keywords: circular RNAs, coding and non-coding transcripts, leaves, seeds, transfer cells, micronutrients, mitochondria

  2. Folate metabolism in the human colon: cellular responses identified through in vitro studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellis, E.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Low folate intake influences the risk of not only neural tube defects and vascular diseases, but also colorectal tumours. Folate forms have different roles in the one-carbon metabolism. This includes DNA synthesis and methylation reactions. Folate is present as 5'-methyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) in th

  3. The Molecular and Cellular Effect of Homocysteine Metabolism Imbalance on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrieta Škovierová

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (Hcy is a sulfur-containing non-proteinogenic amino acid derived in methionine metabolism. The increased level of Hcy in plasma, hyperhomocysteinemia, is considered to be an independent risk factor for cardio and cerebrovascular diseases. However, it is still not clear if Hcy is a marker or a causative agent of diseases. More and more research data suggest that Hcy is an important indicator for overall health status. This review represents the current understanding of molecular mechanism of Hcy metabolism and its link to hyperhomocysteinemia-related pathologies in humans. The aberrant Hcy metabolism could lead to the redox imbalance and oxidative stress resulting in elevated protein, nucleic acid and carbohydrate oxidation and lipoperoxidation, products known to be involved in cytotoxicity. Additionally, we examine the role of Hcy in thiolation of proteins, which results in their molecular and functional modifications. We also highlight the relationship between the imbalance in Hcy metabolism and pathogenesis of diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurological and psychiatric disorders, chronic kidney disease, bone tissue damages, gastrointestinal disorders, cancer, and congenital defects.

  4. Cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by cyanide in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Olsen, N.V.; Toft, P;

    2013-01-01

    variables related to energy metabolism. METHODS: Mitochondrial dysfunction was induced in piglets and evaluated by monitoring brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2 ) and cerebral levels of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, and glycerol bilaterally. The biochemical variables were obtained by microdialysis...... metabolism and degradation of cellular membranes, respectively. CONCLUSION: Mitochondrial dysfunction is characterised by an increased LP ratio signifying a shift in cytoplasmatic redox state at normal or elevated PbtO2 . The condition is biochemically characterised by a marked increase in cerebral lactate...... with a normal or elevated pyruvate level. The metabolic pattern is different from cerebral ischemia, which is characterised by simultaneous decreases in intracerebral pyruvate and PbtO2 . The study supports the hypothesis that cerebral ischemia and mitochondrial dysfunction may be identified and separated...

  5. Brain energy metabolism: development and application of novel live methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This thesis investigates methods of studying brain energy metabolism with a specific focus on the substrates oxygen and glucose. It details the in vitro development and in vivo characterisation of microelectrochemical sensors for the detection of brain tissue oxygen, and the in vivo characterisation of oxygen and glucose electrodes in the hippocampus utilising the technique of long-term in vivo electrochemistry (LIVE). Chapter 1 introduces the brain, energy metabolism and neurochemical ana...

  6. Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology of Cysteine Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most versatile molecules in biology, taking over such different functions as catalysis, structure, regulation and electron transport during evolution. Research on Arabidopsis has contributed decisively to the understanding of cysteine synthesis and its role in the assimilatory pathways of S, N and C in plants. The multimeric cysteine synthase complex is present in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria and forms the centre of a unique metabolic sensing and signaling sys...

  7. Energy metabolism determines the sensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to mitochondrial inhibitors and biguanide drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Ling-Chia; Hsia, Cheng-Yuan; Yin, Pen-Hui; Chi, Chin-Wen; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Lee, Hsin-Chen

    2015-09-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide particularly in Asia. Deregulation of cellular energetics was recently included as one of the cancer hallmarks. Compounds that target the mitochondria in cancer cells were proposed to have therapeutic potential. Biguanide drugs which inhibit mitochondrial complex I and repress mTOR signaling are clinically used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (T2DM) and were recently found to reduce the risk of HCC in T2DM patients. However, whether alteration of energy metabolism is involved in regulating the sensitivity of HCC to biguanide drugs is still unclear. In the present study, we treated four HCC cell lines with mitochondrial inhibitors (rotenone and oligomycin) and biguanide drugs (metformin and phenformin), and found that the HCC cells which had a higher mitochondrial respiration rate were more sensitive to these treatments; whereas the HCC cells which exhibited higher glycolysis were more resistant. When glucose was replaced by galactose in the medium, the altered energy metabolism from glycolysis to mitochondrial respiration in the HCC cells enhanced the cellular sensitivity to mitochondrial inhibitors and biguanides. The energy metabolism change enhanced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, mTOR repression and downregulation of cyclin D1 and Mcl-1 in response to the mitochondrial inhibitors and biguanides. In conclusion, our results suggest that increased mitochondrial oxidative metabolism upregulates the sensitivity of HCC to biguanide drugs. Enhancing the mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in combination with biguanide drugs may be a therapeutic strategy for HCC.

  8. Analysis of energy metabolism of HeLa cancer cells in vitro and in vivo using fluorescence lifetime microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, Maria; Shirmanova, Marina; Dudenkova, Varvara; Druzhkova, Irina; Shumilova, Anastasia; Zagaynova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to study energy metabolism in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells in vitro and in vivo using two-photon FLIM. Cellular metabolism was examined by monitoring of the fluorescence lifetimes of free and protein-bound forms of NAD(P)H and FAD and their relative contributions. Two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy as well as standard histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin were used to characterize tissue structure. Cellular metabolism was analyzed in cancer cells co-cultured with human fibroblasts and in tumor xenografts transplanted to nude mice. In the HeLa-huFB co-culture we observed a metabolic shift from OXPHOS toward glycolysis in cancer cells, and from glycolysis to OXPHOS in fibroblasts, starting from Day 2 of co-culturing. In the tumor tissue we detected metabolic heterogeneity with more glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells in the stroma-rich zones. The results of the study are of a great importance for understanding metabolic behavior of tumors and for development of anticancer drugs targeted to metabolic pathways.

  9. Influence of anaesthesia on energy metabolism in surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prigorodov М.V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to establish adequacy of protection of energy metabolism in a patient under anaes-thesiology in cholecystectomy from mini-access. Material et methods: 122 patients subjected to cholecystectomy from mini access have been surveyed. Among them 92 patients have got intravenous general anaesthesia with AVL, 30 patients have got prolonged epidural anaesthesia on spontaneous breath with insufflations of oxygen through an obverse mask with sedatations. Monitoring of energy-plastic metabolism has been carried out in all patients. Results: Groups of patients have been compared by anthropometrical data, traumatic interventions. In both groups of patients loss of energy to traumatic to an operation stage has insignificantly increased, but after the anaesthesia termination in the group of patients with intravenous anaesthesia loss of energy continued to rise, and in the group of patients with prolonged epidural blockade it has returned to the initial level. After the anaesthesia termination the energy metabolism became essential higher in the first group of patients in comparison with the second one (p <0,01. The energy-plastic metabolism increased in the first group of patients and decreased in the second. PEA during cholecystectomy from mini access provided a stable condition of energy and energy-plastic metabolism. The conclusion: The inspection of 122 patients subjected to cholecystectomy from mini access has established the following data: PEA on spontaneous breath with insufflations of oxygen through an obverse mask in comparison with intravenous general anaesthesia and AVL allows keeping on an optimum level of energy and energy-plastic metabolism.

  10. Cytochrome P450s in the Regulation of Cellular Retinoic Acid Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, A. Catharine; Zolfaghari, Reza

    2011-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA), is a powerful regulator of gene transcription. RA is also a therapeutic drug. The oxidative metabolism of RA by certain members of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily helps to maintain tissue RA concentrations within appropriate bounds. The CYP26 family—CYP26A1, CYP26B1, and CYP26C1—is distinguished by being both regulated by and active toward all-trans-RA (at-RA) while being expressed in different tissue-specific patterns. The CYP26A1...

  11. Combinatorics of feedback in cellular uptake and metabolism of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-12-26

    We analyze the connection between structure and function for regulatory motifs associated with cellular uptake and usage of small molecules. Based on the boolean logic of the feedback we suggest four classes: the socialist, consumer, fashion, and collector motifs. We find that the socialist motif is good for homeostasis of a useful but potentially poisonous molecule, whereas the consumer motif is optimal for nutrition molecules. Accordingly, examples of these motifs are found in, respectively, the iron homeostasis system in various organisms and in the uptake of sugar molecules in bacteria. The remaining two motifs have no obvious analogs in small molecule regulation, but we illustrate their behavior using analogies to fashion and obesity. These extreme motifs could inspire construction of synthetic systems that exhibit bistable, history-dependent states, and homeostasis of flux (rather than concentration). PMID:18093927

  12. Combinatorics of feedback in cellular uptake and metabolism of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-12-26

    We analyze the connection between structure and function for regulatory motifs associated with cellular uptake and usage of small molecules. Based on the boolean logic of the feedback we suggest four classes: the socialist, consumer, fashion, and collector motifs. We find that the socialist motif is good for homeostasis of a useful but potentially poisonous molecule, whereas the consumer motif is optimal for nutrition molecules. Accordingly, examples of these motifs are found in, respectively, the iron homeostasis system in various organisms and in the uptake of sugar molecules in bacteria. The remaining two motifs have no obvious analogs in small molecule regulation, but we illustrate their behavior using analogies to fashion and obesity. These extreme motifs could inspire construction of synthetic systems that exhibit bistable, history-dependent states, and homeostasis of flux (rather than concentration).

  13. Studying of a wave activity condition and cellular metabolism of tissues in patients with perioral dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grashkin V.A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Perioral dermatitis is a facial skin disease with insuffciently studied ethiology and pathogenetic mechanisms, being one of actual problems of dermatology. It is a chronic relapsing facial skin disease mainly in women of young and middle age (in men and children meets less often. The disease has an independent clinical picture which is different from rosacea, demodecosis, seborrheic dermatitis, etc. The standard diagnostic criterion is a visual estimation of expression of an infammation on the basis of signs of exudative reaction which has a subjective character. Possibilities of a radiometric method for an objective estimation of a facial skin functional condition and indicators of an intracellular metabolism in patients with a perioral dermatitis were frst studied.

  14. Cellular uptake of PET tracers of glucose metabolism and hypoxia and their linkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busk, Morten; Horsman, Michael R.; Overgaard, Jens [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus C (Denmark); Jakobsen, Steen [Aarhus University Hospital, PET Centre, Aarhus (Denmark); Bussink, Johan; Kogel, Albert van der [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2008-12-15

    Tumour hypoxia and elevated glycolysis (Warburg effect) predict poor prognosis. Each parameter is assessable separately with positron emission tomography, but they are linked through anaerobic glycolysis (Pasteur effect). Here, we compare the oxygenation-dependent retention of fluoroazomycin arabinoside ([{sup 18}F]FAZA), a promising but not well-characterised hypoxia-specific tracer, and fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) in four carcinoma cell lines. Cells seeded on coverslips were positioned in modified Petri dishes that allow physically separated cells to share the same tracer-containing medium pool. Following oxic, hypoxic or anoxic tracer incubation, coverslips were analysed for radioactivity ([{sup 18}F]FDG+[{sup 18}F]FAZA) or re-incubated in tracer-free oxygenated medium and then measured ([{sup 18}F]FAZA). Next, we tested the reliability of [{sup 18}F]FDG as a relative measure of glucose metabolic rate. Finally, from two cell lines, xenografts were established in mice, and the tracer distribution between hypoxic and well-oxygenated areas were deduced from tissue sections. Three hours of anoxia strongly stimulated [{sup 18}F]FAZA retention with anoxic-to-oxic uptake ratios typically above 30. Three out of four cell lines displayed similar selectivity of [{sup 18}F]FDG versus glucose, but oxic uptake and anoxic-to-oxic uptake ratio of [{sup 18}F]FDG varied considerably. Although less pronounced, [{sup 18}F]FAZA also showed superior in vivo hypoxia specificity compared with [{sup 18}F]FDG. [{sup 18}F]FAZA displays excellent in vitro characteristics for hypoxia imaging including modest cell-to-cell line variability and no binding in oxic cells. In contrast, the usability of [{sup 18}F]FDG as a surrogate marker for hypoxia is questionable due to large variations in baseline (oxic) glucose metabolism and magnitudes of the Pasteur effects. (orig.)

  15. Physiology of leptin: energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyeong-Kyu; Ahima, Rexford S.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and regulates energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function, metabolism, immune function and other systems through its effects on the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Leptin administration has been shown to restore metabolic and neuroendocrine abnormalities in individuals with leptin-deficient states, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and lipoatrophy. In contrast, obese individuals are resistant to leptin. Recombinant leptin is beneficial in pa...

  16. Metabolic restructuring during energy-limited states: insights from Artemia franciscana embryos and other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Steven C; Menze, Michael A; Borcar, Apu; Patil, Yuvraj; Covi, Joseph A; Reynolds, Julie A; Toner, Mehmet

    2011-05-01

    Many life history stages of animals that experience environmental insults enter developmental arrested states that are characterized by reduced cellular proliferation, with or without a concurrent reduction in overall metabolism. In the case of the most profound metabolic arrest reported in invertebrates, i.e., anaerobic quiescence in Artemia franciscana embryos, acidification of the intracellular milieu is a major factor governing catabolic and anabolic downregulation. Release of ions from intracellular compartments is the source for approximately 50% of the proton equivalents needed for the 1.5 unit acidification that is observed. Recovery from the metabolic arrest requires re-sequestration of the protons with a vacuolar-type ATPase (V-ATPase). The remarkable facet of this mechanism is the ability of embryonic cells to survive the dissipation of intracellular ion gradients. Across many diapause-like states, the metabolic reduction and subsequent matching of energy demand is accomplished by shifting energy metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. Molecular pathways that are activated to induce these resilient hypometabolic states include stimulation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and insulin signaling via suite of daf (dauer formation) genes for diapause-like states in nematodes and insects. Contributing factors for other metabolically depressed states involve hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and downregulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Metabolic similarities between natural states of stasis and some cancer phenotypes are noteworthy. Reduction of flux through oxidative phosphorylation helps prevent cell death in certain cancer types, similar to the way it increases viability of dauer stages in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mechanisms that underlie natural stasis are being used to pre-condition mammalian cells prior to cell biostabilization and storage.

  17. Subcellular compartmentation of sugar signalling: Links among carbon cellular status, route of sucrolysis, sink-source allocation, and metabolic partitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel eTiessen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that both subcellular compartmentation and route of sucrolysis are important for plant development, growth, and yield. Signalling effects are dependent on the tissue, cell type and stage of development. Downstream effects also depend on the amount and localisation of hexoses and disaccharides. All enzymes of sucrose metabolism (e.g. invertase, hexokinase, fructokinase, sucrose synthase, and sucrose 6-phosphate synthase are not produced from single genes, but from paralogue families in plant genomes. Each paralogue has unique expression across plant organs and developmental stages. Multiple isoforms can be targeted to different cellular compartments (e.g. plastids, mitochondria, nuclei, and cytosol. Many of the key enzymes are regulated by post-transcriptional modifications and associate in multimeric protein complexes. Some isoforms have regulatory functions, either in addition to or in replacement of their catalytic activity. This explains why some isozymes are not redundant, but also complicates elucidation of their specific involvement in sugar signalling. The subcellular compartmentation of sucrose metabolism forces refinement of some of the paradigms of sugar signalling during physiological processes. For example, the catalytic and signalling functions of diverse paralogues needs to be more carefully analysed in the context of post-genomic biology. It is important to note that it is the differential localization of both the sugars themselves as well as the sugar-metabolizing enzymes that ultimately led to sugar signalling. We conclude that a combination of subcellular complexity and gene duplication/subfunctionalization gave rise to sugar signalling as a regulatory mechanism in plant cells.

  18. Energy-Efficient Relay Selection and Optimal Relay Location in Cooperative Cellular Networks with Asymmetric Traffic

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Wei; Sun, Wanlu

    2010-01-01

    Energy-efficient communication is an important requirement for mobile relay networks due to the limited battery power of user terminals. This paper considers energy-efficient relaying schemes through selection of mobile relays in cooperative cellular systems with asymmetric traffic. The total energy consumption per information bit of the battery-powered terminals, i.e., the mobile station (MS) and the relay, is derived in theory. In the Joint Uplink and Downlink Relay Selection (JUDRS) scheme we proposed, the relay which minimizes the total energy consumption is selected. Additionally, the energy-efficient cooperation regions are investigated, and the optimal relay location is found for cooperative cellular systems with asymmetric traffic. The results reveal that the MS-relay and the relay-base station (BS) channels have different influence over relay selection decisions for optimal energy-efficiency. Information theoretic analysis of the diversity-multiplexing tradeoff (DMT) demonstrates that the proposed sc...

  19. Bioenergetics Race: Teaching Cellular Metabolism to High School Students Through an Educational Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.E.P. Silva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry is a science that deals with complex and abstract topics, which are often not understood by high school students, thus interfering in theteaching/learning process. The educational teaching game isa methodology advocated by several educators. The aim of this study was to develop a pedagogical practice to assist in the teaching/learning of high school students. Inthis context we designed a game about Metabolism, which was named "Bioenergetics Race". The game issimple, uses low cost materials and have easy access. The game consists of a board, chips, and a list with 100 multiple questions. Operation of the game: Selected questions lead the students to draw a card and move the corresponding number of squares on the board. The one who reachesthe finish line first is the winner. To consolidate the proposal information, every answer was discussed. At the end of the game the students answered a questionnaire. According to 77.5% of players the level of difficulty was large and 83% rated the game as good for educational proposal. It was found that 100% of students had neverparticipated in such activity in the classroom. It is notable the interest of students andthe abstract and complex topics are better assimilated.

  20. Molecular, cellular, and tissue impact of depleted uranium on xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Yann; Rouas, Caroline; Monin, Audrey; Manens, Line; Stefani, Johanna; Delissen, Olivia; Grison, Stéphane; Dublineau, Isabelle

    2014-02-01

    Enzymes that metabolize xenobiotics (XME) are well recognized in experimental models as representative indicators of organ detoxification functions and of exposure to toxicants. As several in vivo studies have shown, uranium can alter XME in the rat liver or kidneys after either acute or chronic exposure. To determine how length or level of exposure affects these changes in XME, we continued our investigation of chronic rat exposure to depleted uranium (DU, uranyl nitrate). The first study examined the effect of duration (1-18 months) of chronic exposure to DU, the second evaluated dose dependence, from a level close to that found in the environment near mining sites (0.2 mg/L) to a supra-environmental dose (120 mg/L, 10 times the highest level naturally found in the environment), and the third was an in vitro assessment of whether DU exposure directly affects XME and, in particular, CYP3A. The experimental in vivo models used here demonstrated that CYP3A is the enzyme modified to the greatest extent: high gene expression changed after 6 and 9 months. The most substantial effects were observed in the liver of rats after 9 months of exposure to 120 mg/L of DU: CYP3A gene and protein expression and enzyme activity all decreased by more than 40 %. Nonetheless, no direct effect of DU by itself was observed after in vitro exposure of rat microsomal preparations, HepG2 cells, or human primary hepatocytes. Overall, these results probably indicate the occurrence of regulatory or adaptive mechanisms that could explain the indirect effect observed in vivo after chronic exposure. PMID:24146111

  1. The trophic and metabolic pathways of foraminifera in the Arabian Sea: evidence from cellular stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffreys, R. M.; Fisher, E. H.; Gooday, A. J.; Larkin, K. E.; Billett, D. S. M.; Wolff, G. A.

    2015-03-01

    The Arabian Sea is a region of elevated productivity with the highest globally recorded fluxes of particulate organic matter (POM) to the deep ocean, providing an abundant food source for fauna at the seafloor. However, benthic communities are also strongly influenced by an intense oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), which impinges on the continental slope from 100 to 1000 m water depth. We compared the trophic ecology of foraminifera on the Oman and Pakistan margins of the Arabian Sea (140-3185 m water depth). These two margins are contrasting both in terms of the abundance of sedimentary organic matter and the intensity of the OMZ. Organic carbon concentrations of surficial sediments were higher on the Oman margin (3.32 ± 1.4%) compared to the Pakistan margin (2.45 ± 1.1%) and sedimentary organic matter (SOM) quality estimated from the Hydrogen Index was also higher on the Oman margin (300-400 mg HC mg TOC-1) compared to the Pakistan margin (respiration; this was most notable on the Pakistan margin. Depleted foraminiferal δ15N values, particularly at the Oman margin, may reflect feeding on chemosynthetic bacteria. We suggest that differences in productivity regimes may be responsible for the differences observed in foraminiferal isotopic composition. In addition, at the time of sampling, whole jellyfish carcasses (Crambionella orsini) and a carpet of jelly detritus were observed across the Oman margin transect. Associated chemosynthetic bacteria may have provided an organic-rich food source for foraminifera at these sites. Our data suggest that foraminifera in OMZ settings can utilise a variety of food sources and metabolic pathways to meet their energetic demands.

  2. The trophic and metabolic pathways of foraminifera in the Arabian Sea: evidence from cellular stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Jeffreys

    2014-12-01

    suggest that foraminifera in OMZ settings can utilise a variety of food sources and metabolic pathways to meet their energetic demands.

  3. CCABC: Cyclic Cellular Automata Based Clustering For Energy Conservation in Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Indrajit; Rahaman, Hafizur

    2011-01-01

    Sensor network has been recognized as the most significant technology for next century. Despites of its potential application, wireless sensor network encounters resource restriction such as low power, reduced bandwidth and specially limited power sources. This work proposes an efficient technique for the conservation of energy in a wireless sensor network (WSN) by forming an effective cluster of the network nodes distributed over a wide range of geographical area. The clustering scheme is developed around a specified class of cellular automata (CA) referred to as the modified cyclic cellular automata (mCCA). It sets a number of nodes in stand-by mode at an instance of time without compromising the area of network coverage and thereby conserves the battery power. The proposed scheme also determines an effective cluster size where the inter-cluster and intra-cluster communication cost is minimum. The simulation results establish that the cyclic cellular automata based clustering for energy conservation in sens...

  4. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena K. Sakharkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  5. THE GENERATION OF METABOLIC ENERGY BY SOLUTE TRANSPORT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, W.N; Lolkema, J.S.; Poolman, B.

    1995-01-01

    Secondary metabolic-energy-generating systems generate a proton motive force (pmf) or a sodium ion motive force (smf) by a process that involves the action of secondary transporters. The (electro)chemical gradient of the solute(s) is converted into the electrochemical gradient of protons or sodium i

  6. Fatty Acids in Energy Metabolism of the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Panov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we analyze the current hypotheses regarding energy metabolism in the neurons and astroglia. Recently, it was shown that up to 20% of the total brain’s energy is provided by mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids. However, the existing hypotheses consider glucose, or its derivative lactate, as the only main energy substrate for the brain. Astroglia metabolically supports the neurons by providing lactate as a substrate for neuronal mitochondria. In addition, a significant amount of neuromediators, glutamate and GABA, is transported into neurons and also serves as substrates for mitochondria. Thus, neuronal mitochondria may simultaneously oxidize several substrates. Astrocytes have to replenish the pool of neuromediators by synthesis de novo, which requires large amounts of energy. In this review, we made an attempt to reconcile β-oxidation of fatty acids by astrocytic mitochondria with the existing hypothesis on regulation of aerobic glycolysis. We suggest that, under condition of neuronal excitation, both metabolic pathways may exist simultaneously. We provide experimental evidence that isolated neuronal mitochondria may oxidize palmitoyl carnitine in the presence of other mitochondrial substrates. We also suggest that variations in the brain mitochondrial metabolic phenotype may be associated with different mtDNA haplogroups.

  7. Dual regulation of energy metabolism by p53 in human cervix and breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Reséndiz, Ileana; Román-Rosales, Alejandra; García-Villa, Enríque; López-Macay, Ambar; Pineda, Erika; Saavedra, Emma; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Alvarez-Ríos, Elizabeth; Gariglio, Patricio; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara

    2015-12-01

    The role of p53 as modulator of OxPhos and glycolysis was analyzed in HeLa-L (cells containing negligible p53 protein levels) and HeLa-H (p53-overexpressing) human cervix cancer cells under normoxia and hypoxia. In normoxia, functional p53, mitochondrial enzyme contents, mitochondrial electrical potential (ΔΨm) and OxPhos flux increased in HeLa-H vs. HeLa-L cells; whereas their glycolytic enzyme contents and glycolysis flux were unchanged. OxPhos provided more than 70% of the cellular ATP and proliferation was abolished by anti-mitochondrial drugs in HeLa-H cells. In hypoxia, both cell proliferations were suppressed, but HeLa-H cells exhibited a significant decrease in OxPhos protein contents, ΔΨm and OxPhos flux. Although glycolytic function was also diminished vs. HeLa-L cells in hypoxia, glycolysis provided more than 60% of cellular ATP in HeLa-H cells. The energy metabolism phenotype of HeLa-H cells was reverted to that of HeLa-L cells by incubating with pifithrin-α, a p53-inhibitor. In normoxia, the energy metabolism phenotype of breast cancer MCF-7 cells was similar to that of HeLa-H cells, whereas p53shRNAMCF-7 cells resembled the HeLa-L cell phenotype. In hypoxia, autophagy proteins and lysosomes contents increased 2-5 times in HeLa-H cells suggesting mitophagy activation. These results indicated that under normoxia p53 up-regulated OxPhos without affecting glycolysis, whereas under hypoxia, p53 down-regulated both OxPhos (severely) and glycolysis (weakly). These p53 effects appeared mediated by the formation of p53-HIF-1α complexes. Therefore, p53 exerts a dual and contrasting regulatory role on cancer energy metabolism, depending on the O₂level.

  8. Adipose tissue remodeling: its role in energy metabolism and metabolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Sik eChoe

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue (WAT functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue (BAT accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secret various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic over-nutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response.

  9. Adipose Tissue Remodeling: Its Role in Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Sung Sik; Huh, Jin Young; Hwang, In Jae; Kim, Jong In; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secrete various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue-resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic overnutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response. PMID:27148161

  10. Adipose Tissue Remodeling: Its Role in Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Sung Sik; Huh, Jin Young; Hwang, In Jae; Kim, Jong In; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secrete various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue-resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic overnutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response.

  11. PGC-1 coactivators in the control of energy metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Liu; Jiandie D.Lin

    2011-01-01

    Chronic disruption of energy balance, where energy intake exceeds expenditure, is a major risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome. The latter is characterized by a constellation of symptoms including obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, hypertension, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Altered expression of genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism as well as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these disorders. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1) family of transcriptional coactivators is emerging as a hub linking nutritional and hormonal signals and energy metabolism. PGC-1а and PGC-1β are highly responsive to environmental cues and coordinate metabolic gene pro- grams through interaction with transcription factors and chromatin-remodeling proteins. PGC-1а has been implicated in the pathogenic conditions including obesity, type 2 diabetes, neurodegeneration, and cardiomyopathy, whereas PGC-1β plays an important role in plasma iipoprotein homeostasis and serves as a hepatic target for niacin, a potent hypotriglyceridemic drug. Here, we review recent advances in the identification of physiological and pathophysiological contexts involving PGC-1 coactivators, and also discuss their implications for therapeutic development.

  12. Studies on growth, nitrogen and energy metabolism in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorbek, G; Chwalibog, André; Eggum, B O;

    1982-01-01

    live weight the energy intake decreased from about 1400 to 800 kJ GE/kg0.75. With the high intake of energy the growth curve obtained is assumed to be near maximum level. The curve can be transformed to a linear one based on log days expressed as y, LW, g = -836 + 594 X log days with CV = 7.5% and r2......Feed intake, growth, nitrogen retention and energy metabolism were measured in 12 male Wistar rats fed ad lib. for 14 weeks with non-purified diets. The feed intake increased rapidly in 4 weeks time from 16 g/d to 25 g/d, and then it was constant in the following 10 weeks. In relation to metabolic...

  13. PPARs Integrate the Mammalian Clock and Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are a group of nuclear receptors that function as transcription factors regulating the expression of numerous target genes. PPARs play an essential role in various physiological and pathological processes, especially in energy metabolism. It has long been known that metabolism and circadian clocks are tightly intertwined. However, the mechanism of how they influence each other is not fully understood. Recently, all three PPAR isoforms were found to be rhythmically expressed in given mouse tissues. Among them, PPARα and PPARγ are direct regulators of core clock components, Bmal1 and Rev-erbα, and, conversely, PPARα is also a direct Bmal1 target gene. More importantly, recent studies using knockout mice revealed that all PPARs exert given functions in a circadian manner. These findings demonstrated a novel role of PPARs as regulators in correlating circadian rhythm and metabolism. In this review, we summarize advances in our understanding of PPARs in circadian regulation.

  14. Elevated serum levels of T3 without metabolic effect in nutritionally deficient rats, attributable to reduced cellular uptake of T3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rats receiving a nutritionally deficient diet displayed markedly elevated serum free T3 levels but showed no increase in oxygen consumption. This was associated with greatly reduced ratios of hepatic cellular and nuclear /sub 125/I-T3 to serum /sub 125/I-T3. Kinetic data supported the conclusion that cellular uptake of T3 was decreased in the nutritionally deficient rats. The lack of metabolic effect, despite the elevated serum T3 levels, is attributable to reduced availability of serum T3 to tissue nuclear receptor sites

  15. STAT3 Activities and Energy Metabolism: Dangerous Liaisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camporeale, Annalisa, E-mail: annalisa.camporeale@unito.it [Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Turin, Via Nizza 52, Turin 10126 (Italy); Demaria, Marco [Buck Institute for Research on Aging, 8001 Redwood Blvd, Novato, CA 94945 (United States); Monteleone, Emanuele [Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Turin, Via Nizza 52, Turin 10126 (Italy); Giorgi, Carlotta [Department of Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, Section of General Pathology, Laboratory for Technologies of Advances Therapies (LTTA), University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 70, Ferrara 44121 (Italy); Wieckowski, Mariusz R. [Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Department of Biochemistry, Pasteur Str. 3, Warsaw 02-093 (Poland); Pinton, Paolo [Department of Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, Section of General Pathology, Laboratory for Technologies of Advances Therapies (LTTA), University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 70, Ferrara 44121 (Italy); Poli, Valeria, E-mail: annalisa.camporeale@unito.it [Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Turin, Via Nizza 52, Turin 10126 (Italy)

    2014-07-31

    STAT3 mediates cytokine and growth factor receptor signalling, becoming transcriptionally active upon tyrosine 705 phosphorylation (Y-P). Constitutively Y-P STAT3 is observed in many tumors that become addicted to its activity, and STAT3 transcriptional activation is required for tumor transformation downstream of several oncogenes. We have recently demonstrated that constitutively active STAT3 drives a metabolic switch towards aerobic glycolysis through the transcriptional induction of Hif-1α and the down-regulation of mitochondrial activity, in both MEF cells expressing constitutively active STAT3 (Stat3{sup C/C}) and STAT3-addicted tumor cells. This novel metabolic function is likely involved in mediating pre-oncogenic features in the primary Stat3{sup C/C} MEFs such as resistance to apoptosis and senescence and rapid proliferation. Moreover, it strongly contributes to the ability of primary Stat3{sup C/C} MEFs to undergo malignant transformation upon spontaneous immortalization, a feature that may explain the well known causative link between STAT3 constitutive activity and tumor transformation under chronic inflammatory conditions. Taken together with the recently uncovered role of STAT3 in regulating energy metabolism from within the mitochondrion when phosphorylated on Ser 727, these data place STAT3 at the center of a hub regulating energy metabolism under different conditions, in most cases promoting cell survival, proliferation and malignant transformation even though with distinct mechanisms.

  16. Glucose Availability and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Link Energy Metabolism and Innate Immunity in the Bovine Endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Matthew L; Cronin, James G; Noleto, Pablo G; Sheldon, I Martin

    2016-01-01

    Defences against the bacteria that usually infect the endometrium of postpartum cattle are impaired when there is metabolic energy stress, leading to endometritis and infertility. The endometrial response to bacteria depends on innate immunity, with recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns stimulating inflammation, characterised by secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. How metabolic stress impacts tissue responses to pathogens is unclear, but integration of energy metabolism and innate immunity means that stressing one system might affect the other. Here we tested the hypothesis that homeostatic pathways integrate energy metabolism and innate immunity in bovine endometrial tissue. Glucose deprivation reduced the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 from ex vivo organ cultures of bovine endometrium challenged with the pathogen-associated molecular patterns lipopolysaccharide and bacterial lipopeptide. Endometrial inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide were also reduced by small molecules that activate or inhibit the intracellular sensor of energy, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). However, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin, which is a more global metabolic sensor than AMPK, had little effect on inflammation. Similarly, endometrial inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide were not affected by insulin-like growth factor-1, which is an endocrine regulator of metabolism. Interestingly, the inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide increased endometrial glucose consumption and induced the Warburg effect, which could exacerbate deficits in glucose availability in the tissue. In conclusion, metabolic energy stress perturbed inflammatory responses to pathogen-associated molecular patterns in bovine endometrial tissue, and the most fundamental regulators of cellular energy, glucose availability and AMPK, had the greatest impact on innate immunity. PMID:26974839

  17. Obesity, metabolic syndrome and adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are examples whereby excess energy consumption and energy flux disruptions are causative agents of increased fatness. Because other, as yet elucidated, cellular factors may be involved and because potential treatments of these metabolic problems involve systemic agents...

  18. Cellular Energy Allocation to Assess the Impact of Nanomaterials on Soil Invertebrates (Enchytraeids: The Effect of Cu and Ag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana I. L. Gomes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of several copper (Cu and silver (Ag nanomaterials were assessed using the cellular energy allocation (CEA, a methodology used to evaluate the energetic status and which relates with organisms’ overall condition and response to toxic stress. Enchytraeus crypticus (Oligochatea, was exposed to the reproduction effect concentrations EC20/50 of several Cu and Ag materials (CuNO3, Cu-Field, Cu-Nwires and Cu-NPs; AgNO3, Ag NM300K, Ag-NPs Non-coated and Ag-NPs PVP-coated for 7 days (0-3-7d. The parameters measured were the total energy reserves available (protein, carbohydrate and lipid budgets and the energy consumption (Ec integrated to obtain the CEA. Results showed that these parameters allowed a clear discrimination between Cu and Ag, but less clearly within each of the various materials. For Cu there was an increase in Ec and protein budget, while for Ag a decrease was observed. The results corroborate known mechanisms, e.g., with Cu causing an increase in metabolic rate whereas Ag induces mitochondrial damage. The various Cu forms seem to activate different mechanisms with size and shape (e.g., Cu-NPs versus Cu-Nwires, causing clearly different effects. For Ag, results are in line with a slower oxidation rate of Ag-NMs in comparison with Ag-salt and hence delayed effects.

  19. Physiology-based kinetic modeling of neuronal energy metabolism unravels the molecular basis of NAD(P)H fluorescence transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Kann, Oliver; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2015-09-01

    Imaging of the cellular fluorescence of the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) is one of the few metabolic readouts that enable noninvasive and time-resolved monitoring of the functional status of mitochondria in neuronal tissues. Stimulation-induced transient changes in NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity frequently display a biphasic characteristic that is influenced by various molecular processes, e.g., intracellular calcium dynamics, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, the malate-aspartate shuttle, the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle, oxygen supply or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) demand. To evaluate the relative impact of these processes, we developed and validated a detailed physiologic mathematical model of the energy metabolism of neuronal cells and used the model to simulate metabolic changes of single cells and tissue slices under different settings of stimulus-induced activity and varying nutritional supply of glucose, pyruvate or lactate. Notably, all experimentally determined NAD(P)H responses could be reproduced with one and the same generic cellular model. Our computations reveal that (1) cells with quite different metabolic status may generate almost identical NAD(P)H responses and (2) cells of the same type may quite differently contribute to aggregate NAD(P)H responses recorded in brain slices, depending on the spatial location within the tissue. Our computational approach reconciles different and sometimes even controversial experimental findings and improves our mechanistic understanding of the metabolic changes underlying live-cell NAD(P)H fluorescence transients. PMID:25899300

  20. Energy metabolism in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: insights from transcriptome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Valente, Filipa M.A.; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2007-11-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are important players in the global sulphur and carbon cycles, with considerable economical and ecological impact. However, the process of sulphate respiration is still incompletely understood. Several mechanisms of energy conservation have been proposed, but it is unclear how the different strategies contribute to the overall process. In order to obtain a deeper insight into the energy metabolism of sulphate-reducers whole-genome microarrays were used to compare the transcriptional response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough grown with hydrogen/sulphate, pyruvate/sulphate, pyruvate with limiting sulphate, and lactate/thiosulphate, relative to growth in lactate/sulphate. Growth with hydrogen/sulphate showed the largest number of differentially expressed genes and the largest changes in transcript levels. In this condition the most up-regulated energy metabolism genes were those coding for the periplasmic [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, followed by the Ech hydrogenase. The results also provide evidence for the involvement of formate cycling and the recently proposed ethanol pathway during growth in hydrogen. The pathway involving CO cycling is relevant during growth on lactate and pyruvate, but not during growth in hydrogen as the most down-regulated genes were those coding for the CO-induced hydrogenase. Growth on lactate/thiosulphate reveals a down-regulation of several energymetabolism genes similar to what was observed in the presence of nitrite. This study identifies the role of several proteins involved in the energy metabolism of D. vulgaris and highlights several novel genes related to this process, revealing a more complex bioenergetic metabolism than previously considered.

  1. Changes in the cellular energy state affect the activity of the bacterial phosphotransferase system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohwer, J.M.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Shinohara, Y.;

    1996-01-01

    The effect of different cellular free-energy states on the uptake of methyl alfa-D-glucopyranoside, an analoque of glucose, by Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system was investigated. The intracellular ATP/ADP ratio was varied by changing the expression...... of the atp operon, which codes for the H+-ATPase, or by adding an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation or an inhibitor of respiration. Corresponding initial phosphotransferase uptake rates were determined using an improved uptake assay that works with growing cells in steady state. The results show...... that the initial uptake rate was decreased under conditions of lowered intracellular ATP/ADP ratios, irrespective of which method was used to change the cellular energy state.. When either the expression of the atp operon was changed or 2,4-dinitrophenol was added to wild-type cells, the relationship between...

  2. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Michelsen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The membrane-bound H+-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth...... of reducing equivalents. We interpret these data as indicating that E. coli makes use of its ability to respire even if it cannot directly couple this ability to ATP synthesis; by respiring away excess reducing equivalents E. coli enhances substrate level ATP synthesis....

  3. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  4. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E.; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  5. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  6. Energy and Oxygen Metabolism Disorder During Septic Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-li Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acute kidney injury (AKI during septic shock, which is one of the most common clinical syndromes in the intensive care unit (ICU, has a high mortality rate and poor prognosis, partly because of a poor understanding of the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction during septic shock. Although ischemic injury of the kidney has been reported to result from adenosine triphosphate (ATP depletion, increasing evidence has demonstrated that AKI occurs in the absence of renal hypoperfusion and even occurs during normal or increased renal blood flow (RBF; nevertheless, whether energy metabolism disorder is involved in septic AKI and whether it changes according to renal hemodynamics have not been established. Moreover, tubular cell apoptosis, which is closely related to ATP depletion, rather than necrosis, has been shown to be the major form of cell injury during AKI. Methods: We used canine endotoxin shock models to investigate the hemodynamics, renal energy metabolism, renal oxygen metabolism, and pathological changes during septic AKI and to explore the underlying mechanisms of septic AKI. Results: The present results revealed that the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ pool and the ATP/adenosine diphosphate (ADP ratio were significantly decreased during the early phase of septic AKI, which is accompanied by a decreased renal oxygen extraction ratio (O2ER% and decreased renal oxygen consumption (VO2. Furthermore, significant apoptosis was observed following renal dysfunction. RBF and renal oxygen delivery were not significantly altered. Conclusion: These results suggest that imbalanced energy metabolism, rather than tubular cell apoptosis, may be the initiator of renal dysfunction during septic shock.

  7. Weight Management, Energy Metabolism, and Endocrine Hor¬mones- Review Article

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafavi, Seyed-Ali; Hosseini, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Energy expenditure is determined by basal metabolic rate, physical activity, and Thermic Effect of Foods (TEF). Some endocrine hormones have role in basal metabolism and hence in human energy expenditure. And some foods pose more thermic effects on the total body energy expenditure and therefore can influence body weight. This review was performed to discuss factors which may affect body metabolism and body weight. Latest medical databases and nutrition and metabolism books were reviewed. We ...

  8. An integrative approach to energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbeek, Ross; Fonstein, Veronika; Osterman, Andrei; Gerdes, Svetlana; Vassieva, Olga; Zagnitko, Olga; Rodionov, Dmitry

    2005-02-15

    covering energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and other cyanobacteria has been performed (Specific Aim 4). The main objectives for this year (adjusted to reflect a new, public domain, setting of the Project research team) were: Aim 1. To develop, test, and deploy a new open source system, the SEED, for integrating community-based annotation, and comparative analysis of all publicly available microbial genomes. Develop a comprehensive genomic database by integrating within SEED all publicly available complete and nearly complete genome sequences with special emphasis on genomes of cyanobacteria, phototrophic eukaryotes, and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria--invaluable for comparative genomic studies of energy and carbon metabolism in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Aim 2. To develop the SEED's biological content in the form of a collection of encoded Subsystems largely covering the conserved cellular machinery in prokaryotes (and central metabolic machinery in eukaryotes). Aim 3. To develop, utilizing core SEED technology, the CyanoSEED--a specialized WEB portal for community-based annotation, and comparative analysis of all publicly available cyanobacterial genomes. Encode the set of additional subsystems representing key metabolic transformations in cyanobacteria and other photoautotrophs. We envisioned this resource as complementary to other public access databases for comparative genomic analysis currently available to the cyanobacterial research community. Aim 4. Perform in-depth analysis of several subsystems covering energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and all other cyanobacteria with available genome sequences. Reveal inconsistencies and gaps in the current knowledge of these subsystems. Use functional and genome context analysis tools in CyanoSEED to predict, whenever possible, candidate genes for inferred functional roles. To disseminate freely these conjectures and predictions by publishing

  9. Cooperative Game-Based Energy Efficiency Management over Ultra-Dense Wireless Cellular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Chen, Pengpeng; Gao, Shouwan

    2016-09-13

    Ultra-dense wireless cellular networks have been envisioned as a promising technique for handling the explosive increase of wireless traffic volume. With the extensive deployment of small cells in wireless cellular networks, the network spectral efficiency (SE) is improved with the use of limited frequency. However, the mutual inter-tier and intra-tier interference between or among small cells and macro cells becomes serious. On the other hand, more chances for potential cooperation among different cells are introduced. Energy efficiency (EE) has become one of the most important problems for future wireless networks. This paper proposes a cooperative bargaining game-based method for comprehensive EE management in an ultra-dense wireless cellular network, which highlights the complicated interference influence on energy-saving challenges and the power-coordination process among small cells and macro cells. Especially, a unified EE utility with the consideration of the interference mitigation is proposed to jointly address the SE, the deployment efficiency (DE), and the EE. In particular, closed-form power-coordination solutions for the optimal EE are derived to show the convergence property of the algorithm. Moreover, a simplified algorithm is presented to reduce the complexity of the signaling overhead, which is significant for ultra-dense small cells. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed cooperative bargaining game-based and simplified schemes.

  10. Cooperative Game-Based Energy Efficiency Management over Ultra-Dense Wireless Cellular Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Chen, Pengpeng; Gao, Shouwan

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-dense wireless cellular networks have been envisioned as a promising technique for handling the explosive increase of wireless traffic volume. With the extensive deployment of small cells in wireless cellular networks, the network spectral efficiency (SE) is improved with the use of limited frequency. However, the mutual inter-tier and intra-tier interference between or among small cells and macro cells becomes serious. On the other hand, more chances for potential cooperation among different cells are introduced. Energy efficiency (EE) has become one of the most important problems for future wireless networks. This paper proposes a cooperative bargaining game-based method for comprehensive EE management in an ultra-dense wireless cellular network, which highlights the complicated interference influence on energy-saving challenges and the power-coordination process among small cells and macro cells. Especially, a unified EE utility with the consideration of the interference mitigation is proposed to jointly address the SE, the deployment efficiency (DE), and the EE. In particular, closed-form power-coordination solutions for the optimal EE are derived to show the convergence property of the algorithm. Moreover, a simplified algorithm is presented to reduce the complexity of the signaling overhead, which is significant for ultra-dense small cells. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed cooperative bargaining game-based and simplified schemes. PMID:27649170

  11. Polyphosphate - an ancient energy source and active metabolic regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achbergerová Lucia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are a several molecules on Earth that effectively store energy within their covalent bonds, and one of these energy-rich molecules is polyphosphate. In microbial cells, polyphosphate granules are synthesised for both energy and phosphate storage and are degraded to produce nucleotide triphosphate or phosphate. Energy released from these energetic carriers is used by the cell for production of all vital molecules such as amino acids, nucleobases, sugars and lipids. Polyphosphate chains directly regulate some processes in the cell and are used as phosphate donors in gene regulation. These two processes, energetic metabolism and regulation, are orchestrated by polyphosphate kinases. Polyphosphate kinases (PPKs can currently be categorized into three groups (PPK1, PPK2 and PPK3 according their functionality; they can also be divided into three groups according their homology (EcPPK1, PaPPK2 and ScVTC. This review discusses historical information, similarities and differences, biochemical characteristics, roles in stress response regulation and possible applications in the biotechnology industry of these enzymes. At the end of the review, a hypothesis is discussed in view of synthetic biology applications that states polyphosphate and calcium-rich organelles have endosymbiotic origins from ancient protocells that metabolized polyphosphate.

  12. A Metric for Secrecy-Energy Efficiency Tradeoff Evaluation in 3GPP Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Ciabini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical-layer security is now being considered for information protection in future wireless communications. However, a better understanding of the inherent secrecy of wireless systems under more realistic conditions, with a specific attention to the relative energy consumption costs, has to be pursued. This paper aims at proposing new analysis tools and investigating the relation between secrecy capacity and energy consumption in a 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP cellular network , by focusing on secure and energy efficient communications. New metrics that bind together the secure area in the Base Station (BS sectors, the afforded date-rate and the power spent by the BS to obtain it, are proposed that permit evaluation of the tradeoff between these aspects. The results show that these metrics are useful in identifying the optimum transmit power level for the BS, so that the maximum secure area can be obtained while minimizing the energy consumption.

  13. Cessation of physical exercise changes metabolism and modifies the adipocyte cellularity of the periepididymal white adipose tissue in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertie, Rogerio A L; Andreotti, Sandra; Proença, André R G; Campana, Amanda B; Lima-Salgado, Thais M; Batista, Miguél L; Seelaender, Marilia C L; Curi, Rui; Oliveira, Ariclecio C; Lima, Fabio B

    2013-08-01

    All of the adaptations acquired through physical training are reversible with inactivity. Although significant reductions in maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max) can be observed within 2 to 4 wk of detraining, the consequences of detraining on the physiology of adipose tissue are poorly known. Our aim was therefore to investigate the effects of discontinuing training (physical detraining) on the metabolism and adipocyte cellularity of rat periepididymal (PE) adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats, aged 6 wk, were divided into three groups and studied for 12 wk under the following conditions: 1) trained (T) throughout the period; 2) detrained (D), trained during the first 8 wk and detrained during the remaining 4 wk; and 3) age-matched sedentary (S). Training consisted of treadmill running sessions (1 h/day, 5 days/wk, 50-60% Vo2max). The PE adipocyte size analysis revealed significant differences between the groups. The adipocyte cross-sectional area (in μm(2)) was significantly larger in D than in the T and S groups (3,474 ± 68.8; 1,945.7 ± 45.6; 2,492.4 ± 49.08, respectively, P rats) showed a 48% increase in the ability to perform lipogenesis (both basal and maximally insulin-stimulated) and isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis. No changes were observed with respect to unstimulated lipolysis. A 15% reduction in the proportion of apoptotic adipocytes was observed in groups T and D compared with group S. The gene expression levels of adiponectin and PPAR-gamma were upregulated by factors of 3 and 2 in D vs. S, respectively. PREF-1 gene expression was 3-fold higher in T vs. S. From these results, we hypothesize that adipogenesis was stimulated in group D and accompanied by significant adipocyte hypertrophy and an increase in the lipogenic capacity of the adipocytes. The occurrence of apoptotic nuclei in PE fat cells was reduced in the D and T rats; these results raise the possibility that the adipose tissue changes after detraining are obesogenic. PMID:23703117

  14. Legal pre-event nutritional supplements to assist energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriet, Lawrence L; Perry, Christopher G R; Talanian, Jason L

    2008-01-01

    Physical training and proper nutrition are paramount for success in sport. A key tissue is skeletal muscle, as the metabolic pathways that produce energy or ATP allow the muscles to complete the many activities critical to success in sport. The energy-producing pathways must rapidly respond to the need for ATP during sport and produce energy at a faster rate or for a longer duration through training and proper nutrition which should translate into improved performance in sport activities. There is also continual interest in the possibility that nutritional supplements could further improve muscle metabolism and the provision of energy during sport. Most legal sports supplements do not improve performance following oral ingestion. However, three legal supplements that have received significant attention over the years include creatine, carnitine and sodium bicarbonate. The ingestion of large amounts of creatine for 4-6 days increases skeletal muscle creatine and phosphocreatine contents. The majority of the experimental evidence suggests that creatine supplementation can improve short-term exercise performance, especially in sports that require repeated short-term sprints. It may also augment the accretion of skeletal muscle when taken in combination with a resistance-exercise training programme. Supplementary carnitine has been touted to increase the uptake and oxidation of fat in the mitochondria. However, muscle carnitine levels are not augmented following oral carnitine supplementation and the majority of well-controlled studies have reported no effect of carnitine on enhancing fat oxidation, Vo(2max) or prolonged endurance exercise performance. The ingestion of sodium bicarbonate before intense exercise decreases the blood [H+] to potentially assist the efflux of H+ from the muscle and temper the metabolic acidosis associated with intense exercise. Many studies have reported performance increases in laboratory-based cycling tests and simulated running races in

  15. Autophagy induced by HIF1α overexpression supports trophoblast invasion by supplying cellular energy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikiko Yamanaka-Tatematsu

    Full Text Available Extravillous trophoblasts (EVTs characterize the invasion of the maternal decidua under low oxygen and poor nutrition at the early feto-maternal interface to establish a successful pregnancy. We previously reported that autophagy in EVTs was activated under 2% O2 in vitro, and autophagy activation was also observed in EVTs at the early feto-maternal interface in vivo. Here, we show that autophagy is an energy source for the invasion of EVTs. Cobalt chloride (CoCl2, which induces hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α overexpression, activated autophagy in HTR8/SVneo cells, an EVT cell line. The number of invading HTR8-ATG4B(C74A cells, an autophagy-deficient EVT cell line, was markedly reduced by 81 percent with the CoCl2 treatment through the suppression of MMP9 level, although CoCl2 did not affect the cellular invasion of HTR8-mStrawberry cells, a control cell line. HTR8-ATG4B(C74A cells treated with CoCl2 showed a decrease in cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP levels and a compensatory increase in the expression of purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 7 (P2RX7, which is stimulated with ATP, whereas HTR8-mStrawberry cells maintained cellular ATP levels and did not affect P2RX7 expression. Furthermore, the decreased invasiveness of HTR8-ATG4B(C74A cells treated with CoCl2 was neutralized by ATP supplementation to the level of HTR8-ATG4B(C74A cells treated without CoCl2. These results suggest that autophagy plays a role in maintaining homeostasis by countervailing HIF1α-mediated cellular energy consumption in EVTs.

  16. Intestinal triacylglycerol synthesis in fat absorption and systemic energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Nelson, David W; Yen, Mei-I

    2015-03-01

    The intestine plays a prominent role in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (triglyceride; TAG). Digested dietary TAG is repackaged in the intestine to form the hydrophobic core of chylomicrons, which deliver metabolic fuels, essential fatty acids, and other lipid-soluble nutrients to the peripheral tissues. By controlling the flux of dietary fat into the circulation, intestinal TAG synthesis can greatly impact systemic metabolism. Genes encoding many of the enzymes involved in TAG synthesis have been identified. Among TAG synthesis enzymes, acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)1 are highly expressed in the intestine. Their physiological functions have been examined in the context of whole organisms using genetically engineered mice and, in the case of DGAT1, specific inhibitors. An emerging theme from recent findings is that limiting the rate of TAG synthesis in the intestine can modulate gut hormone secretion, lipid metabolism, and systemic energy balance. The underlying mechanisms and their implications for humans are yet to be explored. Pharmacological inhibition of TAG hydrolysis in the intestinal lumen has been employed to combat obesity and associated disorders with modest efficacy and unwanted side effects. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting specific enzymes involved in intestinal TAG synthesis warrants further investigation.

  17. Intestinal triacylglycerol synthesis in fat absorption and systemic energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Nelson, David W; Yen, Mei-I

    2015-03-01

    The intestine plays a prominent role in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (triglyceride; TAG). Digested dietary TAG is repackaged in the intestine to form the hydrophobic core of chylomicrons, which deliver metabolic fuels, essential fatty acids, and other lipid-soluble nutrients to the peripheral tissues. By controlling the flux of dietary fat into the circulation, intestinal TAG synthesis can greatly impact systemic metabolism. Genes encoding many of the enzymes involved in TAG synthesis have been identified. Among TAG synthesis enzymes, acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)1 are highly expressed in the intestine. Their physiological functions have been examined in the context of whole organisms using genetically engineered mice and, in the case of DGAT1, specific inhibitors. An emerging theme from recent findings is that limiting the rate of TAG synthesis in the intestine can modulate gut hormone secretion, lipid metabolism, and systemic energy balance. The underlying mechanisms and their implications for humans are yet to be explored. Pharmacological inhibition of TAG hydrolysis in the intestinal lumen has been employed to combat obesity and associated disorders with modest efficacy and unwanted side effects. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting specific enzymes involved in intestinal TAG synthesis warrants further investigation. PMID:25231105

  18. Robust Nash Dynamic Game Strategy for User Cooperation Energy Efficiency in Wireless Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhuan Wen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there is an emerging trend of addressing “energy efficiency” aspect of wireless communications. It has been shown that cooperating users relay each other's information to improve data rates. The energy is limited in the wireless cellular network, but the mobile users refuse to relay. This paper presents an approach that encourages user cooperation in order to improve the energy efficiency. The game theory is an efficient method to solve such conflicts. We present a cellular framework in which two mobile users, who desire to communicate with a common base station, may cooperate via decode-and-forward relaying. In the case of imperfect information assumption, cooperative Nash dynamic game is used between the two users' cooperation to tackle the decision making problems: whether to cooperate and how to cooperate in wireless networks. The scheme based on “cooperative game theory” can achieve general pareto-optimal performance for cooperative games, and thus, maximize the entire system payoff while maintaining fairness.

  19. A material optimization model to approximate energy bounds for cellular materials under multiload conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guedes, J.M.; Rodrigues, H.C.; Bendsøe, Martin P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a computational model, based on inverse homogenization and topology design, for approximating energy bounds for two-phase composites under multiple load cases. The approach allows for the identification of possible single-scale cellular materials that give rise to the optimal...... bounds within this class of composites. A comparison of the computational results with the globally optimal bounds given via rank-N layered composites illustrates the behaviour for tension and shear load situations, as well as the importance of considering the shape of the basic unit cell as part...

  20. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also influenced by body composition — people with more muscle and less fat generally have higher BMRs. previous continue Things That Can Go Wrong With Metabolism Most of the time your metabolism works effectively ...

  1. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  2. Cellular Metabolism and Dose Reveal Carnitine-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms of Butyrate Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Anna; Bennett, Natalie; MacDonald, Amber; Johnstone, Megan; Whelan, Jay; Donohoe, Dallas R

    2016-08-01

    Dietary fiber has been suggested to suppress colorectal cancer development, although the mechanisms contributing to this beneficial effect remain elusive. Butyrate, a fermentation product of fiber, has been shown to have anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on colorectal cancer cells. The metabolic fate of butyrate in the cell is important in determining whether, it acts as an HDAC inhibitor or is consumed as a short-chain fatty acid. Non-cancerous colonocytes utilize butyrate as the primary energy source whereas cancerous colonocytes increase glucose utilization through the Warburg effect. In this study, we show that butyrate oxidation is decreased in cancerous colonocytes compared to non-cancerous colonocytes. We demonstrate that colorectal cancer cells utilize both a carnitine-dependent and carnitine-independent mechanism that contributes to butyrate oxidation. The carnitine-dependent mechanism is contingent on butyrate concentration. Knockdown of CPT1A in colorectal cancer cells abolishes butyrate oxidation. In terms of selectivity, the carnitine-dependent mechanism only regulated butyrate oxidation, as acetate and propionate oxidation were carnitine-independent. Carnitine decreased the action of butyrate as an HDAC inhibitor and suppressed induction of H3 acetylation by butyrate in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, diminished oxidation of butyrate is associated with decreased HDAC inhibition and histone acetylation. In relation to the mechanism, we find that dichloroacetate, which decreases phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, increased butyrate oxidation and that this effect was carnitine-dependent. In conclusion, these data suggest that colorectal cancer cells decrease butyrate oxidation through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which is carnitine-dependent, and provide insight into why butyrate shows selective effects toward colorectal cancer cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1804-1813, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661480

  3. Hypothalamus-adipose tissue crosstalk: neuropeptide Y and the regulation of energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Cline, Mark A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an orexigenic neuropeptide that plays a role in regulating adiposity by promoting energy storage in white adipose tissue and inhibiting brown adipose tissue activation in mammals. This review describes mechanisms underlying NPY's effects on adipose tissue energy metabolism, with an emphasis on cellular proliferation, adipogenesis, lipid deposition, and lipolysis in white adipose tissue, and brown fat activation and thermogenesis. In general, NPY promotes adipocyte differentiation and lipid accumulation, leading to energy storage in adipose tissue, with effects mediated mainly through NPY receptor sub-types 1 and 2. This review highlights hypothalamus-sympathetic nervous system-adipose tissue innervation and adipose tissue-hypothalamus feedback loops as pathways underlying these effects. Potential sources of NPY that mediate adipose effects include the bloodstream, sympathetic nerve terminals that innervate the adipose tissue, as well as adipose tissue-derived cells. Understanding the role of central vs. peripherally-derived NPY in whole-body energy balance could shed light on mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of obesity. This information may provide some insight into searching for alternative therapeutic strategies for the treatment of obesity and associated diseases.

  4. Pericytopathy: Oxidative Stress and Impaired Cellular Longevity in the Pancreas and Skeletal Muscle in Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin R. Hayden

    2010-01-01

    early pharmacotherapy in addition to lifestyle changes targeted to maintaining pericyte integrity. In conclusion, we have provided a review of current knowledge regarding the pericyte and novel ultrastructural findings regarding its role in metabolic syndrome and T2DM.

  5. Acetic acid induces pH-independent cellular energy depletion in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sin Mei; Lee, Sui Mae; Dykes, Gary A

    2015-03-01

    Weak organic acids are widely used as preservatives and disinfectants in the food industry. Despite their widespread use, the antimicrobial mode of action of organic acids is still not fully understood. This study investigated the effect of acetic acid on the cell membranes and cellular energy generation of four Salmonella strains. Using a nucleic acid/protein assay, it was established that acetic acid did not cause leakage of intracellular components from the strains. A scanning electron microscopy study further confirmed that membrane disruption was not the antimicrobial mode of action of acetic acid. Some elongated Salmonella cells observed in the micrographs indicated a possibility that acetic acid may inhibit DNA synthesis in the bacterial cells. Using an ATP assay, it was found that at a neutral pH, acetic acid caused cellular energy depletion with an ADP/ATP ratio in the range between 0.48 and 2.63 (pacid molecules. The antimicrobial effect of acetic acid was better under acidic conditions (ADP/ATP ratio of 5.56 ± 1.27; pacid molecules can act together. We concluded that the inhibitory effect of acetic acid is not solely attributable to acidic pH but also to undissociated acid molecules. This finding has implication for the use of acetic acid as an antimicrobial against Salmonella on food products, such as chicken meat, which can buffer its pH.

  6. Monte-Carlo study of energy deposition by heavy charged particles in sub-cellular volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed-history Monte-Carlo code is used to study the energy deposition from proton and alpha particle tracks at the sub-cellular level. Inelastic cross sections for both the vapour and liquid phases of water have been implemented into the code in order to explore the influence of non-linear density effects associated with the condensed-phase cellular environment. Results of energy deposition and its straggling for 0.5 to 5 MeV amu-1 protons and alpha particles traversing or passing near spherical volumes of 2-200 nm in diameter relevant to DNA- and chromosome-size targets are presented. It is shown that the explicit account of δ-ray transport reduces the dose by as much as 10-60%, whereas stochastic fluctuations lead to a relative uncertainty ranging from 20% to more than 100%. Protons and alpha particles of the same velocity exhibit a similar δ-ray effect, whereas the relative uncertainty of the alphas is almost half that of protons. The effect of the phase is noticeable (10-15%) mainly through differences on the transport of δ-rays, which in liquid water have higher penetration distances. It is expected that the implementation of such results into multi-scale biophysical models of radiation effects will lead to a more realistic predictions on the efficacy of new radiotherapeutic modalities that employ either external proton beam irradiation or internal alpha-emitting radionuclides. (authors)

  7. Design of Cellular Composite Sandwich Panels for Maximum Blast Resistance Via Energy Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Jennifer Righman; Su, Hong

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a design methodology for optimizing the energy absorption under blast loads of cellular composite sandwich panels. A combination of dynamic finite element analysis (FEA) and simplified analytical modeling techniques are used. The analytical modeling calculates both the loading effects and structural response resulting from user-input charge sizes and standoff distances and offers the advantage of expediting iterative design processes. The FEA and the analytical model results are compared and contrasted then used to compare the energy response of various cellular composite sandwich panels under blast loads, where various core shapes and dimensions are the focus. As a result, it is concluded that the optimum shape consists of vertically-oriented webs while the optimum dimensions can be generally described as those which cause the most inelasticity without failure of the webs. These dimensions are also specifically quantified for select situations. This guidance is employed, along with the analytical method developed by the authors and considerations of the influences of material properties, to suggest a general design procedure that is a simple yet sufficiently accurate method for design. The suggested design approach is also demonstrated through a design example.

  8. The influence of osmotic pressure on the lifespan of cellularly inspired energy-relevant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapania, Esha; Guillen, Katherine; Freeman, Eric; Philen, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Bimolecular unit cells have recently become a focus for biologically-inspired smart materials. This is largely due their ability to exhibit many of the same properties as the natural cell membrane. In this study, two lipid monolayers formed at a water/oil interface are brought together, creating a lipid bilayer at their interface with each droplet containing a different concentration of ions. This ionic concentration gradient leads to the development of a membrane potential across the bilayer as ions begin to passively diffuse across the membrane at varying rates, providing the proof of concept for energy storage through cellular mechanics. The focus of the study is to determine the influence of osmotic pressure on the lifespan of the lipid bilayer. We hypothesize that the greater osmotic pressure that develops from a greater ionic concentration gradient will prove to have a negative impact on the lifespan of the bilayer membrane, causing it to rupture sooner. This is due to the substantial amount of osmotic swelling that will occur to compensate for the ionic concentration gradient. This study will demonstrate how osmotic pressure will continue to be a limiting factor in the effectiveness and stability of cellularly-inspired energy relevant materials.

  9. A cellular automation model for the change of public attitude regarding nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cellular automation model was constructed to investigate how public opinion on nuclear energy in Japan depends upon the information environment and personal communication between people. From simulation with this model, the following become clear; (i) society is a highly non-linear system with a self-organizing potential: (ii) in a society composed of one type of constituent member with homogeneous characteristics, the trend of public opinion is substantially changed only when the effort to ameliorate public acceptance over a long period of time, by means such as education, persuasion and advertisement, exceeds a certain threshold, and (iii) in the case when the amount of information on nuclear risk released from the newsmedia is reduced continuously from now on, the acceptability of nuclear energy is significantly improved so far as the extent of the reduction exceeds a certain threshold. (author)

  10. Analysis of cellular metals as energy-absorbing elements in car seats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesic, Srecko; Michels, Wilhelm; Krupp, Ulrich [Laboratory for Material Design and Structural Integrity, Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, University of Applied Sciences Osnabrueck (Germany); Schaeffler, Peter [Alulight International GmbH, Ranshofen (Austria); Unruh, Klaus [Faurecia Autositze GmbH, Stadthagen (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Due to the high energy-absorption potential of metal foams and their excellent weight-to-stiffness ratio, metal foams in car seats may contribute to both increasing passenger safety and also weight reduction. An overview and the first results of a research project to apply cellular metals as energy-absorbing components in car seats in case of a crash are discussed. The project aims are material optimization and the generation of standards and design criteria for a novel technical application of metal foams. The first results reveal the microstructure and mechanical behavior of different metal foams and metal-foam/metal-sheet sandwich structures. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Fluoxetine Treatment Rescues Energy Metabolism Pathway Alterations in a Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chi-Ya; He, Zhisong; Henes, Kathrin; Asara, John M; Webhofer, Christian; Filiou, Michaela D; Khaitovich, Philipp; Wotjak, Carsten T; Turck, Christoph W

    2016-05-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent psychiatric disorder. Several studies have attempted to characterize molecular alterations associated with PTSD, but most findings were limited to the investigation of specific cellular markers in the periphery or defined brain regions. In the current study, we aimed to unravel affected molecular pathways/mechanisms in the fear circuitry associated with PTSD. We interrogated a foot shock-induced PTSD mouse model by integrating proteomics and metabolomics profiling data. Alterations at the proteome level were analyzed using in vivo (15)N metabolic labeling combined with mass spectrometry in the prelimbic cortex (PrL), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), basolateral amygdala, central nucleus of the amygdala and CA1 of the hippocampus between shocked and nonshocked (control) mice, with and without fluoxetine treatment. In silico pathway analyses revealed an upregulation of the citric acid cycle pathway in PrL, and downregulation in ACC and nucleus accumbens (NAc). Chronic fluoxetine treatment prevented decreased citric acid cycle activity in NAc and ACC and ameliorated conditioned fear response in shocked mice. Our results shed light on the role of energy metabolism in PTSD pathogenesis and suggest potential therapy through mitochondrial targeting. PMID:27606320

  12. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziru; Mulholland, Michael; Zhang, Weizhen

    2016-03-01

    Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT), a member of MBOATs family, is essential for octanoylation of ghrelin, which is required for active ghrelin to bind with and activate its receptor. GOAT is expressed mainly in the stomach, pancreas and hypothalamus. Levels of GOAT are altered by energy status. GOAT contains 11 transmembrane helices and one reentrant loop. Its invariant residue His-338 and conserved Asn-307 are located in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and cytosol respectively. GOAT contributes to the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure, as well as glucose and lipids homeostasis. Deletion of GOAT blocks the acylation of ghrelin leading to subsequent impairment in energy homeostasis and survival when mice are challenged with high energy diet or severe caloric restriction. GO-CoA-Tat, a peptide GOAT inhibitor, attenuates acyl-ghrelin production and prevents weight gain induced by a medium-chain triglycerides-rich high fat diet. Further, GO-CoA-Tat increases glucose- induced insulin secretion. Overall, inhibition of GOAT is a novel strategy for treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders. PMID:26732975

  13. Research on the Characteristic of Energy Metabolism of Aerobics Sports and Reasonable Nutrition Supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reasonable nutrition problem has received extensive attention. In this study, it takes the characteristics of aerobics sports as the breakthrough point, by analyzing the characteristics of energy metabolism of aerobics; it explains the composition of three large energy systems of energy metabolism, then discusses the nutritional requirements of Fitness Aerobics as well as the reasonable nutrition supplement measures.

  14. Research on the Characteristic of Energy Metabolism of Aerobics Sports and Reasonable Nutrition Supplement

    OpenAIRE

    Shuang Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The reasonable nutrition problem has received extensive attention. In this study, it takes the characteristics of aerobics sports as the breakthrough point, by analyzing the characteristics of energy metabolism of aerobics; it explains the composition of three large energy systems of energy metabolism, then discusses the nutritional requirements of Fitness Aerobics as well as the reasonable nutrition supplement measures.

  15. Islet transplantation in diabetic rats normalizes basal and exercise-induced energy metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, Harmina; Benthem, L.; Suylichem, P.T.R. van; Leest, J. van der; Strubbe, J.H.; Steffens, A.B.

    1995-01-01

    Transplantation of islets of Langerhans in diabetic rats normalizes resting glucose and insulin levels, but it remains unclear whether islet transplantation restores resting and exercise-induced energy metabolism. Therefore, we compared energy metabolism in islet transplanted rats with energy metabo

  16. Lipids, lipid droplets and lipoproteins in their cellular context; an ultrastructural approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesman, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipids are essential for cellular life, functioning either organized as bilayer membranes to compartmentalize cellular processes, as signaling molecules or as metabolic energy storage. Our current knowledge on lipid organization and cellular lipid homeostasis is mainly based on biochemical data. How

  17. Effects of intracerebroventricular administration of neuropeptide Y on metabolic gene expression and energy metabolism in male rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Yan; Foppen, Ewout; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important neurotransmitter in the control of energy metabolism. Several studies have shown that obesity is associated with increased levels of NPY in the hypothalamus. We hypothesized that the central release of NPY has coordinated and integrated effects on energy metaboli

  18. Construction and analysis of the model of energy metabolism in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zixiang Xu

    Full Text Available Genome-scale models of metabolism have only been analyzed with the constraint-based modelling philosophy and there have been several genome-scale gene-protein-reaction models. But research on the modelling for energy metabolism of organisms just began in recent years and research on metabolic weighted complex network are rare in literature. We have made three research based on the complete model of E. coli's energy metabolism. We first constructed a metabolic weighted network using the rates of free energy consumption within metabolic reactions as the weights. We then analyzed some structural characters of the metabolic weighted network that we constructed. We found that the distribution of the weight values was uneven, that most of the weight values were zero while reactions with abstract large weight values were rare and that the relationship between w (weight values and v (flux values was not of linear correlation. At last, we have done some research on the equilibrium of free energy for the energy metabolism system of E. coli. We found that E(out (free energy rate input from the environment can meet the demand of E(ch(in (free energy rate dissipated by chemical process and that chemical process plays a great role in the dissipation of free energy in cells. By these research and to a certain extend, we can understand more about the energy metabolism of E. coli.

  19. Brain energy metabolism and blood flow differences in healthy aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Chakravarty, M Mallar;

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) are important indices of healthy aging of the brain. Although a frequent topic of study, changes of CBF and CMRO(2) during normal aging are still controversial, as some authors...... years. The magnitudes of CMRO(2) and CBF declined in large parts of the cerebral cortex, including association areas, but the primary motor and sensory areas were relatively spared. We found significant increases of OEF in frontal and parietal cortices, excluding primary motor and somatosensory regions......, and in the temporal cortex. Because of the inverse relation between OEF and capillary oxygen tension, increased OEF can compromise oxygen delivery to neurons, with possible perturbation of energy turnover. The results establish a possible mechanism of progression from healthy to unhealthy brain aging, as the regions...

  20. Equine lamellar energy metabolism studied using tissue microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Torres, C E; Pollitt, C C; Underwood, C; Castro-Olivera, E M; Collins, S N; Allavena, R E; Richardson, D W; van Eps, A W

    2014-09-01

    Failure of lamellar energy metabolism may contribute to the pathophysiology of equine laminitis. Tissue microdialysis has the potential to dynamically monitor lamellar energy balance over time. The objectives of this study were to develop a minimally invasive lamellar microdialysis technique and use it to measure normal lamellar energy metabolite concentrations over 24 h. Microdialysis probes were placed (through the white line) into either the lamellar dermis (LAM) (n = 6) or the sublamellar dermis (SUBLAM) (n = 6) and perfused continuously over a 24 h study period. Probes were placed in the skin dermis (SKIN) for simultaneous comparison to LAM (n = 6). Samples were collected every 2 h and analysed for glucose, lactate, pyruvate, urea and glycerol concentrations. LAM was further compared with SUBLAM by simultaneous placement and sampling in four feet from two horses over 4 h. Horses were monitored for lameness, and either clinically evaluated for 1 month after probe removal (n = 4) or subjected to histological evaluation of the probe site (n = 10). There were no deleterious clinical effects of probe placement and the histological response was mild. Sample fluid recovery and metabolite concentrations were stable for 24 h. Glucose was lower (and lactate:glucose ratio higher) in LAM compared with SUBLAM and SKIN (P laminitis pathogenesis. PMID:24947715

  1. Peroxidase-catalyzed metabolism of etoposide (VP-16-213) and covalent binding of reactive intermediates to cellular macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The horseradish peroxidase- and prostaglandin synthetase-catalyzed oxidative metabolism of the highly active anticancer drug, etoposide (VP-16-213), has been studied in vitro. This oxidation of VP-16 resulted in the formation of VP-16 quinone, an aromatic VP-16 derivative and the corresponding aromatic VP-16 quinone. This oxidative metabolism of VP-16 also resulted in the formation of reactive species that covalently bound to exogenously added DNA and heat-inactivated microsomal proteins. The peroxidase-catalyzed binding was time dependent and required the presence of cofactors (hydrogen peroxide or arachidonic acid). The prostaglandin synthetase/arachidonic acid-catalyzed metabolism and binding of VP-16 were inhibited by indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase, and were shown to involve the peroxidative arm of prostaglandin synthetase. Our studies show that the protein covalent binding species were formed as a result of O-demethylation of the drug as shown by the loss of specifically labeled (O-14CH3) radioactivity from O-methoxy group and by incubating proteins with VP-16 quinones. In contrast, the covalent binding intermediates for DNA appeared to be different and VP-16-derived quinone methides are suggested as DNA binding species. Co-oxidation of VP-16 and the related drug, VM-26, during prostaglandin biosynthesis may be an important pathway for the metabolism of these agents and may play a role in their cytotoxic properties

  2. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. PMID:26964832

  3. Metabolic engineering of free-energy (ATP) conserving reactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kok, S.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic engineering – the improvement of cellular activities by manipulation of enzymatic, transport and regulatory functions of the cell – has enabled the industrial production of a wide variety of biological molecules from renewable resources. Microbial production of fuels and chemicals thereby

  4. The plasma membrane as a capacitor for energy and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Supriyo; Kassan, Adam; Busija, Anna R; Rangamani, Padmini; Patel, Hemal H

    2016-02-01

    When considering which components of the cell are the most critical to function and physiology, we naturally focus on the nucleus, the mitochondria that regulate energy and apoptotic signaling, or other organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, ribosomes, etc. Few people will suggest that the membrane is the most critical element of a cell in terms of function and physiology. Those that consider the membrane critical will point to its obvious barrier function regulated by the lipid bilayer and numerous ion channels that regulate homeostatic gradients. What becomes evident upon closer inspection is that not all membranes are created equal and that there are lipid-rich microdomains that serve as platforms of signaling and a means of communication with the intracellular environment. In this review, we explore the evolution of membranes, focus on lipid-rich microdomains, and advance the novel concept that membranes serve as "capacitors for energy and metabolism." Within this framework, the membrane then is the primary and critical regulator of stress and disease adaptation of the cell.

  5. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  6. Bone: from a reservoir of minerals to a regulator of energy metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Confavreux, Cyrille B.

    2011-01-01

    Besides locomotion, organ protection, and calcium–phosphorus homeostasis, the three classical functions of the skeleton, bone remodeling affects energy metabolism through uncarboxylated osteocalcin, a recently discovered hormone secreted by osteoblasts. This review traces how energy metabolism affects osteoblasts through the central control of bone mass involving leptin, serotoninergic neurons, the hypothalamus, and the sympathetic nervous system. Next, the role of osteocalcin (insulin secret...

  7. Human longevity is characterised by high thyroid stimulating hormone secretion without altered energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, S W; Akintola, A A; Roelfsema, F;

    2015-01-01

    hormone (TH) in an inverse relationship. Greater longevity has been associated with higher TSH and lower TH levels, but mechanisms underlying TSH/TH differences and longevity remain unknown. The HPT axis plays a pivotal role in growth, development and energy metabolism. We report that offspring...... may favour longevity without altering energy metabolism....

  8. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood ...

  9. Methanogenesis: Syntrophic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieber, J.R.; McInerney, M.J.; Plugge, C.M.; Schink, B.; Gunsales, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    "Water is life!" All active cellular systems require water as the medium and solvent of their metabolic activities. Hydrophobic compounds and structures, which tend to exclude water, though providing inter alia excellent sources of energy and a means of biological compartmentalization, present probl

  10. Metabolomics analysis of Cistus monspeliensis leaf extract on energy metabolism activation in human intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Yoichi; Han, Junkyu; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Smaoui, Abderrazak; Isoda, Hiroko

    2012-01-01

    Energy metabolism is a very important process to improve and maintain health from the point of view of physiology. It is well known that the intracellular ATP production is contributed to energy metabolism in cells. Cistus monspeliensis is widely used as tea, spices, and medical herb; however, it has not been focusing on the activation of energy metabolism. In this study, C. monspeliensis was investigated as the food resources by activation of energy metabolism in human intestinal epithelial cells. C. monspeliensis extract showed high antioxidant ability. In addition, the promotion of metabolites of glycolysis and TCA cycle was induced by C. monspeliensis treatment. These results suggest that C. monspeliensis extract has an ability to enhance the energy metabolism in human intestinal cells. PMID:22523469

  11. Metabolomics Analysis of Cistus monspeliensis Leaf Extract on Energy Metabolism Activation in Human Intestinal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Shimoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy metabolism is a very important process to improve and maintain health from the point of view of physiology. It is well known that the intracellular ATP production is contributed to energy metabolism in cells. Cistus monspeliensis is widely used as tea, spices, and medical herb; however, it has not been focusing on the activation of energy metabolism. In this study, C. monspeliensis was investigated as the food resources by activation of energy metabolism in human intestinal epithelial cells. C. monspeliensis extract showed high antioxidant ability. In addition, the promotion of metabolites of glycolysis and TCA cycle was induced by C. monspeliensis treatment. These results suggest that C. monspeliensis extract has an ability to enhance the energy metabolism in human intestinal cells.

  12. Separation of effects of adenosine on energy metabolism from those on cyclic AMP in rat thymic lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordeen, S.K.; Young, D.A.

    1977-08-10

    In rat thymic lymphocytes incubated for 2 h without exogenous energy-providing substrate, adenosine may be substituted for glucose as a means of maximally restoring energy metabolism and those cellular functions whose rates are sensitive to small changes in the energy balance, such as protein synthesis and uridine utilization for RNA synthesis. Since effects of adenosine in thymocytes and other cells have frequently been attributed to changes in cyclic AMP, this report investigates its possible involvement in these glucose-like restorative actions of adenosine. Although the same range of doses of adenosine effective at raising cyclic AMP also elicit roughly parallel stimulations of protein synthesis and uridine utilization, further results dissociate the restorative actions from those on cyclic AMP. (a) Other purine nucleosides mimic the glucose-like actions of adenosine without increasing cyclic AMP; (b) conversely, prostaglandin E/sub 1/ mimics the cyclic AMP response without restoring energy metabolism or energy-dependent functions; and (c) potentiation of the cyclic AMP response, either by inhibiting phosphodiesterase or adenosine deaminase, does not enhance the restorative response to a range of doses of adenosine. Finally, cyclic AMP-mediated glycogenolysis cannot account for the glucose-like effects since addition of adenosine increases, not decreases, levels of glycogen.

  13. High resolution simulations of energy absorption in dynamically loaded cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, R. E.; Cotton, M.; Harris, E. J.; Eakins, D. E.; McShane, G.

    2016-04-01

    Cellular materials have potential application as absorbers of energy generated by high velocity impact. CTH, a Sandia National Laboratories Code which allows very severe strains to be simulated, has been used to perform very high resolution simulations showing the dynamic crushing of a series of two-dimensional, stainless steel metal structures with varying architectures. The structures are positioned to provide a cushion between a solid stainless steel flyer plate with velocities ranging from 300 to 900 m/s, and an initially stationary stainless steel target. Each of the alternative architectures under consideration was formed by an array of identical cells each of which had a constant volume and a constant density. The resolution of the simulations was maximised by choosing a configuration in which one-dimensional conditions persisted for the full period over which the specimen densified, a condition which is most readily met by impacting high density specimens at high velocity. It was found that the total plastic flow and, therefore, the irreversible energy dissipated in the fully densified energy absorbing cell, increase (a) as the structure becomes more rodlike and less platelike and (b) as the impact velocity increases. Sequential CTH images of the deformation processes show that the flow of the cell material may be broadly divided into macroscopic flow perpendicular to the compression direction and jetting-type processes (microkinetic flow) which tend to predominate in rod and rodlike configurations and also tend to play an increasing role at increased strain rates. A very simple analysis of a configuration in which a solid flyer impacts a solid target provides a baseline against which to compare and explain features seen in the simulations. The work provides a basis for the development of energy absorbing structures for application in the 200-1000 m/s impact regime.

  14. Energy-Efficient Crowdsensing of Human Mobility and Signal Levels in Cellular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foremski, Paweł; Gorawski, Michał; Grochla, Krzysztof; Polys, Konrad

    2015-09-02

    The paper presents a practical application of the crowdsensing idea to measure human mobility and signal coverage in cellular networks. Currently, virtually everyone is carrying a mobile phone, which may be used as a sensor to gather research data by measuring, e.g., human mobility and radio signal levels. However, many users are unwilling to participate in crowdsensing experiments. This work begins with the analysis of the barriers for engaging people in crowdsensing. A survey showed that people who agree to participate in crowdsensing expect a minimum impact on their battery lifetime and phone usage habits. To address these requirements, this paper proposes an application for measuring the location and signal strength data based on energy-efficient GPS tracking, which allows one to perform the measurements of human mobility and radio signal levels with minimum energy utilization and without any engagement of the user. The method described combines measurements from the accelerometer with effective management of the GPS to monitor the user mobility with the decrease in battery lifetime by approximately 20%. To show the applicability of the proposed platform, the sample results of signal level distribution and coverage maps gathered for an LTE network and representing human mobility are shown.

  15. Evaluation of Emerging Energy-Efficient Heterogeneous Computing Platforms for Biomolecular and Cellular Simulation Workloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, John E.; Hallock, Michael J.; Phillips, James C.; Peterson, Joseph R.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Many of the continuing scientific advances achieved through computational biology are predicated on the availability of ongoing increases in computational power required for detailed simulation and analysis of cellular processes on biologically-relevant timescales. A critical challenge facing the development of future exascale supercomputer systems is the development of new computing hardware and associated scientific applications that dramatically improve upon the energy efficiency of existing solutions, while providing increased simulation, analysis, and visualization performance. Mobile computing platforms have recently become powerful enough to support interactive molecular visualization tasks that were previously only possible on laptops and workstations, creating future opportunities for their convenient use for meetings, remote collaboration, and as head mounted displays for immersive stereoscopic viewing. We describe early experiences adapting several biomolecular simulation and analysis applications for emerging heterogeneous computing platforms that combine power-efficient system-on-chip multi-core CPUs with high-performance massively parallel GPUs. We present low-cost power monitoring instrumentation that provides sufficient temporal resolution to evaluate the power consumption of individual CPU algorithms and GPU kernels. We compare the performance and energy efficiency of scientific applications running on emerging platforms with results obtained on traditional platforms, identify hardware and algorithmic performance bottlenecks that affect the usability of these platforms, and describe avenues for improving both the hardware and applications in pursuit of the needs of molecular modeling tasks on mobile devices and future exascale computers.

  16. A Proposal for Energy-Efficient Cellular Neural Network Based on Spintronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chenyun; Naeemi, Azad

    2016-09-01

    Due to the massive parallel computing capability and outstanding image and signal processing performance, cellular neural network (CNN) is one promising type of non-Boolean computing system that can outperform the traditional digital logic computation and mitigate the physical scaling limit of the conventional CMOS technology. The CNN was originally implemented by VLSI analog technologies with operational amplifiers and operational transconductance amplifiers as neurons and synapses, respectively, which are power and area consuming. In this paper, we propose a hybrid structure to implement the CNN with magnetic components and CMOS peripherals with a complete driving and sensing circuitry. In addition, we propose a digitally programmable magnetic synapse that can achieve both positive and negative values of the templates. After rigorous performance analyses and comparisons, optimal energy is achieved based on various design parameters, including the driving voltage and the CMOS driving size. At a comparable footprint area and operation speed, a spintronic CNN is projected to achieve more than one order of magnitude energy reduction per operation compared to its CMOS counterpart.

  17. Calorie Restriction-like Effects of 30 Days of Resveratrol Supplementation on Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Profile in Obese Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, S.; Konings, E.; Bilet, L.; Houtkooper, R.H.; Weijer, van de T.; Goossens, G.H.; Hoeks, J.; Krieken, van der S.; Ryu, D.; Kersten, A.H.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Hesselink, M.K.C.; Kunz, I.; Schrauwen-Hinderling, V.B.; Blaak, E.E.; Auwerx, J.; Schrauwen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural compound that affects energy metabolism and mitochondrial function and serves as a calorie restriction mimetic, at least in animal models of obesity. Here, we treated 11 healthy, obese men with placebo and 150 mg/day resveratrol (resVida) in a randomized double-blind crossov

  18. Going beyond energy intensity to understand the energy metabolism of nations: The case of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The link between energy consumption and economic growth has been widely studied in the economic literature. Understanding this relationship is important from both an environmental and a socio-economic point of view, as energy consumption is crucial to economic activity and human environmental impact. This relevance is even higher for developing countries, since energy consumption per unit of output varies through the phases of development, increasing from an agricultural stage to an industrial one and then decreasing for certain service based economies. In the Argentinean case, the relevance of energy consumption to economic development seems to be particularly important. While energy intensity seems to exhibit a U-Shaped curve from 1990 to 2003 decreasing slightly after that year, total energy consumption increases along the period of analysis. Why does this happen? How can we relate this result with the sustainability debate? All these questions are very important due to Argentinean hydrocarbons dependence and due to the recent reduction in oil and natural gas reserves, which can lead to a lack of security of supply. In this paper we study Argentinean energy consumption pattern for the period 1990–2007, to discuss current and future energy and economic sustainability. To this purpose, we developed a conventional analysis, studying energy intensity, and a non conventional analysis, using the Multi-Scale Integrated Analysis of Societal and Ecosystem Metabolism (MuSIASEM) accounting methodology. Both methodologies show that the development process followed by Argentina has not been good enough to assure sustainability in the long term. Instead of improving energy use, energy intensity has increased. The current composition of its energy mix, and the recent economic crisis in Argentina, as well as its development path, are some of the possible explanations. -- Highlights: ► We analyze Argentinean energy consumption and social metabolism using MuSIASEM.

  19. Working memory dysfunction associated with brain functional deficits and cellular metabolic changes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chung-Man; Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Choi, Nam-Gil; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-08-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is associated with brain functional and morphological changes in connected with emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficit. This study dealt with the neural functional deficits and metabolic abnormalities in working memory (WM) task with emotion-inducing distractors in patients with GAD. Fourteen patients with GAD and 14 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3T. In response to the emotional distractors in WM tasks, the patients concurrently showed higher activity in the hippocampus and lower activities in the superior occipital gyrus, superior parietal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and precentral gyrus compared to the controls. MRS revealed significantly lower choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios in the DLPFC. In particular, the Cho ratios were positively correlated with the brain activities based on blood oxygenation level-dependent signal change in the DLPFC. This study provides the first evidence for the association between the metabolic alterations and functional deficit in WM processing with emotion-inducing distractors in GAD. These findings will be helpful to understand the neural dysfunction in connection with WM impairment in GAD.

  20. Working memory dysfunction associated with brain functional deficits and cellular metabolic changes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chung-Man; Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Choi, Nam-Gil; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-08-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is associated with brain functional and morphological changes in connected with emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficit. This study dealt with the neural functional deficits and metabolic abnormalities in working memory (WM) task with emotion-inducing distractors in patients with GAD. Fourteen patients with GAD and 14 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3T. In response to the emotional distractors in WM tasks, the patients concurrently showed higher activity in the hippocampus and lower activities in the superior occipital gyrus, superior parietal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and precentral gyrus compared to the controls. MRS revealed significantly lower choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios in the DLPFC. In particular, the Cho ratios were positively correlated with the brain activities based on blood oxygenation level-dependent signal change in the DLPFC. This study provides the first evidence for the association between the metabolic alterations and functional deficit in WM processing with emotion-inducing distractors in GAD. These findings will be helpful to understand the neural dysfunction in connection with WM impairment in GAD. PMID:27442922

  1. Rh2E2, a novel metabolic suppressor, specifically inhibits energy-based metabolism of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Dong, Hang; Liang, Xu; Bai, Li-Ping; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Guo, Yue; Kong, Ah Ng Tony; Wang, Rui; Kam, Richard Kin Ting; Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Hsiao, Wendy Wen Luen; Chan, Ka Man; Wang, Jingrong; Chan, Rick Wai Kit; Guo, Jianru; Zhang, Wei; Yen, Feng Gen; Zhou, Hua; Leung, Elaine Lai Han; Yu, Zhiling; Liu, Liang

    2016-03-01

    Energy metabolism in cancer cells is often increased to meet their higher proliferative rate and biosynthesis demands. Suppressing cancer cell metabolism using agents like metformin has become an attractive strategy for treating cancer patients. We showed that a novel ginsenoside derivative, Rh2E2, is as effective as aspirin in preventing the development of AOM/DSS-induced colorectal cancer and suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in a LLC-1 xenograft. A sub-chronic and acute toxicity LD50 test of Rh2E2 showed no harmful reactions at the maximum oral dosage of 5000 mg/kg body weight in mice. Proteomic profiling revealed that Rh2E2 specifically inhibited ATP production in cancer cells via down-regulation of metabolic enzymes involving glycolysis, fatty acid β-oxidation and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, leading to specific cytotoxicity and S-phase cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. Those findings suggest that Rh2E2 possesses a novel and safe anti-metabolic agent for cancer patients by specific reduction of energy-based metabolism in cancer cells. PMID:26799418

  2. A Flavonoid Compound Promotes Neuronal Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells via PPAR-β Modulating Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yu-qin; Pan, Zong-fu; Chen, Wen-teng; Xu, Min-hua; Zhu, Dan-yan; Yu, Yong-ping; Lou, Yi-jia

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known regarding mitochondrial metabolism in neuronal differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells. By using a small molecule, present research has investigated the pattern of cellular energy metabolism in neural progenitor cells derived from mouse ES cells. Flavonoid compound 4a faithfully facilitated ES cells to differentiate into neurons morphologically and functionally. The expression and localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) were examined in neural progenitor cells. PPAR-β expression showed robust upregulation compared to solvent control. Treatment with PPAR-β agonist L165041 alone or together with compound 4a significantly promoted neuronal differentiation, while antagonist GSK0660 blocked the neurogenesis-promoting effect of compound 4a. Consistently, knockdown of PPAR-β in ES cells abolished compound 4a-induced neuronal differentiation. Interestingly, we found that mitochondrial fusion protein Mfn2 was also abolished by sh-PPAR-β, resulting in abnormal mitochondrial Ca2+ ([Ca2+]M) transients as well as impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics. In conclusion, we demonstrated that by modulating mitochondrial energy metabolism through Mfn2 and mitochondrial Ca2+, PPAR-β took an important role in neuronal differentiation induced by flavonoid compound 4a. PMID:27315062

  3. Leaf Rolling and Stem Fasciation in Grass Pea (Lathyrus sativus L. Mutant Are Mediated through Glutathione-Dependent Cellular and Metabolic Changes and Associated with a Metabolic Diversion through Cysteine during Phenotypic Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibyendu Talukdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A Lathyrus sativus L. mutant isolated in ethylmethane sulfonate-treated M2 progeny of mother variety BioL-212 and designated as rlfL-1 was characterized by inwardly rolled-leaf and stem and bud fasciations. The mutant exhibited karyomorphological peculiarities in both mitosis and meiosis with origin of aneuploidy. The mitosis was vigorous with high frequency of divisional cells and their quick turnover presumably steered cell proliferations. Significant transcriptional upregulations of cysteine and glutathione synthesis and concomitant stimulations of glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense helped rlfL-1 mutant to maintain balanced reactive oxygen species (ROS metabolisms, as deduced by ROS-imaging study. Glutathione synthesis was shut down in buthionine sulfoximine- (BSO- treated mother plant and mutant, and leaf-rolling and stems/buds fasciations in the mutant were reversed, accompanied by normalization of mitotic cell division process. Antioxidant defense was downregulated under low glutathione-redox but cysteine-desulfurations and photorespiratory glycolate oxidase transcripts were markedly overexpressed, preventing cysteine overaccumulation but resulted in excess H2O2 in BSO-treated mutant. This led to oxidative damage in proliferating cells, manifested by severe necrosis in rolled-leaf and fasciated stems. Results indicated vital role of glutathione in maintaining abnormal proliferations in plant organs, and its deficiency triggered phenotypic reversal through metabolic diversions of cysteine and concomitant cellular and metabolic modulations.

  4. Triethylenetetramine modulates polyamine and energy metabolism and inhibits cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvönen, Mervi T; Ucal, Sebahat; Pasanen, Markku; Peräniemi, Sirpa; Weisell, Janne; Khomutov, Maxim; Khomutov, Alex R; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Alhonen, Leena; Keinänen, Tuomo A

    2016-05-15

    Polyamine metabolism is an attractive anticancer drug target, since polyamines are absolutely required for cellular proliferation, and increased levels of polyamines and their biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) are associated with cancer. Triethylenetetramine (TETA) is a charge-deficient isosteric analogue of the polyamine spermidine (Spd) and a Cu(II)-chelating compound used for the treatment of Wilson's disease, and it has been implicated as a potential anticancer therapeutic drug. In the present study, we studied the effects of TETA in comparison with two other Cu(II)-chelators, D-penicillamine (PA) and tetrathiomolybdate (TTM), on polyamine metabolism in DU145 prostate carcinoma, MCF-7 breast carcinoma and JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells. TETA induced antizyme, down-regulated ODC and inhibited [(14)C] Spd uptake. Moreover, it completely prevented α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO)-induced increase in [(14)C] Spd uptake, and inhibited [(14)C] putrescine (Put) uptake and ODC activity in vivo Seven-day treatment of DU145 cells with TETA caused growth cessation by reducing intracellular polyamine levels and suppressing the formation of hypusinated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A). TETA or its N-acetylated metabolites also inhibited spermine (Spm), diamine and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidases and decreased the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Moreover, TETA inhibited the utilization of Put as energy source via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, as indicated by decreased production of (14)CO2 from [(14)C] Put. These results indicate that TETA attacks multiple proven anticancer drug targets not attributed to copper chelation, which warrants further studies to reveal its potential in cancer chemoprevention and cure. PMID:27001865

  5. Energy metabolism of overweight women before, during and after weight reduction assessed by indirect calorimetry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies had suggested that periods of low energy intake evoke compensatory adaptations in energy metabolism, which retard weight loss, and promote weight regain when energy intake returns to normal. The aim of this thesis was to investigate whether a slimming (low-energy) diet based on alte

  6. Effect of carbon/nitrogen ratio on carbohydrate metabolism and light energy dissipation mechanisms in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huarancca Reyes, Thais; Scartazza, Andrea; Lu, Yu; Yamaguchi, Junji; Guglielminetti, Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) nutrient sources are essential elements for metabolism, and their availability must be tightly coordinated for the optimal growth and development in plants. Plants are able to sense and respond to different C/N conditions via specific partitioning of C and N sources and the regulation of a complex cellular metabolic activity. We studied how the interaction between C and N signaling could affect carbohydrate metabolism, soluble sugar levels, photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) and the ability to drive the excess energy in Arabidopsis seedlings under moderated and disrupted C/N-nutrient conditions. Invertase and sucrose synthase activities were markedly affected by C/N-nutrient status depending on the phosphorylation status, suggesting that these enzymes may necessarily be modulated by their direct phosphorylation or phosphorylation of proteins that form complex with them in response to C/N stress. In addition, the enzymatic activity of these enzymes was also correlated with the amount of sugars, which not only act as substrate but also as signaling compounds. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence in plants under disrupted C/N condition suggested a reduction of electron transport rate at PSII level associated with a higher capacity for non-radiative energy dissipation in comparison with plants under moderated C/N condition. In conclusion, the tight coordination between C and N not only affects the carbohydrates metabolism and their concentration within plant tissues, but also the partitioning of the excitation energy at PSII level between radiative (electron transport) and non-radiative (heat) dissipation pathways. PMID:27108206

  7. Mathematical model of uptake and metabolism of arsenic(III in human hepatocytes - Incorporation of cellular antioxidant response and threshold-dependent behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isukapalli Sastry S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is an environmental pollutant, potent human toxicant, and oxidative stress agent with a multiplicity of health effects associated with both acute and chronic exposures. A semi-mechanistic cellular-level toxicokinetic (TK model was developed in order to describe the uptake, biotransformation and clearance of arsenical species in human hepatocytes. Notable features of this model are the incorporation of arsenic-glutathione complex formation and a "switch-like" formulation to describe the antioxidant response of hepatocytes to arsenic exposure. Results The cellular-level TK model applies mass action kinetics in order to predict the concentrations of trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals in hepatocytes. The model simulates uptake of arsenite (iAsIII via aquaporin isozymes 9 (AQP9s, glutathione (GSH conjugation, methylation by arsenic methyltransferase (AS3MT, efflux through multidrug resistant proteins (MRPs and the induced antioxidant response via thioredoxin reductase (TR activity. The model was parameterized by optimization of model estimates for arsenite (iAsIII, monomethylated (MMA and dimethylated (DMA arsenicals concentrations with time-course experimental data in human hepatocytes for a time span of 48 hours, and dose-response data at 24 hours for a range of arsenite concentrations from 0.1 to 10 μM. Global sensitivity analysis of the model showed that at low doses the transport parameters had a dominant role, whereas at higher doses the biotransformation parameters were the most significant. A parametric comparison of the TK model with an analogous model developed for rat hepatocytes from the literature demonstrated that the biotransformation of arsenite (e.g. GSH conjugation has a large role in explaining the variation in methylation between rats and humans. Conclusions The cellular-level TK model captures the temporal modes of arsenical accumulation in human hepatocytes. It highlighted the key biological

  8. Metabolic biotransformation of copper-benzo[a]pyrene combined pollutant on the cellular interface of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuona; Yin, Hua; Tang, Shaoyu; Peng, Hui; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have confirmed that Stenotrophomonas maltophilia can bind an appreciable amount of Cu(II) and degrade BaP. However, the removal mechanisms of Cu(II) coexisted with BaP by S. maltophilia are still unclear. In this study, the micro-interaction of contaminants on the cellular surface was investigated. The results indicated that carboxyl groups played an important role in the binding of copper to the thallus and that the cell walls were the main adsorption sites. Nevertheless, these reactive groups had no obvious effect on the uptake of BaP. Instead, the disruption and modification of cell walls accelerated transportation of BaP across the membrane into cells. The observation of SEM-EDS confirmed that Cu(II) would be adsorbed and precipitated onto the cell surface but would also be removed by extracellular precipitation when BaP coexisted. And the XPS analysis reflected that part of Cu(II) bound onto biosorbents changed into Cu(I) and Cu.

  9. Regulation of lipid metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng LI

    2011-01-01

    @@ Lipids including cholesterol, phospholipids, fatty acids and triacylglycerols are important cellular constituents involved in membrane structure, energy homeostasis and many biological processes such as signal transduction, organelle development and cell differentiation.Recently, the area of lipid metabolism has drawn a great deal of attention due to its emerging role in the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis and liver steatosis.We decided to organize a special issue of Frontiers in Biology focusing on our current understanding of lipid metabolism.

  10. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality and morbidity have remained high in bacterial meningitis. Impairment of cerebral energy metabolism probably contributes to unfavorable outcome. Intracerebral microdialysis is routinely used to monitor cerebral energy metabolism, and recent experimental studies indicate...... that this technique may separate ischemia and non-ischemic mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study is a retrospective interpretation of biochemical data obtained in a series of patients with severe community-acquired meningitis. METHODS: Cerebral energy metabolism was monitored in 15 patients with severe...... community-acquired meningitis utilizing intracerebral microdialysis and bedside biochemical analysis. According to previous studies, cerebral ischemia was defined as lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio >30 with intracerebral pyruvate level

  11. Photosynthetic Characteristics of Portulaca grandiflora, a Succulent C(4) Dicot : CELLULAR COMPARTMENTATION OF ENZYMES AND ACID METABOLISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, S B; Shieh, Y J; Reger, B J; Black, C C

    1981-11-01

    on enzyme localization, a scheme of C(4) photosynthesis in P. grandiflora is proposed.Well-watered plants of P. grandiflora exhibit a diurnal fluctuation of total titratable acidity, with an amplitude of 61 and 54 microequivalent per gram fresh weight for the leaves and stems, respectively. These changes were in parallel with changes in malic acid concentration in these tissues. Under severe drought conditions, diurnal changes in both titratable acidity and malic acid concentration in both leaves and stems were much reduced. However, another C(4) dicot Amaranthus graecizans (nonsucculent) did not show any diurnal acid fluctuation under the same conditions. These results confirm the suggestion made by Koch and Kennedy (Plant Physiol. 65: 193-197, 1980) that succulent C(4) dicots can exhibit an acid metabolism similar to Crassulacean acid metabolism plants in certain environments. PMID:16662054

  12. Substrate-energy metabolism and metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease in relation to fetal growth and adult body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensara, Osama A; Wooton, Steve A; Phillips, David I W; Patel, Mayank; Hoffman, Daniel J; Jackson, Alan A; Elia, Marinos

    2006-08-01

    The effect of fetal programming on intermediary metabolism is uncertain. Therefore, we examined whether fetal programming affects oxidative and nonoxidative macronutrient metabolism and the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in adult life. Healthy older men, aged 64-72 years, with either a lower birth weight (LBW, or=75th %ile; n = 13) had measurements of 1) net oxidative metabolism using indirect calorimetry before and for 6 h after a mixed meal (3,720 kJ) and 2) postprandial oxidation of exogenous [13C]palmitic acid. Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. After adjustment for current weight and height, the LBW group had a lower resting energy expenditure (REE) in the preprandial (4.01 vs. 4.54 kJ/min, P = 0.015) and postprandial state (4.60 vs. 5.20 kJ/min, P = 0.004), and less fat-free mass than the HBW group. The BW category was a significant, independent, and better predictor of REE than weight plus height. There were no significant differences between groups in net oxidative and nonoxidative macronutrient (protein, fat, carbohydrate) metabolism (or of exogenous [13C]palmitate) or in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, which was present almost twice as commonly in the LBW than in the HBW group. The study suggests that fetal programming affects both pre- and postprandial EE in older life by mechanisms that are at least partly related to the mass of the fat-free body. BW was found to be a significant predictor of REE that was independent of adult weight plus height.

  13. Metabolic labeling of cellular glycoproteins with glucosamine: potential for erroneous interpretations due to nonenzymatic radiolabeling of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proteins, including serum proteins of culture media, become nonenzymatically radiolabeled under conditions used for metabolic labeling of cultured cells with glucosamine. This occurs even under sterile conditions in the absence of cells. Various commercial lots of 3H or 14C glcN gave similar results: ∼ 0.7% of total label was incorporated into 20% serum (14 mg/ml protein) in 48 h at 370C. By SDS-PAGE fluorography, labeled serum bands correspond to Coomassie stained bands. Incorporation is linear with protein concentration and label input, shows biphasic kinetics (initial rapid rate within first 3 hr, followed by slower linear rate with no sign of saturation through 120 hr), and is temperature-dependent (no reaction at 00C; incorporation at 200C is ∼ 45% of that at 370C). Poly-D-lysine is a better acceptor than protein: 0.5 mg/ml PL accepts as much label as 7 mg/ml protein. Incorporation is inhibited by excess unlabeled glcN and ethanolamine, but not by man, gal or glucose. However, when proteins were incubated with 160 mM glcN, SDS-PAGE bands were yellow-brown, suggesting the occurrence of Maillard-type reactions. Although the chemical mechanism(s) responsible for nonmetabolic radiolabeling by glcN are not clear at this point, the fact that it occurs represents a serious artifact which may lead to erroneous interpretation of data

  14. Dietary Energy Source in Dairy Cows in Early Lactation: Metabolites and Metabolic Hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knegsel, van A.T.M.; Brand, van den H.; Graat, E.A.M.; Dijkstra, J.; Jorritsma, R.; Decuypere, M.P.; Tamminga, S.; Kemp, B.

    2007-01-01

    Negative energy balance-related metabolic disorders suggest that the balance between available lipogenic and glucogenic nutrients is important. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of a glucogenic or a lipogenic diet on liver triacylglycerides (TAG), metabolites, and metabolic ho

  15. Teaching Energy Metabolism Using Scientific Articles: Implementation of a Virtual Learning Environment for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Espindola, Marina Bazzo; El-Bacha, Tatiana; Giannella, Tais Rabetti; Struchiner, Miriam; da Silva, Wagner S.; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes the use of a virtual learning environment (VLE) applied to the biochemistry class for undergraduate, first-year medical students at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. The course focused on the integration of energy metabolism, exploring metabolic adaptations in different physiological or pathological states such as…

  16. Energy metabolism and hematology of white-tailed deer fawns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, R.E.; DelGiudice, G.D.; Dziuk, H.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    Resting metabolic rates, weight gains and hematologic profiles of six newborn, captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawns (four females, two males) were determined during the first 3 mo of life. Estimated mean daily weight gain of fawns was 0.2 kg. The regression equation for metabolic rate was: Metabolic rate (kcal/kg0.75/day) = 56.1 +/- 1.3 (age in days), r = 0.65, P less than 0.001). Regression equations were also used to relate age to red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin concentration (Hb), packed cell volume, white blood cell count, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. The age relationships of Hb, MCHC, and smaller RBC's were indicative of an increasing and more efficient oxygen-carrying and exchange capacity to fulfill the increasing metabolic demands for oxygen associated with increasing body size.

  17. Fatty acids from diet and microbiota regulate energy metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Joe Alcock; Lin, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    A high-fat diet and elevated levels of free fatty acids are known risk factors for metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and visceral obesity. Although these disease associations are well established, it is unclear how different dietary fats change the risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Here, we review emerging evidence that insulin resistance and fat storage are linked to changes in the gut microbiota. The gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function, in turn, are highly ...

  18. Regulation of hepatic energy metabolism by the nuclear receptor PXR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkola, Jukka; Rysä, Jaana; Hukkanen, Janne

    2016-09-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that is traditionally thought to be specialized for sensing xenobiotic exposure. In concurrence with this feature PXR was originally identified to regulate drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. During the last ten years it has become clear that PXR harbors broader functions. Evidence obtained both in experimental animals and humans indicate that ligand-activated PXR regulates hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism and affects whole body metabolic homeostasis. Currently, the consequences of PXR activation on overall metabolic health are not yet fully understood and varying results on the effect of PXR activation or knockout on metabolic disorders and weight gain have been published in mouse models. Rifampicin and St. John's wort, the prototypical human PXR agonists, impair glucose tolerance in healthy volunteers. Chronic exposure to PXR agonists could potentially represent a risk factor for diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:27041449

  19. Regulation of hepatic energy metabolism by the nuclear receptor PXR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkola, Jukka; Rysä, Jaana; Hukkanen, Janne

    2016-09-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that is traditionally thought to be specialized for sensing xenobiotic exposure. In concurrence with this feature PXR was originally identified to regulate drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. During the last ten years it has become clear that PXR harbors broader functions. Evidence obtained both in experimental animals and humans indicate that ligand-activated PXR regulates hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism and affects whole body metabolic homeostasis. Currently, the consequences of PXR activation on overall metabolic health are not yet fully understood and varying results on the effect of PXR activation or knockout on metabolic disorders and weight gain have been published in mouse models. Rifampicin and St. John's wort, the prototypical human PXR agonists, impair glucose tolerance in healthy volunteers. Chronic exposure to PXR agonists could potentially represent a risk factor for diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie.

  20. Phenylpyrazole insecticides induce cytotoxicity by altering mechanisms involved in cellular energy supply in the human epithelial cell model Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidau, Cyril; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Badiou, Alexandra; Belzunces, Luc P

    2009-06-01

    Phenylpyrazoles are relatively new insecticides designed to manage problematic insect resistance and public health hazards encountered with older pesticide families. In vitro cytotoxicity induced by the phenylpyrazole insecticides, Ethiprol and Fipronil, and Fipronil metabolites, sulfone and sulfide, was studied in Caco-2 cells. This cellular model was chosen because it made possible to mimic the primary site of oral exposure to xenobiotics, the intestinal epithelium. Assessment of the barrier function of Caco-2 epithelium was assessed by TEER measurement and showed a major loss of barrier integrity after exposure to Fipronil and its metabolites, but not to Ethiprol. The disruption of the epithelial barrier was attributed to severe ATP depletion independent of cell viability, as revealed by LDH release. The origin of energetic metabolism failure was investigated and revealed a transient enhancement of tetrazolium salt reduction and an increase in lactate production by Caco-2 cells, suggesting an increase in glucose metabolism by pesticides. Cellular symptoms observed in these experiments lead us to hypothesize that phenylpyrazole insecticides interacted with mitochondria.

  1. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  2. Effect of desipramine and fluoxetine on energy metabolism of cerebral mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Ferrari, Federica; Gorini, Antonella; Brunello, Nicoletta; Tascedda, Fabio

    2016-08-25

    Brain bioenergetic abnormalities in mood disorders were detected by neuroimaging in vivo studies in humans. Because of the increasing importance of mitochondrial pathogenetic hypothesis of Depression, in this study the effects of sub-chronic treatment (21days) with desipramine (15mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10mg/kg) were evaluated on brain energy metabolism. On mitochondria in vivo located in neuronal soma (somatic) and on mitochondria of synapses (synaptic), the catalytic activities of regulatory enzymes of mitochondrial energy-yielding metabolic pathways were assayed. Antidepressants in vivo treatment modified the activities of selected enzymes of different mitochondria, leading to metabolic modifications in the energy metabolism of brain cortex: (a) the enhancement of cytochrome oxidase activity on somatic mitochondria; (b) the decrease of malate, succinate dehydrogenase and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase activities of synaptic mitochondria; (c) the selective effect of fluoxetine on enzymes related to glutamate metabolism. These results overcome the conflicting data so far obtained with antidepressants on brain energy metabolism, because the enzymatic analyses were made on mitochondria with diversified neuronal in vivo localization, i.e. on somatic and synaptic. This research is the first investigation on the pharmacodynamics of antidepressants studied at subcellular level, in the perspective of (i) assessing the role of energy metabolism of cerebral mitochondria in animal models of mood disorders, and (ii) highlighting new therapeutical strategies for antidepressants targeting brain bioenergetics. PMID:27268280

  3. Dissecting the energy metabolism in Mycoplasma pneumoniae through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wodke, J.A.; Puchalka, J.; Lluch-Senar, M.; Marcos, J.; Yus, E.; Godinho, M.; Gutierrez-Gallego, R.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.; Serrano, L.; Klipp, E.; Maier, T.

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a threatening pathogen with a minimal genome, is a model organism for bacterial systems biology for which substantial experimental information is available. With the goal of understanding the complex interactions underlying its metabolism, we analyzed and characterized the met

  4. Cellular damage in vitro. Influence of {beta}-energy and intracellular radionuclide uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendisch, Maria; Drechsel, J.; Freudenberg, R.; Runge, R.; Wunderlich, G.; Kotzerke, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The cellular damage of ionising radiation depends on dose, physical radiation quality (e. g. LET) and intracellular radionuclide uptake. The influence of two beta emitters ({sup 188}Re and {sup 131}I) on the thyroid cell line PC C13 was studied. Furthermore, we analysed the effect of intracellular accumulation. Methods: The thyroid cell line PC C13 was irradiated with {sup 188}Re-perrhenate or {sup 131}I-sodium iodide in presence or absence of perchlorate. The initial DNA-damage was measured in the comet assay as olive tail moment (OTM). The colony forming assay detects the clonogenic cell survival as surviving fraction. Additional the intracellular radionuclide uptake was quantified. Results: Dose response curves were established for irradiation with {sup 188}Re-perrhenate or {sup 131}I-iodine under various extra- and intracellular activity distribution conditions. In the presence of perchlorate DNA-damage and clonogenic cell survival for both radionuclides were comparable. In the absence of perchlorate radionuclide uptake of 1.39% ({sup 131}I) and 4.14% ({sup 188}Re) were measured causing twofold higher radiotoxicity. Although {sup 131}I uptake was lower than {sup 188}Re uptake the OTM values were higher und surviving fractions were lower. Conclusions: {sup 131}I, compared to {sup 188}Re, has lower mean beta energy and a higher LET, and therefore, it induced a higher DNA-damage even at lower intracellular uptake. An additional explanation for the higher radiotoxicity of {sup 131}I could be the higher dose exposition caused by crossfire through neighborhood cells. (orig.)

  5. The effect of herbs on cerebral energy metabolism in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Vascular dementia is one of the most familiar types of senile dementia. Over the past few years, the research on the damage of cerebral tissues after ischemia has become a focus. The factors and mechanism of cerebral tissue damage after ischemia are very complex. The handicap of energy metabolism is regarded as the beginning factor which leads to the damage of neurons, but its dynamic changes in ischemic area and its role during the process of neuronal damage are not very clear. There are few civil reports on using 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance instrument to explore the changes of cerebral energy metabolism in intravital animals. After exploring the influence of herbs on cerebral energy metabolism in ischemia-reperfusion mice, we came to the conclusion that herbs can improve the cerebral energy metabolism in ischemia-reperfusion mice.

  6. Thyroid hormones correlate with resting metabolic rate, not daily energy expenditure, in two charadriiform seabirds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle H. Elliott

    2013-04-01

    Thyroid hormones affect in vitro metabolic intensity, increase basal metabolic rate (BMR in the lab, and are sometimes correlated with basal and/or resting metabolic rate (RMR in a field environment. Given the difficulty of measuring metabolic rate in the field—and the likelihood that capture and long-term restraint necessary to measure metabolic rate in the field jeopardizes other measurements—we examined the possibility that circulating thyroid hormone levels were correlated with RMR in two free-ranging bird species with high levels of energy expenditure (the black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla, and thick-billed murre, Uria lomvia. Because BMR and daily energy expenditure (DEE are purported to be linked, we also tested for a correlation between thyroid hormones and DEE. We examined the relationships between free and bound levels of the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3 with DEE and with 4-hour long measurements of post-absorptive and thermoneutral resting metabolism (resting metabolic rate; RMR. RMR but not DEE increased with T3 in both species; both metabolic rates were independent of T4. T3 and T4 were not correlated with one another. DEE correlated with body mass in kittiwakes but not in murres, presumably owing to the larger coefficient of variation in body mass during chick rearing for the more sexually dimorphic kittiwakes. We suggest T3 provides a good proxy for resting metabolism but not DEE in these seabird species.

  7. Transcriptional Factors Mediating Retinoic Acid Signals in the Control of Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA, an active metabolite of vitamin A (VA, is important for many physiological processes including energy metabolism. This is mainly achieved through RA-regulated gene expression in metabolically active cells. RA regulates gene expression mainly through the activation of two subfamilies in the nuclear receptor superfamily, retinoic acid receptors (RARs and retinoid X receptors (RXRs. RAR/RXR heterodimers or RXR/RXR homodimers bind to RA response element in the promoters of RA target genes and regulate their expressions upon ligand binding. The development of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes is often associated with profound changes in the expressions of genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism in metabolically active cells. RA regulates some of these gene expressions. Recently, in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that status and metabolism of VA regulate macronutrient metabolism. Some studies have shown that, in addition to RARs and RXRs, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor β/δ may function as transcriptional factors mediating RA response. Herein, we summarize current progresses regarding the VA metabolism and the role of nuclear receptors in mediating RA signals, with an emphasis on their implication in energy metabolism.

  8. Metabolic energy is required in human platelets at any stage during optical aggregation and secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Jan Willem N.; Verhoeven, A.J.M.; Mommersteeg, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between metabolic energy and platelet aggregation and secretion was investigated by sudden exhaustion of the cell energy content after these platelet responses had been initiated. In normal platelets, optical aggregation was at any stage susceptible to energy exhaustion, whereas sin

  9. The Central Carbon and Energy Metabolism of Marine Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Nunes-Nesi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are heterokont algae derived from a secondary symbiotic event in which a eukaryotic host cell acquired an eukaryotic red alga as plastid. The multiple endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer processes provide diatoms unusual opportunities for gene mixing to establish distinctive biosynthetic pathways and metabolic control structures. Diatoms are also known to have significant impact on global ecosystems as one of the most dominant phytoplankton species in the contemporary ocean. As such their metabolism and growth regulating factors have been of particular interest for many years. The publication of the genomic sequences of two independent species of diatoms and the advent of an enhanced experimental toolbox for molecular biological investigations have afforded far greater opportunities than were previously apparent for these species and re-invigorated studies regarding the central carbon metabolism of diatoms. In this review we discuss distinctive features of the central carbon metabolism of diatoms and its response to forthcoming environmental changes and recent advances facilitating the possibility of industrial use of diatoms for oil production. Although the operation and importance of several key pathways of diatom metabolism have already been demonstrated and determined, we will also highlight other potentially important pathways wherein this has yet to be achieved.

  10. The CPT1C 5'UTR contains a repressing upstream open reading frame that is regulated by cellular energy availability and AMPK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Lohse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Translational control is utilized as a means of regulating gene expression in many species. In most cases, posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms play an important role in stress response pathways and can lead to dysfunctional physiology if blocked by mutations. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 C (CPT1C, the brain-specific member of the CPT 1 family, has previously been shown to be involved in regulating metabolism in situations of energy surplus. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sequence analysis of the CPT1C mRNA revealed that it contains an upstream open reading frame (uORF in the 5' UTR of its mRNA. Using CPT1C 5' UTR/luciferase constructs, we investigated the role of the uORF in translational regulation. The results presented here show that translation from the CPT1C main open reading frame (mORF is repressed by the presence of the uORF, that this repression is relieved in response to specific stress stimuli, namely glucose deprivation and palmitate-BSA treatment, and that AMPK inhibition can relieve this uORF-dependent repression. SIGNIFICANCE: The fact that the mORF regulation is relieved in response to a specific set of stress stimuli rather than general stress response, hints at an involvement of CPT1C in cellular energy-sensing pathways and provides further evidence for a role of CPT1C in hypothalamic regulation of energy homeostasis.

  11. Role of Mitochondria in Cerebral Vascular Function: Energy Production, Cellular Protection, and Regulation of Vascular Tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busija, David W; Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V

    2016-06-13

    Mitochondria not only produce energy in the form of ATP to support the activities of cells comprising the neurovascular unit, but mitochondrial events, such as depolarization and/or ROS release, also initiate signaling events which protect the endothelium and neurons against lethal stresses via pre-/postconditioning as well as promote changes in cerebral vascular tone. Mitochondrial depolarization in vascular smooth muscle (VSM), via pharmacological activation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels on the inner mitochondrial membrane (mitoKATP channels), leads to vasorelaxation through generation of calcium sparks by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and subsequent downstream signaling mechanisms. Increased release of ROS by mitochondria has similar effects. Relaxation of VSM can also be indirectly achieved via actions of nitric oxide (NO) and other vasoactive agents produced by endothelium, perivascular and parenchymal nerves, and astroglia following mitochondrial activation. Additionally, NO production following mitochondrial activation is involved in neuronal preconditioning. Cerebral arteries from female rats have greater mitochondrial mass and respiration and enhanced cerebral arterial dilation to mitochondrial activators. Preexisting chronic conditions such as insulin resistance and/or diabetes impair mitoKATP channel relaxation of cerebral arteries and preconditioning. Surprisingly, mitoKATP channel function after transient ischemia appears to be retained in the endothelium of large cerebral arteries despite generalized cerebral vascular dysfunction. Thus, mitochondrial mechanisms may represent the elusive signaling link between metabolic rate and blood flow as well as mediators of vascular change according to physiological status. Mitochondrial mechanisms are an important, but underutilized target for improving vascular function and decreasing brain injury in stroke patients. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1529-1548, 2016.

  12. Role of Mitochondria in Cerebral Vascular Function: Energy Production, Cellular Protection, and Regulation of Vascular Tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busija, David W; Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria not only produce energy in the form of ATP to support the activities of cells comprising the neurovascular unit, but mitochondrial events, such as depolarization and/or ROS release, also initiate signaling events which protect the endothelium and neurons against lethal stresses via pre-/postconditioning as well as promote changes in cerebral vascular tone. Mitochondrial depolarization in vascular smooth muscle (VSM), via pharmacological activation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels on the inner mitochondrial membrane (mitoKATP channels), leads to vasorelaxation through generation of calcium sparks by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and subsequent downstream signaling mechanisms. Increased release of ROS by mitochondria has similar effects. Relaxation of VSM can also be indirectly achieved via actions of nitric oxide (NO) and other vasoactive agents produced by endothelium, perivascular and parenchymal nerves, and astroglia following mitochondrial activation. Additionally, NO production following mitochondrial activation is involved in neuronal preconditioning. Cerebral arteries from female rats have greater mitochondrial mass and respiration and enhanced cerebral arterial dilation to mitochondrial activators. Preexisting chronic conditions such as insulin resistance and/or diabetes impair mitoKATP channel relaxation of cerebral arteries and preconditioning. Surprisingly, mitoKATP channel function after transient ischemia appears to be retained in the endothelium of large cerebral arteries despite generalized cerebral vascular dysfunction. Thus, mitochondrial mechanisms may represent the elusive signaling link between metabolic rate and blood flow as well as mediators of vascular change according to physiological status. Mitochondrial mechanisms are an important, but underutilized target for improving vascular function and decreasing brain injury in stroke patients. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1529-1548, 2016. PMID:27347901

  13. Altered poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism impairs cellular responses to genotoxic stress in a hypomorphic mutant of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genotoxic stress activates nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) metabolism leading to PAR synthesis catalyzed by DNA damage activated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and rapid PAR turnover by action of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG). The involvement of PARP-1 and PARP-2 in responses to DNA damage has been well studied but the involvement of nuclear PARG is less well understood. To gain insights into the function of nuclear PARG in DNA damage responses, we have quantitatively studied PAR metabolism in cells derived from a hypomorphic mutant mouse model in which exons 2 and 3 of the PARG gene have been deleted (PARG-Δ2,3 cells), resulting in a nuclear PARG containing a catalytic domain but lacking the N-terminal region (A domain) of the protein. Following DNA damage induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), we found that the activity of both PARG and PARPs in intact cells is increased in PARG-Δ2,3 cells. The increased PARG activity leads to decreased PARP-1 automodification with resulting increased PARP activity. The degree of PARG activation is greater than PARP, resulting in decreased PAR accumulation. Following MNNG treatment, PARG-Δ2,3 cells show reduced formation of XRCC1 foci, delayed H2AX phosphorylation, decreased DNA break intermediates during repair, and increased cell death. Our results show that a precise coordination of PARPs and PARG activities is important for normal cellular responses to DNA damage and that this coordination is defective in the absence of the PARG A domain

  14. Modeling the Contribution of Allosteric Regulation for Flux Control in the Central Carbon Metabolism of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Daniel; Herrgard, Markus; Rocha, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Modeling cellular metabolism is fundamental for many biotechnological applications, including drug discovery and rational cell factory design. Central carbon metabolism (CCM) is particularly important as it provides the energy and precursors for other biological processes. However, the complex...

  15. Natural compounds regulate energy metabolism by the modulating the activity of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity causes excess fat accumulation in various tissues, most notoriously in the adipose tissue, along with other insulin-responsive organs such as skeletal muscle and the liver, which predisposes an individual to the development of metabolic abnormalities. The molecular mechanisms underlying obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities have not been completely elucidated; however, in recent years, the search for therapies to prevent the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders has increased. It is known that several nuclear receptors, when activated by specific ligands, regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at the transcriptional level. The expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes is directly regulated by the activity of various nuclear receptors via their interaction with specific response elements in promoters of those genes. Many natural compounds act as ligands of nuclear receptors and regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by regulating the activities of these nuclear receptors. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of obesity, the role of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors in energy metabolism, and several examples of food factors that act as agonists or antagonists of nuclear receptors, which may be useful for the management of obesity and the accompanying energy metabolism abnormalities.

  16. Sex Differences in Energy Metabolism Need to Be Considered with Lifestyle Modifications in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty N. Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Women have a higher proportion of body fat compared to men. However, women consume fewer kilojoules per kilogram lean mass and burn fat more preferentially during exercise compared with men. During gestation, women store even greater amounts of fat that cannot be solely attributed to increased energy intake. These observations suggest that the relationship between kilojoules consumed and kilojoules utilised is different in men and women. The reason for these sex differences in energy metabolism is not known; however, it may relate to sex steroids, differences in insulin resistance, or metabolic effects of other hormones such as leptin. When considering lifestyle modifications, sex differences in energy metabolism should be considered. Moreover, elucidating the regulatory role of hormones in energy homeostasis is important for understanding the pathogenesis of obesity and perhaps in the future may lead to ways to reduce body fat with less energy restriction.

  17. Ontogeny of hepatic energy metabolism genes in mice as revealed by RNA-sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Helen J; Cui, Yue Julia; Lu, Hong; Zhong, Xiao-bo; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis by coordinating synthesis, storage, breakdown, and redistribution of nutrients. Hepatic energy metabolism is dynamically regulated throughout different life stages due to different demands for energy during growth and development. However, changes in gene expression patterns throughout ontogeny for factors important in hepatic energy metabolism are not well understood. We performed detailed transcript analysis of energy metabolism genes during various stages of liver development in mice. Livers from male C57BL/6J mice were collected at twelve ages, including perinatal and postnatal time points (n = 3/age). The mRNA was quantified by RNA-Sequencing, with transcript abundance estimated by Cufflinks. One thousand sixty energy metabolism genes were examined; 794 were above detection, of which 627 were significantly changed during at least one developmental age compared to adult liver. Two-way hierarchical clustering revealed three major clusters dependent on age: GD17.5-Day 5 (perinatal-enriched), Day 10-Day 20 (pre-weaning-enriched), and Day 25-Day 60 (adolescence/adulthood-enriched). Clustering analysis of cumulative mRNA expression values for individual pathways of energy metabolism revealed three patterns of enrichment: glycolysis, ketogenesis, and glycogenesis were all perinatally-enriched; glycogenolysis was the only pathway enriched during pre-weaning ages; whereas lipid droplet metabolism, cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and lipid metabolism were all enriched in adolescence/adulthood. This study reveals novel findings such as the divergent expression of the fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes Acyl-CoA oxidase 1 and Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a, indicating a switch from mitochondrial to peroxisomal β-oxidation after weaning; as well as the dynamic ontogeny of genes implicated in obesity such as Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 and Elongation of very long chain fatty acids-like 3. These

  18. Ontogeny of hepatic energy metabolism genes in mice as revealed by RNA-sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen J Renaud

    Full Text Available The liver plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis by coordinating synthesis, storage, breakdown, and redistribution of nutrients. Hepatic energy metabolism is dynamically regulated throughout different life stages due to different demands for energy during growth and development. However, changes in gene expression patterns throughout ontogeny for factors important in hepatic energy metabolism are not well understood. We performed detailed transcript analysis of energy metabolism genes during various stages of liver development in mice. Livers from male C57BL/6J mice were collected at twelve ages, including perinatal and postnatal time points (n = 3/age. The mRNA was quantified by RNA-Sequencing, with transcript abundance estimated by Cufflinks. One thousand sixty energy metabolism genes were examined; 794 were above detection, of which 627 were significantly changed during at least one developmental age compared to adult liver. Two-way hierarchical clustering revealed three major clusters dependent on age: GD17.5-Day 5 (perinatal-enriched, Day 10-Day 20 (pre-weaning-enriched, and Day 25-Day 60 (adolescence/adulthood-enriched. Clustering analysis of cumulative mRNA expression values for individual pathways of energy metabolism revealed three patterns of enrichment: glycolysis, ketogenesis, and glycogenesis were all perinatally-enriched; glycogenolysis was the only pathway enriched during pre-weaning ages; whereas lipid droplet metabolism, cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and lipid metabolism were all enriched in adolescence/adulthood. This study reveals novel findings such as the divergent expression of the fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes Acyl-CoA oxidase 1 and Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a, indicating a switch from mitochondrial to peroxisomal β-oxidation after weaning; as well as the dynamic ontogeny of genes implicated in obesity such as Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 and Elongation of very long chain fatty

  19. New cellular metals with enhanced energy absorption: Wire-woven bulk kagome (WBK)-metal hollow sphere (MHS) hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming-Zhen; Kang, Ki-Ju [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Chonnam National University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Stephani, Guenter [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing and Advanced Materials, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Two types of new cellular metals are fabricated by assembling layer by layer helically-formed wires with metal hollow sphere (MHS) arrays. In the finished configuration, the MHSs are located in small tetrahedrons or octahedrons of the inner space of a wire-woven bulk Kagome (WBK) structure. Compression tests reveal excellent energy absorption, which is attributed to combination of suppression of strut buckling in the WBK and moving plastic hinge occurring in the MHSs. The WBK-MHS hybrids outperform competitors in deformation energy absorption. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Harvesting biomechanical energy or carrying batteries? An evaluation method based on a comparison of metabolic power

    OpenAIRE

    Schertzer, Eliran; Riemer, Raziel

    2015-01-01

    Background Harvesting energy from human motion is an innovative alternative to using batteries as a source of electrical power for portable devices. Yet there are no guidelines as to whether energy harvesting should be preferred over batteries. This paper introduces an approach to determine which source of energy should be preferred. The proposed approach compares the metabolic power while harvesting energy and while using batteries (or any other power supply, e.g., solar panels), which provi...

  1. [Optimization of energy metabolism in patients with chronic heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzh, A N

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays particular interest of clinicians is attracted by metabolic therapy of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of complex therapy with addition of Vasonat on the dynamics of remodeling indexes of left ventricle and functional class of CHF on classification of NYHA. It has been shown that application of metabolic modulator Vasonat in addition to conventional therapy of CHF facilitated the clinical improvement and significant decline of functional class. Vasonat use resulted in the meaningful improvement of the contractive function of myocardium and increase of tolerance to the physical exercise. Moreover, high efficiency of Vasonat has been demonstrated in the control of the syndrome of oxidizing stress, by decrease in intensity of free-radical processes and activation of the antioxidant defense system. PMID:21265120

  2. Lysophosphatidylinositol Signalling and Metabolic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Syamsul A; Falasca, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism is a chemical process used by cells to transform food-derived nutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates and fats, into chemical and thermal energy. Whenever an alteration of this process occurs, the chemical balance within the cells is impaired and this can affect their growth and response to the environment, leading to the development of a metabolic disease. Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several metabolic risk factors such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidaemia, is increasingly common in modern society. Metabolic syndrome, as well as other diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia and hypertension, are associated with abnormal lipid metabolism. Cellular lipids are the major component of cell membranes; they represent also a valuable source of energy and therefore play a crucial role for both cellular and physiological energy homeostasis. In this review, we will focus on the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the lysophospholipid mediator lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) and its receptor G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) in metabolic diseases. LPI is a bioactive lipid generated by phospholipase A (PLA) family of lipases which is believed to play an important role in several diseases. Indeed LPI can affect various functions such as cell growth, differentiation and motility in a number of cell-types. Recently published data suggest that LPI plays an important role in different physiological and pathological contexts, including a role in metabolism and glucose homeostasis. PMID:26784247

  3. Role of energy metabolism in the brown fat gene program

    OpenAIRE

    Minwoo eNam; Marcus eCooper

    2015-01-01

    In murine and human brown adipose tissue (BAT), mitochondria are powerful generators of heat that safely metabolize fat, a feature that has great promise in the fight against obesity and diabetes. Recent studies suggest that the action of mitochondria extend beyond their conventional role as generators of heat. There is mounting evidence that impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity is accompanied by attenuated expression of Ucp1 and other BAT-selective genes, implying that mitochondria ex...

  4. Interrelationships between mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism and oxidative stress during development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Kayo [Department of Molecular Life Science, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan); Education and Research Support Center, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan); Hartman, Philip S. [Biology Department, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Ishii, Takamasa [Department of Molecular Life Science, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan); Suda, Hitoshi [School of High-Technology for Human Welfare, Tokai University, Nishino 317, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-0395 (Japan); Akatsuka, Akira [Education and Research Support Center, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan); Shoyama, Tetsuji [School of High-Technology for Human Welfare, Tokai University, Nishino 317, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-0395 (Japan); Miyazawa, Masaki [Department of Molecular Life Science, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan); Ishii, Naoaki, E-mail: nishii@is.icc.u-tokai.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Life Science, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan)

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} Growth and development of a fzo-1 mutant defective in the fusion process of mitochondria was delayed relative to the wild type of Caenorhabditis elegans. {yields} Oxygen sensitivity during larval development, superoxide production and carbonyl protein accumulation of the fzo-1 mutant were similar to wild type. {yields} fzo-1 animals had significantly lower metabolism than did N2 and mev-1 overproducing superoxide from mitochondrial electron transport complex II. {yields} Mitochondrial fusion can profoundly affect energy metabolism and development. -- Abstract: Mitochondria are known to be dynamic structures with the energetically and enzymatically mediated processes of fusion and fission responsible for maintaining a constant flux. Mitochondria also play a role of reactive oxygen species production as a byproduct of energy metabolism. In the current study, interrelationships between mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism and oxidative stress on development were explored using a fzo-1 mutant defective in the fusion process and a mev-1 mutant overproducing superoxide from mitochondrial electron transport complex II of Caenorhabditis elegans. While growth and development of both single mutants was slightly delayed relative to the wild type, the fzo-1;mev-1 double mutant experienced considerable delay. Oxygen sensitivity during larval development, superoxide production and carbonyl protein accumulation of the fzo-1 mutant were similar to wild type. fzo-1 animals had significantly lower metabolism than did N2 and mev-1. These data indicate that mitochondrial fusion can profoundly affect energy metabolism and development.

  5. Effect of bacterial protein meal on protein and energy metabolism in growing chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Skrede, Anders

    2006-01-01

    This experiment investigates the effect of increasing the dietary content of bacterial protein meal (BPM) on the protein and energy metabolism, and carcass chemical composition of growing chickens. Seventy-two Ross male chickens were allocated to four diets, each in three replicates with 0% (D0), 2...... for protein and energy retention found in the balance and respiration experiments. It was concluded that the overall protein and energy metabolism as well as carcass composition were not influenced by a dietary content of up to 6% BPM corresponding to 20% of dietary N....

  6. Metabolic and Transcriptional Response to Cofactor Perturbations in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders Koefoed; Blank, L.M.; Oldiges, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic cofactors such as NADH and ATP play important roles in a large number of cellular reactions, and it is of great interest to dissect the role of these cofactors in different aspects of metabolism. Toward this goal, we overexpressed NADH oxidase and the soluble F1-ATPase in Escherichia coli...... of redox and energy metabolism and should help in developing metabolic engineering strategies in E. coli....

  7. Body composition and energy metabolism in elderly people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes several studies related to the three components of energy balance in elderly people: body composition, energy expenditure, and energy intake.Body composition. The applicability of the body mass index, skinfold thickness method, and multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance was te

  8. Role of gut microbiota in the control of energy and carbohydrate metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review: To describe the recent developments and insights gained in the role played by the colonic microbiota in energy and carbohydrate metabolism related to obesity in humans. Recent findings: Previous findings that the ratio of Firmicutes and Bacteriodetes is important in energy harvest

  9. Simulating the physiology of athletes during endurance sports events: Modelling human energy conversion and metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, J.H.G.M. van; Supandi, F.; Gavai, A.K.; Graaf, A.A. de; Binsl, T.W.; Hettling, H.

    2011-01-01

    The human physiological system is stressed to its limits during endurance sports competition events.We describe a whole body computational model for energy conversion during bicycle racing. About 23 per cent of the metabolic energy is used for muscle work, the rest is converted to heat. We calculate

  10. Dietary energy density is associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome in U.S. adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising obesity rates have been linked to the consumption of energy-dense diets. We examined whether dietary energy density was associated with obesity and related disorders, including insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. We conducted a cross-sectional study using nationally representative ...

  11. Simultaneous Analysis of Major Coenzymes of Cellular Redox Reactions and Energy Using ex Vivo (1)H NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagana Gowda, G A; Abell, Lauren; Lee, Chi Fung; Tian, Rong; Raftery, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Coenzymes of cellular redox reactions and cellular energy mediate biochemical reactions fundamental to the functioning of all living cells. Despite their immense interest, no simple method exists to gain insights into their cellular concentrations in a single step. We show that a simple (1)H NMR experiment can simultaneously measure oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+) and NADH), oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+) and NADPH), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and its precursors, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), using mouse heart, kidney, brain, liver, and skeletal muscle tissue extracts as examples. Combining 1D/2D NMR experiments, chemical shift libraries, and authentic compound data, reliable peak identities for these coenzymes have been established. To assess this methodology, cardiac NADH and NAD(+) ratios/pool sizes were measured using mouse models with a cardiac-specific knockout of the mitochondrial Complex I Ndufs4 gene (cKO) and cardiac-specific overexpression of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (cNAMPT) as examples. Sensitivity of NAD(+) and NADH to cKO or cNAMPT was observed, as anticipated. Time-dependent investigations showed that the levels of NADH and NADPH diminish by up to ∼50% within 24 h; concomitantly, NAD(+) and NADP(+) increase proportionately; however, degassing the sample and flushing the sample tubes with helium gas halted such changes. The analysis protocol along with the annotated characteristic fingerprints for each coenzyme is provided for easy identification and absolute quantification using a single internal reference for routine use. The ability to visualize the ubiquitous coenzymes fundamental to cellular functions, simultaneously and reliably, offers a new avenue to interrogate the mechanistic details of cellular function in health and disease. PMID:27043450

  12. PET studies of brain energy metabolism in a model of subcortical dementia: progressive supranuclear Palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 41 patients with clinically determined Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, a model of degenerative subcortical dementia, alterations in regional brain energy metabolism with respect to control subjects have been investigated using positron computed tomography and correlated to clinical and neuropsychological scores. A generalized significant reduction in brain metabolism was found, which predominated in the prefrontal cortex in accordance with, and statistically correlated to, the frontal neuropsychological score

  13. Thermal effects on cephalopod energy metabolism - A case study for Sepia officinalis

    OpenAIRE

    Mark, F.; Melzner, Frank; Bock, C.; Poermer, H.; Ellington, C.; Claireaux, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cephalopods are the largest, most active invertebrates and there is considerable evidence for their convergent evolution with fishes. However, most active cephalopods display standard and active metabolic rates that are several-fold higher than comparably sized fishes. Shifting habitat temperatures due to climate change will therefore affect a cephalopods energy metabolism much more than that of a fish. Prediction of the probable outcome of cephalopod-fish competition thus requires quantitati...

  14. In vivo modular control analysis of energy metabolism in contracting skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Arsac, Laurent M; Beuste, Christophe; Miraux, Sylvain; Deschodt-Arsac, Veronique; Thiaudière, Eric; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Diolez, Philippe H

    2008-01-01

    Abstract We used 31P MR spectroscopy measurements of energetic intermediates (ATP, Pi, PCr) in combination with the analytical tools of metabolic control analysis to study in vivo energy metabolism in contracting skeletal muscle of anesthetized rats over a broad range of workload. According to our recent Modular Control Analysis (MoCA) used to describe regulatory mechanisms in beating heart, we defined the energetic system of muscle contraction as two modules (PCr-Producer and PCr-...

  15. SIRT1 IS INVOLVED IN ENERGY METABOLISM: THE ROLE OF CHRONIC ETHANOL FEEDING AND RESVERATROL

    OpenAIRE

    Oliva, Joan; French, Barbara A.; Li, Jun; Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Fu, Paul; French, Samuel W.

    2008-01-01

    Sirt1, a deacetylase involved in regulating energy metabolism in response to calorie restriction, is up regulated after chronic ethanol feeding using the intragastric feeding model of alcohol liver disease. PGC1α is also up regulated in response to ethanol. These changes are consistent with activation of the Sirt1/PGC1α pathway of metabolism and aging, involved in alcohol liver disease including steatosis, necrosis and fibrosis of the liver. To test this hypothesis, male rats fed ethanol intr...

  16. Role of low energy expenditure and sitting in obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Marc T; Hamilton, Deborah G; Zderic, Theodore W

    2007-11-01

    It is not uncommon for people to spend one-half of their waking day sitting, with relatively idle muscles. The other half of the day includes the often large volume of nonexercise physical activity. Given the increasing pace of technological change in domestic, community, and workplace environments, modern humans may still not have reached the historical pinnacle of physical inactivity, even in cohorts where people already do not perform exercise. Our purpose here is to examine the role of sedentary behaviors, especially sitting, on mortality, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome risk factors, and obesity. Recent observational epidemiological studies strongly suggest that daily sitting time or low nonexercise activity levels may have a significant direct relationship with each of these medical concerns. There is now a need for studies to differentiate between the potentially unique molecular, physiologic, and clinical effects of too much sitting (inactivity physiology) separate from the responses caused by structured exercise (exercise physiology). In theory, this may be in part because nonexercise activity thermogenesis is generally a much greater component of total energy expenditure than exercise or because any type of brief, yet frequent, muscular contraction throughout the day may be necessary to short-circuit unhealthy molecular signals causing metabolic diseases. One of the first series of controlled laboratory studies providing translational evidence for a molecular reason to maintain high levels of daily low-intensity and intermittent activity came from examinations of the cellular regulation of skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase (LPL) (a protein important for controlling plasma triglyceride catabolism, HDL cholesterol, and other metabolic risk factors). Experimentally reducing normal spontaneous standing and ambulatory time had a much greater effect on LPL regulation than adding vigorous exercise training on top of the normal level

  17. Rhodanese functions as sulfur supplier for key enzymes in sulfur energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussignargues, Clément; Giuliani, Marie-Cécile; Infossi, Pascale; Lojou, Elisabeth; Guiral, Marianne; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ilbert, Marianne

    2012-06-01

    How microorganisms obtain energy is a challenging topic, and there have been numerous studies on the mechanisms involved. Here, we focus on the energy substrate traffic in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This bacterium can use insoluble sulfur as an energy substrate and has an intricate sulfur energy metabolism involving several sulfur-reducing and -oxidizing supercomplexes and enzymes. We demonstrate that the cytoplasmic rhodanese SbdP participates in this sulfur energy metabolism. Rhodaneses are a widespread family of proteins known to transfer sulfur atoms. We show that SbdP has also some unusual characteristics compared with other rhodaneses; it can load a long sulfur chain, and it can interact with more than one partner. Its partners (sulfur reductase and sulfur oxygenase reductase) are key enzymes of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus and share the capacity to use long sulfur chains as substrate. We demonstrate a positive effect of SbdP, once loaded with sulfur chains, on sulfur reductase activity, most likely by optimizing substrate uptake. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a physiological role for SbdP as a carrier and sulfur chain donor to these key enzymes, therefore enabling channeling of sulfur substrate in the cell as well as greater efficiency of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus. PMID:22496367

  18. Body composition and energy metabolism in elderly people.

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, M.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes several studies related to the three components of energy balance in elderly people: body composition, energy expenditure, and energy intake.Body composition. The applicability of the body mass index, skinfold thickness method, and multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance was tested in elderly men and women. The first two methods predicted body fat in elderly people on a group level with a mean prediction error of 5%. The impedance method predicted total body water (at 50...

  19. Energy metabolism and energy-sensing pathways in mammalian embryonic and adult stem cell fate

    OpenAIRE

    Rafalski, Victoria A.; Mancini, Elena; Brunet, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism is influenced by age, food intake, and conditions such as diabetes and obesity. How do physiological or pathological metabolic changes influence stem cells, which are crucial for tissue homeostasis? This Commentary reviews recent evidence that stem cells have different metabolic demands than differentiated cells, and that the molecular mechanisms that control stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are functionally connected to the metabolic state of the cell and the surrounding...

  20. PII, the key regulator of nitrogen metabolism in the cyanobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; ZHAO JinDong

    2008-01-01

    PII proteins are a protein family important to signal transduction in bacteria and plants. PII plays a critical role in regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria. Through conformation change and covalent modification, which are regulated by 2-oxoglutarate, PII interacts with different target proteins in response to changes of cellular energy status and carbon and nitrogen sources in cyanobacteria and regulates cellular metabolism. This article reports recent progress in PII research in cyanobacteria and discusses the mechanism of PII regulation of cellular metabolism.

  1. Energy metabolism and metabolic sensors in stem cells: the metabostem crossroads of aging and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    We are as old as our adult stem cells are; therefore, stem cell exhaustion is considered a hallmark of aging. Our tumors are as aggressive as the number of cancer stem cells (CSCs) they bear because CSCs can survive treatments with hormones, radiation, chemotherapy, and molecularly targeted drugs, thus increasing the difficulty of curing cancer. Not surprisingly, interest in stem cell research has never been greater among members of the public, politicians, and scientists. But how can we slow the rate at which our adult stem cells decline over our lifetime, reducing the regenerative potential of tissues, while efficiently eliminating the aberrant, life-threatening activity of "selfish", immortal, and migrating CSCs? Frustrated by the gene-centric limitations of conventional approaches to aging diseases, our group and other groups have begun to appreciate that bioenergetic metabolism, i.e., the production of fuel & building blocks for growth and division, and autophagy/mitophagy, i.e., the quality-control, self-cannibalistic system responsible for "cleaning house" and "recycling the trash", can govern the genetic and epigenetic networks that facilitate stem cell behaviors. Indeed, it is reasonable to suggest the existence of a "metabostem" infrastructure that operates as a shared hallmark of aging and cancer, thus making it physiologically plausible to maintain or even increase the functionality of adult stem cells while reducing the incidence of cancer and extending the lifespan. This "metabostemness" property could lead to the discovery of new drugs that reprogram cell metabotypes to increase the structural and functional integrity of adult stem cells and positively influence their lineage determination, while preventing the development and aberrant function of stem cells in cancer tissues. While it is obvious that the antifungal antibiotic rapamycin, the polyphenol resveratrol, and the biguanide metformin already belong to this new family of metabostemness

  2. Constrained Total Energy Expenditure and Metabolic Adaptation to Physical Activity in Adult Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzer, Herman; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Dugas, Lara R; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence E; Lambert, Estelle V; Cooper, Richard S; Schoeller, Dale A; Luke, Amy

    2016-02-01

    Current obesity prevention strategies recommend increasing daily physical activity, assuming that increased activity will lead to corresponding increases in total energy expenditure and prevent or reverse energy imbalance and weight gain [1-3]. Such Additive total energy expenditure models are supported by exercise intervention and accelerometry studies reporting positive correlations between physical activity and total energy expenditure [4] but are challenged by ecological studies in humans and other species showing that more active populations do not have higher total energy expenditure [5-8]. Here we tested a Constrained total energy expenditure model, in which total energy expenditure increases with physical activity at low activity levels but plateaus at higher activity levels as the body adapts to maintain total energy expenditure within a narrow range. We compared total energy expenditure, measured using doubly labeled water, against physical activity, measured using accelerometry, for a large (n = 332) sample of adults living in five populations [9]. After adjusting for body size and composition, total energy expenditure was positively correlated with physical activity, but the relationship was markedly stronger over the lower range of physical activity. For subjects in the upper range of physical activity, total energy expenditure plateaued, supporting a Constrained total energy expenditure model. Body fat percentage and activity intensity appear to modulate the metabolic response to physical activity. Models of energy balance employed in public health [1-3] should be revised to better reflect the constrained nature of total energy expenditure and the complex effects of physical activity on metabolic physiology.

  3. Inter-organ metabolic communication involved in energy homeostasis: potential therapeutic targets for obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The global rate of obesity is rising alarmingly, exerting a major adverse impact on human health by increasing the prevalences of disorders, such as diabetes, hypertension and heart disease. To maintain systemic energy homeostasis, metabolic information must be communicated among organs/tissues. Obesity-related disorders can be thought of as resulting from dysregulation of this vital inter-tissue communication. Remarkable advances in obesity research during this decade have shown humoral factors manufactured and secreted by adipose tissue (adipocytokines) to be of great importance. In addition to these humoral factors, such as nutrients (glucose, fatty acids and amino acids) and hormones (insulin, adipocytokines and so on), the functional significance of the autonomic nervous system has recently attracted research attention. Autonomic nerves are essential components of the endogenous system for maintaining energy homeostasis, making them potential therapeutic targets for obesity-related disorders. This review focuses on the therapeutic possibilities of targeting inter-organ communication systems.

  4. Effect of fatty acids on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell energy metabolism and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, Natasha; Huqi, Alda; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Mori, Jun; Paulin, Roxane; Haromy, Alois; Onay-Besikci, Arzu; Ionescu, Lavinia; Thébaud, Bernard; Michelakis, Evangelos; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Successful stem cell therapy requires the optimal proliferation, engraftment, and differentiation of stem cells into the desired cell lineage of tissues. However, stem cell therapy clinical trials to date have had limited success, suggesting that a better understanding of stem cell biology is needed. This includes a better understanding of stem cell energy metabolism because of the importance of energy metabolism in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. We report here the first direct evidence that human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMMSC) energy metabolism is highly glycolytic with low rates of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The contribution of glycolysis to ATP production is greater than 97% in undifferentiated BMMSCs, while glucose and fatty acid oxidation combined only contribute 3% of ATP production. We also assessed the effect of physiological levels of fatty acids on human BMMSC survival and energy metabolism. We found that the saturated fatty acid palmitate induces BMMSC apoptosis and decreases proliferation, an effect prevented by the unsaturated fatty acid oleate. Interestingly, chronic exposure of human BMMSCs to physiological levels of palmitate (for 24 hr) reduces palmitate oxidation rates. This decrease in palmitate oxidation is prevented by chronic exposure of the BMMSCs to oleate. These results suggest that reducing saturated fatty acid oxidation can decrease human BMMSC proliferation and cause cell death. These results also suggest that saturated fatty acids may be involved in the long-term impairment of BMMSC survival in vivo.

  5. Cellular Energy Absorbing TRIP-Steel/Mg-PSZ Composite: Honeycomb Structures Fabricated by a New Extrusion Powder Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Martin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight linear cellular composite materials on basis of austenite stainless TRIP- (TRansformation Induced Plasticity- steel as matrix with reinforcements of MgO partially stabilized zirconia (Mg-PSZ are described. Two-dimensional cellular materials for structural applications are conventionally produced by sheet expansion or corrugation processes. The presented composites are fabricated by a modified ceramic extrusion powder technology. Characterization of the microstructure in as-received and deformed conditions was carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Magnetic balance measurements and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD were used to identify the deformation-induced martensite evolution in the cell wall material. The honeycomb composite samples exhibit an increased strain hardening up to a certain engineering compressive strain and an extraordinary high specific energy absorption per unit mass and unit volume, respectively. Based on improved property-to-weight ratio such linear cellular structures will be of interest as crash absorbers or stiffened core materials for aerospace, railway, or automotive applications.

  6. Influence of NO-containing gas flow on various parameters of energy metabolism in erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martusevich, A K; Solov'yova, A G; Peretyagin, S P; Karelin, V I; Selemir, V D

    2014-11-01

    We studied the influence of NO-containing gas phase on some parameters of energy metabolism in human erythrocytes. Whole blood samples were aerated with gas flows from the Plazon instrument (NO concentrations 800 and 80 ppm) and from the experimental generator (75 ppm). Activity of lactate dehydrogenase in direct and reverse reactions, lactate level, and a number of derived coefficients were estimated. Treatment of blood with 800 ppm NO inhibited erythrocyte energy metabolism, and its 10-fold dilution attenuated the effect. The use of ROS-free gas flow containing 75 ppm of NO promoted optimization of the process under investigation. PMID:25403392

  7. Impact of different temperatures on survival and energy metabolism in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shesheny, Ibrahim; Hijaz, Faraj; El-Hawary, Ibrahim; Mesbah, Ibrahim; Killiny, Nabil

    2016-02-01

    Temperature influences the life history and metabolic parameters of insects. Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri is a tropical and subtropical pest. ACP invaded new regions around the world and threatened the citrus industry as a vector for Huanglongbing (HLB) disease. ACP is widely distributed and can survive high (up to 45 °C) and low temperatures (as low as -6 °C). The precise mechanism of temperature tolerance in ACP is poorly understood. We investigated adult survival, cellular energy balance, gene expression, and nucleotide and sugar-nucleotide changes under the effect of different temperature regimes (0 °C to 45 °C with 5 °C intervals). The optimum temperatures for survival were 20 and 25 °C. Low temperatures of 0 °C and 5 °C caused 50% mortality after 2 and 4 days respectively, while one day at high temperature (40 °C and 45 °C) caused more than 95% mortality. The lowest quantity of ATP (3.69 ± 1.6 ng/insect) and the maximum ATPase enzyme activities (57.43 ± 7.6 μU/insect) were observed at 25 °C. Correlation between ATP quantities and ATPase activity was negative. Gene expression of hsp 70, V-type proton ATPase catalytic subunit A and ATP synthase α subunit matched these results. Twenty-four nucleotides and sugar-nucleotides were quantified using HPLC in ACP adults maintained at low, high, and optimum temperatures. The nucleotide profiles were different among treatments. The ratios between AMP:ATP and ADP:ATP were significantly decreased and positively correlated to adults survival, whereas the adenylate energy charge was increased in response to low and high temperatures. Exploring energy metabolic regulation in relation with adult survival might help in understanding the physiological basis of how ACP tolerates newly invaded regions. PMID:26603556

  8. Impact of different temperatures on survival and energy metabolism in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shesheny, Ibrahim; Hijaz, Faraj; El-Hawary, Ibrahim; Mesbah, Ibrahim; Killiny, Nabil

    2016-02-01

    Temperature influences the life history and metabolic parameters of insects. Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri is a tropical and subtropical pest. ACP invaded new regions around the world and threatened the citrus industry as a vector for Huanglongbing (HLB) disease. ACP is widely distributed and can survive high (up to 45 °C) and low temperatures (as low as -6 °C). The precise mechanism of temperature tolerance in ACP is poorly understood. We investigated adult survival, cellular energy balance, gene expression, and nucleotide and sugar-nucleotide changes under the effect of different temperature regimes (0 °C to 45 °C with 5 °C intervals). The optimum temperatures for survival were 20 and 25 °C. Low temperatures of 0 °C and 5 °C caused 50% mortality after 2 and 4 days respectively, while one day at high temperature (40 °C and 45 °C) caused more than 95% mortality. The lowest quantity of ATP (3.69 ± 1.6 ng/insect) and the maximum ATPase enzyme activities (57.43 ± 7.6 μU/insect) were observed at 25 °C. Correlation between ATP quantities and ATPase activity was negative. Gene expression of hsp 70, V-type proton ATPase catalytic subunit A and ATP synthase α subunit matched these results. Twenty-four nucleotides and sugar-nucleotides were quantified using HPLC in ACP adults maintained at low, high, and optimum temperatures. The nucleotide profiles were different among treatments. The ratios between AMP:ATP and ADP:ATP were significantly decreased and positively correlated to adults survival, whereas the adenylate energy charge was increased in response to low and high temperatures. Exploring energy metabolic regulation in relation with adult survival might help in understanding the physiological basis of how ACP tolerates newly invaded regions.

  9. Lymphocytes Mitochondrial Physiology as Biomarker of Energy Metabolism during Fasted and Fed Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Cortez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are central coordinators of energy metabolism, and changes of their physiology have long been associated with metabolic disorders. Thus, observations of energy dynamics in different cell types are of utmost importance. Therefore, tools with quick and easy handling are needed for consistent evaluations of such interventions. In this paper, our main hypothesis is that during different nutritional situations lymphocytes mitochondrial physiology could be associated with the metabolism of other cell types, such as cardiomyocytes, and consequently be used as metabolic biomarker. Blood lymphocytes and heart muscle fibers were obtained from both fed and 24 h-fasted mice, and mitochondrial analysis was assessed by high-resolution respirometry and western blotting. Carbohydrate-linked oxidation and fatty acid oxidation were significantly higher after fasting. Carnitine palmitoil transferase 1 and uncouple protein 2 contents were increased in the fasted group, while the glucose transporters 1 and 4 and the ratio phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase/AMPK did not change between groups. In summary, under a nutritional status modification, mitochondria demonstrated earlier adaptive capacity than other metabolic sensors such as glucose transporters and AMPK, suggesting the accuracy of mitochondria physiology of lymphocytes as biomarker for metabolic changes.

  10. Rethinking energy in parkinsonian motor symptoms: a potential role for neural metabolic deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Shinichi; Kegelmeyer, Deborah; Hong, S Lee

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized as a chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder that results in a variety of debilitating symptoms, including bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity, and postural instability. Research spanning several decades has emphasized basal ganglia dysfunction, predominantly resulting from dopaminergic (DA) cell loss, as the primarily cause of the aforementioned parkinsonian features. But, why those particular features manifest themselves remains an enigma. The goal of this paper is to develop a theoretical framework that parkinsonian motor features are behavioral consequence of a long-term adaptation to their inability (inflexibility or lack of capacity) to meet energetic demands, due to neural metabolic deficits arising from mitochondrial dysfunction associated with PD. Here, we discuss neurophysiological changes that are generally associated with PD, such as selective degeneration of DA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), in conjunction with metabolic and mitochondrial dysfunction. We then characterize the cardinal motor symptoms of PD, bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity and gait disturbance, reviewing literature to demonstrate how these motor patterns are actually energy efficient from a metabolic perspective. We will also develop three testable hypotheses: (1) neural metabolic deficits precede the increased rate of neurodegeneration and onset of behavioral symptoms in PD; (2) motor behavior of persons with PD are more sensitive to changes in metabolic/bioenergetic state; and (3) improvement of metabolic function could lead to better motor performance in persons with PD. These hypotheses are designed to introduce a novel viewpoint that can elucidate the connections between metabolic, neural and motor function in PD. PMID:25610377

  11. In Vitro Disease Model of Microgravity Conditioning on Human Energy Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jessica; Culbertson, C.; Zhang, Ye; Emami, K.; Wu, H.; Sun, Wei

    2010-01-01

    NASA and its partners are committed to introducing appropriate new technology to enable learning and living safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time in a sustainable and possibly indefinite manner. In the responsible acquisition of that goal, life sciences is tasked to tune and advance current medical technology to prepare for human health and wellness in the space environment. The space environment affects the condition and function of biological systems from organ level function to shape of individual organelles. The objective of this paper is to study the effect of microgravity on kinetics of drug metabolism. This fundamental characterization is meaningful to (1) scientific understanding of the response of biology to microgravity and (2) clinical dosing requirements and pharmacological thresholds during long term manned space exploration. Metabolism kinetics of the anti-nausea drug promethazine (PMZ) were determined by an in vitro ground model of 3-dimensional aggregates of human hepatocytes conditioned to weightlessness using a rotating wall bioreactor. The authors observed up-regulated PMZ conversion in model microgravity conditions and attribute this to effect to model microgravity conditioning acting on metabolic mechanisms of the cells. Further work is necessary to determine which particular cellular mechanisms are governing the experimental observations, but the authors conclude kinetics of drug metabolism are responsive to gravitational fields and further study of this sensitivity would improve dosing of pharmaceuticals to persons exposed to a microgravity environment.

  12. Energy crisis precedes global metabolic failure in a novel Caenorhabditis elegans Alzheimer Disease model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Sheng; Teo, Emelyne; Ng, Li Fang; Chen, Ce-Belle; Lakshmanan, Lakshmi Narayanan; Tsoi, Sau Yee; Moore, Philip Keith; Inoue, Takao; Halliwell, Barry; Gruber, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer Disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by the deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ), predominantly the Aβ1–42 form, in the brain. Mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired energy metabolism are important components of AD pathogenesis. However, the causal and temporal relationships between them and AD pathology remain unclear. Using a novel C. elegans AD strain with constitutive neuronal Aβ1–42 expression that displays neuromuscular defects and age-dependent behavioural dysfunction reminiscent of AD, we have shown that mitochondrial bioenergetic deficit is an early event in AD pathogenesis, preceding dysfunction of mitochondrial electron transfer chain (ETC) complexes and the onset of global metabolic failure. These results are consistent with an emerging view that AD may be a metabolic neurodegenerative disease, and also confirm that Aβ-driven metabolic and mitochondrial effects can be reproduced in organisms separated by large evolutionary distances. PMID:27653553

  13. Energetic and metabolic consequences of aerobic and an-aerobic ATP-production.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, V.V.A.M.; Aarts, M.J.; IJssennagger, N.; Hermans, J.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2007-01-01

    ATP, the currency of cellular energy metabolism, can be produced during aerobic and an-aerobic oxidation of metabolic substrates. The aerobic oxidation yields CO2 + H2O as metabolic end products while ATP is produced by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. Carbohydrate, protein and fat pro

  14. Short photoperiod increases energy intake, metabolic thermogenesis and organ mass in silky starlings Sturnus sericeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Qi; Wang, Jia-Jia; Wu, Xu-Jian; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Liu, Jin-Song

    2016-03-18

    Environmental cues play important roles in the regulation of an animal's physiology and behavior. One such cue, photoperiod, plays an important role in the seasonal acclimatization of birds. It has been demonstrated that an animal's body mass, basal metabolic rate (BMR), and energy intake, are all affected by photoperiod. The present study was designed to examine photoperiod induced changes in the body mass, metabolism and metabolic organs of the silky starling, Sturnus sericeus. Captive silky starlings increased their body mass and BMR during four weeks of acclimation to a short photoperiod. Birds acclimated to a short photoperiod also increased the mass of certain organs (liver, gizzard and small intestine), and both gross energy intake (GEI) and digestible energy intake (DEI), relative to those acclimated to a long photoperiod. Furthermore, BMR was positively correlated with body mass, liver mass, GEI and DEI. These results suggest that silky starlings increase metabolic thermogenesis when exposed to a short photoperiod by increasing their body and metabolic organ mass, and their GEI and DEI. These findings support the hypothesis that bird species from temperate climates typically display high phenotypic flexibility in thermogenic capacity. PMID:27029864

  15. Preservation of rat skeletal muscle energy metabolism by illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgård, Ann; Lundberg, Jonas; Rakotonirainy, Olivier; Elander, Anna; Soussi, Bassam

    2003-04-25

    Skeletal muscle viability is crucially dependent on the tissue levels of its high energy phosphates. In this study we investigated the effect of the preservation medium Perfadex and illumination with Singlet Oxygen Energy (SOE). Singlet oxygen can be produced photochemically by energy transfer from an excited photosensitizer. The energy emitted from singlet oxygen upon relaxation to its triplet state is captured as photons at 634 nm and is here referred to as SOE. Rat hind limb rectus femoris muscles were preserved for five hours at 22 degrees C in Perfadex, saline, SOE illuminated Perfadex or SOE illuminated saline. Extracts of the muscles were analysed by 31P NMR. Data were analysed using two-way analysis of variance and are given as mean values micromol/g dry weight) +/- SEM. The ATP concentration was higher (p = 0.006) in saline groups (4.52) compared with Perfadex groups (2.82). There was no statistically significant difference in PCr between the saline groups (1.25) and Perfadex groups (0.82). However, there were higher (p = 0.003) ATP in the SOE illuminated groups (4.61) compared with the non-illuminated groups (2.73). The PCr was also higher (p < 0.0001) in the SOE illuminated groups (1.89) compared with the non-illuminated groups (0.18). In conclusion, Perfadex in this experimental model was incapable of preserving the high energy phosphates in skeletal muscle during 5 hours of ischemia. Illumination with SOE at 634 nm improved the preservation potential, in terms of a positive effect on the energy status of the muscle cell.

  16. Energy analysis for a sustainable future multi-scale integrated analysis of societal and ecosystem metabolism

    CERN Document Server

    Giampietro, Mario; Sorman, Alevgül H

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of the countries of the world are now facing an imminent energy crisis, particularly the USA, China, India, Japan and EU countries, but also developing countries having to boost their economic growth precisely when more powerful economies will prevent them from using the limited supply of fossil energy. Despite this crisis, current protocols of energy accounting have been developed for dealing with fossil energy exclusively and are therefore not useful for the analysis of alternative energy sources. The first part of the book illustrates the weakness of existing analyses of energy problems: the science of energy was born and developed neglecting the issue of scale. The authors argue that it is necessary to adopt more complex protocols of accounting and analysis in order to generate robust energy scenarios and effective assessments of the quality of alternative energy sources. The second part of the book introduces the concept of energetic metabolism of modern societies and uses empirical res...

  17. On the use of prior information in modelling metabolic utilization of energy in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Jørgensen, Henry; Fernández, José Adalberto;

    2011-01-01

    Construction of models that provide a realistic representation of metabolic utilization of energy in growing animals tend to be over-parameterized because data generated from individual metabolic studies are often sparse. In the Bayesian framework prior information can enter the data analysis...... through formal statements of probability because model parameters are random variables and hence, are assigned probability distribution (Gelman et al. 2004). The objective of the study was to introduce prior information in modelling metabolizable energy (ME) intake, protein (PD) and lipid deposition (LD......) curves, resulting from a metabolism study on growing pigs of high genetic potential. A total of 17 crossbred pigs of three genders (barrows, boars and gilts) were used. Pigs were fed four diets based on barley, wheat and soybean meal supplemented with crystalline amino acids to meet Danish nutrient...

  18. High fat diet induced disturbances of energy metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Sjoerd Adrianus Antonius van den

    2010-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance (IR) are multifactorial pathologies, characterized by a complex etiology. In addition to genetics, age and sex, environmental factors such as dietary composition and lifestyle have profound effects on the development of both pathologies. Excess dietary energy intake (E

  19. Environmental physiology: effects of energy-related pollutants on daily cycles of energy metabolism, motor activity, and thermoregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section contains a summary of research on the effects of energy-related pollutants on daily cycles of energy metabolism, motor activity, and thermoregulation. So far, mice have been exposed to fast neutron-gamma radiation or to the chemical effluents of an atmospheric pressure experimental fluidized-bed combustor. The physiological parameters measured included: O2 consumption; CO2 production; motor activity; and deep body temperatures

  20. CHANGES IN THE PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE AND ENERGY METABOLISM OF AN ESTUARINE MYSID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measures of physiological performance and energy metabolism were made on an estuarine mysid (Mysidopsis bahia) exposed throughout a life cycle to the defoliant DEF. EF concentrations > 0.246 ug/l reduced survival through release of the first brood. oung production was completely ...

  1. Malolactic Fermentation : Electrogenic Malate Uptake and Malate/Lactate Antiport Generate Metabolic Energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert; Molenaar, Douwe; Smid, Eddy J.; Ubbink, Trees; Abee, Tjakko; Renault, Pierre P.; Konings, Wil N.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of metabolic energy production by malolactic fermentation in Lactococcus lactis has been investigated. In the presence of L-malate, a proton motive force composed of a membrane potential and pH gradient is generated which has about the same magnitude as the proton motive force generate

  2. Variation in energy intake and basal metabolic rate of a bird migrating in a wind tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindström, Å.; Klaassen, M.R.J.; Kvist, A.

    1999-01-01

    1. We studied the changes in body mass, metabolizable energy intake rate (ME) and basal metabolic rate (BMR) of a Thrush Nightingale, Luscinia luscinia, following repeated 12-h migratory flights in a wind tunnel. In total the bird flew for 176 h corresponding to 6300 km. This is the first study wher

  3. Energy metabolism and lactation performance of primiparous sows as affected by dietary fat and vitamin E.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babinszky, L.

    1992-01-01

    In this thesis different levels of dietary fat (37, 43, 75 and 125 g/kg DM, respectively) and vitamin E (from 14 to 151 mg α-tocopherol/kg diet) in the lactation diet, were studied for their effect on the energy metabolism, and lactation performance of primiparous sows. The effects of different leve

  4. The energy metabolism of Fasciola hepatica during its development in the final host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, A.G.M.; Heuvel, J.M. van den; Bergh, S.G. van den

    1984-01-01

    Mature liver flukes, Fasciola hepatica, of different ages were isolated from the bile ducts of experimentally infected rats. Their energy metabolism was studied during aerobic incubation with [6-14C]glucose. The results showed that the aerobic potentials of the parenchymal liver flukes are not lost

  5. Changes in energy metabolism of the juvenile Fasciola hepatica during its development in the liver parenchyma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, A.G.M.; Heuvel, J.M. van den; Bergh, S.G. van den

    1982-01-01

    Juvenile Fasciola hepatica at different stages of development were isolated from the liver parenchyma of experimentally infected rats. Their energy metabolism was studied by incubation with D-[16-14C]glucose and compared with that of juveniles isolated immediately after in vitro emergence from the m

  6. Hepatic ERK activity plays a role in energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Ping; Feng, Bin; Li, Yujie; He, Qin; Xu, Haiyan

    2013-08-15

    Mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and P38, have been reported to play important roles in energy homeostasis. In this study, we show that the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is increased in the livers of diet induced and genetically obese mice. Activation of ERK in the livers of lean mice by over-expressing the constitutively active MAPK kinase 1 (MEK CA) results in decreased energy expenditure, lowered expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation, increases fasting hyperglycemia and causes systemic insulin resistance. Interestingly, hepatic glycogen content is markedly increased and expression of G6Pase gene is decreased in mice over-expressing MEK CA compared to control mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), therefore hepatic glucose output is not likely the major contributor of hyperglycemia. One potential mechanism of decreased expression of G6Pase gene by MEK CA is likely due to ERK mediated phosphorylation and cytosolic retention of FOXO1. Adipocytes isolated from MEK CA mice display increased lipolysis. Circulating levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) in these mice are also increased, which possibly contribute to systemic insulin resistance and subsequent hyperglycemia. Consistent with these results, knocking down ERK expression in the liver of diet induced obese (DIO) mice improves systemic insulin and glucose tolerance. These results indicate that increased hepatic ERK activity in DIO mice may contribute to increased liver glycogen content and decreased energy expenditure in obesity. PMID:23732116

  7. Adipose tissue lipolysis and energy metabolism in early cancer cachexia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliewer, Kara L; Ke, Jia-Yu; Tian, Min; Cole, Rachel M; Andridge, Rebecca R; Belury, Martha A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a progressive metabolic disorder that results in depletion of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. A growing body of literature suggests that maintaining adipose tissue mass in cachexia may improve quality-of-life and survival outcomes. Studies of lipid metabolism in cachexia, however, have generally focused on later stages of the disorder when severe loss of adipose tissue has already occurred. Here, we investigated lipid metabolism in adipose, liver and muscle tissues during early stage cachexia - before severe fat loss - in the colon-26 murine model of cachexia. White adipose tissue mass in cachectic mice was moderately reduced (34-42%) and weight loss was less than 10% of initial body weight in this study of early cachexia. In white adipose depots of cachectic mice, we found evidence of enhanced protein kinase A - activated lipolysis which coincided with elevated total energy expenditure and increased expression of markers of brown (but not white) adipose tissue thermogenesis and the acute phase response. Total lipids in liver and muscle were unchanged in early cachexia while markers of fatty oxidation were increased. Many of these initial metabolic responses contrast with reports of lipid metabolism in later stages of cachexia. Our observations suggest intervention studies to preserve fat mass in cachexia should be tailored to the stage of cachexia. Our observations also highlight a need for studies that delineate the contribution of cachexia stage and animal model to altered lipid metabolism in cancer cachexia and identify those that most closely mimic the human condition.

  8. Basal metabolic rate in relation to body composition and daily energy expenditure in the field vole, Microtus agrestis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, P; Bolle, L; Visser, GH; Masman, D; Daan, S

    1997-01-01

    Basal metabolic rate in the field vole (Microtus agrestis) was studied in relation to body composition and daily energy expenditure in the field Daily energy expenditure was measured by means of doubly labelled water ((D2O)-O-18). In the same individuals, basal metabolic rate was subsequently derive

  9. Eyeless Mexican cavefish save energy by eliminating the circadian rhythm in metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Moran

    Full Text Available The eyed surface form and eyeless cave form of the Mexican tetra Astyanax mexicanus experience stark differences in the daily periodicities of light, food and predation, factors which are likely to have a profound influence on metabolism. We measured the metabolic rate of Pachón cave and surface fish at a fixed swimming speed under light/dark and constant dark photoperiods. In constant darkness surface forms exhibited a circadian rhythm in metabolism with an increase in oxygen demand during the subjective daytime, whereas cave forms did not. The lack of circadian rhythm in metabolism leads to a 27% energy savings for Pachón cave fish compared to surface fish when comparing both forms in their natural photoperiods. When surface forms were tested under constant dark conditions they expended 38% more energy than cave forms under equivalent conditions. Elimination of the circadian rhythm in metabolism may be a general feature of animals that live in perpetually dark food-limited environments such as caves or the deep sea.

  10. Energy metabolism in human pluripotent stem cells and their differentiated counterparts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Varum

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells have the ability to generate all cell types present in the adult organism, therefore harboring great potential for the in vitro study of differentiation and for the development of cell-based therapies. Nonetheless their use may prove challenging as incomplete differentiation of these cells might lead to tumoregenicity. Interestingly, many cancer types have been reported to display metabolic modifications with features that might be similar to stem cells. Understanding the metabolic properties of human pluripotent stem cells when compared to their differentiated counterparts can thus be of crucial importance. Furthermore recent data has stressed distinct features of different human pluripotent cells lines, namely when comparing embryo-derived human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs reprogrammed from somatic cells.We compared the energy metabolism of hESCs, IPSCs, and their somatic counterparts. Focusing on mitochondria, we tracked organelle localization and morphology. Furthermore we performed gene expression analysis of several pathways related to the glucose metabolism, including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. In addition we determined oxygen consumption rates (OCR using a metabolic extracellular flux analyzer, as well as total intracellular ATP levels by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Finally we explored the expression of key proteins involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism.Our results demonstrate that, although the metabolic signature of IPSCs is not identical to that of hESCs, nonetheless they cluster with hESCs rather than with their somatic counterparts. ATP levels, lactate production and OCR revealed that human pluripotent cells rely mostly on glycolysis to meet their energy demands. Furthermore, our work points to some of the strategies which human pluripotent stem cells may use to maintain high

  11. A comparative genomic analysis of energy metabolism in sulfate reducing bacteria and archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês A. C. ePereira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The number of sequenced genomes of sulfate-reducing organisms (SRO has increased significantly in the recent years, providing an opportunity for a broader perspective into the energy metabolism of such organisms. In this work we carried out a comparative survey of energy metabolism genes found in twenty-five available genomes of SRO. This analysis revealed a higher diversity of possible energy conserving pathways than classically considered to be present in these organisms, and permitted the identification of new proteins not known to be present in this group. The Deltaproteobacteria (and Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii are characterized by a large number of cytochromes c and cytochrome c-associated membrane redox complexes, indicating that periplasmic electron transfer pathways are important in these bacteria. The Archaea and Clostridia groups contain practically no cytochromes c or associated membrane complexes. However, despite the absence of a periplasmic space, a few extracytoplasmic membrane redox proteins were detected in the Gram-positive bacteria. Several ion-translocating complexes were detected in SRO including H+-pyrophosphatases, complex I homologues, Rnf and Ech/Coo hydrogenases. Furthermore, we found evidence that cytoplasmic electron bifurcating mechanisms, recently described for other anaerobes, are also likely to play an important role in energy metabolism of SRO. A number of cytoplasmic [NiFe] and [FeFe] hydrogenases, formate dehydrogenases and heterodisulfide reductase-related proteins are likely candidates to be involved in energy coupling through electron bifurcation, from diverse electron donors such as H2, formate, pyruvate, NAD(PH, β-oxidation and others. In conclusion, this analysis indicates that energy metabolism of SRO is far more versatile than previously considered, and that both chemiosmotic and flavin-based electron bifurcating mechanisms provide alternative strategies for energy conservation.

  12. Increased power to weight ratio of piezoelectric energy harvesters through integration of cellular honeycomb structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, N.; Thompson, L. L.

    2016-04-01

    The limitations posed by batteries have compelled the need to investigate energy harvesting methods to power small electronic devices that require very low operational power. Vibration based energy harvesting methods with piezoelectric transduction in particular has been shown to possess potential towards energy harvesters replacing batteries. Current piezoelectric energy harvesters exhibit considerably lower power to weight ratio or specific power when compared to batteries the harvesters seek to replace. To attain the goal of battery-less self-sustainable device operation the power to weight ratio gap between piezoelectric energy harvesters and batteries need to be bridged. In this paper the potential of integrating lightweight honeycomb structures with existing piezoelectric device configurations (bimorph) towards achieving higher specific power is investigated. It is shown in this study that at low excitation frequency ranges, replacing the solid continuous substrate of conventional bimorph with honeycomb structures of the same material results in a significant increase in power to weight ratio of the piezoelectric harvester. At higher driving frequency ranges it is shown that unlike the traditional piezoelectric bimorph with solid continuous substrate, the honeycomb substrate bimorph can preserve optimum global design parameters through manipulation of honeycomb unit cell parameters. Increased operating lifetime and design flexibility of the honeycomb core piezoelectric bimorph is demonstrated as unit cell parameters of the honeycomb structures can be manipulated to alter mass and stiffness properties of the substrate, resulting in unit cell parameter significantly influencing power generation.

  13. A Monte Carlo study of energy deposition at the sub-cellular level for application to targeted radionuclide therapy with low-energy electron emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emfietzoglou, D. [Medical Physics Laboratory, University of Ioannina Medical School, Ioannina 451 10 (Greece); Bousis, C. [Medical Physics Laboratory, University of Ioannina Medical School, Ioannina 451 10 (Greece); Hindorf, C. [Joint Department of Physics, The Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Fotopoulos, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ioannina Medical School, Ioannina 451 10 (Greece); Pathak, A. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Kostarelos, K. [Nanomedicine Laboratory, Centre for Drug Delivery Research, School of Pharmacy, University of London, London WC1N 1AX (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: kostas.kostarelos@pharmacy.ac.uk

    2007-03-15

    Optimizing targeted radionuclide therapy for patients with circulating malignant cells (e.g. blood-related cancers) or a micrometastatic spread requires quantification of various dosimetric parameters at the single-cell level. We present results on the energy deposition of monoenergetic electrons of initial energy from 100 eV to 20 keV - relevant to Auger emitting radionuclides - distributed either uniformly or at the surface of spherical volumes of radii from 10 nm to 1 {mu}m which correspond to critical sub-cellular targets. Calculations have been carried out by our detailed-history Monte Carlo (MC) code which simulates event-by-event the complete slowing down (to 1 Ry) of both the primary and all subsequent generations of electrons, as well as, by the continuous-slowing-down-approximation (CSDA) using analytic range-energy relationships. The latter method has been adopted by the MIRD committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine for dosimetry at the cellular level (>1 {mu}m). Differences between the MC and CSDA results are up to {approx}50% and are expected to be even larger at higher energies and/or smaller volumes. They are attributed to the deficiencies of the CSDA method associated with the neglect of straggling and {delta}-ray transport. The results are particularly relevant to targeted radiotherapy at the genome level by Auger emitters.

  14. Sleep fragmentation alters brain energy metabolism without modifying hippocampal electrophysiological response to novelty exposure

    KAUST Repository

    Baud, Maxime O.

    2016-05-03

    © 2016 European Sleep Research Society. Sleep is viewed as a fundamental restorative function of the brain, but its specific role in neural energy budget remains poorly understood. Sleep deprivation dampens brain energy metabolism and impairs cognitive functions. Intriguingly, sleep fragmentation, despite normal total sleep duration, has a similar cognitive impact, and in this paper we ask the question of whether it may also impair brain energy metabolism. To this end, we used a recently developed mouse model of 2 weeks of sleep fragmentation and measured 2-deoxy-glucose uptake and glycogen, glucose and lactate concentration in different brain regions. In order to homogenize mice behaviour during metabolic measurements, we exposed them to a novel environment for 1 h. Using an intra-hippocampal electrode, we first showed that hippocampal electroencephalograph (EEG) response to exploration was unaltered by 1 or 14 days of sleep fragmentation. However, after 14 days, sleep fragmented mice exhibited a lower uptake of 2-deoxy-glucose in cortex and hippocampus and lower cortical lactate levels than control mice. Our results suggest that long-term sleep fragmentation impaired brain metabolism to a similar extent as total sleep deprivation without affecting the neuronal responsiveness of hippocampus to a novel environment.

  15. Water-energy links in cities: the urban metabolism of London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijic, A.; Ruiz Cazorla, J.; Keirstead, J.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid urbanisation results in increased water consumption in cities, requiring improved tools for understanding adaptive measures for water resources management under climate change. The energy sector is facing the same challenges and requires equally comprehensive solutions. More frequent water shortages due to climate and land use changes and potential limits on CO2 emissions from fossil fuels that science demands indicate clearly that the next step in the sustainable city development will be to look for the most efficient use of these highly interdependent resources. One of the concepts that could be used for quantifying fundamental flows in an urban environment such as water and energy is the urban metabolism framework. This paper will examine the concept of urban metabolism by quantifying amounts and trends of water and energy consumed in London by four main sectors: residential, industrial, commercial and public. Key data requirements at the sector level will be identified and initial mapping of critical factors for urban sustainability will be provided. Finally, the work will examine the potential of urban metabolism framework to provide data and information for implementing water, energy and greenhouse emissions trade-off 'fit-for-purpose' strategy for water supply security. The paper is a part of the Panta Rhei Research Initiative of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) under the working group of Energy and Food Impacts on Water.

  16. 运动与心脏能量代谢%Exercise and Cardiac Energy Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张仁祥; 乔飞跃; 牛洁

    2012-01-01

    心脏的功能取决于高效率能量代谢。不同状态下(病理和生理),心脏能量代谢会发生变化。正常健康的心脏,脂肪酸是主要的底物;疾病的心脏,糖的利用可能更为有益;在运动状态下,乳酸代谢增加。运动诱导心肌肥大能量代谢正常,底物来自于脂肪代谢。特定的核受体转录因子和共激活剂调节与能量代谢底物选择发生变化相关基因的表达。但是涉及到运动益处的确切机制并不清楚,须进一步研究。%Cardiac function depends on efficient energy metabolism. Under different condition (Pathology and physiology), cardiac energy metabolism will change. For healthy heart, fatty acids are the major substrates, while the diseased heart, glucose utilization may be more useful. Under the exercise condition, lactate metabolism in- creases. Exercise induced myocardial hypertrophy of energy metabolism in normal and the substrate from fat me- tabolism. Specific nuclear receptor transcription factor and co - activator adjustment and energy metabolism sub- strate selection change related gene expression. However, the exact mechanism related to exercise benefits is not clear and need further study.

  17. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the control of energy metabolism and food intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eDrougard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC and agouti-related protein (AgRP/neuropeptide Y (NPY neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,..., neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,.... The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders.

  18. Genome-scale estimate of the metabolic turnover of E. Coli from the energy balance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, D.

    2016-02-01

    In this article the notion of metabolic turnover is revisited in the light of recent results of out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics. By means of Monte Carlo methods we perform an exact sampling of the enzymatic fluxes in a genome scale metabolic network of E. Coli in stationary growth conditions from which we infer the metabolites turnover times. However the latter are inferred from net fluxes, and we argue that this approximation is not valid for enzymes working nearby thermodynamic equilibrium. We recalculate turnover times from total fluxes by performing an energy balance analysis of the network and recurring to the fluctuation theorem. We find in many cases values one of order of magnitude lower, implying a faster picture of intermediate metabolism.

  19. Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body ... that produce the energy. You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or ...

  20. c-Myc and AMPK Control Cellular Energy Levels by Cooperatively Regulating Mitochondrial Structure and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia R Edmunds

    Full Text Available The c-Myc (Myc oncoprotein and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK regulate glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (Oxphos although often for different purposes. Because Myc over-expression depletes ATP with the resultant activation of AMPK, we explored the potential co-dependency of and cross-talk between these proteins by comparing the consequences of acute Myc induction in ampk+/+ (WT and ampk-/- (KO murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs. KO MEFs showed a higher basal rate of glycolysis than WT MEFs and an appropriate increase in response to activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor (MycER fusion protein. However, KO MEFs had a diminished ability to increase Oxphos, mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species in response to MycER activation. Other differences between WT and KO MEFs, either in the basal state or following MycER induction, included abnormalities in electron transport chain function, levels of TCA cycle-related oxidoreductases and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox states. Transcriptional profiling of pathways pertinent to glycolysis, Oxphos and mitochondrial structure and function also uncovered significant differences between WT and KO MEFs and their response to MycER activation. Finally, an unbiased mass-spectrometry (MS-based survey capable of quantifying ~40% of all mitochondrial proteins, showed about 15% of them to be AMPK- and/or Myc-dependent in their steady state. Significant differences in the activities of the rate-limiting enzymes pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase, which dictate pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A abundance, were also differentially responsive to Myc and AMPK and could account for some of the differences in basal metabolite levels that were also detected by MS. Thus, Myc and AMPK are highly co-dependent and appear to engage in significant cross-talk across numerous pathways which support metabolic and ATP-generating functions.

  1. Cellular and molecular studies of mutation induction by low energy heavy ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TomKHei; DavidJChen; 等

    1997-01-01

    Mutation induction by low energy heavy ions was scored at the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase(HGPRT) locus using both normal human fibroblasts and the human-hamster hybrid AL cells.In addition,the mutation yield at a non-essential chromosome was also examined by using the S1 marker gene locating on human chromosome 11 in AL cells,Mutagenicity induced by low energy heavy ions was dose and LET dependent.THe induced mutant fractions at the S1 locus were consistently higher than those for HGPRT.Using a mutation system that can detect multilocus changes,it can be shown by either Southern blotting or multiplex PCR techniques that radiation can induce chromosomal deletions in the millions of basepairs.

  2. Rethinking Energy in Parkinsonian Motor Symptoms: A Potential Role for Neural Metabolic Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi eAmano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is characterized as a chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder that results in a variety of debilitating symptoms, including bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity, and postural instability. Research spanning several decades has emphasized basal ganglia dysfunction, predominantly resulting from dopaminergic cell loss, as the primarily cause of the aforementioned parkinsonian features. But, why those particular features manifest themselves remains an enigma. The goal of this paper is to develop a theoretical framework that parkinsonian motor features are behavioral consequence of a long-term adaptation to their inability (inflexibility or lack of capacity to meet energetic demands, due to neural metabolic deficits arising from mitochondrial dysfunction associated with PD. Here, we discuss neurophysiological changes that are generally associated with PD, such as selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, in conjunction with metabolic and mitochondrial dysfunction. We then characterize the cardinal motor symptoms of PD, bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity and gait disturbance, reviewing literature to demonstrate how these motor patterns are actually energy efficient from a metabolic perspective. We will also develop three testable hypotheses: (1 neural metabolic deficits precede the increased rate of neurodegeneration and onset of behavioral symptoms in PD, (2 motor behavior of persons with PD are more sensitive to changes in metabolic/bioenergetic state, and (3 improvement of metabolic function could lead to better motor performance in persons with PD. These hypotheses are designed to introduce a novel viewpoint that can elucidate the connections between metabolic, neural and motor function in PD.

  3. Strategic Analysis of Cellular M2M Communication Opportunities within the Smart Energy Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Skura, Neal

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies a strategic analysis framework to analyze a new market opportunity for Sierra Wireless within the smart energy industry. It considers the industry value chain and competitive forces that influence the market structure to identify opportunities and challenges. The core competence-based view of the firm recognizes the existing strengths and competitive advantages that Sierra Wireless can leverage for profitable growth within the market. As different strategies are required fo...

  4. Energy cost and putative benefits of cellular mechanisms modulating buoyancy in aflagellate marine phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Michel; Raven, John A; Levasseur, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    Little information is available on the energetics of buoyancy modulation in aflagellate phytoplankton, which comprises the majority of autotrophic cells found in the ocean. Here, we computed for three aflagellate species of marine phytoplankton (Emiliania huxleyi, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Ethmodiscus rex) the theoretical minimum energy cost as photons absorbed and nitrogen resource required of the key physiological mechanisms (i.e., replacement of quaternary ammonium by dimethyl-sulfoniopropionate, storage of polysaccharides, and cell wall biosynthesis) affecting the cell's vertical movement as a function of nitrogen (N) availability. These energy costs were also normalized to the capacity of each buoyancy mechanism to modulate sinking or rising rates based on Stokes' law. The three physiological mechanisms could act as ballast in the three species tested in conditions of low N availability at a low fraction (organic solute synthesis to achieve vertical migration. This supports the carbohydrate-ballast strategy for vertical migration for this species, but argues against the theory of replacement of low- or high-density organic solutes. This study brings new insights into the energy cost and potential selective advantages of several strategies modulating the buoyancy of aflagellate marine phytoplankton. PMID:27037589

  5. Cellular High-energy Cavitation Trauma - description of a novel in vitro trauma model in three different cell types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli eCao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms involved in traumatic brain injury (TBI have yet to be fully characterized. One mechanism that, especially in high energy trauma, could be of importance is cavitation. Cavitation can be described as a process of vaporization, bubble generation and bubble implosion as a result of a decrease and subsequent increase in pressure. Cavitation as an injury mechanism is difficult to visualize and model due to its short duration and limited spatial distribution. One strategy to analyze the cellular response of cavitation is to employ suitable in vitro models. The flyer plate is an in vitro high energy trauma model that includes cavitation as a trauma mechanism. A copper fragment is accelerated by means of a laser, hits the bottom of a cell culture well causing cavitation and shock waves inside the well and cell medium. We have found the flyer plate model to be efficient, reproducible and easy to control. In this study we have used the model to analyze the cellular response to microcavitation in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, Caco-2, and C6 glioma cell lines. Mitotic activity in neuroblastoma and glioma was investigated with BrdU staining, and cell numbers were calculated using automated time-lapse imaging. We found variations between cell types and between different zones surrounding the lesion with these methods. It was also shown that the injured cell cultures released S-100B in a dose dependent manner. Using gene expression microarray a number of gene families of potential interest were found to be strongly, but differently regulated in neuroblastoma and glioma at 24 hr post trauma. The data from the gene expression arrays may be used to identify new candidates for biomarkers in cavitation trauma. We conclude that our model is useful for studies of trauma in vitro and that it could be applied in future treatment studies.

  6. Cellular High-Energy Cavitation Trauma – Description of a Novel In Vitro Trauma Model in Three Different Cell Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuli; Risling, Mårten; Malm, Elisabeth; Sondén, Anders; Bolling, Magnus Frödin; Sköld, Mattias K.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in traumatic brain injury have yet to be fully characterized. One mechanism that, especially in high-energy trauma, could be of importance is cavitation. Cavitation can be described as a process of vaporization, bubble generation, and bubble implosion as a result of a decrease and subsequent increase in pressure. Cavitation as an injury mechanism is difficult to visualize and model due to its short duration and limited spatial distribution. One strategy to analyze the cellular response of cavitation is to employ suitable in vitro models. The flyer-plate model is an in vitro high-energy trauma model that includes cavitation as a trauma mechanism. A copper fragment is accelerated by means of a laser, hits the bottom of a cell culture well causing cavitation, and shock waves inside the well and cell medium. We have found the flyer-plate model to be efficient, reproducible, and easy to control. In this study, we have used the model to analyze the cellular response to microcavitation in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, Caco-2, and C6 glioma cell lines. Mitotic activity in neuroblastoma and glioma was investigated with BrdU staining, and cell numbers were calculated using automated time-lapse imaging. We found variations between cell types and between different zones surrounding the lesion with these methods. It was also shown that the injured cell cultures released S-100B in a dose-dependent manner. Using gene expression microarray, a number of gene families of potential interest were found to be strongly, but differently regulated in neuroblastoma and glioma at 24 h post trauma. The data from the gene expression arrays may be used to identify new candidates for biomarkers in cavitation trauma. We conclude that our model is useful for studies of trauma in vitro and that it could be applied in future treatment studies. PMID:26869990

  7. Cellular High-Energy Cavitation Trauma - Description of a Novel In Vitro Trauma Model in Three Different Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuli; Risling, Mårten; Malm, Elisabeth; Sondén, Anders; Bolling, Magnus Frödin; Sköld, Mattias K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in traumatic brain injury have yet to be fully characterized. One mechanism that, especially in high-energy trauma, could be of importance is cavitation. Cavitation can be described as a process of vaporization, bubble generation, and bubble implosion as a result of a decrease and subsequent increase in pressure. Cavitation as an injury mechanism is difficult to visualize and model due to its short duration and limited spatial distribution. One strategy to analyze the cellular response of cavitation is to employ suitable in vitro models. The flyer-plate model is an in vitro high-energy trauma model that includes cavitation as a trauma mechanism. A copper fragment is accelerated by means of a laser, hits the bottom of a cell culture well causing cavitation, and shock waves inside the well and cell medium. We have found the flyer-plate model to be efficient, reproducible, and easy to control. In this study, we have used the model to analyze the cellular response to microcavitation in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, Caco-2, and C6 glioma cell lines. Mitotic activity in neuroblastoma and glioma was investigated with BrdU staining, and cell numbers were calculated using automated time-lapse imaging. We found variations between cell types and between different zones surrounding the lesion with these methods. It was also shown that the injured cell cultures released S-100B in a dose-dependent manner. Using gene expression microarray, a number of gene families of potential interest were found to be strongly, but differently regulated in neuroblastoma and glioma at 24 h post trauma. The data from the gene expression arrays may be used to identify new candidates for biomarkers in cavitation trauma. We conclude that our model is useful for studies of trauma in vitro and that it could be applied in future treatment studies. PMID:26869990

  8. Glycerol: An unexpected major metabolite of energy metabolism by the human malaria parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bray Patrick G

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a global health emergency, and yet our understanding of the energy metabolism of the principle causative agent of this devastating disease, Plasmodium falciparum, remains rather basic. Glucose was shown to be an essential nutritional requirement nearly 100 years ago and since this original observation, much of the current knowledge of Plasmodium energy metabolism is based on early biochemical work, performed using basic analytical techniques (e.g. paper chromatography, carried out almost exclusively on avian and rodent malaria. Data derived from malaria parasite genome and transcriptome studies suggest that the energy metabolism of the parasite may be more complex than hitherto anticipated. This study was undertaken in order to further characterize the fate of glucose catabolism in the human malaria parasite, P. falciparum. Methods Products of glucose catabolism were determined by incubating erythrocyte-freed parasites with D-[1-13C] glucose under controlled conditions and metabolites were identified using 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Results Following a 2 h incubation of freed-P. falciparum parasites with 25 mM D-[1-13C] glucose (n = 4, the major metabolites identified included; [3-13C] lactate, [1,3-13C] glycerol, [3-13C] pyruvate, [3-13C] alanine and [3-13C] glycerol-3-phosphate. Control experiments performed with uninfected erythrocytes incubated under identical conditions did not show any metabolism of D-[1-13C] glucose to glycerol or glycerol-3-phosphate. Discussion The identification of glycerol as a major glucose metabolite confirms the view that energy metabolism in this parasite is more complex than previously proposed. It is hypothesized here that glycerol production by the malaria parasite is the result of a metabolic adaptation to growth in O2-limited (and CO2 elevated conditions by the operation of a glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle for the re-oxidation of assimilatory NADH. Similar metabolic adaptations have

  9. Simulating the physiology of athletes during endurance sports events: modelling human energy conversion and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Johannes H G M; Supandi, Farahaniza; Gavai, Anand K; de Graaf, Albert A; Binsl, Thomas W; Hettling, Hannes

    2011-11-13

    The human physiological system is stressed to its limits during endurance sports competition events. We describe a whole body computational model for energy conversion during bicycle racing. About 23 per cent of the metabolic energy is used for muscle work, the rest is converted to heat. We calculated heat transfer by conduction and blood flow inside the body, and heat transfer from the skin by radiation, convection and sweat evaporation, resulting in temperature changes in 25 body compartments. We simulated a mountain time trial to Alpe d'Huez during the Tour de France. To approach the time realized by Lance Armstrong in 2004, very high oxygen uptake must be sustained by the simulated cyclist. Temperature was predicted to reach 39°C in the brain, and 39.7°C in leg muscle. In addition to the macroscopic simulation, we analysed the buffering of bursts of high adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis by creatine kinase during cyclical muscle activity at the biochemical pathway level. To investigate the low oxygen to carbohydrate ratio for the brain, which takes up lactate during exercise, we calculated the flux distribution in cerebral energy metabolism. Computational modelling of the human body, describing heat exchange and energy metabolism, makes simulation of endurance sports events feasible.

  10. Unique flexibility in energy metabolism allows mycobacteria to combat starvation and hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Berney

    Full Text Available Mycobacteria are a group of obligate aerobes that require oxygen for growth, but paradoxically have the ability to survive and metabolize under hypoxia. The mechanisms responsible for this metabolic plasticity are unknown. Here, we report on the adaptation of Mycobacterium smegmatis to slow growth rate and hypoxia using carbon-limited continuous culture. When M. smegmatis is switched from a 4.6 h to a 69 h doubling time at a constant oxygen saturation of 50%, the cells respond through the down regulation of respiratory chain components and the F1Fo-ATP synthase, consistent with the cells lower demand for energy at a reduced growth rate. This was paralleled by an up regulation of molecular machinery that allowed more efficient energy generation (i.e. Complex I and the use of alternative electron donors (e.g. hydrogenases and primary dehydrogenases to maintain the flow of reducing equivalents to the electron transport chain during conditions of severe energy limitation. A hydrogenase mutant showed a 40% reduction in growth yield highlighting the importance of this enzyme in adaptation to low energy supply. Slow growing cells at 50% oxygen saturation subjected to hypoxia (0.6% oxygen saturation responded by switching on oxygen scavenging cytochrome bd, proton-translocating cytochrome bc1-aa3 supercomplex, another putative hydrogenase, and by substituting NAD+-dependent enzymes with ferredoxin-dependent enzymes thus highlighting a new pattern of mycobacterial adaptation to hypoxia. The expression of ferredoxins and a hydrogenase provides a potential conduit for disposing of and transferring electrons in the absence of exogenous electron acceptors. The use of ferredoxin-dependent enzymes would allow the cell to maintain a high carbon flux through its central carbon metabolism independent of the NAD+/NADH ratio. These data demonstrate the remarkable metabolic plasticity of the mycobacterial cell and provide a new framework for understanding their

  11. The Gut Microbiota Modulates Energy Metabolism in the Hibernating Brown Bear Ursus arctos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Felix; Ståhlman, Marcus; Ilkayeva, Olga;

    2016-01-01

    Hibernation is an adaptation that helps many animals to conserve energy during food shortage in winter. Brown bears double their fat depots during summer and use these stored lipids during hibernation. Although bears seasonally become obese, they remain metabolically healthy. We analyzed the micr......Hibernation is an adaptation that helps many animals to conserve energy during food shortage in winter. Brown bears double their fat depots during summer and use these stored lipids during hibernation. Although bears seasonally become obese, they remain metabolically healthy. We analyzed...... the microbiota of free-ranging brown bears during their active phase and hibernation. Compared to the active phase, hibernation microbiota had reduced diversity, reduced levels of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, and increased levels of Bacteroidetes. Several metabolites involved in lipid metabolism, including...... triglycerides, cholesterol, and bile acids, were also affected by hibernation. Transplantation of the bear microbiota from summer and winter to germ-free mice transferred some of the seasonal metabolic features and demonstrated that the summer microbiota promoted adiposity without impairing glucose tolerance...

  12. Effect of fipronil on energy metabolism in the perfused rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Hyllana Catarine Dias; Constantin, Jorgete; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza; Mingatto, Fábio Erminio

    2015-07-01

    Fipronil is an insecticide used to control pests in animals and plants that can causes hepatotoxicity in animals and humans, and it is hepatically metabolized to fipronil sulfone by cytochrome P-450. The present study aimed to characterize the effects of fipronil (10-50μM) on energy metabolism in isolated perfused rat livers. In fed animals, there was increased glucose and lactate release from glycogen catabolism, indicating the stimulation of glycogenolysis and glycolysis. In the livers of fasted animals, fipronil inhibited glucose and urea production from exogenous l-alanine, whereas ammonia and lactate production were increased. In addition, fipronil at 50μM concentration inhibited the oxygen uptake and increased the cytosolic NADH/NAD⁺ ratio under glycolytic conditions. The metabolic alterations were found both in livers from normal or proadifen-pretreated rats revealing that fipronil and its reactive metabolites contributed for the observed activity. The effects on oxygen uptake indicated that the possible mechanism of toxicity of fipronil involves impairment on mitochondrial respiratory activity, and therefore, interference with energy metabolism. The inhibitory effects on oxygen uptake observed at the highest concentration of 50μM was abolished by pretreatment of the rats with proadifen indicating that the metabolites of fipronil, including fipronil sulfone, acted predominantly as inhibitors of respiratory chain. The hepatoxicity of both the parent compound and its reactive metabolites was corroborated by the increase in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in the effluent perfusate in livers from normal or proadifen-pretreated rats. PMID:25943759

  13. TRPV1 activation improves exercise endurance and energy metabolism through PGC-1α upregulation in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhidan Luo; Tingbing Cao; Daoyan Liu; Bernd Nilius; Yu Huang; Zhencheng Yan; Zhiming Zhu; Liqun Ma; Zhigang Zhao; Hongbo He; Dachun Yang; Xiaoli Feng; Shuangtao Ma; Xiaoping Chen; Tianqi Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Impaired aerobic exercise capacity and skeletal muscle dysfunction are associated with cardiometabolic diseases.Acute administration of capsaicin enhances exercise endurance in rodents,but the long-term effect of dietary capsaicin is unknown.The capsaicin receptor,the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1(TRPV1)cation channel has been detected in skeletal muscle,the role of which remains unclear.Here we report the function of TRPV1 in cultured C2C12 myocytes and the effect of TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin on energy metabolism and exercise endurance of skeletal muscles in mice.In vitro,capsaicin increased cytosolic free calcium and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α(PGC-1α)expression in C2C12 myotubes through activating TRPV1.In vivo,PGC-1α in skeletal muscle was upregulated by capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activation or genetic overexpression of TRPV1 in mice.TRPV1 activation increased the expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial respiration,promoted mitochondrial biogenesis,increased oxidative fibers,enhanced exercise endurance and prevented high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders.Importantly,these effects of capsaicin were absent in TRPV1-deficient mice.We conclude that TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin improves energy metabolism and exercise endurance by upregulating PGC-1α in skeletal muscles.The present results indicate a novel therapeutic strategy for managing metabolic diseases and improving exercise endurance.

  14. The roles of nuclear receptors CAR and PXR in hepatic energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Negishi, Masahiko; Kodama, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear receptors constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) were originally characterized as transcription factors regulating the hepatic genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes. Recent works have now revealed that these nuclear receptors also play the critical roles in modulating hepatic energy metabolism. While CAR and PXR directly bind to their response sequences phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM) and xenobiotic responsive enhancer module (XREM) in the promoter of target genes to increase drug metabolism, the receptors also cross talk with various hormone responsive transcription factors such as forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), forkhead box A2 (FoxA2), cAMP-response element binding protein, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC 1alpha) to decrease energy metabolism through down-regulating gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis and up-regulating lipogenesis. In addition, CAR modulates thyroid hormone activity by regulating type 1 deiodinase in the regenerating liver. Thus, CAR and PXR are now placed at the crossroad where both xenobiotics and endogenous stimuli co-regulate liver function.

  15. Effect of fipronil on energy metabolism in the perfused rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Hyllana Catarine Dias; Constantin, Jorgete; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza; Mingatto, Fábio Erminio

    2015-07-01

    Fipronil is an insecticide used to control pests in animals and plants that can causes hepatotoxicity in animals and humans, and it is hepatically metabolized to fipronil sulfone by cytochrome P-450. The present study aimed to characterize the effects of fipronil (10-50μM) on energy metabolism in isolated perfused rat livers. In fed animals, there was increased glucose and lactate release from glycogen catabolism, indicating the stimulation of glycogenolysis and glycolysis. In the livers of fasted animals, fipronil inhibited glucose and urea production from exogenous l-alanine, whereas ammonia and lactate production were increased. In addition, fipronil at 50μM concentration inhibited the oxygen uptake and increased the cytosolic NADH/NAD⁺ ratio under glycolytic conditions. The metabolic alterations were found both in livers from normal or proadifen-pretreated rats revealing that fipronil and its reactive metabolites contributed for the observed activity. The effects on oxygen uptake indicated that the possible mechanism of toxicity of fipronil involves impairment on mitochondrial respiratory activity, and therefore, interference with energy metabolism. The inhibitory effects on oxygen uptake observed at the highest concentration of 50μM was abolished by pretreatment of the rats with proadifen indicating that the metabolites of fipronil, including fipronil sulfone, acted predominantly as inhibitors of respiratory chain. The hepatoxicity of both the parent compound and its reactive metabolites was corroborated by the increase in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in the effluent perfusate in livers from normal or proadifen-pretreated rats.

  16. Metabolic Plasticity in Stem Cell Homeostasis and Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Folmes, Clifford D. L.; Dzeja, Petras P.; Nelson, Timothy J.; Terzic, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Plasticity in energy metabolism allows stem cells to match the divergent demands of self-renewal and lineage specification. Beyond a role in energetic support, new evidence implicates nutrient-responsive metabolites as mediators of crosstalk between metabolic flux, cellular signaling, and epigenetic regulation of cell fate. Stem cell metabolism also offers a potential target for controlling tissue homeostasis and regeneration in aging and disease. In this Perspective, we cover recent progress...

  17. Interplay Between Diet, Gut Microbiota, Immune Cells and Energy Metabolism in Obesity Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danneskiold-Samsøe, Niels Banhos

    -glycemic carbohydrates such as refined grains and sugars. The lack of sufficient therapeutic options for obesity, and the inability of most individuals to reduce energy intake or increase expenditure highlight the importance of understanding its underlying biological mechanisms. Obesity is associated with low......Obesity and associated metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes are major causes of morbidity and mortality globally. A major contributor to development of the obesity pandemic has been the increasing intake of energy dense diets, consisting of dietary fats combined with high...... investigation of the interactions between the diet, gut microbiota and development of inflammation is necessary to understand development of obesity. For this, it is important to understand the regulation of the local immune system of fat and other tissues important for regulation of systemic metabolism...

  18. Mitochondrial Function and Energy Metabolism in Umbilical Cord Blood- and Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomäki, Sami; Lehtonen, Siri; Ritamo, Ilja; Valmu, Leena; Nystedt, Johanna; Laitinen, Saara; Leskelä, Hannnu-Ville; Sormunen, Raija; Pesälä, Juha; Nordström, Katrina; Vepsäläinen, Ari; Lehenkari, Petri

    2012-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are an attractive choice for a variety of cellular therapies. hMSCs can be isolated from many different tissues and possess unique mitochondrial properties that can be used to determine their differentiation potential. Mitochondrial properties may possibly be used as a quality measure of hMSC-based products. Accordingly, the present work focuses on the mitochondrial function of hMSCs from umbilical cord blood (UCBMSC) cells and bone marrow cells from donors younger than 18 years of age (BMMSC 50). Changes of ultrastructure and energy metabolism during osteogenic differentiation in all hMSC types were studied in detail. Results show that despite similar surface antigen characteristics, the UCBMSCs had smaller cell surface area and possessed more abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum than BMMSC >50. BMMSC 50 and BMMSC 50 showed a lower level of mitochondrial maturation and differentiation capacity. UCBMSCs and BMMSCs also showed a different pattern of exocytosed proteins and glycoproteoglycansins. These results indicate that hMSCs with similar cell surface antigen expression have different mitochondrial and functional properties, suggesting different maturation levels and other significant biological variations of the hMSCs. Therefore, it appears that mitochondrial analysis presents useful characterization criteria for hMSCs intended for clinical use. PMID:21615273

  19. Aspects of Energy Metabolism in Mangalitsa Pigs Exposed at Thermic Neutral Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Pârvu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The studies aimed the energy metabolism determination in Mangalitsa pigs exposed at thermic neutral temperature, compared to Large White pigs. The experimental period was between 80 and 100 kg liveweight. The animals had free access to standard, isoprotein and isocalory diets, with 13.5% crude protein (CP and 3100 kcal/kg metabolizable energy. Feed intake was measured on a daily basis. The energy-protein balance was calculated on the basis of comparative slaughter made at the beginning and end of the experiment. The metabolizable energy (MEc was estimated by chemical analysis (feed and excreta using mathematical modelling and the Whittemore’s formula. The metabolizable energy utilization efficiency was 0.61 at Large White and 0.53 at Mangalitsa.

  20. Effects of DGAT1 deficiency on energy and glucose metabolism are independent of adiponectin

    OpenAIRE

    Streeper, Ryan S.; Koliwad, Suneil K.; Villanueva, Claudio J.; Farese, Robert V

    2006-01-01

    Mice lacking acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1), an enzyme that catalyzes the terminal step in triacylglycerol synthesis, have enhanced insulin sensitivity and are protected from obesity, a result of increased energy expenditure. In these mice, factors derived from white adipose tissue (WAT) contribute to the systemic changes in metabolism. One such factor, adiponectin, increases fatty acid oxidation and enhances insulin sensitivity. To test the hypothesis that adiponectin is r...

  1. A Review of Effects of Heat Stress on Substance and Energy Metabolism in Muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiyong WU; Zhi FANG; Bo XUE; Longzhou LIU; Ye YANG

    2015-01-01

    Environmental temperature is a major factor affecting animal performance in South China. With global warming, heat stress wil become more and more seri-ous. This paper reviewed the effects of heat stress on metabolism of proteins, glu-cose, fat and energy in skeletal muscle and related mechanisms so as to provide theoretical guidance for al eviating heat stress and improving production performance of animal suffering from heat stress.

  2. Ubc9 Impairs Activation of the Brown Fat Energy Metabolism Program in Human White Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, Sean M; Bader, David A; Abadie, Kathleen V; Motamed, Massoud; Hamilton, Mark P; Long, Weiwen; York, Brian; Mueller, Michaela; Wagner, Martin; Trauner, Michael; Chan, Lawrence; Bajaj, Mandeep; Moore, David D; Mancini, Michael A; McGuire, Sean E

    2015-09-01

    Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) result from an inability to efficiently store and catabolize surplus energy in adipose tissue. Subcutaneous adipocytes protect against insulin resistance and T2DM by coupling differentiation with the induction of brown fat gene programs for efficient energy metabolism. Mechanisms that disrupt these programs in adipocytes are currently poorly defined, but represent therapeutic targets for the treatment of T2DM. To gain insight into these mechanisms, we performed a high-throughput microscopy screen that identified ubiquitin carrier protein 9 (Ubc9) as a negative regulator of energy storage in human sc adipocytes. Ubc9 depletion enhanced energy storage and induced the brown fat gene program in human sc adipocytes. Induction of adipocyte differentiation resulted in decreased Ubc9 expression commensurate with increased brown fat gene expression. Thiazolidinedione treatment reduced the interaction between Ubc9 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, suggesting a mechanism by which Ubc9 represses PPARγ activity. In support of this hypothesis, Ubc9 overexpression remodeled energy metabolism in human sc adipocytes by selectively inhibiting brown adipocyte-specific function. Further, Ubc9 overexpression decreased uncoupling protein 1 expression by disrupting PPARγ binding at a critical uncoupling protein 1 enhancer region. Last, Ubc9 is significantly elevated in sc adipose tissue isolated from mouse models of insulin resistance as well as diabetic and insulin-resistant humans. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a critical role for Ubc9 in the regulation of sc adipocyte energy homeostasis.

  3. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  4. Postprandial Energy Metabolism in the Regulation of Body Weight: Is there a Mechanistic Role for Dietary Calcium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario J. Soares

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been much interest in the mechanisms by which calcium may attenuate weight gain or accelerate body fat loss. This review focuses on postprandial energy metabolism and indicates that dietary calcium increases whole body fat oxidation after single and multiple meals. There is, as yet, no conclusive evidence for a greater diet induced thermogenesis, an increased lipolysis or suppression of key lipogenic enzyme systems. There is however convincing evidence that higher calcium intakes promote a modest energy loss through increased fecal fat excretion. Overall, there is a role for dietary calcium in human energy metabolism. Future studies need to define threshold intakes for metabolic and gastrointestinal outcomes.

  5. LGR4 and its role in intestinal protection and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziru eLi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptors (LGRs were identified by the unique nature of their long leucine-rich repeat extracellular domains. Distinct from classical G protein-coupled receptors which act via G proteins, LGR4 functions mainly through Wnt/β-catenin signaling to regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and adult stem cell homeostasis. LGR4 is widely expressed in tissues ranging from the reproductive system, urinary system, sensory organs, digestive system, and the central nervous system, indicating LGR4 may have multiple functions in development. Here we focus on the digestive system by reviewing its effects on crypt cells differentiation and stem cells maintenance, which are important for cell regeneration after injury. Through effects on Wnt/β-catenin signaling and cell proliferation, LGR4 and its endogenous ligands, R-spondins, are involved in colon tumorigenesis. LGR4 also contributes to regulation of energy metabolism, including food intake, energy expenditure and lipid metabolism, as well as pancreatic β-cell proliferation and insulin secretion. This review summarizes the identification of LGR4, its endogenous ligand, ligand-receptor binding and intracellular signaling. Physiological functions include intestinal development and energy metabolism. The potential effects of LGR4 and its ligand in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, chemoradiotherapy induced gut damage, colorectal cancer and diabetes are also discussed.

  6. The Energy Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans under The Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Hui; Sun, Yongyan; Yang, Chuanjun; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2015-02-01

    A literal mountain of documentation generated in the past five decades showing unmistakable health hazards associated with extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) exposure. However, the relation between energy mechanism and ELF-EMF exposure is poorly understood. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at intensities of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mT, respectively. Their metabolite variations were analyzed by GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomics. Although minimal metabolic variations and no regular pattern were observed, the contents of energy metabolism-related metabolites such as pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, and L-malic acid were elevated in all the treatments. The expressions of nineteen related genes that encode glycolytic enzymes were analyzed by using quantitative real-time PCR. Only genes encoding GAPDH were significantly upregulated (P elegans exposed to ELF-EMF have enhanced energy metabolism and restricted dietary, which might contribute to the resistance against exogenous ELF-EMF stress.

  7. Irradiation induced injury reduces energy metabolism in small intestine of Tibet minipigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jue Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The radiation-induced energy metabolism dysfunction related to injury and radiation doses is largely elusive. The purpose of this study is to investigate the early response of energy metabolism in small intestinal tissue and its correlation with pathologic lesion after total body X-ray irradiation (TBI in Tibet minipigs. METHODS AND RESULTS: 30 Tibet minipigs were assigned into 6 groups including 5 experimental groups and one control group with 6 animals each group. The minipigs in these experimental groups were subjected to a TBI of 2, 5, 8, 11, and 14 Gy, respectively. Small intestine tissues were collected at 24 h following X-ray exposure and analyzed by histology and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. DNA contents in this tissue were also examined. Irradiation causes pathologic lesions and mitochondrial abnormalities. The Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA content-corrected and uncorrected adenosine-triphosphate (ATP and total adenine nucleotides (TAN were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by 2-8 Gy exposure, and no further reduction was observed over 8 Gy. CONCLUSION: TBI induced injury is highly dependent on the irradiation dosage in small intestine and inversely correlates with the energy metabolism, with its reduction potentially indicating the severity of injury.

  8. A Single Oral Administration of Theaflavins Increases Energy Expenditure and the Expression of Metabolic Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Kudo

    Full Text Available Theaflavins are polyphenols found in black tea, whose physiological activities are not well understood. This study on mice evaluated the influence of a single oral administration of theaflavins on energy metabolism by monitoring the initial metabolic changess in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue (BAT. Oxygen consumption (VO2 and energy expenditure (EE were increased significantly in mice treated with theaflavin rich fraction (TF compared with the group administered vehicle alone. There was no difference in locomotor activity. Fasting mice were euthanized under anesthesia before and 2 and 5, 20-hr after treatment with TF or vehicle. The mRNA levels of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α in BAT were increased significantly 2-hr after administration ofTF. The levels of UCP-3 and PGC-1α in the gastrocnemius muscle were increased significantly 2 and 5-hr after administration of TF. The concentration of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK 1α was also increased significantly in the gastrocnemius 2 and 5-hr after treatment with TF. These results indicate that TF significantly enhances systemic energy expenditure, as evidenced by an increase in expression of metabolic genes.

  9. Dynamics of the cellular metabolome during human cytomegalovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Munger

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Viral replication requires energy and macromolecular precursors derived from the metabolic network of the host cell. Despite this reliance, the effect of viral infection on host cell metabolic composition remains poorly understood. Here we applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to measure the levels of 63 different intracellular metabolites at multiple times after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection of human fibroblasts. Parallel microarray analysis provided complementary data on transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways. As the infection progressed, the levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis markedly increased. HCMV-induced transcriptional upregulation of specific glycolytic and citric acid cycle enzymes mirrored the increases in metabolite levels. The peak levels of numerous metabolites during infection far exceeded those observed during normal fibroblast growth or quiescence, demonstrating that HCMV markedly disrupts cellular metabolic homeostasis and institutes its own specific metabolic program.

  10. Energy transfer in "parasitic" cancer metabolism: mitochondria are the powerhouse and Achilles' heel of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Tykocinski, Mark L; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Machado, Fabiana S; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2011-12-15

    It is now widely recognized that the tumor microenvironment promotes cancer cell growth and metastasis via changes in cytokine secretion and extracellular matrix remodeling. However, the role of tumor stromal cells in providing energy for epithelial cancer cell growth is a newly emerging paradigm. For example, we and others have recently proposed that tumor growth and metastasis is related to an energy imbalance. Host cells produce energy-rich nutrients via catabolism (through autophagy, mitophagy, and aerobic glycolysis), which are then transferred to cancer cells to fuel anabolic tumor growth. Stromal cell-derived L-lactate is taken up by cancer cells and is used for mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to produce ATP efficiently. However, "parasitic" energy transfer may be a more generalized mechanism in cancer biology than previously appreciated. Two recent papers in Science and Nature Medicine now show that lipolysis in host tissues also fuels tumor growth. These studies demonstrate that free fatty acids produced by host cell lipolysis are re-used via beta-oxidation (beta-OX) in cancer cell mitochondria. Thus, stromal catabolites (such as lactate, ketones, glutamine and free fatty acids) promote tumor growth by acting as high-energy onco-metabolites. As such, host catabolism, via autophagy, mitophagy and lipolysis, may explain the pathogenesis of cancer-associated cachexia and provides exciting new druggable targets for novel therapeutic interventions. Taken together, these findings also suggest that tumor cells promote their own growth and survival by behaving as a "parasitic organism." Hence, we propose the term "Parasitic Cancer Metabolism" to describe this type of metabolic coupling in tumors. Targeting tumor cell mitochondria (OXPHOS and beta-OX) would effectively uncouple tumor cells from their hosts, leading to their acute starvation. In this context, we discuss new evidence that high-energy onco-metabolites (produced by the stroma) can

  11. Endogenous and dietary lipids influencing feed intake and energy metabolism of periparturient dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhla, B; Metges, C C; Hammon, H M

    2016-07-01

    The high metabolic priority of the mammary gland for milk production, accompanied by limited feed intake around parturition results in a high propensity to mobilize body fat reserves. Under these conditions, fuel selection of many peripheral organs is switched, for example, from carbohydrate to fat utilization to spare glucose for milk production and to ensure partitioning of tissue- and dietary-derived nutrients toward the mammary gland. For example, muscle tissue uses nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) but releases lactate and amino acids in a coordinated order, thereby providing precursors for milk synthesis or hepatic gluconeogenesis. Tissue metabolism and in concert, nutrient partitioning are controlled by the endocrine system involving a reduction in insulin secretion and systemic insulin sensitivity and orchestrated changes in plasma hormones such as insulin, adiponectin, insulin growth factor-I, growth hormone, glucagon, leptin, glucocorticoids, and catecholamines. However, the endocrine system is highly sensitive and responsive to an overload of fatty acids no matter if excessive NEFA supply originates from exogenous or endogenous sources. Feeding a diet containing rumen-protected fat from late lactation to calving and beyond exerts similar negative effects on energy intake, glucose and insulin concentrations as does a high extent of body fat mobilization around parturition in regard to the risk for ketosis and fatty liver development. High plasma NEFA concentrations are thought not to act directly at the brain level, but they increase the energy charge of the liver which is, signaled to the brain to diminish feed intake. Cows differing in fat mobilization during the transition phase differ in their hepatic energy charge, whole body fat oxidation, glucose metabolism, plasma ghrelin, and leptin concentrations and in feed intake several week before parturition. Hence, a high lipid load, no matter if stored, mobilized or fed, affects the endocrine system

  12. Endogenous and dietary lipids influencing feed intake and energy metabolism of periparturient dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhla, B; Metges, C C; Hammon, H M

    2016-07-01

    The high metabolic priority of the mammary gland for milk production, accompanied by limited feed intake around parturition results in a high propensity to mobilize body fat reserves. Under these conditions, fuel selection of many peripheral organs is switched, for example, from carbohydrate to fat utilization to spare glucose for milk production and to ensure partitioning of tissue- and dietary-derived nutrients toward the mammary gland. For example, muscle tissue uses nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) but releases lactate and amino acids in a coordinated order, thereby providing precursors for milk synthesis or hepatic gluconeogenesis. Tissue metabolism and in concert, nutrient partitioning are controlled by the endocrine system involving a reduction in insulin secretion and systemic insulin sensitivity and orchestrated changes in plasma hormones such as insulin, adiponectin, insulin growth factor-I, growth hormone, glucagon, leptin, glucocorticoids, and catecholamines. However, the endocrine system is highly sensitive and responsive to an overload of fatty acids no matter if excessive NEFA supply originates from exogenous or endogenous sources. Feeding a diet containing rumen-protected fat from late lactation to calving and beyond exerts similar negative effects on energy intake, glucose and insulin concentrations as does a high extent of body fat mobilization around parturition in regard to the risk for ketosis and fatty liver development. High plasma NEFA concentrations are thought not to act directly at the brain level, but they increase the energy charge of the liver which is, signaled to the brain to diminish feed intake. Cows differing in fat mobilization during the transition phase differ in their hepatic energy charge, whole body fat oxidation, glucose metabolism, plasma ghrelin, and leptin concentrations and in feed intake several week before parturition. Hence, a high lipid load, no matter if stored, mobilized or fed, affects the endocrine system

  13. Effect of short-term thyroxine administration on energy metabolism and mitochondrial efficiency in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy L Johannsen

    Full Text Available The physiologic effects of triiodothyronine (T3 on metabolic rate are well-documented; however, the effects of thyroxine (T4 are less clear despite its wide-spread use to treat thyroid-related disorders and other non-thyroidal conditions. Here, we investigated the effects of acute (3-day T4 supplementation on energy expenditure at rest and during incremental exercise. Furthermore, we used a combination of in situ and in vitro approaches to measure skeletal muscle metabolism before and after T4 treatment. Ten healthy, euthyroid males were given 200 µg T4 (levothyroxine per day for 3 days. Energy expenditure was measured at rest and during exercise by indirect calorimetry, and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function was assessed by in situ ATP flux ((31P MRS and in vitro respiratory control ratio (RCR, state 3/state 4 rate of oxygen uptake using a Clark-type electrode before and after acute T4 treatment. Thyroxine had a subtle effect on resting metabolic rate, increasing it by 4% (p = 0.059 without a change in resting ATP demand (i.e., ATP flux of the vastus lateralis. Exercise efficiency did not change with T4 treatment. The maximal capacity to produce ATP (state 3 respiration and the coupled state of the mitochondria (RCR were reduced by approximately 30% with T4 (p = 0.057 and p = 0.04, respectively. Together, the results suggest that T4, although less metabolically active than T3, reduces skeletal muscle efficiency and modestly increases resting metabolism even after short-term supplementation. Our findings may be clinically relevant given the expanding application of T4 to treat non-thyroidal conditions such as obesity and weight loss.

  14. Effects of rutin and buckwheat seeds on energy metabolism and methane production in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoldt, Ann-Kathrin; Derno, Michael; Das, Gürbüz; Weitzel, Joachim M; Wolffram, Siegfried; Metges, Cornelia C

    2016-03-01

    Flavonoids are secondary plant metabolites with several health promoting effects. As dairy cows often suffer from metabolic imbalance and health problems, interest is growing in health improvements by plant substances such as flavonoids. Our group has recently shown that the flavonoids quercetin and rutin (a glucorhamnoside of quercetin) are bioavailable in cows when given via a duodenal fistula or orally, respectively, affect glucose metabolism, and have beneficial effects on liver health. Furthermore, flavonoids may reduce rumen methane production in vitro through their antibacterial properties. To test the hypothesis that rutin has effects on energy metabolism, methane production, and production performance in dairy cows, we fed rutin trihydrate at a dose of 100mg/kg of body weight to a group of 7 lactating dairy cows for 2 wk in a crossover design. In a second experiment, 2 cows were fed the same ration but were supplemented with buckwheat seeds (Fagopyrum tartaricum), providing rutin at a dose comparable to the first experiment. Two other cows receiving barley supplements were used as controls in a change-over mode. Blood samples were taken weekly and respiration measurements were performed at the end of each treatment. Supplementation of pure rutin, but not of rutin contained in buckwheat seeds, increased the plasma quercetin content. Methane production and milk yield and composition were not affected by rutin treatment in either form. Plasma glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate, and albumin were increased by pure rutin treatment, indicating a possible metabolic effect of rutin on energy metabolism of dairy cows. In addition, we did not show that in vivo ruminal methane production was reduced by rutin. In conclusion, we could not confirm earlier reports on in vitro methane reduction by rutin supplementation in dairy cows in established lactation.

  15. Energy substrate metabolism among habitually violent alcoholic offenders having antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkkunen, Matti; Rissanen, Aila; Naukkarinen, Hannu; Franssila-Kallunki, Anja; Linnoila, Markku; Tiihonen, Jari

    2007-04-15

    A large proportion of violent offences in Western countries are attributable to antisocial personality disorder (APD). Several studies have shown abnormal lipid, carbohydrate and low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolite levels in habitually violent alcoholic offenders with APD, but it is not clear how these biochemical abnormalities are related to each other in this disorder. We aimed to study energy substrate metabolism among habitually violent offenders with APD. Insulin sensitivity (euglycemic insulin clamp), basal energy expenditure (indirect calorimetry), and CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) measurements were performed on 96 habitually violent antisocial male alcoholic offenders and on 40 normal male controls. Habitually violent, incarcerated offenders with APD had significantly lower non-oxidative glucose metabolism, basal glucagon, and free fatty acids when compared with normal controls, but glucose oxidation and CSF 5-HIAA did not differ markedly between these groups. The effect sizes for lower non-oxidative glucose metabolism among incarcerated and non-incarcerated APD subjects were 0.73 and 0.51, respectively, when compared with controls, indicating that this finding was not explained by incarceration. Habitually violent offenders with APD have markedly lower glucagon and non-oxidative glucose metabolism when compared with healthy controls, and these findings were more strongly associated with habitual violent offending than low CSF 5-HIAA levels, a well-established marker for impulsive violent behavior. Follow-up studies are needed to confirm if abnormal glucose and lipid metabolism can be used to predict violent offending over the course of the APD offender's life span. PMID:17316826

  16. Effects of rutin and buckwheat seeds on energy metabolism and methane production in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoldt, Ann-Kathrin; Derno, Michael; Das, Gürbüz; Weitzel, Joachim M; Wolffram, Siegfried; Metges, Cornelia C

    2016-03-01

    Flavonoids are secondary plant metabolites with several health promoting effects. As dairy cows often suffer from metabolic imbalance and health problems, interest is growing in health improvements by plant substances such as flavonoids. Our group has recently shown that the flavonoids quercetin and rutin (a glucorhamnoside of quercetin) are bioavailable in cows when given via a duodenal fistula or orally, respectively, affect glucose metabolism, and have beneficial effects on liver health. Furthermore, flavonoids may reduce rumen methane production in vitro through their antibacterial properties. To test the hypothesis that rutin has effects on energy metabolism, methane production, and production performance in dairy cows, we fed rutin trihydrate at a dose of 100mg/kg of body weight to a group of 7 lactating dairy cows for 2 wk in a crossover design. In a second experiment, 2 cows were fed the same ration but were supplemented with buckwheat seeds (Fagopyrum tartaricum), providing rutin at a dose comparable to the first experiment. Two other cows receiving barley supplements were used as controls in a change-over mode. Blood samples were taken weekly and respiration measurements were performed at the end of each treatment. Supplementation of pure rutin, but not of rutin contained in buckwheat seeds, increased the plasma quercetin content. Methane production and milk yield and composition were not affected by rutin treatment in either form. Plasma glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate, and albumin were increased by pure rutin treatment, indicating a possible metabolic effect of rutin on energy metabolism of dairy cows. In addition, we did not show that in vivo ruminal methane production was reduced by rutin. In conclusion, we could not confirm earlier reports on in vitro methane reduction by rutin supplementation in dairy cows in established lactation. PMID:26805964

  17. Computational Methods for Reconstruction and Analysis of Genome-Scale Metabolic Networks

    OpenAIRE

    PitkÀnen, Esa

    2010-01-01

    Metabolism is the cellular subsystem responsible for generation of energy from nutrients and production of building blocks for larger macromolecules. Computational and statistical modeling of metabolism is vital to many disciplines including bioengineering, the study of diseases, drug target identification, and understanding the evolution of metabolism. In this thesis, we propose efficient computational methods for metabolic modeling. The techniques presented are targeted particularly at the ...

  18. Autophagy in the light of sphingolipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvald, Eva Bang; Olsen, Anne Sofie Braun; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2015-01-01

    , has over the past decade been recognized as an essential part of metabolism. Autophagy not only rids the cell of excessive or damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and invading microorganisms, it also provides nutrients to maintain crucial cellular functions. Besides serving as essential structural......Maintenance of cellular homeostasis requires tight and coordinated control of numerous metabolic pathways, which are governed by interconnected networks of signaling pathways and energy-sensing regulators. Autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway by which the cell self-digests its own components...

  19. Predicting changes of body weight, body fat, energy expenditure and metabolic fuel selection in C57BL/6 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juen Guo

    Full Text Available The mouse is an important model organism for investigating the molecular mechanisms of body weight regulation, but a quantitative understanding of mouse energy metabolism remains lacking. Therefore, we created a mathematical model of mouse energy metabolism to predict dynamic changes of body weight, body fat, energy expenditure, and metabolic fuel selection. Based on the principle of energy balance, we constructed ordinary differential equations representing the dynamics of body fat mass (FM and fat-free mass (FFM as a function of dietary intake and energy expenditure (EE. The EE model included the cost of tissue deposition, physical activity, diet-induced thermogenesis, and the influence of FM and FFM on metabolic rate. The model was calibrated using previously published data and validated by comparing its predictions to measurements in five groups of male C57/BL6 mice (N = 30 provided ad libitum access to either chow or high fat diets for varying time periods. The mathematical model accurately predicted the observed body weight and FM changes. Physical activity was predicted to decrease immediately upon switching from the chow to the high fat diet and the model coefficients relating EE to FM and FFM agreed with previous independent estimates. Metabolic fuel selection was predicted to depend on a complex interplay between diet composition, the degree of energy imbalance, and body composition. This is the first validated mathematical model of mouse energy metabolism and it provides a quantitative framework for investigating energy balance relationships in mouse models of obesity and diabetes.

  20. Changes in energy metabolism in response to 48 h of overfeeding and fasting in Caucasians and Pima Indians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weyer, C; Vozarova, B; Ravussin, E;

    2001-01-01

    Differences in the metabolic response to overfeeding and starvation may confer susceptibility or resistance to obesity in humans. To further examine this hypothesis, we assessed the changes in 24 h energy metabolism in response to short-term overfeeding and fasting in Caucasians (C) and Pima Indi...

  1. Possible therapeutic effect of naftidrofuryl oxalate on brain energy metabolism after microsphere-induced cerebral embolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Miyake, K.; Tanonaka, K; Minematsu, R.; Inoue, K.; Takeo, S.

    1989-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to determine whether naftidrofuryl oxalate exerts a possible therapeutic effect on brain energy metabolism impaired by microsphere-induced cerebral embolism in vitro. 2. Injection of microspheres into the right carotid canal resulted in a decrease in tissue high-energy phosphates both in the right and left hemispheres, and an increase in tissue lactate in the right hemisphere, on the 3rd and the 5th day after the embolism. The embolism also induced a marked r...

  2. Mechanisms of metabonomic for a gateway drug: nicotine priming enhances behavioral response to cocaine with modification in energy metabolism and neurotransmitter level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Li

    Full Text Available Nicotine, one of the most commonly used drugs, has become a major concern because tobacco serves as a gateway drug and is linked to illicit drug abuse, such as cocaine and marijuana. However, previous studies mainly focused on certain genes or neurotransmitters which have already been known to participate in drug addiction, lacking endogenous metabolic profiling in a global view. To further explore the mechanism by which nicotine modifies the response to cocaine, we developed two conditioned place preference (CPP models in mice. In threshold dose model, mice were pretreated with nicotine, followed by cocaine treatment at the dose of 2 mg/kg, a threshold dose of cocaine to induce CPP in mice. In high-dose model, mice were only treated with 20 mg/kg cocaine, which induced a significant CPP. (1H nuclear magnetic resonance based on metabonomics was used to investigate metabolic profiles of the nucleus accumbens (NAc and striatum. We found that nicotine pretreatment dramatically increased CPP induced by 2 mg/kg cocaine, which was similar to 20 mg/kg cocaine-induced CPP. Interestingly, metabolic profiles showed considerable overlap between these two models. These overlapped metabolites mainly included neurotransmitters as well as the molecules participating in energy homeostasis and cellular metabolism. Our results show that the reinforcing effect of nicotine on behavioral response to cocaine may attribute to the modification of some specific metabolites in NAc and striatum, thus creating a favorable metabolic environment for enhancing conditioned rewarding effect of cocaine. Our findings provide an insight into the effect of cigarette smoking on cocaine dependence and the underlying mechanism.

  3. Microalgal bioengineering for sustainable energy development: Recent transgenesis and metabolic engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Chiranjib; Singh, Puneet Kumar; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-03-01

    Exploring the efficiency of algae to produce remarkable products can be directly benefitted by studying its mechanism at systems level. Recent advents in biotechnology like flux balance analysis (FBA), genomics and in silico proteomics minimize the wet lab exertion. It is understood that FBA predicts the metabolic products, metabolic pathways and alternative pathway to maximize the desired product, and these are key components for microalgae bio-engineering. This review encompasses recent transgenesis techniques and metabolic engineering strategies applied to different microalgae for improving different traits. Further it also throws light on RNAi and riboswitch engineering based methods which may be advantageous for high throughput microalgal research. A valid and optimally designed microalga can be developed where every engineering strategies meet each other successfully and will definitely fulfill the market needs. It is also to be noted that Omics (viz. genetic and metabolic manipulation with bioinformatics) should be integrated to develop a strain which could prove to be a futuristic solution for sustainable development for energy. PMID:26844808

  4. A conserved role for syndecan family members in the regulation of whole-body energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria De Luca

    Full Text Available Syndecans are a family of type-I transmembrane proteins that are involved in cell-matrix adhesion, migration, neuronal development, and inflammation. Previous quantitative genetic studies pinpointed Drosophila Syndecan (dSdc as a positional candidate gene affecting variation in fat storage between two Drosophila melanogaster strains. Here, we first used quantitative complementation tests with dSdc mutants to confirm that natural variation in this gene affects variability in Drosophila fat storage. Next, we examined the effects of a viable dSdc mutant on Drosophila whole-body energy metabolism and associated traits. We observed that young flies homozygous for the dSdc mutation had reduced fat storage and slept longer than homozygous wild-type flies. They also displayed significantly reduced metabolic rate, lower expression of spargel (the Drosophila homologue of PGC-1, and reduced mitochondrial respiration. Compared to control flies, dSdc mutants had lower expression of brain insulin-like peptides, were less fecund, more sensitive to starvation, and had reduced life span. Finally, we tested for association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the human SDC4 gene and variation in body composition, metabolism, glucose homeostasis, and sleep traits in a cohort of healthy early pubertal children. We found that SNP rs4599 was significantly associated with resting energy expenditure (P = 0.001 after Bonferroni correction and nominally associated with fasting glucose levels (P = 0.01 and sleep duration (P = 0.044. On average, children homozygous for the minor allele had lower levels of glucose, higher resting energy expenditure, and slept shorter than children homozygous for the common allele. We also observed that SNP rs1981429 was nominally associated with lean tissue mass (P = 0.035 and intra-abdominal fat (P = 0.049, and SNP rs2267871 with insulin sensitivity (P = 0.037. Collectively, our results in Drosophila and humans argue that

  5. Exposure of clinical MRSA heterogeneous strains to β-lactams redirects metabolism to optimize energy production through the TCA cycle.

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    Mignon A Keaton

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged as one of the most important pathogens both in health care and community-onset infections. The prerequisite for methicillin resistance is mecA, which encodes a β-lactam-insensitive penicillin binding protein PBP2a. A characteristic of MRSA strains from hospital and community associated infections is their heterogeneous expression of resistance to β-lactam (HeR in which only a small portion (≤ 0.1% of the population expresses resistance to oxacillin (OXA ≥ 10 µg/ml, while in other isolates, most of the population expresses resistance to a high level (homotypic resistance, HoR. The mechanism associated with heterogeneous expression requires both increase expression of mecA and a mutational event that involved the triggering of a β-lactam-mediated SOS response and related lexA and recA genes. In the present study we investigated the cellular physiology of HeR-MRSA strains during the process of β-lactam-mediated HeR/HoR selection at sub-inhibitory concentrations by using a combinatorial approach of microarray analyses and global biochemical profiling employing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS to investigate changes in metabolic pathways and the metabolome associated with β-lactam-mediated HeR/HoR selection in clinically relevant heterogeneous MRSA. We found unique features present in the oxacillin-selected SA13011-HoR derivative when compared to the corresponding SA13011-HeR parental strain that included significant increases in tricarboxyl citric acid (TCA cycle intermediates and a concomitant decrease in fermentative pathways. Inactivation of the TCA cycle enzyme cis-aconitase gene in the SA13011-HeR strain abolished β-lactam-mediated HeR/HoR selection demonstrating the significance of altered TCA cycle activity during the HeR/HoR selection. These results provide evidence of both the metabolic cost and the

  6. Rhabdomyosarcoma cells show an energy producing anabolic metabolic phenotype compared with primary myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higashi Richard M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functional status of a cell is expressed in its metabolic activity. We have applied stable isotope tracing methods to determine the differences in metabolic pathways in proliferating Rhabdomysarcoma cells (Rh30 and human primary myocytes in culture. Uniformly 13C-labeled glucose was used as a source molecule to follow the incorporation of 13C into more than 40 marker metabolites using NMR and GC-MS. These include metabolites that report on the activity of glycolysis, Krebs' cycle, pentose phosphate pathway and pyrimidine biosynthesis. Results The Rh30 cells proliferated faster than the myocytes. Major differences in flux through glycolysis were evident from incorporation of label into secreted lactate, which accounts for a substantial fraction of the glucose carbon utilized by the cells. Krebs' cycle activity as determined by 13C isotopomer distributions in glutamate, aspartate, malate and pyrimidine rings was considerably higher in the cancer cells than in the primary myocytes. Large differences were also evident in de novo biosynthesis of riboses in the free nucleotide pools, as well as entry of glucose carbon into the pyrimidine rings in the free nucleotide pool. Specific labeling patterns in these metabolites show the increased importance of anaplerotic reactions in the cancer cells to maintain the high demand for anabolic and energy metabolism compared with the slower growing primary myocytes. Serum-stimulated Rh30 cells showed higher degrees of labeling than serum starved cells, but they retained their characteristic anabolic metabolism profile. The myocytes showed evidence of de novo synthesis of glycogen, which was absent in the Rh30 cells. Conclusion The specific 13C isotopomer patterns showed that the major difference between the transformed and the primary cells is the shift from energy and maintenance metabolism in the myocytes toward increased energy and anabolic metabolism for proliferation in the Rh30 cells

  7. Mechanisms controlling pork quality development: The biochemistry controlling postmortem energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, T L; Gerrard, D E

    2007-09-01

    Pale, soft and exudative (PSE) pork represents considerable economic losses for the industry due to its limited functionality and undesirable appearance. During the past several decades, exhaustive research covering various aspects of the food chain has established genotyping procedures, recommended handling practices, and quality indicators in order to reduce the incidence of inferior pork quality. Despite these efforts, there is still a relatively high occurrence of PSE pork. Development of pork quality attributes is largely governed by the rate and extent of postmortem pH decline. The combination of high temperature at low pH or abnormally low ultimate pH causes denaturation of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins, resulting in paler color and reduced water holding capacity. The pH decline is closely related to muscle energy availability and demand at or around slaughter. The postmortem degradation of glycogen through glycogenolysis and glycolysis provides ATP to help meet energy demand and decreases pH by generating lactate and H+. Therefore, the flux of metabolites through glycolysis, the involvement of energy signaling pathways that modulate glycolytic activity, and the inherent metabolism of different fiber types are critical factors influencing pH decline and pork quality. Further, recent work implicates adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as a major energy sensor for the cell, and thus may be involved in the control of postmortem metabolism. The intent of this paper is to review the biochemistry controlling postmortem energy metabolism in pig muscle and explore new information generated using genetic mutations in order to define the fundamental mechanisms controlling the transformation of muscle to meat. PMID:22061391

  8. PII,the key regulator of nitrogen metabolism in the cyanobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    PII proteins are a protein family important to signal transduction in bacteria and plants. PII plays a critical role in regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria. Through conformation change and covalent modification, which are regulated by 2-oxoglutarate, PII interacts with different target proteins in response to changes of cellular energy status and carbon and nitrogen sources in cyanobacteria and regulates cellular metabolism. This article reports recent progress in PII research in cyanobacteria and discusses the mechanism of PII regulation of cellular metabolism .

  9. Evaluation of mild hypothermia therapy for neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy on brain energy metabolism using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Mei; Li, Qingping; DONG, WENBIN; Zhai, Xuesong; Kang, Lan

    2014-01-01

    It remains unclear whether mild hypothermia affects energy metabolism in the brain tissue of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE). The current study aimed to investigate the effect of mild hypothermia on energy metabolism in neonatal HIE and assess brain energy metabolism using position emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning. The mean standardised uptake values of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) were used to determine the glucose metabolic rate in various b...

  10. Fluvoxamine alters the activity of energy metabolism enzymes in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela K. Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Several studies support the hypothesis that metabolism impairment is involved in the pathophysiology of depression and that some antidepressants act by modulating brain energy metabolism. Thus, we evaluated the activity of Krebs cycle enzymes, the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and creatine kinase in the brain of rats subjected to prolonged administration of fluvoxamine. Methods: Wistar rats received daily administration of fluvoxamine in saline (10, 30, and 60 mg/kg for 14 days. Twelve hours after the last administration, rats were killed by decapitation and the prefrontal cortex, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum were rapidly isolated. Results: The activities of citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and complexes I, II-III, and IV were decreased after prolonged administration of fluvoxamine in rats. However, the activities of complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase were increased. Conclusions: Alterations in activity of energy metabolism enzymes were observed in most brain areas analyzed. Thus, we suggest that the decrease in citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and complexes I, II-III, and IV can be related to adverse effects of pharmacotherapy, but long-term molecular adaptations cannot be ruled out. In addition, we demonstrated that these changes varied according to brain structure or biochemical analysis and were not dose-dependent.

  11. Metabolic energy-based modelling explains product yielding in anaerobic mixed culture fermentations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca González-Cabaleiro

    Full Text Available The fermentation of glucose using microbial mixed cultures is of great interest given its potential to convert wastes into valuable products at low cost, however, the difficulties associated with the control of the process still pose important challenges for its industrial implementation. A deeper understanding of the fermentation process involving metabolic and biochemical principles is very necessary to overcome these difficulties. In this work a novel metabolic energy based model is presented that accurately predicts for the first time the experimentally observed changes in product spectrum with pH. The model predicts the observed shift towards formate production at high pH, accompanied with ethanol and acetate production. Acetate (accompanied with a more reduced product and butyrate are predicted main products at low pH. The production of propionate between pH 6 and 8 is also predicted. These results are mechanistically explained for the first time considering the impact that variable proton motive potential and active transport energy costs have in terms of energy harvest over different products yielding. The model results, in line with numerous reported experiments, validate the mechanistic and bioenergetics hypotheses that fermentative mixed cultures products yielding appears to be controlled by the principle of maximum energy harvest and the necessity of balancing the redox equivalents in absence of external electron acceptors.

  12. Mechanotransduction in primary human osteoarthritic chondrocytes is mediated by metabolism of energy, lipids, and amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zignego, Donald L; Hilmer, Jonathan K; June, Ronald K

    2015-12-16

    Chondrocytes are the sole cell type found in articular cartilage and are repeatedly subjected to mechanical loading in vivo. We hypothesized that physiological dynamic compression results in changes in energy metabolism to produce proteins for maintenance of the pericellular and extracellular matrices. The objective of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding for the short term (human chondrocytes harvested from femoral heads of osteoarthritic donors. Cell-seeded agarose constructs were randomly assigned to experimental groups, and dynamic compression was applied for 0, 15, or 30min. Following dynamic compression, metabolites were extracted and detected by HPLC-MS. Untargeted analyzes examined changes in global metabolomics profiles and targeted analysis examined the expression of specific metabolites related to central energy metabolism. We identified hundreds of metabolites that were regulated by applied compression, and we report the detection of 16 molecules not found in existing metabolite databases. We observed patient-specific mechanotransduction with aging dependence. Targeted studies found a transient increase in the ratio of NADP+ to NADPH and an initial decrease in the ratio of GDP to GTP, suggesting a flux of energy into the TCA cycle. By characterizing metabolomics profiles of primary chondrocytes in response to applied dynamic compression, this study provides insight into how OA chondrocytes respond to mechanical load. These results are consistent with increases in glycolytic energy utilization by mechanically induced signaling, and add substantial new data to a complex picture of how chondrocytes transduce mechanical loads.

  13. Metabolomic analysis of amino acid and energy metabolism in rats supplemented with chlorogenic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zheng; Yang, Yuhui; Zhou, Yan; Wen, Yanmei; Ding, Sheng; Liu, Gang; Wu, Xin; Deng, Zeyuan; Assaad, Houssein; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA) supplementation on serum and hepatic metabolomes in rats. Rats received daily intragastric administration of either CGA (60 mg/kg body weight) or distilled water (control) for 4 weeks. Growth performance, serum biochemical profiles, and hepatic morphology were measured. Additionally, serum and liver tissue extracts were analyzed for metabolomes by high-resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics and multivariate statistics. CGA did not affect rat growth performance, serum biochemical profiles, or hepatic morphology. However, supplementation with CGA decreased serum concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, succinate, citrate, β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, while increasing serum concentrations of glycine and hepatic concentrations of glutathione. These results suggest that CGA supplementation results in perturbation of energy and amino acid metabolism in rats. We suggest that glycine and glutathione in serum may be useful biomarkers for biological properties of CGA on nitrogen metabolism in vivo. PMID:24927697

  14. Bone morphogenetic proteins in inflammation, glucose homeostasis and adipose tissue energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grgurevic, Lovorka; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schulz, Tim J;

    2016-01-01

    implicated in pancreas development as well as control of adult glucose homeostasis. Lastly, we review the recently recognized role of BMPs in brown adipose tissue formation and their consequences for energy expenditure and adiposity. In summary, BMPs play a pivotal role in metabolism beyond their role...... homeostasis (anaemia, hemochromatosis) and oxidative damage. The second and third parts of this review focus on BMPs in the development of metabolic pathologies such as type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. The pancreatic beta cells are the sole source of the hormone insulin and BMPs have recently been...... in skeletal homeostasis. However, increased understanding of these pleiotropic functions also highlights the necessity of tissue-specific strategies when harnessing BMP action as a therapeutic target....

  15. Simulating antler growth and energy, nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus metabolism in caribou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Moen

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available We added antler growth and mineral metabolism modules to a previously developed energetics model for ruminants to simulate energy and mineral balance of male and female caribou throughout an annual cycle. Body watet, fat, protein, and ash are monitored on a daily time step, and energy costs associated with reproduction and body mass changes are simulated. In order to simulate antler growth, we had to predict calcium and phosphorus metabolism as it is affected by antler growth, gestation, and lactation. We used data on dietary digestibility, protein, calcium and phosphorus content, and seasonal patterns in body mass to predict the energy, nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus balances of a "generic" male and female caribou. Antler growth in males increased energy requirements during antler growth by 8 to 16%, depending on the efficiency with which energy was used for antler growth. Female energy requirements for antler growth were proportionately much smaller because of the smaller size of female antlers. Protein requirements for antler growth in both males and females were met by forage intake. Calcium and phosphorus must be resorbed from bone during peak antler growth in males, when > 25 g/day of calcium and > 12 g/day of phosphorus are being deposited in antlers. Females are capable of meeting calcium needs during antler growth without bone resorption, but phosphorus was resorbed from bone during the final stages of antler mineralization. After energy, phosphorus was most likely to limit growth of antlers for both males and females in our simulations. Input parameters can be easily changed to represent caribou from specific geographic regions in which dietary nutrient content or body mass patterns differ from those in our "generic" caribou. The model can be used to quantitatively analyze the evolutionary basis for development of antlers in female caribou, and the relationship between body mass and antler size in the Cervidae.

  16. The influence of temperature on the electrical resistivity of the cellular polypropylene and the effect of activation energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Floran; Dhima, Pranvera; Mandija, Florian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we determine the surface and volume electrical resistivity of the 50 μm thick cellular polypropylen (VHD50), for the temperature range 393-453 K. For this we use a contemporary methodology, which consist of a voltage measurement across the sample, with a known current flowing through it. This methodology includes a three-electrode system, which allows us to estimate the resistivity of the samples, based on their corresponding total resistances. The electric fields applied for a time interval of 1 min are of the order of 200 kVm (-1). The order of magnitude of surface and volume electrical resistivity is 10(13) Ω and 10(11) Ωm, respectively. For both types of the resistivity, the temperature dependence is an increasing or decreasing exponential function, depending on the type of the activation energy, (its average value for the temperature range mentioned above is 41,20 kJmol (-1)), totally confirmed by the corresponding theoretical interpretation, conditioned by the ionic conduction. The methodology and equipment used, as well as the satisfying accordance with the results, found out directly or indirectly with the consulted literature, confirm the high accuracy of experimental measurements. PMID:25674393

  17. Reconstitution of supramolecular organization involved in energy metabolism at electrochemical interfaces for biosensing and bioenergy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, M; de Poulpiquet, A; Ciaccafava, A; Ilbert, M; Guiral, M; Giudici-Orticoni, M T; Lojou, E

    2014-02-01

    How the redox proteins and enzymes involved in bioenergetic pathways are organized is a relevant fundamental question, but our understanding of this is still incomplete. This review provides a critical examination of the electrochemical tools developed in recent years to obtain knowledge of the intramolecular and intermolecular electron transfer processes involved in metabolic pathways. Furthermore, better understanding of the electron transfer processes associated with energy metabolism will provide the basis for the rational design of biotechnological devices such as electrochemical biosensors, enzymatic and microbial fuel cells, and hydrogen production factories. Starting from the redox complexes involved in two relevant bacterial chains, i.e., from the hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus and the acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, examination of protein-protein interactions using electrochemistry is first reviewed, with a focus on the orientation of a protein on an electrochemical interface mimic of a physiological interaction between two partners. Special attention is paid to current research in the electrochemistry of essential membrane proteins, which is one mandatory step toward the understanding of energy metabolic pathways. The complex and challenging architectures built to reconstitute a membrane-like environment at an electrode are especially considered. The role played by electrochemistry in the attempt to consider full bacterial metabolism is finally emphasized through the study of whole cells immobilized at electrodes as suspensions or biofilms. Before the performances of biotechnological devices can be further improved to make them really attractive, questions remain to be addressed in this particular field of research. We discuss the bottlenecks that need to be overcome in the future. PMID:24292430

  18. The Characteristic of Energy Metabolism and Nutritional Supplement of Volleyball Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantial metabolism and energy metabolism is the base of the normal operation for every organ. Nutrition arrangement instructed by the knowledge about the regularities of metabolism is very significant. The purpose of the presented study was the examination of nutrition intake influence on energy metabolism in young volleyball players. The study was performed in twenty four 16-18 years old male volleyball players in the competition period. Subjects were divided into 2 groups, depending on the calcium intake: more than 1300 mg/day in the first group (13 athletes; and less than 1300 mg/day in the second group (11 athletes. The nutrition mode assessment was based on the 24-h dietary history using the recall method. In the blood serum concentrations of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase (bALP, C-terminal telopeptide of collagen I (ICTP, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, insulin-like-growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3, growth hormone (hGH and ionized calcium and magnesium were determined. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between both groups investigated in respect to the calcium (p<0.01 and protein (p<0.05 intake and the bALP and (IGFBP-3 concentrations (p<0.05. The results of the study led us to conclude that low calcium and protein intake together with systematic sport activity negatively influenced the bone formation level. At last to improve the capacity of sports man we give some advice such as the methods of volleyball train and supplying some nutrient matter in the training.

  19. Role of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor on energy metabolism in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the combined effects of intravenous infusion of the recombinant cytokines beta-interleukin 1 (IL-1) and alpha-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on energy substrate metabolism in awake, conditioned, adult rabbits was performed. After a 2-h basal or control period, 48-h fasted rabbits were administered TNF and IL-1 as a bolus (5 micrograms/kg) followed by a continuous intravenous infusion (25 ng.kg-1.min-1) for 3 h. Significant increases in plasma lactate (P less than 0.01), glucose (P less than 0.01), and triglycerides (P less than 0.05) occurred during the combined infusion of IL-1 and TNF, whereas neither cytokine alone had no effect. There was a 33% increase in the rate of glucose appearance (P less than 0.05), but glucose clearance was not altered compared with the control period. Glucose oxidation increased during the combined cytokine infusion period and glucose recycling increased by 600% (P less than 0.002). Lactic acidosis and decreased oxygen consumption, as a result of the cytokine infusions, indicated development of anaerobic glycolytic metabolism. A reduction in the activity state of hepatic mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (65 vs. 82% in control animals, P less than 0.05) was consistent with the observed increase in anaerobic glycolysis. Thus the combined infusion of IL-1 and TNF in rabbits produces metabolic manifestations seen in severe injury and sepsis in human patients and, as such, may account for the profound alterations of energy metabolism seen in these conditions

  20. Who controls the ATP supply in cancer cells? Biochemistry lessons to understand cancer energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Saavedra, Emma; Pardo, Juan P; Ralph, Stephen J; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara

    2014-05-01

    Applying basic biochemical principles, this review analyzes data that contrasts with the Warburg hypothesis that glycolysis is the exclusive ATP provider in cancer cells. Although disregarded for many years, there is increasing experimental evidence demonstrating that oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) makes a significant contribution to ATP supply in many cancer cell types and under a variety of conditions. Substrates oxidized by normal mitochondria such as amino acids and fatty acids are also avidly consumed by cancer cells. In this regard, the proposal that cancer cells metabolize glutamine for anabolic purposes without the need for a functional respiratory chain and OxPhos is analyzed considering thermodynamic and kinetic aspects for the reductive carboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate catalyzed by isocitrate dehydrogenase. In addition, metabolic control analysis (MCA) studies applied to energy metabolism of cancer cells are reevaluated. Regardless of the experimental/environmental conditions and the rate of lactate production, the flux-control of cancer glycolysis is robust in the sense that it involves the same steps: glucose transport, hexokinase, hexosephosphate isomerase and glycogen degradation, all at the beginning of the pathway; these steps together with phosphofructokinase 1 also control glycolysis in normal cells. The respiratory chain complexes exert significantly higher flux-control on OxPhos in cancer cells than in normal cells. Thus, determination of the contribution of each pathway to ATP supply and/or the flux-control distribution of both pathways in cancer cells is necessary in order to identify differences from normal cells which may lead to the design of rational alternative therapies that selectively target cancer energy metabolism. PMID:24513530

  1. Environmental oxygen tension regulates the energy metabolism and self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Forristal

    Full Text Available Energy metabolism is intrinsic to cell viability but surprisingly has been little studied in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. The current study aims to investigate the effect of environmental O2 tension on carbohydrate utilisation of hESCs. Highly pluripotent hESCs cultured at 5% O2 consumed significantly more glucose, less pyruvate and produced more lactate compared to those maintained at 20% O2. Moreover, hESCs cultured at atmospheric O2 levels expressed significantly less OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG than those maintained at 5% O2. To determine whether this difference in metabolism was a reflection of the pluripotent state, hESCs were cultured at 5% O2 in the absence of FGF2 for 16 hours leading to a significant reduction in the expression of SOX2. In addition, these cells consumed less glucose and produced significantly less lactate compared to those cultured in the presence of FGF2. hESCs maintained at 5% O2 were found to consume significantly less O2 than those cultured in the absence of FGF2, or at 20% O2. GLUT1 expression correlated with glucose consumption and using siRNA and chromatin immunoprecipitation was found to be directly regulated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-2α at 5% O2. In conclusion, highly pluripotent cells associated with hypoxic culture consume low levels of O2, high levels of glucose and produce large amounts of lactate, while at atmospheric conditions glucose consumption and lactate production are reduced and there is an increase in oxidative metabolism. These data suggest that environmental O2 regulates energy metabolism and is intrinsic to the self-renewal of hESCs.

  2. ER Stress and Lipid Metabolism in Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth S. Zha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is a rapidly emerging field of interest in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. Recent studies have shown that chronic activation of ER stress is closely linked to dysregulation of lipid metabolism in several metabolically important cells including hepatocytes, macrophages, β-cells, and adipocytes. Adipocytes are one of the major cell types involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Recent advances in dissecting the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of adipogenesis and lipid metabolism indicate that activation of ER stress plays a central role in regulating adipocyte function. In this paper, we discuss the current understanding of the potential role of ER stress in lipid metabolism in adipocytes. In addition, we touch upon the interaction of ER stress and autophagy as well as inflammation. Inhibition of ER stress has the potential of decreasing the pathology in adipose tissue that is seen with energy overbalance.

  3. Cellular energy allocation and scope for growth in the estuarine mysid Neomysis integer (Crustacea: Mysidacea) following chlorpyrifos exposure: a method comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Verslycke, T.; Roast, S.D.; Widdows, J.; Jones, M B; Janssen, C. R.

    2004-01-01

    Mysids (Crustacea: Mysidacea) are used routinely in acute toxicity testing to evaluate the comparative toxicity of chemicals to aquatic organisms. The need for sublethal endpoints that provide comprehensive understanding of the potential impacts of toxicants to natural populations has resulted in examination of several physiological responses in mysid shrimp, including scope for growth (SFG) and cellular energy allocation (CEA). Both assays, based on the concept that energy in excess of that ...

  4. Identifying quantitative operation principles in metabolic pathways: a systematic method for searching feasible enzyme activity patterns leading to cellular adaptive responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorribas Albert

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimization methods allow designing changes in a system so that specific goals are attained. These techniques are fundamental for metabolic engineering. However, they are not directly applicable for investigating the evolution of metabolic adaptation to environmental changes. Although biological systems have evolved by natural selection and result in well-adapted systems, we can hardly expect that actual metabolic processes are at the theoretical optimum that could result from an optimization analysis. More likely, natural systems are to be found in a feasible region compatible with global physiological requirements. Results We first present a new method for globally optimizing nonlinear models of metabolic pathways that are based on the Generalized Mass Action (GMA representation. The optimization task is posed as a nonconvex nonlinear programming (NLP problem that is solved by an outer-approximation algorithm. This method relies on solving iteratively reduced NLP slave subproblems and mixed-integer linear programming (MILP master problems that provide valid upper and lower bounds, respectively, on the global solution to the original NLP. The capabilities of this method are illustrated through its application to the anaerobic fermentation pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We next introduce a method to identify the feasibility parametric regions that allow a system to meet a set of physiological constraints that can be represented in mathematical terms through algebraic equations. This technique is based on applying the outer-approximation based algorithm iteratively over a reduced search space in order to identify regions that contain feasible solutions to the problem and discard others in which no feasible solution exists. As an example, we characterize the feasible enzyme activity changes that are compatible with an appropriate adaptive response of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to heat shock Conclusion Our results

  5. Citric acid as the last therapeutic approach in an acute life-threatening metabolic decompensation of propionic acidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekmeyer, Manuela; Petzold-Quinque, Stefanie; Terpe, Friederike; Beblo, Skadi; Gebhardt, Rolf; Schlensog-Schuster, Franziska; Kiess, Wieland; Siekmeyer, Werner

    2013-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle represents the key enzymatic steps in cellular energy metabolism. Once the TCA cycle is impaired in case of inherited metabolic disorders, life-threatening episodes of metabolic decompensation and severe organ failure can arise. We present the case of a 6 ½-year-old girl with propionic acidaemia during an episode of acute life-threatening metabolic decompensation and severe lactic acidosis. Citric acid given as an oral formulation showed the potential to sustain the TCA cycle flux. This therapeutic approach may become a treatment option in a situation of acute metabolic crisis, possibly preventing severe disturbance of energy metabolism.

  6. Semecarpus anacardium (Bhallataka Alters the Glucose Metabolism and Energy Production in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Aseervatham

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose produced by gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis plays an important role in aggravating hyperglycemia in diabetes, and altered mitochondrial function is associated with impaired energy production. The present study focuses on the effect of Semecarpus anacardium on carbohydrate metabolism and energy production in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by the administration of Streptozotocin at a dose of 50 mg/kg.b.wt. Three days after the induction, Semecarpus anacardium at a dose of 300 mg/kg.b.wt was administered for 21 days. After the experimental duration, the activities of the enzymes involved in Glycolysis, TCA cycle, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen were assayed in the liver and kidney of the experimental animals. In addition, to the complexes the protein expression of AKT and PI3K were assayed. The levels of the enzymes involved in Glycolysis and TCA cycle increased, while that of gluconeogensis decreased. The activities of the mitochondrial complexes were also favorably modulated. The expressions of PI3K and AKT also increased in the skeletal muscle. These effects may be attributed to the hypoglycemic and the antioxidative activity of Semecarpus anacardium. The results of the study revealed that Semecarpus anacardium was able to restore the altered activities of the enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and energy production.

  7. Cardiac energy metabolism and oxidative stress biomarkers in diabetic rat treated with resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolo dos Santos, Klinsmann; Pereira Braga, Camila; Octavio Barbanera, Pedro; Seiva, Fábio Rodrigues Ferreira; Fernandes Junior, Ary; Fernandes, Ana Angélica Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV), polyphenol from grape, was studied to evaluate its effects on calorimetric parameters, energy metabolism, and antioxidants in the myocardium of diabetic rats. The animals were randomly divided into four groups (n = 8): C (control group): normal rats; C-RSV: normal rats receiving RSV; DM: diabetic rats; and DM-RSV: diabetics rats receiving RSV. Type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced with administration of streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg(-1) body weight, single dose, i.p.). After 48 hours of STZ administration, the animals received RSV (1.0 mg/kg/day) for gavage for 30 days. Food, water, and energy intake were higher in the DM group, while administration of RSV caused decreases (pdiabetic rats showed higher serum-free fatty acid, which was normalized with RSV. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) decreased (plactate dehydrogenase compared to the DM-RSV group. Myocardial protein carbonyl was increased in the DM group. RSV increased reduced glutathione in the cardiac tissue of diabetic animals. The glutathione reductase activity was higher in the DM-RSV group compared to the DM group. In conclusion, diabetes is accompanied by cardiac energy metabolism dysfunction and change in the biomarkers of oxidative stress. The cardioprotective effect may be mediated through RVS's ability to normalize free fatty acid oxidation, enhance utilization glucose, and control the biomarkers' level of oxidative stress under diabetic conditions. PMID:25050809

  8. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) deficiency affects energy metabolism pattern in murine oxidative skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momken, Iman; Fortin, Dominique; Serrurier, Bernard; Bigard, Xavier; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Veksler, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    Oxidative capacity of muscles correlates with capillary density and with microcirculation, which in turn depend on various regulatory factors, including NO generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). To determine the role of eNOS in patterns of regulation of energy metabolism in various muscles, we studied mitochondrial respiration in situ in saponin-permeabilized fibres as well as the energy metabolism enzyme profile in the cardiac, soleus (oxidative) and gastrocnemius (glycolytic) muscles isolated from mice lacking eNOS (eNOS(-/-)). In soleus muscle, the absence of eNOS induced a marked decrease in both basal mitochondrial respiration without ADP (-32%; P <0.05) and maximal respiration in the presence of ADP (-29%; P <0.05). Furthermore, the eNOS(-/-) soleus muscle showed a decrease in total creatine kinase (-29%; P <0.05), citrate synthase (-31%; P <0.01), adenylate kinase (-27%; P <0.05), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (-43%; P <0.01) and pyruvate kinase (-26%; P <0.05) activities. The percentage of myosin heavy chains I (slow isoform) was significantly increased from 24.3+/-1.5% in control to 30.1+/-1.1% in eNOS(-/-) soleus muscle ( P <0.05) at the expense of a slight non-significant decrease in the three other (fast) isoforms. Besides, eNOS(-/-) soleus showed a 28% loss of weight. Interestingly, we did not find differences in any parameters in cardiac and gastrocnemius muscles compared with respective controls. These results show that eNOS knockout has an important effect on muscle oxidative capacity as well on the activities of energy metabolism enzymes in oxidative (soleus) muscle. The absence of such effects in cardiac and glycolytic (gastrocnemius) muscle suggests a specific role for eNOS-produced NO in oxidative skeletal muscle. PMID:12123418

  9. Going beyond energy intensity to understand the energy metabolism of nations: The case of Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Recalde, Marina; Ramos Martín, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    The link between energy consumption and economic growth has been widely studied in the economic literature. Understanding this relationship is important from both an environmental and a socio-economic point of view, as energy consumption is crucial to economic activity and human environmental impact. This relevance is even higher for developing countries, since energy consumption per unit of output varies through the phases of development, increasing from an agricultural stage to an industria...

  10. Effect of exercise intensity on the expression of UCP2 and energy metabolism in rat myocardium

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiao-Yan; Ke MENG; Zhang, Hong-Ming; Ji, Li-li; Zhang, Guo-ming; Jin, Qun; Chen, Ying-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Objective  To study the effect of different exercise intensity on the expression of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) in mitochondria of rat myocardium, and investigate the correlation and significance between energy metabolism and UCP2. Methods Forty five male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (15 each): normal control (NC) group, endurance exercise (EnE) group and exhaustive exercise (ExE) group. Four weeks later, both the serum concentration of free fatty acid (FFA) and the content...

  11. Environmental oxygen tension regulates the energy metabolism and self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Forristal, Catherine E; David R. Christensen; Chinnery, Fay E.; Raffaella Petruzzelli; Parry, Kate L.; Tilman Sanchez-Elsner; Franchesca D. Houghton

    2013-01-01

    Energy metabolism is intrinsic to cell viability but surprisingly has been little studied in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The current study aims to investigate the effect of environmental O2 tension on carbohydrate utilisation of hESCs. Highly pluripotent hESCs cultured at 5% O2 consumed significantly more glucose, less pyruvate and produced more lactate compared to those maintained at 20% O2. Moreover, hESCs cultured at atmospheric O2 levels expressed significantly less OCT4, SOX2 and...

  12. Differential expression of microRNAs in mouse liver under aberrant energy metabolic status[S

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shengjie; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Hongjie; Liang, Xiangying; Xiang, Yang; Yu, Chaohui; Zen, Ke; Li, Youming; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Despite years of effort, exact pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains obscure. To gain an insight into the regulatory roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in aberrant energy metabolic status and pathogenesis of NAFLD, we analyzed the expression of miRNAs in livers of ob/ob mice, streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mice, and normal C57BL/6 mice by miRNA microarray. Compared with normal C57BL/6 mice, ob/ob mice showed upregulation of eight miRNAs and downregulation of ...

  13. Redistribution of whole-body energy metabolism by exercise. A positron emission tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to evaluate changes in glucose metabolism of skeletal muscles and viscera induced by different workloads using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) and three-dimensional positron emission tomography (3-D PET). Five male volunteers performed ergometer bicycle exercise for 40 min at 40% and 70% of the maximal O2 consumption (VO2max). [18]FDG was injected 10 min later following the exercise task. Whole-body 3-D PET was performed. Five other male volunteers were studied as a control to compare with the exercise group. The PET image data were analyzed using manually defined regions of interest to quantify the regional metabolic rate of glucose (rMRGlc). Group comparisons were made using analysis of variance, and significant differences (P18F]FDG-PET can be used as an index of organ energy metabolism for moderate exercise workloads (70% VO2max). The results of this investigation may contribute to sports medicine and rehabilitation science. (author)

  14. Regulation of neurotrophic factors and energy metabolism by antidepressants in astrocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Martin, Jean Luc

    2013-09-01

    There is growing evidence that astrocytes are involved in the neuropathology of major depression. In particular, decreases in glial cell density observed in the cerebral cortex of individuals with major depressive disorder are accompanied by a reduction of several astrocytic markers suggesting that astrocyte dysfunction may contribute to the pathophysiology of major depression. In rodents, glial loss in the prefrontal cortex is sufficient to induce depressive-like behaviors and antidepressant treatment prevents the stress-induced reduction of astrocyte number in the hippocampus. Collectively, these data support the existence of a link between astrocyte loss or dysfunction, depressive-like behavior and antidepressant treatment. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized to play important roles in neuronal development, neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity and maintenance of brain homeostasis. It is also well established that astrocytes provide trophic, structural, and metabolic support to neurons. In this article, we review evidence that antidepressants regulate energy metabolism and neurotrophic factor expression with particular emphasis on studies in astrocytes. These observations support a role for astrocytes as new targets for antidepressants. The contribution of changes in astrocyte glucose metabolism and neurotrophic factor expression to the therapeutic effects of antidepressants remains to be established. © 2013 Bentham Science Publishers.

  15. Determinants of brain cell metabolic phenotypes and energy substrate utilization unraveled with a modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitana Neves

    Full Text Available Although all brain cells bear in principle a comparable potential in terms of energetics, in reality they exhibit different metabolic profiles. The specific biochemical characteristics explaining such disparities and their relative importance are largely unknown. Using a modeling approach, we show that modifying the kinetic parameters of pyruvate dehydrogenase and mitochondrial NADH shuttling within a realistic interval can yield a striking switch in lactate flux direction. In this context, cells having essentially an oxidative profile exhibit pronounced extracellular lactate uptake and consumption. However, they can be turned into cells with prominent aerobic glycolysis by selectively reducing the aforementioned parameters. In the case of primarily oxidative cells, we also examined the role of glycolysis and lactate transport in providing pyruvate to mitochondria in order to sustain oxidative phosphorylation. The results show that changes in lactate transport capacity and extracellular lactate concentration within the range described experimentally can sustain enhanced oxidative metabolism upon activation. Such a demonstration provides key elements to understand why certain brain cell types constitutively adopt a particular metabolic profile and how specific features can be altered under different physiological and pathological conditions in order to face evolving energy demands.

  16. Nuclear receptor/microRNA circuitry links muscle fiber type to energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhenji; Rumsey, John; Hazen, Bethany C; Lai, Ling; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Xie, Hui; Conley, Kevin E; Auwerx, Johan; Smith, Steven R; Olson, Eric N; Kralli, Anastasia; Kelly, Daniel P

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the coordinate regulation of the metabolic and structural programs controlling muscle fitness and endurance are unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ was shown to activate muscle endurance programs in transgenic mice. In contrast, muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of the related nuclear receptor, PPARα, results in reduced capacity for endurance exercise. We took advantage of the divergent actions of PPARβ/δ and PPARα to explore the downstream regulatory circuitry that orchestrates the programs linking muscle fiber type with energy metabolism. Our results indicate that, in addition to the well-established role in transcriptional control of muscle metabolic genes, PPARβ/δ and PPARα participate in programs that exert opposing actions upon the type I fiber program through a distinct muscle microRNA (miRNA) network, dependent on the actions of another nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ). Gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies in mice, together with assessment of muscle biopsies from humans, demonstrated that type I muscle fiber proportion is increased via the stimulatory actions of ERRγ on the expression of miR-499 and miR-208b. This nuclear receptor/miRNA regulatory circuit shows promise for the identification of therapeutic targets aimed at maintaining muscle fitness in a variety of chronic disease states, such as obesity, skeletal myopathies, and heart failure.

  17. Bone and energy metabolism parameters in professional cyclists during the Giro d'Italia 3-weeks stage race.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Lombardi

    Full Text Available Cycling is a not weight-bearing activity and is known to induce bone resorption. Stage races are really strenuous endurance performances affecting the energy homeostasis. The recently highlighted link, in the co-regulation of bone and energy metabolism, demonstrates a central role for the equilibrium between carboxylated and undercarboxylated forms of osteocalcin. Aim of this study was to understand the acute physiological responses to a cycling stage race in terms of bone turnover and energy metabolism and the possible co-regulative mechanisms underlying their relationship. We studied nine professional cyclists engaged in 2011 Giro d'Italia stage race. Pre-analytical and analytical phases tightly followed academic and anti-doping authority's recommendations. Bone and energy metabolism markers (bone alkaline phosphatase, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, total and undercarboxylated osteocalcin, leptin and adiponectin and related hormones (cortisol and testosterone were measured, by Sandwich Enzyme Immunoassays, at days -1 (pre-race, 12 and 22 during the race. The power output and the energy expenditure (mean and accumulated were derived and correlated with the biochemical indexes. During the race, bone metabolism showed that an unbalance in behalf of resorption, which is enhanced, occurred along with a relative increase in the concentration of the undercarboxylated form of osteocalcin that was indirectly related to the enhanced energy expenditure, through adipokines modifications, with leptin decrease (high energy consumption and adiponectin increase (optimization of energy expenditure. The exertion due to heavy effort induced a decrease of cortisol, while testosterone levels resulted unchanged. In conclusion, during a 3-weeks stage race, bone metabolism is pushed towards resorption. A possible relationship between the bone and the energy metabolisms is suggested by the relative correlations among absolute and relative concentrations

  18. Systems genetics analysis of body weight and energy metabolism traits in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Katherine W

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and phenotypic traits associated with this condition exhibit significant heritability in natural populations of most organisms. While a number of genes and genetic pathways have been implicated to play a role in obesity associated traits, the genetic architecture that underlies the natural variation in these traits is largely unknown. Here, we used 40 wild-derived inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster to quantify genetic variation in body weight, the content of three major metabolites (glycogen, triacylglycerol, and glycerol associated with obesity, and metabolic rate in young flies. We chose these lines because they were previously screened for variation in whole-genome transcript abundance and in several adult life-history traits, including longevity, resistance to starvation stress, chill-coma recovery, mating behavior, and competitive fitness. This enabled us not only to identify candidate genes and transcriptional networks that might explain variation for energy metabolism traits, but also to investigate the genetic interrelationships among energy metabolism, behavioral, and life-history traits that have evolved in natural populations. Results We found significant genetically based variation in all traits. Using a genome-wide association screen for single feature polymorphisms and quantitative trait transcripts, we identified 337, 211, 237, 553, and 152 novel candidate genes associated with body weight, glycogen content, triacylglycerol storage, glycerol levels, and metabolic rate, respectively. Weighted gene co-expression analyses grouped transcripts associated with each trait in significant modules of co-expressed genes and we interpreted these modules in terms of their gene enrichment based on Gene Ontology analysis. Comparison of gene co-expression modules for traits in this study with previously determined modules for life-history traits identified significant modular pleiotropy between glycogen content

  19. Associations of fatty acids in cerebrospinal fluid with peripheral glucose concentrations and energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Jumpertz

    Full Text Available Rodent experiments have emphasized a role of central fatty acid (FA species, such as oleic acid, in regulating peripheral glucose and energy metabolism. Thus, we hypothesized that central FAs are related to peripheral glucose regulation and energy expenditure in humans. To test this we measured FA species profiles in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma of 32 individuals who stayed in our clinical inpatient unit for 6 days. Body composition was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and glucose regulation by an oral glucose test (OGTT followed by measurements of 24 hour (24EE and sleep energy expenditure (SLEEP as well as respiratory quotient (RQ in a respiratory chamber. CSF was obtained via lumbar punctures; FA concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. As expected, FA concentrations were higher in plasma compared to CSF. Individuals with high concentrations of CSF very-long-chain saturated FAs had lower rates of SLEEP. In the plasma moderate associations of these FAs with higher 24EE were observed. Moreover, CSF monounsaturated long-chain FA (palmitoleic and oleic acid concentrations were associated with lower RQs and lower glucose area under the curve during the OGTT. Thus, FAs in the CSF strongly correlated with peripheral metabolic traits. These physiological parameters were most specific to long-chain monounsaturated (C16:1, C18:1 and very-long-chain saturated (C24:0, C26:0 FAs.Together with previous animal experiments these initial cross-sectional human data indicate that central FA species are linked to peripheral glucose and energy homeostasis.

  20. Identification of microbes from the surfaces of food-processing lines based on the flow cytometric evaluation of cellular metabolic activity combined with cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzwa, W; Duber, A; Myszka, K; Białas, W; Czaczyk, K

    2016-09-01

    In this study the design of a flow cytometry-based procedure to facilitate the detection of adherent bacteria from food-processing surfaces was evaluated. The measurement of the cellular redox potential (CRP) of microbial cells was combined with cell sorting for the identification of microorganisms. The procedure enhanced live/dead cell discrimination owing to the measurement of the cell physiology. The microbial contamination of the surface of a stainless steel conveyor used to process button mushrooms was evaluated in three independent experiments. The flow cytometry procedure provided a step towards monitoring of contamination and enabled the assessment of microbial food safety hazards by the discrimination of active, mid-active and non-active bacterial sub-populations based on determination of their cellular vitality and subsequently single cell sorting to isolate microbial strains from discriminated sub-populations. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.97; p method and flow cytometry, despite there being differences in the absolute number of cells detected. The combined approach of flow cytometric CRP measurement and cell sorting allowed an in situ analysis of microbial cell vitality and the identification of species from defined sub-populations, although the identified microbes were limited to culturable cells.

  1. Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae infection affects the expression of genes involved in cellular signal transduction and iron metabolism in the kidney of the brown trout Salmo trutta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Sarker, Subhodeep; Menanteau-Ledouble, Simon; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2015-06-01

    Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is an enigmatic endoparasite which causes proliferative kidney disease in various species of salmonids in Europe and North America. The life cycle of the European strain of T. bryosalmonae generally completes in an invertebrate host freshwater bryozoan and vertebrate host brown trout (Salmo trutta) Linnaeus, 1758. Little is known about the gene expression in the kidney of brown trout during the developmental stages of T. bryosalmonae. In the present study, quantitative real-time PCR was applied to quantify the target genes of interest in the kidney of brown trout at different time points of T. bryosalmonae development. PCR primers specific for target genes were designed and optimized, and their gene expression levels were quantified in the cDNA kidney samples using SYBR Green Supermix. Expression of Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta, integral membrane protein 2B, NADH dehydrogenase 1 beta subcomplex subunit 6, and 26S protease regulatory subunit S10B were upregulated significantly in infected brown trout, while the expression of the ferritin M middle subunit was downregulated significantly. These results suggest that host genes involved in cellular signal transduction, proteasomal activities, including membrane transporters and cellular iron storage, are differentially upregulated or downregulated in the kidney of brown trout during parasite development. The gene expression pattern of infected renal tissue may support the development of intraluminal sporogonic stages of T. bryosalmonae in the renal tubular lumen of brown trout which may facilitate the release of viable parasite spores to transmit to the invertebrate host bryozoan. PMID:25786607

  2. Identification of microbes from the surfaces of food-processing lines based on the flow cytometric evaluation of cellular metabolic activity combined with cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzwa, W; Duber, A; Myszka, K; Białas, W; Czaczyk, K

    2016-09-01

    In this study the design of a flow cytometry-based procedure to facilitate the detection of adherent bacteria from food-processing surfaces was evaluated. The measurement of the cellular redox potential (CRP) of microbial cells was combined with cell sorting for the identification of microorganisms. The procedure enhanced live/dead cell discrimination owing to the measurement of the cell physiology. The microbial contamination of the surface of a stainless steel conveyor used to process button mushrooms was evaluated in three independent experiments. The flow cytometry procedure provided a step towards monitoring of contamination and enabled the assessment of microbial food safety hazards by the discrimination of active, mid-active and non-active bacterial sub-populations based on determination of their cellular vitality and subsequently single cell sorting to isolate microbial strains from discriminated sub-populations. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.97; p < 0.05) between the bacterial cell count estimated by the pour plate method and flow cytometry, despite there being differences in the absolute number of cells detected. The combined approach of flow cytometric CRP measurement and cell sorting allowed an in situ analysis of microbial cell vitality and the identification of species from defined sub-populations, although the identified microbes were limited to culturable cells. PMID:27406324

  3. Dynamic Metabolism in Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hommrani, Mazen; Chakraborty, Paramita; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2016-01-01

    Cell, the basic unit of life depends for its survival on nutrients and thereby energy to perform its physiological function. Cells of lymphoid and myeloid origin are key in evoking an immune response against “self” or “non-self” antigens. The thymus derived lymphoid cells called T cells are a heterogenous group with distinct phenotypic and molecular signatures that have been shown to respond against an infection (bacterial, viral, protozoan) or cancer. Recent studies have unearthed the key differences in energy metabolism between the various T cell subsets, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid derived suppressor cells. While a number of groups are dwelling into the nuances of the metabolism and its role in immune response at various strata, this review focuses on dynamic state of metabolism that is operational within various cellular compartments that interact to mount an effective immune response to alleviate disease state.

  4. Cancer as a metabolic disease: implications for novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Flores, Roberto E; Poff, Angela M; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2014-03-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that cancer is primarily a metabolic disease involving disturbances in energy production through respiration and fermentation. The genomic instability observed in tumor cells and all other recognized hallmarks of cancer are considered downstream epiphenomena of the initial disturbance of cellular energy metabolism. The disturbances in tumor cell energy metabolism can be linked to abnormalities in the structure and function of the mitochondria. When viewed as a mitochondrial metabolic disease, the evolutionary theory of Lamarck can better explain cancer progression than can the evolutionary theory of Darwin. Cancer growth and progression can be managed following a whole body transition from fermentable metabolites, primarily glucose and glutamine, to respiratory metabolites, primarily ketone bodies. As each individual is a unique metabolic entity, personalization of metabolic therapy as a broad-based cancer treatment strategy will require fine-tuning to match the therapy to an individual's unique physiology. PMID:24343361

  5. Maternal melatonin programs the daily pattern of energy metabolism in adult offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo S Ferreira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Shift work was recently described as a factor that increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, rats born to mothers subjected to a phase shift throughout pregnancy are glucose intolerant. However, the mechanism by which a phase shift transmits metabolic information to the offspring has not been determined. Among several endocrine secretions, phase shifts in the light/dark cycle were described as altering the circadian profile of melatonin production by the pineal gland. The present study addresses the importance of maternal melatonin for the metabolic programming of the offspring. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Female Wistar rats were submitted to SHAM surgery or pinealectomy (PINX. The PINX rats were divided into two groups and received either melatonin (PM or vehicle. The SHAM, the PINX vehicle and the PM females were housed with male Wistar rats. Rats were allowed to mate and after weaning, the male and female offspring were subjected to a glucose tolerance test (GTT, a pyruvate tolerance test (PTT and an insulin tolerance test (ITT. Pancreatic islets were isolated for insulin secretion, and insulin signaling was assessed in the liver and in the skeletal muscle by western blots. We found that male and female rats born to PINX mothers display glucose intolerance at the end of the light phase of the light/dark cycle, but not at the beginning. We further demonstrate that impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and hepatic insulin resistance are mechanisms that may contribute to glucose intolerance in the offspring of PINX mothers. The metabolic programming described here occurs due to an absence of maternal melatonin because the offspring born to PINX mothers treated with melatonin were not glucose intolerant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present results support the novel concept that maternal melatonin is responsible for the programming of the daily pattern of energy metabolism in their offspring.

  6. On the origin of 3-methylglutaconic acid in disorders of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikon, Nikita; Ryan, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    3-methylglutaconic acid (3MGA)-uria occurs in numerous inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) associated with compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism. This organic acid arises from thioester cleavage of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA (3MG CoA), an intermediate in leucine catabolism. In individuals harboring mutations in 3MG CoA hydratase (i.e., primary 3MGA-uria), dietary leucine is the source of 3MGA. In secondary 3MGA-uria, however, no leucine metabolism defects have been reported. While others have suggested 3MGA arises from aberrant isoprenoid shunting from cytosol to mitochondria, an alternative route posits that 3MG CoA arises in three steps from mitochondrial acetyl CoA. Support for this biosynthetic route in IEMs is seen by its regulated occurrence in microorganisms. The fungus, Ustilago maydis, the myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus and the marine cyanobacterium, Lyngbya majuscule, generate 3MG CoA (or acyl carrier protein derivative) in the biosynthesis of iron chelating siderophores, iso-odd chain fatty acids and polyketide/nonribosomal peptide products, respectively. The existence of this biosynthetic machinery in these organisms supports a model wherein, under conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of acetyl CoA in the inner mitochondrial space as a result of inefficient fuel utilization drives de novo synthesis of 3MG CoA. Since humans lack the downstream biosynthetic capability of the organisms mentioned above, as 3MG CoA levels rise, thioester hydrolysis yields 3MGA, which is excreted in urine as unspent fuel. Understanding the metabolic origins of 3MGA may increase its utility as a biomarker. PMID:27091556

  7. SUPPLY AND DEMAND IN CEREBRAL ENERGY METABOLISM: THE ROLE OF NUTRIENT TRANSPORTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Ian A.; Carruthers, Anthony; Vannucci, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    Glucose is the obligate energetic fuel for the mammalian brain and most studies of cerebral energy metabolism assume that the vast majority of cerebral glucose utilization fuels neuronal activity via oxidative metabolism, both in the basal and activated state. Glucose transporter proteins (GLUTs) deliver glucose from the circulation to the brain: GLUT1 in the microvascular endothelial cells of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and glia; GLUT3 in neurons. Lactate, the glycolytic product of glucose metabolism, is transported into and out of neural cells by the monocarboxylate transporters: MCT1 in the BBB and astrocytes and MCT2 in neurons. The proposal of the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis (Pellerin and Magistretti, 1994) suggested that astrocytes play the primary role in cerebral glucose utilization and generate lactate for neuronal energetics, especially during activation. Since the identification of the GLUTs and MCTs in brain, much has been learned about their transport properties, i.e. capacity and affinity for substrate, which must be considered in any model of cerebral glucose uptake and utilization. Using concentrations and kinetic parameters of GLUT1 and GLUT3 in BBB endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons, along with the corresponding kinetic properties of the monocarboxylate transporters, we have successfully modeled brain glucose and lactate levels as well as lactate transients in response to neuronal stimulation. Simulations based on these parameters suggest that glucose readily diffuses through the basal lamina and interstitium to neurons, which are primarily responsible for glucose uptake, metabolism, and the generation of the lactate transients observed upon neuronal activation. PMID:17579656

  8. Molecular mechanism of carvedilol in attenuating the reversion to fetal energy metabolism during cardiac hypertrophy development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡琴; 李隆贵

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the molecular regulation mechanism of carvedilol in attenuating the reversion back towards fetal energy metabolism during the development of cardiac hypertrophy induced by coarctation of abdominal aorta (CAA) in male Wistar rats. Methods: Hemodynamic and ventricular remodeling parameters, free fatty acid content in the serum were measured in the experimental animals at 16 weeks after the surgical CAA, the rats receiving carvedilol intervention (CAR) after CAA, and those with sham operation (SH). The expressions of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferaseⅠ (M-CPTⅠ) and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) mRNA in the cardiac myocytes from every group were studied with RT-PCR. Results: Significant left ventricular hypertrophy were observed in the rats 16 weeks after coarctation operation (P<0.05), together with significant free fatty acids accumulation and downregulation of M-CPTⅠ and MCAD mRNA (P<0.05) in CAA group. Carvedilol at a dose of 30 mg/kg/d for 12 weeks inhibited the left ventricular hypertrophy induced by pressure overload and enhanced the gene expressions of rate-limiting enzyme (M-CPTⅠ) and key enzyme of fatty acid (MCAD) in the CAR group compared with CAA group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Pressure overload-induced hypertrophy in CAA rats causes the reversion back towards fetal enery metabolism, that is, downregulates the expressions of rate-limiting enzyme and key enzyme of fatty acid oxidation. The intervention therapy with carvedilol, a vasodilating alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist, attenuates the reversion of the metabolic gene expression to fetal type through upregulating M-CPTⅠ and MCAD mRNA expressions. Thus, carvedilol may exert cardioprotective effects on heart failure by the mechanism of preserving the adult metabolic gene regulation.

  9. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Li; Armstrong, Cheryl L.H.; Campbell, Wayne W.

    2016-01-01

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER)...

  10. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse – theoretical, practical and analytical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Roger Speakman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is one of the most important model organisms for understanding human genetic function and disease. This includes characterisation of the factors that influence energy expenditure and dysregulation of energy balance leading to obesity and its sequalae. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse presents a challenge because the animals are small, and in this respect it presents similar challenges to measuring energy demands in many other species of small mammal. This paper considers some theoretical, practical and analytical considerations to be considered when measuring energy expenditure in mice. Theoretically total daily energy expenditure is comprised of several different components: basal or resting expenditure, physical activity, thermoregulation and the thermic effect of food. Energy expenditure in mice is normally measured using open flow indirect calorimetry apparatus. Two types of system are available – one of which involves a single small Spartan chamber linked to a single analyser, which is ideal for measuring the individual components of energy demand. The other type of system involves a large chamber which mimics the home cage environment and is generally configured with several chambers per analyser. These latter systems are ideal for measuring total daily energy expenditure but at present do not allow accurate decomposition of the total expenditure into its components. The greatest analytical challenge for mouse expenditure data is how to account for body size differences between individuals. This has been a matter of some discussion for at least 120 years. The statistically most appropriate approach is to use ANCOVA with individual aspects of body composition as independent predictors.

  11. Alterations in energy metabolism, neuroprotection and visual signal transduction in the retina of Parkinsonian, MPTP-treated monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Campello

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease is mainly characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system, including the retina. Different interrelated molecular mechanisms underlying Parkinson disease-associated neuronal death have been put forward in the brain, including oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Systemic injection of the proneurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP to monkeys elicits the appearance of a parkinsonian syndrome, including morphological and functional impairments in the retina. However, the intracellular events leading to derangement of dopaminergic and other retinal neurons in MPTP-treated animal models have not been so far investigated. Here we have used a comparative proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in the retina of MPTP-treated monkeys. Proteins were solubilized from the neural retinas of control and MPTP-treated animals, labelled separately with two different cyanine fluorophores and run pairwise on 2D DIGE gels. Out of >700 protein spots resolved and quantified, 36 were found to exhibit statistically significant differences in their expression levels, of at least ± 1.4-fold, in the parkinsonian monkey retina compared with controls. Most of these spots were excised from preparative 2D gels, trypsinized and subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and LC-MS/MS analyses. Data obtained were used for protein sequence database interrogation, and 15 different proteins were successfully identified, of which 13 were underexpressed and 2 overexpressed. These proteins were involved in key cellular functional pathways such as glycolysis and mitochondrial electron transport, neuronal protection against stress and survival, and phototransduction processes. These functional categories underscore that alterations in energy metabolism, neuroprotective mechanisms and signal transduction are involved in MPTP-induced neuronal degeneration in the retina, in similarity to

  12. MiADMSA reverses impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism and neuronal apoptotic cell death after arsenic exposure in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, Nidhi; Mehta, Ashish; Yadav, Abhishek [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Defence Research and Development Establishment, Gwalior-474 002 (India); Binukumar, B.K.; Gill, Kiran Dip [Department of Biochemistry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160 012 (India); Flora, Swaran J.S., E-mail: sjsflora@hotmail.com [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Defence Research and Development Establishment, Gwalior-474 002 (India)

    2011-11-15

    Arsenicosis, due to contaminated drinking water, is a serious health hazard in terms of morbidity and mortality. Arsenic induced free radicals generated are known to cause cellular apoptosis through mitochondrial driven pathway. In the present study, we investigated the effect of arsenic interactions with various complexes of the electron transport chain and attempted to evaluate if there was any complex preference of arsenic that could trigger apoptosis. We also evaluated if chelation with monoisoamyl dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA) could reverse these detrimental effects. Our results indicate that arsenic exposure induced free radical generation in rat neuronal cells, which diminished mitochondrial potential and enzyme activities of all the complexes of the electron transport chain. Moreover, these complexes showed differential responses towards arsenic. These early events along with diminished ATP levels could be co-related with the later events of cytosolic migration of cytochrome c, altered bax/bcl{sub 2} ratio, and increased caspase 3 activity. Although MiADMSA could reverse most of these arsenic-induced altered variables to various extents, DNA damage remained unaffected. Our study for the first time demonstrates the differential effect of arsenic on the complexes leading to deficits in bioenergetics leading to apoptosis in rat brain. However, more in depth studies are warranted for better understanding of arsenic interactions with the mitochondria. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic impairs mitochondrial energy metabolism leading to neuronal apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic differentially affects mitochondrial complexes, I - III and IV being more sensitive than complex II. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic-induced apoptosis initiates through ROS generation or impaired [Ca{sup 2+}]i homeostasis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiADMSA reverses arsenic toxicity via intracellular arsenic- chelation, antioxidant

  13. Cellular Energy Absorbing TRIP-Steel/Mg-PSZ Composite: Honeycomb Structures Fabricated by a New Extrusion Powder Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich Martin; David Ehinger; Lutz Krüger; Stefan Martin; Thomas Mottitschka; Christian Weigelt; Aneziris, Christos G.; Mathias Herrmann

    2010-01-01

    Lightweight linear cellular composite materials on basis of austenite stainless TRIP- (TRansformation Induced Plasticity-) steel as matrix with reinforcements of MgO partially stabilized zirconia (Mg-PSZ) are described. Two-dimensional cellular materials for structural applications are conventionally produced by sheet expansion or corrugation processes. The presented composites are fabricated by a modified ceramic extrusion powder technology. Characterization of the microstructure in as-recei...

  14. Renewable energy from Cyanobacteria: energy production optimization by metabolic pathway engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Naira; Van der Kooy, Frank; Van de Rhee, Miranda D; Voshol, Gerben P; Verpoorte, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The need to develop and improve sustainable energy resources is of eminent importance due to the finite nature of our fossil fuels. This review paper deals with a third generation renewable energy resource which does not compete with our food resources, cyanobacteria. We discuss the current state of the art in developing different types of bioenergy (ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, etc.) from cyanobacteria. The major important biochemical pathways in cyanobacteria are highlighted, and the possibility to influence these pathways to improve the production of specific types of energy forms the major part of this review. PMID:21691792

  15. Renewable energy from Cyanobacteria: energy production optimization by metabolic pathway engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Naira; Van der Kooy, Frank; Van de Rhee, Miranda D; Voshol, Gerben P; Verpoorte, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The need to develop and improve sustainable energy resources is of eminent importance due to the finite nature of our fossil fuels. This review paper deals with a third generation renewable energy resource which does not compete with our food resources, cyanobacteria. We discuss the current state of the art in developing different types of bioenergy (ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, etc.) from cyanobacteria. The major important biochemical pathways in cyanobacteria are highlighted, and the possibility to influence these pathways to improve the production of specific types of energy forms the major part of this review.

  16. Increasing serotonin concentrations alter calcium and energy metabolism in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, Jimena; Moore, Spencer A E; Weaver, Samantha R; Cronick, Callyssa M; Olsen, Megan; Prichard, Austin P; Schnell, Brian P; Crenshaw, Thomas D; Peñagaricano, Francisco; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Hernandez, Laura L

    2015-07-01

    A 4×4 Latin square design in which varied doses (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/kg) of 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP, a serotonin precursor) were intravenously infused into late-lactation, non-pregnant Holstein dairy cows was used to determine the effects of serotonin on calcium and energy metabolism. Infusion periods lasted 4 days, with a 5-day washout between periods. Cows were infused at a constant rate for 1 h each day. Blood was collected pre- and 5, 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min post-infusion, urine was collected pre- and post-infusion, and milk was collected daily. All of the 5-HTP doses increased systemic serotonin as compared to the 0 mg/kg dose, and the 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg doses increased circulating glucose and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and decreased beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHBA) concentrations. Treatment of cows with either 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg 5-HTP doses decreased urine calcium elimination, and the 1.5 mg/kg dose increased milk calcium concentrations. No differences were detected in the heart rates, respiration rates, or body temperatures of the cows; however, manure scores and defecation frequency were affected. Indeed, cows that received 5-HTP defecated more, and the consistency of their manure was softer. Treatment of late-lactation dairy cows with 5-HTP improved energy metabolism, decreased loss of calcium into urine, and increased calcium secretion into milk. Further research should target the effects of increasing serotonin during the transition period to determine any benefits for post-parturient calcium and glucose metabolism. PMID:26099356

  17. NMR studies of myocardial energy metabolism and ionic homeostasis during ischemia and reperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study several aspects of myocardial energy metabolism and ionic homeostasis during ischemia and reperfusion were investigated in isolated perfused rat hearts, regionally ischemic rabbit hearts, and ex vivo human donor hearts during long term hypothermic cardioplegia. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy was used as a powerful tool to non-destructively follow the time course in changes in intracellular high-energy phosphates, (creatine phosphate and ATP), inorganic phosphate, and pH. In addition, changes in intracellular free magnesium were followed during ischemia and reperfusion. Sodium-23 (23Na) NMR spectroscopy was used to study intracellular sodium during ischemia and reperfusion and during calcium-free perfusion. (author). 495 refs.; 33 figs.; 11 tabs

  18. Comparison Between Cerebral Tissue Oxygen Tension and Energy Metabolism in Experimental Subdural Hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Engell, Susanne I; Johnsen, Rikke Aagaard;

    2011-01-01

    . Intracranial pressure (ICP) was monitored in the "good-side." RESULTS: ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), PbtO(2), glucose, lactate, pyruvate, lactate-pyruvate ratio (LP ratio), glutamate, and glycerol were recorded at baseline (60 min) and post trauma (360 min). After the creation of the ASDH, PbtO(2......BACKGROUND: An experimental swine model (n = 7) simulating an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) was employed (1) to explore the relation between the brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO(2)) and the regional cerebral energy metabolism as obtained by microdialysis, and (2) to define the lowest level of PbtO(2......) compatible with intact energy metabolism. METHODS: ASDH was produced by infusion of 7 ml of autologous blood (infusion rate 0.5 ml/min) by a catheter placed subdurally. PbtO(2) and microdialysis probes were placed symmetrically in the injured ("bad-side") and non-injured ("good-side") hemispheres...

  19. Tyrosine impairs enzymes of energy metabolism in cerebral cortex of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Rodrigo Binkowski; Gemelli, Tanise; Rojas, Denise Bertin; Funchal, Cláudia; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; Wannmacher, Clovis Milton Duval

    2012-05-01

    Tyrosine levels are abnormally elevated in tissues and physiological fluids of patients with inborn errors of tyrosine catabolism, especially in tyrosinemia type II, which is caused by deficiency of tyrosine aminotransferase and provokes eyes, skin, and central nervous system disturbances. Considering that the mechanisms of brain damage in these disorders are poorly known, in this study, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro effects of tyrosine on some parameters of energy metabolism in cerebral cortex of 14-day-old Wistar rats. We observed that 2 mM tyrosine inhibited in vitro the pyruvate kinase (PK) activity and that this inhibition was prevented by 1 mM reduced glutathione with 30, 60, and 90 min of preincubation. Moreover, administration of tyrosine methyl ester (TME) (0.5 mg/g of body weight) decreased the activity of PK and this reduction was prevented by pre-treatment with creatine (Cr). On the other hand, tyrosine did not alter adenylate kinase (AK) activity in vitro, but administration of TME enhanced AK activity not prevented by Cr pre-treatment. Finally, TME administration decreased the activity of CK from cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions and this diminution was prevented by Cr pre-treatment. The results suggest that tyrosine alters essential sulfhydryl groups necessary for CK and PK functions, possibly through oxidative stress. In case this also occurs in the patients, it is possible that energy metabolism alterations may contribute, along with other mechanisms, to the neurological dysfunction of hypertyrosinemias.

  20. Effects of a block in cysteine catabolism on energy balance and fat metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiadomski, Julie; Zhou, James Q; Roman, Heather B; Liu, Xiaojing; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Locasale, Jason W; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2016-01-01

    To gain further insights into the effects of elevated cysteine levels on energy metabolism and the possible mechanisms underlying these effects, we conducted studies in cysteine dioxygenase (Cdo1)-null mice. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) catalyzes the first step of the major pathway for cysteine catabolism. When CDO is absent, tissue and plasma cysteine levels are elevated, resulting in enhanced flux of cysteine through desulfhydration reactions. When Cdo1-null mice were fed a high-fat diet, they gained more weight than their wild-type controls, regardless of whether the diet was supplemented with taurine. Cdo1-null mice had markedly lower leptin levels, higher feed intakes, and markedly higher abundance of hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) compared to wild-type control mice, and these differences were not affected by the fat or taurine content of the diet. Thus, reported associations of elevated cysteine levels with greater weight gain and with elevated hepatic Scd1 expression are also seen in the Cdo1-null mouse model. Hepatic accumulation of acylcarnitines suggests impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acids in Cdo1-null mice. The strong associations of elevated cysteine levels with excess H2 S production and impairments in energy metabolism suggest that H2 S signaling could be involved.

  1. ANGPTL2 activity in cardiac pathologies accelerates heart failure by perturbing cardiac function and energy metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhe; Miyata, Keishi; Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Horiguchi, Haruki; Fukushima, Hiroyuki; Tohyama, Shugo; Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Zhao, Jiabin; Endo, Motoyoshi; Morinaga, Jun; Sato, Michio; Sugizaki, Taichi; Zhu, Shunshun; Terada, Kazutoyo; Sakaguchi, Hisashi; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro; Takeda, Naoki; Araki, Kimi; Manabe, Ichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi; Otsu, Kinya; Wada, Jun; Murohara, Toyoaki; Mohri, Satoshi; Yamashita, Jun K.; Sano, Motoaki; Oike, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    A cardioprotective response that alters ventricular contractility or promotes cardiomyocyte enlargement occurs with increased workload in conditions such as hypertension. When that response is excessive, pathological cardiac remodelling occurs, which can progress to heart failure, a leading cause of death worldwide. Mechanisms underlying this response are not fully understood. Here, we report that expression of angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) increases in pathologically-remodeled hearts of mice and humans, while decreased cardiac ANGPTL2 expression occurs in physiological cardiac remodelling induced by endurance training in mice. Mice overexpressing ANGPTL2 in heart show cardiac dysfunction caused by both inactivation of AKT and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA)2a signalling and decreased myocardial energy metabolism. Conversely, Angptl2 knockout mice exhibit increased left ventricular contractility and upregulated AKT-SERCA2a signalling and energy metabolism. Finally, ANGPTL2-knockdown in mice subjected to pressure overload ameliorates cardiac dysfunction. Overall, these studies suggest that therapeutic ANGPTL2 suppression could antagonize development of heart failure. PMID:27677409

  2. Day–Night Changes of Energy-rich Compounds in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) Species Utilizing Hexose and Starch

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Li-Song; NOSE, Akihiro

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) can be divided into two groups according to the major carbohydrates used for malic acid synthesis, either polysaccharide (starch) or monosaccharide (hexose). This is related to the mechanism and affects energy metabolism in the two groups. In Kalanchoë pinnata and K. daigremontiana, which utilize starch, ATP-dependent phosphofructokinase (tonoplast inorganic pyrophosphatase) activity is greater than inorganic pyrophosphate-d...

  3. The Deep Correlation between Energy Metabolism and Reproduction: A View on the Effects of Nutrition for Women Fertility

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Fontana; Sara Della Torre

    2016-01-01

    In female mammals, mechanisms have been developed, throughout evolution, to integrate environmental, nutritional and hormonal cues in order to guarantee reproduction in favorable energetic conditions and to inhibit it in case of food scarcity. This metabolic strategy could be an advantage in nutritionally poor environments, but nowadays is affecting women’s health. The unlimited availability of nutrients, in association with reduced energy expenditure, leads to alterations in many metabolic p...

  4. An Integrative Approach to Energy, Carbon, and Redox Metabolism in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Special Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbeek, R.

    2003-06-30

    The main objectives for the first year were to produce a detailed metabolic reconstruction of synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 especially in interrelated areas of photosynthesis, respiration, and central carbon metabolism to support a more complete understanding and modeling of this organism. Additionally, Integrated Genomics, Inc., provided detailed bioinformatic analysis of selected functional systems related to carbon and energy generation and utilization, and of the corresponding pathways, functional roles and individual genes to support wet lab experiments by collaborators.

  5. Targeting SIRT1 to improve metabolism: all you need is NAD+?

    OpenAIRE

    Cantó, Carles; Auwerx, Johan

    2011-01-01

    SIRT1 is an evolutionary conserved NAD+-dependent deacetylase that is at the pinnacle of metabolic control, all the way from yeast to humans. SIRT1 senses changes in intracellular NAD+ levels, which reflect energy level, and uses this information to adapt the cellular energy output, such that the it matches cellular energy requirements. Generally, but not exclusively, the changes induced by SIRT1 activation are transcriptional in nature and are related to an increase in mitochondrial metaboli...

  6. Deiodinase knockdown during early zebrafish development affects growth, development, energy metabolism, motility and phototransduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enise Bagci

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH balance is essential for vertebrate development. Deiodinase type 1 (D1 and type 2 (D2 increase and deiodinase type 3 (D3 decreases local intracellular levels of T3, the most important active TH. The role of deiodinase-mediated TH effects in early vertebrate development is only partially understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of deiodinases during early development of zebrafish until 96 hours post fertilization at the level of the transcriptome (microarray, biochemistry, morphology and physiology using morpholino (MO knockdown. Knockdown of D1+D2 (D1D2MO and knockdown of D3 (D3MO both resulted in transcriptional regulation of energy metabolism and (muscle development in abdomen and tail, together with reduced growth, impaired swim bladder inflation, reduced protein content and reduced motility. The reduced growth and impaired swim bladder inflation in D1D2MO could be due to lower levels of T3 which is known to drive growth and development. The pronounced upregulation of a large number of transcripts coding for key proteins in ATP-producing pathways in D1D2MO could reflect a compensatory response to a decreased metabolic rate, also typically linked to hypothyroidism. Compared to D1D2MO, the effects were more pronounced or more frequent in D3MO, in which hyperthyroidism is expected. More specifically, increased heart rate, delayed hatching and increased carbohydrate content were observed only in D3MO. An increase of the metabolic rate, a decrease of the metabolic efficiency and a stimulation of gluconeogenesis using amino acids as substrates may have been involved in the observed reduced protein content, growth and motility in D3MO larvae. Furthermore, expression of transcripts involved in purine metabolism coupled to vision was decreased in both knockdown conditions, suggesting that both may impair vision. This study provides new insights, not only into the role of deiodinases, but also into the importance of a correct

  7. Cellular Telephone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨周

    1996-01-01

    Cellular phones, used in automobiles, airliners, and passenger trains, are basically low-power radiotelephones. Calls go through radio transmitters that are located within small geographical units called cells. Because each cell’s signals are too weak to interfere with those of other cells operating on the same fre-

  8. Demonstration of metabolic and cellular effects of portal vein ligation using multi-modal PET/MRI measurements in healthy rat liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Fülöp

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In the early recognition of portal vein ligation (PVL induced tumor progression, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI could improve diagnostic accuracy of conventionally used methods. It is unknown how PVL affects metabolic patterns of tumor free hepatic tissues. The aim of this preliminary study is to evaluate the effect of PVL on glucose metabolism, using PET/MRI imaging in healthy rat liver. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male Wistar rats (n=30 underwent PVL. 2-deoxy-2-(18Ffluoro-D-glucose (FDG PET/MRI imaging (nanoScan PET/MRI and morphological/histological examination were performed before (Day 0 and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after PVL. Dynamic PET data were collected and the standardized uptake values (SUV for ligated and non-ligated liver lobes were calculated in relation to cardiac left ventricle (SUVVOI/SUVCLV and mean liver SUV (SUVVOI/SUVLiver. RESULTS: PVL induced atrophy of ligated lobes, while non-ligated liver tissue showed compensatory hypertrophy. Dynamic PET scan revealed altered FDG kinetics in both ligated and non-ligated liver lobes. SUVVOI/SUVCLV significantly increased in both groups of lobes, with a maximal value at the 2nd postoperative day and returned near to the baseline 7 days after the ligation. After PVL, ligated liver lobes showed significantly higher tracer uptake compared to the non-ligated lobes (significantly higher SUVVOI/SUVLiver values were observed at postoperative day 1, 2 and 3. The homogenous tracer biodistribution observed before PVL reappeared by 7th postoperative day. CONCLUSION: The observed alterations in FDG uptake dynamics should be taken into account during the assessment of PET data until the PVL induced atrophic and regenerative processes are completed.

  9. Effects of Chinese herbal medicine on plasma glucose, protein and energy metabolism in sheep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Liang; Kyota Yamazaki; Mohammad Kamruzzaman; Xue Bi; Arvinda Panthee; Hiroaki Sano

    2014-01-01

    Background:The use of antibiotics in animal diets is facing negative feedback due to the hidden danger of drug residues to human health. Traditional Chinese herbal medicine has been used to replace antibiotics in the past two decades and played an increasingly important role in livestock production. The present study was carried out to assess the feeding effects of a traditional nourishing Chinese herbal medicine mixture on kinetics of plasma glucose, protein and energy metabolism in sheep. Ruminal fermentation characteristics were also determined. Methods:Four sheep were fed on either mixed hay (MH-diet) or MH-diet supplemented with 2%of Chinese herbal medicine (mixture of Astragalus root, Angelica root and Atractylodes rhizome;CHM-diet) over two 35-day periods using a crossover design. The turnover rate of plasma glucose was measured with an isotope dilution method using [U-13C]glucose. The rates of plasma leucine turnover and leucine oxidation, whole body protein synthesis (WBPS) and metabolic heat production were measured using the [1-13C]leucine dilution and open circuit calorimetry. Results:Body weight gain of sheep was higher (P=0.03) for CHM-diet than for MH-diet. Rumen pH was lower (P=0.02), concentration of rumen total volatile fatty acid tended to be higher (P=0.05) and acetate was higher (P=0.04) for CHM-diet than for MH-diet. Turnover rates of plasma glucose and leucine did not differ between diets. Oxidation rate of leucine tended to be higher (P=0.06) for CHM-diet than for MH-diet, but the WBPS did not differ between diets. Metabolic heat production tended to be greater (P=0.05) for CHM-diet than for MH-diet. Conclusions:The sheep fed on CHM-diet had a higher body weight gain and showed positive impacts on rumen fermentation and energy metabolism without resulting in any adverse response. Therefore, these results suggested that the Chinese herbal medicine mixture should be considered as a potential feed additive for sheep.

  10. Alteration of the interconversion of pyruvate and malate in the plastid or cytosol of ripening tomato fruit invokes diverse consequences on sugar but similar effects on cellular organic acid, metabolism, and transitory starch accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Sonia; Vallarino, José G; Szecowka, Marek; Ufaz, Shai; Tzin, Vered; Angelovici, Ruthie; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of decreased cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and plastidic NADP-dependent malic enzyme (ME) on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) ripening. Transgenic tomato plants with strongly reduced levels of PEPCK and plastidic NADP-ME were generated by RNA interference gene silencing under the control of a ripening-specific E8 promoter. While these genetic modifications had relatively little effect on the total fruit yield and size, they had strong effects on fruit metabolism. Both transformants were characterized by lower levels of starch at breaker stage. Analysis of the activation state of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase correlated with the decrease of starch in both transformants, which suggests that it is due to an altered cellular redox status. Moreover, metabolic profiling and feeding experiments involving positionally labeled glucoses of fruits lacking in plastidic NADP-ME and cytosolic PEPCK activities revealed differential changes in overall respiration rates and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux. Inactivation of cytosolic PEPCK affected the respiration rate, which suggests that an excess of oxaloacetate is converted to aspartate and reintroduced in the TCA cycle via 2-oxoglutarate/glutamate. On the other hand, the plastidic NADP-ME antisense lines were characterized by no changes in respiration rates and TCA cycle flux, which together with increases of pyruvate kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities indicate that pyruvate is supplied through these enzymes to the TCA cycle. These results are discussed in the context of current models of the importance of malate during tomato fruit ripening.

  11. Striatal neurodevelopment is dysregulated in purine metabolism deficiency and impacts DARPP-32, BDNF/TrkB expression and signaling: new insights on the molecular and cellular basis of Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiabe-Henri Guibinga

    Full Text Available Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome (LNS is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT. This syndrome is characterized by an array of severe neurological impairments that in part originate from striatal dysfunctions. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these dysfunctions remain largely unidentified. In this report, we demonstrate that HPRT-deficiency causes dysregulated expression of key genes essential for striatal patterning, most notably the striatally-enriched transcription factor B-cell leukemia 11b (Bcl11b. The data also reveal that the down-regulated expression of Bcl11b in HPRT-deficient immortalized mouse striatal (STHdh neural stem cells is accompanied by aberrant expression of some of its transcriptional partners and other striatally-enriched genes, including the gene encoding dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32, (DARPP-32. Furthermore, we demonstrate that components of the BDNF/TrkB signaling, a known activator of DARPP-32 striatal expression and effector of Bcl11b transcriptional activation are markedly increased in HPRT-deficient cells and in the striatum of HPRT knockout mouse. Consequently, the HPRT-deficient cells display superior protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated cell death upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide. These findings suggest that the purine metabolic defect caused by HPRT-deficiency, while it may provide neuroprotection to striatal neurons, affects key genes and signaling pathways that may underlie the neuropathogenesis of LNS.

  12. Cellular distributions of monocarboxylate transporters: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Kishimoto, Ayuko

    2015-01-01

    Lactate and ketone bodies play important roles as alternative energy substrates, especially in conditions with a decreased utility of glucose. Short-chain fatty acids (acetate, propionate, and butyrate), produced by bacterial fermentation, supply most of the energy substrates in ruminants such as the cow and sheep. These monocarboxylates are transfered through the plasma membrane by proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and sodium-coupled MCTs (SMCTs). To reveal the metabolism and functional significance of monocarboxylates, the cellular localization of MCTs and SMCTs together with the expressed intensities holds great importance. This paper reviews the immunohistochemical localization of SMCTs and major MCT subtypes throughout the mammalian body. MCTs and SMCTs display a selective membrane-bound localization with porality. In contrast to the limited expression of SMCTs in the intestine and kidney, MCTs display a broader distribution pattern than GLUTs. The brain, kidney, placenta, and male genital tract express multiple subtypes of the MCT family. Determination of the cellular localization of MCTs is most controversial in the brain, possibly due to regional differences and the transcriptional modification of MCT proteins. Information on the localization of MCTs and SMCTs aids in understanding the nutrient absorption and metabolism throughout the mammalian body. In some cases, the body may use monocarboxylates as signal molecules, like hormones. PMID:26522146

  13. Energy metabolic disorder is a major risk factor in severe influenza virus infection: Proposals for new therapeutic options based on animal model experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Hiroshi; Indalao, Irene L; Kim, Hyejin; Kimoto, Takashi; Sakai, Satoko; Takahashi, Etsuhisa

    2016-09-01

    Severe influenza is characterized by cytokine storm and multiorgan failure. Influenza patients with underlying diseases show a rapid progression in disease severity. The major mechanism that underlies multiorgan failure during the progressive stage of infection, particularly in patients with underlying risk factors, is mitochondrial energy crisis. The relationship between the factors that determine infection severity, such as influenza virus, cytokines, cellular trypsin as a hemagglutinin processing protease for viral multiplication, accumulation of metabolic intermediates and ATP crisis in mitochondria, is termed the "influenza virus-cytokine-trypsin" cycle. This occurs during the initial stages of infection, and is interconnected with the "metabolic disorders-cytokine" cycle in the middle to late phase of infection. Experiments using animal models have highlighted the complex relationship between these two cycles. New treatment options have been proposed that target the ATP crisis and multiorgan failure during the late phase of infection, rather than antiviral treatments with neuraminidase inhibitors that work during the initial phase. These options are (i) restoration of glucose oxidation in mitochondria by diisopropylamine dichloroacetate, which inhibits infection-induced pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 activity, and (ii) restoration of long-chain fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria by l-carnitine and bezafibrate, an agonist of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptors-β/δ, which transcriptionally upregulates carnitine palmitoyltransferase II. The latter is particularly effective in patients with influenza-associated encephalopathy who have thermolabile and short half-life compound variants of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II. PMID:27566378

  14. Effect Of Ferrous Sulfate Supplementation On Digestibility, Nutritive Value And Energy Nitrogen Metabolism In Local Sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of ferrous sulfate supplementation to sheep's diet on the feed intake, digestibility, nutritive values, nitrogen and energy utilization in mature rams. Sixteen local sheep rams (about 53 kg) were randomly divided into two groups; the 1st group fed concentrate feed mixture and rice straw and the 2nd group fed on the same concentrate feed mixture supplemented with ferrous sulfate plus rice straw. The results showed that feed intake by rams was significantly decreased by ferrous sulfate addition. Dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM) and nitrogen free extract (NFE) digestibility were significantly increased with the addition of ferrous sulfate while the crud protein, crude fiber (CF) and ether extract digestibility were non-significantly altered by ferrous sulfate addition. Total digestible nutrient (TDN) % and starch equivalent (SE) % were significantly increased with the treatment but digestible crud protein % was not affected. The retained nitrogen was significantly decreased with the addition of ferrous sulphate and the metabolic energy was also decreased with supplementation. The results of ferrous sulfate supplementation to the ration offered to rams led to a decreased feed intake and loss in appetite of animal. On the other hand, blood parameters illustrated that there were significant increase in blood haemoglobin, serum glucose, Ca, P, Mg and Fe concentrations, and ALT and AST activities, whereby serum T3 and T4 levels were non-significantly altered by FeSO4 supplementation. The results of the present study indicated that ferrous sulfate addition to diet of sheep induced a decrease in daily dry matter intake, nitrogen balance and energy metabolism with no effects on crew viability, activity and serum T3 and T4 levels.

  15. Subchronic Exposure of Mice to Cadmium Perturbs Their Hepatic Energy Metabolism and Gut Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songbin; Jin, Yuanxiang; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Liu, Zhenzhen; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-10-19

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental pollutant known to cause liver damage; however, the mechanisms of its hepatotoxicity remain poorly understood. In this study, the effects of subchronic exposure in mice to low doses of Cd on energy metabolism and the gut microbiome were evaluated. The exposure of mice to 10 mg/L Cd supplied in drinking water for 10 weeks increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG), serum free fatty acid (FFA), and TG levels. The mRNA levels of several key genes involved in both de novo FFA synthesis and transport pathways and in TG synthesis in the liver also increased significantly in the Cd-treated mice, indicating that alterations of these genes may be a possible mechanism to explain subchronic Cd exposure induced hepatic toxicity at a molecular level. As for the gut microbiome, at the phylum level, the amounts of Firmicutes and γ-proteobacteria decreased significantly in the feces after 4 weeks of Cd exposure, and the quantity of Firmicutes decreased significantly in the cecum contents after 10 weeks of Cd exposure. In addition, 16S rRNA gene sequencing further revealed that Cd exposure significantly perturbed the gut microflora structure and richness at family and genus levels. The alteration of gut microbiome composition might result in an increase in serum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and induce hepatic inflammation, which may indirectly cause perturbations of energy homeostasis after Cd exposure. Taken together, the present study indicated that subchronic Cd exposure caused the dysregulation of energy metabolism and changed the gut microbiome composition in mice.

  16. Energy dense, protein restricted diet increases adiposity and perturbs metabolism in young, genetically lean pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly D Fisher

    Full Text Available Animal models of obesity and metabolic dysregulation during growth (or childhood are lacking. Our objective was to increase adiposity and induce metabolic syndrome in young, genetically lean pigs. Pre-pubertal female pigs, age 35 d, were fed a high-energy diet (HED; n = 12, containing 15% tallow, 35% refined sugars and 9.1-12.9% crude protein, or a control corn-based diet (n = 11 with 12.2-19.2% crude protein for 16 wk. Initially, HED pigs self-regulated energy intake similar to controls, but by wk 5, consumed more (P<0.001 energy per kg body weight. At wk 15, pigs were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; blood glucose increased (P<0.05 in control pigs and returned to baseline levels within 60 min. HED pigs were hyperglycemic at time 0, and blood glucose did not return to baseline (P = 0.01, even 4 h post-challenge. During OGTT, glucose area under the curve (AUC was higher and insulin AUC was lower in HED pigs compared to controls (P = 0.001. Chronic HED intake increased (P<0.05 subcutaneous, intramuscular, and perirenal fat deposition, and induced hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and low-density lipoprotein hypercholesterolemia. A subset of HED pigs (n = 7 was transitioned back to a control diet for an additional six weeks. These pigs were subjected to an additional OGTT at 22 wk. Glucose AUC and insulin AUC did not improve, supporting that dietary intervention was not sufficient to recover glucose tolerance or insulin production. These data suggest a HED may be used to increase adiposity and disrupt glucose homeostasis in young, growing pigs.

  17. The energy-water-food nexus: strategic analysis of technologies for transforming the urban metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel Walker, R; Beck, M B; Hall, J W; Dawson, R J; Heidrich, O

    2014-08-01

    Urban areas are considered net consumers of materials and energy, attracting these from the surrounding hinterland and other parts of the planet. The way these flows are transformed and returned to the environment by the city is important for addressing questions of sustainability and the effect of human behavior on the metabolism of the city. The present work explores these questions with the use of systems analysis, specifically in the form of a Multi-sectoral Systems Analysis (MSA), a tool for research and for supporting decision-making for policy and investment. The application of MSA is illustrated in the context of Greater London, with these three objectives: (a) estimating resource fluxes (nutrients, water and energy) entering, leaving and circulating within the city-watershed system; (b) revealing the synergies and antagonisms resulting from various combinations of water-sector innovations; and (c) estimating the economic benefits associated with implementing these technologies, from the point of view of production of fertilizer and energy, and the reduction of greenhouse gases. Results show that the selection of the best technological innovation depends on which resource is the focus for improvement. Urine separation can potentially recover 47% of the nitrogen in the food consumed in London, with revenue of $33 M per annum from fertilizer production. Collecting food waste in sewers together with growing algae in wastewater treatment plants could beneficially increase the amount of carbon release from renewable energy by 66%, with potential annual revenues of $58 M from fuel production.

  18. Effects of PYY1-36 and PYY3-36 on appetite, energy intake, energy expenditure, glucose and fat metabolism in obese and lean subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Birgitte; Holst, Jens Juul; Flint, Anne;

    2006-01-01

    Peptide YY (PYY)(3-36) has been shown to produce dramatic reductions in energy intake (EI), but no human data exist regarding energy expenditure (EE), glucose and fat metabolism. Nothing is known regarding PYY1-36. To compare effects of PYY(1-36) and PYY(3-36) on appetite, EI, EE, insulin, glucos...

  19. Mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analogs inhibit breast cancer cell energy metabolism and promote cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research has revealed that targeting mitochondrial bioenergetic metabolism is a promising chemotherapeutic strategy. Key to successful implementation of this chemotherapeutic strategy is the use of new and improved mitochondria-targeted cationic agents that selectively inhibit energy metabolism in breast cancer cells, while exerting little or no long-term cytotoxic effect in normal cells. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and alterations in bioenergetic metabolism induced by mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analog (Mito-chromanol, Mito-ChM) and its acetylated ester analog (Mito-ChMAc). Assays of cell death, colony formation, mitochondrial bioenergetic function, intracellular ATP levels, intracellular and tissue concentrations of tested compounds, and in vivo tumor growth were performed. Both Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc selectively depleted intracellular ATP and caused prolonged inhibition of ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate in breast cancer cells, but not in non-cancerous cells. These effects were significantly augmented by inhibition of glycolysis. Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc exhibited anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in several breast cancer cells with different genetic background. Furthermore, Mito-ChM selectively accumulated in tumor tissue and inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft model of human breast cancer. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted small molecular weight chromanols exhibit selective anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in multiple breast cancer cells, and that esterification of the hydroxyl group in mito-chromanols is not a critical requirement for its anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effect

  20. Protein S-glutathionlyation links energy metabolism to redox signaling in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Treberg, Jason R

    2016-08-01

    At its core mitochondrial function relies on redox reactions. Electrons stripped from nutrients are used to form NADH and NADPH, electron carriers that are similar in structure but support different functions. NADH supports ATP production but also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide (O2(·-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). NADH-driven ROS production is counterbalanced by NADPH which maintains antioxidants in an active state. Mitochondria rely on a redox buffering network composed of reduced glutathione (GSH) and peroxiredoxins (Prx) to quench ROS generated by nutrient metabolism. As H2O2 is quenched, NADPH is expended to reactivate antioxidant networks and reset the redox environment. Thus, the mitochondrial redox environment is in a constant state of flux reflecting changes in nutrient and ROS metabolism. Changes in redox environment can modulate protein function through oxidation of protein cysteine thiols. Typically cysteine oxidation is considered to be mediated by H2O2 which oxidizes protein thiols (SH) forming sulfenic acid (SOH). However, problems begin to emerge when one critically evaluates the regulatory function of SOH. Indeed SOH formation is slow, non-specific, and once formed SOH reacts rapidly with a variety of molecules. By contrast, protein S-glutathionylation (PGlu) reactions involve the conjugation and removal of glutathione moieties from modifiable cysteine residues. PGlu reactions are driven by fluctuations in the availability of GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and thus should be exquisitely sensitive to changes ROS flux due to shifts in the glutathione pool in response to varying H2O2 availability. Here, we propose that energy metabolism-linked redox signals originating from mitochondria are mediated indirectly by H2O2 through the GSH redox buffering network in and outside mitochondria. This proposal is based on several observations that have shown that unlike other redox modifications PGlu reactions fulfill the requisite

  1. Metabolomics reveals mycoplasma contamination interferes with the metabolism of PANC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Wang, Yongtao; Zhang, Huizhen; Johnson, Caroline H; Jiang, Yiming; Li, Xiangjun; Wu, Zeming; Liu, Tian; Krausz, Kristopher W; Yu, Aiming; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2016-06-01

    Mycoplasma contamination is a common problem in cell culture and can alter cellular functions. Since cell metabolism is either directly or indirectly involved in every aspect of cell function, it is important to detect changes to the cellular metabolome after mycoplasma infection. In this study, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based metabolomics was used to investigate the effect of mycoplasma contamination on the cellular metabolism of human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that mycoplasma contamination induced significant metabolic changes in PANC-1 cells. Twenty-three metabolites were identified and found to be involved in arginine and purine metabolism and energy supply. This study demonstrates that mycoplasma contamination significantly alters cellular metabolite levels, confirming the compelling need for routine checking of cell cultures for mycoplasma contamination, particularly when used for metabolomics studies. Graphical abstract Metabolomics reveals mycoplasma contamination changes the metabolome of PANC-1 cells.

  2. Metabolomics reveals mycoplasma contamination interferes with the metabolism of PANC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Wang, Yongtao; Zhang, Huizhen; Johnson, Caroline H; Jiang, Yiming; Li, Xiangjun; Wu, Zeming; Liu, Tian; Krausz, Kristopher W; Yu, Aiming; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2016-06-01

    Mycoplasma contamination is a common problem in cell culture and can alter cellular functions. Since cell metabolism is either directly or indirectly involved in every aspect of cell function, it is important to detect changes to the cellular metabolome after mycoplasma infection. In this study, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based metabolomics was used to investigate the effect of mycoplasma contamination on the cellular metabolism of human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that mycoplasma contamination induced significant metabolic changes in PANC-1 cells. Twenty-three metabolites were identified and found to be involved in arginine and purine metabolism and energy supply. This study demonstrates that mycoplasma contamination significantly alters cellular metabolite levels, confirming the compelling need for routine checking of cell cultures for mycoplasma contamination, particularly when used for metabolomics studies. Graphical abstract Metabolomics reveals mycoplasma contamination changes the metabolome of PANC-1 cells. PMID:27074779

  3. Persistent overexpression of phosphoglycerate mutase, a glycolytic enzyme, modifies energy metabolism and reduces stress resistance of heart in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Okuda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heart failure is associated with changes in cardiac energy metabolism. Glucose metabolism in particular is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of heart failure. We examined the effects of persistent overexpression of phosphoglycerate mutase 2 (Pgam2, a glycolytic enzyme, on cardiac energy metabolism and function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Transgenic mice constitutively overexpressing Pgam2 in a heart-specific manner were generated, and cardiac energy metabolism and function were analyzed. Cardiac function at rest was normal. The uptake of analogs of glucose or fatty acids and the phosphocreatine/βATP ratio at rest were normal. A comprehensive metabolomic analysis revealed an increase in the levels of a few metabolites immediately upstream and downstream of Pgam2 in the glycolytic pathway, whereas the levels of metabolites in the initial few steps of glycolysis and lactate remained unchanged. The levels of metabolites in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle were altered. The capacity for respiration by isolated mitochondria in vitro was decreased, and that for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in vitro was increased. Impaired cardiac function was observed in response to dobutamine. Mice developed systolic dysfunction upon pressure overload. CONCLUSIONS: Constitutive overexpression of Pgam2 modified energy metabolism and reduced stress resistance of heart in mice.

  4. Metabolic reprogramming during neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M; Romeo, F; Inoue, S; Niklison-Chirou, M V; Elia, A J; Dinsdale, D; Morone, N; Knight, R A; Mak, T W; Melino, G

    2016-09-01

    Newly generated neurons pass through a series of well-defined developmental stages, which allow them to integrate into existing neuronal circuits. After exit from the cell cycle, postmitotic neurons undergo neuronal migration, axonal elongation, axon pruning, dendrite morphogenesis and synaptic maturation and plasticity. Lack of a global metabolic analysis during early cortical neuronal development led us to explore the role of cellular metabolism and mitochondrial biology during ex vivo differentiation of primary cortical neurons. Unexpectedly, we observed a huge increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. Changes in mitochondrial mass, morphology and function were correlated with the upregulation of the master regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, TFAM and PGC-1α. Concomitant with mitochondrial biogenesis, we observed an increase in glucose metabolism during neuronal differentiation, which was linked to an increase in glucose uptake and enhanced GLUT3 mRNA expression and platelet isoform of phosphofructokinase 1 (PFKp) protein expression. In addition, glutamate-glutamine metabolism was also increased during the differentiation of cortical neurons. We identified PI3K-Akt-mTOR signalling as a critical regulator role of energy metabolism in neurons. Selective pharmacological inhibition of these metabolic pathways indicate existence of metabolic checkpoint that need to be satisfied in order to allow neuronal differentiation. PMID:27058317

  5. Nucleotide Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, M.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are connected through their utilization of nucleotides as supplier of energy, allosteric effectors, and their role in activation of intermediates. Therefore, any attempt to exploit a given living organism in a biotechnological process will have an impact on nucleotide metabolism....... The aim of this article is to provide knowledge of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation to facilitate interpretation of data arising from genetics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in connection with biotechnological processes and beyond....

  6. Sneaker Male Squid Produce Long-lived Spermatozoa by Modulating Their Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirohashi, Noritaka; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Nakaya, Fumio; Iida, Tomohiro; Iwata, Yoko

    2016-09-01

    Spermatozoa released by males should remain viable until fertilization. Hence, sperm longevity is governed by intrinsic and environmental factors in accordance with the male mating strategy. However, whether intraspecific variation of insemination modes can impact sperm longevity remains to be elucidated. In the squid Heterololigo bleekeri, male dimorphism (consort and sneaker) is linked to two discontinuous insemination modes that differ in place and time. Notably, only sneaker male spermatozoa inseminated long before egg spawning can be stored in the seminal receptacle. We found that sneaker spermatozoa exhibited greater persistence in fertilization competence and flagellar motility than consort ones because of a larger amount of flagellar glycogen. Sneaker spermatozoa also showed higher capacities in glucose uptake and lactate efflux. Lactic acidosis was considered to stabilize CO2-triggered self-clustering of sneaker spermatozoa, thus establishing hypoxia-induced metabolic changes and sperm survival. These results, together with comparative omics analyses, suggest that postcopulatory reproductive contexts define sperm longevity by modulating the inherent energy levels and metabolic pathways. PMID:27385589

  7. SIRT1 IS INVOLVED IN ENERGY METABOLISM: THE ROLE OF CHRONIC ETHANOL FEEDING AND RESVERATROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Joan; French, Barbara A.; Li, Jun; Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Fu, Paul; French, Samuel W.

    2010-01-01

    Sirt1, a deacetylase involved in regulating energy metabolism in response to calorie restriction, is up regulated after chronic ethanol feeding using the intragastric feeding model of alcohol liver disease. PGC1α is also up regulated in response to ethanol. These changes are consistent with activation of the Sirt1/PGC1α pathway of metabolism and aging, involved in alcohol liver disease including steatosis, necrosis and fibrosis of the liver. To test this hypothesis, male rats fed ethanol intragastrically for 1 month were compared with rats fed ethanol plus resveratrol or naringin. Liver histology showed macrovesicular steatosis caused by ethanol and this change was unchanged by resveratrol or naringin treatment. Necrosis occurred with ethanol alone but was accentuated by resveratrol treatment, as was fibrosis. The expression of Sirt1 and PGC1α was increased by ethanol but not when naringin or resveratrol was fed with ethanol. Sirt3 was also up regulated by ethanol but not when resveratrol was fed with ethanol. These results support the concept that ethanol induces the Sirt1/PGC1α pathway of gene regulation and both naringin and resveratrol prevent the activation of this pathway by ethanol. However, resveratrol did not reduce the liver pathology caused by chronic ethanol feeding. PMID:18793633

  8. Energy metabolism in young mink kits (Neovison vison) affected by protein and carbohydrate level in the diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Hansen, NE; Tauson, A-H

    information about the relative contribution of different nutrients to the total heat production (HE; Tauson et al. 1997). The aim of the study was to examine the effect of different provision of protein and carbohydrate on the energy metabolism and substrate oxidation of mink kits between 6 and 12 weeks......The mink is a strict carnivore and mink diets usually have a high content of protein. The energy metabolism in young minks in the transition period from milk to solid food is not investigated in detail, and the protein requirement is poorly defined. The substrate oxidation can give useful...

  9. Energy Deposition in the Body from External Sources to Chemically Trigger Cellular Responses in Desired Localized Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, Stuart Duncan

    One of the major challenges of modern chemotherapy is to deliver a therapeutic dose of active drug to the tumor tissue without causing systemic exposure. The realization of this goal could considerably reduce the negative side effects experienced by patients. The work conducted in this thesis looks at two different approaches to trigger drug activation with the use of external energy sources. This avoids the challenges of relying solely on biochemical and environmental differences as triggers. The two triggers used were low intensity focused ultrasound and 365 nm light delivered with a custom designed needle UV LED fiber optic system. Both can be localized within the body to spatially highlight just the tumor tissue creating a stark differentiation between it and the healthy tissue. The 365nm light based delivery scheme developed here was the first demonstration of a photoactivatable doxorubicin (DOX) prodrug called DOX-PCB. DOX-PCB was shown to be 200 times less toxic than DOX and could be activated to a fully therapeutic form upon exposure to 365nm light. The pharmacokinetics showed a circulation half life comparable to that of DOX and stability against in vivo metabolic degradation. The 365 nm light was shown to adequately irradiate a centimeter of tumor tissue and cause localized activation. In vivo tumors exposed to the light had significantly higher doses of DOX than unexposed control tumors in the same individual. The second delivery scheme made use of focused ultrasound to activate echogenic drug delivery vehicles. These vehicles were the first demonstration of encapsulating microbubbles within liposomes. Specially designed optical equipment documented that the microbubble was ultrasound responsive. The microbubble was shown to violently cavitate and rupture the outer liposome membrane releasing the payload contents. The three dimensional localization of activation was demonstrated in tissue phantoms. The strengths of these two delivery schemes could

  10. Milk metabolome relates enteric methane emission to milk synthesis and energy metabolism pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes-Fernandes, E C; van Gastelen, S; Dijkstra, J; Hettinga, K A; Vervoort, J

    2016-08-01

    still related to CH4 intensity when FPCM was included as covariate. The UDP-hexose B is an intermediate of lactose metabolism, and citrate is an important intermediate of Krebs cycle-related energy processes. Therefore, the negative correlation of UDP-hexose B and citrate with CH4 intensity may reflect a decrease in metabolic activity in the mammary gland. Our results suggest that an integrative approach including milk yield and composition, and dietary and animal traits will help to explain the biological metabolism of dairy cows in relation to methane CH4 emission. PMID:27236769

  11. The globally widespread genus Sulfurimonas: versatile energy metabolisms and adaptations to redox clines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuchen; Perner, Mirjam

    2015-01-01

    Sulfurimonas species are commonly isolated from sulfidic habitats and numerous 16S rRNA sequences related to Sulfurimonas species have been identified in chemically distinct environments, such as hydrothermal deep-sea vents, marine sediments, the ocean's water column, and terrestrial habitats. In some of these habitats, Sulfurimonas have been demonstrated to play an important role in chemoautotrophic processes. Sulfurimonas species can grow with a variety of electron donors and acceptors, which may contribute to their widespread distribution. Multiple copies of one type of enzyme (e.g., sulfide:quinone reductases and hydrogenases) may play a pivotal role in Sulfurimonas' flexibility to colonize disparate environments. Many of these genes appear to have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer which has promoted adaptations to the distinct habitats. Here we summarize Sulfurimonas' versatile energy metabolisms and link their physiological properties to their global distribution.

  12. Lessons from "lower" organisms: what worms, flies, and zebrafish can teach us about human energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon Schlegel

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A pandemic of metabolic diseases (atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and obesity, unleashed by multiple social and economic factors beyond the control of most individuals, threatens to diminish human life span for the first time in the modern era. Given the redundancy and inherent complexity of processes regulating the uptake, transport, catabolism, and synthesis of nutrients, magic bullets to target these diseases will be hard to find. Recent studies using the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the fly Drosophila melanogaster, and the zebrafish Danio rerio indicate that these "lower" metazoans possess unique attributes that should help in identifying, investigating, and even validating new pharmaceutical targets for these diseases. We summarize findings in these organisms that shed light on highly conserved pathways of energy homeostasis.

  13. Progress in drug development for Alzheimer's disease: An overview in relation to mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroudová, Jana; Singh, Namrata; Fišar, Zdeněk; Ghosh, Kallol K

    2016-10-01

    Current possibilities of Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment are very limited and are based on administration of cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine) and/or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, memantine. Newly synthesized drugs affect multiple AD pathophysiological pathways and can act as inhibitors of cholinesterases (AChE, BuChE), inhibitors of monoamine oxidases (MAO-A, MAO-B), modulators of mitochondrial permeability transition pores, modulators of amyloid-beta binding alcohol dehydrogenase and antioxidants. Effects of clinically used as well as newly developed AD drugs were studied in relation to energy metabolism and mitochondrial functions, including oxidative phosphorylation, activities of enzymes of citric acid cycle or electron transfer system, mitochondrial membrane potential, calcium homeostasis, production of reactive oxygen species and MAO activity. PMID:27094132

  14. A simple metabolic model of glacial-interglacial energy supply to the upper ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Pelegrí

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We use a simple two-state two-box ocean to simulate the CO2 signal during the last four glacial-interglacial transitions in the earth system. The model is inspired by the similarity in spatial organization and temporal transition patterns between the earth and other complex systems, such as mammals. The comparison identifies the earth's metabolic rate with net autotrophic primary production in the upper ocean, sustained through new inorganic carbon and nutrients advected from the deep ocean and organic matter remineralized within the upper ocean. We view the glacial-interglacial transition as a switch of the upper ocean from a basal to an enhanced metabolic state, with energy supply initially relying on the remineralization of the local organic sources and the eventual steady state resulting from the increased advective supply of inorganic deep sources. During the interglacial-glacial transition the opposite occurs, with an initial excess of advective supply and primary production that allows the replenishment of the upper-ocean organic storages. We set the relative change in energy supply from the CO2 signal and use genetic algorithms to explore the sensitivity of the model output to both the basal recirculation rate and the intensity-timing of the maximum recirculation rate. The model is capable of reproducing quite well the long-term oscillations, as shown by correlations with observations typically about 0.8. The dominant time scale for each cycle ranges between about 40 and 45 kyr, close to the 41 kyr average obliquity astronomical period, and the deep-ocean recirculation rate increases between one and two orders of magnitude from glacial to interglacial periods.

  15. Keratin 8 absence down-regulates colonocyte HMGCS2 and modulates colonic ketogenesis and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, Terhi O; Misiorek, Julia O; Nyström, Joel H; Fortelius, Lina E; Habtezion, Aida; Liao, Jian; Asghar, M Nadeem; Zhang, Haiyan; Azhar, Salman; Omary, M Bishr; Toivola, Diana M

    2015-06-15

    Simple-type epithelial keratins are intermediate filament proteins important for mechanical stability and stress protection. Keratin mutations predispose to human liver disorders, whereas their roles in intestinal diseases are unclear. Absence of keratin 8 (K8) in mice leads to colitis, decreased Na/Cl uptake, protein mistargeting, and longer crypts, suggesting that keratins contribute to intestinal homeostasis. We describe the rate-limiting enzyme of the ketogenic energy metabolism pathway, mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), as a major down-regulated protein in the K8-knockout (K8(-/-)) colon. K8 absence leads to decreased quantity and activity of HMGCS2, and the down-regulation is not dependent on the inflammatory state, since HMGCS2 is not decreased in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, a transcriptional activator of HMGCS2, is similarly down-regulated. Ketogenic conditions-starvation or ketogenic diet-increase K8(+/+) HMGCS2, whereas this response is blunted in the K8(-/-) colon. Microbiota-produced short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), substrates in the colonic ketone body pathway, are increased in stool, which correlates with decreased levels of their main transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1). Microbial populations, including the main SCFA-butyrate producers in the colon, were not altered in the K8(-/-). In summary, the regulation of the SCFA-MCT1-HMGCS2 axis is disrupted in K8(-/-) colonocytes, suggesting a role for keratins in colonocyte energy metabolism and homeostasis. PMID:25904331

  16. The effect of fat composition of the diet on energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marken Lichtenbelt, W D; Mensink, R P; Westerterp, K R

    1997-12-01

    Animal and human studies show that polyunsaturated fatty acids (P) are oxidized more rapidly than saturated fatty acids (S). There are indications that diets high in P/S ratio result in a relatively high resting metabolic rate (RMR) and high diet induced thermogenesis (DIT). However, studies with human subjects are limited. The effect of dietary fatty acid composition on energy metabolism was studied in 6 male subjects, age 25-48 y. Two diets were supplied, each over a period of 14 days, in a randomized crossover design with a washout period of 14 days. P/S ratios of the diets were 0.19 and 1.67. On day 14, RMR was determined in the morning in fasting state by means of indirect calorimetry (ventilated hood), followed by a 4 hour measurement of the DIT after consumption of a standardized meal of 3.3 MJ with the same fatty acid composition as during the dietary period. The meal contained 46, 37, and 17 % energy as fat, carbohydrate, and protein, respectively. RMR after the period with the high P/S diet was significantly higher than after the period of the low P/S diet. The average difference (+/- SD) was 0.17 +/- 0.14 kJ/min or 3.6 +/- 2.7 % of RMR. The DIT was also higher in all subjects during a breakfast with a high P/S ratio. The average difference was 0.29 +/- 0.16 kJ/min, which is 22.1 +/- 12.6 % of DIT. The study showed that a prolonged food intake of a diet with a high P/S ratio results in a relatively high RMR and DIT. These results indicate the importance of dietary lipid profile in the treatment of obesity. PMID:9467221

  17. Operative stress response and energy metabolism after laparoscopic cholecystectomy compared to open surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Luo; Jie-Shou Li; Ling-Tang Li; Kei-Hui Wang; Jing-Mei Shun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine the least invasive surgical procedure by comparing the levels of operative stress hormones, responsereactive protein (CRP) and rest energy expenditure (REE)after laparoscopic (LC) and open cholecystectomy (OC).METHODS: Twenty-six consecutive patients with noncomplicated gallstones were randomized for LC (14) and OC (12). Plasma concentrations of somatotropin, insulin, cortisol and CRP were measured. The levels of REE were determined.RESULTS: In the third postoperative day, the insulin levels were lower compared to that before operation (P<0.05).Tn the first postoperative day, the levels of somatotropin and cortisol were higher in OC than those in LC. After operation the parameters of somatotropin, CRP and cortisol increased, compared to those in the preoperative period in the all patients (P<0.05). In the all-postoperative days,the CRP level was higher in OC than that in LC (7.46±0.02;7.38±0.01, P<0.05). After operation the REE level all increased in OC and LC (P<0.05). In the all-postoperative days, the REE level was higher in OC than that in LC (1438.5±A18.5;1222.3±L80.8, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: LC results in less prominent stress response and smaller metabolic interference compared to open surgery. These advantages are beneficial to the restoration of stress hormones, the nitrogen balance, and the energy metabolism. However, LC can also induce acidemia and pulmonary hypoperfusion because of the penumoperitonium it uses during surgery.

  18. Lenticular energy metabolism during exogenous calcium deprivation and during recovery: effects of dextran-40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glonek, T; Kopp, S J; Greiner, J V; Sanders, D R

    1985-02-01

    Phosphatic metabolites of the intact rabbit lens were quantitated as a function of time by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (P-31 NMR) spectroscopy during in vitro incubations at 37 degrees C in calcium-sufficient and calcium-deficient modified Earle's buffer with and without the osmotic agent, Dextran-40. Intralenticular pH was determined from the resonance shift position of inorganic orthophosphate (Pi). Incubation of lenses in calcium-deficient buffer resulted in a pronounced, time-dependent decrease in lenticular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. The half-life of ATP within the lens was 11 hr under these experimental conditions. A concomitant, essentially stoichiometric increase in adenosine diphosphate and Pi levels was observed also. The other phosphatic metabolites were unaffected by exogenous calcium deprivation except for adenosine and inosine monophosphate which accumulated with time. Dextran-40 (6%), which has been shown to prevent lens swelling under these same experimental conditions, did not influence the metabolic responses of the lens to external calcium deprivation and did not facilitate subsequent restoration of lens phosphatic metabolites following restoration of a physiologic calcium concentration to the supporting medium. The Dextran-40 did, however, promote the retention of intralenticular pH environment during the experimental period. These findings suggest that the previously reported Dextran-40-dependent recovery of intralenticular sodium and potassium concentrations to control levels following 10 hr of incubation in calcium-deficient media cannot be attributed to a direct energy-sparing action of Dextran-40 on lenticular energy metabolism. Instead, the mechanistic basis for the action of Dextran-40 would appear to be related to its colloid osmotic properties and its ability to prevent lenticular swelling, which otherwise occurs in the absence of Dextran under these experimental conditions. PMID:2579839

  19. The role of leucine and its metabolites in protein and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Li, Yinghui; Tang, Yulong; Kong, Xiangfeng; Feng, Zemeng; Anthony, Tracy G; Watford, Malcolm; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Leucine (Leu) is a nutritionally essential branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) in animal nutrition. It is usually one of the most abundant amino acids in high-quality protein foods. Leu increases protein synthesis through activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and placental cells. Leu promotes energy metabolism (glucose uptake, mitochondrial biogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation) to provide energy for protein synthesis, while inhibiting protein degradation. Approximately 80 % of Leu is normally used for protein synthesis, while the remainder is converted to α-ketoisocaproate (α-KIC) and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) in skeletal muscle. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that some of the functions of Leu are modulated by its metabolites. Both α-KIC and HMB have recently received considerable attention as nutritional supplements used to increase protein synthesis, inhibit protein degradation, and regulate energy homeostasis in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models. Leu and its metabolites hold great promise to enhance the growth and health of animals (including humans, birds and fish). PMID:26255285

  20. Lean and obese dietary phenotypes: differences in energy and substrate metabolism and appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clamp, Louise; Hehir, Anthony P J; Lambert, Estelle V; Beglinger, Christoph; Goedecke, Julia H

    2015-11-28

    This study aimed to characterise lean and obese phenotypes according to diet and body composition, and to compare fasting and postprandial appetite and metabolic profiles following a high-fat test meal. A total of ten lean (BMI40 and 30 kg/m2) high-fat consumers (OHF; >40 % energy from fat) were recruited. Before and following the test meal (4727 kJ (1130 kcal), 77 % fat, 20 % carbohydrate (CHO) and 3 % protein), fasting plasma glucose, insulin, leptin, ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), RER, RMR and subjective appetite ratings (AR) were measured for 6 h. Thereafter, subjects consumed a self-selected portion of a standardised post-test meal (40 % fat, 45 % CHO and 15 % protein) and reported AR. Fasting (P=0·01) and postprandial (Plean groups, fasting and postprandial energy expenditures were significantly higher in OHF compared with LHF (Plean groups showed appropriate changes in plasma ghrelin and PYY following the test meal, whereas the OHF group showed a blunted response. In conclusion, the LHF phenotype had a greater capacity for fat oxidation, which may be protective against weight gain. OHF individuals had a blunted appetite hormone response to the high-fat test meal, which may subsequently increase energy intake, driving further weight gain.

  1. Metabolic profile in growing buffalo heifers fed diet with different energy content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gasparrini

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to verify the relation among the mediators and indicators of nutritional status like insulin, glucagon, urea, cholesterol, triglycerides and total proteins in growing buffalo heifers, fed diets with different energy density. 12 Murrah heifers were randomly allocated into two dietary treatments (High, Group H; Low, Group L that differed in energetic levels (Group H: 5.8 UFL/d; Group L: 3.6 UFL/d. Every 30 days, for a total of five times, blood samples were collected at 08.00 h, before feeding, from the jugular vein in vacutainer tubes and analysed to determine metabolic profile. Data on haematic constants were analysed by ANOVA for repeated measures with treatment as the main factor. Low energy availability and low NSC reduced the glucose and insulin and increased glucagone and urea blood levels. The increase of NSC in the diet of group H during the experiment may caused a reduction of the fibre digestibility after the period of adaptation of the rumen microflora and, as a paradox effect, suffered for an energetic lack with a subsequent activation of lipolysis and mobilization of their body reserves. Liver and muscular synthesis increase in group with a high energy availability.

  2. Identification of Human N-Myristoylated Proteins from Human Complementary DNA Resources by Cell-Free and Cellular Metabolic Labeling Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamitsu, Emi; Otsuka, Motoaki; Haebara, Tatsuki; Yano, Manami; Matsuzaki, Kanako; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Moriya, Koko; Utsumi, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    To identify physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins, 90 cDNA clones predicted to encode human N-myristoylated proteins were selected from a human cDNA resource (4,369 Kazusa ORFeome project human cDNA clones) by two bioinformatic N-myristoylation prediction systems, NMT-The MYR Predictor and Myristoylator. After database searches to exclude known human N-myristoylated proteins, 37 cDNA clones were selected as potential human N-myristoylated proteins. The susceptibility of these cDNA clones to protein N-myristoylation was first evaluated using fusion proteins in which the N-terminal ten amino acid residues were fused to an epitope-tagged model protein. Then, protein N-myristoylation of the gene products of full-length cDNAs was evaluated by metabolic labeling experiments both in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system and in transfected human cells. As a result, the products of 13 cDNA clones (FBXL7, PPM1B, SAMM50, PLEKHN, AIFM3, C22orf42, STK32A, FAM131C, DRICH1, MCC1, HID1, P2RX5, STK32B) were found to be human N-myristoylated proteins. Analysis of the role of protein N-myristoylation on the intracellular localization of SAMM50, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, revealed that protein N-myristoylation was required for proper targeting of SAMM50 to mitochondria. Thus, the strategy used in this study is useful for the identification of physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins from human cDNA resources. PMID:26308446

  3. Identification of Human N-Myristoylated Proteins from Human Complementary DNA Resources by Cell-Free and Cellular Metabolic Labeling Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Takamitsu

    Full Text Available To identify physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins, 90 cDNA clones predicted to encode human N-myristoylated proteins were selected from a human cDNA resource (4,369 Kazusa ORFeome project human cDNA clones by two bioinformatic N-myristoylation prediction systems, NMT-The MYR Predictor and Myristoylator. After database searches to exclude known human N-myristoylated proteins, 37 cDNA clones were selected as potential human N-myristoylated proteins. The susceptibility of these cDNA clones to protein N-myristoylation was first evaluated using fusion proteins in which the N-terminal ten amino acid residues were fused to an epitope-tagged model protein. Then, protein N-myristoylation of the gene products of full-length cDNAs was evaluated by metabolic labeling experiments both in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system and in transfected human cells. As a result, the products of 13 cDNA clones (FBXL7, PPM1B, SAMM50, PLEKHN, AIFM3, C22orf42, STK32A, FAM131C, DRICH1, MCC1, HID1, P2RX5, STK32B were found to be human N-myristoylated proteins. Analysis of the role of protein N-myristoylation on the intracellular localization of SAMM50, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, revealed that protein N-myristoylation was required for proper targeting of SAMM50 to mitochondria. Thus, the strategy used in this study is useful for the identification of physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins from human cDNA resources.

  4. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Armstrong, Cheryl L. H.; Campbell, Wayne W.

    2016-01-01

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER) in overweight and obese adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to one protein source and then consumed diets with different quantities of protein (4 weeks each) in a randomized crossover manner. Perceived appetite ratings (free-living and in-lab), TEF, and fasting cardio-metabolic indices were assessed at the end of each 4-week period. Protein source and quantity did not affect TEF, hunger, or desire to eat, other than a modestly higher daily composite fullness rating with 30% vs. 10% protein diet (p = 0.03). While the 20% and 30% protein diets reduced cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and APO-B vs. 10% protein (p < 0.05), protein source did not affect cardio-metabolic indices. In conclusion, diets varying in protein quantity with either beef/pork or soy/legume as the predominant source have minimal effects on appetite control, energy expenditure and cardio-metabolic risk factors during ER-induced weight loss. PMID:26821042

  5. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Armstrong, Cheryl L H; Campbell, Wayne W

    2016-02-01

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER) in overweight and obese adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to one protein source and then consumed diets with different quantities of protein (4 weeks each) in a randomized crossover manner. Perceived appetite ratings (free-living and in-lab), TEF, and fasting cardio-metabolic indices were assessed at the end of each 4-week period. Protein source and quantity did not affect TEF, hunger, or desire to eat, other than a modestly higher daily composite fullness rating with 30% vs. 10% protein diet (p = 0.03). While the 20% and 30% protein diets reduced cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and APO-B vs. 10% protein (p protein source did not affect cardio-metabolic indices. In conclusion, diets varying in protein quantity with either beef/pork or soy/legume as the predominant source have minimal effects on appetite control, energy expenditure and cardio-metabolic risk factors during ER-induced weight loss. PMID:26821042

  6. Gustatory perception and fat body energy metabolism are jointly affected by vitellogenin and juvenile hormone in honey bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Honey bees (Apis mellifera provide a system for studying social and food-related behavior. A caste of workers performs age-related tasks: young bees (nurses usually feed the brood and other adult bees inside the nest, while older bees (foragers forage outside for pollen, a protein/lipid source, or nectar, a carbohydrate source. The workers' transition from nursing to foraging and their foraging preferences correlate with differences in gustatory perception, metabolic gene expression, and endocrine physiology including the endocrine factors vitellogenin (Vg and juvenile hormone (JH. However, the understanding of connections among social behavior, energy metabolism, and endocrine factors is incomplete. We used RNA interference (RNAi to perturb the gene network of Vg and JH to learn more about these connections through effects on gustation, gene transcripts, and physiology. The RNAi perturbation was achieved by single and double knockdown of the genes ultraspiracle (usp and vg, which encode a putative JH receptor and Vg, respectively. The double knockdown enhanced gustatory perception and elevated hemolymph glucose, trehalose, and JH. We also observed transcriptional responses in insulin like peptide 1 (ilp1, the adipokinetic hormone receptor (AKHR, and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG, or "foraging gene" Amfor. Our study demonstrates that the Vg-JH regulatory module controls changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but not lipid metabolism, when worker bees shift from nursing to foraging. The module is also placed upstream of ilp1, AKHR, and PKG for the first time. As insulin, adipokinetic hormone (AKH, and PKG pathways influence metabolism and gustation in many animals, we propose that honey bees have conserved pathways in carbohydrate metabolism and conserved connections between energy metabolism and gustatory perception. Thus, perhaps the bee can make general contributions to the understanding of food-related behavior and metabolic disorders.

  7. Restitution of Energy Metabolism in Irradiated Rats Considering Curcumin Antioxidant Capacity and Metal Biotransformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary source of energy in living cells is ATP. Creatine kinase attached to the inner mitochondrial membrane (Mi-CK) is a key enzyme catalyzing the reversible phosphoryl transfer form phosphoryl creatine to ADP. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of curcumin in minimizing the radiation induced alterations in Mi-CK related to the antioxidant status of mitochondria. Curcumin was supplemented daily to rats (45 mg/kg body weight/day); by gavage, 15 days before whole body exposure to 7 Gy gamma radiation. Experimental investigation performed 1,3,10 days after irradiation reveals that curcumin treatment significantly ameliorated the decrease in the activity of Mi-Ck in brain and heart tissues of irradiated rats. Curcumin was also effective in minimizing the radiation induced increase in lipid peroxidation determined as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Significant amelioration was observed for the changes in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities. Furthermore, the data obtained showed that, the decrease of mitochondrial trace metals (Fe, Zn, Cu, Mg and Mn) was less pronounced. According to the results obtained it was concluded that curcumin maintains the integrity of mitochondrial membrane and Mi-CK activity, and plays a role in cellular energy production

  8. The role of sirtuins in cellular homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupis, Wioleta; Pałyga, Jan; Tomal, Ewa; Niewiadomska, Ewa

    2016-09-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent lysine deacylases or ADP-ribosyltransferases. These cellular enzymes are metabolic sensors sensitive to NAD(+) levels that maintain physiological homeostasis in the animal and plant cells. PMID:27154583

  9. Astroglial Contribution to Brain Energy Metabolism in Humans Revealed by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Elucidation of the Dominant Pathway for Neurotransmitter Glutamate Repletion and Measurement of Astrocytic Oxidative Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Lebon, Vincent; Petersen, Kitt F.; Cline, Gary W.; Shen, Jun; Mason, Graeme F.; Dufour, Sylvie; Behar, Kevin L.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2002-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a crucial role for glial metabolism in maintaining proper synaptic function and in the etiology of neurological disease. However, the study of glial metabolism in humans has been hampered by the lack of noninvasive methods. To specifically measure the contribution of astroglia to brain energy metabolism in humans, we used a novel noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic approach. We measured carbon 13 incorporation into brain glutamate and glutamine in...

  10. Mathematical modelling of metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gombert, Andreas Karoly; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Mathematical models of the cellular metabolism have a special interest within biotechnology. Many different kinds of commercially important products are derived from the cell factory, and metabolic engineering can be applied to improve existing production processes, as well as to make new processes...... available. Both stoichiometric and kinetic models have been used to investigate the metabolism, which has resulted in defining the optimal fermentation conditions, as well as in directing the genetic changes to be introduced in order to obtain a good producer strain or cell line. With the increasing...... availability of genomic information and powerful analytical techniques, mathematical models also serve as a tool for understanding the cellular metabolism and physiology....

  11. Mitochondrial energy metabolism changes during aging-mouse cranial nerve cells treated with various doses and forms of Fructus schizandrae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Guo; Jinhe Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During the cellular aging process, the number of mitochondria, generation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), activity of respiratory chain enzyme complex 1 and 4, and oxidation decrease. OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of aqueous and spirituous extract, as well as polysaccharides from Fructus schizandrae (Magnolia Vine) on energy metabolism and mitochondrial anti-oxidation in cranial nerve cells of a D-gal-induccd aging mouse model.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, animal study. The experiment was conducted at the Department of Biochemistry, Qiqihar Medical College between March and July 2006.MATERIALS: Fifty healthy, Kunming mice of both sexes, aged 2 3 months old and weighing 18-22 g, were used for the present study. Fructus schizandrae was purchased from the Medical College of Jiamusi University. Aqueous extracts, spirituous extracts, and polysaccharides from Fructus schizandrae were prepared. D-galactose (D-gal) is a product of the Second Reagent Factory, Shanghai City, China. Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) kit, malonaldehyde (MDA) kit, protein quantification kit, and inorganic phosphorus testing kit were purchased from Jian Cheng Bioeng. Co., China.METHODS: Fifty mice were randomly divided into five groups, with 10 mice in each group: young control, aging model, aqueous Fructus schizandrae extract, spirituous Fructus schizandrae extract, and Fructus schizandrae polysaccharides. Over a course of 30 days, mice in aging model, aqueous Fructus schizandrae extract, spirituous Fructus schizandrae extract, and Fructus schizandrae polysaccharides groups were injected subcutaneously with D-gal (100 mg/kg) into the nape of the neck daily, and administered intragastrically with an equal volume of sterile, warm water (aging model), aqueous Fructus schizandrae extract (2 g/kg), spirituous Fructus schizandrae extract (2 g/kg), or Fructus schizandrae polysaccharides (0.2 g/kg), respectively. Mice in the young control group were injected into

  12. Quantitative characterization of metabolism and metabolic shifts during growth of the new human cell line AGE1.HN using time resolved metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Jens; Schräder, Eva; Sandig, Volker; Noll, Thomas; Heinzle, Elmar

    2011-06-01

    For the improved production of vaccines and therapeutic proteins, a detailed understanding of the metabolic dynamics during batch or fed-batch production is requested. To study the new human cell line AGE1.HN, a flexible metabolic flux analysis method was developed that is considering dynamic changes in growth and metabolism during cultivation. This method comprises analysis of formation of cellular components as well as conversion of major substrates and products, spline fitting of dynamic data and flux estimation using metabolite balancing. During batch cultivation of AGE1.HN three distinct phases were observed, an initial one with consumption of pyruvate and high glycolytic activity, a second characterized by a highly efficient metabolism with very little energy spilling waste production and a third with glutamine limitation and decreasing viability. Main events triggering changes in cellular metabolism were depletion of pyruvate and glutamine. Potential targets for the improvement identified from the analysis are (i) reduction of overflow metabolism in the beginning of cultivation, e.g. accomplished by reduction of pyruvate content in the medium and (ii) prolongation of phase 2 with its highly efficient energy metabolism applying e.g. specific feeding strategies. The method presented allows fast and reliable metabolic flux analysis during the development of producer cells and production processes from microtiter plate to large scale reactors with moderate analytical and computational effort. It seems well suited to guide media optimization and genetic engineering of producing cell lines. PMID:21188421

  13. [Enhanced porcine interferon-alpha production by Pichia pastoris by methanol/sorbitol co-feeding and energy metabolism shift].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Jin, Hu; Gao, Minjie; Dai, Keke; Dong, Shijuan; Yu, Ruisong; Li, Zhen; Shi, Zhongping

    2012-02-01

    Porcine interferon-alpha (pIFN-alpha) fermentative production by recombinant Pichia pastoris was carried out in a 10-L bioreactor to study its metabolism changes and effects on fermentation under different inducing strategies, by analyzing the change patterns of the corresponding metabolism and energy regeneration. The results show that the specific activities of alcohol oxidase (AOX), formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FLD) and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) largely increased when reducing temperature from 30 degrees C to 20 degrees C under pure methanol induction, leading significant enhancements in methanol metabolism, formaldehyde dissimilatory energy metabolism and pIFN-alpha antiviral activity. The highest pIFN-alpha antiviral activity reached 1.4 x 10(6) IU/mL, which was about 10-folds of that obtained under 30 degrees C induction. Using methanol/sorbitol co-feeding strategy at 30 degrees C, the major energy metabolism energizing pIFN-alpha synthesis shifted from formaldehyde dissimilatory energy metabolism pathway to TCA cycle, formaldehyde dissimilatory pathway was weakened and accumulation of toxic intermediate metabolite-formaldehyde was relieved, and methanol flux distribution towards to pIFN-alpha synthesis was enhanced. Under this condition, the highest pIFN-alpha antiviral activity reached 1.8 x 10(7) IU/mL which was about 100-folds of that obtained under pure methanol induction at 30 degrees C. More important, enhanced pIFN-alpha production with methanol/sorbitol co-feeding strategy could be implemented under mild conditions, which greatly reduced the fermentation costs and improved the entire fermentation performance.

  14. Microbial catabolic activities are naturally selected by metabolic energy harvest rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabaleiro, Rebeca; Ofiţeru, Irina D; Lema, Juan M; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    The fundamental trade-off between yield and rate of energy harvest per unit of substrate has been largely discussed as a main characteristic for microbial established cooperation or competition. In this study, this point is addressed by developing a generalized model that simulates competition between existing and not experimentally reported microbial catabolic activities defined only based on well-known biochemical pathways. No specific microbial physiological adaptations are considered, growth yield is calculated coupled to catabolism energetics and a common maximum biomass-specific catabolism rate (expressed as electron transfer rate) is assumed for all microbial groups. Under this approach, successful microbial metabolisms are predicted in line with experimental observations under the hypothesis of maximum energy harvest rate. Two microbial ecosystems, typically found in wastewater treatment plants, are simulated, namely: (i) the anaerobic fermentation of glucose and (ii) the oxidation and reduction of nitrogen under aerobic autotrophic (nitrification) and anoxic heterotrophic and autotrophic (denitrification) conditions. The experimentally observed cross feeding in glucose fermentation, through multiple intermediate fermentation pathways, towards ultimately methane and carbon dioxide is predicted. Analogously, two-stage nitrification (by ammonium and nitrite oxidizers) is predicted as prevailing over nitrification in one stage. Conversely, denitrification is predicted in one stage (by denitrifiers) as well as anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation). The model results suggest that these observations are a direct consequence of the different energy yields per electron transferred at the different steps of the pathways. Overall, our results theoretically support the hypothesis that successful microbial catabolic activities are selected by an overall maximum energy harvest rate. PMID:26161636

  15. Combining Flux Balance and Energy Balance Analysis for Large-Scale Metabolic Network: Biochemical Circuit Theory for Analysis of Large-Scale Metabolic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Daniel A.; Liang, Shou-Dan; Qian, Hong; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Predicting behavior of large-scale biochemical metabolic networks represents one of the greatest challenges of bioinformatics and computational biology. Approaches, such as flux balance analysis (FBA), that account for the known stoichiometry of the reaction network while avoiding implementation of detailed reaction kinetics are perhaps the most promising tools for the analysis of large complex networks. As a step towards building a complete theory of biochemical circuit analysis, we introduce energy balance analysis (EBA), which compliments the FBA approach by introducing fundamental constraints based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Fluxes obtained with EBA are thermodynamically feasible and provide valuable insight into the activation and suppression of biochemical pathways.

  16. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  17. Metabolic ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Murray M; McCann, Kevin S

    2014-01-01

    Ecological theory that is grounded in metabolic currencies and constraints offers the potential to link ecological outcomes to biophysical processes across multiple scales of organization. The metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) has emphasized the potential for metabolism to serve as a unified theory of ecology, while focusing primarily on the size and temperature dependence of whole-organism metabolic rates. Generalizing metabolic ecology requires extending beyond prediction and application of standardized metabolic rates to theory focused on how energy moves through ecological systems. A bibliometric and network analysis of recent metabolic ecology literature reveals a research network characterized by major clusters focused on MTE, foraging theory, bioenergetics, trophic status, and generalized patterns and predictions. This generalized research network, which we refer to as metabolic ecology, can be considered to include the scaling, temperature and stoichiometric models forming the core of MTE, as well as bioenergetic equations, foraging theory, life-history allocation models, consumer-resource equations, food web theory and energy-based macroecology models that are frequently employed in ecological literature. We conclude with six points we believe to be important to the advancement and integration of metabolic ecology, including nomination of a second fundamental equation, complementary to the first fundamental equation offered by the MTE. PMID:24028511

  18. Common variants near MC4R in relation to body fat, body fat distribution, metabolic traits and energy expenditure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kring, Sofia Inez Iqbal; Holst, C; Toubro, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    Common variants near melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) have been related to fatness and type 2 diabetes. We examined the associations of rs17782313 and rs17700633 in relation to body fat, body fat distribution, metabolic traits, weight development and energy expenditure....

  19. VAPB/ALS8 MSP ligands regulate striated muscle energy metabolism critical for adult survival in caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Min Han

    Full Text Available Mutations in VAPB/ALS8 are associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, two motor neuron diseases that often include alterations in energy metabolism. We have shown that C. elegans and Drosophila neurons secrete a cleavage product of VAPB, the N-terminal major sperm protein domain (vMSP. Secreted vMSPs signal through Roundabout and Lar-like receptors expressed on striated muscle. The muscle signaling pathway localizes mitochondria to myofilaments, alters their fission/fusion balance, and promotes energy production. Here, we show that neuronal loss of the C. elegans VAPB homolog triggers metabolic alterations that appear to compensate for muscle mitochondrial dysfunction. When vMSP levels drop, cytoskeletal or mitochondrial abnormalities in muscle induce elevated DAF-16, the Forkhead Box O (FoxO homolog, transcription factor activity. DAF-16 promotes muscle triacylglycerol accumulation, increases ATP levels in adults, and extends lifespan, despite reduced muscle mitochondria electron transport chain activity. Finally, Vapb knock-out mice exhibit abnormal muscular triacylglycerol levels and FoxO target gene transcriptional responses to fasting and refeeding. Our data indicate that impaired vMSP signaling to striated muscle alters FoxO activity, which affects energy metabolism. Abnormalities in energy metabolism of ALS patients may thus constitute a compensatory mechanism counterbalancing skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Variation in energy expenditure among black-legged kittiwakes : Effects of activity-specific metabolic rates and activity budgets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jodice, PGR; Roby, DD; Suryan, RM; Irons, DB; Kaufman, AM; Turco, KR; Visser, GH

    2003-01-01

    We sought to determine the effect of variation in time-activity budgets (TABs) and foraging behavior on energy expenditure rates of parent black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla). We quantified TABs using direct observations of radio-tagged adults and simultaneously measured field metabolic rates