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Sample records for cells support feeder-independent

  1. Efficient reprogramming of naive-like induced pluripotent stem cells from porcine adipose-derived stem cells with a feeder-independent and serum-free system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are somatic cells reprogrammed by ectopic expression of transcription factors or small molecule treatment, which resemble embryonic stem cells (ESCs. They hold great promise for improving the generation of genetically modified large animals. However, few porcine iPSCs (piPSCs lines obtained currently can support development of cloned embryos. Here, we generated iPSCs from porcine adipose-derived stem cells (pADSCs, using drug-inducible expression of defined human factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. Reprogramming of iPSCs from pADSCs was more efficient than from fibroblasts, regardless of using feeder-independent or feeder-dependent manners. By addition of Lif-2i medium containing mouse Lif, CHIR99021 and PD0325901 (Lif-2i, naïve-like piPSCs were obtained under feeder-independent and serum-free conditions. These successfully reprogrammed piPSCs were characterized by short cell cycle intervals, alkaline phosphatase (AP staining, expression of Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, SSEA3 and SSEA4, and normal karyotypes. The resemblance of piPSCs to naïve ESCs was confirmed by their packed dome morphology, growth after single-cell dissociation, Lif-dependency, up-regulation of Stella and Eras, low expression levels of TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81 and MHC I and activation of both X chromosomes. Full reprogramming of naïve-like piPSCs was evaluated by the significant up-regulation of Lin28, Esrrb, Utf1 and Dppa5, differentiating into cell types of all three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, nuclear transfer embryos from naïve-like piPSCs could develop to blastocysts with improved quality. Thus, we provided an efficient protocol for generating naïve-like piPSCs from pADSCs in a feeder-independent and serum-free system with controlled regulation of exogenous genes, which may facilitate optimization of culture media and the production of transgenic pigs.

  2. Feeder-independent continuous culture of the PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    The PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line is a bipotent cell line, i.e., capable of forming either bile ductules or hepatocyte monolayers in vitro, that was derived from the primary culture of pig embryonic stem cells. The cell line has been strictly feeder-dependent in that cell replication morphology,...

  3. Efficient reprogramming of naïve-like induced pluripotent stem cells from porcine adipose-derived stem cells with a feeder-independent and serum-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Wei, Chao; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Xia; Liu, Tong; Pu, Yong; Li, Yunsheng; Cao, Zubing; Cao, Hongguo; Liu, Ya; Zhang, Xiaorong; Zhang, Yunhai

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are somatic cells reprogrammed by ectopic expression of transcription factors or small molecule treatment, which resemble embryonic stem cells (ESCs). They hold great promise for improving the generation of genetically modified large animals. However, few porcine iPSCs (piPSCs) lines obtained currently can support development of cloned embryos. Here, we generated iPSCs from porcine adipose-derived stem cells (pADSCs), using drug-inducible expression of defined human factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4). Reprogramming of iPSCs from pADSCs was more efficient than from fibroblasts, regardless of using feeder-independent or feeder-dependent manners. By addition of Lif-2i medium containing mouse Lif, CHIR99021 and PD0325901 (Lif-2i), naïve-like piPSCs were obtained under feeder-independent and serum-free conditions. These successfully reprogrammed piPSCs were characterized by short cell cycle intervals, alkaline phosphatase (AP) staining, expression of Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, SSEA3 and SSEA4, and normal karyotypes. The resemblance of piPSCs to naïve ESCs was confirmed by their packed dome morphology, growth after single-cell dissociation, Lif-dependency, up-regulation of Stella and Eras, low expression levels of TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81 and MHC I and activation of both X chromosomes. Full reprogramming of naïve-like piPSCs was evaluated by the significant up-regulation of Lin28, Esrrb, Utf1 and Dppa5, differentiating into cell types of all three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, nuclear transfer embryos from naïve-like piPSCs could develop to blastocysts with improved quality. Thus, we provided an efficient protocol for generating naïve-like piPSCs from pADSCs in a feeder-independent and serum-free system with controlled regulation of exogenous genes, which may facilitate optimization of culture media and the production of transgenic pigs.

  4. Derivation of human embryonic stem cells in defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Tenneille E; Levenstein, Mark E; Jones, Jeffrey M; Berggren, W Travis; Mitchen, Erika R; Frane, Jennifer L; Crandall, Leann J; Daigh, Christine A; Conard, Kevin R; Piekarczyk, Marian S; Llanas, Rachel A; Thomson, James A

    2006-02-01

    We have previously reported that high concentrations of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) support feeder-independent growth of human embryonic stem (ES) cells, but those conditions included poorly defined serum and matrix components. Here we report feeder-independent human ES cell culture that includes protein components solely derived from recombinant sources or purified from human material. We describe the derivation of two new human ES cell lines in these defined culture conditions.

  5. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  7. Functionalized Graphitic Supports for Improved Fuel Cell Catalyst Stability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) together with the University of Connecticut (UCONN) proposes to demonstrate the improved fuel cell catalyst support durability offered...

  8. Supporting Cells-a New Area in Cochlear Physiology Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Li-dong; LIU Jun; HU Yin-yan; SUN Jian-he; YANG Shi-ming

    2008-01-01

    For many years, studies about the cochlea have been mainly focused on sensory cells, i.e. the inner hair cell (IHC) and outer hair cell (OHC), and the neuron system. Supporting cells, such as Hensen's cells and Deiters' cells are less studied. Their physiological functions and other characteris-tics are not well documented. Nowadays, supporting cells are a new world attracting to scientists" inter-ests. The scope of this review is to detail the biological properties of the supporting cells, mainly Hensen's cells and Deiters' cells in the cochlea. Studies on this subject will be helpful in understanding physiology of the cochlea, and hopefully provide new approaches in treating diseases of inner ear.

  9. Strength of Anode‐Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faes, A.; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Kaiser, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Nickel oxide and yttria doped zirconia composite strength is crucial for anode‐supported solid oxide fuel cells, especially during transient operation, but also for the initial stacking process, where cell curvature after sintering can cause problems. This work first compares tensile and ball......‐on‐ring strength measurements of as‐sintered anodes support. Secondly, the strength of anode support sintered alone is compared to the strength of a co‐sintered anode support with anode and electrolyte layers. Finally, the orientation of the specimens to the bending axis of a co‐sintered half‐cell is investigated...

  10. Advanced catalyst supports for PEM fuel cell cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Lei; Shao, Yuyan; Sun, Junming; Yin, Geping; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Electrocatalyst support materials are key components for polymer exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, which play a critical role in determining electrocatalyst durability and activity, mass transfer and water management. The commonly-used supports, e.g. porous carbon black, cannot meet all the requirements under the harsh operation condition of PEM fuel cells. Great efforts have been made in the last few years in developing alternative support materials. In this paper, we selectively review recent progress on three types of important support materials: carbon, non-carbon and hybrid carbon-oxides nanocomposites. A perspective on future R&D of electrocatalyst support materials is also provided.

  11. Advances in Metal Supported Cells in the METSOFC EU Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, Brandon J.; Christiansen, Niels; Schauperl, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Employing a mechanically robust metal support as the structural element in SOFC has been the objective of various development efforts. The EU-sponsored project “METSOFC”, completed at the end of 2011, resulted in a number of advancements towards implementing this strategy. These include robust......). Further success was attained with even larger cell areas of 12 cm squares, which facilitated integration into stacks at Topsoe Fuel Cell. Development of MSC stacks showed that the MSCs could achieve similar or better performance, compared to SoA anode supported ceramic cells. The best stacked MSCs had...

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells support hepatocyte function in engineered liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yoshie; Yagi, Hiroshi; Inomata, Kenta; Matsubara, Kentaro; Hibi, Taizo; Abe, Yuta; Kitago, Minoru; Shinoda, Masahiro; Obara, Hideaki; Itano, Osamu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that organ decellularization is a promising approach to facilitate the clinical application of regenerative therapy by providing a platform for organ engineering. This unique strategy uses native matrices to act as a reservoir for the functional cells which may show therapeutic potential when implanted into the body. Appropriate cell sources for artificial livers have been debated for some time. The desired cell type in artificial livers is primary hepatocytes, but in addition, other supportive cells may facilitate this stem cell technology. In this context, the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) is an option meeting the criteria for therapeutic organ engineering. Ideally, supportive cells are required to (1) reduce the hepatic cell mass needed in an engineered liver by enhancing hepatocyte function, (2) modulate hepatic regeneration in a paracrine fashion or by direct contact, and (3) enhance the preservability of parenchymal cells during storage. Here, we describe enhanced hepatic function achieved using a strategy of sequential infusion of cells and illustrate the advantages of co-cultivating bone marrow-derived MSCs with primary hepatocytes in the engineered whole-liver scaffold. These co-recellularized liver scaffolds colonized by MSCs and hepatocytes were transplanted into live animals. After blood flow was established, we show that expression of adhesion molecules and proangiogenic factors was upregulated in the graft.

  13. Zebrafish Caudal Haematopoietic Embryonic Stromal Tissue (CHEST) Cells Support Haematopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Anja; Aggio, Julian; Campbell, Clyde; Wright, Francis; Marquez, Gabriel; Traver, David; Stachura, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Haematopoiesis is an essential process in early vertebrate development that occurs in different distinct spatial locations in the embryo that shift over time. These different sites have distinct functions: in some anatomical locations specific hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are generated de novo. In others, HSPCs expand. HSPCs differentiate and renew in other locations, ensuring homeostatic maintenance. These niches primarily control haematopoiesis through a combination of cell-to-cell signalling and cytokine secretion that elicit unique biological effects in progenitors. To understand the molecular signals generated by these niches, we report the generation of caudal hematopoietic embryonic stromal tissue (CHEST) cells from 72-hours post fertilization (hpf) caudal hematopoietic tissue (CHT), the site of embryonic HSPC expansion in fish. CHEST cells are a primary cell line with perivascular endothelial properties that expand hematopoietic cells in vitro. Morphological and transcript analysis of these cultures indicates lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid differentiation, indicating that CHEST cells are a useful tool for identifying molecular signals critical for HSPC proliferation and differentiation in the zebrafish. These findings permit comparison with other temporally and spatially distinct haematopoietic-supportive zebrafish niches, as well as with mammalian haematopoietic-supportive cells to further the understanding of the evolution of the vertebrate hematopoietic system. PMID:28300168

  14. NASA Alternative Orion Small Cell Battery Design Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Chuck

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Orion Crew Module Reference Design was produced to address large scale thermal runaway (TR) hazard with specific safety controls for the Orion Spacecraft. The design presented provides the description of a full scale battery design reference for implementation as a drop in replacement to meet all spacecraft energy requirements with compatible 120 Vdc electrical and mechanical interface using small cell technology (18650) packaging. The 32V SuperBrick incorporates unique support features and an electrical bus bar arrangement that allows cells negative can insertion into heat sink that is compressively coupled to the battery enclosure to promote good thermal management. The housing design also provides an internal flame suppression "filter tray" and positive venting path internal to the enclosure to allow hot effluent ejecta to escape in the event of single cell TR. Virtual cells (14P Banks) that are supported to provide cell spacing with interstitial materials to prevent side can failures that can produce cell to cell TR propagation. These features were successfully test in four separate TR run with the full scale DTA1 test article in February 2016. Successfully Completed Test Objectives - Four separate TR test runs with Full-Scale DTA1 housing with Two SuperBricks, Two SuperBrick Emulators All Tests resulted in "clean" gas with less than 6 C rise at Battery vent All Tests resulted in less than 2 C temperature rise on cold-plate outlet All Tests resulted in less than 6 psi pressure rise in the battery housing Test Run 1 -One neighbor cell TR, highest remaining neighbor 139 C. Ejecta shorted to bus caused prolonged additional heating, One shorted cell did experience TR after 12 minutes, remaining cells had adequate thermal margin Test Run 2 - No cell to cell propagation, highest neighbor cell 112 C; Test Run 3 - No cell to cell propagation, highest neighbor cell 96 C; Test Run 4 - No cell to cell propagation, highest neighbor cell 101 C; Primary TR testing

  15. A comparative study of protocols for mouse embryonic stem cell culturing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffer Tamm

    Full Text Available Most stem cell laboratories still rely on old culture methods to support the expansion and maintenance of mouse embryonic stem (ES cells. These involve growing cells on mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cells or on gelatin in media supplemented with fetal bovine serum and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF. However, these techniques have several drawbacks including the need for feeder-cells and/or use of undefined media containing animal derived components. Culture of stem cells under undefined conditions can induce spontaneous differentiation and reduce reproducibility of experiments. In recent years several new ES cell culture protocols, using more well-defined conditions, have been published and we have compared the standard culture protocols with two of the newly described ones: 1 growing cells in semi-adherence in a medium containing two small molecule inhibitors (CHIR99021, PD0325901 and; 2 growing cells in a spheroid suspension culture in a defined medium containing LIF and bFGF. Two feeder-dependent mouse ES (mES cell lines and two cell lines adapted to feeder-independent growth were used in the study. The overall aim has not only been to compare self-renewal and differentiation capacity, but also ease-of-use and cost efficiency. We show that mES cells when grown adherently proliferate much faster than when grown in suspension as free-floating spheres, independent of media used. Although all the tested culture protocols could maintain sustained pluripotency after prolonged culturing, our data confirm previous reports showing that the media containing two chemical inhibitors generate more pure stem cell cultures with negligible signs of spontaneous differentiation as compared to standard mES media. Furthermore, we show that this medium effectively rescues and cleans up cultures that have started to deteriorate, as well as allow for effective adaption of feeder-dependent mES cell lines to be maintained in feeder-free conditions.

  16. Symmetrical, bi-electrode supported solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Thomas L. (Inventor); Sofie, Stephen W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is a symmetrical bi-electrode supported solid oxide fuel cell comprising a sintered monolithic framework having graded pore electrode scaffolds that, upon treatment with metal solutions and heat subsequent to sintering, acquire respective anodic and cathodic catalytic activity. The invention is also a method for making such a solid oxide fuel cell. The graded pore structure of the graded pore electrode scaffolds in achieved by a novel freeze casting for YSZ tape.

  17. Pharmacologically active microcarriers for endothelial progenitor cell support and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilli, Claudia; Karam, Jean-Pierre; Paccosi, Sara; Muscari, Claudio; Mugelli, Alessandro; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Parenti, Astrid

    2012-08-01

    The regenerative potential of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-based therapies is limited due to poor cell viability and minimal retention following application. Neovascularization can be improved by means of scaffolds supporting EPCs. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether human early EPCs (eEPCs) could be efficiently cultured on pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs), made with poly(d,l-lactic-coglycolic acid) and coated with adhesion/extracellular matrix molecules. They may serve as a support for stem cells and may be used as cell carriers providing a controlled delivery of active protein such as the angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). eEPC adhesion to fibronectin-coated PAMs (FN-PAMs) was assessed by means of microscopic evaluation and by means of Alamar blue assay. Phospho ERK(1/2) and PARP-1 expression was measured by means of Western blot to assess the survival effects of FN-PAMs releasing VEGF-A (FN-VEGF-PAMs). The Alamar blue assay or a modified Boyden chamber assay was employed to assess proliferative or migratory capacity, respectively. Our data indicate that eEPCs were able to adhere to empty FN-PAMs within a few hours. FN-VEGF-PAMs increased the ability of eEPCs to adhere to them and strongly supported endothelial-like phenotype and cell survival. Moreover, the release of VEGF-A by FN-PAMs stimulated in vitro HUVEC migration and proliferation. These data strongly support the use of PAMs for supporting eEPC growth and survival and for stimulating resident mature human endothelial cells.

  18. Mammalin cochlear supporting cells transdifferentiation into outer hair cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the recovery of the outer hair cells in the bat cochlea after gentamicin exposure. Methods Bats were injected with a daily dose of gentamicin for 15 consecutive days and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was given from day 16 to day 40 of this recovery phase. Hearing was assessed by overt acoustic behavior and auditory brainstem responses analysis, which was performed one day prior to the first injection and a day after the last injection (day 16). On day 40 animals were sacrificed for detection o...

  19. Spray deposition of Nafion membranes: Electrode-supported fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Thomas; Pham, Hung Cuong; Sasaki, Kazunari; Lyth, Stephen Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Fuel cells are a key technology for the successful transition towards a hydrogen society. In order to accelerate fuel cell commercialization, improvements in performance are required. Generally, polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEFCs) are membrane-supported; the electrocatalyst layer is sprayed onto both sides of the membrane, and sandwiched between carbon-based gas diffusion layers (GDLs). In this work we redesign the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and fabricate an electrode-supported PEFC. First the electrocatalyst layer is sprayed onto the GDL, and then Nafion dispersion is sprayed over the top of this to form a thin membrane. This method has the advantage of simplifying the fabrication process, allowing the fabrication of extremely thin electrolyte layers (down to ∼10 μm in this case), and reducing the amount of ionomer required in the cell. Electrode-supported PEFCs operate at significantly increased power density compared to conventional membrane-supported PEFCs, with a maximum of 581 mW/cm2 at 80 °C (atmospheric pressure, air at the cathode). Impedance spectroscopy confirmed that the origin of the improved performance was an 80% reduction in the membrane resistance due the thinner Nafion layer. This novel fabrication method is a step towards cheaper, thinner, fully printable PEFCs with high power density and efficiency.

  20. Advances in Metal Supported Cells in the METSOFC EU Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, B. J.; Christiansen, N.; Schauperl, R.;

    2013-01-01

    ). Further success was attained with even larger cell areas of 12 × 12 cm2 squares, which facilitated integration into small stacks at Topsoe Fuel Cell having powers approaching 1/2 kW. Development of MSC stacks showed that the MSCs could achieve similar or better performance, compared to most standard...... industrial anode supported ceramic cells. The best stacked MSCs had power densities approaching 275 mW cm–2 (at 680 °C and 0.8 V). Furthermore, extended testing at AVL determined extra stack performance and reliability characteristics, including behavior toward sulfur and simulated diesel reformate......, and tolerance to thermal cycles and load cycles. These and other key outcomes of the METSOFC consortium are covered, along with associated work supported by the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation....

  1. Advances in Ceramic Supports for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oran Lori

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Durability of catalyst supports is a technical barrier for both stationary and transportation applications of polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells. New classes of non-carbon-based materials were developed in order to overcome the current limitations of the state-of-the-art carbon supports. Some of these materials are designed and tested to exceed the US DOE lifetime goals of 5000 or 40,000 hrs for transportation and stationary applications, respectively. In addition to their increased durability, the interactions between some new support materials and metal catalysts such as Pt result in increased catalyst activity. In this review, we will cover the latest studies conducted with ceramic supports based on carbides, oxides, nitrides, borides, and some composite materials.

  2. Fetal liver hepatic progenitors are supportive stromal cells for hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-04-27

    Previously we showed that the ~2% of fetal liver cells reactive with an anti-CD3epsilon monoclonal antibody support ex vivo expansion of both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs); these cells express two proteins important for HSC ex vivo expansion, IGF2, and angiopoietin-like 3. Here we show that these cells do not express any CD3 protein and are not T cells; rather, we purified these HSC-supportive stromal cells based on the surface phenotype of SCF(+)DLK(+). Competitive repopulating experiments show that SCF(+)DLK(+) cells support the maintenance of HSCs in ex vivo culture. These are the principal fetal liver cells that express not only angiopoietin-like 3 and IGF2, but also SCF and thrombopoietin, two other growth factors important for HSC expansion. They are also the principal fetal liver cells that express CXCL12, a factor required for HSC homing, and also alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), indicating that they are fetal hepatic stem or progenitor cells. Immunocytochemistry shows that >93% of the SCF(+) cells express DLK and Angptl3, and a portion of SCF(+) cells also expresses CXCL12. Thus SCF(+)DLK(+) cells are a highly homogenous population that express a complete set of factors for HSC expansion and are likely the primary stromal cells that support HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  3. Hyaluronan scaffold supports osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow concentrate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, C; Desando, G; Ferrari, A; Zini, N; Mariani, E; Grigolo, B

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions are considered a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Currently, the treatments available are often unsatisfactory and unable to stimulate tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering offers a new therapeutic strategy, taking into account the role exerted by cells, biomaterial and growth factors in restoring tissue damage. In this light, Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) have been indicated as a fascinating tool for regenerative medicine thanks to their ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage and adipose tissue. However, in vitro-cultivation of MSCs could be associated with some risks such as de-differentiation/reprogramming, infection and contaminations of the cells. To overcome these shortcomings, a new approach is represented by the use of Bone Marrow Concentrate (BMC), that could allow the delivery of cells surrounded by their microenvironment in injured tissue. For this purpose, cells require a tridimensional scaffold that can support their adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. This study is focused on the potentiality of BMC seeded onto a hyaluronan-based scaffold (Hyaff-11) to differentiate into osteogenic lineage. This process depends on the specific interaction between cells derived from bone marrow (surrounded by their niche) and scaffold, that create an environment able to support the regeneration of damaged tissue. The data obtained from the present study demonstrate that BMC grown onto Hyaff-11 are able to differentiate toward osteogenic sense, producing specific osteogenic genes and matrix proteins.

  4. Transplanting Retinal Cells using Bucky Paper for Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, David J.; Cinke, Martin; Meyyappan, Meyya; Fishman, Harvey; Leng, Ted; Huie, Philip; Bilbao, Kalayaan

    2004-01-01

    A novel treatment for retinal degenerative disorders involving transplantation of cells into the eye is currently under development at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University School of Medicine. The technique uses bucky paper as a support material for retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells, and/or stem cells. This technology is envisioned as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of blindness in persons over age 65 in Western nations. Additionally, patients with other retinal degenerative disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa, may be treated by this strategy. Bucky paper is a mesh of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), as shown in Figure 1, that can be made from any of the commercial sources of CNTs. Bucky paper is biocompatible and capable of supporting the growth of biological cells. Because bucky paper is highly porous, nutrients, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and waste can readily diffuse through it. The thickness, density, and porosity of bucky paper can be tailored in manufacturing. For transplantation of cells into the retina, bucky paper serves simultaneously as a substrate for cell growth and as a barrier for new blood vessel formation, which can be a problem in the exudative type of macular degeneration. Bucky paper is easily handled during surgical implantation into the eye. Through appropriate choice of manufacturing processes, bucky paper can be made relatively rigid yet able to conform to the retina when the bucky paper is implanted. Bucky paper offers a distinct advantage over other materials that have been investigated for retinal cell transplantation - lens capsule and Descemet's membrane - which are difficult to handle during surgery because they are flimsy and do not stay flat.

  5. Hepatic Stellate Cells Support Hematopoiesis and are Liver-Resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Kordes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hematopoiesis can occur in the liver, when the bone marrow fails to provide an adequate environment for hematopoietic stem cells. Hepatic stellate cells possess characteristics of stem/progenitor cells, but their contribution to hematopoiesis is not known thus far. Methods: Isolated hepatic stellate cells from rats were characterized with respect to molecular markers of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and treated with adipocyte or osteocyte differentiation media. Stellate cells of rats were further co-cultured with murine stem cell antigen-1+ hematopoietic stem cells selected by magnetic cell sorting. The expression of murine hematopoietic stem cell markers was analyzed by mouse specific quantitative PCR during co-culture. Hepatic stellate cells from eGFP+ rats were transplanted into lethally irradiated wild type rats. Results: Desmin-expressing stellate cells were associated with hematopoietic sites in the fetal rat liver. Hepatic stellate cells expressed MSC markers and were able to differentiate into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro. Stellate cells supported hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells during co-culture similar to bone marrow MSC, but failed to differentiate into blood cell lineages after transplantation. Conclusion: Hepatic stellate cells are liver-resident MSC and can fulfill typical functions of bone marrow MSC such as the differentiation into adipocytes or osteocytes and support of hematopoiesis.

  6. Recombinant human albumin supports single cell cloning of CHO cells in chemically defined media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Wooh, Jong Wei; Hou, Jeff Jia Cheng; Hughes, Benjamin S; Gray, Peter P; Munro, Trent P

    2012-01-01

    Biologic drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies, are commonly made using mammalian cells in culture. The cell lines used for manufacturing should ideally be clonal, meaning derived from a single cell, which represents a technically challenging process. Fetal bovine serum is often used to support low cell density cultures, however, from a regulatory perspective, it is preferable to avoid animal-derived components to increase process consistency and reduce the risk of contamination from adventitious agents. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most widely used cell line in industry and a large number of serum-free, protein-free, and fully chemically defined growth media are commercially available, although these media alone do not readily support efficient single cell cloning. In this work, we have developed a simple, fully defined, single-cell cloning media, specifically for CHO cells, using commercially available reagents. Our results show that a 1:1 mixture of CD-CHO™ and DMEM/F12 supplemented with 1.5 g/L of recombinant albumin (Albucult®) supports single cell cloning. This formulation can support recovery of single cells in 43% of cultures compared to 62% in the presence of serum.

  7. Proteoglycans support proper granule formation in pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroso, Miguel; Agricola, Brigitte; Hacker, Christian; Schrader, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Zymogen granules (ZG) are specialized organelles in the exocrine pancreas which allow digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion. The molecular mechanisms of their biogenesis and the sorting of zymogens are still incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of proteoglycans in granule formation and secretion of zymogens in pancreatic AR42J cells, an acinar model system. Cupromeronic Blue cytochemistry and biochemical studies revealed an association of proteoglycans primarily with the granule membrane. Removal of proteoglycans by carbonate treatment led to a loss of membrane curvature indicating a supportive role in the maintenance of membrane shape and stability. Chemical inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis impaired the formation of normal electron-dense granules in AR42J cells and resulted in the formation of unusually small granule structures. These structures still contained the zymogen carboxypeptidase, a cargo molecule of secretory granules, but migrated to lighter fractions after density gradient centrifugation. Furthermore, the basal secretion of amylase was increased in AR42J cells after inhibitor treatment. In addition, irregular-shaped granules appeared in pancreatic lobules. We conclude that the assembly of a proteoglycan scaffold at the ZG membrane is supporting efficient packaging of zymogens and the proper formation of stimulus-competent storage granules in acinar cells of the pancreas.

  8. Standard guide for hot cell specialized support equipment and tools

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 Intent: 1.1.1 This guide presents practices and guidelines for the design and implementation of equipment and tools to assist assembly, disassembly, alignment, fastening, maintenance, or general handling of equipment in a hot cell. Operating in a remote hot cell environment significantly increases the difficulty and time required to perform a task compared to completing a similar task directly by hand. Successful specialized support equipment and tools minimize the required effort, reduce risks, and increase operating efficiencies. 1.2 Applicability: 1.2.1 This guide may apply to the design of specialized support equipment and tools anywhere it is remotely operated, maintained, and viewed through shielding windows or by other remote viewing systems. 1.2.2 Consideration should be given to the need for specialized support equipment and tools early in the design process. 1.2.3 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conv...

  9. Fabrication of anode supported PEN for solid oxide fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢淑红; 崔崑; 夏风; 肖建中

    2004-01-01

    Fabrication process for anode supported planar PEN of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) was introduced, in which tape casting and screen printing methods were used. Gd2O3 doped CeO2(GDC) powders were prepared by solid reaction method. Anode tape was produced by tape casting. Electrolyte and cathode were produced by screen printing. The GDC powder's component, thermal expand coefficient, the porosity, density and microstructure of anode and electrolyte were investigated . It was shown that an bi-layer with dense thin electrolyte film and porous anode support and with good coherency of the electrolyte film to the anode could be realized after co-sintering the green tape at 1 350℃ by optimizing the power characteristics of the starting materials in the slurry.

  10. Prediction of cell penetrating peptides by support vector machines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S Sanders

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs are those peptides that can transverse cell membranes to enter cells. Once inside the cell, different CPPs can localize to different cellular components and perform different roles. Some generate pore-forming complexes resulting in the destruction of cells while others localize to various organelles. Use of machine learning methods to predict potential new CPPs will enable more rapid screening for applications such as drug delivery. We have investigated the influence of the composition of training datasets on the ability to classify peptides as cell penetrating using support vector machines (SVMs. We identified 111 known CPPs and 34 known non-penetrating peptides from the literature and commercial vendors and used several approaches to build training data sets for the classifiers. Features were calculated from the datasets using a set of basic biochemical properties combined with features from the literature determined to be relevant in the prediction of CPPs. Our results using different training datasets confirm the importance of a balanced training set with approximately equal number of positive and negative examples. The SVM based classifiers have greater classification accuracy than previously reported methods for the prediction of CPPs, and because they use primary biochemical properties of the peptides as features, these classifiers provide insight into the properties needed for cell-penetration. To confirm our SVM classifications, a subset of peptides classified as either penetrating or non-penetrating was selected for synthesis and experimental validation. Of the synthesized peptides predicted to be CPPs, 100% of these peptides were shown to be penetrating.

  11. Th17 effector cells support B cell responses outside of germinal centres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agapitos Patakas

    Full Text Available Th17 cells are pro-inflammatory CD4⁺T cells, which are important in immune responses against fungal pathogens and extracellular bacteria and have also been implicated in various autoimmune syndromes. However, their role in supporting B cell responses in these scenarios remains unclear, representing a significant lapse in our understanding of the role Th17 play in vaccine responses and the regulation of autoimmunity. We employed T cell and B cell receptor transgenic mice specific for model antigens, and adoptive transfer approaches that allowed the tracking of cognate B and T cells in situ and ex vivo using immunological methods. We have found that T cells activated under Th17 polarising conditions have a greater capacity to provide cognate B cell help compared with Th1 polarised populations, supporting higher expansion of antigen specific B cells and enhanced antibody titres. This advantage is associated with the increased persistence of Th17 polarised cells in areas of the lymph nodes where they can provide help (i.e. the B cell follicles. Also the Th17 cells are characterised by their higher expression of ICOS, a costimulatory molecule important for B cell help. Surprisingly, contrary to published reports, Th17 cells were not detected inside germinal centres, although they were found in close proximity to cognate B cells in the follicle early in the genesis of the humoral immune response. These data indicate that, Th17 cells have a more significant role earlier in the initiation/development of the germinal centre response and/or germinal centre-independent events, consistent with their early effector status.

  12. Restrictions in cell cycle progression of adult vestibular supporting cells in response to ectopic cyclin D1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Loponen

    Full Text Available Sensory hair cells and supporting cells of the mammalian inner ear are quiescent cells, which do not regenerate. In contrast, non-mammalian supporting cells have the ability to re-enter the cell cycle and produce replacement hair cells. Earlier studies have demonstrated cyclin D1 expression in the developing mouse supporting cells and its downregulation along maturation. In explant cultures of the mouse utricle, we have here focused on the cell cycle control mechanisms and proliferative potential of adult supporting cells. These cells were forced into the cell cycle through adenoviral-mediated cyclin D1 overexpression. Ectopic cyclin D1 triggered robust cell cycle re-entry of supporting cells, accompanied by changes in p27(Kip1 and p21(Cip1 expressions. Main part of cell cycle reactivated supporting cells were DNA damaged and arrested at the G2/M boundary. Only small numbers of mitotic supporting cells and rare cells with signs of two successive replications were found. Ectopic cyclin D1-triggered cell cycle reactivation did not lead to hyperplasia of the sensory epithelium. In addition, a part of ectopic cyclin D1 was sequestered in the cytoplasm, reflecting its ineffective nuclear import. Combined, our data reveal intrinsic barriers that limit proliferative capacity of utricular supporting cells.

  13. Autologous bone marrow Th cells can support multiple myeloma cell proliferation in vitro and in xenografted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Fløisand, Y; Myklebust, C V; Bürgler, S; Parente-Ribes, A; Hofgaard, P O; Bogen, B; Tasken, K; Tjønnfjord, G E; Schjesvold, F; Dalgaard, J; Tveita, A; Munthe, L A

    2017-02-24

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy where MM cell growth is supported by the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment with poorly defined cellular and molecular mechanisms. MM cells express CD40, a receptor known to activate autocrine secretion of cytokines and elicit proliferation. Activated T helper (Th) cells express CD40 ligand (CD40L) and BM Th cells are significantly increased in MM patients. We hypothesized that activated BM Th cells could support MM cell growth. We here found that activated autologous BM Th cells supported MM cell growth in a contact- and CD40L-dependent manner in vitro. MM cells had retained the ability to activate Th cells that reciprocated and stimulated MM cell proliferation. Autologous BM Th cells supported MM cell growth in xenografted mice and were found in close contact with MM cells. MM cells secreted chemokines that attracted Th cells, secretion was augmented by CD40-stimulation. Within 14 days of culture of whole bone marrow aspirates in autologous serum, MM cells and Th cells mutually stimulated each other, and MM cells required Th cells for further expansion in vitro and in mice. The results suggest that Th cells may support the expansion of MM cells in patients.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 24 February 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.69.

  14. Microbial Fuel Cell Transformation of Recalcitrant Organic Compounds in Support of Biosensor Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Microbial Fuel Cell Transformation of Recalcitrant Organic Compounds in Support of Biosensor ...in the United States. AFIT-ENV-14-M-62 Microbial Fuel Cell Transformation of Recalcitrant Organic Compounds in Support of Biosensor Research...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENV-14-M-62 Microbial Fuel Cell Transformation of Recalcitrant Organic Compounds in Support of Biosensor Research Marc

  15. Generation of functional thymic epithelium from human embryonic stem cells that supports host T cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Audrey V; Russ, Holger A; Khan, Imran S; LaFlam, Taylor N; Metzger, Todd C; Anderson, Mark S; Hebrok, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    Inducing immune tolerance to prevent rejection is a key step toward successful engraftment of stem-cell-derived tissue in a clinical setting. Using human pluripotent stem cells to generate thymic epithelial cells (TECs) capable of supportingcell development represents a promising approach to reach this goal; however, progress toward generating functional TECs has been limited. Here, we describe a robust in vitro method to direct differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into thymic epithelial progenitors (TEPs) by precise regulation of TGFβ, BMP4, RA, Wnt, Shh, and FGF signaling. The hESC-derived TEPs further mature into functional TECs that supportcell development upon transplantation into thymus-deficient mice. Importantly, the engrafted TEPs produce T cells capable of in vitro proliferation as well as in vivo immune responses. Thus, hESC-derived TEP grafts may have broad applications for enhancing engraftment in cell-based therapies as well as restoring age- and stress-related thymic decline.

  16. Insect cell transformation vectors that support high level expression and promoter assessment in insect cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    A somatic transformation vector, pDP9, was constructed that provides a simplified means of producing permanently transformed cultured insect cells that support high levels of protein expression of foreign genes. The pDP9 plasmid vector incorporates DNA sequences from the Junonia coenia densovirus th...

  17. Numerical evaluation of micro-structural parameters of porous supports in metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Brandstätter, Wilhelm;

    2014-01-01

    -ray tomography and micro-structural modelling is presented in this work. The simulation technique comprises a novel treatment of the boundary conditions, which leads to more accurate effective transport parameters compared to those, which can be achieved with the conventional homogenisation procedures......Metallic supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are considered as a durable and cost effective alternative to the state-of-the-art ceramic supported cell designs. In order to understand the mass and charge transport in the metal-support of this new type of cell a novel technique involving X...... of the evaluation show three significant findings. Firstly, that the effective transport parameters are up to a factor of 20 lower compared to other SOFC anodes. Secondly, that the microstructure can have regions, which are much denser, especially the first 100 mm of the interface between gas-channel and support-structure...

  18. Optimization of Ferritic Steel Porous Supports for Protonic Fuel Cells Working at 600°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Sebastian; Chen, Ming; Bonanos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Porous alloys are used as supporting structures in high temperature fuel cells. A novel concept is to fabricate metal supported protonic conducting fuel cells working at 600°C. This fuel cell type offers several advantages for using porous alloy substrate in comparison to an oxygen conducting solid...

  19. Numerical evaluation of micro-structural parameters of porous supports in metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Brandstätter, Wilhelm; Weber, André

    2015-01-01

    Metallic supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are considered as a durable and cost effective alternative to the state-of-the-art ceramic supported cell designs. In order to understand the mass and charge transport in the metal-support of this new type of cell a novel technique involving X-ray tomography and micro-structural modelling is presented in this work. The simulation technique comprises a novel treatment of the boundary conditions, which leads to more accurate effective transport parameters compared to those, which can be achieved with the conventional homogenisation procedures. Furthermore, the porosity distribution in the metal-support was determined, which provided information about the inhomogeneous nature of the material. In addition to that, transport parameters for two identified, different dense layers of the metal-support are evaluated separately. The results of the evaluation show three significant findings. Firstly, that the effective transport parameters are up to a factor of 20 lower compared to other SOFC anodes. Secondly, that the micro-structure can have regions, which are much denser, especially the first 100 μm of the interface between gas-channel and support-structure. Thirdly, that the calculation of the transport parameters depends on the correct application of boundary conditions.

  20. Bucky Paper as a Support Membrane in Retinal Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, David J. (Inventor); Leng, Theodore (Inventor); Huie, Philip (Inventor); Fishman, Harvey (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for repairing a retinal system of an eye, using bucky paper on which a plurality of retina pigment epithelial cells and/or iris pigment epithelial cells and/or stem cells is deposited, either randomly or in a selected cell pattern. The cell-covered bucky paper is positioned in a sub-retinal space to transfer cells to this space and thereby restore the retina to its normal functioning, where retinal damage or degeneration, such as macular degeneration, has occurred.

  1. Natural Killer Cell Differentiation From Hematopoietic Stem Cells: A Comparative Analysis of Heparin and Stromal Cell Supported Methods

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells differentiated from hematopietic stem cells (HSCs)may have significant clinical benefits over those from adult donors, including the ability to choose allo-reactive donors and potentially more robust in vivo expansion. Stromal-based methods have been used to study NK differentiation from HSCs. Stroma and cytokines support NK differentiation, but may have considerable regulatory hurdles. Recently, a clinical grade heparin-based method has been reported and could serve...

  2. Cathode-supported hybrid direct carbon fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Gurauskis, Jonas; Deleebeeck, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The direct conversion of coal to heat and electricity by a hybrid direct carbon fuel cell (HDCFC) is a highly efficient and cleaner technology than the conventional combustion power plants. HDCFC is defined as a combination of solid oxide fuel cell and molten carbonate fuel cell. This work...

  3. Production of a half cell with a LSM/CGO support for electrochemical flue gas purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kjeld Bøhm; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2013-01-01

    Described herein is the production of a half cell with a strontium-substituted lanthanum manganite/cerium gadolinium oxide support and dense cerium gadolinium oxide electrolyte for electrochemical flue gas purification. The half cells were constructed through tape casting a strontium......-substituted lanthanum manganite/cerium gadolinium oxide support and cerium gadolinium oxide electrolyte. The half cells were produced by laminating the support and electrolyte layers followed by sintering. Perfectly flat half cells were constructed with a porous strontium-substituted lanthanum manganite....../cerium gadolinium oxide support layer and dense cerium gadolinium oxide electrolyte by adjusting sintering shrinkage at the electrolyte layer and altering the sintering aid....

  4. The ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 improves recovery of human embryonic stem cells after fluorescence-activated cell sorting with multiple cell surface markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nil Emre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to the inherent sensitivity of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs to manipulations, the recovery and survival of hESCs after fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS can be low. Additionally, a well characterized and robust methodology for performing FACS on hESCs using multiple-cell surface markers has not been described. The p160-Rho-associated coiled kinase (ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632, previously has been identified as enhancing survival of hESCs upon single-cell dissociation, as well as enhancing recovery from cryopreservation. Here we examined the application of Y-27632 to hESCs after FACS to improve survival in both feeder-dependent and feeder-independent growth conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HESCs were sorted using markers for SSEA-3, TRA-1-81, and SSEA-1. Cells were plated after sorting for 24 hours in either the presence or the absence of Y-27632. In both feeder-dependent and feeder-independent conditions, cell survival was greater when Y-27632 was applied to the hESCs after sort. Specifically, treatment of cells with Y-27632 improved post-sort recovery up to four fold. To determine the long-term effects of sorting with and without the application of Y-27632, hESCs were further analyzed. Specifically, hESCs sorted with and without the addition of Y-27632 retained normal morphology, expressed hESC-specific markers as measured by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, and maintained a stable karyotype. In addition, the hESCs could differentiate into three germ layers in vitro and in vivo in both feeder-dependent and feeder-independent growth conditions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The application of Y-27632 to hESCs after cell sorting improves cell recovery with no observed effect on pluripotency, and enables the consistent recovery of hESCs by FACS using multiple surface markers. This improved methodology for cell sorting of hESCs will aid many applications such as removal of hESCs from secondary cell types

  5. Understanding the Hough transform: Hough cell support and its utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus; Andersen, Jens Damgaard

    1997-01-01

    of images. If accumulator array peaks are used to find lines then peripherally located lines are missed. Uniform feature detection probability in all parts of the image requires normalisation of the accumulator array by the support. The paper describes some further applications of the concept of support...

  6. Fetal hepatic progenitors support long-term expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Flygare, Johan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a coculture system that establishes DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors as the authentic supportive cells for expansion of hematopoietic stem (HSCs) and progenitor cells. In 1-week cultures supplemented with serum and supportive cytokines, both cocultured DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors and their conditioned medium supported rapid expansion of hematopoietic progenitors and a small increase in HSC numbers. In 2- and 3-week cultures DLK(+) cells, but not their conditioned medium, continuously and significantly (>20-fold) expanded both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Physical contact between HSCs and DLK(+) cells was crucial to maintaining this long-term expansion. Similar HSC expansion (approximately sevenfold) was achieved in cocultures using a serum-free, low cytokine- containing medium. In contrast, DLK(-) cells are incapable of expanding hematopoietic cells, demonstrating that hepatic progenitors are the principle supportive cells for HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  7. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-08-01

    This report identifies the commercial and near-commercial (emerging) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  8. Conditioned medium from activated spleen cells supports the survival of rat retinal cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sholl-Franco

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are a heterogeneous group of molecules that have been associated with several functions in the nervous system, such as survival and differentiation of neuronal and glial cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that conditioned medium from spleen cells activated with concanavalin A increased neuritogenesis and survival of retinal cells, as measured by biochemical and morphological criteria. Our data showed that conditioned medium induced a five-fold increase in the amount of protein after 120 h in vitro. This effect was not inhibited by the blockade of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels with 5.0 µM nifedipine. However, the use of an intracellular calcium chelator (15.0 µM BAPTA-AM inhibited this effect. Our results support the idea that factors secreted by activated lymphocytes, such as cytokines, can modulate the maintenance and the differentiation of rat retinal cells in vitro, indicating a possible role of these molecules in the development of retinal cells, as well as in its protection against pathological conditions

  9. Graphene-supported platinum catalysts for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seselj, Nedjeljko; Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing concerns with non-renewable energy sources drive research and development of sustainable energy technology. Fuel cells have become a central part in solving challenges associated with energy conversion. This review summarizes recent development of catalysts used for fuel cells over the...

  10. Natural Killer Cell Differentiation From Hematopoietic Stem Cells: A Comparative Analysis of Heparin and Stromal Cell Supported Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezell, Steven A.; Ahn, Yong-Oon; Spanholtz, Jan; Wang, Hongbo; Weeres, Matthew; Jackson, Scott; Cooley, Sarah; Dolstra, Harry; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Verneris, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells differentiated from hematopietic stem cells (HSCs)may have significant clinical benefits over those from adult donors, including the ability to choose allo-reactive donors and potentially more robust in vivo expansion. Stromal-based methods have been used to study NK differentiation from HSCs. Stroma and cytokines support NK differentiation, but may have considerable regulatory hurdles. Recently, a clinical grade heparin-based method has been reported and could serve as an alternative. How these two compare in NK generating efficiency or functionis unknown. We show that compared to heparin-based cultures, stromasignificantly increases the yield of HSC-derived NK cells by differentiating less committed progenitors into the NK lineage. NK cells generated by both approaches were similar for most NK activating or inhibitor receptors. While both approaches resulted in a phenotype consistent with CD56brightstage IV NK cells, heparin-based cultures favored the development of CD56+CD16+ cells, while stromaproducedmore KIR-expressing NK cells, both markers of terminal maturation. At day 21, stromal-based cultures showed significantly more IL-22 production and both methods yielded similar amounts of IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity (day 35). Thus, heparin-based cultures are an effective replacement for stroma and may facilitate clinical trials testing HSC-derived NK cells. PMID:22155502

  11. SiC nanocrystals as Pt catalyst supports for fuel cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhiman, Rajnish; Morgen, Per; Skou, E.M.

    2013-01-01

    A robust catalyst support is pivotal to Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) to overcome challenges such as catalyst support corrosion, low catalyst utilization and overall capital cost. SiC is a promising candidate material which could be applied as a catalyst support in PEMFCs. Si...... based catalysts (BASF & HISPEC). These promising results signal a new era of SiC based catalysts for fuel cell applications. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013....

  12. Application of multiple graphene layers as catalyst support material in fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Saner, Burcu; YÜRÜM, YUDA; Yurum, Yuda

    2010-01-01

    The fuel cell electrode layer is a significant part of a fuel cell. The electrode layer is composed of the catalyst and porous electrode or gas diffusion layer. Catalyst has critical importance due to the influence on the cost and durability of fuel cells. The production of novel catalyst support materials could open up new ways in order to ensure the catalytic activity by lowering the amount of catalyst loaded [1]. At this point, utilization of multiple graphene layers as catalyst support...

  13. SNL fibroblast feeder layers support derivation and maintenance of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chuanying; Hicks, Amy; Guan, Xuan; Chen, Hong; Bishop, Colin E

    2010-04-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be derived from human somatic cells by cellular reprogramming. This technology provides a potential source of non-controversial therapeutic cells for tissue repair, drug discovery, and opportunities for studying the molecular basis of human disease. Normally, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are used as feeder layers in the initial derivation of iPS lines. The purpose of this study was to determine whether SNL fibroblasts can be used to support the growth of human iPS cells reprogrammed from somatic cells using lentiviral expressed reprogramming factors. In our study, iPS cells expressed common pluripotency markers, displayed human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) morphology and unmethylated promoters of NANOG and OCT4. These data demonstrate that SNL feeder cells can support the derivation and maintenance of human iPS cells.

  14. Impacts of the IBM Cell Processor to Support Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shujia; Duffy, Daniel; Clune, Tom; Suarez, Max; Williams, Samuel; Halem, Milt

    2008-01-01

    NASA is interested in the performance and cost benefits for adapting its applications to the IBM Cell processor. However, its 256KB local memory per SPE and the new communication mechanism, make it very challenging to port an application. We selected the solar radiation component of the NASA GEOS-5 climate model, which: (1) is representative of column physics (approximately 50% computational time), (2) has a high computational load relative to transferring data from and to main memory, (3) performs independent calculations across multiple columns. We converted the baseline code (single-precision, Fortran) to C and ported it with manually SIMDizing 4 independent columns and found that a Cell with 8 SPEs can process 2274 columns per second. Compared with the baseline results, the Cell is approximately 5.2X, approximately 8.2X, approximately 15.1X faster than a core on Intel Woodcrest, Dempsey, and Itanium2, respectively. We believe this dramatic performance improvement makes a hybrid cluster with Cell and traditional nodes competitive.

  15. Odor supported place cell model and goal navigation in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulvicius, Tomas; Tamosiunaite, Minija; Ainge, James;

    2008-01-01

    Experiments with rodents demonstrate that visual cues play an important role in the control of hippocampal place cells and spatial navigation. Nevertheless, rats may also rely on auditory, olfactory and somatosensory stimuli for orientation. It is also known that rats can track odors or self...

  16. Reproducible establishment of hemopoietic supportive stromal cell lines from murine bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K.; Tezuka, H.; Sakoda, H.; Konno, M.; Nagata, K.; Uchiyama, T.; Uchino, H.; Mori, K.J.

    1989-02-01

    Stromal cell lines, designated MS-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, and -7 were established by irradiating the adherent cells in long-term bone marrow cultures with 900-rad x-rays. Two of the cell lines, MS-1 and MS-5, have the capacity to support the growth of hemopoietic stem cells (spleen colony-forming cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells) for greater than 2 months in vitro. These two cell lines were alkaline phosphatase-, peroxidase-, and factor VIII-negative and positive for periodic acid-Schiff and nonspecific esterase. Extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, laminin, and collagen type I were produced by these two cell lines. Neither MS-1 cell- nor MS-5 cell-conditioned medium supported the growth of hemopoietic stem cells, and hemopoietic stem cells were found preferentially to be under and on MS-1 and MS-5 layers rather than in suspension. Close contact with the MS-1 cell layer or the MS-5 cell layer appears to be essential in maintaining hemopoiesis in vitro. Conditioned media from MS-1 cells and MS-5 cells stimulated granulocyte colony formation from murine bone marrow cells in semisolid culture.

  17. Ovine carotid artery-derived cells as an optimized supportive cell layer in 2-D capillary network assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Weinandy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial cell co-culture assays are differentiation assays which simulate the formation of capillary-like tubules with the aid of a supportive cell layer. Different cell types have been employed as a supportive cell layer, including human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs and human mammary fibroblasts. However, these sources of human tissue-derived cells are limited, and more readily accessible human or animal tissue-derived cell sources would simplify the endothelial cell co-culture assay. In the present study, we investigated the potential use of alternative, accessible supportive cells for endothelial cell co-culture assay, including human umbilical cord and ovine carotid artery. METHODS AND RESULTS: Human umbilical artery SMCs (HUASMCs and ovine carotid artery-derived cells were seeded into 96-well plates, followed by addition of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Nine days after co-culture, cells were fixed, immunostained and analysed using an in vitro angiogenesis quantification tool. Capillary-like structures were detected on ovine carotid artery-derived supportive cell layers. The initial cell number, as well as pro- and anti-angiogenic factors (VEGF, PDGF-BB and Bevacizumab, had a positive or negative influence on the number of capillary-like structures. Furthermore, HUVECs from different donors showed distinct levels of VEGF receptor-2, which correlated with the amount of capillary-like structures. In the case of HUASMC supportive cell layers, HUVECs detached almost completely from the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Cells of different origin have a varying applicability regarding the endothelial cell co-culture assay: under the conditions described here, ovine carotid artery-derived cells seem to be more suitable than HUASMCs for an endothelial co-culture assay. Furthermore, the ovine carotid artery-derived cells are easier to obtain and are in more abundant supply than the currently used dermal or breast

  18. Macrophages: supportive cells for tissue repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2014-03-01

    Macrophages, and more broadly inflammation, have been considered for a long time as bad markers of tissue homeostasis. However, if it is indisputable that macrophages are associated with many diseases in a deleterious way, new roles have emerged, showing beneficial properties of macrophages during tissue repair and regeneration. This discrepancy is likely due to the high plasticity of macrophages, which may exhibit a wide range of phenotypes and functions depending on their environment. Therefore, regardless of their role in immunity, macrophages play a myriad of roles in the maintenance and recovery of tissue homeostasis. They take a major part in the resolution of inflammation. They also exert various effects of parenchymal cells, including stem and progenitor cell, of which they regulate the fate. In the present review, few examples from various tissues are presented to illustrate that, beyond their specific properties in a given tissue, common features have been described that sustain a role of macrophages in the recovery and maintenance of tissue homeostasis.

  19. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha Krömmelbein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production.

  20. DNA methylation supports intrinsic epigenetic memory in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the role of DNA methylation in the initiation and maintenance of silenced chromatin in somatic mammalian cells. We found that a mutated transgene, in which all the CpG dinucleotides have been eliminated, underwent transcriptional silencing to the same extent as the unmodified transgene. These observations demonstrate that DNA methylation is not required for silencing. The silenced CpG-free transgene exhibited all the features of heterochromatin, including silencing of transcriptional activity, delayed DNA replication, lack of histone H3 and H4 acetylation, lack of H3-K4 methylation, and enrichment in tri-methyl-H3-K9. In contrast, when we tested for transgene reactivation using a Cre recombinase-mediated inversion assay, we observed a marked difference between a CpG-free and an unmodified transgene: the CpG-free transgene resumed transcription and did not exhibit markers of heterochromatin whereas the unmodified transgene remained silenced. These data indicate that methylation of CpG residues conferred epigenetic memory in this system. These results also suggest that replication delay, lack of histone H3 and H4 acetylation, H3-K4 methylation, and enrichment in tri-methyl-H3-K9 are not sufficient to confer epigenetic memory. We propose that DNA methylation within transgenes serves as an intrinsic epigenetic memory to permanently silence transgenes and prevent their reactivation.

  1. Electronic Safety Resource Tools -- Supporting Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barilo, Nick F.

    2014-09-29

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrogen Safety Program conducted a planning session in Los Angeles, CA on April 1, 2014 to consider what electronic safety tools would benefit the next phase of hydrogen and fuel cell commercialization. A diverse, 20-person team led by an experienced facilitator considered the question as it applied to the eight most relevant user groups. The results and subsequent evaluation activities revealed several possible resource tools that could greatly benefit users. The tool identified as having the greatest potential for impact is a hydrogen safety portal, which can be the central location for integrating and disseminating safety information (including most of the tools identified in this report). Such a tool can provide credible and reliable information from a trustworthy source. Other impactful tools identified include a codes and standards wizard to guide users through a series of questions relating to application and specific features of the requirements; a scenario-based virtual reality training for first responders; peer networking tools to bring users from focused groups together to discuss and collaborate on hydrogen safety issues; and a focused tool for training inspectors. Table ES.1 provides results of the planning session, including proposed new tools and changes to existing tools.

  2. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 expression by a distinct population of mouse vestibular supporting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo eRusso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The function of the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD is to convert glutamate in -aminobutyric acid (GABA.GAD exists as two major isoforms, termed GAD65 and GAD67,.that are usually expressed in GABA-containing neurons in the central nervous system. GAD65 has been proposed to be associated with GABA exocytosis whereas GAD67 with GABA metabolism. In the present immunofluorescence study, we have investigated the presence of the two GAD isoforms in the semicircular canal cristae of wild type and GAD67-GFP knock-in mice. While no evidence for GAD65 expression was found, GAD67 was detected in a distinct population of peripherally-located supporting cells, but not in hair cells or in centrally-located supporting cells. GABA, on the other hand, was found in all supporting cells. The present result indicate that only a discrete population of supporting cells use GAD67 to synthesize GABA. This is the first report of a marker that allows to distinguish two populations of supporting cells in the vestibular epithelium. On the other hand, the lack of GABA and GAD enzymes in hair cells excludes its involvement in afferent transmission.

  3. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-01-08

    This FY 2015 report updates the results of an effort to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 to 5 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  4. Anode Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells - Deconvolution of Degradation into Cathode and Anode Contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke; Liu, Yi-Lin; Barfod, Rasmus;

    2007-01-01

    The degradation of anode supported cells was studied over 1500 h as function of cell polarization either in air or oxygen on the cathode. Based on impedance analysis, contributions of anode and cathode to the increase of total resistance were assigned. Accordingly, the degradation rates of the ca...

  5. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Nagai, Mami [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Roeder, Robert G. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Asano, Shigetaka [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Ito, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: itomi@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Department of Family and Community Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Support Survival and Proliferation of Primary Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells through Heterogeneous Molecular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Annette K.; Nepstad, Ina; Bruserud, Øystein

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a bone marrow malignancy, and various bone marrow stromal cells seem to support leukemogenesis, including osteoblasts and endothelial cells. We have investigated how normal bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) support the in vitro proliferation of primary human AML cells. Both MSCs and primary AML cells show constitutive release of several soluble mediators, and the mediator repertoires of the two cell types are partly overlapping. The two cell populations were cocultured on transwell plates, and MSC effects on AML cells mediated through the local cytokine/soluble mediator network could thus be evaluated. The presence of normal MSCs had an antiapoptotic and growth-enhancing effect on primary human AML cells when investigating a group of 51 unselected AML patients; this was associated with increased phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream targets, and the effect was independent of cytogenetic or molecular-genetic abnormalities. The MSCs also supported the long-term proliferation of the AML cells. A subset of the patients also showed an altered cytokine network with supra-additive levels for several cytokines. The presence of cytokine-neutralizing antibodies or receptor inhibitors demonstrated that AML cells derived from different patients were heterogeneous with regard to effects of various cytokines on AML cell proliferation or regulation of apoptosis. We conclude that even though the effects of single cytokines derived from bone marrow MSCs on human AML cells differ among patients, the final cytokine-mediated effects of the MSCs during coculture is growth enhancement and inhibition of apoptosis.

  7. Novel Metal Oxide Support with Water Activation Ability for Use in Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingjing; WEI Ang; ZHAO Xiaohui; ZHANG Shuyong

    2009-01-01

    A new principle for designing catalyst supports with water activation ability was proposed.According to this principle,stabilized nickel(+3)oxides with different dopants were tested as possible support and promoter for Pt catalyst in direct methanol fuel cells.It was found that the chemical and electrochemical stabilities of these novel supports in acidic solution were sufficient.The support doped with Ai(+3)has catalytic activity towards methanol electrooxidation while that doped with Co(+3)can improve both activity and poisoning tolerance of the Pt catalyst.

  8. Biofunctionalization of conductive hydrogel coatings to support olfactory ensheathing cells at implantable electrode interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassarati, Rachelle T; Marcal, Helder; John, L; Foster, R; Green, Rylie A

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical discrepancies between conventional platinum (Pt) electrodes and neural tissue often result in scar tissue encapsulation of implanted neural recording and stimulating devices. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a supportive glial cell in the olfactory nervous system which can transition through glial scar tissue while supporting the outgrowth of neural processes. It has been proposed that this function can be used to reconnect implanted electrodes with the target neural pathways. Conductive hydrogel (CH) electrode coatings have been proposed as a substrate for supporting OEC survival and proliferation at the device interface. To determine an ideal CH to support OECs, this study explored eight CH variants, with differing biochemical composition, in comparison to a conventional Pt electrodes. All CH variants were based on a biosynthetic hydrogel, consisting of poly(vinyl alcohol) and heparin, through which the conductive polymer (CP) poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) was electropolymerized. The biochemical composition was varied through incorporation of gelatin and sericin, which were expected to provide cell adherence functionality, supporting attachment, and cell spreading. Combinations of these biomolecules varied from 1 to 3 wt %. The physical, electrical, and biological impact of these molecules on electrode performance was assessed. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy demonstrated that the addition of these biological molecules had little significant effect on the coating's ability to safely transfer charge. Cell attachment studies, however, determined that the incorporation of 1 wt % gelatin in the hydrogel was sufficient to significantly increase the attachment of OECs compared to the nonfunctionalized CH.

  9. The aged lymphoid tissue environment fails to support naïve T cell homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becklund, Bryan R; Purton, Jared F; Ramsey, Chris; Favre, Stéphanie; Vogt, Tobias K; Martin, Christopher E; Spasova, Darina S; Sarkisyan, Gor; LeRoy, Eric; Tan, Joyce T; Wahlus, Heidi; Bondi-Boyd, Brea; Luther, Sanjiv A; Surh, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of naïve T cells and a reciprocal increase in the proportion of memory T cells. While reduced thymic output is important, age-dependent changes in factors supporting naïve T cells homeostasis may also be involved. Indeed, we noted a dramatic decrease in the ability of aged mice to support survival and homeostatic proliferation of naïve T cells. The defect was not due to a reduction in IL-7 expression, but from a combination of changes in the secondary lymphoid environment that impaired naïve T cell entry and access to key survival factors. We observed an age-related shift in the expression of homing chemokines and structural deterioration of the stromal network in T cell zones. Treatment with IL-7/mAb complexes can restore naïve T cell homeostatic proliferation in aged mice. Our data suggests that homeostatic mechanisms that support the naïve T cell pool deteriorate with age.

  10. MYC gene delivery to adult mouse utricles stimulates proliferation of postmitotic supporting cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C Burns

    Full Text Available The inner ears of adult humans and other mammals possess a limited capacity for regenerating sensory hair cells, which can lead to permanent auditory and vestibular deficits. During development and regeneration, undifferentiated supporting cells within inner ear sensory epithelia can self-renew and give rise to new hair cells; however, these otic progenitors become depleted postnatally. Therefore, reprogramming differentiated supporting cells into otic progenitors is a potential strategy for restoring regenerative potential to the ear. Transient expression of the induced pluripotency transcription factors, Oct3/4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc reprograms fibroblasts into neural progenitors under neural-promoting culture conditions, so as a first step, we explored whether ectopic expression of these factors can reverse supporting cell quiescence in whole organ cultures of adult mouse utricles. Co-infection of utricles with adenoviral vectors separately encoding Oct3/4, Klf4, Sox2, and the degradation-resistant T58A mutant of c-Myc (c-MycT58A triggered significant levels of supporting cell S-phase entry as assessed by continuous BrdU labeling. Of the four factors, c-MycT58A alone was both necessary and sufficient for the proliferative response. The number of BrdU-labeled cells plateaued between 5-7 days after infection, and then decreased ~60% by 3 weeks, as many cycling cells appeared to enter apoptosis. Switching to differentiation-promoting culture medium at 5 days after ectopic expression of c-MycT58A temporarily attenuated the loss of BrdU-labeled cells and accompanied a very modest but significant expansion of the sensory epithelium. A small number of the proliferating cells in these cultures labeled for the hair cell marker, myosin VIIA, suggesting they had begun differentiating towards a hair cell fate. The results indicate that ectopic expression of c-MycT58A in combination with methods for promoting cell survival and differentiation may restore

  11. Embryonic Stem Cell Culture Conditions Support Distinct States Associated with Different Developmental Stages and Potency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin Gonzalez, Javier; Morgani, Sophie M; Bone, Robert A;

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are cell lines derived from the mammalian pre-implantation embryo. Here we assess the impact of derivation and culture conditions on both functional potency and ESC transcriptional identity. Individual ESCs cultured in either two small-molecule inhibitors (2i....... Conversely, the transcriptome of serum-cultured ESCs correlated with later stages of development (E4.5), at which point embryonic cells are more restricted in their developmental potential. Thus, ESC culture systems are not equivalent, but support cell types that resemble distinct developmental stages. Cells......) or with knockout serum replacement (KOSR), but not serum, can generate high-level chimeras regardless of how these cells were derived. ESCs cultured in these conditions showed a transcriptional correlation with early pre-implantation embryos (E1.5-E3.5) and contributed to development from the 2-cell stage...

  12. γδ T Cells Support Pancreatic Oncogenesis by Restraining αβ T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Donnele; Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Seifert, Lena; Akkad, Neha; Mohan, Navyatha; Werba, Gregor; Barilla, Rocky; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu Raj Kumar; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel; Narayanan, Rajkishen; Jang, Jung-Eun; Newman, Elliot; Pillarisetty, Venu Gopal; Dustin, Michael Loran; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2016-09-08

    Inflammation is paramount in pancreatic oncogenesis. We identified a uniquely activated γδT cell population, which constituted ∼40% of tumor-infiltrating T cells in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Recruitment and activation of γδT cells was contingent on diverse chemokine signals. Deletion, depletion, or blockade of γδT cell recruitment was protective against PDA and resulted in increased infiltration, activation, and Th1 polarization of αβT cells. Although αβT cells were dispensable to outcome in PDA, they became indispensable mediators of tumor protection upon γδT cell ablation. PDA-infiltrating γδT cells expressed high levels of exhaustion ligands and thereby negated adaptive anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of PD-L1 in γδT cells enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltration and immunogenicity and induced tumor protection suggesting that γδT cells are critical sources of immune-suppressive checkpoint ligands in PDA. We describe γδT cells as central regulators of effector T cell activation in cancer via novel cross-talk.

  13. Aquaporin-4 in Astroglial Cells in the CNS and Supporting Cells of Sensory Organs—A Comparative Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Gleiser

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The main water channel of the brain, aquaporin-4 (AQP4, is one of the classical water-specific aquaporins. It is expressed in many epithelial tissues in the basolateral membrane domain. It is present in the membranes of supporting cells in most sensory organs in a specifically adapted pattern: in the supporting cells of the olfactory mucosa, AQP4 occurs along the basolateral aspects, in mammalian retinal Müller cells it is highly polarized. In the cochlear epithelium of the inner ear, it is expressed basolaterally in some cells but strictly basally in others. Within the central nervous system, aquaporin-4 (AQP4 is expressed by cells of the astroglial family, more specifically, by astrocytes and ependymal cells. In the mammalian brain, AQP4 is located in high density in the membranes of astrocytic endfeet facing the pial surface and surrounding blood vessels. At these locations, AQP4 plays a role in the maintenance of ionic homeostasis and volume regulation. This highly polarized expression has not been observed in the brain of fish where astroglial cells have long processes and occur mostly as radial glial cells. In the brain of the zebrafish, AQP4 immunoreactivity is found along the radial extent of astroglial cells. This suggests that the polarized expression of AQP4 was not present at all stages of evolution. Thus, a polarized expression of AQP4 as part of a control mechanism for a stable ionic environment and water balanced occurred at several locations in supporting and glial cells during evolution. This initially basolateral membrane localization of AQP4 is shifted to highly polarized expression in astrocytic endfeet in the mammalian brain and serves as a part of the neurovascular unit to efficiently maintain homeostasis.

  14. Aquaporin-4 in Astroglial Cells in the CNS and Supporting Cells of Sensory Organs-A Comparative Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiser, Corinna; Wagner, Andreas; Fallier-Becker, Petra; Wolburg, Hartwig; Hirt, Bernhard; Mack, Andreas F

    2016-08-26

    The main water channel of the brain, aquaporin-4 (AQP4), is one of the classical water-specific aquaporins. It is expressed in many epithelial tissues in the basolateral membrane domain. It is present in the membranes of supporting cells in most sensory organs in a specifically adapted pattern: in the supporting cells of the olfactory mucosa, AQP4 occurs along the basolateral aspects, in mammalian retinal Müller cells it is highly polarized. In the cochlear epithelium of the inner ear, it is expressed basolaterally in some cells but strictly basally in others. Within the central nervous system, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is expressed by cells of the astroglial family, more specifically, by astrocytes and ependymal cells. In the mammalian brain, AQP4 is located in high density in the membranes of astrocytic endfeet facing the pial surface and surrounding blood vessels. At these locations, AQP4 plays a role in the maintenance of ionic homeostasis and volume regulation. This highly polarized expression has not been observed in the brain of fish where astroglial cells have long processes and occur mostly as radial glial cells. In the brain of the zebrafish, AQP4 immunoreactivity is found along the radial extent of astroglial cells. This suggests that the polarized expression of AQP4 was not present at all stages of evolution. Thus, a polarized expression of AQP4 as part of a control mechanism for a stable ionic environment and water balanced occurred at several locations in supporting and glial cells during evolution. This initially basolateral membrane localization of AQP4 is shifted to highly polarized expression in astrocytic endfeet in the mammalian brain and serves as a part of the neurovascular unit to efficiently maintain homeostasis.

  15. The diabetes medication Canagliflozin reduces cancer cell proliferation by inhibiting mitochondrial complex-I supported respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda A. Villani

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: These data indicate that like the biguanide metformin, Canagliflozin not only lowers blood glucose but also inhibits complex-I supported respiration and cellular proliferation in prostate and lung cancer cells. These observations support the initiation of studies evaluating the clinical efficacy of Canagliflozin on limiting tumorigenesis in pre-clinical animal models as well epidemiological studies on cancer incidence relative to other glucose lowering therapies in clinical populations.

  16. Performance Assessment of Single Electrode-Supported Solid Oxide Cells Operating in the Steam Electrolysis Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X. Zhang; J. E. O' Brien; R. C. O' Brien; N. Petigny

    2011-11-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of electrode-supported solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Results presented in this paper were obtained from single cells, with an active area of 16 cm{sup 2} per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes ({approx}10 {mu}m thick), nickel-YSZ steam/hydrogen electrodes ({approx}1400 {mu}m thick), and modified LSM or LSCF air-side electrodes ({approx}90 {mu}m thick). The purpose of the present study is to document and compare the performance and degradation rates of these cells in the fuel cell mode and in the electrolysis mode under various operating conditions. Initial performance was documented through a series of voltage-current (VI) sweeps and AC impedance spectroscopy measurements. Degradation was determined through long-term testing, first in the fuel cell mode, then in the electrolysis mode. Results generally indicate accelerated degradation rates in the electrolysis mode compared to the fuel cell mode, possibly due to electrode delamination. The paper also includes details of an improved single-cell test apparatus developed specifically for these experiments.

  17. Effect of Different Support Morphologies and Pt Particle Sizes in Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sevjidsuren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a low temperature fuel cell is strongly correlated with parameters like the platinum particle size, platinum dispersion on the carbon support, and electronic and protonic conductivity in the catalyst layer as well as its porosity. These parameters can be controlled by a rational choice of the appropriate catalyst synthesis and carbon support. Only recently, particular attention has been given to the support morphology, as it plays an important role for the formation of the electrode structure. Due to their significantly different structure, mesoporous carbon microbeads (MCMBs and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were used as supports and compared. Pt nanoparticles were decorated on these supports using the polyol method. Their size was varied by different heating times during the synthesis, and XRD, TEM, SEM, CV, and single cell tests used in their detailed characterization. A membrane-electrode assembly prepared with the MCMB did not show any activity in the fuel cell test, although the catalyst's electrochemical activity was almost similar to the MWCNT. This is assumed to be due to the very dense electrode structure formed by this support material, which does not allow for sufficient mass transport.

  18. Smooth-muscle-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells support and augment cord-like structures in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Elaine; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Zha, Yuanting; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-06-01

    Engineering vascularized tissue is crucial for its successful implantation, survival, and integration with the host tissue. Vascular smooth muscle cells (v-SMCs) provide physical support to the vasculature and aid in maintaining endothelial viability. In this study, we show an efficient derivation of v-SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and demonstrate their functionality and ability to support the vasculature in vitro. Human ESCs were differentiated in monolayers and supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Human ESC-derived smooth-muscle-like cells (SMLCs) were found to highly express specific smooth muscle cell (SMC) markers--including alpha-smooth muscle actin, calponin, SM22, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain--to produce and secrete fibronectin and collagen, and to contract in response to carbachol. In vitro tubulogenesis assays revealed that these hESC-derived SMLCs interacted with human endothelial progenitor cell (EPCs) to form longer and thicker cord-like structures in vitro. We have demonstrated a simple protocol for the efficient derivation of highly purified SMLCs from hESCs. These in vitro functional SMLCs interacted with EPCs to support and augment capillary-like structures (CLSs), demonstrating the potential of hESCs as a cell source for therapeutic vascular tissue engineering.

  19. Limbal melanocytes support limbal epithelial stem cells in 2D and 3D microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziasko, Marc A; Tuft, Stephen J; Daniels, Julie T

    2015-09-01

    Human limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) are essential for the maintenance of the corneal epithelium of the ocular surface. LESCs are located within limbal crypts between the palisades of Vogt in the limbus; the interface between the peripheral cornea and conjunctiva. The limbal crypts have been proposed as a LESC niche owing to their support of epithelial cells, which can form holoclone colonies in vitro. Closely associated with the limbal crypts is a concentrated population of melanocytes. The anatomical location and close proximity to putative LESC suggests that melanocytes might play a role in maintenance of these stem cells in the niche. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of human limbal melanocytes (hLM) to support the expansion of human limbal epithelial cells (LECs) in vitro as an indicator of functional cell-cell interaction. After observing that hLM co-localize with clusters of compact epithelial cells in the native limbal crypts, hLM were isolated from crypt-rich cadaveric limbal biopsies and used as feeders for the culture of LECs. Interestingly, LECs grown on mitotically active hLM were able to generate large epithelial colonies that contained small and compact cells with morphological stem cell characteristics. Immunocytochemistry revealed that LECs expanded on hLM were positive for the expression of the putative stem cell markers CK15, Bmi-1 and p63α and negative for the marker of terminal cell differentiation CK3. LECs and hLM were finally co-cultured on RAFT (real architecture for 3D tissue) collagen tissue equivalents. In 3D co-cultures, hLM promoted multi-layering of the epithelial sheet in which basal cells were maintained in an undifferentiated state. Taken together, these observations suggest melanocytes could play an important role in the maintenance of LESCs in the native human limbal stem cell niche.

  20. Comparison of bacterial cells and amine-functionalized abiotic surfaces as support for Pd nanoparticle synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Corte, Simon; Bechstein, Stefanie; Lokanathan, Arcot R.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing demand for catalytic Pd nanoparticles has motivated the search for sustainable production methods. An innovative approach uses bacterial cells as support material for synthesizing Pd nanoparticles by reduction of Pd(II) with e.g. hydrogen or formate. Nevertheless, drawbacks...... nanoparticles, and that abiotic surfaces could support the Pd particle synthesis as efficiently as bacteria. In this study, we explore the possibility of replacing bacteria with amine-functionalized materials, and we compare different functionalization strategies. Pd nanoparticles formed on the support...... of microbially supported Pd catalysts are the low catalytic activity compared to conventional Pd nanocatalysts and the possible poisoning of the catalyst surface by sulfur originating from bacterial proteins. A recent study showed that amine groups were a key component in surface-supported synthesis of Pd...

  1. Influence of carbon nanofiber properties as electrocatalyst support on the electrochemical performance for PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, D.; Suelves, I.; Moliner, R.; Lazaro, M.J. [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Energy and Environment, C/Miguel Luesma Castan 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Calderon, J.C.; Gonzalez-Exposito, J.A.; Pastor, E. [Universidad de La Laguna, Dpto de Quimica-Fisica, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Martinez-Huerta, M.V. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    Novel carbonaceous supports for electrocatalysts are being investigated to improve the performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Within several supports, carbon nanofibers blend two properties that rarely coexist in a material: a high mesoporosity and a high electrical conductivity, due to their particular structure. Carbon nanofibers have been obtained by catalytic decomposition of methane, optimizing growth conditions to obtain carbon supports with different properties. Subsequently, the surface chemistry has been modified by an oxidation treatment, in order to create oxygen surface groups of different nature that have been observed to be necessary to obtain a higher performance of the electrocatalyst. Platinum has then been supported on the as-prepared carbon nanofibers by different deposition methods and the obtained catalysts have been studied by different electrochemical techniques. The influence of carbon nanofibers properties and functionalization on the electrochemical behavior of the electrocatalysts has been studied and discussed, obtaining higher performances than commercial electrocatalysts with the highest electrical conductive carbon nanofibers as support. (author)

  2. Performance of Electrolyte Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with STN Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune; Reddy Sudireddy, Bhaskar; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley

    2013-01-01

    In order to replace the state of the art Ni-cermet as SOFC anode, electrolyte supported cells comprising CGO/Ni infiltrated Nbdoped SrTiO3 anodes, and LSM/YSZ cathodes have been developed and tested as single 5 x 5 cm2 cells. The initial performance reached 0.4 W/cm2 at 850 C. Further tests under...

  3. Identification of molecules derived from human fibroblast feeder cells that support the proliferation of human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anisimov, Sergey V.; Christophersen, Nicolaj S.; Correia, Ana S.

    2011-01-01

    the proliferation and pluripotency of these cells. Importantly, feeder cells generally lose their capacity to support human embryonic stem cell proliferation in vitro following long-term culture. In this study, we performed large-scale gene expression profiles of human foreskin fibroblasts during early......, intermediate and late passages using a custom DNA microarray platform (NeuroStem 2.0 Chip). The microarray data was validated using RT-PCR and virtual SAGE analysis. Our comparative gene expression study identified a limited number of molecular targets potentially involved in the ability of human neonatal...

  4. Highly durable anode supported solid oxide fuel cell with an infiltrated cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Alfred Junio; Hjalmarsson, Per; Søgaard, Martin; Hjelm, Johan; Bonanos, Nikolaos

    2012-10-01

    An anode supported solid oxide fuel cell with an La0.6Sr0.4Co1.05O3-δ (LSC) infiltrated-Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) cathode that shows a stable performance has been developed. The cathode was prepared by screen printing a porous CGO backbone on top of a laminated and co-fired anode supported half cell, consisting of a Ni-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode support, a Ni-scandia-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (ScYSZ) anode, a ScYSZ electrolyte, and a CGO barrier layer. LSC was introduced into the CGO backbone by multiple infiltrations of an aqueous nitrate solution followed by firing. The cell was tested at 700 °C under a current density of 0.5 A cm-2 for 1500 h using air as oxidant and humidified hydrogen as fuel. The electrochemical performance of the cell was analyzed by impedance spectroscopy and current-voltage relationships. No measurable degradation in the cell voltage or increase in the resistance from the recorded impedance was observed during long term testing. The power density reached 0.79 W cm-2 at a cell voltage of 0.6 V at 750 °C. Post test analysis of the LSC infiltrated-CGO cathode by scanning electron microscopy revealed no significant micro-structural difference to that of a nominally identical untested counterpart.

  5. Performance of Single Electrode-Supported Cells Operating in the Electrolysis Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; G. K. Housley; D. G. Milobar

    2009-11-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of electrode-supported solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. Results presented in this paper were obtained from single cells, with an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes (~10 µm thick), nickel-YSZ steam/hydrogen electrodes (~1400 µm thick), and manganite (LSM) air-side electrodes. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 – 0.6), gas flow rates, and current densities (0 to 0.6 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. On a molar basis, the steam consumption rate is equal to the hydrogen production rate. Cell performance was evaluated by performing DC potential sweeps at 800, 850, and 900°C. The voltage-current characteristics are presented, along with values of area-specific resistance as a function of current density. Long-term cell performance is also assessed to evaluate cell degradation. Details of the custom single-cell test apparatus developed for these experiments are also presented.

  6. Oral keratinocytes support non-replicative infection and transfer of harbored HIV-1 to permissive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacaman Rodrigo A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral keratinocytes on the mucosal surface are frequently exposed to HIV-1 through contact with infected sexual partners or nursing mothers. To determine the plausibility that oral keratinocytes are primary targets of HIV-1, we tested the hypothesis that HIV-1 infects oral keratinocytes in a restricted manner. Results To study the fate of HIV-1, immortalized oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT-2; TERT-2 cells were characterized for the fate of HIV-specific RNA and DNA. At 6 h post inoculation with X4 or R5-tropic HIV-1, HIV-1gag RNA was detected maximally within TERT-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase activity in TERT-2 cells was confirmed by VSV-G-mediated infection with HIV-NL4-3Δenv-EGFP. AZT inhibited EGFP expression in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that viral replication can be supported if receptors are bypassed. Within 3 h post inoculation, integrated HIV-1 DNA was detected in TERT-2 cell nuclei and persisted after subculture. Multiply spliced and unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs were not detectable up to 72 h post inoculation, suggesting that HIV replication may abort and that infection is non-productive. Within 48 h post inoculation, however, virus harbored by CD4 negative TERT-2 cells trans infected co-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or MOLT4 cells (CD4+ CCR5+ by direct cell-to-cell transfer or by releasing low levels of infectious virions. Primary tonsil epithelial cells also trans infected HIV-1 to permissive cells in a donor-specific manner. Conclusion Oral keratinocytes appear, therefore, to support stable non-replicative integration, while harboring and transmitting infectious X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 to permissive cells for up to 48 h.

  7. The influence of social support on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation survival: a systematic review of literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Beattie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hematopoietic Stem cell Transplantation (HSCT can negatively impact the psychosocial well-being of the patient. Social support is a complex term that has been variably used to encompass perceived and objective support, including caregiver presence. Social support has been associated with superior psychosocial outcomes; however the influence of social support on HSCT survival remains unclear. We sought to summarize the literature on the influence of social support on HSCT survival. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, COCHRANE, CINAHL, AND PSYCINFO WERE SEARCHED USING THE FOLLOWING SEARCH CATEGORIES/CONCEPTS: 1 HSCT, 2 Social support, 3 Caregiver, 4 Survival, and 5 Treatment outcomes. RESULTS: We identified 6 relevant studies: 4 publications, 1 dissertation, and 1 abstract. Three studies were retrospective and 3, prospective. Sample size ranged between 92-272 with a mean/median patient age between 30-55 yrs. The duration of follow-up ranged between 13.3-48 months. Social support was measured inconsistently: 2 by retrospective investigator assessment, 2 as patients' perceived support, 1 as caregiver presence, and 1 included caregiver presence and retrospective investigator assessment. The 4 published studies and 1 abstract demonstrate an association between better social support and survival. However, the unpublished dissertation, with the largest sample size found no association. CONCLUSIONS: There is a paucity of evidence examining social support with HSCT survival. Available studies are older, with the most recent publication in 2005. A heterogeneous group of HSCT patients were studied with variable follow-up times. Further, covariates were variably considered in HSCT survival analyses and we suggest that there may be publication bias, given the negative unpublished study with the largest sample size. Prospective studies using validated scales are necessary to better assess the influence of social support on HSCT mortality. Given the potential

  8. Zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, survival, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Clyde; Su, Tammy; Lau, Ryan P; Shah, Arpit; Laurie, Payton C; Avalos, Brenda; Aggio, Julian; Harris, Elena; Traver, David; Stachura, David L

    2015-12-01

    Forward genetic screens in zebrafish have been used to identify genes essential for the generation of primitive blood and the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but have not elucidated the genes essential for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation and differentiation because of the lack of methodologies to functionally assess these processes. We previously described techniques used to test the developmental potential of HSPCs by culturing them on zebrafish kidney stromal (ZKS) cells, derived from the main site of hematopoiesis in the adult teleost. Here we describe an additional primary stromal cell line we refer to as zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells, derived from tissue surrounding the embryonic dorsal aorta, the site of HSC emergence in developing fish. ZEST cells encouraged HSPC differentiation toward the myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid pathways when assessed by morphologic and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses. Additionally, ZEST cells significantly expanded the number of cultured HSPCs in vitro, indicating that these stromal cells are supportive of both HSPC proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Examination of ZEST cells indicates that they express numerous cytokines and Notch ligands and possess endothelial characteristics. Further characterization of ZEST cells should prove to be invaluable in understanding the complex signaling cascades instigated by the embryonic hematopoietic niche required to expand and differentiate HSPCs. Elucidating these processes and identifying possibilities for the modulation of these molecular pathways should allow the in vitro expansion of HSPCs for a multitude of therapeutic uses.

  9. T Regulatory Cells Support Plasma Cell Populations in the Bone Marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielle Glatman Zaretsky

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-lived plasma cells (PCs in the bone marrow (BM are a critical source of antibodies after infection or vaccination, but questions remain about the factors that control PCs. We found that systemic infection alters the BM, greatly reducing PCs and regulatory T (Treg cells, a population that contributes to immune privilege in the BM. The use of intravital imaging revealed that BM Treg cells display a distinct behavior characterized by sustained co-localization with PCs and CD11c-YFP+ cells. Gene expression profiling indicated that BM Treg cells express high levels of Treg effector molecules, and CTLA-4 deletion in these cells resulted in elevated PCs. Furthermore, preservation of Treg cells during systemic infection prevents PC loss, while Treg cell depletion in uninfected mice reduced PC populations. These studies suggest a role for Treg cells in PC biology and provide a potential target for the modulation of PCs during vaccine-induced humoral responses or autoimmunity.

  10. Polymerized laminin-332 matrix supports rapid and tight adhesion of keratinocytes, suppressing cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Kariya

    Full Text Available Laminin-332 (α3ß3γ2 (Lm332 supports the stable anchoring of basal keratinocytes to the epidermal basement membrane, while it functions as a motility factor for wound healing and cancer invasion. To understand these contrasting activities of Lm332, we investigated Lm332 matrices deposited by normal human keratinocytes and other Lm332-expressing cell lines. All types of the cells efficiently deposited Lm332 on the culture plates in specific patterns. On the contrary, laminins containing laminin ß1 and/or γ1 chains, such as Lm511 and Lm311, were not deposited on the culture plates even if secreted into culture medium. The Lm332 deposition was not inhibited by function-blocking antibodies to the α3 and α6 integrins but was inhibited by sodium selenate, suggesting that sulfated glycosaminoglycans on cell surface, e.g. heparan sulfate proteoglycans, might be involved in the process. HEK293 cells overexpressing exogenous Lm332 (Lm332-HEK almost exclusively deposited Lm332 on the plates. The deposited Lm332 matrix showed a mesh-like network structure as analyzed by electron microscopy, suggesting that Lm332 was highly polymerized. When biological activity was analyzed, the Lm332 matrix rather suppressed the migration of keratinocytes as compared with purified Lm332, which highly promoted the cell migration. The Lm332 matrix supported adhesion of keratinocytes much more strongly and stably than purified Lm332. Integrin α3ß1 bound to the Lm332 matrix at a three times higher level than purified Lm332. Normal keratinocytes prominently showed integrin α6ß4-containing, hemidesmosome-like structures on the Lm332 matrix but not on the purified one. These results indicate that the polymerized Lm332 matrix supports stable cell adhesion by interacting with both integrin α6ß4 and α3ß1, whereas unassembled soluble Lm332 supports cell migration.

  11. Carbon Supported Polyaniline as Anode Catalyst: Pathway to Platinum-Free Fuel Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Zabrodskii, A G; Malyshkin, V G; Sapurina, I Y

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of carbon supported polyaniline as anode catalyst in a fuel cell (FC) with direct formic acid electrooxidation is experimentally demonstrated. A prototype FC with such a platinum-free composite anode exhibited a maximum room-temperature specific power of about 5 mW/cm2

  12. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-04-30

    This FY 2013 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  13. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-02-01

    This FY 2014 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  14. Pt supported on nanosized oxides for electrocatalyst used in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banu, N.; Serban, E. C.; Marinescu, A.

    2011-01-01

    Even though Pt is a standard catalyst for fuel cells, new advanced materials with low activation energy and high specific surface area are required. Researches proved that conducting oxides are the emerging candidates as support for Pt catalysts targeting replacement of nanocarbons. This paper...

  15. ATP-Evoked Intracellular Ca(2+) Signaling of Different Supporting Cells in the Hearing Mouse Hemicochlea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horváth, T; Polony, G; Fekete, Á; Aller, M; Halmos, G; Lendvai, B; Heinrich, Ansgard; Sperlágh, B; Vizi, E S; Zelles, T

    2016-01-01

    Hearing and its protection is regulated by ATP-evoked Ca(2+) signaling in the supporting cells of the organ of Corti, however, the unique anatomy of the cochlea hampers observing these mechanisms. For the first time, we have performed functional ratiometric Ca(2+) imaging (fura-2) in three different

  16. Investigation of Novel Electrocatalysts for Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells - Ru:GDC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Nielsen, Jimmy; Thydén, Karl Tor Sune;

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical performance and stability of the planar metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (MS-SOFC) with two different electrocatalytically active materials, namely, Ni:GDC and Ru:GDC were investigated. Ru:GDC with an ASR of 0.322 Ωcm2 performed better than Ni:GDC with an ASR of 0.453 Ωc...

  17. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This FY 2011 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  18. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-09-01

    This FY 2012 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  19. Membrane fuel cell cathode catalysts based on titanium oxide supported platinum nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Christian; Jusys, Zenonas; Wassner, Maximilian; Hüsing, Nicola; Behm, R Jürgen

    2014-07-21

    The potential of platinum catalysts supported on pure, nitrogen-, or carbon-doped titania for application in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), as a cathode catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, is investigated. The oxide supports are synthesized by using a sol-gel route. Modification with nitrogen and carbon doping is achieved by thermal decomposition of urea and the structure-directing agent P123. Platinum nanoparticles are prepared by reduction of a Pt(IV) salt in ethylene glycol and subsequently immobilized on different support materials. Structural and electronic properties of the support materials and the resulting catalysts are characterized by various methods, including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These results and electrochemical characterization of the support materials and platinum nanoparticle catalysts indicate distinct support effects in the catalysts. The electrocatalytic performance of these catalysts in the ORR, as determined in rotating ring disc electrode measurements, is promising. Also here, distinct support effects can be identified. Correlations with the structural/electronic and the electrochemical properties are discussed, as well as the role of metal-support interactions.

  20. Spinel-based coatings for metal supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefan, Elena; Neagu, Dragos; Blennow Tullmar, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Metal supports and metal supported half cells developed at DTU are used for the study of a solution infiltration approach to form protective coatings on porous metal scaffolds. The metal particles in the anode layer, and sometimes even in the support may undergo oxidation in realistic operating...... conditions leading to severe cell degradation. Here, a controlled oxidation of the porous metal substrate and infiltration of Mn and/or Ce nitrate solutions are applied for in situ formation of protective coatings. Our approach consists of scavenging the FeCr oxides formed during the controlled oxidation...... into a continuous and well adhered coating. The effectiveness of coatings is the result of composition and structure, but also of the microstructure and surface characteristics of the metal scaffolds....

  1. Kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells and supportive activities of stromal cells in a three-dimensional bone marrow culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tomonori; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tsuboi, Isao; Glomm, Wilhelm Robert; Yasuda, Masahiro; Aizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    In the bone marrow, hematopoietic cells proliferate and differentiate in close association with a three-dimensional (3D) hematopoietic microenvironment. Previously, we established a 3D bone marrow culture system. In this study, we analyzed the kinetics of hematopoietic cells, and more than 50% of hematopoietic progenitor cells, including CFU-Mix, CFU-GM and BFU-E in 3D culture were in a resting (non-S) phase. Furthermore, we examined the hematopoietic supportive ability of stromal cells by measuring the expression of various mRNAs relevant to hematopoietic regulation. Over the 4 weeks of culture, the stromal cells in the 3D culture are not needlessly activated and "quietly" regulate hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation during the culture, resulting in the presence of resting hematopoietic stem cells in the 3D culture for a long time. Thus, the 3D culture system may be a new tool for investigating hematopoietic stem cell-stromal cell interactions in vitro.

  2. Sustainable Hypersaline Microbial Fuel Cells: Inexpensive Recyclable Polymer Supports for Carbon Nanotube Conductive Paint Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattieri, Matteo; Shivel, Nelson; Sifat, Iram; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Minteer, Shelley

    2017-02-28

    Microbial fuel cells are an emerging technology for wastewater treatment, but in order to be commercially viable and sustainable, the electrode materials must be inexpensive, recyclable and reliable. In this paper, recyclable polymeric supports were explored for the development of anode electrodes to be applied in-field in single chamber microbial fuel cells operated in hypersaline conditions. The support was covered with a carbon-nanotube (CNT)-based conductive paint and biofilms were able to colonize the electrodes. The single chamber microbial fuel cells with Pt-free cathodes delivered a reproducible power output after 15 days of operation, achieving 12 ± 1 mW m-2 at a current density of 69 ± 7 mA m-2. The decrease of performance in long-term experiments was mostly related to inorganic precipitates on the cathode electrode and did not affect the performance of the anode, as shown by experiments replacing the cathode that regenerated the fuel cell performance. The results of these studies show the feasibility of carbon nanotube-based paint coated polymeric supports for microbial fuel cell applications.

  3. Ferritin-supported lipid bilayers for triggering the endothelial cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriano, C; Lupo, G; Motta, C; Anfuso, C D; Di Pietro, P; Kasemo, B

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid nanoassemblies of ferritin and silica-supported lipid bilayers (ferritin-SLBs) have been prepared and tested for the adhesion, spreading and proliferation of retinal microvascular endothelial cells (ECs). Lipid membranes with varying surface charge were obtained by mixing cationic 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (POEPC) with zwitterionic 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) at increasing POPC/POEPC ratios. The supported bilayer formation and their subsequent interaction processes with ferritin were studied at the pH of 7.4 at different protein concentrations, by using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and by atomic force microscopy. Both kinetics and viscoelastic parameters of the protein-lipid membrane interface were scrutinized, as well as surface coverage. Phase-contrast optical microscopy analyses of the ferritin-SLBs substrates after their interaction with endothelial cells evidenced the highest cell adhesion (2-4h of incubation time) and proliferation (from 24h to 5 days) for the membranes of POPC/POEPC (75:25 ratio). Moreover, ferritin increased both cell adhesion and proliferation in comparison to control glass (respectively 1.5- and 1.75-fold) as well as proliferation in comparison to bare POPC/POEPC (95:5 ratio) (2 fold). Results are very promising in the goal of modulating the endothelial cell response through the interplay of viscoelastic/charge properties of the solid-supported membranes and the SLB-conditioned ferritin activity.

  4. Fluidic and air-stable supported lipid bilayer and cell-mimicking microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yang; Wang, Yini; Holtz, Bryan; Li, Jingyi; Traaseth, Nathan; Veglia, Gianluigi; Stottrup, Benjamin J; Elde, Robert; Pei, Duanqing; Guo, Athena; Zhu, X-Y

    2008-05-14

    As drug delivery, therapy, and medical imaging are becoming increasingly cell-specific, there is a critical need for high fidelity and high-throughput screening methods for cell surface interactions. Cell membrane-mimicking surfaces, i.e., supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), are currently not sufficiently robust to meet this need. Here we describe a method of forming fluidic and air-stable SLBs through tethered and dispersed cholesterol groups incorporated into the bottom leaflet. Achieving air stability allows us to easily fabricate SLB microarrays from direct robotic spotting of vesicle solutions. We demonstrate their application as cell membrane-mimicking microarrays by reconstituting peripheral as well as integral membrane components that can be recognized by their respective targets. These demonstrations establish the viability of the fluidic and air-stable SLB platform for generating content microarrays in high throughput studies, e.g., the screening of drugs and nanomedicine targeting cell surface receptors.

  5. 3D Bearing Capacity of Structured Cells Supported on Cohesive Soil: Simplified Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Galván Sergio Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a simplified analysis method to compute the bearing capacity of structured cell foundations subjected to vertical loading and supported in soft cohesive soil is proposed. A structured cell is comprised by a top concrete slab structurally connected to concrete external walls that enclose the natural soil. Contrary to a box foundation it does not include a bottom slab and hence, the soil within the walls becomes an important component of the structured cell. This simplified method considers the three-dimensional geometry of the cell, the undrained shear strength of cohesive soils and the existence of structural continuity between the top concrete slab and the surrounding walls, along the walls themselves and the walls structural joints. The method was developed from results of numerical-parametric analyses, from which it was found that structured cells fail according to a punching-type mechanism.

  6. Highly durable anode supported solid oxide fuel cell with an infiltrated cathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Alfred Junio; Hjalmarsson, Per; Søgaard, Martin

    2012-01-01

    An anode supported solid oxide fuel cell with an La0.6Sr0.4Co1.05O3_δ (LSC) infiltrated-Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) cathode that shows a stable performance has been developed. The cathode was prepared by screen printing a porous CGO backbone on top of a laminated and co-fired anode supported half cell...... in the resistance from the recorded impedance was observed during long term testing. The power density reached 0.79Wcm-2 at a cell voltage of 0.6 V at 750 deg. C. Post test analysis of the LSC infiltrated-CGO cathode by scanning electron microscopy revealed no significant micro-structural difference...

  7. Optimization of Ferritic Steel Porous Supports for Protonic Fuel Cells Working at 600°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatachalam, Vinothini; Molin, Sebastian; Chen, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Metal supported protonic fuel cells (PCFC) offer one major advantage over standard solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) with oxygen conducting electrolytes, namely that the product, water, is produced on the cathode (air) side. This feature simplifies the engineering of the stack, boosts efficiency......, and is particularly helpful for a porous metal supported cell because it limits the corrosion of the metal by exposure to water vapor in the anode gas. In this work, we show the effect of composition and microstructure on the high temperature corrosion and phase stability (formation of sigma phase/Laves phase......) of porous alloys. Alloys in the compositional range Fe-20%Cr to Fe-32%Cr were evaluated and the effects of surface modification on corrosion resistance were studied using thermogravimetry, x-ray diffractometry and electron microscopy. The results show that surface modified porous ferritic steels are very...

  8. Toward new fuel cell support materials: a theoretical and experimental study of nitrogen-doped graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Min Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Lim, Eun Ja; Kwon, In Hye; Seo, Joon Kyo; Noh, Seung Hyo; Kim, Won Bae; Han, Byungchan

    2014-09-01

    Nano-scale Pt particles are often reported to be more electrochemically active and stable in a fuel cell if properly displaced on support materials; however, the factors that affect their activity and stability are not well understood. We applied first-principles calculations and experimental measurements to well-defined model systems of N-doped graphene supports (N-GNS) to reveal the fundamental mechanisms that control the catalytic properties and structural integrity of nano-scale Pt particles. DFT calculations predict thermodynamic and electrochemical interactions between N-GNS and Pt nanoparticles in the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Moreover, the dissolution potentials of the Pt nanoparticles supported on GNS and N-GNS catalysts are calculated under acidic conditions. Our results provide insight into the design of new support materials for enhanced catalytic efficiency and long-term stability.

  9. Graphene-Supported Platinum Catalyst-Based Membrane Electrode Assembly for PEM Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devrim, Yilser; Albostan, Ayhan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is the preparation and characterization of a graphene-supported platinum (Pt) catalyst for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications. The graphene-supported Pt catalysts were prepared by chemical reduction of graphene and chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) in ethylene glycol. X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy have been used to analyze structure and surface morphology of the graphene-supported catalyst. The TGA results showed that the Pt loading of the graphene-supported catalyst was 31%. The proof of the Pt particles on the support surfaces was also verified by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis. The commercial carbon-supported catalyst and prepared Pt/graphene catalysts were used as both anode and cathode electrodes for PEMFC at ambient pressure and 70°C. The maximum power density was obtained for the Pt/graphene-based membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with H2/O2 reactant gases as 0.925 W cm2. The maximum current density of the Pt/graphene-based MEA can reach 1.267 and 0.43 A/cm2 at 0.6 V with H2/O2 and H2/air, respectively. The MEA prepared by the Pt/graphene catalyst shows good stability in long-term PEMFC durability tests. The PEMFC cell voltage was maintained at 0.6 V without apparent voltage drop when operated at 0.43 A/cm2 constant current density and 70°C for 400 h. As a result, PEMFC performance was found to be superlative for the graphene-supported Pt catalyst compared with the Pt/C commercial catalyst. The results indicate the graphene-supported Pt catalyst could be utilized as the electrocatalyst for PEMFC applications.

  10. Feeder cells support the culture of induced pluripotent stem cells even after chemical fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Shan Yue

    Full Text Available Chemically fixed mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs, instead of live feeder cells, were applied to the maintenance of mouse induced pluripotent stem (miPS cells. Formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde were used for chemical fixation. The chemically fixed MEF feeders maintained the pluripotency of miPS cells, as well as their undifferentiated state. Furthermore, the chemically fixed MEF feeders were reused several times without affecting their functions. These results indicate that chemical fixation can be applied to modify biological feeders chemically, without losing their original functions. Chemically fixed MEF feeders will be applicable to other stem cell cultures as a reusable extracellular matrix candidate that can be preserved on a long-term basis.

  11. Cells must express components of the planar cell polarity system and extracellular matrix to support cytonemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2016-09-03

    Drosophila dorsal air sac development depends on Decapentaplegic (Dpp) and Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) proteins produced by the wing imaginal disc and transported by cytonemes to the air sac primordium (ASP). Dpp and FGF signaling in the ASP was dependent on components of the planar cell polarity (PCP) system in the disc, and neither Dpp- nor FGF-receiving cytonemes extended over mutant disc cells that lacked them. ASP cytonemes normally navigate through extracellular matrix (ECM) composed of collagen, laminin, Dally and Dally-like (Dlp) proteins that are stratified in layers over the disc cells. However, ECM over PCP mutant cells had reduced levels of laminin, Dally and Dlp, and whereas Dpp-receiving ASP cytonemes navigated in the Dally layer and required Dally (but not Dlp), FGF-receiving ASP cytonemes navigated in the Dlp layer, requiring Dlp (but not Dally). These findings suggest that cytonemes interact directly and specifically with proteins in the stratified ECM.

  12. Molecular chaperone CCT3 supports proper mitotic progression and cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yuqi; Wei, Youheng; Wu, Jiaxue; Zhang, Pingzhao; Shen, Suqin; Saiyin, Hexige; Wumaier, Reziya; Yang, Xianmei; Wang, Chenji; Yu, Long

    2016-03-01

    CCT3 was one of the subunits of molecular chaperone CCT/TRiC complex, which plays a central role in maintaining cellular proteostasis. We demonstrated that expressions of CCT3 mRNA and protein are highly up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, and high level of CCT3 is correlated with poor survival in cancer patients. In HCC cell lines, CCT3 depletion suppresses cell proliferation by inducing mitotic arrest at prometaphase and apoptosis eventually. We also identified CCT3 as a novel regulator of spindle integrity and as a requirement for proper kinetochore-microtubule attachment during mitosis. Moreover, we found that CCT3 depletion sensitizes HCC cells to microtubule destabilizing drug Vincristine. Collectively, our study suggests that CCT3 is indispensible for HCC cell proliferation, and provides a potential drug target for treatment of HCC.

  13. Plant and microorganisms support media for electricity generation in biological fuel cells with living hydrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Juárez, María Guadalupe; Roquero, Pedro; Durán-Domínguez-de-Bazúa, María Del Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Plant support media may impact power output in a biological fuel cell with living plants, due to the physical and biochemical processes that take place in it. A material for support medium should provide the suitable conditions for the robust microbial growth and its metabolic activity, degrading organic matter and other substances; and, transferring electrons to the anode. To consider the implementation of this type of bio-electrochemical systems in constructed wetlands, this study analyzes the electrochemical behavior of biological fuel cells with the vegetal species Phragmites australis, by using two different support media: graphite granules and a volcanic slag, commonly known as tezontle (stone as light as hair, from the Aztec or Nahuatl language). Derived from the results, both, graphite and tezontle have the potential to be used as support medium for plants and microorganisms supporting a maximum power of 26.78mW/m(2) in graphite reactors. These reactors worked under mixed control: with ohmic and kinetic resistances of the same order of magnitude. Tezontle reactors operated under kinetic control with a high activation resistance supplying 9.73mW/m(2). These performances could be improved with stronger bacterial populations in the reactor, to ensure the rapid depletion of substrate.

  14. An analysis of the NIH-supported sickle cell disease research portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavini, Nara; Hoots, W Keith; Mensah, George A; Hanspal, Manjit

    2015-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), an inherited blood disorder is due to a single amino acid substitution on the beta chain of hemoglobin, and is characterized by anemia, severe infections, acute and chronic pain, and multi-organ damage. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is dedicated to support basic, translational and clinical science research to improve care and ultimately, to find a cure for SCD that causes such suffering. This report provides a detailed analysis of grants funded by the NIH for SCD research in Fiscal Years 2007 through 2013. During this period, the NIH supported 247 de novo grants totaling $272,210,367 that address various aspects of SCD. 83% of these funds supported research project grants investigating the following 5 scientific themes: Pathology of Sickle Red Blood Cells; Globin Gene Expression; Adhesion and Vascular Dysfunction; Neurological Complications and Organ-specific Dysfunction; and Pain Management and Intervention. The remaining 17% of total funds supported career development and training grants; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants; large Center grants; and Conference grants. Further analysis showed that the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is the largest funder of SCD research within NIH with 67% of total grants, contributing 77% of total funds; followed by the National Institute for Digestive Diseases and Kidney (NIDDK) that is funding 19% of grants, contributing 13% of total funds. The remaining 14% of grants totaling 10% of the funds were supported by all other NIH Institutes/Centers (ICs) combined. In summary, the NIH is using multiple funding mechanisms to support a sickle cell disease research agenda that is intended to advance the detection, treatment, and cure of this debilitating genetic disease.

  15. 3D bioprinting of biomimetic aortic vascular constructs with self-supporting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukgul, Can; Ozler, S Burce; Inci, Ilyas; Karakas, Ezgi; Irmak, Ster; Gozuacik, Devrim; Taralp, Alpay; Koc, Bahattin

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of deaths throughout the world. Vascular diseases are mostly treated with autografts and blood vessel transplantations. However, traditional grafting methods have several problems including lack of suitable harvest sites, additional surgical costs for harvesting procedure, pain, infection, lack of donors, and even no substitutes at all. Recently, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches are used to regenerate damaged or diseased tissues. Most of the tissue engineering investigations have been based on the cell seeding into scaffolds by providing a suitable environment for cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. Because of the challenges such as difficulties in seeding cells spatially, rejection, and inflammation of biomaterials used, the recent tissue engineering studies focus on scaffold-free techniques. In this paper, the development of novel computer aided algorithms and methods are developed for 3D bioprinting of scaffold-free biomimetic macrovascular structures. Computer model mimicking a real human aorta is generated using imaging techniques and the proposed computational algorithms. An optimized three-dimensional bioprinting path planning are developed with the proposed self-supported model. Mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell aggregates and support structures (hydrogels) are 3D bioprinted layer-by-layer according to the proposed self-supported method to form an aortic tissue construct.

  16. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  17. Micromechanical Modeling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode Supports based on Three-dimensional Reconstructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency and lifetime of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is compromised by mechanical failure of cells in the system. Improving the mechanical reliability is a major step in ensuring feasibility of the technology. To quantify the stress in a cell, mechanical properties of the different layers...... need to be accurately known. Since the mechanical properties are heavily dependent on the microstructures of the materials, it is highly advantageous to understand the impact of microstructures and to be able to determine accurate effective mechanical properties for cell or stack scale analyses...... are computed by the finite element method. The macroscopic creep response of the porous anode support is determined based on homogenization theory. It is shown that micromechanical modeling provides an effective tool to study the effect of microstructures on the macroscopic properties....

  18. Hematopoietic Support Capacity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Biology and Clinical Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Orduña, Guadalupe R; Mayani, Héctor; Montesinos, Juan J

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in the physiology and homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. Because MSCs generate most of the stromal cells present in the bone marrow (BM), form part of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche, and produce various molecules regulating hematopoiesis, their hematopoiesis-supporting capacity has been demonstrated. In the last decade, BM-MSCs have been proposed to be useful in some ex vivo protocols for HSC expansion, with the aim of expanding their numbers for transplant purposes (HSC transplant, HSCT). Furthermore, application of MSCs has been proposed as an adjuvant cellular therapy for promoting rapid hematopoietic recovery in HSCT patients. Although the MSCs used in preliminary clinical trials have come from the BM, isolation of MSCs from far more accessible sources such as neonatal tissues has now been achieved, and these cells have been found to possess similar biological characteristics to those isolated from the BM. Therefore, such tissues are now considered as a potential alternative source of MSCs for clinical applications. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the biological characteristics of MSCs as related to their capacity to support the formation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We also describe MSC manipulation for ex vivo HSC expansion protocols used for transplants and their clinical relevance for hematopoietic recovery in HSCT patients.

  19. Final Report - Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debe, Mark

    2012-09-28

    The principal objectives of the program were development of a durable, low cost, high performance cathode electrode (catalyst and support), that is fully integrated into a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly with gas diffusion media, fabricated by high volume capable processes, and is able to meet or exceed the 2015 DOE targets. Work completed in this contract was an extension of the developments under three preceding cooperative agreements/grants Nos. DE-FC-02-97EE50473, DE-FC-99EE50582 and DE-FC36- 02AL67621 which investigated catalyzed membrane electrode assemblies for PEM fuel cells based on a fundamentally new, nanostructured thin film catalyst and support system, and demonstrated the feasibility for high volume manufacturability.

  20. High surface area graphite as alternative support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Folgado, M.A. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Daza, L. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie, 2 Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    The suitability of a high surface area graphite (HSAG) as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalyst support has been evaluated and compared with that of the most popular carbon black: the Vulcan XC72. It has been observed that Pt is arranged on the graphite surface resulting in different structures which depend on the catalysts synthesis conditions. The influence that the metal particle size and the metal-support interaction exert on the catalysts degradation rate is analyzed. Temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) under oxygen containing streams has been shown to be a useful method to assess the resistance of PEMFC catalysts to carbon corrosion. The synthesized Pt/HSAG catalysts have been evaluated in single cell tests in the cathode catalytic layer. The obtained results show that HSAG can be a promising alternative to the traditionally used Vulcan XC72 carbon black when suitable catalysts synthesis conditions are used. (author)

  1. Performance of a novel type of electrolyte-supported solid oxide fuel cell with honeycomb structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Morales, Juan Carlos; Savvin, Stanislav N.; Nunez, Pedro [Departmento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 Tenerife (Spain); Marrero-Lopez, David [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Pena-Martinez, Juan; Canales-Vazquez, Jesus [Instituto de Energias Renovables-Universidad de Castilla la Mancha, 02006 Albacete (Spain); Roa, Joan Josep; Segarra, Merce [DIOPMA, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ing. Metalurgica, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    A novel design, alternative to the conventional electrolyte-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is presented. In this new design, a honeycomb-electrolyte is fabricated from hexagonal cells, providing high mechanical strength to the whole structure and supporting the thin layer used as electrolyte of a SOFC. This new design allows a reduction of {proportional_to}70% of the electrolyte material and it renders modest performances over 320 mW cm{sup -2} but high volumetric power densities, i.e. 1.22 W cm{sup -3} under pure CH{sub 4} at 900 C, with a high OCV of 1.13 V, using the standard Ni-YSZ cermet as anode, Pt as cathode material and air as the oxidant gas. (author)

  2. Investigation of altenative carbon materials for fuel-cell catalyst support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mikkel Juul

    In order to ensure high utilization of the catalyst material in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) it is usually fixed in the form of nanoparticles on a supporting material. The catalyst is platinum or a platinum alloy, and the commonly used support is carbon black (CB). Although...... the large surface area and good anchoring properties make it a suited material for this purpose, it is prone to degradation in the fuel-cell environment. Thus alternative materials with higher durability than CB, but with similar (or better) capability of dispersion, are desired. Among them are highly...... of non- or low-temperature-treated CBs were dominated by defects, and the FWCNTs contained both elements. By XPS it was possible to determine the concentration of oxygen in the carbons, but an exact deconvolution of the XPS peaks was not possible due to the very low oxygen contents, the lack of parameter...

  3. Self-supported interconnected Pt nanoassemblies as highly stable electrocatalysts for low-temperature fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bao Yu; Ng, Wan Theng; Wu, Hao Bin; Wang, Xin; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2012-07-16

    In it for the long haul: Clusters of Pt nanowires (3D Pt nanoassemblies, Pt NA) serve as an electrocatalyst for low-temperature fuel cells. These Pt nanoassemblies exhibit remarkably high stability following thousands of voltage cycles and good catalytic activity, when compared with a commercial Pt catalyst and 20 % wt Pt catalyst supported on carbon black (20 % Pt/CB).

  4. Social Behavior in Medulloblastoma: Functional Analysis of Tumor-Supporting Glial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    proliferation of tumor GNPs. These findings highlight a self-building supportive network within medulloblastoma. Our finding resonates with recent reports in...pieces was transferred to a 50 mL conical tube and liquid aspirated leaving tissue pieces. Enzyme neutralization was achieved by adding 3 ml of Low Ovo...tissue pieces settle, collect supernatant into a new 50 mL conical (these are all tumor cells). Repeat trituration with 5 mL Low Ovo and collect

  5. Oxidation of Carbon Supports at Fuel Cell Cathodes: Differential Electrochemical Mass Spectrometric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-fang; Tao, Qian; Liao, Ling-wen; Xu, Jie; Cai, Jun; Chen, Yan-xia

    2010-08-01

    The effects of O2 and the supported Pt nano-particles on the mechanisms and kinetics of the carbon support corrosion are investigated by monitoring the CO2 production using differential electrochemical mass spectrometry in a dual-thin layer flow cell. Carbon can be oxidized in different distinct potential regimes; O2 accelerates carbon oxidation, the rates of CO2 production from carbon oxidation in O2 saturated solution are two times of that in N2 saturated solution at the same potential; Pt can catalyze the carbon oxidation, with supported Pt nanoparticles, the overpotential for carbon oxidation is much smaller than that without loading in the carbon electrode. The mechanism for the enhanced carbon oxidation by Pt and O2 are discussed.

  6. Comparison among three anion exchange chromatographic supports to capture erythropoietin from cell culture supernatant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lourdes HERNNDEZ; Diobel STEWART; Lourdes ZUMALACRREGUI; Daniel AMARO

    2015-01-01

    Affinity and ion exchange conventional chromatography have been used to capture erythropoietin ( EPO)from mammalian cell culture supernatant. Currently,chromatographic adsorbent perfusion is available, however a limited number of applications have been found in the literature. In this work,three anion exchange chromatographic supports( gel,membrane and monolithic)were evaluated in the capture step of the recombi-nant erythropoietin purification process. The influences of load and flow rate on each support performance were analyzed. Also the purity of the EPO molecules was determined. A productivity analysis,as a decision tool for larger scale implementation,was done. As a conclusion,the evaluated supports are technically suitable to cap-ture EPO with adequate recovery and good purity. However,the monolithic column admits high operating velocity,showing the highest adsorption capacity and productivity.

  7. A novel Ni/ceria-based anode for metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek-Wöckner, Veronika A.; Opitz, Alexander K.; Brandner, Marco; Mathé, Jörg; Bram, Martin

    2016-10-01

    For optimization of ageing behavior, electrochemical performance, and sulfur tolerance of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells a new anode concept is introduced, which is based on a Ni/GDC cermet replacing the established Ni/YSZ anodes. In the present work optimized processing parameters compatible with MSC substrates are specified by doing sintering studies on pressed bulk specimen and on real porous anode structures. The electrochemical performance of the Ni/GDC anodes was characterized by means of symmetrical electrolyte supported model-type cells. In this study, three main objectives are pursued. Firstly, the effective technical realization of the Ni/GDC concept is demonstrated. Secondly, the electrochemical behavior of Ni/GDC porous anodes is characterized by impedance spectroscopy and compared with the current standard Ni/YSZ anode. Further, a qualitative comparison of the sulfur poisoning behavior of both anode types is presented. Thirdly, preliminary results of a successful implementation of the Ni/GDC cermet into a metal-supported single cell are presented.

  8. Single crystals of fullerene (C60 makes organic thick film solar cells and self supporting organic solar cells possible.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Umeno

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of Fullerene (SC-C60 were synthesized by simple liquid/liquid interface precipitation method. Organic thick film solar cell (with an active layer thickness of approximately 20 microns thick is demonstrated by combining SC-C60 with poly(3-octylthiophene. Our preliminary results indicate that organic thick film solar cells are possible; which were considered to be impossible due to low mobility and small exciton diffusion lengths in most of the organic materials including small organic molecules and conjugated conducting polymers. Further, SC-C60 seems to be promising materials for organic photovoltaics. Self supporting organic solar cell is also demonstrated using SC-C60.

  9. Development of analytical cell support for vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, F.H.; Borek, T.T.; Christopher, J.Z. [and others

    1997-12-01

    Analytical and Process Chemistry (A&PC) support is essential to the high-level waste vitrification campaign at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). A&PC characterizes the waste, providing information necessary to formulate the recipe for the target radioactive glass product. High-level waste (HLW) samples are prepared and analyzed in the analytical cells (ACs) and Sample Storage Cell (SSC) on the third floor of the main plant. The high levels of radioactivity in the samples require handling them in the shielded cells with remote manipulators. The analytical hot cells and third floor laboratories were refurbished to ensure optimal uninterrupted operation during the vitrification campaign. New and modified instrumentation, tools, sample preparation and analysis techniques, and equipment and training were required for A&PC to support vitrification. Analytical Cell Mockup Units (ACMUs) were designed to facilitate method development, scientist and technician training, and planning for analytical process flow. The ACMUs were fabricated and installed to simulate the analytical cell environment and dimensions. New techniques, equipment, and tools could be evaluated m in the ACMUs without the consequences of generating or handling radioactive waste. Tools were fabricated, handling and disposal of wastes was addressed, and spatial arrangements for equipment were refined. As a result of the work at the ACMUs the remote preparation and analysis methods and the equipment and tools were ready for installation into the ACs and SSC m in July 1995. Before use m in the hot cells, all remote methods had been validated and four to eight technicians were trained on each. Fine tuning of the procedures has been ongoing at the ACs based on input from A&PC technicians. Working at the ACs presents greater challenges than had development at the ACMUs. The ACMU work and further refinements m in the ACs have resulted m in a reduction m in analysis turnaround time (TAT).

  10. Development of a Novel Ceramic Support Layer for Planar Solid Oxide Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemensø, Trine; Boccaccini, Dino; Brodersen, Karen;

    2014-01-01

    of the support can be done simultaneously with forming the oxygen electrode, since some of the best performing oxygen electrodes are based on infiltrated LSC. The potential of the proposed structure was investigated by testing the mechanical and electrical properties of the support layer. Comparable strength....... Electronic conductivity in the 3YSZ support is obtained post sintering by infiltrating LSC (La0.6Sr0.4Co1.05O3). The potential advantages of the proposed design is a strong cell, due to the base of a strong ceramic material (3YSZ is a partially stabilized zirconia), and that the LSC infiltration...... properties to the conventional Ni/YSZ support were seen, and sufficient and fairly stable conductivity of LSC infiltrated 3YSZ was observed. The conductivity of 8–15 S cm–1 at 850 °C seen for over 600 h, corresponds to a serial resistance of less than 3.5 m Ω cm2 of a 300 μm thick support layer....

  11. Collagen-IV supported embryoid bodies formation and differentiation from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taru Sharma, G., E-mail: gts553@gmail.com [Reproductive Physiology Laboratory, Division of Physiology and Climatology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar-243 122, Bareilly, U.P. (India); Dubey, Pawan K.; Verma, Om Prakash; Pratheesh, M.D.; Nath, Amar; Sai Kumar, G. [Reproductive Physiology Laboratory, Division of Physiology and Climatology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar-243 122, Bareilly, U.P. (India)

    2012-08-03

    supported buffalo EBs formation, their subsequent differentiation could prove to be useful as promising candidate for ES cells based therapeutic applications.

  12. Break-down of Losses in High Performing Metal-Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromp, Alexander; Nielsen, Jimmi; Blennow Tullmar, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    present the results of performance and stability improvements for a metal supported cell developed within the European project METSOFC and the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation. The cells consist of a porous metal backbone, a metal / zirconia cermet anode and a 10ScYSZ electrolyte, cofired...... in hydrogen. The electrochemically active parts were applied by infiltrating CGO-Ni precursor solution into the porous metal and anode backbone and screenprinting (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3-based cathodes. To prevent a solid state reaction between cathode and zirconia electrolyte, CGO buffer layers were applied...... in between cathode and electrolyte. The detailed electrochemical characterization by means of impedance spectroscopy and a subsequent data analysis by the distribution of relaxation times enabled us to separate the different loss contributions in the cell. Based on an appropriate equivalent circuit model...

  13. Human GLUD2 glutamate dehydrogenase is expressed in neural and testicular supporting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Zaganas, Ioannis; Kleopa, Kleopas A; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2010-05-28

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is an allosterically regulated enzyme that is expressed widely. Its activity is potently inhibited by GTP and thought to be controlled by the need of the cell for ATP. In addition to this housekeeping human (h) GDH1, humans have acquired (via a duplication event) a highly homologous isoenzyme (hGDH2) that is resistant to GTP. Although transcripts of GLUD2, the gene encoding hGDH2, have been detected in human neural and testicular tissues, data on the endogenous protein are lacking. Here, we developed an antibody specific for hGDH2 and used it to study human tissues. Western blot analyses revealed, to our surprise, that endogenous hGDH2 is more densely expressed in testis than in brain. At the subcellular level, hGDH2 localized to mitochondria. Study of testicular tissue using immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence methods revealed that the Sertoli cells were strongly labeled by our anti-hGDH2 antibody. In human cerebral cortex, a robust labeling of astrocytes was detected, with neurons showing faint hGDH2 immunoreactivity. Astrocytes and Sertoli cells are known to support neurons and germ cells, respectively, providing them with lactate that largely derives from the tricarboxylic acid cycle via conversion of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate (GDH reaction). As hGDH2 is not subject to GTP control, the enzyme is able to metabolize glutamate even when the tricarboxylic acid cycle generates GTP amounts sufficient to inactivate the housekeeping hGDH1 protein. Hence, the selective expression of hGDH2 by astrocytes and Sertoli cells may provide a significant biological advantage by facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential to the supportive role of these cells.

  14. A self-supported 40W direct methanol fuel cell system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Manokaran; R Vijayakumar; T N Thomman; P Sridhar; S Pitchumani; A K Shukla

    2011-05-01

    A self-supported 40W Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) system has been developed and performance tested. The auxiliaries in the DMFC system comprise a methanol sensor, a liquid-level indicator, and fuel and air pumps that consume a total power of about 5W. The system has a 15-cell DMFC stack with active electrode-area of 45 cm2. The self-supported DMFC system addresses issues related to water recovery from the cathode exhaust, and maintains a constant methanol-feed concentration with thermal management in the system. Pure methanol and water from cathode exhaust are pumped to the methanol-mixing tank where the liquid level is monitored and controlled with the help of a liquid-level indicator. During the operation, methanol concentration in the feed solution at the stack outlet is monitored using a methanol sensor, and pure methanol is added to restore the desired methanol concentration in the feed tank by adding the product water from the cathode exhaust. The feed-rate requirements of fuel and oxidant are designed for the stack capacity of 40W. The self-supported DMFC system is ideally suited for various defense and civil applications and, in particular, for charging the storage batteries.

  15. Engineered Nano-scale Ceramic Supports for PEM Fuel Cells. Tech Team Meeting Presentaion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosha, Eric L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elbaz Alon, Lior [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henson, Neil J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roy, Aaron [University of New Mexico; Serov, Alexey [University of New Mexico; Ward, Timothy [University of New Mexico

    2012-08-13

    Catalyst support durability is currently a technical barrier for commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, especially for transportation applications. Degradation and corrosion of the conventional carbon supports leads to losses in active catalyst surface area and, consequently, reduced performance. As a result, the goal of this work is to develop support materials that interact strongly with Pt, yet sustain bulk-like catalytic activities with very highly dispersed particles. Ceramic materials that are prepared using conventional solid-state methods have large grain sizes and low surface areas that can only be minimally ameliorated through grinding and ball milling. Other synthesis routes to produce ceramic materials must be investigated and utilized in order to obtain desired surface areas. In this work, several different synthesis methods are being utilized to prepare electronically conductive ceramic boride, nitride, and oxide materials with high surface areas and have the potential for use as PEMFC catalyst supports. Polymer-assisted deposition (PAD) and aerosol-through plasma (A-T-P) torch are among several methods used to obtain ceramic materials with surface areas that are equal to, or exceed Vulcan XC-72R supports. Cubic Mo-based ceramic phases have been prepared with average XRD-determined crystallite sizes as low as 1.6 nm (from full profile, XRD fitting) and a BET surface area exceeding 200 m{sup 2}/g. Additionally, black, sub-stoichiometric TiO{sub 2-x}, have been prepared with an average crystallite size in the 4 nm range and surface areas exceeding 250 m{sup 2}/gr. Pt disposition using an incipient wetness approach produced materials with activity for hydrogen redox reactions and ORR. Cyclic voltammetry data will be shown for a variety of potential Pt/ceramic catalysts. Initial experiments indicate enhanced Pt metal-support interactions as well. Plane wave periodic density functional calculations (VASP) are being used to

  16. Virus movements on the plasma membrane support infection and transmission between cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph J Burckhardt

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available How viruses are transmitted across the mucosal epithelia of the respiratory, digestive, or excretory tracts, and how they spread from cell to cell and cause systemic infections, is incompletely understood. Recent advances from single virus tracking experiments have revealed conserved patterns of virus movements on the plasma membrane, including diffusive motions, drifting motions depending on retrograde flow of actin filaments or actin tail formation by polymerization, and confinement to submicrometer areas. Here, we discuss how viruses take advantage of cellular mechanisms that normally drive the movements of proteins and lipids on the cell surface. A concept emerges where short periods of fast diffusive motions allow viruses to rapidly move over several micrometers. Coupling to actin flow supports directional transport of virus particles during entry and cell-cell transmission, and local confinement coincides with either nonproductive stalling or infectious endocytic uptake. These conserved features of virus-host interactions upstream of infectious entry offer new perspectives for anti-viral interference.

  17. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B.; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M.; Stobinski, L.; Ciecierska, E.; Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M.

    2016-12-01

    One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  18. Age-related changes in brain support cells: Implications for stroke severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabji, Farida; Bake, Shameena; Lewis, Danielle K

    2013-10-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of adult disability and the fourth leading cause of mortality in the US. Stroke disproportionately occurs among the elderly, where the disease is more likely to be fatal or lead to long-term supportive care. Animal models, where the ischemic insult can be controlled more precisely, also confirm that aged animals sustain more severe strokes as compared to young animals. Furthermore, the neuroprotection usually seen in younger females when compared to young males is not observed in older females. The preclinical literature thus provides a valuable resource for understanding why the aging brain is more susceptible to severe infarction. In this review, we discuss the hypothesis that stroke severity in the aging brain may be associated with reduced functional capacity of critical support cells. Specifically, we focus on astrocytes, that are critical for detoxification of the brain microenvironment and endothelial cells, which play a crucial role in maintaining the blood brain barrier. In view of the sex difference in stroke severity, this review also discusses studies of middle-aged acyclic females as well as the effects of the estrogen on astrocytes and endothelial cells.

  19. Optimization of the Interconnect Ribs for a Cathode-Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Kong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive mathematical model of the performance of the cathode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC with syngas fuel is presented. The model couples the intricate interdependency between the ionic conduction, electronic conduction, gas transport, the electrochemical reaction processes in the functional layers and on the electrode/electrolyte interfaces, methane steam reforming (MSR and the water gas shift reaction (WGSR. The validity of the mathematical model is demonstrated by the excellent agreement between the numerical and experimental I-V curves. The effect of anode rib width and cathode rib width on gas diffusion and cell performance is examined. The results show conclusively that the cell performance is strongly influenced by the rib width. Furthermore, the anode optimal rib width is smaller than that for cathode, which is contrary to anode-supported SOFC. Finally, the formulae for the anode and cathode optimal rib width are given, which provide an easy to use guidance for the broad SOFC engineering community.

  20. Mitochondrial free fatty acid β-oxidation supports oxidative phosphorylation and proliferation in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; El Hafidi, Mohammed; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Reséndiz, Ileana; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Pacheco-Velázquez, Silvia C; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) is functional and sustains tumor proliferation in several cancer cell types. To establish whether mitochondrial β-oxidation of free fatty acids (FFAs) contributes to cancer OxPhos functioning, its protein contents and enzyme activities, as well as respiratory rates and electrical membrane potential (ΔΨm) driven by FFA oxidation were assessed in rat AS-30D hepatoma and liver (RLM) mitochondria. Higher protein contents (1.4-3 times) of β-oxidation (CPT1, SCAD) as well as proteins and enzyme activities (1.7-13-times) of Krebs cycle (KC: ICD, 2OGDH, PDH, ME, GA), and respiratory chain (RC: COX) were determined in hepatoma mitochondria vs. RLM. Although increased cholesterol content (9-times vs. RLM) was determined in the hepatoma mitochondrial membranes, FFAs and other NAD-linked substrates were oxidized faster (1.6-6.6 times) by hepatoma mitochondria than RLM, maintaining similar ΔΨm values. The contents of β-oxidation, KC and RC enzymes were also assessed in cells. The mitochondrial enzyme levels in human cervix cancer HeLa and AS-30D cells were higher than those observed in rat hepatocytes whereas in human breast cancer biopsies, CPT1 and SCAD contents were lower than in human breast normal tissue. The presence of CPT1 and SCAD in AS-30D mitochondria and HeLa cells correlated with an active FFA utilization in HeLa cells. Furthermore, the β-oxidation inhibitor perhexiline blocked FFA utilization, OxPhos and proliferation in HeLa and other cancer cells. In conclusion, functional mitochondria supported by FFA β-oxidation are essential for the accelerated cancer cell proliferation and hence anti-β-oxidation therapeutics appears as an alternative promising approach to deter malignant tumor growth.

  1. IMMUNE MODULATORY EFFECTS of HUMAN CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN on DENDRITIC CELLS SUPPORTING FETAL SURVIVAL in MURINE PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Dauven

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are critically involved in the determination of immunity versus tolerance. Hence, DCs are key regulators of immune responses either favoring or disfavoring fetal survival. Several factors were proposed to modulate DC phenotype and function during preg-nancy. Here, we studied whether the pregnancy hormone human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG is involved in DC regulation.In vitro, bone-marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs were stimulated in the presence or absence of urine-purified (uhCG or recombinant hCG (rhCG preparations. Subsequently, BMDC matu-ration was assessed. Cytokine secretion of activated BMDCs and their capability to enforce TH1, TH2, TH17 or Treg cell differentiation was determined after rhCG treatment. Moreover, the in vivo potential of hCG-modulated BMDCs to influence pregnancy outcome, Treg cell number and local cytokine expression was evaluated after adoptive transfer in a murine abor-tion-prone model before and after conception. Both hCG preparations impaired the maturation process of BMDCs. rhCG treatment did nei-ther alter cytokine secretion by BMDCs nor their ability to drive TH1, TH2 or TH17 differen-tiation. rhCG-treated BMDCs augmented the number of Treg cells within the T cell popula-tion. Adoptive transfer of rhCG-treated BMDCs after conception did not influence pregnancy outcome. However, transfer of hCG-treated BMDCs prior to mating had a protective effect on pregnancy. This positive effect was accompanied by increased Treg cell numbers and decidual IL-10 and TGF-β expression. Our results unveil the importance of hCG in retaining DCs in a tolerogenic state, thereby promoting Treg cell increment and supporting fetal survival.

  2. Immune Modulatory Effects of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin on Dendritic Cells Supporting Fetal Survival in Murine Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauven, Dominique; Ehrentraut, Stefanie; Langwisch, Stefanie; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Schumacher, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critically involved in the determination of immunity vs. tolerance. Hence, DCs are key regulators of immune responses either favoring or disfavoring fetal survival. Several factors were proposed to modulate DC phenotype and function during pregnancy. Here, we studied whether the pregnancy hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is involved in DC regulation. In vitro, bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were stimulated in the presence or absence of urine-purified or recombinant hCG (rhCG) preparations. Subsequently, BMDC maturation was assessed. Cytokine secretion of activated BMDCs and their capability to enforce TH1, TH2, TH17, or Treg cell differentiation was determined after rhCG treatment. Moreover, the in vivo potential of hCG-modulated BMDCs to influence pregnancy outcome, Treg cell number, and local cytokine expression was evaluated after adoptive transfer in a murine abortion-prone model before and after conception. Both hCG preparations impaired the maturation process of BMDCs. rhCG treatment did neither alter cytokine secretion by BMDCs nor their ability to drive TH1, TH2, or TH17 differentiation. rhCG-treated BMDCs augmented the number of Treg cells within the T cell population. Adoptive transfer of rhCG-treated BMDCs after conception did not influence pregnancy outcome. However, transfer of hCG-treated BMDCs prior to mating had a protective effect on pregnancy. This positive effect was accompanied by increased Treg cell numbers and decidual IL-10 and TGF-β expression. Our results unveil the importance of hCG in retaining DCs in a tolerogenic state, thereby promoting Treg cell increment and supporting fetal survival. PMID:27895621

  3. E-cadherin gene-engineered feeder systems for supporting undifferentiated growth of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Masanobu; Ito, Akira; Kiyohara, Takehiko; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2010-11-01

    Conventionally, embryonic stem (ES) cells are cultured on a cell layer of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as feeder cells to support undifferentiated growth of ES cells. In this study, cell-cell interactions between mouse ES and feeder cells were artificially engineered via an epithelial cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, whose expression is considerable in ES cells. Mouse mesenchymal STO and NIH3T3 cells that were genetically engineered to express E-cadherin were used in ES cell cultures as feeder cells. ES cells cultured on the E-cadherin-expressing feeder cells maintained the expression of stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase (AP), Oct3/4, Nanog and Sox2, and the efficiency of AP-positive colony formation was comparable to MEFs, and much better than parental STO and NIH3T3 cells. Furthermore, ES cells maintained on the E-cadherin-expressing feeder cells possessed the ability to differentiate into the three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo. The results indicated that E-cadherin expression in feeder cells could improve the performance of feeder cells, which may be further applicable to create new artificial feeder cell lines.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Supports and Half‐Cells for Solid Oxide Electrolysis Influenced by Alumina‐Zirconia Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlas, Benoit; Ni, De Wei; Frandsen, Henrik Lund;

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the durability and robustness of solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) and stacks, it is necessary to improve the strength of its components. In cathode supported SOEC, the main structural component is the Ni(O)- YSZ support. But the strength of the half-cell or cell is also...... determined by the strength of other weaker components and by the residual stress state induced by the thermal expansion mismatch. In this study, the mechanical properties of Ni(O)-3YSZ supports with a reference composition and with substitution of 3YSZ by 20A3YSZ (3YSZ with 20 wt.% Al2O3) have been tested...

  5. LOW-TEMPERATURE, ANODE-SUPPORTED HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS WITH NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Anil V. Virkar

    2003-05-23

    This report summarizes the work done during the entire project period, between October 1, 1999 and March 31, 2003, which includes a six-month no-cost extension. During the project, eight research papers have, either been, published, accepted for publication, or submitted for publication. In addition, several presentations have been made in technical meetings and workshops. The project also has provided support for four graduate students working towards advanced degrees. The principal technical objective of the project was to analyze the role of electrode microstructure on solid oxide fuel cell performance. Prior theoretical work conducted in our laboratory demonstrated that the particle size of composite electrodes has a profound effect on cell performance; the finer the particle size, the lower the activation polarization, the better the performance. The composite cathodes examined consisted of electronically conducting perovskites such as Sr-doped LaMnO{sub 3} (LSM) or Sr-doped LaCoO{sub 3} (LSC), which is also a mixed conductor, as the electrocatalyst, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) or rare earth oxide doped CeO{sub 2} as the ionic conductor. The composite anodes examined were mixtures of Ni and YSZ. A procedure was developed for the synthesis of nanosize YSZ by molecular decomposition, in which unwanted species were removed by leaching, leaving behind nanosize YSZ. Anode-supported cells were made using the as-synthesized powders, or using commercially acquired powders. The electrolyte was usually a thin ({approx}10 microns), dense layer of YSZ, supported on a thick ({approx}1 mm), porous Ni + YSZ anode. The cathode was a porous mixture of electrocatalyst and an ionic conductor. Most of the cell testing was done at 800 C with hydrogen as fuel and air as the oxidant. Maximum power densities as high as 1.8 W/cm{sup 2} were demonstrated. Polarization behavior of the cells was theoretically analyzed. A limited amount of cell testing was done using liquid

  6. High-performance anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with impregnated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinkin, D. A.; Bogdanovich, N. M.; Beresnev, S. M.; Zhuravlev, V. D.

    2015-08-01

    The 61%NiO + 39%Zr0.84Y0.16O1.92 (NiO-YSZ) and 56%NiO + 44%Zr0.83Sc0.16Ce0.01O1.92 (NiO-CeSSZ) composite powders have been prepared using two-steps and one-step combustion synthesis, respectively. The Ni-YSZ anode substrate with a low level of electrical resistance (less than 1 mOhm cm) and porosity of about 53% in the reduced state was fabricated. The functional layer of the anode with the high level of electrochemical activity was made of NiO-CeSSZ. The single anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with the bi-layer Ni-cermet anode, Zr0.84Sc0.16O1.92 film electrolyte and the Pt + 3% Zr0.84Y0.16O1.92 cathode was fabricated. The power density and the U-I curves of the fuel cell at initial state and after impregnation of the cathode and anode by praseodymium and cerium oxides, respectively, have been measured at different temperatures. The maximum of power density of the initial fuel cell was 0.35 W cm-2 at conditions of wet hydrogen (air) supply to the anode (cathode) at 900 °C. After the electrodes were impregnated, the value of power density increased by seven times and was approximately 2.4 W cm-2 at 0.6 V. It was suggested that after the electrodes impregnation the polarization resistance of the fuel cell was determined by the gas diffusion in the supported anode.

  7. Neutrophils support lung colonization of metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wculek, Stefanie K; Malanchi, Ilaria

    2015-12-17

    Despite progress in the development of drugs that efficiently target cancer cells, treatments for metastatic tumours are often ineffective. The now well-established dependency of cancer cells on their microenvironment suggests that targeting the non-cancer-cell component of the tumour might form a basis for the development of novel therapeutic approaches. However, the as-yet poorly characterized contribution of host responses during tumour growth and metastatic progression represents a limitation to exploiting this approach. Here we identify neutrophils as the main component and driver of metastatic establishment within the (pre-)metastatic lung microenvironment in mouse breast cancer models. Neutrophils have a fundamental role in inflammatory responses and their contribution to tumorigenesis is still controversial. Using various strategies to block neutrophil recruitment to the pre-metastatic site, we demonstrate that neutrophils specifically support metastatic initiation. Importantly, we find that neutrophil-derived leukotrienes aid the colonization of distant tissues by selectively expanding the sub-pool of cancer cells that retain high tumorigenic potential. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of the leukotriene-generating enzyme arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5) abrogates neutrophil pro-metastatic activity and consequently reduces metastasis. Our results reveal the efficacy of using targeted therapy against a specific tumour microenvironment component and indicate that neutrophil Alox5 inhibition may limit metastatic progression.

  8. Platelet GPIIb supports initial pulmonary retention but inhibits subsequent proliferation of melanoma cells during hematogenic metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtler, Katrin; Konrad, Ildiko; Lorenz, Michael; Schneider, Simon; Hofmaier, Sebastian; Plenagl, Florian; Stark, Konstantin; Czermak, Thomas; Tirniceriu, Anca; Eichhorn, Martin; Walch, Axel; Enders, Georg; Massberg, Steffen; Schulz, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Platelets modulate the process of cancer metastasis. However, current knowledge on the direct interaction of platelets and tumor cells is mostly based on findings obtained in vitro. We addressed the role of the platelet fibrinogen receptor glycoprotein IIb (integrin αIIb) for experimental melanoma metastasis in vivo. Highly metastatic B16-D5 melanoma cells were injected intravenously into GPIIb-deficient (GPIIb-/-) or wildtype (WT) mice. Acute accumulation of tumor cells in the pulmonary vasculature was assessed in real-time by confocal videofluorescence microscopy. Arrest of tumor cells was dramatically reduced in GPIIb-/- mice as compared to WT. Importantly, we found that mainly multicellular aggregates accumulated in the pulmonary circulation of WT, instead B16-D5 aggregates were significantly smaller in GPIIb-/- mice. While pulmonary arrest of melanoma was clearly dependent on GPIIb in this early phase of metastasis, we also addressed tumor progression 10 days after injection. Inversely, and unexpectedly, we found that melanoma metastasis was now increased in GPIIb-/- mice. In contrast, GPIIb did not regulate local melanoma proliferation in a subcutaneous tumor model. Our data suggest that the platelet fibrinogen receptor has a differential role in the modulation of hematogenic melanoma metastasis. While platelets clearly support early steps in pulmonary metastasis via GPIIb-dependent formation of platelet-tumor-aggregates, at a later stage its absence is associated with an accelerated development of melanoma metastases. PMID:28253287

  9. Automated Cell Selection Using Support Vector Machine for Application to Spectral Nanocytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Miao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial wave spectroscopy (PWS enables quantification of the statistical properties of cell structures at the nanoscale, which has been used to identify patients harboring premalignant tumors by interrogating easily accessible sites distant from location of the lesion. Due to its high sensitivity, cells that are well preserved need to be selected from the smear images for further analysis. To date, such cell selection has been done manually. This is time-consuming, is labor-intensive, is vulnerable to bias, and has considerable inter- and intraoperator variability. In this study, we developed a classification scheme to identify and remove the corrupted cells or debris that are of no diagnostic value from raw smear images. The slide of smear sample is digitized by acquiring and stitching low-magnification transmission. Objects are then extracted from these images through segmentation algorithms. A training-set is created by manually classifying objects as suitable or unsuitable. A feature-set is created by quantifying a large number of features for each object. The training-set and feature-set are used to train a selection algorithm using Support Vector Machine (SVM classifiers. We show that the selection algorithm achieves an error rate of 93% with a sensitivity of 95%.

  10. Hierarchical polymeric scaffolds support the growth of MC3T3-E1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarzadeh, Rosa; Minton, Joshua A; Janney, Cara S; Smith, Tyler A; James, Paul F; Yousefi, Azizeh-Mitra

    2015-02-01

    Tissue engineering makes use of the principles of biology and engineering to sustain 3D cell growth and promote tissue repair and/or regeneration. In this study, macro/microporous scaffold architectures have been developed using a hybrid solid freeform fabrication/thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) technique. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) dissolved in 1,4-dioxane was used to generate a microporous matrix by the TIPS method. The 3D-bioplotting technique was used to fabricate 3D macroporous constructs made of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Embedding the PEG constructs inside the PLGA solution prior to the TIPS process and subsequent extraction of PEG following solvent removal (1,4-dioaxane) resulted in a macro/microporous structure. These hierarchical scaffolds with a bimodal pore size distribution (300 μm) contained orthogonally interconnected macro-channels generated by the extracted PEG. The diameter of the macro-channels was varied by tuning the dispensing parameters of the 3D bioplotter. The in vitro cell culture using murine MC3T3-E1 cell line for 21 days demonstrated that these scaffolds could provide a favorable environment to support cell adhesion and growth.

  11. TAp73 enhances the pentose phosphate pathway and supports cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenjing; Jiang, Peng; Mancuso, Anthony; Stonestrom, Aaron; Brewer, Michael D; Minn, Andy J; Mak, Tak W; Wu, Mian; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-08-01

    TAp73 is a structural homologue of the pre-eminent tumour suppressor p53. However, unlike p53, TAp73 is rarely mutated, and instead is frequently overexpressed in human tumours. It remains unclear whether TAp73 affords an advantage to tumour cells and if so, what the underlying mechanism is. Here we show that TAp73 supports the proliferation of human and mouse tumour cells. TAp73 activates the expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). By stimulating G6PD, TAp73 increases PPP flux and directs glucose to the production of NADPH and ribose, for the synthesis of macromolecules and detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The growth defect of TAp73-deficient cells can be rescued by either enforced G6PD expression or the presence of nucleosides plus an ROS scavenger. These findings establish a critical role for TAp73 in regulating metabolism, and connect TAp73 and the PPP to oncogenic cell growth.

  12. Effect of interlayer on structure and performance of anode-supported SOFC single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Tae Wook; Yang, Hae Kwang; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Yoon, Hyon Hee; Kim, Jong Sung; Park, Sang Joon

    2008-09-01

    To lower the operating temperatures in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operations, anode-supported SOFC single cells with a single dip-coated interlayer were fabricated and the effect of the interlayer on the electrolyte structure and the electrical performance was investigated. For the preparation of SOFC single cells, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, NiO-YSZ anode, and 50% YSZ-50% strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) cathode were used. In order to characterize the cells, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were utilized and the gas (air) permeability measurements were conducted for gas tightness estimation. When the interlayer was inserted onto NiO-YSZ anode, the surface roughness of anode was diminished by about 40% and dense crack-free electrolytes were obtained. The electrical performance was enhanced remarkably and the maximum power density was 0.57 W/cm(2) at 800 degrees C and 0.44 W/cm(2) at 700 degrees C. On the other hand, the effect of interlayer on the gas tightness was negligible. The characterization study revealed that the enhancement in the electrical performance was mainly attributed to the increase of ion transmission area of anode/electrolyte interface and the increase of ionic conductivity of dense crack-free electrolyte layer.

  13. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A.; Brown, Scott A.

    2011-09-29

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). To do this, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related patents that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, and within the FCT portfolio.

  14. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A.

    2012-09-28

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify patents related to hydrogen and fuel cells that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents’ current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs that are related to hydrogen and fuel cells.

  15. LRP-1 promotes cancer cell invasion by supporting ERK and inhibiting JNK signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Langlois

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1 is an endocytic receptor mediating the clearance of various extracellular molecules involved in the dissemination of cancer cells. LRP-1 thus appeared as an attractive receptor for targeting the invasive behavior of malignant cells. However, recent results suggest that LRP-1 may facilitate the development and growth of cancer metastases in vivo, but the precise contribution of the receptor during cancer progression remains to be elucidated. The lack of mechanistic insights into the intracellular signaling networks downstream of LRP-1 has prevented the understanding of its contribution towards cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Through a short-hairpin RNA-mediated silencing approach, we identified LRP-1 as a main regulator of ERK and JNK signaling in a tumor cell context. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that LRP-1 constitutes an intracellular docking site for MAPK containing complexes. By using pharmacological agents, constitutively active and dominant-negative kinases, we demonstrated that LRP-1 maintains malignant cells in an adhesive state that is favorable for invasion by activating ERK and inhibiting JNK. We further demonstrated that the LRP-1-dependent regulation of MAPK signaling organizes the cytoskeletal architecture and mediates adhesive complex turnover in cancer cells. Moreover, we found that LRP-1 is tethered to the actin network and to focal adhesion sites and controls ERK and JNK targeting to talin-rich structures. CONCLUSIONS: We identified ERK and JNK as the main molecular relays by which LRP-1 regulates focal adhesion disassembly of malignant cells to support invasion.

  16. Hair cell regeneration or the expression of related factors that regulate the fate specification of supporting cells in the cochlear ducts of embryonic and posthatch chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingling; Jin, Ran; Xu, Jincao; Ji, Yubin; Zhang, Meiguang; Zhang, Xuebo; Zhang, Xinwen; Han, Zhongming; Zeng, Shaoju

    2016-02-01

    Hair cells in posthatch chickens regenerate spontaneously through mitosis or the transdifferentiation of supporting cells in response to antibiotic injury. However, how embryonic chicken cochleae respond to antibiotic treatment remains unknown. This study is the first to indicate that unlike hair cells in posthatch chickens, the auditory epithelium was free from antibiotic injury (25-250 mg gentamicin/kg) in embryonic chickens, although FITC-conjugated gentamicin actually reached embryonic hair cells. Next, we examined and counted the cells and performed labeling for BrdU, Sox2, Atoh1/Math1, PV or p27(kip1) (triple or double labeling) in the injured cochlea ducts after gentamicin treatment at 2 h (h), 15 h, 24 h, 2 days (d), 3 d and 7 d after BrdU treatment in posthatch chickens. Our results indicated that following gentamicin administration, proliferating cells (BrdU+) were labeled for Atoh1/Math1 in the damaged areas 3d after gentamicin administration, whereas hair cells (PV+) renewed through mitosis (BrdU+) or direct transdifferentiation (BrdU-) were evident only after 5 d of gentamicin administration. In addition, Sox2 expression was up-regulated in triggered supporting cells at an early stage of regeneration, but stopped at the advent of mature hair cells. Our study also indicated that p27(kip1) was expressed in both hair cells and supporting cells but was down-regulated in a subgroup of the supporting cells that gave rise to hair cells. These data and the obtained dynamic changes of the cells labeled for BrdU, Sox2, Atoh1/Math1, PV or p27(kip1) are useful for understanding supporting cell behaviors and their fate specification during hair cell regeneration.

  17. Electrolyser and fuel cells, key elements for energy and life support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockstahler, Klaus; Funke, Helmut; Lucas, Joachim

    Both, Electrolyser and Fuel Cells are key elements for regenerative energy and life support systems. Electrolyser technology is originally intended for oxygen production in manned space habitats and in submarines, through splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. Fuel cells serve for energy production through the reaction, triggered in the presence of an electrolyte, between a fuel and an oxidant. Now combining both technologies i.e. electrolyser and fuel cell makes it a Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS). In charge mode, i.e. with energy supplied e.g. by solar cells, the electrolyser splits water into hydrogen and oxygen being stored in tanks. In discharge mode, when power is needed but no energy is available, the stored gases are converted in the fuel cell to generate electricity under the formation of water that is stored in tanks. Rerouting the water to the electrolyser makes it a closed-loop i.e. regenerative process. Different electrolyser and fuel cell technologies are being evolved. At Astrium emphasis is put on the development of an RFCS comprised of Fixed Alkaline Electrolyser (FAE) and Fuel Cell (AFC) as such technology offers a high electrical efficiency and thus reduced system weight, which is important in space applications. With increasing power demand and increasing discharge time an RFCS proves to be superior to batteries. Since the early technology development multiple design refinements were done at Astrium, funded by the European Space Agency ESA and the German National Agency DLR as well as based on company internal R and T funding. Today a complete RFCS energy system breadboard is established and the operational behavior of the system is being tested. In parallel the electrolyser itself is subject to design refinement and testing in terms of oxygen production in manned space habitats. In addition essential features and components for process monitoring and control are being developed. The present results and achievements and the dedicated

  18. Nanostructured Carbon Materials as Supports in the Preparation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Lázaro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Different advanced nanostructured carbon materials, such as carbon nanocoils, carbon nanofibers, graphitized ordered mesoporous carbons and carbon xerogels, presenting interesting features such as high electrical conductivity and extensively developed porous structure were synthesized and used as supports in the preparation of electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. The main advantage of these supports is that their physical properties and surface chemistry can be tailored to adapt the carbonaceous material to the catalytic requirements. Moreover, all of them present a highly mesoporous structure, diminishing diffusion problems, and both graphitic character and surface area can be conveniently modified. In the present work, the influence of the particular features of each material on the catalytic activity and stability was analyzed. Results have been compared with those obtained for commercial catalysts supported on Vulcan XC-72R, Pt/C and PtRu/C (ETEK. Both a highly ordered graphitic and mesopore-enriched structure of these advanced nanostructured materials resulted in an improved electrochemical performance in comparison to the commercial catalysts assayed, both towards CO and alcohol oxidation.

  19. Carbon-Supported PtRuMo Electrocatalysts for Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L.G. Fierro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The review article discusses the current status and recent findings of our investigations on the synthesis and characterization of carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells. In particular, the effect of the carbon support and the composition on the structure, stability and the activity of the PtRuMo nanoparticles for the electrooxidation of CO, methanol and ethanol have been studied. Different physicochemical techniques have been employed for the analysis of the catalysts structures: X-ray analytical methods (XRD, XPS, TXRF, thermogravimetry (TGA and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, as well as a number of electrochemical techniques like CO adsorption studies, current-time curves and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Furthermore, spectroscopic methods adapted to the electrochemical systems for in situ studies, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS, have been used to evaluate the oxidation process of CO, methanol and ethanol over the carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts.

  20. Accelerated creep in solid oxide fuel cell anode supports during reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, H. L.; Makowska, M.; Greco, F.; Chatzichristodoulou, C.; Ni, D. W.; Curran, D. J.; Strobl, M.; Kuhn, L. T.; Hendriksen, P. V.

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the reliability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks during operation, the stress field in the stack must be known. During operation the stress field will depend on time as creep processes relax stresses. The creep of reduced Ni-YSZ anode support at operating conditions has been studied previously. In this work a newly discovered creep phenomenon taking place during the reduction is reported. This relaxes stresses at a much higher rate (∼×104) than creep during operation. The phenomenon was studied both in three-point bending and uniaxial tension. Differences between the two measurements could be explained by newly observed stress promoted reduction. Finally, samples exposed to a small tensile stress (∼0.004 MPa) were observed to expand during reduction, which is in contradiction to previous literature. These observations suggest that release of internal residual stresses between the NiO and the YSZ phases occurs during reduction. The accelerated creep should practically eliminate any residual stress in the anode support in an SOFC stack, as has previously been indirectly observed. This phenomenon has to be taken into account both in the production of stacks and in the simulation of the stress field in a stack based on anode supported SOFCs.

  1. Supportive angiogenic and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells and endothelial cells in monolayer and co-cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florian Böhrnsen; Henning Schliephake

    2016-01-01

    Sites of implantation with compromised biology may be unable to achieve the required level of angiogenic and osteogenic regeneration. The specific function and contribution of different cell types to the formation of prevascularized, osteogenic networks in co-culture remains unclear. To determine how bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) contribute to cellular proangiogenic differentiation, we analysed the differentiation of BMSCs and ECs in standardized monolayer, Transwell and co-cultures. BMSCs were derived from the iliac bone marrow of five patients, characterized and differentiated in standardized monolayers, permeable Transwells and co-cultures with human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs). The expression levels of CD31, von Willebrand factor, osteonectin (ON) and Runx2 were assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of alkaline phosphatase, ON and CD31 was demonstrated via histochemical and immunofluorescence analysis. The results showed that BMSCs and HUVECs were able to retain their lineage-specific osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation in direct and indirect co-cultures. In addition, BMSCs demonstrated a supportive expression of angiogenic function in co-culture, while HUVEC was able to improve the expression of osteogenic marker molecules in BMSCs.

  2. TESTING AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NASA 5 CM BY 5 CM BI-SUPPORTED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS OPERATED IN BOTH FUEL CELL AND STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. C. O' Brien; J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; X. Zhang; S. C. Farmer; T. L. Cable; J. A. Setlock

    2011-11-01

    A series of 5 cm by 5 cm bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 cm by 5 cm SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.

  3. TAM receptors support neural stem cell survival, proliferation and neuronal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Ji

    Full Text Available Tyro3, Axl and Mertk (TAM receptor tyrosine kinases play multiple functional roles by either providing intrinsic trophic support for cell growth or regulating the expression of target genes that are important in the homeostatic regulation of immune responses. TAM receptors have been shown to regulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis by negatively regulation of glial cell activation in central nervous system (CNS. In the present study, we further demonstrated that all three TAM receptors were expressed by cultured primary neural stem cells (NSCs and played a direct growth trophic role in NSCs proliferation, neuronal differentiation and survival. The cultured primary NSCs lacking TAM receptors exhibited slower growth, reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis as shown by decreased BrdU incorporation and increased TUNEL labeling, than those from the WT NSCs. In addition, the neuronal differentiation and maturation of the mutant NSCs were impeded, as characterized by less neuronal differentiation (β-tubulin III+ and neurite outgrowth than their WT counterparts. To elucidate the underlying mechanism that the TAM receptors play on the differentiating NSCs, we examined the expression profile of neurotrophins and their receptors by real-time qPCR on the total RNAs from hippocampus and primary NSCs; and found that the TKO NSC showed a significant reduction in the expression of both nerve growth factor (NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, but accompanied by compensational increases in the expression of the TrkA, TrkB, TrkC and p75 receptors. These results suggest that TAM receptors support NSCs survival, proliferation and differentiation by regulating expression of neurotrophins, especially the NGF.

  4. Influence of supporting electrolyte in electricity generation and degradation of organic pollutants in photocatalytic fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Voon, Chun-Hong; Yusuf, Sara Yasina; Yusoff, Nik Athirah; Lee, Sin-Li

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of different supporting electrolyte (Na2SO4, MgSO4, NaCl) in degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and generation of electricity. Zinc oxide (ZnO) was immobilized onto carbon felt acted as photoanode, while Pt-coated carbon paper as photocathode was placed in a single chamber photocatalytic fuel cell, which then irradiated by UV lamp for 24 h. The degradation and mineralization of RB5 with 0.1 M NaCl rapidly decreased after 24-h irradiation time, followed by MgSO4, Na2SO4 and without electrolyte. The voltage outputs for Na2SO4, MgSO4 and NaCl were 908, 628 and 523 mV, respectively, after 24-h irradiation time; meanwhile, their short-circuit current density, J SC, was 1.3, 1.2 and 1.05 mA cm(-2), respectively. The power densities for Na2SO4, MgSO4 and NaCl were 0.335, 0.256 and 0.245 mW cm(-2), respectively. On the other hand, for without supporting electrolyte, the voltage output and short-circuit current density was 271.6 mV and 0.055 mA cm(-2), respectively. The supporting electrolyte NaCl showed greater performance in degradation of RB5 and generation of electricity due to the formation of superoxide radical anions which enhance the degradation of dye. The mineralization of RB5 with different supporting electrolyte was measured through spectrum analysis and reduction in COD concentration.

  5. Hypoxia Affects the Structure of Breast Cancer Cell-Derived Matrix to Support Angiogenic Responses of Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hielscher, Abigail; Qiu, Connie; Porterfield, Josh; Smith, Quinton; Gerecht, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia, a common feature of the tumor environment and participant in tumor progression, is known to alter gene and protein expression of several Extracellular Matrix (ECM) proteins, many of which have roles in angiogenesis. Previously, we reported that ECM deposited from co-cultures of Neonatal Fibroblasts (NuFF) with breast cancer cells, supported 3-dimensional vascular morphogenesis. Here, we sought to characterize the hypoxic ECM and to identify whether the deposited ECM induce angiogenic responses in Endothelial Cells (ECs). NuFF and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were co-cultured, subjected to alternating cycles of 24 hours of 1% (hypoxia) and 21% (atmospheric) oxygen and de-cellularized for analyses of deposited ECM. We report differences in mRNA expression profiles of matrix proteins and crosslinking enzymes relevant to angiogenesis in hypoxia-exposed co-cultures. Interestingly, overt differences in the expression of ECM proteins were not detected in the de-cellularized ECM; however, up-regulation of the cell-binding fragment of fibronecin was observed in the conditioned media of hypoxic co-cultures. Ultrastructure analyses of the de-cellularized ECM revealed differences in fiber morphology with hypoxic fibers more compact and aligned, occupying a greater percent area and having larger diameter fibers than atmospheric ECM. Examining the effect of hypoxic ECM on angiogenic responses of ECs, morphological differences in Capillary-Like Structures (CLS) formed atop de-cellularized hypoxic and atmospheric ECM were not evident. Interestingly, we found that hypoxic ECM regulated the expression of angiogenic factors and matrix metalloproteinases in CLS. Overall, we report that in vitro, hypoxia does not alter the composition of the ECM deposited by co-cultures of NuFF/MDA-MB-231, but rather alters fiber morphology, and induces vascular expression of angiogenic growth factors and metalloproteinases. Taken together, these results have important implications for

  6. Polymer-based mesh as supports for multi-layered 3D cell culture and assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Karen A; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron D; Ngo, Philip M; Whitesides, George M

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system-Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM)-that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells-layer-by-layer-within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis-(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format.

  7. A Novel Flow-Perfusion Bioreactor Supports 3D Dynamic Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Sailon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bone engineering requires thicker three-dimensional constructs than the maximum thickness supported by standard cell-culture techniques (2 mm. A flow-perfusion bioreactor was developed to provide chemotransportation to thick (6 mm scaffolds. Methods. Polyurethane scaffolds, seeded with murine preosteoblasts, were loaded into a novel bioreactor. Control scaffolds remained in static culture. Samples were harvested at days 2, 4, 6, and 8 and analyzed for cellular distribution, viability, metabolic activity, and density at the periphery and core. Results. By day 8, static scaffolds had a periphery cell density of 67%±5.0%, while in the core it was 0.3%±0.3%. Flow-perfused scaffolds demonstrated peripheral cell density of 94%±8.3% and core density of 76%±3.1% at day 8. Conclusions. Flow perfusion provides chemotransportation to thick scaffolds. This system may permit high throughput study of 3D tissues in vitro and enable prefabrication of biological constructs large enough to solve clinical problems.

  8. Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briault, Pauline; Rieu, Mathilde; Laucournet, Richard; Morel, Bertrand; Viricelle, Jean-Paul

    2014-12-01

    This project deals with the development and the electrochemical characterization of anode supported single chamber SOFC in a simulated environment of thermal engine exhaust gas. In the present work, a gas mixture representative of exhaust conditions is selected. It is composed of hydrocarbons (HC: propane and propene), oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and water. Only oxygen content is varied leading to different gas mixtures characterized by three ratios R = HC/O2. Concerning the cell components, a cermet made of nickel and an electrolyte material, Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) is used as anode and two cathode materials, La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) and Pr2NiO4+δ (PNO), are evaluated. The prepared cells are investigated in the various gas mixtures for temperatures ranging from 450 °C to 600 °C. Ni-CGO/CGO/LSCF-CGO cell has delivered a maximum power density of 15 mW cm-2 at 500 °C with R = HC/O2 = 0.21, while lower power densities are obtained for the other ratios, R = 0.44 and R = 0.67. Afterwards, LSCF and PNO cathode materials are compared and LSCF is found to deliver the highest power densities. Finally, by improving the electrolyte microstructure, some cells presenting a maximum power density of 25 mW cm-2 at 550 °C are produced. Moreover, up to 17% of initial HC are eliminated in the gas mixture.

  9. Accelerated creep in solid oxide fuel cell anode supports during reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Makowska, Malgorzata Grazyna; Greco, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks during operation, the stress field in the stack must be known. During operation the stress field will depend on time as creep processes relax stresses. The creep of reduced Ni-YSZ anode support at operating conditions has been...... studied previously. In this work a newly discovered creep phenomenon taking place during the reduction is reported. This relaxes stresses at a much higher rate (∼ x104) than creep during operation. The phenomenon was studied both in three-point bending and uniaxial tension. Differences between the two...... measurements could be explained by newly observed stress promoted reduction. Finally, samples exposed to a small tensile stress (∼ 0.004 MPa) were observed to expand during reduction, which is in contradiction to previous literature. These observations suggest that release of internal residual stresses between...

  10. Nanostructured polypyrrole/carbon composite as Pt catalyst support for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Li, Lei; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongming [School of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2008-10-01

    A novel catalyst support was synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole on Vulcan XC-72 carbon in naphthalene sulfonic acid (NSA) solution containing ammonium persulfate as oxidant at room temperature. Pt nanoparticles with 3-4 nm size were deposited on the prepared polypyrrole-carbon composites by chemical reduction method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements showed that Pt particles were homogeneously dispersed in polypyrrole-carbon composites. The Pt nanoparticles-dispersed catalyst composites were used as anodes of fuel cells for hydrogen and methanol oxidation. Cyclic voltammetry measurements of hydrogen and methanol oxidation showed that Pt nanoparticles deposited on polypyrrole-carbon with NSA as dopant exhibit better catalytic activity than those on plain carbon. This result might be due to the higher electrochemically available surface areas, electronic conductivity and easier charge-transfer at polymer/carbon particle interfaces allowing a high dispersion and utilization of deposited Pt nanoparticles. (author)

  11. Sulfur Poisoning of the Water Gas Shift Reaction on Anode Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of fuels containing sulfur impurities is important regarding durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) because they are present in various potential fuels for SOFC applications. The effect of H2S in the ppm range on the performance of state-of-the-art anode supported SOFC at 850...... and 750°C is evaluated in either hydrogen/steam or hydrogen/steam/CO fuel. It was found that the poisoning effect is more severe in H2/H2O/CO vs. H2/H2O fuel. Only ∼8 ppm H2S can be allowed in the CO containing fuel without risking damage to the anode, whereas 90 ppm (or even more) is possible in H2/H2O...

  12. Nanostructured polypyrrole/carbon composite as Pt catalyst support for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Li, Lei; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongming

    A novel catalyst support was synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole on Vulcan XC-72 carbon in naphthalene sulfonic acid (NSA) solution containing ammonium persulfate as oxidant at room temperature. Pt nanoparticles with 3-4 nm size were deposited on the prepared polypyrrole-carbon composites by chemical reduction method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements showed that Pt particles were homogeneously dispersed in polypyrrole-carbon composites. The Pt nanoparticles-dispersed catalyst composites were used as anodes of fuel cells for hydrogen and methanol oxidation. Cyclic voltammetry measurements of hydrogen and methanol oxidation showed that Pt nanoparticles deposited on polypyrrole-carbon with NSA as dopant exhibit better catalytic activity than those on plain carbon. This result might be due to the higher electrochemically available surface areas, electronic conductivity and easier charge-transfer at polymer/carbon particle interfaces allowing a high dispersion and utilization of deposited Pt nanoparticles.

  13. Highly Porous Carbon Derived from MOF-5 as a Support of ORR Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Inayat Ali; Qian, Yuhong; Badshah, Amin; Nadeem, Muhammad Arif; Zhao, Dan

    2016-07-13

    The development of highly competent electrocatalysts for the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at cathodes of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is extremely important for their long-term operation and wide applications. Herein, we present highly efficient ORR electrocatalysts based on Pt/Ni bimetallic nanoparticles dispersed on highly porous carbon obtained via pyrolysis of a metal-organic framework MOF-5. In comparison to the commercial Pt/C (20%), the electrocatalyst Pt-Ni/PC 950 (15:15%) in this study exhibits a pronounced positive shift of 90 mV in Eonset. In addition, it also demonstrates excellent long-term stability and durability during the 500-cycle continue-oxygen-supply (COS) accelerating durability tests (ADTs). The significantly improved activity and stability of Pt-Ni/PC 950 (15:15%) can be attributed to the Pt electron interaction with Ni and carbon support as has been proved in X-ray and microscopic analysis.

  14. Air-stable supported membranes for single-cell cytometry on PDMS microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, K Scott; Kang, Kyung Mo; Licata, Louise; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2010-04-07

    Protein-reinforced supported bilayer membranes (rSBMs) composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC), biotin-PE and Neutravidin were used to coat hybrid microchips composed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and glass. Since the coatings required a freshly oxidized, hydrophilic substrate, a novel method to rapidly connect reservoirs using plasma oxidation was first developed and found to support up to 5.2 N cm(-2) (1.5 N) pull-off force. rSBMs were then assembled in the oxidized hydrophilic channels. The electroosmotic mobility (mu(eo)) of rSBM-coated channels was measured over a 3 h time to evaluate the stability of the coatings for microchip electrophoresis. rSBM-coated microchips with a simple cross-design had excellent properties for microchip separations, yielding efficiencies of up to 700,000 plates m(-1) for fluorescent dyes and peptides. The separation performance of rSBM and PC-coated channels was evaluated after repeatedly drying and rehydrating the channels. The separation efficiency of fluorescein on PC-coated devices decreased by 40% after one dehydration cycle and nearly 75% after 3 cycles. In contrast for rSBM-coated devices there was no significant change in the fluorescein efficiency until the third cycle (10% decreased efficiency). rSBM-coated channels were also markedly more stable when placed in a dehydrated state during long-term storage compared to PC-coated channels, and showed reduced chip failure and no reduction in performance for up to one month of dehydrated storage. Finally, rSBM-coated devices were used to perform single-cell cytometry. Microchips that had been dehydrated, stored two weeks, and rehydrated prior to use demonstrated similar performance to newly coated devices for the separation of fluorescein and carboxyfluorescein from single cells. Thus rSBM-coated devices were rugged withstanding electric fields, prolonged storage under dehydrated conditions, and biofouling by cellular constituents while maintaining excellent separation

  15. Enhanced stability of multilayer graphene-supported catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinkas, A.; Hempelmann, R.; Heinzel, A.; Peinecke, V.; Radev, I.; Natter, H.

    2015-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the field of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is to enhance the lifetime and the long-term stability of PEMFC electrodes, especially of cathodes, furthermore, to reduce their platinum loading, which could lead to a cost reduction for efficient PEMFCs. These demands could be achieved with a new catalyst support architecture consisting of a composite of carbon structures with significant different morphologies. A highly porous cathode catalyst support layer is prepared by addition of various carbon types (carbon black particles, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)) to multilayer graphene (MLG). The reported optimized cathodes shows extremely high durability and similar performance to commercial standard cathodes but with 89% lower Pt loading. The accelerated aging protocol (AAP) on the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) shows that the presence of MLG increases drastically the durability and the Pt-extended electrochemical surface area (ECSA). In fact, after the AAP slightly enhanced performance can be observed for the MLG-containing cathodes instead of a performance loss, which is typical for the commercial carbon-based cathodes. Furthermore, the presence of MLG drastically decreases the ECSA loss rate. The MLG-containing cathodes show up to 6.8 times higher mass-normalized Pt-extended ECSA compared to the commercial standard systems.

  16. Micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell based on a porous yttria-stabilized zirconia support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthi, Dhruba; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    2014-08-29

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are promising electrochemical energy conversion devices owing to their high power generation efficiency and environmentally benign operation. Micro-tubular SOFCs, which have diameters ranging from a few millimeters to the sub-millimeter scale, offer several advantages over competing SOFCs such as high volumetric power density, good endurance against thermal cycling, and flexible sealing between fuel and oxidant streams. Herein, we successfully realized a novel micro-tubular SOFC design based on a porous yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) support using multi-step dip coating and co-sintering methods. The micro-tubular SOFC consisted of Ni-YSZ, YSZ, and strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM)-YSZ as the anode, electrolyte, and cathode, respectively. In addition, to facilitate current collection from the anode and cathode, Ni and LSM were applied as an anode current collector and cathode current collector, respectively. Micro-crystalline cellulose was selected as a pore former to achieve better shrinkage behavior of the YSZ support so that the electrolyte layer could be densified at a co-sintering temperature of 1300 °C. The developed micro-tubular design showed a promising electrochemical performance with maximum power densities of 525, 442, and 354 mW cm(-2) at 850, 800, and 750 °C, respectively.

  17. Carbon Supported Ag Nanoparticles as High Performance Cathode Catalyst for Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le eXin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A solution phase-based nanocapsule method was successfully developed to synthesize non-precious metal catalyst - carbon supported Ag nanoparticles (Ag/C. XRD patterns and TEM image show Ag nanoparticles with a small average size (5.4 nm and narrow size distribution (2-9 nm are uniformly dispersed on the carbon black Vulcan XC-72 support. The intrinsic activity and pathway of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR on the Ag/C and commercial Pt/C were investigated using rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE tests at room temperature. The results confirmed that the 4-electron pathway of ORR proceeds on small Ag nanoparticles, and showed comparable ORR activities on the self-prepared Ag/C and a commercial Pt/C. A single H2-O2 anion exchange membrane fuel cell with the Ag/C cathode catalyst exhibited an open circuit potential of 0.98 V and a peak power density of 190 mW/cm2 at 80 oC.

  18. Can the Outputs of LGN Y-Cells Support Emotion Recognition? A Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Cesarei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that emotional visual input is processed along both a slower cortical pathway and a faster subcortical pathway which comprises the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN, the superior colliculus, the pulvinar, and finally the amygdala. However, anatomical as well as functional evidence concerning the subcortical route is lacking. Here, we adopt a computational approach in order to investigate whether the visual representation that is achieved in the LGN may support emotion recognition and emotional response along the subcortical route. In four experiments, we show that the outputs of LGN Y-cells support neither facial expression categorization nor the same/different expression matching by an artificial classificator. However, the same classificator is able to perform at an above chance level in a statistics-based categorization of scenes containing animals and scenes containing people and of light and dark patterns. It is concluded that the visual representation achieved in the LGN is insufficient to allow for the recognition of emotional facial expression.

  19. Physical supports from liver cancer cells are essential for differentiation and remodeling of endothelial cells in a HepG2-HUVEC co-culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiew, Geraldine Giap Ying; Fu, Afu; Low, Kar Perng; Luo, Kathy Qian

    2015-06-08

    Blood vessel remodeling is crucial in tumor growth. Growth factors released by tumor cells and endothelium-extracellular matrix interactions are highlighted in tumor angiogenesis, however the physical tumor-endothelium interactions are highly neglected. Here, we report that the physical supports from hepatocellular carcinoma, HepG2 cells, are essential for the differentiation and remodeling of endothelial cells. In a HepG2-HUVEC co-culture model, endothelial cells in direct contact with HepG2 cells could differentiate and form tubular structures similar to those plated on matrigel. By employing HepG2 cell sheet as a supportive layer, endothelial cells formed protrusions and sprouts above it. In separate experiments, fixed HepG2 cells could stimulate endothelial cells differentiation while the conditioned media could not, indicating that physical interactions between tumor and endothelial cells were indispensable. To further investigate the endothelium-remodeling mechanisms, the co-culture model was treated with inhibitors targeting different angiogenic signaling pathways. Inhibitors targeting focal adhesions effectively inhibited the differentiation of endothelial cells, while the growth factor receptor inhibitor displayed little effect. In conclusion, the co-culture model has provided evidences of the essential role of cancer cells in the differentiation and remodeling of endothelial cells, and is a potential platform for the discovery of new anti-angiogenic agents for liver cancer therapy.

  20. Magnetron sputtered gadolinia-doped ceria diffusion barriers for metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Steffen; Klemensø, Trine; Christensen, Bjarke H.;

    2014-01-01

    and substrate bias voltage. A GDC layer thickness of 0.6 μm is found to effectively block Sr diffusion when bias voltage and deposition temperature is tuned to promote dense coatings. The adatom mobility has a large influence on the film density. Low temperature and bias voltage result in underdense column......Gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) thin films are deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering in an industrial-scale setup and implemented as barrier layers between the cathode and electrolyte in metal-based solid oxide fuel cells consisting of a metal support, an electrolyte of ZrO2 co-doped with Sc2O3...... and Y2O3 (ScYSZ) and a Sr-doped lanthanum cobalt oxide cathode. In order to optimize the deposition of GDC to obtain high electrochemical performance of the cells, the influence of film thickness and adatom mobility is studied. The adatom mobility is varied by tuning the deposition temperature...

  1. Supported PtRu on mesoporous carbons for direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbizzani, Catia; Beninati, Sabina; Soavi, Francesca; Varzi, Alberto; Mastragostino, Marina [University of Bologna, Department of Metal Science, Electrochemistry and Chemical Techniques, via San Donato 15, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2008-12-01

    We prepared and characterized several cryogel mesoporous carbons of different pore size distribution and report the catalytic activity of PtRu supported on mesoporous carbons of pore size >15 nm in passive and in active direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). At room temperature (RT), the specific maximum power of the passive DMFCs with mesoporous carbon/PtRu systems as anode was in the range 3-5 W g{sup -1}. Passive DMFC assembly and RT tests limit the performance of the electrocatalytic systems and the anodes were thus tested in active DMFCs at 30, 60 and 80 C. Their responses were also compared to those of commercial Vulcan carbon/PtRu. At 80 C, the specific maximum power of the active DMFC with C656/PtRu was 37 W g{sup -1} and the required amount of Pt per kW estimated at 0.4 V cell voltage was 31 g kW{sup -1}, a value less than half that of Vulcan carbon/PtRu. (author)

  2. Isonitrosoacetophenone drives transcriptional reprogramming in Nicotiana tabacum cells in support of innate immunity and defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud T Djami-Tchatchou

    Full Text Available Plants respond to various stress stimuli by activating broad-spectrum defense responses both locally as well as systemically. As such, identification of expressed genes represents an important step towards understanding inducible defense responses and assists in designing appropriate intervention strategies for disease management. Genes differentially expressed in tobacco cell suspensions following elicitation with isonitrosoacetophenone (INAP were identified using mRNA differential display and pyro-sequencing. Sequencing data produced 14579 reads, which resulted in 198 contigs and 1758 singletons. Following BLAST analyses, several inducible plant defense genes of interest were identified and classified into functional categories including signal transduction, transcription activation, transcription and protein synthesis, protein degradation and ubiquitination, stress-responsive, defense-related, metabolism and energy, regulation, transportation, cytoskeleton and cell wall-related. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate the expression of 17 selected target genes within these categories. Results indicate that INAP has a sensitising or priming effect through activation of salicylic acid-, jasmonic acid- and ethylene pathways that result in an altered transcriptome, with the expression of genes involved in perception of pathogens and associated cellular re-programming in support of defense. Furthermore, infection assays with the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci confirmed the establishment of a functional anti-microbial environment in planta.

  3. LOW-TEMPERATURE, ANODE-SUPPORTED HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS WITH NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anil V. Virkar

    2001-09-26

    Anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells with Ni + yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode, YSZ-samaria-doped ceria (SDC) bi-layer electrolyte and Sr-doped LaCoO{sub 3} (LSC) + SDC cathode were fabricated. Fuel used consisted of H{sub 2} diluted with He, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O or CO{sub 2}, mixtures of H{sub 2} and CO, and mixtures of CO and CO{sub 2}. Cell performance was measured at 800 C with above-mentioned fuel gas mixtures and air as oxidant. For a given concentration of the diluent, the cell performance was higher with He as the diluent than with N{sub 2} as the diluent. Mass transport through porous Ni-YSZ anode for H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, CO-CO{sub 2} binary systems and H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-diluent gas ternary systems was analyzed using multicomponent gas diffusion theory. At high concentrations of the diluent, the maximum achievable current density was limited by the anodic concentration polarization. From this measured limiting current density, the corresponding effective gas diffusivity was estimated. Highest effective diffusivity was estimated for fuel gas mixtures containing H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-He mixtures ({approx}0.34 cm{sup 2}/s), and the lowest for CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures ({approx}0.07 cm{sup 2}/s). The lowest performance was observed with CO-CO{sub 2} mixture as a fuel, which in part was attributed to the lowest effective diffusivity of the fuels tested.

  4. Hierarchically oriented macroporous anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with thin ceria electrolyte film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zhang, Yanxiang; Baker, Jeffrey; Majumdar, Prasun; Yang, Zhibin; Han, Minfang; Chen, Fanglin

    2014-04-09

    Application of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with ceria based electrolyte has often been limited by high cost of electrolyte film fabrication and high electrode polarization. In this study, dense Gd0.1Ce0.9O2 (GDC) thin film electrolytes have been fabricated on hierarchically oriented macroporous NiO-GDC anodes by a combination of freeze-drying tape-casting of the NiO-GDC anode, drop-coating GDC slurry on NiO-GDC anode, and co-firing the electrolyte/anode bilayers. Using 3D X-ray microscopy and subsequent analysis, it has been determined that the NiO-GDC anode substrates have a porosity of around 42% and channel size from around 10 μm at the electrolyte side to around 20 μm at the other side of the NiO-GDC (away from the electrolyte), indicating a hierarchically oriented macroporous NiO-GDC microstructure. Such NiO-GDC microstructure shows a tortuosity factor of ∼1.3 along the thickness direction, expecting to facilitate gas diffusion in the anode during fuel cell operation. SOFCs with such Ni-GDC anode, GDC film (30 μm) electrolyte, and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-GDC (LSCF-GDC) cathode show significantly enhanced cell power output of 1.021 W cm(-2) at 600 °C using H2 as fuel and ambient air as oxidant. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) analysis indicates a decrease in both activation and concentration polarizations. This study has demonstrated that freeze-drying tape-casting is a very promising approach to fabricate hierarchically oriented porous substrate for SOFC and other applications.

  5. Dose escalation of the hypoxic cell sensitizer etanidazole combined with ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide, and autologous hematopoietic stem cell support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, A D; Wheeler, C; Ayash, L J; Schwartz, G; Ibrahim, J; Mills, L; McCauley, M; Coleman, N; Warren, D; Schnipper, L; Antman, K H; Teicher, B A; Frei, E

    1998-06-01

    Multiple mechanisms of drug resistance contribute to treatment failure. Although high-dose therapy attempts to overwhelm these defenses pharmacologically, this approach is only successful in a fraction of treated patients. Many drug resistance mechanisms are shared between malignant and normal cells, but the expression of various drug resistance mechanisms associated with hypoxia is largely confined to tumor tissue. Thus, reversal of this mechanism is likely to provide a therapeutic advantage to the host. This study was designed to define the dose-limiting toxicities and maximum tolerated dose of etanidazole when it is given concurrently with high-dose ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE), with hematopoietic stem cell support. The maximum tolerated doses of high-dose ICE were administered concurrently with dose escalations of etanidazole, a hypoxic cell sensitizer. All agents were given by 96-h continuous i.v. infusion beginning on day -7. Mesna uroprotection was provided. Autologous marrow and cytokine mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells were reinfused on day 0. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was administered following reinfusion until the granulocytes recovered to > 1000/microliter. Fifty-five adults with advanced malignancies were enrolled in cohorts of five to nine patients. Four dose levels of etanidazole between 3 and 5.5 g/m2/day (12, 16, 20, and 22 g/m2 total doses) and two doses of carboplatin (1600 and 1800 mg/m2 total doses) were evaluated. Seven patients died of organ toxicity (13%); two each from veno-occlusive disease of liver and sepsis; and one each from sudden death, renal failure, and refractory thrombocytopenic hemorrhage. Five deaths occurred at the top dose level. One additional patient suffered a witnessed cardiorespiratory arrest from ventricular fibrillation and was resuscitated. Dose-dependent and largely reversible peripheral neuropathy was observed consisting of two syndromes: severe cramping myalgic/neuralgic pain

  6. Ferrite-based perovskites as cathode materials for anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, Andreas; Haanappel, Vincent A.C.; Uhlenbruck, Sven; Tietz, Frank; Stoever, Detlev [Institute for Materials and Processes in Energy Systems, Forschungszentrum Juelich, IWV-1, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2005-05-12

    The properties and the applicability of iron- and cobalt-containing perovskites were evaluated as cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in comparison to state-of-the-art manganite-based perovskites. The materials examined were La{sub 1-x-y}Sr{sub x}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (x=0.2 and 0.4; y=0-0.05), La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3-{delta}}, La{sub 0.7}Ba{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} and Ce{sub 0.05}Sr{sub 0.95}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}}. The main emphasis was placed on the electrochemical properties of the materials, which were investigated on planar anode-supported SOFCs with 8 mol% yttria-stabilised zirconia (8YSZ) electrolytes. An interlayer of the composition Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-{delta}} was placed between the electrolyte and the cathode to prevent undesired chemical reactions between the materials. The sintering temperatures of the cathodes were adapted for each of the materials to obtain similar microstructures. In comparison to the SOFCs with state-of-the-art manganite-based cathodes, SOFCs with La{sub 1-x-y}Sr{sub x}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} cathodes achieved much higher current densities. Small A-site deficiency and high strontium content had a particularly positive effect on cell performance. The measured current densities of cells with these cathodes were as high as 1.76 A/cm{sup 2} at 800 {sup o}C and 0.7 V, which is about twice the current density of cells with LSM/YSZ cathodes. SOFCs with La{sub 0.58}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} cathodes have been operated for more than 5000 h in endurance tests with a degradation of 1.0-1.5% per 1000 h.

  7. eDNA: A Bio-Inspired Reconfigurable Hardware Cell Architecture Supporting Self-organisation and Self-healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Michael Reibel; Madsen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of a biological inspired reconfigurable hardware cell architecture which supports self-organisation and self-healing. Two fundamental processes in biology, namely fertilization-to-birth and cell self-healing have inspired the development of this cell architecture....... In biology as well as in our hardware cell architecture it is the DNA which enables these processes. We propose a platform based on the electronic DNA (eDNA) and show through simulation, its capabilities as a new generation of robust reconfigurable hardware platforms. We have created a Java based simulator...

  8. Platinum supported on titanium-ruthenium oxide is a remarkably stable electrocatayst for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrondo, Javier; Han, Taehee; Niangar, Ellazar; Wang, Chunmei; Dale, Nilesh; Adjemian, Kev; Ramani, Vijay

    2014-01-07

    We report a unique and highly stable electrocatalyst-platinum (Pt) supported on titanium-ruthenium oxide (TRO)-for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The Pt/TRO electrocatalyst was exposed to stringent accelerated test protocols designed to induce degradation and failure mechanisms identical to those seen during extended normal operation of a fuel cell automobile-namely, support corrosion during vehicle startup and shutdown, and platinum dissolution during vehicle acceleration and deceleration. These experiments were performed both ex situ (on supports and catalysts deposited onto a glassy carbon rotating disk electrode) and in situ (in a membrane electrode assembly). The Pt/TRO was compared against a state-of-the-art benchmark catalyst-Pt supported on high surface-area carbon (Pt/HSAC). In ex situ tests, Pt/TRO lost only 18% of its initial oxygen reduction reaction mass activity and 3% of its oxygen reduction reaction-specific activity, whereas the corresponding losses for Pt/HSAC were 52% and 22%. In in situ-accelerated degradation tests performed on membrane electrode assemblies, the loss in cell voltage at 1 A · cm(-2) at 100% RH was a negligible 15 mV for Pt/TRO, whereas the loss was too high to permit operation at 1 A · cm(-2) for Pt/HSAC. We clearly show that electrocatalyst support corrosion induced during fuel cell startup and shutdown is a far more potent failure mode than platinum dissolution during fuel cell operation. Hence, we posit that the need for a highly stable support (such as TRO) is paramount. Finally, we demonstrate that the corrosion of carbon present in the gas diffusion layer of the fuel cell is only of minor concern.

  9. Thymic Nurse Cells Support CD4-CD8+ Thymocytes to Differentiate into CD4+CD8+ Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aidong Li; Xueli Liu; Baochun Duan; Jie Ma

    2005-01-01

    Thymic nurse cells (TNCs) represent a unique microenvironment in the thymus for T cell maturation. In order to investigate the role of thymic nurse cells during T cell differentiation, a TNC clone, RWTE-1, which formed a typical complex with fetal thymocytes in vitro was established from normal Wistar rat. Hanging drop culture method was applied to reveal the interaction between TNCs and thymocytes. Our result revealed that eighty percent of immature CD4-CD8+ cells differentiated into CD4+CD8+ cells after a 12-hour hanging drop culture with RWTE-1. However, in a 12-hour culture of immature CD4-CD8+ cells with or without RWTE-1 supernatant, only 30% of the cells differentiated into CD4+CD8+ cells spontaneously. This observation led to the conclusion that RWTE-1 cell has the capacity to facilitate immature CD4-CD8+ thymocytes to differentiate into CD4+CD8+ T cells by direct interaction.

  10. The impact of preparation and support procedures for children with sickle cell disease undergoing MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cejda, Katherine R. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Child Life Program, Memphis, TN (United States); Smeltzer, Matthew P. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); Hansbury, Eileen N. [Baylor International Hematology Center of Excellence and the Texas Children' s Center for Global Health, Houston, TX (United States); McCarville, Mary Elizabeth; Helton, Kathleen J. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Hankins, Jane S. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Hematology, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) often undergo MRI studies to assess brain injury or to quantify hepatic iron. MRI requires the child to lie motionless for 30-60 min, thus sedation/anesthesia might be used to facilitate successful completion of exams, but this poses additional risks for SCD patients. To improve children's ability to cope with MRI examinations and avoid sedation, our institution established preparation and support procedures (PSP). To investigate the impact of PSP in reducing the need for sedation during MRI exams among children with SCD. Data on successful completion of MRI testing were compared among 5- to 12-year-olds who underwent brain MRI or liver R2*MRI with or without receiving PSP. Seventy-one children with SCD (median age 9.85 years, range 5.57-12.99 years) underwent a brain MRI (n = 60) or liver R2*MRI (n = 11). Children who received PSP were more likely to complete an interpretable MRI exam than those who did not 30 of 33; 91% vs. 27 of 38; 71%, unadjusted OR = 4.1 (P = 0.04) and OR = 8.5 (P < 0.01) when adjusting for age. PSP can help young children with SCD complete clinically interpretable, nonsedated MRI exams, avoiding the risks of sedation/anesthesia. (orig.)

  11. Preparation and characterization of Pt supported on graphene with enhanced electrocatalytic activity in fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yuchen; Liu, Jian-guo; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Wenming; Gao, Jian; Xie, Yun; Yin, Ying; Zou, Zhigang

    Pt nanoparticles are deposited onto graphene sheets via synchronous reduction of H 2PtCl 6 and graphene oxide (GO) suspension using NaBH 4. Lyophilization is introduced to avoid irreversible aggregation of graphene (G) sheets, which happens during conventional drying process. Pt/G catalysts reveal a high catalytic activity for both methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reaction compared to Pt supported on carbon black (Pt/C). The performance of Pt/G catalysts is further improved after heat treatment in N 2 atmosphere at 300 °C for 2 h, and the peak current density of methanol oxidation for Pt/G after heat treatment is almost 3.5 times higher than Pt/C. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show that the Pt particles are uniformly distributed on graphene sheets. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results demonstrate that the interaction between Pt and graphene is enhanced during annealing. It suggests that graphene has provided a new way to improve electrocatalytic activity of catalyst for fuel cell.

  12. Tungsten carbide modified high surface area carbon as fuel cell catalyst support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Minhua; Merzougui, Belabbes; Shoemaker, Krista; Stolar, Laura; Protsailo, Lesia; Mellinger, Zachary J.; Hsu, Irene J.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    Phase pure WC nanoparticles were synthesized on high surface area carbon black (800 m 2 g -1) by a temperature programmed reaction (TPR) method. The particle size of WC can be controlled under 30 nm with a relatively high coverage on the carbon surface. The electrochemical testing results demonstrated that the corrosion resistance of carbon black was improved by 2-fold with a surface modification by phase pure WC particles. However, the WC itself showed some dissolution under potential cycling. Based on the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, most of the WC on the surface was lost or transformed to oxides after 5000 potential cycles in the potential range of 0.65-1.2 V. The Pt catalyst supported on WC/C showed a slightly better ORR activity than that of Pt/C, with the Pt activity loss rate for Pt/WC/C being slightly slower compared to that of Pt/C. The performance and decay rate of Pt/WC/C were also evaluated in a fuel cell.

  13. Mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood as support for ex vivo expansion of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and for chondrogenic differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN-FUWANG; LI-JUANWANG; YI-FANWU; YINGXIANG; CHUN-GANGXIE; BING-BINGJIA; JENNYHARRINGTON; IANK.MCNIECE

    2005-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Human mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSPC) ar pluripotent, being the precursors for marrow stroma, bone, cartilage, muscle and connective tissues. Although the presence of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) in umbilical cord blood (UCB) is well known, that of MSPC has been not fully evaluated. Design and Methods. In this study, we examined the immunophenotype, the supporting function in relation to exvivo expansion of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells and the chondrogenic differentiation of cultured cells with characteristics of MSPC from UCB. When UCB nucleated cells were isolated and 107 cells cultured in IMDM with 20% fetal bovine serum, the mean number of adherent fibroblastlike colonies was 3.5±0.7/106 monuclear cells. Results. UCB-derived MSPC could be expanded for at least 15 passages. In their undifferentiated state, UCB-derived MSPC were CD 13+, CD29+, CD90+, CD105+, CD166+, SH2+,SH3+, SH4+, CD45-, CD34-, and CD14-; they produced stem cell factor, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α.UCB-derived MSPC cultured in chondrogenic media differentiated into chondrogenic cells. UCB-derived MSPC supported the proliferation and differentiation of CD34+ cells from UCB in vitro. Interpretation and Conclusions. UCB-derived MSPC have the potential to support ex vivo expansion of HSPC and chondrogenic differentiation. UCB should not be regarded as medical waste. It can serve as an alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells and may provide a unique source of fetal cells for cellular and gene therapy.

  14. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa Helen; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy;

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in developing metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (MS-SOFCs). MS-SOFCs are interesting as they potentially offer some advantages compared to conventional electrode and electrolyte supported SOFCs, such as low materials cost, better thermal...... conductivity and ductility of the support. The two later aspects improve the shock resistance and lower internal gradients within the stacks. This enables fast start-up and provides higher tolerance towards operation under transient conditions that are particularly desirable for APU applications. Today...

  15. Oct4 expression in adult human stem cells: evidence in support of the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Mei-Hui; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Kiupel, Matti; Webster, Joshua D; Olson, L Karl; Trosko, James E

    2005-02-01

    The Oct3/4 gene, a POU family transcription factor, has been noted as being specifically expressed in embryonic stem cells and in tumor cells but not in cells of differentiated tissues. With the ability to isolate adult human stem cells it became possible to test for the expression of Oct3/4 gene in adult stem cells and to test the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis. Using antibodies and PCR primers we tested human breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, mesenchyme and gastric stem cells, the cancer cell lines HeLa and MCF-7 and human, dog and rat tumors for Oct4 expression. The results indicate that adult human stem cells, immortalized non-tumorigenic cells and tumor cells and cell lines, but not differentiated cells, express Oct4. Oct4 is expressed in a few cells found in the basal layer of human skin epidermis. The data demonstrate that adult stem cells maintain expression of Oct4, consistent with the stem cell hypothesis of carcinogenesis.

  16. A Silicon-Based Nanothin Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Array with Edge Reinforced Support for Enhanced Thermal Mechanical Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jong Dae; Yu, Chen-Chiang; Su, Pei-Chen

    2016-04-13

    A silicon-based micro-solid oxide fuel cell (μ-SOFC) with electrolyte membrane array embedded in a thin silicon supporting membrane, featuring a unique edge reinforcement structure, was demonstrated by utilizing simple silicon micromachining processes. The square silicon supporting membrane, fabricated by combining deep reactive ion etching and through-wafer wet etching processes, has thicker edges and corners than the center portion of the membrane, which effectively improved the mechanical stability of the entire fuel cell array during cell fabrication and cell operation. The 20 μm thick single crystalline silicon membrane supports a large number of 80 nm thick free-standing yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes. The fuel cell array was stably maintained at the open circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.04 V for more than 30 h of operation at 350 °C. A high peak power density of 317 mW/cm(2) was obtained at 400 °C. During a rigorous in situ thermal cycling between 150 and 400 °C at a fast cooling and heating rate of 25 °C/min, the OCV of the μ-SOFC recovered to its high value of 1.07 V without any drop caused by membrane failure, which justifies the superior thermal stability of this novel cell architecture.

  17. Bone Marrow Adipocytes Facilitate Fatty Acid Oxidation Activating AMPK and a Transcriptional Network Supporting Survival of Acute Monocytic Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabe, Yoko; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Saitoh, Kaori; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Mogushi, Kaoru; Shikami, Masato; Ruvolo, Vivian; Ishizawa, Jo; Hail, Numsen; Kazuno, Saiko; Igarashi, Mamoru; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Yasunari; Arai, Hajime; Nagaoka, Isao; Miida, Takashi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael

    2017-03-15

    Leukemia cells in the bone marrow must meet the biochemical demands of increased cell proliferation and also survive by continually adapting to fluctuations in nutrient and oxygen availability. Thus, targeting metabolic abnormalities in leukemia cells located in the bone marrow is a novel therapeutic approach. In this study, we investigated the metabolic role of bone marrow adipocytes in supporting the growth of leukemic blasts. Prevention of nutrient starvation-induced apoptosis of leukemic cells by bone marrow adipocytes, as well as the metabolic and molecular mechanisms involved in this process, was investigated using various analytic techniques. In acute monocytic leukemia (AMoL) cells, the prevention of spontaneous apoptosis by bone marrow adipocytes was associated with an increase in fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) along with the upregulation of PPARγ, FABP4, CD36, and BCL2 genes. In AMoL cells, bone marrow adipocyte coculture increased adiponectin receptor gene expression and its downstream target stress response kinase AMPK, p38 MAPK with autophagy activation, and upregulated antiapoptotic chaperone HSPs. Inhibition of FAO disrupted metabolic homeostasis, increased reactive oxygen species production, and induced the integrated stress response mediator ATF4 and apoptosis in AMoL cells cocultured with bone marrow adipocytes. Our results suggest that bone marrow adipocytes support AMoL cell survival by regulating their metabolic energy balance and that the disruption of FAO in bone marrow adipocytes may be an alternative, novel therapeutic strategy for AMoL therapy. Cancer Res; 77(6); 1453-64. ©2017 AACR.

  18. SAP expression in invariant NKT cells is required for cognate help to support B-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Castro, Wilson; Agyemang, Amma F; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Carroll, Michael C; Tsokos, George C; Wang, Ninghai; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Terhorst, Cox

    2012-07-05

    One of the manifestations of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is progressive agammaglobulinemia, caused by the absence of a functional signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) in T, invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells and NK cells. Here we report that α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) activated NKT cells positively regulate antibody responses to haptenated protein antigens at multiple checkpoints, including germinal center formation and affinity maturation. Whereas NKT cell-dependent B cell responses were absent in SAP(-/-).B6 mice that completely lack NKT cells, the small number of SAP-deficient NKT cells in SAP(-/-).BALB/c mice adjuvated antibody production, but not the germinal center reaction. To test the hypothesis that SAP-deficient NKT cells can facilitate humoral immunity, SAP was deleted after development in SAP(fl/fl).tgCreERT2.B6 mice. We find that NKT cell intrinsic expression of SAP is dispensable for noncognate helper functions, but is critical for providing cognate help to antigen-specific B cells. These results demonstrate that SLAM-family receptor-regulated cell-cell interactions are not limited to T-B cell conjugates. We conclude that in the absence of SAP, several routes of NKT cell-mediated antibody production are still accessible. The latter suggests that residual NKT cells in XLP patients might contribute to variations in dysgammaglobulinemia.

  19. Cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) supports tumor cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, K; Albrechtsen, R; Gilpin, B J;

    1999-01-01

    The ADAMs (A disintegrin and metalloprotease) comprise a family of membrane-anchored cell surface proteins with a putative role in cell-cell and/or cell-matrix interactions. By immunostaining, ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) was up-regulated in several human carcinomas and could be detected along the tum...

  20. Nanostructured carbon electrocatalyst supports for intermediate-temperature fuel cells: Single-walled versus multi-walled structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papandrew, Alexander B.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; Tian, Mengkun; Tennyson, Wesley D.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Geohegan, David B.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    It is unknown if nanostructured carbons possess the requisite electrochemical stability to be used as catalyst supports in the cathode of intermediate-temperature solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) based on the CsH2PO4 electrolyte. To investigate this application, single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were used as supports for Pt catalysts in SAFCs operating at 250 °C. SWNH-based cathodes display greater maximum activity than their MWNT-based counterparts at a cell voltage of 0.8 V, but are unstable in the SAFC cathode as a consequence of electrochemical carbon corrosion. MWNT-based cells are resistant to this effect and capable of operation for at least 160 h at 0.6 V and 250 °C. Cells fabricated with nanostructured carbon supports are more active (52 mA cm-1vs. 28 mA cm-1 at 0.8 V) than state-of-the-art carbon-free formulations while simultaneously displaying enhanced Pt utilization (40 mA mgPt-1vs. 16 mA mgPt-1 at 0.8 V). These results suggest that MWNTs are a viable support material for developing stable, high-performance, low-cost air electrodes for solid-state electrochemical devices operating above 230 °C.

  1. Fabrication and evaluation of the thin NiFe supported solid oxide fuel cell by co-firing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Hyun; Kim, Haekyoung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Min [Fuel Cell Project, Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang 790-330 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are one of the most promising candidates for power plants as well as portable applications due to their good mechanical and thermal properties. In this study, the thin NiFe supported SOFC, which consisted of thin metal support (NiFe, {proportional_to}70 {mu}m), anode functional layer (Ni-YSZ, {proportional_to}30 {mu}m), electrolyte (YSZ, {proportional_to}15 {mu}m), and cathode (LSCF, {proportional_to}30 {mu}m), was fabricated through tape casting and co-firing method. The cell showed 1.05-1.1 V of open circuit voltage and 1.4 W cm{sup -2} of maximum power density at 800 C with the ohmic resistance (R{sub ohm}) of 0.12 {omega} cm{sup 2} and the polarization resistance (R{sub p}) of 0.38 {omega} cm{sup 2}. The high performance and the successful measurement of thin metal supported cell showed the possibility for mobile applications through the large area cell fabrications. (author)

  2. Fabrication and Characterization of Graded Anodes for Anode-Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells by Tape Casting and Lamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltran-Lopez, J.F.; Laguna-Bercero, M.A.; Gurauskis, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Graded anodes for anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are fabricated by tape casting and subsequent cold lamination of plates using different compositions. Rheological parameters are adjusted to obtain stable suspensions for tape casting. The conditions for the tape casting and laminat...

  3. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-08-01

    This report documents the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  4. The synergistic effect of beta-boswellic acid and Nurr1 overexpression on dopaminergic programming of antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1-expressing murine embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abasi, M; Massumi, M; Riazi, G; Amini, H

    2012-10-11

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which the nigro-striatal dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons have been selectively lost. Due to side effects of levodopa, a dopamine precursor drug, recently cell replacement therapy for PD has been considered. Lack of sufficient amounts of, embryos and ethical problems regarding the use of dopamine-rich embryonic neural cells have limited the application of these cells for PD cell therapy. Therefore, many investigators have focused on using the pluripotent stem cells to generate DAergic neurons. This study is aimed first to establish a mouse embryonic stem (mES) cell line that can stably co-express Nurr1 (Nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 2) transcription factor in order to efficiently generate DAergic neurons, and glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX-1) to protect the differentiated DAergic-like cells against oxidative stress. In addition to genetic engineering of ES cells, the effect of Beta-boswellic acid (BBA) on DAergic differentiation course of mES cells was sought in the present study. To that end, the feeder-independent CGR8 mouse embryonic stem cells were transduced by Nurr1- and GPX-1-harboring Lentiviruses and the generated Nurr1/GPX-1-expresssing ES clones were characterized and verified. Gene expression analyses demonstrated that BBA treatment and overexpression of Nurr1 has a synergistic effect on derivation of DAergic neurons from Nurr1/GPX-1-expressing ES cells. The differentiated cells could exclusively synthesize and secrete dopamine in response to stimuli. Overexpression of GPX-1 in genetically engineered Nurr1/GPX-1-ES cells increased the viability of these cells during their differentiation into CNS stem cells. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that Nurr1-overexpressing feeder-independent ES cells like the feeder-dependent ES cells, can be efficiently programmed into functional DAergic neurons and additional treatment of cells by BBA can even augment this efficiency. GPX-1

  5. HepG2 cells support viral replication and gene expression of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Awady, Mostafa K; Tabll, Ashraf A; El-Abd, Yasmine S; Bahgat, Mahmoud M; Shoeb, Hussein A; Youssef, Samar S; Din, Noha G Bader El; Redwan, El-Rashdy M; El-Demellawy, Maha; Omran, Moataza H; El-Garf, Wael T; Goueli, Said A

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To establish a cell culture system with long-term replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome and expression of viral antigens in vitro. METHODS: HepG2 cell line was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubation with a serum from a patient with chronic hepatitis C. Cells and supernatant were harvested at various time points during the culture. Culture supernatant was tested for its ability to infect naïve cells. The presence of minus (antisense) RNA strand, and the detection of core and E1 antigens in cells were examined by RT-PCR and immunological techniques (flow cytometry and Western blot) respectively. RESULTS: The intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on d 3 after infection and then could be consistently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least three months. The fresh cells could be infected with supernatant from cultured infected cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed surface and intracellular HCV antigen expression using in house made polyclonal antibodies (anti-core, and anti-E1). Western blot analysis showed the expression of a cluster of immunogenic peptides at molecular weights extended between 31 and 45 kDa in an one month old culture of infected cells whereas this cluster was undetectable in uninfected HepG2 cells. CONCLUSION: HepG2 cell line is not only susceptible to HCV infection but also supports its replication in vitro. Expression of HCV structural proteins can be detected in infected HepG2 cells. These cells are also capable of shedding viral particles into culture media which in turn become infectious to uninfected cells. PMID:16937465

  6. HepG2 cells support viral replication and gene expression of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa K El-Awady; Moataza H Omran; Wael T El-Garf; Said A Goueli; Ashraf A Tabll; Yasmine S El-Abd; Mahmoud M Bahgat; Hussein A Shoeb; Samar S Youssef; Noha G Bader El Din; El-Rashdy M Redwan; Maha El-Demellawy

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To establish a cell culture system with longterm replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome and expression of viral antigens in vitro. METHODS: HepG2 cell line was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubation with a serum from a patient with chronic hepatitis C. Cells and supernatant were harvested at various time points during the culture. Culture supernatant was tested for its ability to infect naive cells. The presence of minus (antisense) RNA strand, and the detection of core and E1 antigens in cells were examined by RT-PCR and immunological techniques (flow cytometry and Western blot) respectively. RESULTS: The intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on d 3 after infection and then could be consistently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least three months. The fresh cells could be infected with supernatant from cultured infected cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed surface and intracellular HCV antigen expression using in house made polyclonal antibodies (anti-core, and anti-E1). Western blot analysis showed the expression of a cluster of immunogenic peptides at molecular weights extended between 31 and 45 kDa in an one month old culture of infected cells whereas this cluster was undetectable in uninfected HepG2 cells. CONCLUSION: HepG2 cell line is not only susceptible to HCV infection but also supports its replication in vitro. Expression of HCV structural proteins can be detected in infected HepG2 cells. These cells are also capable of shedding viral particles into culture media which in turn become infectious to uninfected cells.

  7. Tailoring the Microstructure of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode Support by Calcination and Milling of YSZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanifi, Amir Reza; Laguna-Bercero, Miguel A.; Sandhu, Navjot Kaur; Etsell, Thomas H.; Sarkar, Partha

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the effects of calcination and milling of 8YSZ (8 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia) used in the nickel-YSZ anode on the performance of anode supported tubular fuel cells were investigated. For this purpose, two different types of cells were prepared based on a Ni-YSZ/YSZ/Nd2NiO4+δ-YSZ configuration. For the anode preparation, a suspension was prepared by mixing NiO and YSZ in a ratio of 65:35 wt% (Ni:YSZ 50:50 vol.%) with 30 vol.% graphite as the pore former. As received Tosoh YSZ or its calcined form (heated at 1500 °C for 3 hours) was used in the anode support as the YSZ source. Electrochemical results showed that optimization of the fuel electrode microstructure is essential for the optimal distribution of gas within the support of the cell, especially under electrolysis operation where the performance for an optimized cell (calcined YSZ) was enhanced by a factor of two. In comparison with a standard cell (containing as received YSZ), at 1.5 V and 800 °C the measured current density was -1380 mA cm-2 and -690 mA cm-2 for the cells containing calcined and as received YSZ, respectively. The present study suggests that the anode porosity for improved cell performance under SOEC is more critical than SOFC mode due to more complex gas diffusion under electrolysis mode where large amount of steam needs to be transfered into the cell.

  8. Enlarged colitogenic T cell population paradoxically supports colitis prevention through the B-lymphocyte-dependent peripheral generation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Canto, Fábio Barrozo; Campos, Sylvia Maria Nicolau; Granato, Alessandra; da Silva, Rafael F; de Paiva, Luciana Souza; Nóbrega, Alberto; Bellio, Maria; Fucs, Rita

    2016-06-29

    Intestinal inflammation can be induced by the reconstitution of T/B cell-deficient mice with low numbers of CD4(+) T lymphocytes depleted of CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg). Using RAG-knockout mice as recipients of either splenocytes exclusively depleted of CD25(+) cells or FACS-purified CD4(+)CD25(-)Foxp3(-) T cells, we found that the augmentation of potentially colitogenic naïve T cell numbers in the inoculum was unexpectedly beneficial for the suppression of colon disease and maintenance of immune homeostasis. Protection against T cell-mediated colitis correlated with a significant increment in the frequency of peripherally-induced CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T (pTreg) cells, especially in the mesenteric lymph nodes, an effect that required the presence of B cells and CD4(+)CD25(-)Foxp3(+) cells in physiological proportions. Our findings support a model whereby the interplay between B lymphocytes and a diversified naïve T cell repertoire is critical for the generation of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) pTreg cells and colitis suppression.

  9. Electrochemical durability of heat-treated carbon nanospheres as catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Haifeng; Wu, Peng; Wan, Wei; Mu, Shichun

    2014-09-01

    Carbon nanospheres is wildly used to support noble metal nanocatalysts in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, however they show a low resistance to electrochemical corrosion. In this study, the N-doped treatment of carbon nanospheres (Vulcan XC-72) is carried out in ammonia gas. The effect of heating treatment (up to 1000 degrees C) on resistances to electrochemical oxidation of the N-doped carbon nanospheres (HNC) is investigated. The resistance to electrochemical oxidation of carbon supports and stability of the catalysts are investigated with potentiostatic oxidation and accelerated durability test by simulating PEM fuel cell environment. The HNC exhibit a higher resistance to electrochemical oxidation than traditional Vulcan XC-72. The results show that the N-doped carbon nanospheres have a great potential application in PEM fuel cells.

  10. Production of planar copper-based anode supported intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells cosintered at 950 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Vincenzo; Grazioli, Alberto; Sglavo, Vincenzo M.

    2016-10-01

    Copper-based anode supported planar Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells are produced and characterized in the present work. The most important advancement is related to the use of copper within the anodic layer, this giving promising results for feeding Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with carbon and sulphur containing fuels. Both anode and Li2O containing-Gadolinia Doped Ceria based electrolyte are produced by water based tape casting process. The supporting anode is coupled to the electrolyte by thermopressing, the cathode being obtained by screen printing. A 3 h isotherm at 950 °C allows to obtain the cosintering of the three layers. The electrochemical test performed on such cells reveals a 0.8 V open circuit voltage and a power density higher than 26 mW cm-2 at 650 °C.

  11. Combination nickel foam expanded nickel screen electrical connection supports for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Robert; Prevish, Thomas; Bronson, Angela; George, Raymond A.

    2007-01-02

    A solid oxide fuel assembly is made, wherein rows (14, 25) of fuel cells (17, 19, 21, 27, 29, 31), each having an outer interconnection (20) and an outer electrode (32), are disposed next to each other with corrugated, electrically conducting expanded metal mesh member (22) between each row of cells, the corrugated mesh (22) having top crown portions and bottom portions, where the top crown portion (40) have a top bonded open cell nickel foam (51) which contacts outer interconnections (20) of the fuel cells, said mesh and nickel foam electrically connecting each row of fuel cells, and where there are no more metal felt connections between any fuel cells.

  12. Scalable air cathode microbial fuel cells using glass fiber separators, plastic mesh supporters, and graphite fiber brush anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    The combined use of brush anodes and glass fiber (GF1) separators, and plastic mesh supporters were used here for the first time to create a scalable microbial fuel cell architecture. Separators prevented short circuiting of closely-spaced electrodes, and cathode supporters were used to avoid water gaps between the separator and cathode that can reduce power production. The maximum power density with a separator and supporter and a single cathode was 75±1W/m3. Removing the separator decreased power by 8%. Adding a second cathode increased power to 154±1W/m3. Current was increased by connecting two MFCs connected in parallel. These results show that brush anodes, combined with a glass fiber separator and a plastic mesh supporter, produce a useful MFC architecture that is inherently scalable due to good insulation between the electrodes and a compact architecture. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Effect of leukemia inhibitory factor on embryonic stem cell differentiation: implications for supporting neuronal differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao HE; Jing-jing LI; Chang-hong ZHEN; Lin-ying FENG; Xiao-yan DING

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a pleiotropic cytokine, has been used extensively in the maintenance of mouse embryonic stem cell pluripotency. In this current work, we examined the effect of the LIF signaling pathway in embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation to a neural fate. Methods: In the presence of LIF (1000 U/mL), the production of neuronal cells derived from embryoid bodies (EB)was tested under various culture conditions. Inhibition of the LIF pathway was examined with specific inhibitors. The effects of cell apoptosis and proliferation on neural differentiation were examined. ES cell differentiation into three-gem layers was compared. Results: Under various culture conditions, neuronal differentiation was increased in the presence of LIF. Blocking the LIF-activated STAT3signaling pathway with specific inhibitors abolished the neuronal differentiation of ES cells, whereas inhibition of the LIF-activated MEK signaling pathway impaired the differentiation of ES cells toward a glial fate. LIF suppressed cell apoptosis and promoted cell proliferation during ES cell differentiation. LIF inhibited the differentiation of ES cells to both mesoderm and extraembryonic endoderm fates, but enhanced the determination of neural progenitors. Conclusion:These results suggest that LIF plays a positive role during the differentiation of ES cells into neuronal cells.

  14. Investigation of Novel Electrocatalysts for Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells - Ru:GDC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Nielsen, Jimmi; Thydén, Karl Tor Sune;

    2015-01-01

    in tolerating the vibrations, transient loads, thermal and redox cycling [1-2]. The DTU MS-SOFC design based on ferritic stainless steel requires incorporation of electrocatalyst into the anode functional layer by infiltration methods [3]. Previously, the preferred electrocatalyst has been gadolinium doped...... the development of metal supported SOFCs (MS-SOFCs) by using the cheaper support materials such as stainless steel. Furthermore, MS-SOFCs offer some advantages compared to conventional electrode and electrolyte supported SOFCs such as higher thermal conductivity, ductility in support, which are advantageous...

  15. Pt supported on carbon nanofibers as electrocatalyst for low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaide, Francisco; Alvarez, Garbine; Miguel, Oscar [Dpto. de Energia, CIDETEC, Paseo Miramon, 196, 20009 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain); Lazaro, Maria Jesus; Moliner, Rafael [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Lopez-Cudero, Ana; Solla-Gullon, Jose; Herrero, Enrique; Aldaz, Antonio [Instituto de Electroquimica, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    Carbon nanofibers synthesized via the thermo catalytic decomposition of methane were investigated for the first time as an electrocatalyst support in PEMFC cathodes. Their textural and physical properties make them a highly efficient catalyst support for cathodic oxygen reduction in low temperature PEMFC. Tests performed in MEAs showed that Pt supported on carbon nanofibers exhibited an enhancement of ca. 94% in power density at 0.600 V, in comparison with a commercial catalyst supported on conventional carbon black, Pt/Vulcan XC-72R. (author)

  16. Human fetal liver stromal cells that overexpress bFGF support growth and maintenance of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafei Xi

    Full Text Available In guiding hES cell technology toward the clinic, one key issue to be addressed is to culture and maintain hES cells much more safely and economically in large scale. In order to avoid using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs we isolated human fetal liver stromal cells (hFLSCs from 14 weeks human fetal liver as new human feeder cells. hFLSCs feeders could maintain hES cells for 15 passages (about 100 days. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF is known to play an important role in promoting self-renewal of human embryonic stem (hES cells. So, we established transgenic hFLSCs that stably express bFGF by lentiviral vectors. These transgenic human feeder cells--bFGF-hFLSCs maintained the properties of H9 hES cells without supplementing with any exogenous growth factors. H9 hES cells culturing under these conditions maintained all hES cell features after prolonged culture, including the developmental potential to differentiate into representative tissues of all three embryonic germ layers, unlimited and undifferentiated proliferative ability, and maintenance of normal karyotype. Our results demonstrated that bFGF-hFLSCs feeder cells were central to establishing the signaling network among bFGF, insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2, and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β, thereby providing the framework in which hES cells were instructed to self-renew or to differentiate. We also found that the conditioned medium of bFGF-hFLSCs could maintain the H9 hES cells under feeder-free conditions without supplementing with bFGF. Taken together, bFGF-hFLSCs had great potential as feeders for maintaining pluripotent hES cell lines more safely and economically.

  17. Layer-by-layer tissue microfabrication supports cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catros, S.; Guillemont, F.; Nandakumar, A.; Ziane, S.; Moroni, L.; Habibovic, P.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Rousseau, B.; Chassande, O.; Amedee, J.; Fricain, J-C.

    2012-01-01

    Layer-by-layer biofabrication represents a novel strategy to create three-dimensional living structures with a controlled internal architecture, using cell micromanipulation technologies. Laser assisted bioprinting (LAB) is an effective printing method for patterning cells, biomolecules, and biomate

  18. Human amniotic fluid stem cells support undifferentiated propagation and pluripotency of human embryonic stem cell without b-FGF in a density dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaorong; Li, Huanqi; Xin, Shujia; Ma, Yueting; Ouyang, Tianxiang

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent cells which can give rise to almost all adult cell lineages. Culture system of hESCs is complex, requiring exogenous b-FGF and feeder cell layer. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) not only synthesize soluble cytokines or factors such as b-FGF, but also provide other mechanism which might play positive role on sustaining hESCs propagation and pluripotency. Human amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells, which share characteristics of both embryonic and adult stem cells, have been regarded as promising cells for regenerative medicine. Taking advantage by AFS cells, we studied the ability of AFS cells in supporting undifferentiated propagation and pluripotency of Chinese population derived X-01 hESCs. Human AF-type amniotic fluid stem cells (hAF-AFSCs) transcribed genes including Activin A, TGF-β1, Noggin and b-FGF, which involved in maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal of hESCs. Compared to mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), hAF-AFSCs secreted higher concentration of b-FGF which was important in hESCs culture (P FGF supplementation, keeping undifferentiated status. While exogenous b-FGF was obviated, propagation of hESCs with undifferentiated status was dependent on density of hAF-AFSC feeder layer. Lower density of hAF-AFSCs resulted in rapid decline in undifferentiated clone number, while higher ones hindered the growth of colonies. The most appropriate hAF-AFSCs feeder density to maintain the X-01 hESC line without exogenous b-FGF was 15-20×10(4)/well. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that hAF-AFSCs could support undifferentiated propagation and pluripotency of Chinese population derived hESCs without exogenous b-FGF supplementation.

  19. Probiotic metabolites from Bacillus coagulans GanedenBC30TM support maturation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathleen F Benson; Kimberlee A Redman; Steve G Carter; David Keller; Sean Farmer; John R Endres; Gitte S Jensen

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the effects of probiotic metabolites on maturation stage of antigen-presenting immune cells.METHODS:Ganeden Bacillus coagulans 30 (GBC30)bacterial cultures in log phase were used to isolate the secreted metabolite (MET) fraction.A second fraction was made to generate a crude cell-wall-enriched fraction,by centrifugation and lysis,followed by washing.A preparation of MET was subjected to size exclusion centrifugation,generating three fractions:< 3 kDa,3-30 kDa,and 30-200 kDa and activities were tested in comparison to crude MET and cell wall in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) as a source of antigen-presenting mononuclear phagocytes.The maturation status of mononudear phagocytes was evaluated by staining with monoclonal antibodies towards CD14,CD16,CD80 and CD86 and analyzed by flow cytometry.RESULTS:Treatment of PBMC with MET supported maturation of mononuclear phagocytes toward both macrophage and dendritic cell phenotypes.The biological activity unique to the metabolites included a reduction of CD14+ CD16+ pro-inflammatory ceils,and this property was associated with the high molecular weight metabolite fraction.Changes were also seen for the dendritic cell maturation markers CD80 and CD86.On CD14dim cells,an increase in both CD80 and CD86 expression was seen,in contrast to a selective increase in CD86 expression on CD14bright cells.The co-expression of CD80 and CD86 indicates effective antigen presentation to T cells and support of T helper cell differentiation.The selective expression of CD86 in the absence of CD80 points to a role in generating T regulatory cells.CONCLUSION:The data show that a primary mechanism of action of GBC30 metabolites involves support of more mature phenotypes of antigen-presenting cells,important for immunological decision-making.

  20. In vitro generated Th17 cells support the expansion and phenotypic stability of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiong; Hu, Ya; Howard, O M Zack; Oppenheim, Joost J; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    CD4(+) T cells stimulate immune responses through distinct patterns of cytokine produced by Th1, Th2 or Th17 cells, or inhibit immune responses through Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs). Paradoxically, effector T cells were recently shown to activate Tregs, however, it remains unclear which Th subset is responsible for this effect. In this study, we found that Th17 cells expressed the highest levels of TNF among in vitro generated Th subsets, and most potently promoted expansion and stabilized Foxp3 expression by Tregs when co-transferred into Rag1(-/-) mice. Both TNF and IL-2 produced by Th17 cells contributed to this effect. The stimulatory effect of Th17 cells on Tregs was largely abolished when co-transferred with TNFR2-deficient Tregs. Furthermore, Tregs deficient in TNFR2 also supported a much lower production of IL-17A and TNF expression by co-transferred Th17 cells. Thus, our data indicate that the TNF-TNFR2 pathway plays a crucial role in the reciprocal stimulatory effect of Th17 cells and Tregs. This bidirectional interaction should be taken into account when designing therapy targeting Th17 cells, Tregs, TNF and TNFR2.

  1. Metal Oxide-Supported Platinum Overlayers as Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the activity and stability of n=(1, 2, 3) platinum layers supported on a number of rutile metal oxides (MO2; M=Ti, Sn, Ta, Nb, Hf and Zr). A suitable oxide support can alleviate the problem of carbon corrosion and platinum dissolution in Pt/C catalysts. Moreover, it can increase t...

  2. Research data supporting "Photon recycling in lead-iodide perovskite solar cells"

    OpenAIRE

    Pazos-Outón, Luis M.; Szumilo, Monika; Lamboll, Robin; Richter, Johannes M.; Crespo-Quesada, Micaela; Abdi - Jalebi, Mojtaba; Beeson, Harry J.; Vrucinic, Milan; Alsari, Mejd; Snaith, Henry J.; Ehrler, Bruno; Friend, Richard H.; Deschler, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Data for the figures presented in the manuscript. These research data support “Photon recycling in lead-iodide perovskite solar cells” published in “Science” (http://dx.doi.org./10.1126/science.aaf1168) This work was supported by the EPSRC [grant number EP/M005143/1] and Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability.

  3. Strategies for bioengineered scaffolds that support adipose stem cells in regenerative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, Tracy N; Luna, Gabriel; Fisher, Steven K; Clegg, Dennis O

    2016-09-01

    Regenerative medicine possesses the potential to ameliorate damage to tissue that results from a vast range of conditions, including traumatic injury, tumor resection and inherited tissue defects. Adult stem cells, while more limited in their potential than pluripotent stem cells, are still capable of differentiating into numerous lineages and provide feasible allogeneic and autologous treatment options for many conditions. Adipose stem cells are one of the most abundant types of stem cell in the adult human. Here, we review recent advances in the development of synthetic scaffolding systems used in concert with adipose stem cells and assess their potential use for clinical applications.

  4. Comparison of hematopoietic supportive capacity between human fetal and adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Yang, Shao-Guang; Xing, Wen; Lu, Shi-Hong; Zhao, Qin-Jun; Ren, Hong-Ying; Chi, Ying; Ma, Feng-Xia; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2011-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) shift from fetal liver and spleen to bone marrow at neonatal stages and this movement may be due to inductive signals from different microenvironments. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are the precursors of stromal cells in bone marrow microenvironments such as osteoblasts and endothelial cells. Some researchers speculated that fetal bone marrow before birth might be not perfectly suit HSC growth. However, it is still lack of direct evidence to prove this hypothesis. This study was aimed to compare the hematopoietic supportive capacity between human fetal and adult bone marrow MSC in vitro. Adult bone marrow MSC (ABM-MSC) were isolated from three healthy donors and fetal bone marrow MSC (FBM-MSC) were isolated from three fetuses between gestations of 19 to 20 weeks. After irradiation, MSC were co-cultured with CD34(+) cells isolated from umbilical cord blood in long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assay. The colony number of colony forming cells (CFC) was counted and the phenotypic changes of co-cultured CD34(+) cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokine expressions in both kinds of MSC were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that ABM-MSC had a stronger hematopoietic supportive capacity than FBM-MSC. Both of them enhanced the differentiation of CD34(+) cells into myeloid lineages. Cytokines were expressed differently in ABM-MSC and FBM-MSC. It is concluded that ABM-MSC possess more potential application in some treatments than FBM-MSC, especially in hematopoietic reconstitution.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Bone Marrow Provide a Supportive Niche for Early Disseminated Breast Tumor Initiating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    redistribution of E-cadherin and β catenin to the membrane of tumor cells was observed. ERα was re-expressed in lung metastatic cells in two of five samples...collagenase (300 U/ml)/hyaluronidase (100 U/ml) solution followed by sequential filtration . Single cell suspensions were cultured on ultra low attachment...Curriculum Vitae Carolyn Marsden 6 Assistant Professor Research Associate Professor Department of Pharmacology Department of Microbiology and

  6. Support schemes and ownership structures - The policy context for fuel cell based micro-combined heat and power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropenus, S.; Thorsten Schroeder, S.; Costa, A.; Obe, E.

    2010-05-15

    In recent years, fuel cell based micro-combined heat and power has received increasing attention due to its potential contribution to energy savings, efficiency gains, customer proximity and flexibility in operation and capacity size. The FC4Home project assesses technical and economic aspects of the ongoing fuel cell based micro-combined heat and power (mCHP) demonstration projects by addressing the socio-economic and systems analyses perspectives of a large-scale promotion scheme of fuel cells. This document constitutes the deliverable of Work Package 1 of the FC4Home project and provides an introduction to the policy context for mCHP. Section 1 describes the rationale for the promotion of mCHP by explaining its potential contribution to European energy policy goals. Section 2 addresses the policy context at the supranational European level by outlining relevant EU Directives on support schemes for promoting combined heat and power and energy from renewable sources. These Directives are to be implemented at the national level by the Member States. Section 3 conceptually presents the spectrum of national support schemes, ranging from investment support to market-based operational support. The choice of support scheme simultaneously affects risk and technological development, which is the focus of Section 4. Subsequent to this conceptual overview, Section 5 takes a glance at the national application of support schemes for mCHP in practice, notably in the three country cases of the FC4Home project, Denmark, France and Portugal. Another crucial aspect for the diffusion of the mCHP technology is possible ownership structures. These may range from full consumer ownership to ownership by utilities and energy service companies, which is discussed in Section 6. Finally, a conclusion (Section 7) wraps up previous findings and provides a short 'preview' of the quantitative analyses in subsequent Work Packages by giving some food for thought on the way. (author)

  7. Research of special carbon nanobeads supported Pt catalyst for fuel cell through high temperature pyrolysis and deposition from novel phthalocyanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yanchuan; YUE Jun; PAN Zhongxiao; XU Haitao; ZHANG Bing; HAN Fengmei; CHEN Lijuan; PENG Bixian; XIE Wenwei; QIAN Haisheng; YAN Tiantang

    2004-01-01

    The carbon nanobeads were prepared through high temperature pyrolysis and deposition from phthaiocyanine. After surface's functionalization treatment of the carbon beads, the carbon nanobeads supported Pt catalyst was produced. The Pt/C catalyst was characterized by SEM,TEM, Raman spectrum, EDS and XRD methods. Combining the carbonaceous paper spreaded up with the catalyst with Nafion membrane, we made MEA electrode. The discharge curves indicated that this carbon nanobeads supported Pt is a good fuel cell catalyst with excellent performance, high activity and sign of a long-time life.

  8. Research and development of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation system. ; Supporting studies. Yoyu tansan'engata nenryo denchi hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu. ; Support kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    With an objective to develop a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power generation system, this paper discusses such supporting technologies as material and coal gas handling technologies, capacity increasing technologies, and CO2 separating technologies. Performance of generating a voltage of 0.825V has been obtained from a single cell using iron-based alloy powder materials when anode porosity is 70% and current density is 150 mA/cm[sup 2]. A separator material with aluminum electrolytically plated, and nickel dispersed showed superb corrosion resistance. Crack generation has been reduced in a ZrO2 fiber reinforced electrolyte plate. High-performance corrosion resistant electrolyte plates have been fabricated in the ceramic system by using the electrode microstructure controlling technology and alumina-based fiber reinforcement. Desulfurizing catalyst, TiO2-ZnO, for coal gas dry refining has been studied. Zinc ferrite, a regenerative desulfurizing agent, has been improved for the inorganic salt type gas refining. Discussions have been given on increasing capacity of a 500-MW class coal gasification MCFC power generation system. A CO2 separation testing equipment of a PSA system has been opened for inspection, but no anomalies such as corrosion, damages, and sludge generation have been discovered. 4 figs.

  9. Human Airway Primary Epithelial Cells Show Distinct Architectures on Membrane Supports Under Different Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Rosania, Gus R; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-06-01

    To facilitate drug development for lung delivery, it is highly demanding to establish appropriate airway epithelial cell models as transport barriers to evaluate pharmacokinetic profiles of drug molecules. Besides the cancer-derived cell lines, as the primary cell model, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells have been used for drug screenings because of physiological relevance to in vivo. Therefore, to accurately interpret drug transport data in NHBE measured by different laboratories, it is important to know biophysical characteristics of NHBE grown on membranes in different culture conditions. In this study, NHBE was grown on the polyester membrane in a different medium and its transport barrier properties as well as cell architectures were fully characterized by functional assays and confocal imaging throughout the days of cultures. Moreover, NHBE cells on inserts in a different medium were subject to either of air-interfaced culture (AIC) or liquid-covered culture (LCC) condition. Cells in the AIC condition were cultivated on the membrane with medium in the basolateral side only, whereas cells with medium in apical and basolateral sides under the LCC condition. Quantitative microscopic imaging with biophysical examination revealed distinct multilayered architectures of differentiated NHBE cells, suggesting NHBE as functional cell barriers for the lung-targeting drug transport.

  10. Injury-induced neurogenesis: consideration of resident microglia as supportive of neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Christopher A; Kraft, Andrew D; Harry, G Jean

    2011-02-01

    The induction of neurogenesis in the adult subgranular zone (SGZ) by injury is often accompanied by changes in the extracellular environment that can have significant impacts on neural progenitor cells (NPCs). We examined the induction of neurogenesis in the SGZ at 72 h following an injection of the hippocampal toxicant, trimethyltin (TMT; 2 mg/kg, ip) inducing apoptosis in dentate granule neurons. BrdU+ incorporation during the active period of neuronal death indicated NPC proliferation and migration of newly generated cells into the granule cell layer (GCL). BrdU+ cells were transiently in contact with process bearing microglia within the inner SGZ layer. Contact with GFAP+ astrocyte processes occurred once cells were within the GCL. A small percentage of the BrdU+ cells within the SGZ region showed immunoreactivity for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) p75 receptor (TNFp75R). In mice deficient for TNFp75R, TMT injection produced an equivalent level of dentate granule cell death however; BrdU+ cells were localized at the SGZ as compared to the presence of cells within the GCL in the WT mice dosed with TMT. These data suggest that cells generated by NPCs in the SGZ induced with a focal lesion to the dentate granule neurons of adolescent mice maintain the capacity to utilize the neuroinflammation and microglia responses within their environment for migration into the GCL.

  11. Wnt/β-Catenin Stimulation and Laminins Support Cardiovascular Cell Progenitor Expansion from Human Fetal Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Månsson-Broberg, Agneta; Rodin, Sergey; Bulatovic, Ivana; Ibarra, Cristián; Löfling, Marie; Genead, Rami; Wärdell, Eva; Felldin, Ulrika; Granath, Carl; Alici, Evren; Le Blanc, Katarina; Smith, C I Edvard; Salašová, Alena; Westgren, Magnus; Sundström, Erik; Uhlén, Per; Arenas, Ernest; Sylvén, Christer; Tryggvason, Karl; Corbascio, Matthias; Simonson, Oscar E; Österholm, Cecilia; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik

    2016-04-12

    The intrinsic regenerative capacity of human fetal cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has not been fully characterized. Here we demonstrate that we can expand cells with characteristics of cardiovascular progenitor cells from the MSC population of human fetal hearts. Cells cultured on cardiac muscle laminin (LN)-based substrata in combination with stimulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway showed increased gene expression of ISL1, OCT4, KDR, and NKX2.5. The majority of cells stained positive for PDGFR-α, ISL1, and NKX2.5, and subpopulations also expressed the progenitor markers TBX18, KDR, c-KIT, and SSEA-1. Upon culture of the cardiac MSCs in differentiation media and on relevant LNs, portions of the cells differentiated into spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle-like cells. Our protocol for large-scale culture of human fetal cardiac MSCs enables future exploration of the regenerative functions of these cells in the context of myocardial injury in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Wnt/β-Catenin Stimulation and Laminins Support Cardiovascular Cell Progenitor Expansion from Human Fetal Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Månsson-Broberg

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic regenerative capacity of human fetal cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs has not been fully characterized. Here we demonstrate that we can expand cells with characteristics of cardiovascular progenitor cells from the MSC population of human fetal hearts. Cells cultured on cardiac muscle laminin (LN-based substrata in combination with stimulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway showed increased gene expression of ISL1, OCT4, KDR, and NKX2.5. The majority of cells stained positive for PDGFR-α, ISL1, and NKX2.5, and subpopulations also expressed the progenitor markers TBX18, KDR, c-KIT, and SSEA-1. Upon culture of the cardiac MSCs in differentiation media and on relevant LNs, portions of the cells differentiated into spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle-like cells. Our protocol for large-scale culture of human fetal cardiac MSCs enables future exploration of the regenerative functions of these cells in the context of myocardial injury in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Sonic Hedgehog Produced by Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Supports Cell Survival in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixue Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of marrow microenvironment in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS remains controversial. Therefore, we studied the influence of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs from patients with different risk types of MDS on the survival of the MDS cell lines SKM-1 and MUTZ-1. We first demonstrated that the expression of Sonic hedgehog (Shh, smoothened (Smo, and glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (Gli1 was increased in MDS patients n=23; the increase in expression was positively correlated with the presence of high-risk factors. The Shh signaling inhibitor, cyclopamine, inhibited high-risk MDS BMSC-induced survival of SKM-1 and MUTZ-1 cells, suggesting a role for Shh signaling in MDS cell survival. Furthermore, cyclopamine-mediated inhibition of Shh signaling in SKM-1 and MUTZ-1 cells resulted in decreased DNMT1 expression and cell survival; however, exogenous Shh peptide had the opposite effect, suggesting that Shh signaling could regulate the expression of DNMT1, thereby modulating cell survival in MDS. In addition, the apoptosis of SKM-1 and MUTZ-1 cell increased significantly when cultured with cyclopamine and a demethylation agent, 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine. These findings suggest that Shh signaling from BMSCs is important in the pathogenesis of MDS and could play a role in disease progression by modulating methylation.

  14. Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory Of The NASA Bi-Supported Cell Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Stoots; J O' Brien; T Cable

    2009-11-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has been researching the application of solid-oxide fuel cell technology for large-scale hydrogen production. As a result, the Idaho National Laboratory has been testing various cell designs to characterize electrolytic performance. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This paper presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

  15. Human cardiac extracellular matrix supports myocardial lineage commitment of pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberwallner, Barbara; Brodarac, Andreja; Anić, Petra;

    2015-01-01

    lysis buffer, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and foetal bovine serum (FBS). Murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were seeded and grown in standard culture, on cECM or on non-specific ECM preparations (Matrigel® or Geltrex®). Cell......OBJECTIVES: Cross-talk between organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) and stem cells is often assumed but has not been directly demonstrated. We developed a protocol for the preparation of human cardiac ECM (cECM) and studied whether cECM has effects on pluripotent stem cell differentiation...... that may be useful for future cardiac regeneration strategies in patients with end-stage heart failure. METHODS: Of note, 0.3 mm-thick cECM slices were prepared from samples of myocardium from patients with end-stage non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy, using a three-step protocol involving hypotonic...

  16. Fuel Cell Stack Testing and Durability in Support of Ion Tiger UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    This report covers efforts by the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii under the ONR-funded Ion Tiger UAV award that included testing of Ion Tiger fuel cell stacks in HNEI’s Hawaii Fuel Cell Test Facility located in Honolulu, Hawaii. Work was focused on steady-state stack characteristics of Protonex fuel cell stacks under various operating conditions. In addition, Hardware-in-the-Loop testing was performed to characterize dynamic

  17. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma: case report with immunohistochemical findings adding support to the challenging diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    XAVIER, FLÁVIA CALÓ AQUINO; Rodini, Camila Oliveira; Ramalho,Luciana Maria Pedreira; Sarmento,Viviane Almeida; Nunes, Fabio Daumas

    2008-01-01

    Acesso restrito: Texto completo. p. 403-410 Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC) is a rare odontogenic tumor associated with aggressive clinical behavior, metastasis, and low survival. We report a case of CCOC affecting the mandible of a 39-year-old man. The tumor presented a biphasic pattern composed of clear cell nests intermingled with eosinophilic cells and separated by collagenous stroma. Immunoreactivity to cytokeratin (CK), specifically AE1/AE3 and CK 8, 14, 18, and 19 was fou...

  18. Variations in Humanized and Defined Culture Conditions Supporting Derivation of New Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher, Judy M; Ferrier, Patricia M; Gardner, John O

    2006-01-01

    and the potential to form cells representative of all three germinal lineages in vitro and in vivo, when transitioned off of feeders onto Laminin or Matrigel. Our study thus demonstrates the capacity to integrate derivation strategies eliminating a requirement for animal immune compliment and serum products......, with a transitional requirement for human feeder cells. This represents another sequential step in the generation of therapeutic grade stem cells with reduced risk of zoonotic pathogen transmission....

  19. Matrigel supports neural, melanocytic and chondrogenic differentiation of trunk neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Hryb, Ana B; Da-Costa, Meline C; Trentin, Andréa G; Calloni, Giordano W

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) is composed of highly multipotent precursor cells able to differentiate into both neural and mesenchymal phenotypes. Until now, most studies focusing on NC cell differentiation have been performed with traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture systems. However, such culture systems do not reflect the complex three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments of in vivo NC cells. To address this limitation, we have developed a method of Matrigel™ coating to create 2D and 3D microenvironments in the same culture well. When we performed cultures of trunk neural crest cells (TNCCs) on three different lots of basement membrane matrix (Matrigel™), we observed that all analyzed Matrigel™ lots were equally efficient in allowing the appearance of glial cells, neurons, melanocytes, smooth muscle cells and chondrocytes. We further observed that chondrocytes were found predominantly in the 3D microenvironment, whereas smooth muscle cells were almost exclusively located in the 2D microenvironment. Glial cells were present in both environments, but with broader quantities on the 2D surface. Melanocytes and neurons were equally distributed in both 2D and 3D microenvironments, but with distinct morphologies. It is worth noting the higher frequency of chondrocytes detected in this study using the 3D Matrigel™ microenvironment compared to previous reports of chondrogenesis obtained from TNCCs on traditional 2D cultures. In conclusion, Matrigel™ represents an attractive scaffold to study NC multipotentiality and differentiation, since it permits the appearance of the major NC phenotypes.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of anode-supported micro-tubular solide oxide fuel cell by phase inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Cong

    Nowadays, the micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs), especially the anode supported MT-SOFCs have been extensively developed to be applied for SOFC stacks designation, which can be potentially used for portable power sources and vehicle power supply. To prepare MT-SOFCs with high electrochemical performance, one of the main strategies is to optimize the microstructure of the anode support. Recently, a novel phase inversion method has been applied to prepare the anode support with a unique asymmetrical microstructure, which can improve the electrochemical performance of the MT-SOFCs. Since several process parameters of the phase inversion method can influence the pore formation mechanism and final microstructure, it is essential and necessary to systematically investigate the relationship between phase inversion process parameters and final microstructure of the anode supports. The objective of this study is aiming at correlating the process parameters and microstructure and further preparing MT-SOFCs with enhanced electrochemical performance. Non-solvent, which is used to trigger the phase separation process, can significantly influence the microstructure of the anode support fabricated by phase inversion method. To investigate the mechanism of non-solvent affecting the microstructure, water and ethanol/water mixture were selected for the NiO-YSZ anode supports fabrication. The presence of ethanol in non-solvent can inhibit the growth of the finger-like pores in the tubes. With the increasing of the ethanol concentration in the non-solvent, a relatively dense layer can be observed both in the outside and inside of the tubes. The mechanism of pores growth and morphology obtained by using non-solvent with high concentration ethanol was explained based on the inter-diffusivity between solvent and non-solvent. Solvent and non-solvent pair with larger Dm value is benefit for the growth of finger-like pores. Three cells with different anode geometries was

  1. The Plasma Simulation Code: A modern particle-in-cell code with load-balancing and GPU support

    CERN Document Server

    Germaschewski, Kai; Ahmadi, Narges; Wang, Liang; Abbott, Stephen; Ruhl, Hartmut; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Recent increases in supercomputing power, driven by the multi-core revolution and accelerators such as the IBM Cell processor, graphics processing units (GPUs) and Intel's Many Integrated Core (MIC) technology have enabled kinetic simulations of plasmas at unprecedented resolutions, but changing HPC architectures also come with challenges for writing efficient numerical codes. This paper describes the Plasma Simulation Code (PSC), an explicit, electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with support for different order particle shape functions. We focus on two distinguishing feature of the code: patch-based load balancing using space-filling curves, and support for Nvidia GPUs, which achieves substantial speed-up of up to more than 6x on the Cray XK7 architecture compared to a CPU-only implementation.

  2. Genetic and proteomic evidences support the localization of yeast enolase in the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Villar, Elena; Monteoliva, Lucía; Larsen, Martin Røssel;

    2006-01-01

    Although enolase, other glycolytic enzymes, and a variety of cytoplasmic proteins lacking an N-terminal secretion signal have been widely described as located at the cell surface in yeast and in mammalian cells, their presence in this external location is still controversial. Here, we report that...

  3. NK cells modulate the inflammatory response to corneal epithelial abrasion and thereby support wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural killer cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that have crucial cytotoxic and regulatory roles in adaptive immunity and inflammation. Herein, we consider a role for these cells in corneal wound healing. After a 2-mm central epithelial abrasion of the mouse cornea, a subset of clas...

  4. Social Behavior in Medulloblastoma: Functional Analysis of Tumor-Supporting Glial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    University of Chile, Santiago, Chile, January 10, 2014 • Invited speaker. UC Santa Cruz, Department of Molecular , Cell , and Developmental Biology, Santa...the purification and culture of rodent astrocytes. Neuron 71(5):799-811. 2. Fellmann C, et al. (2011) Functional identification of optimized RNAi triggers using a massively parallel sensor assay. Molecular cell 41(6):733-746.

  5. Automated cell analysis tool for a genome-wide RNAi screen with support vector machine based supervised learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmele, Steffen; Ritzerfeld, Julia; Nickel, Walter; Hesser, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    RNAi-based high-throughput microscopy screens have become an important tool in biological sciences in order to decrypt mostly unknown biological functions of human genes. However, manual analysis is impossible for such screens since the amount of image data sets can often be in the hundred thousands. Reliable automated tools are thus required to analyse the fluorescence microscopy image data sets usually containing two or more reaction channels. The herein presented image analysis tool is designed to analyse an RNAi screen investigating the intracellular trafficking and targeting of acylated Src kinases. In this specific screen, a data set consists of three reaction channels and the investigated cells can appear in different phenotypes. The main issue of the image processing task is an automatic cell segmentation which has to be robust and accurate for all different phenotypes and a successive phenotype classification. The cell segmentation is done in two steps by segmenting the cell nuclei first and then using a classifier-enhanced region growing on basis of the cell nuclei to segment the cells. The classification of the cells is realized by a support vector machine which has to be trained manually using supervised learning. Furthermore, the tool is brightness invariant allowing different staining quality and it provides a quality control that copes with typical defects during preparation and acquisition. A first version of the tool has already been successfully applied for an RNAi-screen containing three hundred thousand image data sets and the SVM extended version is designed for additional screens.

  6. Evaluation of Tissue Homogenization to Support the Generation of GMP-Compliant Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from the Umbilical Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Emnett

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that the umbilical cord (UC is an excellent source of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. However, current protocols for extracting and culturing UC-MSCs do not meet current good manufacturing practice (cGMP standards, in part due to the use of xenogeneic reagents. To support the development of a cGMP-compliant method, we have examined an enzyme-free isolation method utilizing tissue homogenization (t-H followed by culture in human platelet lysate (PL supplemented media. The yield and viability of cells after t-H were comparable to those obtained after collagenase digestion (Col-D. Importantly, kinetic analysis of cultured cells showed logarithmic growth over 10 tested passages, although the rate of cell division was lower for t-H as compared to Col-D. This slower growth of t-H-derived cells was also reflected in their longer population doubling time. Interestingly, there was no difference in the expression of mesenchymal markers and trilineage differentiation potential of cells generated using either method. Finally, t-H-derived cells had greater clonogenic potential compared to Col-D/FBS but not Col-D/PL and were able to maintain CFU-F capacity through P7. This bench scale study demonstrates the possibility of generating therapeutic doses of good quality UC-MSCs within a reasonable length of time using t-H and PL.

  7. Hypoxia induces triglycerides accumulation in prostate cancer cells and extracellular vesicles supporting growth and invasiveness following reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaepfer, Isabel R; Nambiar, Dhanya K; Ramteke, Anand; Kumar, Rahul; Dhar, Deepanshi; Agarwal, Chapla; Bergman, Bryan; Graner, Michael; Maroni, Paul; Singh, Rana P; Agarwal, Rajesh; Deep, Gagan

    2015-09-08

    Hypoxia is an independent prognostic indicator of poor outcome in several malignancies. However, precise mechanism through which hypoxia promotes disease aggressiveness is still unclear. Here, we report that under hypoxia (1% O2), human prostate cancer (PCA) cells, and extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by these cells, are significantly enriched in triglycerides due to the activation of lipogenesis-related enzymes and signaling molecules. This is likely a survival response to hypoxic stress as accumulated lipids could support growth following reoxygenation. Consistent with this, significantly higher proliferation was observed in hypoxic PCA cells following reoxygenation associated with rapid use of accumulated lipids. Importantly, lipid utilization inhibition by CPT1 inhibitor etomoxir and shRNA-mediated CPT1-knockdown significantly compromised hypoxic PCA cell proliferation following reoxygenation. Furthermore, COX2 inhibitor celecoxib strongly reduced growth and invasiveness following hypoxic PCA cells reoxygenation, and inhibited invasiveness induced by hypoxic PCA EVs. This establishes a role for COX2 enzymatic products in the enhanced PCA growth and invasiveness. Importantly, concentration and loading of EVs secreted by PCA cells were significantly compromised under delipidized serum condition and by lipogenesis inhibitors (fatostatin and silibinin). Overall, present study highlights the biological significance of lipid accumulation in hypoxic PCA cells and its therapeutic relevance in PCA.

  8. Influence of Electrode Design and Contacting Layers on Performance of Electrolyte Supported SOFC/SOEC Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihails Kusnezoff

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The solid oxide cell is a basis for highly efficient and reversible electrochemical energy conversion. A single cell based on a planar electrolyte substrate as support (ESC is often utilized for SOFC/SOEC stack manufacturing and fulfills necessary requirements for application in small, medium and large scale fuel cell and electrolysis systems. Thickness of the electrolyte substrate, and its ionic conductivity limits the power density of the ESC. To improve the performance of this cell type in SOFC/SOEC mode, alternative fuel electrodes, on the basis of Ni/CGO as well as electrolytes with reduced thickness, have been applied. Furthermore, different interlayers on the air side have been tested to avoid the electrode delamination and to reduce the cell degradation in electrolysis mode. Finally, the influence of the contacting layer on cell performance, especially for cells with an ultrathin electrolyte and thin electrode layers, has been investigated. It has been found that Ni/CGO outperform traditional Ni/8YSZ electrodes and the introduction of a ScSZ interlayer substantially reduces the degradation rate of ESC in electrolysis mode. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that, for thin electrodes, the application of contacting layers with good conductivity and adhesion to current collectors improves performance significantly.

  9. Cell phone-supported cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety disorders: a protocol for effectiveness studies in frontline settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröberg Anders

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT for anxiety disorders have reported large pre- to post-treatment within-group effect sizes on measures of anxiety when supplied in therapist consultations and in technology-supported settings. However, the stringent experimental control of RCTs results in a lack of external validity, which limits the generalizability of findings to real-world frontline clinical practice. We set out to examine the specification of a protocol for study of the effectiveness of cell phone-supported CBT for in situ management of anxiety disorders. Methods and design Nominal group methods were used for requirements analysis and protocol design. Making a distinction between different forms of technology-supported therapy, examination of therapists' role, and implementing trials in existing organizational and community contexts were found to be the central requirements in the protocol. Discussion The resulting protocol (NCT01205191 at clinicaltrials.gov for use in frontline clinical practice in which effectiveness, adherence, and the role of the therapists are analyzed, provides evidence for what are truly valuable cell phone-supported CBT treatments and guidance for the broader introduction of CBT in health services.

  10. Application of a self-supporting microporous layer to gas diffusion layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Heo, Yun; Ishida, Masayoshi; Nakano, Akihiro; Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo

    2017-02-01

    The intrinsic effect of properties of a self-supporting microporous layer (MPL) on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is identified. First, a self-supporting MPL is fabricated and applied to a gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a PEMFC, when the GDL is either an integrated sample composed of a gas diffusion backing (GDB, i.e., carbon paper) combined with MPL or a sample with only MPL. Cell performance tests reveal that, the same as the MPL fabricated by the coating method, the self-supporting MPL on the GDB improves the cell performance at high current density. Furthermore, the GDL composed only of the MPL (i.e., GDB-free GDL) shows better performance than does the integrated GDB/MPL GDL. These results along with literature data strongly suggest that the low thermal conductivity of MPL induces a high temperature throughout the GDL, and thus vapor diffusion is dominant in the transport of product water through the MPL.

  11. Two distinct mechanisms mediate the involvement of bone marrow cells in islet remodeling: neogenesis of insulin-producing cells and support of islet recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskovich, Svetlana; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Sadikov, Tamila; Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that small-sized bone marrow cells (BMCs) isolated by counterflow centrifugal elutriation and depleted of lineage markers (Fr25lin(-)) have the capacity to differentiate and contribute to regeneration of injured islets. In this study, we assess some of the characteristics of these cells compared to elutriated hematopoietic progenitors (R/O) and whole BMCs in a murine model of streptozotocin-induced chemical diabetes. The GFP(bright)CD45(+) progeny of whole BMCs and R/O progenitors progressively infiltrate the pancreas with evolution of donor chimerism; are found at islet perimeter, vascular, and ductal walls; and have a modest impact on islet recovery from injury. In contrast, Fr25lin(-) cells incorporate in the islets, convert to GFP(dim)CD45(-)PDX-1(+) phenotypes, produce proinsulin, and secrete insulin with significant contribution to stabilization of glucose homeostasis. The elutriated Fr25lin(-) cells express low levels of CD45 and are negative for SCA-1 and c-kit, as removal of cells expressing these markers did not impair conversion to produce insulin. BMCs mediate two synergistic mechanisms that contribute to islet recovery from injury: support of islet remodeling by hematopoietic cells and neogenesis of insulin-producing cells from stem cells.

  12. Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Serum for Culturing the Supportive Feeder Cells of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruttachuk Rungsiwiwut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs can proliferate robustly on the feeder-free culture system, genetic instability of hPSCs has been reported in such environment. Alternatively, feeder cells enable hPSCs to maintain their pluripotency. The feeder cells are usually grown in a culture medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS prior to coculture with hPSCs. The use of FBS might limit the clinical application of hPSCs. Recently, human cord blood-derived serum (hUCS showed a positive effect on culture of mesenchymal stem cells. It is interesting to test whether hUCS can be used for culture of feeder cells of hPSCs. This study was aimed to replace FBS with hUCS for culturing the human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs prior to feeder cell preparation. The results showed that HFFs cultured in hUCS-containing medium (HFF-hUCS displayed fibroblastic features, high proliferation rates, short population doubling times, and normal karyotypes after prolonged culture. Inactivated HFF-hUCS expressed important genes, including Activin A, FGF2, and TGFβ1, which have been implicated in the maintenance of hPSC pluripotency. Moreover, hPSC lines maintained pluripotency, differentiation capacities, and karyotypic stability after being cocultured for extended period with inactivated HFF-hUCS. Therefore, the results demonstrated the benefit of hUCS for hPSCs culture system.

  13. Stimulating Neoblast-Like Cell Proliferation in Juvenile Fasciola hepatica Supports Growth and Progression towards the Adult Phenotype In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinasamy, Vignesh; Toet, Hayley; McCammick, Erin; O’Connor, Anna; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela; Brennan, Gerard P.; Halton, David W.; Spithill, Terry W.; Maule, Aaron G.

    2016-01-01

    Fascioliasis (or fasciolosis) is a socioeconomically important parasitic disease caused by liver flukes of the genus Fasciola. Flukicide resistance has exposed the need for new drugs and/or a vaccine for liver fluke control. A rapidly improving ‘molecular toolbox’ for liver fluke encompasses quality genomic/transcriptomic datasets and an RNA interference platform that facilitates functional genomics approaches to drug/vaccine target validation. The exploitation of these resources is undermined by the absence of effective culture/maintenance systems that would support in vitro studies on juvenile fluke development/biology. Here we report markedly improved in vitro maintenance methods for Fasciola hepatica that achieved 65% survival of juvenile fluke after 6 months in standard cell culture medium supplemented with 50% chicken serum. We discovered that this long-term maintenance was dependent upon fluke growth, which was supported by increased proliferation of cells resembling the “neoblast” stem cells described in other flatworms. Growth led to dramatic morphological changes in juveniles, including the development of the digestive tract, reproductive organs and the tegument, towards more adult-like forms. The inhibition of DNA synthesis prevented neoblast-like cell proliferation and inhibited growth/development. Supporting our assertion that we have triggered the development of juveniles towards adult-like fluke, mass spectrometric analyses showed that growing fluke have an excretory/secretory protein profile that is distinct from that of newly-excysted juveniles and more closely resembles that of ex vivo immature and adult fluke. Further, in vitro maintained fluke displayed a transition in their movement from the probing behaviour associated with migrating stage worms to a slower wave-like motility seen in adults. Our ability to stimulate neoblast-like cell proliferation and growth in F. hepatica underpins the first simple platform for their long-term in

  14. Preparation of catalyst for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell using a novel spherical carbon support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, Mika; Okubo, Atsuhiko; Kobayashi, Yoshio [Department of Biomolecular Functional Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shun [Material and Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Kikuchi, Mayuko; Nishitani-Gamo, Mikka [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Uno, Katsuhiro [Department of Media and Telecommunications Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Ando, Toshihiro [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    In this study, the support Pt catalyst was supported by a novel spherical carbon using a convenient technique. Two different preparation methods utilizing a nanocolloidal solution method without heat treatment were developed (methods 1 and 2). The scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations showed that the Pt nanoparticles (particle size) were supported, with higher dispersion being achieved with method 2 than method 1. The peak of the Pt metal was confirmed from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. Based on the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements, Pt loading was 19.5 wt.% in method 1 and approximately 50 wt.% in method 2. The Pt specific surface area of the Pt/novel spherical carbon catalyst calculated from the cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurement result was larger than that of the commercially available Pt/Ketjen catalyst. These results indicated that the Pt nanoparticles were supported in high dispersion without heat treatment using novel spherical carbon as a carbon support. (author)

  15. Experimental Support for the Ecoimmunity Theory: Distinct Phenotypes of Nonlymphocytic Cells in SCID and Wild-Type Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochayon, David E; Baranovski, Boris M; Malkin, Peter; Schuster, Ronen; Kalay, Noa; Ben-Hamo, Rotem; Sloma, Ido; Levinson, Justin; Brazg, Jared; Efroni, Sol; Lewis, Eli C; Nevo, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Immune tolerance toward "self" is critical in multiple immune disorders. While there are several mechanisms to describe the involvement of immune cells in the process, the role of peripheral tissue cells in that context is not yet clear. The theory of ecoimmunity postulates that interactions between immune and tissue cells represent a predator-prey relationship. A lifelong interaction, shaped mainly during early ontogeny, leads to selection of nonimmune cell phenotypes. Normally, therefore, nonimmune cells that evolve alongside an intact immune system would be phenotypically capable of evading immune responses, and cells whose phenotype falls short of satisfying this steady state would expire under hostile immune responses. This view was supported until recently by experimental evidence showing an inferior endurance of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-derived pancreatic islets when engrafted into syngeneic immune-intact wild-type (WT) mice, relative to islets from WT. Here we extend the experimental exploration of ecoimmunity by searching for the presence of the phenotypic changes suggested by the theory. Immune-related phenotypes of islets, spleen, and bone marrow immune cells were determined, as well as SCID and WT nonlymphocytic cells. Islet submass grafting was performed to depict syngeneic graft functionality. Islet cultures were examined under both resting and inflamed conditions for expression of CD40 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/II and release of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-10, and insulin. Results depict multiple pathways that appear to be related to the sculpting of nonimmune cells by immune cells; 59 SCID islet genes displayed relative expression changes compared with WT islets. SCID cells expressed lower tolerability to inflammation and higher levels of immune-related molecules, including MHC class I. Accordingly, islets exhibited a marked increase in insulin release upon

  16. Platelet lysates produced from expired platelet concentrates support growth and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mjoll Jonsdottir-Buch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells are promising candidates in regenerative cell therapy. Conventional culture methods involve the use of animal substances, specifically fetal bovine serum as growth supplement. Since the use of animal-derived products is undesirable for human applications, platelet lysates produced from human platelets are an attractive alternative. This is especially true if platelet lysates from already approved transfusion units at blood banks can be utilized. The purpose of this study was to produce human platelet lysates from expired, blood bank-approved platelet concentrates and evaluate their use as growth supplement in the culture of mesenchymal stem cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured with one of three culture supplements; fetal bovine serum, lysates from freshly prepared human platelet concentrates, or lysates from expired human platelet concentrates. The effects of these platelet-derived culture supplements on basic mesenchymal stem cell characteristics were evaluated. All cultures maintained the typical mesenchymal stem cell surface marker expression, trilineage differentiation potential, and the ability to suppress in vitro immune responses. However, mesenchymal stem cells supplemented with platelet lysates proliferated faster than traditionally cultured cells and increased the expression of the osteogenic marker gene RUNX-2; yet no difference between the use of fresh and expired platelet concentrates was observed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that human platelet lysates produced from expired platelet concentrates can be used as an alternative to fetal bovine serum for mesenchymal stem cell culture to the same extent as lysates from fresh platelets.

  17. Deep transcriptome profiling of mammalian stem cells supports a regulatory role for retrotransposons in pluripotency maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fort, Alexandre; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Yamada, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    The importance of microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs in the regulation of pluripotency has been documented; however, the noncoding components of stem cell gene networks remain largely unknown. Here we investigate the role of noncoding RNAs in the pluripotent state, with particular emphasis...... on nuclear and retrotransposon-derived transcripts. We have performed deep profiling of the nuclear and cytoplasmic transcriptomes of human and mouse stem cells, identifying a class of previously undetected stem cell-specific transcripts. We show that long terminal repeat (LTR)-derived transcripts contribute...

  18. How chemistry supports cell biology: the chemical toolbox at your service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Neefjes, Jacques; Ovaa, Huib

    2014-12-01

    Chemical biology is a young and rapidly developing scientific field. In this field, chemistry is inspired by biology to create various tools to monitor and modulate biochemical and cell biological processes. Chemical contributions such as small-molecule inhibitors and activity-based probes (ABPs) can provide new and unique insights into previously unexplored cellular processes. This review provides an overview of recent breakthroughs in chemical biology that are likely to have a significant impact on cell biology. We also discuss the application of several chemical tools in cell biology research.

  19. Midkine is a NF-κB-inducible gene that supports prostate cancer cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Zongbing

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Midkine is a heparin-binding growth factor that is over-expressed in various human cancers and plays important roles in cell transformation, growth, survival, migration, and angiogenesis. However, little is known about the upstream factors and signaling mechanisms that regulate midkine gene expression. Methods Two prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC3 were studied for their expression of midkine. Induction of midkine expression in LNCaP cells by serum, growth factors and cytokines was determined by Western blot analysis and/or real-time quantitative reverse-transcription – polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The cell viability was determined by the trypan blue exclusion assay when the LNCaP cells were treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα and/or recombinant midkine. When the LNCaP cells were treated with recombinant midkine, activation of intracellular signalling pathways was determined by Western blot analysis. Prostate tissue microarray slides containing 129 cases (18 normal prostate tissues, 40 early stage cancers, and 71 late stage cancers were assessed for midkine expression by immunohistochemical staining. Results We identified that fetal bovine serum, some growth factors (epidermal growth factor, androgen, insulin-like growth factor-I, and hepatocyte growth factor and cytokines (TNFα and interleukin-1beta induced midkine expression in a human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP cells. TNFα also induced midkine expression in PC3 cells. TNFα was the strongest inducer of midkine expression via nuclear factor-kappa B pathway. Midkine partially inhibited TNFα-induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells. Knockdown of endogenous midkine expression by small interfering RNA enhanced TNFα-induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells. Midkine activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in LNCaP cells. Furthermore, midkine expression was significantly increased in late stage

  20. Impaired antiviral response of adenovirus-transformed cell lines supports virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Mandy; Breitwieser, Theresa; Lipps, Christoph; Wirth, Dagmar; Jordan, Ingo; Reichl, Udo; Frensing, Timo

    2016-02-01

    Activation of the innate immune response represents one of the most important cellular mechanisms to limit virus replication and spread in cell culture. Here, we examined the effect of adenoviral gene expression on the antiviral response in adenovirus-transformed cell lines; HEK293, HEK293SF and AGE1.HN. We demonstrate that the expression of the early region protein 1A in these cell lines impairs their ability to activate antiviral genes by the IFN pathway. This property may help in the isolation of newly emerging viruses and the propagation of interferon-sensitive virus strains.

  1. CD30 on extracellular vesicles from malignant Hodgkin cells supports damaging of CD30 ligand-expressing bystander cells with Brentuximab-Vedotin, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Hinrich P; Trad, Ahmad; Dams, Maria; Zigrino, Paola; Moss, Marcia; Tator, Maximilian; Schön, Gisela; Grenzi, Patricia C; Bachurski, Daniel; Aquino, Bruno; Dürkop, Horst; Reiners, Katrin S; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Hallek, Michael; Grötzinger, Joachim; Engert, Andreas; Paes Leme, Adriana F; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke

    2016-05-24

    The goal of targeted immunotherapy in cancer is to damage both malignant and tumor-supporting cells of the microenvironment but spare unaffected tissue. The malignant cells in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) selectively express CD30. They release this receptor on extracellular vesicles (EVs) for the tumor-supporting communication with CD30 ligand (CD30L)-positive bystander cells. Here, we investigated how CD30-positive EVs influence the efficacy of the CD30 antibody drug conjugate (ADC) Brentuximab Vedotin (SGN-35). The malignant cells and the EVs expressed the active sheddase ADAM10. ADAM10 cleaved and released the CD30 ectodomain (sCD30), causing a gradual depletion of SGN-35 binding sites on EVs and creating a soluble competitor of the ADC therapy. In a 3D semi-solid tumor microenvironment model, the EVs were retained in the matrix whereas sCD30 penetrated readily into the surrounding culture medium. This resulted in a lowered ratio of EV-associated CD30 (CD30EV) to sCD30 in the surrounding medium in comparison to non-embedded cultures. A low percentage of CD30EV was also detected in the plasma of cHL patients, supporting the clinical relevance of the model. The adherence of CD30EV but not sCD30 to CD30-/CD30L+ mast cells and eosinophils allowed the indirect binding of SGN-35. Moreover, SGN-35 damaged CD30-negative cells, provided they were loaded with CD30+ EVs.

  2. New electrocatalyst support for high temperature PEM fuel cells (HT-PEMFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boaventura, M.; Brandao, L.; Mendes, A. [Porto Univ. (PT). Lab. de Engenharia de Processos, Ambiente e Energia (LEPAE)

    2010-07-01

    This work compares the performance of electrocatalysts based on platinum supported in single-wall carbon nanohorns (Pt-SWNH) and supported in carbon black (Pt-carbon black) during high temperature PEM fuel operation. MEAs made of phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) were characterized by polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), at 160 C. The Pt-SWNH electrocatalyst presented a higher electrochemical surface area (ESA) when compared to Pt-carbon black. However, electrochemical experiments showed a higher ohmic resistance of the Pt-SWNH electrode related to a higher hydrophobic character of the SWNH carbon. (orig.)

  3. Break‐down of Losses in High Performing Metal‐Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromp, A.; Nielsen, Jimmi; Blennow Tullmar, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    in the metal support, the electrochemical fuel oxidation at the anode and the oxygen reduction in the mixed ionic electronic conducting cathode. An additional process with a rather high relaxation frequency was attributed to the formation of insulating interlayers at the cathode/electrolyte‐interface. Based...... on these results, selective measures to improve performance and stability, such as (i) PVD‐deposited CGO buffer layer preventing solid state reaction between cathode and the zirconia‐based electrolyte, (ii) LSC‐CGO based in‐situ sintered cathodes and (iii) reduced corrosion of the metal support, were adopted...

  4. Dermal Substitutes Support the Growth of Human Skin-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Potential Tool for Skin Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremias, Talita da Silva; Machado, Rafaela Grecco; Visoni, Silvia Beatriz Coutinho; Pereima, Maurício José; Leonardi, Dilmar Francisco; Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    New strategies for skin regeneration are needed in order to provide effective treatment for cutaneous wounds and disease. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because of their prolonged self-renewal capacity, multipotentiality, and ability to release active molecules important for tissue repair. In this paper, we show that human skin-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (SD-MSCs) display similar characteristics to the multipotent MSCs. We also evaluate their growth in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system with dermal substitutes (Integra and Pelnac). When cultured in monolayers, SD-MSCs expressed mesenchymal markers, such as CD105, Fibronectin, and α-SMA; and neural markers, such as Nestin and βIII-Tubulin; at transcriptional and/or protein level. Integra and Pelnac equally supported the adhesion, spread and growth of human SD-MSCs in 3D culture, maintaining the MSC characteristics and the expression of multilineage markers. Therefore, dermal substitutes support the growth of mesenchymal stromal cells from human skin, promising an effective tool for tissue engineering and regenerative technology. PMID:24586857

  5. NASA's Planned Fuel Cell Development Activities for 2009 and Beyond in Support of the Exploration Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Energy Storage Project is one of many technology development efforts being implemented as part of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP), under the auspices of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD). The Energy Storage Project is a focused technology development effort to advance lithium-ion battery and proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technologies to meet the specific power and energy storage needs of NASA Exploration missions. The fuel cell portion of the project has as its focus the development of both primary fuel cell power systems and regenerative fuel cell (RFC) energy storage systems, and is led by the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in partnership with the Johnson Space Center (JSC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), academia, and industrial partners. The development goals are to improve stack electrical performance, reduce system mass and parasitic power requirements, and increase system life and reliability.

  6. pRb phosphorylation regulates the proliferation of supporting cells in gentamicin-damaged neonatal avian utricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingfang; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Chen, Yan; Li, Huawei

    2014-10-01

    The ability of nonmammalian vertebrates to regenerate hair cells (HCs) after damage-induced HC loss has stimulated and inspired research in the field of HC regeneration. The protein pRb encoded by retinoblastoma gene Rb1 forces sensory progenitor cells to exit cell cycle and maintain differentiated HCs and supporting cells (SCs) in a quiescent state. pRb function is regulated by phosphorylation through the MEK/ERK or the pRb/Raf-1 signaling pathway. In our previous study, we have shown that pRb phosphorylation is crucial for progenitor cell proliferation and survival during the early embryonic stage of avian otocyst sensory epithelium development. However, in damaged avian utricle, the role of pRb in regulating the cell cycling of SCs or HCs regeneration still remains unclear. To further elucidate the function of pRb phosphorylation on SCs re-entering the cell cycle triggered by gentamycin-induced HCs damage, we isolated neonatal chicken utricles and treated them with the MEK inhibitor U0126 or the pRb/Raf-1 inhibitor RRD-251, respectively in vitro. We found that after gentamycin-induced HCs damage, pRb phosphorylation is important for the quiescent SCs re-entering the cell cycle in the neonatal chicken utricle. In addition, the proliferation of SCs decreased in a dose-dependent manner in response to both U0126 and RRD-251, which indicates that both the MEK/ERK and the pRb/Raf-1 signaling pathway play important roles in pRb phosphorylation in damaged neonatal chicken utricle. Together, these findings on the function of pRb in damaged neonatal chicken utricle improve our understanding of the regulation of the cell cycle of SCs after HCs loss and may shed light on the mammalian HC regeneration from SCs in damaged organs.

  7. Molting, Ecdysis, and Reproduction of Trichinella spiralis Are Supported In Vitro by Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gagliardo, L. F.; McVay, C S; Appleton, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Trichinella spiralis is an obligate parasite of animals that has an unusual intracellular life cycle. Investigation of parasitism at the cellular and molecular levels has been challenging because of a shortage of tools for in vitro cultivation of T. spiralis. We have found that T. spiralis larvae molt, ecdyse, develop to adulthood, and reproduce when they are inoculated onto cultured intestinal epithelial cells. Initially, larvae invade and migrate through cells in a monolayer (T. ManWarren, ...

  8. Platelet Lysates Produced from Expired Platelet Concentrates Support Growth and Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Mjoll Jonsdottir-Buch; Ramona Lieder; Olafur Eysteinn Sigurjonsson

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells are promising candidates in regenerative cell therapy. Conventional culture methods involve the use of animal substances, specifically fetal bovine serum as growth supplement. Since the use of animal-derived products is undesirable for human applications, platelet lysates produced from human platelets are an attractive alternative. This is especially true if platelet lysates from already approved transfusion units at blood banks can be utilized. The purpose ...

  9. Data in support of dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulations frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Rincón-Arévalo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world, atherosclerosis being its main underlying disease. Information about the role of B cells during atherosclerotic process is scarce, but both proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been described in the immunopathology of this disease. Frequency and phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE−/− mice fed or not with high-fat diet (HFD, by flow cytometry. Here, we provide the information about the materials, methods, analysis and additional information related to our study published in Atherosclerosis (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.022, article reference: ATH14410 [1]. The data contained in this article shows and supports that mice with advanced atherosclerosis have a variety of alterations in frequency and phenotype of B cell subsets, most of which associated with dyslipidemia.

  10. Effects of the Use of Pore Formers on Performance of an Anode supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haslam, J J; Pham, A; Chung, B W; DiCarlo, J F; Glass, R S

    2003-12-04

    The effects of amount of pore former used to produce porosity in the anode of an anode supported planar solid oxide fuel cell were examined. The pore forming material utilized was rice starch. The reduction rate of the anode material was measured by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) to qualitatively characterize the gas transport within the porous anode materials. Fuel cells with varying amounts of porosity produced by using rice starch as a pore former were tested. The performance of the fuel cell was the greatest with an optimum amount of pore former used to create porosity in the anode. This optimum is believed to be related to a trade off between increasing gas diffusion to the active three-phase boundary region of the anode and the loss of performance due to the replacement of active three-phase boundary regions of the anode with porosity.

  11. Data in support of dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulations frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Arévalo, Héctor; Castaño, Diana; Villa-Pulgarín, Janny; Rojas, Mauricio; Vásquez, Gloria; Correa, Luis A.; Ramírez-Pineda, José R.; Yassin, Lina M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world, atherosclerosis being its main underlying disease. Information about the role of B cells during atherosclerotic process is scarce, but both proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been described in the immunopathology of this disease. Frequency and phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice fed or not with high-fat diet (HFD), by flow cytometry. Here, we provide the information about the materials, methods, analysis and additional information related to our study published in Atherosclerosis (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.022, article reference: ATH14410) [1]. The data contained in this article shows and supports that mice with advanced atherosclerosis have a variety of alterations in frequency and phenotype of B cell subsets, most of which associated with dyslipidemia. PMID:27081674

  12. Endothelin-1 supports clonal derivation and expansion of cardiovascular progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Boon-Seng; Ng, Shi-Yan; Wu, Hao; Buac, Kristina; Park, Joo-Hye C; Lian, Xiaojun; Xu, Jiejia; Foo, Kylie S; Felldin, Ulrika; He, Xiaobing; Nichane, Massimo; Yang, Henry; Bu, Lei; Li, Ronald A; Lim, Bing; Chien, Kenneth R

    2016-03-08

    Coronary arteriogenesis is a central step in cardiogenesis, requiring coordinated generation and integration of endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cells. At present, it is unclear whether the cell fate programme of cardiac progenitors to generate complex muscular or vascular structures is entirely cell autonomous. Here we demonstrate the intrinsic ability of vascular progenitors to develop and self-organize into cardiac tissues by clonally isolating and expanding second heart field cardiovascular progenitors using WNT3A and endothelin-1 (EDN1) human recombinant proteins. Progenitor clones undergo long-term expansion and differentiate primarily into endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages in vitro, and contribute extensively to coronary-like vessels in vivo, forming a functional human-mouse chimeric circulatory system. Our study identifies EDN1 as a key factor towards the generation and clonal derivation of ISL1(+) vascular intermediates, and demonstrates the intrinsic cell-autonomous nature of these progenitors to differentiate and self-organize into functional vasculatures in vivo.

  13. The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome supports cell survival in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meifan Chen

    Full Text Available The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C is a multi-subunit ubiquitin ligase that regulates exit from mitosis and G1 phase of the cell cycle. Although the regulation and function of APC/C(Cdh1 in the unperturbed cell cycle is well studied, little is known of its role in non-genotoxic stress responses. Here, we demonstrate the role of APC/C(Cdh1 (APC/C activated by Cdh1 protein in cellular protection from endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Activation of APC/C(Cdh1 under ER stress conditions is evidenced by Cdh1-dependent degradation of its substrates. Importantly, the activity of APC/C(Cdh1 maintains the ER stress checkpoint, as depletion of Cdh1 by RNAi impairs cell cycle arrest and accelerates cell death following ER stress. Our findings identify APC/C(Cdh1 as a regulator of cell cycle checkpoint and cell survival in response to proteotoxic insults.

  14. Virtual reality based support system for layout planning and programming of an industrial robotic work cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Hwa Jen; Taha, Zahari; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md; Chang, Siow-Wee

    2014-01-01

    Traditional robotic work cell design and programming are considered inefficient and outdated in current industrial and market demands. In this research, virtual reality (VR) technology is used to improve human-robot interface, whereby complicated commands or programming knowledge is not required. The proposed solution, known as VR-based Programming of a Robotic Work Cell (VR-Rocell), consists of two sub-programmes, which are VR-Robotic Work Cell Layout (VR-RoWL) and VR-based Robot Teaching System (VR-RoT). VR-RoWL is developed to assign the layout design for an industrial robotic work cell, whereby VR-RoT is developed to overcome safety issues and lack of trained personnel in robot programming. Simple and user-friendly interfaces are designed for inexperienced users to generate robot commands without damaging the robot or interrupting the production line. The user is able to attempt numerous times to attain an optimum solution. A case study is conducted in the Robotics Laboratory to assemble an electronics casing and it is found that the output models are compatible with commercial software without loss of information. Furthermore, the generated KUKA commands are workable when loaded into a commercial simulator. The operation of the actual robotic work cell shows that the errors may be due to the dynamics of the KUKA robot rather than the accuracy of the generated programme. Therefore, it is concluded that the virtual reality based solution approach can be implemented in an industrial robotic work cell.

  15. Importance of Fuel Cell Tests for Stability Assessment—Suitability of Titanium Diboride as an Alternative Support Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Roth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon corrosion is a severe issue limiting the long-term stability of carbon-supported catalysts, in particular in the highly dynamic conditions of automotive applications. (Doped oxides have been discussed as suitable alternatives to replace carbon, but often suffer from poor electron conductivity. That is why non-oxide ceramics, such as tungsten carbide and titanium nitride, have been discussed recently. Titanium diboride has also been proposed, due to its promising activity and stability in an aqueous electrochemical cell. In this work, Pt nanoparticles were deposited onto μm-sized TiB2 particles with improved grain size, manufactured into porous gas diffusion electrodes and tested in a realistic polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cell environment. In contrast to the model studies in an aqueous electrochemical cell, in the presence of oxygen and high potentials at the cathode side of a real fuel cell, TiB2 becomes rapidly oxidized as indicated by intensely colored regions in the membrane-electrode assembly (MEA. Moreover, already the electrode manufacturing process led to the formation of titanium oxides, as shown by X-ray diffraction measurements. This demonstrates that Cyclic Voltammetry (CV measurements in an aqueous electrochemical cell are not sufficient to prove stability of novel materials for fuel cell applications.

  16. Short communication: Initial evidence supporting existence of potential rumen epidermal stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohe, T T; Tucker, H L M; Parsons, C L M; Geiger, A J; Akers, R M; Daniels, K M

    2016-09-01

    The bovine rumen epidermis is a keratinized multilayered tissue that experiences persistent cell turnover. Because of this constant cell turnover, epidermal stem cells and their slightly more differentiated daughter cells, epidermal progenitor cells, must exist in the stratum basale of rumen epidermis. To date, these 2 epidermal cell populations and any unique cellular markers they may possess remain completely uncharacterized in the bovine rumen. An important first step in this new research area is the demonstration of the relative abundance and existence of markers for these cells in rumen tissue. A related second step is to document rumen epidermal proliferative responses to an extrinsic signal such as nutrient concentration within the rumen. The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the extrinsic effect of diet on (1) gene expression of 6 potential rumen epidermal stem or progenitor cell markers and (2) rumen epidermal cell proliferation within the stratum basale. Twelve preweaned Holstein heifers were fed either a restricted diet (R) or an enhanced diet (EH). Animals on R received a milk replacer (MR) diet fed at 0.44kg of powder dry matter (DM)/d (20.9% crude protein, 29.8% fat, DM basis) and EH received MR at 1.08kg of powder dry matter/d (28.9% crude protein, 26.2% fat, DM basis). All calves had access to a 20% crude protein starter and were weaned during wk 7 of the experiment. Lifetime DM intake was 0.73kg of DM/calf per day for R (5.88 Mcal of net energy/calf per day) and 1.26kg of DM/calf per day for EH (10.68 Mcal of net energy/calf per day). Twenty-four hours before slaughter heifers received an intravenous dose of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine to label proliferating cells. Heifers were slaughtered at 8 wk of age, and rumen samples from the ventral sac region were obtained and stored in RNA preservative and processed for routine histology. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to analyze relative abundance of genes. Candidate

  17. Electrocatalysts and their Supporting Materials for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells: Activity and Durability Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Permyakova, Anastasia Aleksandrovna

    instruments: TEM (FEI Tecnai T20 G2), EDS, AFM, XRD (PANalytical Multipurpose Diffractometer) and FTIR-IR. Chapter 3 describes the results of synthesis and testing of the Pt nanoparticulate catalyst supported by PBI wrapped Graphene for oxygen reduction reaction in PEMFCs. The physiochemical material...

  18. Ability of tetraploid rat blastocysts to support fetal development after complementation with embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Masumi; Tamura, Chihiro; Sanbo, Makoto; Goto, Teppei; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Hochi, Shinichi

    2012-06-01

    This study was undertaken to generate rat offspring via tetraploid blastocyst complementation with embryonic stem (ES) cells. Tetraploid blastocysts were prepared by electrofusion of blastomeres from two-cell stage embryos, and subsequent in vivo culture for 4 days. Microinjection into the tetraploid blastocoel of an inner cell mass isolated by immunosurgery resulted in the generation of rat offspring, suggesting the successful contribution of tetraploid blastocysts to their placenta. Tetraploid blastocyst complementation was attempted with a total of 4 ES cell lines (2 lines of female karyotype and 2 lines of male karyotype). In the rESWIv-3i-5 (XX) cell line, normal-sized fetuses with heartbeats were harvested on E11.5 (12.1%), E12.5 (9.5%), and E13.5 (9.1%), but no viable fetuses were detected on E14.5. Similarly, use of the rESWIv-3i-1 (XX) cell line resulted in no viable fetus production on E14.5. Using the rESBLK2i-1 (XY) cell line, viable fetuses were harvested not only on E11.5-E13.5 (2.6-5.5%), but also on E14.5 (3.0%). The transfer of a total of 487 tetraploid blastocysts complemented with rESBLK2i-1 cells resulted in 256 implantation sites (52.6%) on E21.5, but no viable offspring was detected. Use of the rESBLK2i-1/huKO (XY) cell line also resulted in no viable offspring production on E21.5. Analyses of the methylation pattern in differentially methylated regions and transcript level of genes that are imprinted in mice (H19, Meg3, Igf2r, Peg5, and Peg10) in the E14.5 conceptuses indicated a marked difference between the ES cell-derived and control normal fetuses, but not between the tetraploid and control diploid placenta.

  19. Research and development of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation system. ; Supporting studies. Yoyu tansan'engata nenryo denchi hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu. ; Support kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This paper presents a report on supporting studies as part of researches on a molten carbonate fuel cell power generation system, as a NEDO fiscal 1988-1992 report. With respect to developing the material technologies, iron-based and nickel-based cathodes have been fabricated on a trial basis to compare and discuss their polarization characteristics; optimal conditions for hydrogen reduction when Ni-Al anodes are manufactured have been elucidated; Ni-Cr alloy thin separators have been fabricated on a trial basis; and prototype ceramics materials (cathodes and electrolyte plates) have been manufactured and evaluated. These activities have provided a large number of useful findings. In addition, developments have been progressed in respective areas of coal gas handling technologies, capacity increasing technologies, and high-performance gas separation and purification technologies. In the coal gas handling technologies, for example, influences of HCl and NH3 on desulfurization using TiO2-ZnO have been investigated to have elucidated that NH3 has no influence whatsoever. The capacity increasing technology development has discussed a system configuration of coal gas MCFC power generation of 500-MW class, and device sizes. 3 figs.

  20. Deletion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in genetically targeted mice supports development of intestinal inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boehm Franziska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice lacking Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg cells develop severe tissue inflammation in lung, skin, and liver with premature death, whereas the intestine remains uninflamed. This study aims to demonstrate the importance of Foxp3+ Treg for the activation of T cells and the development of intestinal inflammation. Methods Foxp3-GFP-DTR (human diphtheria toxin receptor C57BL/6 mice allow elimination of Foxp3+ Treg by treatment with Dx (diphtheria toxin. The influence of Foxp3+ Treg on intestinal inflammation was tested using the CD4+ T-cell transfer colitis model in Rag−/− C57BL/6 mice and the acute DSS-colitis model. Results Continuous depletion of Foxp3+ Treg in Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice led to dramatic weight loss and death of mice by day 28. After 10 days of depletion of Foxp3+ Treg, isolated CD4+ T-cells were activated and produced extensive amounts of IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-17A. Transfer of total CD4+ T-cells isolated from Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice did not result in any changes of intestinal homeostasis in Rag−/− C57BL/6 mice. However, administration of DTx between days 14 and 18 after T-cell reconstitution, lead to elimination of Foxp3+ Treg and to immediate weight loss due to intestinal inflammation. This pro-inflammatory effect of Foxp3+ Treg depletion consecutively increased inflammatory cytokine production. Further, the depletion of Foxp3+ Treg from Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice increased the severity of acute dSS-colitis accompanied by 80% lethality of Treg-depleted mice. CD4+ effector T-cells from Foxp3+ Treg-depleted mice produced significantly more pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusion Intermittent depletion of Foxp3+ Treg aggravates intestinal inflammatory responses demonstrating the importance of Foxp3+ Treg for the balance at the mucosal surface of the intestine.

  1. Microfluidically supported biochip design for culture of endothelial cell layers with improved perfusion conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasch, Martin; Rennert, Knut; Jahn, Tobias; Peters, Sven; Henkel, Thomas; Huber, Otmar; Schulz, Ingo; Becker, Holger; Lorkowski, Stefan; Funke, Harald; Mosig, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Hemodynamic forces generated by the blood flow are of central importance for the function of endothelial cells (ECs), which form a biologically active cellular monolayer in blood vessels and serve as a selective barrier for macromolecular permeability. Mechanical stimulation of the endothelial monolayer induces morphological remodeling in its cytoskeleton. For in vitro studies on EC biology culture devices are desirable that simulate conditions of flow in blood vessels and allow flow-based adhesion/permeability assays under optimal perfusion conditions. With this aim we designed a biochip comprising a perfusable membrane that serves as cell culture platform multi-organ-tissue-flow (MOTiF biochip). This biochip allows an effective supply with nutrition medium, discharge of catabolic cell metabolites and defined application of shear stress to ECs under laminar flow conditions. To characterize EC layers cultured in the MOTiF biochip we investigated cell viability, expression of EC marker proteins and cell adhesion molecules of ECs dynamically cultured under low and high shear stress, and compared them with an endothelial culture in established two-dimensionally perfused flow chambers and under static conditions. We show that ECs cultured in the MOTiF biochip form a tight EC monolayer with increased cellular density, enhanced cell layer thickness, presumably as the result of a rapid and effective adaption to shear stress by remodeling of the cytoskeleton. Moreover, endothelial layers in the MOTiF biochip express higher amounts of EC marker proteins von-Willebrand-factor and PECAM-1. EC layers were highly responsive to stimulation with TNFα as detected at the level of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression and modulation of endothelial permeability in response to TNFα/IFNγ treatment under flow conditions. Compared to static and two-dimensionally perfused cell culture condition we consider MOTiF biochips as a valuable tool for studying EC biology in vitro under

  2. An Optimized Injectable Hydrogel Scaffold Supports Human Dental Pulp Stem Cell Viability and Spreading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Jones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. HyStem-C™ is a commercially available injectable hydrogel composed of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA, hyaluronan (HA, and gelatin (Gn. These components can be mechanically tuned to enhance cell viability and spreading. Methods. The concentration of PEGDA with an added disulfide bond (PEGSSDA was varied from 0.5 to 8.0% (w/v to determine the optimal concentration for injectable clinical application. We evaluated the cell viability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs embedded in 2% (w/v PEGSSDA-HA-Gn hydrogels. Volume ratios of HA : Gn from 100 : 0 to 25 : 75 were varied to encourage hDPSC spreading. Fibronectin (Fn was added to our model to determine the effect of extracellular matrix protein concentration on hDPSC behavior. Results. Our preliminary data suggests that the hydrogel gelation time decreased as the PEGSSDA cross-linker concentration increased. The PEGSSDA-HA-Gn was biocompatible with hDPSCs, and increased ratios of HA : Gn enhanced cell viability for 14 days. Additionally, cell proliferation with added fibronectin increased significantly over time at concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 μg/mL in PEGDA-HA-Gn hydrogels, while cell spreading significantly increased at Fn concentrations of 0.1 μg/mL. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that PEG-based injectable hydrogels maintain hDPSC viability and facilitate cell spreading, mainly in the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins.

  3. Living biointerfaces based on non-pathogenic bacteria support stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jake J.; Rodrigo-Navarro, Aleixandre; Hassi, Karoliina; Moulisova, Vladimira; Dalby, Matthew J.; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Lactococcus lactis, a non-pathogenic bacteria, has been genetically engineered to express the III7–10 fragment of human fibronectin as a membrane protein. The engineered L. lactis is able to develop biofilms on different surfaces (such as glass and synthetic polymers) and serves as a long-term substrate for mammalian cell culture, specifically human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). This system constitutes a living interface between biomaterials and stem cells. The engineered biofilms remain stable and viable for up to 28 days while the expressed fibronectin fragment induces hMSC adhesion. We have optimised conditions to allow long-term mammalian cell culture, and found that the biofilm is functionally equivalent to a fibronectin-coated surface in terms of osteoblastic differentiation using bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) added to the medium. This living bacteria interface holds promise as a dynamic substrate for stem cell differentiation that can be further engineered to express other biochemical cues to control hMSC differentiation.

  4. Embryonic stem cells deficient for Brca2 or Blm exhibit divergent genotoxic profiles that support opposing activities during homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marple, Teresa [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Kim, Tae Moon [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Hasty, Paul [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States)]. E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu

    2006-12-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility protein, Brca2 and the RecQ helicase, Blm (Bloom syndrome mutated) are tumor suppressors that maintain genome integrity, at least in part, through homologous recombination (HR). Brca2 facilitates HR by interacting with Rad51 in multiple regions, the BRC motifs encoded by exon 11 and a single domain encoded by exon 27; however, the exact importance of these regions is not fully understood. Blm also interacts with Rad51 and appears to suppress HR in most circumstances; however, its yeast homologue Sgs1 facilitates HR in response to some genotoxins. To better understand the biological importance of these two proteins, we performed a genotoxic screen on mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells impaired for either Brca2 or Blm to establish their genotoxic profiles (a cellular dose-response to a wide range of agents). This is the first side-by-side comparison of these two proteins in an identical genetic background. We compared cells deleted for Brca2 exon 27 to cells reduced for Blm expression and find that the Brca2- and Blm-impaired cells exhibit genotoxic profiles that reflect opposing activities during HR. Cells deleted for Brca2 exon 27 are hypersensitive to {gamma}-radiation, streptonigrin, mitomycin C and camptothecin and mildly resistant to ICRF-193 which is similar to HR defective cells null for Rad54. By contrast, Blm-impaired cells are hypersensitive to ICRF-193, mildly resistant to camptothecin and mitomycin C and more strongly resistant to hydroxyurea. These divergent profiles support the notion that Brca2 and Blm perform opposing functions during HR in mouse ES cells.

  5. New methodology of preparation support for solid oxide fuel cells using different pore forming agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiuza, Raigenis da P.; Guedes, Bruna C.F.; Silva, Marcos A. da; Carvalho, Luiz F.V. de; Boaventura, Jaime S. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (IQ/UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Pontes, Luiz A.M. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (EP/UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica

    2008-07-01

    The development of environment-friendly energy sources has been of the most important scientific and technological area. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are very promising alternative for their ability to handle renewable fuels with low emissions and high efficiency. However, this device requires massive improvement before commercial application. This work studies the pore formation in the cell anode and cathode with NaHCO{sub 3} or citric acid, comparing to graphite. The three agents make pore with similar features, but the use of NaHCO{sub 3} and citric acid considerably improves the adhesion of the electrode-electrolyte interface, critical characteristic for good cell efficiency. The prepared anode-electrolyte-cathode structure was studied by SEM technique. The SOFC prepared using citric acid was tested with gaseous ethanol, natural gas and hydrogen. For all these three fuels the SOFC shows virtually no overpotential, indicating the good ionic conductance of the electrodes-electrolyte interface.. (author)

  6. Non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth supports sub-clonal heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusyk, Andriy; Tabassum, Doris P; Altrock, Philipp M; Almendro, Vanessa; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-10-02

    Cancers arise through a process of somatic evolution that can result in substantial sub-clonal heterogeneity within tumours. The mechanisms responsible for the coexistence of distinct sub-clones and the biological consequences of this coexistence remain poorly understood. Here we used a mouse xenograft model to investigate the impact of sub-clonal heterogeneity on tumour phenotypes and the competitive expansion of individual clones. We found that tumour growth can be driven by a minor cell subpopulation, which enhances the proliferation of all cells within a tumour by overcoming environmental constraints and yet can be outcompeted by faster proliferating competitors, resulting in tumour collapse. We developed a mathematical modelling framework to identify the rules underlying the generation of intra-tumour clonal heterogeneity. We found that non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth, together with clonal interference, stabilizes sub-clonal heterogeneity, thereby enabling inter-clonal interactions that can lead to new phenotypic traits.

  7. Signaling network of dendritic cells in response to pathogens: a community-input supported knowledgebase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nudelman Irina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in linking the innate and adaptive immune systems. Much research has focused on the signaling pathways triggered upon infection of dendritic cells by various pathogens. The high level of activity in the field makes it desirable to have a pathway-based resource to access the information in the literature. Current pathway diagrams lack either comprehensiveness, or an open-access editorial interface. Hence, there is a need for a dependable, expertly curated knowledgebase that integrates this information into a map of signaling networks. Description We have built a detailed diagram of the dendritic cell signaling network, with the goal of providing researchers with a valuable resource and a facile method for community input. Network construction has relied on comprehensive review of the literature and regular updates. The diagram includes detailed depictions of pathways activated downstream of different pathogen recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors. Initially assembled using CellDesigner software, it provides an annotated graphical representation of interactions stored in Systems Biology Mark-up Language. The network, which comprises 249 nodes and 213 edges, has been web-published through the Biological Pathway Publisher software suite. Nodes are annotated with PubMed references and gene-related information, and linked to a public wiki, providing a discussion forum for updates and corrections. To gain more insight into regulatory patterns of dendritic cell signaling, we analyzed the network using graph-theory methods: bifan, feedforward and multi-input convergence motifs were enriched. This emphasis on activating control mechanisms is consonant with a network that subserves persistent and coordinated responses to

  8. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed.

  9. Human PIF1 helicase supports DNA replication and cell growth under oncogenic-stress

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Unwinding duplex DNA is a critical processing step during replication, repair and transcription. Pif1 are highly conserved non-processive 5′->3′ DNA helicases with well-established roles in maintenance of yeast genome stability. However, the function of the sole member of Pif1 family in humans remains unclear. Human PIF1 is essential for tumour cell viability, particularly during replication stress, but is dispensable in non-cancerous cells and Pif1 deficient mice. Here we report that suppres...

  10. Components of yeast (Sacchromyces cervisiae) extract as defined media additives that support the growth and productivity of CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, Maureen; Chan, Sarah; Jung, Vince; Kowbel, Vanessa; Mendoza, Meg; Miranda, Vivian; Butler, Michael

    2016-09-10

    Yeast and plant hydrolysates are used as media supplements to support the growth and productivity of CHO cultures for biopharmaceutical production. Through fractionation of a yeast lysate and metabolic analysis of a fraction that had bioactivity equivalent to commercial yeast extract (YE), bioactive components were identified that promoted growth and productivity of two recombinant CHO cell lines (CHO-Luc and CHO-hFcEG2) equivalent to or greater than YE-supplemented media. Autolysis of the yeast lysate was not necessary for full activity, suggesting that the active components are present in untreated yeast cells. A bioactive fraction (3KF) of the yeast lysate was isolated from the permeate using a 3kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) filter. Supplementation of this 3KF fraction into the base media supported growth of CHO-Luc cells over eight passages equivalent to YE-supplemented media. The 3KF fraction was fractionated further by a cation exchange spin column using a stepwise pH elution. Metabolomic analysis of a bioactive fraction isolated at high pH identified several arginine and lysine-containing peptides as well as two polyamines, spermine and spermidine, with 3.5× and 4.5× higher levels compared to a fraction showing no bioactivity. The addition of a mixture of polyamines and their precursors (putrescine, spermine, spermidine, ornithine and citrulline) as well as increasing the concentration of some of the components of the original base medium resulted in a chemically-defined (CD) formulation that produced an equivalent viable cell density (VCD) and productivity of the CHO-Luc cells as the YE-supplemented medium. The VCD of the CHO-hFcEG2 culture in the CD medium was 1.9× greater and with equivalent productivity to the YE-supplemented media.

  11. Optimization of pediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplant outcomes through the application of pharmacokinetics and supportive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupuis, L.L.E.

    2013-01-01

    The research described in this thesis aims to optimize drug-related outcomes in children undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). The use of pharmacokinetics to individualize exposure to busulfan and cyclosporine; the assessment of the symptom burden of children receiving chemotherapy

  12. Wire-supported CdSe nanowire array photoelectrochemical solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luhui; Shi, Enzheng; Li, Zhen; Li, Peixu; Jia, Yi; Ji, Chunyan; Wei, Jinquan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai; Cao, Anyuan

    2012-03-14

    Previous fiber-shaped solar cells are based on polymeric materials or dye-sensitized wide band-gap oxides. Here, we show that efficient fiber solar cells can be made from semiconducting nanostructures (e.g. CdSe) with smaller band-gap as the light absorption material. We directly grow a vertical array of CdSe nanowires uniformly around a core metal wire and make the device by covering the top of nanowires with a carbon nanotube (CNT) film as the porous transparent electrode. The CdSe-CNT fiber solar cells show power conversion efficiencies of 1-2% under AM 1.5 illumination after the nanowires are infiltrated with redox electrolyte. We do not use a secondary metal wire (e.g. Pt) as in conventional fiber-shaped devices, instead, the end part of the CNT film is condensed into a conductive yarn to serve as the secondary electrode. In addition, our CdSe nanowire-based photoelectrochemical fiber solar cells maintain good flexibility and stable performance upon rotation and bending to large angles.

  13. Manufacturing and characterization of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blennow Tullmar, Peter; Hjelm, Johan; Klemensø, Trine

    2011-01-01

    functional layer, oxygen reduction in the mixed ionic-electronic conducting cathode and an additional polarization process with a rather high relaxation frequency, which may be assigned to an insulating corrosion interlayer.The durability of the cells was investigated by means of galvanostatic operation...

  14. Effectiveness of Partner Social Support Predicts Enduring Psychological Distress after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rini, Christine; Redd, William H.; Austin, Jane; Mosher, Catherine E.; Meschian, Yeraz Markarian; Isola, Luis; Scigliano, Eileen; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Papadopoulos, Esperanza; Labay, Larissa E.; Rowley, Scott; Burkhalter, Jack E.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; DuHamel, Katherine N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) survivors who are 1 to 3 years posttransplant are challenged by the need to resume valued social roles and activities--a task that may be complicated by enduring transplant-related psychological distress common in this patient population. The present study investigated whether transplant…

  15. CXCR6 expression in non-small cell lung carcinoma supports metastatic process via modulating metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Hina; Singh, Rajesh; Kloecker, Goetz H; Lillard, James W; Singh, Shailesh

    2015-04-30

    Lung cancer (LuCa) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide regardless of the gender. High mortality associated with LuCa is due to metastasis, molecular mechanisms of which are yet to be defined. Here, we present evidence that chemokine receptor CXCR6 and its only natural ligand, CXCL16, are significantly expressed by non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and are involved in the pathobiology of LuCa. CXCR6 expression was significantly higher in two subtypes of NSCLC (adenocarcinomas-ACs and squamous cell carcinoma-SCCs) as compared to non-neoplastic tissue. Additionally, serum CXCL16 was significantly elevated in LuCa cases as compared to healthy controls. Similar to CXCR6 tissue expression, serum level of CXCL16 in AC patients was significantly higher than SCC patients. Biological significance of this axis was validated using SCC and AC cell lines. Expression of CXCR6 was higher in AC cells, which also showed higher migratory and invasive potential than SCC. Differences in migratory and invasive potential between AC and SCC were due to differential expression of metalloproteinases following CXCL16 stimulation. Hence, our findings suggest clinical and biological significance of CXCR6/CXCL16 axis in LuCa, which could be used as potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target.

  16. Assessment of the cathode contribution to the degradation of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke; Liu, Yi-Lin; Barfod, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    of these craters observed after testing correlated with the cell voltage degradation rates. The results can be interpreted in terms of element redistribution at the cathode/electrolyte interface and formation of foreign phases giving rise to a weakening of local contact points of the LSM cathode and yttria...

  17. Severe encephalopathy after high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support for brain tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkmortel, F. van den; Gidding, C.E.M.; Kanter, M. De; Punt, C.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Recurrent medulloblastoma carries a poor prognosis. Long-term survival has been obtained with high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation and secondary irradiation. A 21-year-old woman with recurrent medulloblastoma after previous chemotherapy and radiotherapy is presented. The

  18. Diagnosis of a cathode-supported solid oxide electrolysis cell by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nechache, A.; Mansuy, A.; Petitjean, M.; Mougin, J.; Mauvy, F.; Boukamp, B.A.; Cassir, M.; Ringuede, A.

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature electrolysis (HTSE) is a quite recent topic where most of the studies are focused on performance measurements and degradation observations, mainly achieved by polarization curve. However, it mainly leads to the overall cell behaviour. To get more specific knowledge on the operation

  19. Promoter Methylation Analysis Reveals that KCNA5 Ion Channel Silencing Supports Ewing Sarcoma Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryland, Katherine E; Hawkins, Allegra G.; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Punj, Vasu; Borinstein, Scott C.; Laird, Peter W.; Martens, Jeffrey R.; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb proteins are essential regulators of gene expression in stem cells and development. They function to reversibly repress gene transcription via post-translational modification of histones and chromatin compaction. In many human cancers, genes that are repressed by polycomb in stem cells are subject to more stable silencing via DNA methylation of promoter CpG islands. Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive bone and soft tissue tumor that is characterized by over-expression of polycomb proteins. This study investigates the DNA methylation status of polycomb target gene promoters in Ewing sarcoma tumors and cell lines and observes that the promoters of differentiation genes are frequent targets of CpG-island DNA methylation. In addition, the promoters of ion channel genes are highly differentially methylated in Ewing sarcoma compared to non-malignant adult tissues. Ion channels regulate a variety of biological processes, including proliferation, and dysfunction of these channels contributes to tumor pathogenesis. In particular, reduced expression of the voltage-gated Kv1.5 channel has been implicated in tumor progression. These data show that DNA methylation of the KCNA5 promoter contributes to stable epigenetic silencing of Kv1.5 channel. This epigenetic repression is reversed by exposure to the DNA methylation inhibitor decitabine, which inhibits Ewing sarcoma cell proliferation through mechanisms that include restoration of Kv1.5 channel function. Implications This study demonstrates that promoters of ion channels are aberrantly methylated in Ewing sarcoma and that epigenetic silencing of KCNA5 contributes to tumor cell proliferation, thus providing further evidence of the importance of ion channel dyregulation to tumorigenesis. PMID:26573141

  20. Does tranexamic acid stabilised fibrin support the osteogenic differentiation of human periosteum derived cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Demol

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fibrin sealants have long been used as carrier for osteogenic cells in bone regeneration. However, it has not been demonstrated whether fibrin’s role is limited to delivering cells to the bone defect or whether fibrin enhances osteogenesis. This study investigated fibrin’s influence on the behaviour of human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs when cultured in vitro under osteogenic conditions in two-dimensional (fibrin substrate and three-dimensional (fibrin carrier environments. Tranexamic acid (TEA was used to reduce fibrin degradation after investigating its effect on hPDCs in monolayer culture on plastic.TEA did not affect proliferation nor calcium deposition of hPDCs under these conditions. Expression profiles of specific osteogenic markers were also maintained within the presence of TEA, apart from reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP expression (day 14. Compared to plastic, proliferation was upregulated on 2D fibrin substrates with a 220% higher DNA content by day 21. Gene expression was also altered, with significantly (p<0.05 decreased Runx2 (day 7 and ALP (day 14 expression and increased collagen I expression (day 14 and 21. In contrast to plastic, mineralisation was absent on fibrin substrates. Inside fibrin carriers, hPDCs were uniformly distributed. Moderate cell growth and reduced osteogenic marker expression was observed inside fibrin carriers. After 2 weeks, increased cell death was present in the carrier’s centre. In conclusion, fibrin negatively influences osteogenic differentiation, compared to culture plastic, but enhanced proliferation (at least in 2D cultures for hPDCs cultured in osteogenic conditions. TEA maintained the integrity of fibrin-based constructs, with minor effects on the osteogenic differentiation of hPDCs.

  1. Influence of pore formers on physical properties and microstructures of supporting cathodes of solid oxide electrolysis cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyi, Liu; Bo, Yu.; Jingming, Xu; Jing, Chen [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-04-15

    High-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) systems using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) provided a promising method for highly efficient large-scale hydrogen production, which was one of the most potential hydrogen production technologies to meet the hydrogen economy demand in the future. The physical properties and microstructures of supporting cathodes are crucial for the performances of the entire SOECs. For this reason, four different pore formers (polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), potato starch, ammonium oxalate, ammonium carbonate) were considered for its optimization. Their influence on the amount of porosity and on the pore shape and distribution as well as the effect on the electronic conductivity was analyzed. The results showed that PMMA was the most promising pore former, which had high porosity and uniform pore size distribution. The optimum weight percent concentration was 10%, correspondingly, porosity was 45% and electronic conductivity was 6726S cm{sup -1}, which was suitable for supporting cathodes for SOEC application. The pore former of potato starch was better than the inorganic pore formers of ammonium oxalate and ammonium carbonate. The optimum weight percent concentration was 10%, correspondingly, porosity was 40% and electronic conductivity was 5827S cm{sup -1}, which was not suitable for supporting cathodes for SOEC application, while, It was suitable for supporting anodes for SOFC application. (author)

  2. Singlet oxygen generation using a porous monolithic polymer supported photosensitizer: potential application to the photodynamic destruction of melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguete, M Isabel; Galindo, Francisco; Gavara, Raquel; Luis, Santiago V; Moreno, Miguel; Thomas, Paul; Russell, David A

    2009-01-01

    Photogeneration of singlet oxygen (1O2) by rose bengal is improved through the use of a porous monolithic polymer (PMP) as a support, as compared to a classic gel-type resin matrix. This type of monolithic polymeric matrix can be made at a multigram scale in quantitative yields enabling the preparation of large amounts of supported photosensitizer at low cost. The singlet oxygen induced oxidation of 9,10-diphenylanthracene has been used as a benchmark reaction, and a comparative study using rose bengal in solution, entrapped within gel-type derived polymer and entrapped within a porous monolithic polymer (PMP) has been performed. The enhanced photoreactivity of the PMP-rose bengal conjugates has been utilised for the successful photodynamic therapy (PDT) of melanoma cells.

  3. Carbon nanotubes and other nanostructures as support material for nanoparticulate noble-metal catalysts in fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune; Larsen, Mikkel Juul; Elina, Yli-Rantala

    or platinum-alloy catalysts in the electrodes are required. To maximize the utilization of the noble metal it is frequently deposited as nanoparticles (1–5 nm) on a stabilizing support of carbon black. Carbon black provides good anchoring of the catalyst particles, but is prone to severe destructive oxidation...... of the fuel-cell electrodes. However, the low concentration of structural defects also poses challenges with regard to anchoring of the catalyst particles on the CNT surface. Thus, activation treatments introducing surface functional groups may be necessary. Also, the surface properties are responsible...... for difficulties in contacting the nanotubes with other substances in the electrode or electrode preparation. Other promising candidate structures for catalyst support include carbon nanofibers (CNF) and various modifications of CNTs. We present some of our work with the investigation of surface properties...

  4. Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures as Support Material for Nanoparticulate Noble-Metal Catalysts in Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mikkel Juul; Veltzé, Sune; Skou, Eivind Morten

    or platinum-alloy catalysts in the electrodes are required. To maximize the utilization of the noble metal it is frequently deposited as nanoparticles (1-5 nm) on a stabilizing support of carbon black. Carbon black provides good anchoring of the catalyst particles, but is prone to severe destructive oxidation...... of the fuel-cell electrodes. However, the low concentration of structural defects also poses challenges with regard to anchoring of the catalyst particles on the CNT surface. Thus, activation treatments introducing surface functional groups may be necessary. Also, the surface properties are responsible...... for difficulties in contacting the nanotubes with other substances in the electrode or electrode preparation. Other promising candidate structures for catalyst support include carbon nanofibers (CNF) and various modifications of CNTs. We present some of our work with the investigation of surface properties...

  5. Numerical evaluation of oxide growth in metallic support microstructures of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and its influence on mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Persson, Åsa Helen

    2015-01-01

    -temperature corrosion theory, and the required model parameters can be retrieved by standard corrosion weight gain measurements. The microstructure is reconstructed from X-ray computed tomography, and converted into a computational grid. The influence of the changing microstructure on the fuel cell performance...... is evaluated by determining an effective diffusion coefficient and the equivalent electrical area specific resistance (ASR) due to diffusion over time. It is thus possible to assess the applicability (in terms of corrosion behaviour) of potential metallic supports without costly long-term experiments......-term performance of the SOFCs. In order to understand the implications of the corrosion on the mass-transport through the metallic support, a corrosion model is developed that is capable of determining the change of the porous microstructure due to oxide scale growth. The model is based on high...

  6. Creep behaviour of porous metal supports for solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccaccini, Dino; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy

    2014-01-01

    a significant role affecting the creep behaviour of the metal supports, in particular the stress exponent. The variation of the elastic modulus as function of temperature and oxidation conditions was also determined by a high temperature impulse excitation technique. Additionally nano-indentation testing...... was performed in the metal oxide interface to elucidate the mechanical properties of the oxide scales and qualitative information about the oxide scale-metal interfacial bonding. Copyright © 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. Structured Dendritic Inhibition Supports Branch-Selective Integration in CA1 Pyramidal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, Erik B; Cembrowski, Mark S; Karsh, Bill; Colonell, Jennifer; Fetter, Richard D; Spruston, Nelson

    2016-03-02

    Neuronal circuit function is governed by precise patterns of connectivity between specialized groups of neurons. The diversity of GABAergic interneurons is a hallmark of cortical circuits, yet little is known about their targeting to individual postsynaptic dendrites. We examined synaptic connectivity between molecularly defined inhibitory interneurons and CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites using correlative light-electron microscopy and large-volume array tomography. We show that interneurons can be highly selective in their connectivity to specific dendritic branch types and, furthermore, exhibit precisely targeted connectivity to the origin or end of individual branches. Computational simulations indicate that the observed subcellular targeting enables control over the nonlinear integration of synaptic input or the initiation and backpropagation of action potentials in a branch-selective manner. Our results demonstrate that connectivity between interneurons and pyramidal cell dendrites is more precise and spatially segregated than previously appreciated, which may be a critical determinant of how inhibition shapes dendritic computation.

  8. The P2X7 receptor supports both life and death in fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian A Haanes

    Full Text Available The pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs have complex roles in pancreas, including tissue repair and fibrosis. PSCs surround ATP releasing exocrine cells, but little is known about purinergic receptors and their function in PSCs. Our aim was to resolve whether PSCs express the multifunctional P2X7 receptor and elucidate how it regulates PSC viability. The number of PSCs isolated from wild type (WT mice was 50% higher than those from the Pfizer P2X7 receptor knock out (KO mice. The P2X7 receptor protein and mRNA of all known isoforms were expressed in WT PSCs, while KO PSCs only expressed truncated versions of the receptor. In culture, the proliferation rate of the KO PSCs was significantly lower. Inclusion of apyrase reduced the proliferation rate in both WT and KO PSCs, indicating importance of endogenous ATP. Exogenous ATP had a two-sided effect. Proliferation of both WT and KO cells was stimulated with ATP in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximum effect at 100 µM. At high ATP concentration (5 mM, WT PSCs, but not the KO PSCs died. The intracellular Ca(2+ signals and proliferation rate induced by micromolar ATP concentrations were inhibited by the allosteric P2X7 receptor inhibitor az10606120. The P2X7 receptor-pore inhibitor A438079 partially prevented cell death induced by millimolar ATP concentrations. This study shows that ATP and P2X7 receptors are important regulators of PSC proliferation and death, and therefore might be potential targets for treatments of pancreatic fibrosis and cancer.

  9. Antimicrobial design of titanium surface that kill sessile bacteria but support stem cells adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Bao, Ni-Rong; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2016-12-01

    Implant-related bacterial infection is one of the most severe postoperative complications in orthopedic or dental surgery. In this context, from the perspective of surface modification, increasing efforts have been made to enhance the antibacterial capability of titanium surface. In this work, a hierarchical hybrid surface architecture was firstly constructed on titanium surface by two-step strategy of acid etching and H2O2 aging. Then silver nanoparticles were firmly immobilized on the hierarchical surface by ion implantation, showing no detectable release of silver ions from surface. The designed titanium surface showed good bioactivity. More importantly, this elaborately designed titanium surface can effectively inactivate the adherent S. aureus on surface by virtue of a contact-killing mode. Meanwhile, the designed titanium surface can significantly facilitate the initial adhesion and spreading behaviors of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on titanium. The results suggested that, the elaborately designed titanium surface might own a cell-favoring ability that can help mammalian cells win the initial adhesion race against bacteria. We hope the present study can provide a new insight for the better understanding and designing of antimicrobial titanium surface, and pave the way to satisfying clinical requirements.

  10. SNARE-Mediated Cholesterol Movement to Mitochondria Supports Steroidogenesis in Rodent Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ye; Hou, Xiaoming; Shen, Wen-Jun; Hanssen, Ruth; Khor, Victor K; Cortez, Yuan; Roseman, Ann N; Azhar, Salman; Kraemer, Fredric B

    2016-02-01

    Vesicular transport involving soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins is known to be responsible for many major cellular activities. In steroidogenic tissues, chronic hormone stimulation results in increased expression of proteins involved in the steroidogenic pathway, whereas acute hormone stimulation prompts the rapid transfer of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane to be utilized as substrate for steroid hormone production. Several different pathways are involved in supplying cholesterol to mitochondria, but mobilization of stored cholesteryl esters appears to initially constitute the preferred source; however, the mechanisms mediating this cholesterol transfer are not fully understood. To study the potential contribution of SNARE proteins in steroidogenesis, we examined the expression levels of various SNARE proteins in response to hormone stimulation in steroidogenic tissues and cells and established an in vitro mitochondria reconstitution assay system to assess the contribution of various SNARE proteins on cholesterol delivery for steroidogenesis. Our results from reconstitution experiments along with knockdown studies in rat primary granulosa cells and in a Leydig cell line show that soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein-α, synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa, syntaxin-5, and syntaxin-17 facilitate the transport of cholesterol to mitochondria. Thus, although StAR is required for efficient cholesterol movement into mitochondria for steroidogenesis, specific SNAREs participate and are necessary to mediate cholesterol movement to mitochondria.

  11. Ability of bone graft substitutes to support the osteoprogenitor cells: An in-vitro study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziad; Dahabreh; Michalis; Panteli; Ippokratis; Pountos; Mark; Howard; Peter; Campbell; Peter; V; Giannoudis

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare seven commercially available bone graft substitutes(BGS) in terms of these properties and without using any additional biological growth factors.METHODS: Porcine osteoprogenitor cells were loaded on seven commercially available BGS and allowed to proliferate for one week followed by osteogenic induction. Staining for live/dead cells as well as scanning electron microscopy(SEM) was carried out to determine viability and cellular binding. Further outcome measures included alkaline phosphatase(ALP) assays with normalisation for DNA content to quantify osteogenic potential. Negative and positive control experiments were carried out in parallel to validate the results.RESULTS: Live/dead and SEM imaging showed higher viability and attachment with β-tricalcium phosphate(β-TCP) than with other BGS(P < 0.05). The average ALP activity in nmol/mL(normalised value for DNA content in nmol/μg DNA) per sample was 657.58(132.03) for β-TCP, 36.22(unable to normalise) for calcium sulphate, 19.93(11.39) for the Hydroxyapatite/Tricalcium Phosphate composite, 14.79(18.53) for polygraft, 13.98(8.15) for the highly porous β-Tricalcium Phosphate, 5.56(10.0) for polymers, and 3.82(3.8) for Hydroxyapatite.CONCLUSION: Under the above experimental conditions, β-TCP was able to maintain better the viability of osteoprogenitor cells and allow proliferation and differentiation(P < 0.05).

  12. High dose chemotherapy with stem cell support in thetreatment of testicular cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC) is rare form ofmalignant disease that occurs mostly in young manbetween age 15 and 40. The worldwide incidence ofTGCC is 1.5 per 100000 man with the highest rates inNorth Europe. After discovery of cisplatin cure ratesof TGCC are very favorable between 90%-95% andunlike most solid tumors, cure rate for metastatic TGCCis around 80%. Metastatic TGCC is usually treatedwith 3-4 cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, cisplatinumchemotherapy with or without retroperitoneal surgeryand cure rates with this approach are between 41% inpoor risk group and 92% in good risk group of patients.Cure rates are lower in relapsed and refractory patientsand many of them will die from the disease if not curedwith first line chemotherapy. High dose chemotherapy(HDCT) approach was used for the first time during the1980s. Progress in hematology allowed the possibility tokeep autologous haematopoietic stem cells alive ex-vivoat very low temperatures and use them to repopulatethe bone marrow after sub-lethal dose of intesivemyeloablative chemotherapy. Despite the fact thatthere is no positive randomized study to prove HDCTconcept, cure rates in relapsed TGCC are higher afterhigh dose therapy then in historical controls in studieswith conventional treatment. Here we review clinicalstudies in HDCT for TGCC, possibilities of mobilisingsufficient number of stem cells and future directions inthe treatment of this disease.

  13. Degradation behavior of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell using LNF cathode as function of current load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Takeshi; Yoshida, Yoshiteru; Watanabe, Kimitaka; Chiba, Reiichi; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Orui, Himeko; Arai, Hajime [NTT Energy and Environment Systems Laboratories, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the effect of current loading on the degradation behavior of an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The cell consisted of LaNi{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LNF), alumina-doped scandia stabilized zirconia (SASZ), and a Ni-SASZ cermet as the cathode, electrolyte, and anode, respectively. The test was carried out at 1073 K with constant loads of 0.3, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.3 A cm{sup -2}. The degradation rate, defined by the voltage loss during a fixed period (about 1000 h), was faster at higher current densities. From an impedance analysis, the degradation depended mainly on increases in the cathodic resistance, while the anodic and ohmic resistances contributed very little. The cathode microstructures were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). (author)

  14. Lineage tracing in the adult mouse corneal epithelium supports the limbal epithelial stem cell hypothesis with intermittent periods of stem cell quiescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie J. Dorà

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The limbal epithelial stem cell (LESC hypothesis proposes that LESCs in the corneal limbus maintain the corneal epithelium both during normal homeostasis and wound repair. The alternative corneal epithelial stem cell (CESC hypothesis proposes that LESCs are only involved in wound repair and CESCs in the corneal epithelium itself maintain the corneal epithelium during normal homeostasis. We used tamoxifen-inducible, CreER-loxP lineage tracing to distinguish between these hypotheses. Clones of labelled cells were induced in adult CAGG-CreER;R26R-LacZ reporter mice and their distributions analysed after different chase periods. Short-lived clones, derived from labelled transient amplifying cells, were shed during the chase period and long-lived clones, derived from stem cells, expanded. At 6 weeks, labelled clones appeared at the periphery, extended centripetally as radial stripes and a few reached the centre by 14 weeks. Stripe numbers depended on the age of tamoxifen treatment. Stripes varied in length, some were discontinuous, few reached the centre and almost half had one end at the limbus. Similar stripes extended across the cornea in CAGG-CreER;R26R-mT/mG reporter mice. The distributions of labelled clones are inconsistent with the CESC hypothesis and support the LESC hypothesis if LESCs cycle between phases of activity and quiescence, each lasting several weeks.

  15. The retinol esterifying enzyme LRAT supports cell signaling by retinol-binding protein and its receptor STRA6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwarha, Gurdeep; Berry, Daniel C; Croniger, Colleen M; Noy, Noa

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin A, retinol, circulates in blood bound to retinol-binding protein (RBP). At some tissues, holo-RBP is recognized by a plasma membrane receptor termed STRA6, which serves a dual role: it mediates transport of retinol from RBP into cells, and it functions as a cytokine receptor that, on binding holo-RBP, activates JAK2/STAT5 signaling. As STAT target genes include SOCS3, an inhibitor of insulin receptor, holo-RBP suppresses insulin responses in STRA6-expressing cells. We have shown previously that the two functions of STRA6 are interdependent. These observations suggest factors that regulate STRA6-mediated retinol transport may also control STRA6-mediated cell signaling. One such factor is retinol metabolism, which enables cellular uptake of retinol by maintaining an inward-directed concentration gradient. We show here that lecithin:retinol acyl transferase (LRAT), which catalyzes esterification of retinol to its storage species retinyl esters, is necessary for activation of the STRA6/JAK2/STAT5 cascade by holo-RBP. In accordance, LRAT-null mice are protected from holo-RBP-induced suppression of insulin responses. Hence, STRA6 signaling, which requires STRA6-mediated retinol transport, is supported by LRAT-catalyzed retinol metabolism. The observations demonstrate that STRA6 regulates key cellular processes by coupling circulating holo-RBP levels and intracellular retinol metabolism to cell signaling.

  16. Giant-Cell Tumor of the Distal Ulna Treated by Wide Resection and Ulnar Support Reconstruction: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Minami

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant-cell tumor of bone occurred in the distal end of the ulna is extremely uncommon. A 23-year-old male had a giant-cell tumor occurred in the distal end of the ulna. After wide resection of the distal segment of the ulna including giant-cell tumor, ulnar components of the wrist joint were reconstructed with modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure using the iliac bone graft, preserving the triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar collateral ligament in order to maintain ulnar support of the wrist, and the proximal stump of the resected ulna was stabilized by tenodesis using the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. One year after operation, the patient's wrist was pain-free and had a full range of motion. Postoperative X-rays showed no abnormal findings including recurrence of the giant-cell tumor and ulnar translation of the entire carpus. The stability of the proximal stump of the distal ulna was also maintained.

  17. Comparative study of shape, intensity and texture features and support vector machine for white blood cell classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Habibzadeh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The complete blood count (CBC is widely used test for counting and categorizing various peripheral particles in the blood. The main goal of the paper is to count and classify white blood cells (leukocytes in microscopic images into five major categories using features such as shape, intensity and texture features. The first critical step of counting and classification procedure involves segmentation of individual cells in cytological images of thin blood smears. The quality of segmentation has significant impact on the cell type identification, but poor quality, noise, and/or low resolution images make segmentation less reliable. We analyze the performance of our system for three different sets of features and we determine that the best performance is achieved by wavelet features using the Dual-Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DT-CWT which is based on multi-resolution characteristics of the image. These features are combined with the Support Vector Machine (SVM which classifies white blood cells into their five primary types. This approach was validated with experiments conducted on digital normal blood smear images with low resolution.

  18. Human mesenchymal stem cells prolong survival and ameliorate motor deficit through trophic support in Huntington's disease mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Ta Lin

    Full Text Available We investigated the therapeutic potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs in Huntington's disease (HD mouse models. Ten weeks after intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (QA, mice that received hBM-MSC transplantation showed a significant reduction in motor function impairment and increased survival rate. Transplanted hBM-MSCs were capable of survival, and inducing neural proliferation and differentiation in the QA-lesioned striatum. In addition, the transplanted hBM-MSCs induced microglia, neuroblasts and bone marrow-derived cells to migrate into the QA-lesioned region. Similar results were obtained in R6/2-J2, a genetically-modified animal model of HD, except for the improvement of motor function. After hBM-MSC transplantation, the transplanted hBM-MSCs may integrate with the host cells and increase the levels of laminin, Von Willebrand Factor (VWF, stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, and the SDF-1 receptor Cxcr4. The p-Erk1/2 expression was increased while Bax and caspase-3 levels were decreased after hBM-MSC transplantation suggesting that the reduced level of apoptosis after hBM-MSC transplantation was of benefit to the QA-lesioned mice. Our data suggest that hBM-MSCs have neural differentiation improvement potential, neurotrophic support capability and an anti-apoptotic effect, and may be a feasible candidate for HD therapy.

  19. A new peptide-based urethane polymer: synthesis, biodegradation, and potential to support cell growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J Y; Beckman, E J; Piesco, N P; Agarwal, S

    2000-06-01

    A novel non-toxic biodegradable lysine-di-isocyanate (LDI)-based urethane polymer was developed for use in tissue engineering applications. This matrix was synthesized with highly purified LDI made from the lysine diethylester. The ethyl ester of LDI was polymerized with glycerol to form a prepolymer. LDI-glycerol prepolymer when reacted with water foamed with the liberation of CO2 to provide a pliable spongy urethane polymer. The LDI-glycerol matrix degraded in aqueous solutions at 100, 37, 22, and 4 degrees C at a rate of 27.7, 1.8, 0.8, and 0.1 mM per 10 days, respectively. Its thermal stability in water allowed its sterilization by autoclaving. The degradation of the LDI-glycerol polymer yielded lysine, ethanol, and glycerol as breakdown products. The degradation products of LDI-glycerol polymer did not significantly affect the pH of the solution. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of this polymer was found to be 103.4 degrees C. The physical properties of the polymer network were found to be adequate to support the cell growth in vitro, as evidenced by the fact that rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) attached to the polymer matrix and remained viable on its surface. Culture of BMSC on LDI-glycerol matrix for long durations resulted in the formation of multilayered confluent cultures, a characteristic typical of bone cells. Furthermore, cells grown on LDI-glycerol matrix did not differ phenotypically from the cells grown on the tissue culture polystyrene plates as assessed by the cell growth, and expression of mRNA for collagen type I, and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1). The observations suggest that biodegradable peptide-based urethane polymers can be synthesized which may pave their way for possible use in tissue engineering applications.

  20. Unit cell modeling in support of interim performance assessment for low level tank waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, N.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    A unit cell model is used to simulate the base analysis case and related sensitivity cases for the interim performance assessment of low level tank waste disposal. Simulation case results are summarized in terms of fractional contaminant release rates to the vadose zone and to the water table at the unconfined aquifer. Results suggest that the crushed glass water conditioning layer at the top of the facility and the chemical retardation pad at the bottom of the facility can be important components of the facility. Results also suggest that the release rates to the water table are dominated by the release rate from the waste form.

  1. Personalised Multi-Criterial Online Decision Support for Siblings Considering Stem Cell Donation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Salkeld, Glenn; Dowie, Jack

    2016-01-01

    conversation. A case study and storyline on four siblings facing a transplant coordinator's call to donate stem cells to their brother [1] is 'translated' and used to demonstrate how an interactive multi-criteria aid can be developed for each within a conversational mode. The personalized dialogue and decision...... aid are accessible online for interaction. Each sibling's decision exemplifies the communication including physical and psychosocial complexities within any decision cascade from call-to-test and to donate, if compatible. A shared template can embrace the informational and ethical aspects...

  2. Characterisation of micro direct methanol fuel cells with silicon plate supported integrated ionomer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jackie Vincent; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Kallesee, C.

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the investigation and fabrication of Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (μDMFC). They are investigated as a possible alternative for zinc-air batteries in small size consumer devices such as hearing aids. In such devices the conventional rechargeable batteries such as lithium......-ion batteries have insufficiently low energy density in the range 240 Wh/L to 300 Wh/L Methanol is a promising fuel for such devices due to the high energy density, with pure methanol having an energy density of 4400 Wh/L. Using a liquid fuel also allows refueling, which can be achieved much faster than battery...

  3. Burn Wound gammadelta T-Cells Support a Th2 and Th17 Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    MC. Biologic therapies in clinical development for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. J Clin Rheumatol 2005;11(3 Suppl):S45–54. 25. Kupetsky EA...Mathers AR, Ferris LK. Anti-cytokine therapy in the treatment of psoriasis . Cytokine 2013;61:704–12. 26. Greenblatt MB, Vrbanac V, Vbranac V, et al...disorder (rheumatoid arthritis), psoriasis , and graft vs host disease.24–27 Gamma-δ T-cells are functionally specialized and are involved in

  4. Nutritional support in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharyngeal area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mudunov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Up to half of all patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharyngeal area start their treatment when they have malnutrition that results from the primary disease. The main causes of weight loss in oropharyngeal tumors are pain syndrome and dysphagia of various etiologies, which lead to malnutrition and dehydration, as well as intoxication caused by tumor lysis and contamination. This results in impaired metabolic processes, worsening the general condition of patients. During further antitumor therapy, the manifestations of malnutrition are only aggravated, which is due to the high toxicity of chemoradiation therapy and the traumaticity of surgical interventions. 

  5. Synthetic Biology and Microbial Fuel Cells: Towards Self-Sustaining Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, John Andrew

    2014-01-01

    NASA ARC and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) collaborated to investigate the development of advanced microbial fuels cells (MFCs) for biological wastewater treatment and electricity production (electrogenesis). Synthetic biology techniques and integrated hardware advances were investigated to increase system efficiency and robustness, with the intent of increasing power self-sufficiency and potential product formation from carbon dioxide. MFCs possess numerous advantages for space missions, including rapid processing, reduced biomass and effective removal of organics, nitrogen and phosphorus. Project efforts include developing space-based MFC concepts, integration analyses, increasing energy efficiency, and investigating novel bioelectrochemical system applications

  6. Non-noble catalysts and catalyst supports for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcalister, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Tungsten carbide, which is active for hydrogen oxidation, is CO tolerant and has a hexagonal structure is discussed. Titanium carbide is inactive and has a cubic structure. Four different samples of the cubic alloys W sub x-1Ti sub XC sub 1-y were found to be active and CO tolerant. When the activities of these cubic alloys are weighted by the reciprocal of the square to those of highly forms of WC. They offer important insight into the nature of the active sites on W-C anode catalysts for use in phosphoric acid fuel cells.

  7. The P2X7 Receptor Supports Both Life and Death in Fibrogenic Pancreatic Stellate Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haanes, Kristian; Schwab, Albrecht; Novak, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    The pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) have complex roles in pancreas, including tissue repair and fibrosis. PSCs surround ATP releasing exocrine cells, but little is known about purinergic receptors and their function in PSCs. Our aim was to resolve whether PSCs express the multifunctional P2X7...... receptor and elucidate how it regulates PSC viability. The number of PSCs isolated from wild type (WT) mice was 50% higher than those from the Pfizer P2X7 receptor knock out (KO) mice. The P2X7 receptor protein and mRNA of all known isoforms were expressed in WT PSCs, while KO PSCs only expressed truncated...... was stimulated with ATP in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximum effect at 100 µM. At high ATP concentration (5 mM), WT PSCs, but not the KO PSCs died. The intracellular Ca(2+) signals and proliferation rate induced by micromolar ATP concentrations were inhibited by the allosteric P2X7 receptor...

  8. Biomimetic alginate/polyacrylamide porous scaffold supports human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and chondrogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng [Department of ENT-Head and Neck Surgery, EENT Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, 210029 (China); Yuan, Yasheng, E-mail: yuanyasheng@163.com [Department of ENT-Head and Neck Surgery, EENT Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, 210029 (China); Eaton-Peabody Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Chi, Fanglu [Department of ENT-Head and Neck Surgery, EENT Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, 210029 (China)

    2014-09-01

    We describe the development of alginate/polyacrylamide (ALG/PAAm) porous hydrogels based on interpenetrating polymer network structure for human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and chondrogenesis. Three ALG/PAAm hydrogels at molar ratios of 10/90, 20/80, and 30/70 were prepared and characterized with enhanced elastic and rubbery mechanical properties, which are similar to native human cartilage tissues. Their elasticity and swelling properties were also studied under different physiological pH conditions. Finally, in vitro tests demonstrated that human mesenchymal stem cells could proliferate on the as-synthesized hydrogels with improved alkaline phosphatase activities. These results suggest that ALG/PAAm hydrogels may be a promising biomaterial for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • ALG/PAAm hydrogels were prepared at different molar ratios for cartilage tissue engineering. • ALG/PAAm hydrogels feature an interpenetrating polymer network structure. • ALG/PAAm hydrogels demonstrate strengthened elastic and rubbery mechanical properties. • hMSCs could be cultured on the ALG/PAAm hydrogels for proliferation and chondrogenesis.

  9. Carbon supported ruthenium chalcogenide as cathode catalyst in a microfluidic formic acid fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gago, A.S.; Alonso-Vante, N. [Laboratory of Electrocatalysis, UMR-CNRS 6503, Universite de Poitiers, 40 Avenue du Recteur Pineau, F-86022 Potiers Cedex (France); Morales-Acosta, D.; Arriaga, L.G. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, S.C. Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76703, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2011-02-01

    This work reports the electrochemical measurements of 20 wt.% Ru{sub x}Se{sub y}/C for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in presence of different concentration of HCOOH and its use as cathode catalyst in a microfluidic formic acid fuel cell ({mu}FAFC). The results were compared to those obtained with commercial Pt/C. Half-cell electrochemical measurements showed that the chalcogenide catalyst has a high tolerance and selectivity towards ORR in electrolytes containing up to 0.1 M HCOOH. The depolarization effect was higher on Pt/C than on Ru{sub x}Se{sub y}/C by a factor of ca. 23. Both catalysts were evaluated as cathode of a {mu}FAFC operating with different concentrations of HCOOH. When 0.5 M HCOOH was used, maximum current densities of 11.44 mA cm{sup -2} and 4.44 mA cm{sup -2} were obtained when the cathode was Ru{sub x}Se{sub y}/C and Pt/C, respectively. At 0.5 M HCOOH, the peak power density of the {mu}FAFC was similar for both catalysts, ca. 1.9 mW cm{sup -2}. At 5 M HCOOH the power density of the {mu}FAFC using Ru{sub x}Se{sub y}, was 9.3 times higher than the obtained with Pt/C. (author)

  10. Spatial representations of place cells in darkness are supported by path integration and border information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sijie; Schönfeld, Fabian; Wiskott, Laurenz; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Effective spatial navigation is enabled by reliable reference cues that derive from sensory information from the external environment, as well as from internal sources such as the vestibular system. The integration of information from these sources enables dead reckoning in the form of path integration. Navigation in the dark is associated with the accumulation of errors in terms of perception of allocentric position and this may relate to error accumulation in path integration. We assessed this by recording from place cells in the dark under circumstances where spatial sensory cues were suppressed. Spatial information content, spatial coherence, place field size, and peak and infield firing rates decreased whereas sparsity increased following exploration in the dark compared to the light. Nonetheless it was observed that place field stability in darkness was sustained by border information in a subset of place cells. To examine the impact of encountering the environment’s border on navigation, we analyzed the trajectory and spiking data gathered during navigation in the dark. Our data suggest that although error accumulation in path integration drives place field drift in darkness, under circumstances where border contact is possible, this information is integrated to enable retention of spatial representations. PMID:25009477

  11. Synthesizing 2D MoS2 Nanofins on carbon nanospheres as catalyst support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Chua, Daniel H. C.

    2016-06-01

    Highly dense 2D MoS2 fin-like nanostructures on carbon nanospheres were fabricated and formed the main catalyst support structure in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These nanofins were observed growing perpendicular to the carbon nanosphere surface in random orientations and high resolution transmission electron microscope confirmed 2D layers. The PEM fuel cell test showed enhanced electrochemical activity with good stability, generating over 8.5 W.mgPt-1 as compared to standard carbon black of 7.4 W.mgPt-1 under normal operating conditions. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy confirmed that the performance improvement is highly due to the excellent water management of the MoS2 lamellar network, which facilitates water retention at low current density and flood prevention at high current density. Reliability test further demonstrated that these nanofins are highly stable in the electrochemical reaction and is an excellent ORR catalyst support.

  12. Investigation of titanium nitride as catalyst support material and development of durable electrocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasarala, Bharat K.

    The impending energy and climatic crisis makes it imperative for human society to seek non-fossil based alternative sources for our energy needs. Although many alternative energy technologies are currently being developed, fuel cell technology provides energy solutions, which satisfy a wide range of applications. But the current fuel cell technology is far from its target of large scale commercialization mainly because of its high cost and poor durability. Considerable work has been done in reducing the cost but its durability still needs significant improvement. Of the various materials in a PEM fuel cell, the degradation of electrocatalyst affects its durability the most, leading to performance loss. Carbon black (C) support corrosion plays a significant role in the electrocatalyst degradation and its severe affects due to potential cycling has been identified through my research. Through my resaerch, I introduce titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiN NP) as alternative catalyst supports replacing carbon black. TiN NP has higher electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance compared to that of C. The physical and electrochemical properties of TiN NP were studied and the Pt/TiN electrocatalyst was synthesized using polyol process. Upon optimizing using DOE, for desired catalyst particle size and activity, Pt/TiN is shown to have higher catalytic performance than conventional Pt/C. TiN NP are significantly influenced by the electrochemical conditions and show 'active' or 'passive' nature depending on the temperature and acidic concentration; and a temperature dependence model is proposed to understand the active/passive nature of TiN NP. A one-to-one comparison between TiN NP and C electrodes under similar electrochemical conditions show a superior performance of TiN NP as a catalyst support. The durability of the Pt/TiN electrocatalyst is also tested and it agrees well with the proposed model of active/passive nature of the TiN NP. Through theoretical calculation

  13. Transcriptomic Analysis of Mouse Cochlear Supporting Cell Maturation Reveals Large-Scale Changes in Notch Responsiveness Prior to the Onset of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Juan C.; Gu, Rende; Cai, Tiantian; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Cantellano, Silvia C.; Asprer, Joanna S. T.; Zhang, Hongyuan; Jen, Hsin-I; Edlund, Renée K.; Liu, Zhandong; Groves, Andrew K.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal mouse cochlear supporting cells have a limited ability to divide and trans-differentiate into hair cells, but this ability declines rapidly in the two weeks after birth. This decline is concomitant with the morphological and functional maturation of the organ of Corti prior to the onset of hearing. However, despite this association between maturation and loss of regenerative potential, little is known of the molecular changes that underlie these events. To identify these changes, we used RNA-seq to generate transcriptional profiles of purified cochlear supporting cells from 1- and 6-day-old mice. We found many significant changes in gene expression during this period, many of which were related to regulation of proliferation, differentiation of inner ear components and the maturation of the organ of Corti prior to the onset of hearing. One example of a change in regenerative potential of supporting cells is their robust production of hair cells in response to a blockade of the Notch signaling pathway at the time of birth, but a complete lack of response to such blockade just a few days later. By comparing our supporting cell transcriptomes to those of supporting cells cultured in the presence of Notch pathway inhibitors, we show that the transcriptional response to Notch blockade disappears almost completely in the first postnatal week. Our results offer some of the first molecular insights into the failure of hair cell regeneration in the mammalian cochlea. PMID:27918591

  14. Enhanced Catalytic Activity of Pt Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Electrodes for Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qizhong; Park, Soo-Jin; Kim, Seok

    2015-11-01

    We report an efficient method for the synthesis of nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide supported Pt nanocatalysts (Pt/N-RGO). Nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) was prepared by pyrolysis of graphene oxide with cyanamide as a nitrogen source. Then, the Pt nanoparticles were deposited over N-RGO by one-step chemical polyol reduction process. The morphology and structure of as-prepared catalysts were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subsequently, electrocatalytic activities of the catalysts were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). As a result, the Pt/N-RGO catalysts exhibit the superior electrochemical activity toward methanol oxidation in compared with that of Pt loaded on undoped reduced graphene oxide (Pt/RGO) and Pt/carbon blacks (Pt/C). This was mainly attributed to the better distribution of Pt nanoparticles as well as the synergistic electrochemical effects of the nitrogen doped supports. These results demonstrate that N-RGO could be a promising candidate as a high performance catalyst support for a fuel cell application.

  15. Water gas shift reaction over Cu catalyst supported by mixed oxide materials for fuel cell application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tepamatr Pannipa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The water gas shift activities of Cu on ceria and Gd doped ceria have been studied for the further enhancement of hydrogen purity [1] after the steam reforming of ethanol. The catalytic properties of commercial catalysts were also studied to compare with the as-prepared catalysts. Copper-containing cerium oxide materials are shown in this work to be suitable for the high temperature. Copper-ceria is a stable high-temperature shift catalyst, unlike iron-chrome catalysts that deactivate severely in CO2-rich gases. We found that 5%Cu/10%GDC(D has much higher activity than other copper ceria based catalysts. The finely dispersed CuO species is favorable to the higher activity, which explained the activity enhancement of this catalyst. The kinetics of the WGS reaction over Cu catalysts supported by mixed oxide materials were measured in the temperature range 200-400 °C. An independence of the CO conversion rate on CO2 and H2 was found.

  16. CELL-ENGINEERING DESIGNS TRANSPLANTED INTO LIVER PROVIDE WITH PROLONGED SUPPORT OF RECOVERY PROCESSES IN DAMAGED LIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Shagidulin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim is to develop a method for a prolonged support of recovery processes in damaged liver. Materials and me- thods. It was carried out 3 groups of experiments on Wistar rats with the modeling of chronic fibrotic liver injury (n = 70: I group control (n = 20; in the II group (n = 20 a suspension of liver cells was transplanted into liver; in the III group (n = 30 cell-engineering designs (CED, which contained liver cells and BM MMSC, enclosed in a heterogeneous biodegradable gel “Sphero®GEL-long” were transplanted into damaged liver. The activity of recovery processes was evaluated by using biochemical and morphological methods in dynamics on 30, 60, 90 and 180 days. Results. It was shown that in the II and III gr. significantly accelerated the recovery processes in damaged livers compared with the I gr. The normalization of biochemical parameters took place in II and III du- ring 30 days instead of 90 days in the I group. However, the normalization of morphological signs of hepatocytes theirs viability and a degree of defibrotic changes in liver were more pronounced and prolonged in the III group. A study showed integration of CED by liver structures with formation of new bile ducts after 90 and 180 days. Conclusion. Higher levels and prolonged periods of recovery processes in damaged liver after CED transplanta- tion were due to the creation of biologically appropriate conditions for prolonged cell activity, included in their structure (donor liver cells and BM MMSC. 

  17. Testicular cell-conditioned medium supports embryonic stem cell differentiation toward germ lineage and to spermatocyte- and oocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed M; Saini, Neha; Singh, Manoj K; Manik, Radheysham; Singla, Suresh K; Palta, Prabhat; Chauhan, Manmohan S

    2016-08-01

    Testicular cells are believed to secrete various growth factors that activate signaling pathways finally leading to gametogenesis. In vitro gametogenesis is an obscure but paramountly important task primarily because of paucity of the precursor cells and first trimester gonadal tissues. To overcome these limitations for development of in vitro gametes, the present study was designed to induce differentiation of buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cells into germ lineage cells on stimulation by testicular cell-conditioned medium (TCM), on the basis of the assumption that ES cells have the intrinsic property to differentiate into any cell type and TCM would provide the necessary growth factors for differentiation toward germ cell lineage. For this purpose, buffalo ES cells were differentiated as embryoid bodies (EB) in floating cultures and as monolayer adherent cultures in different doses (10%, 20%, and 40%) of TCM for different culture intervals (4, 8, and 14 days), to identify the optimum dose-and-time period. We observed that 40% TCM dose induces highest expression of primordial germ cell-specific (DAZL, VASA, and PLZF), meiotic (SYCP3, MLH1, TNP1/2, and PRM2), spermatocyte-specific (BOULE and TEKT1), and oocyte-specific genes (GDF9 and ZP2/3) for a culture period of 14 days under both floating and adherent differentiation. Immunocytochemical analysis of EBs and adherent cultures revealed presence of primordial germ cell markers (c-KIT, DAZL, and VASA), meiotic markers (SYCP3, MLH1 and PROTAMINE1), spermatocyte markers (ACROSIN and HAPRIN), and oocyte markers (GDF9 and ZP4), indicating progression into post-meiotic gametogenesis. The detection of germ cell-specific proteins in Day 14 EBs like VASA, GDF9, and ZP4 by Western blotting further confirmed germ lineage differentiation. The significantly lower (P embryonic development and progressed through two-cell, four-cell, eight-cell, morula, and blastocyst-like structures, indicative of their developmental competence

  18. Parallel mesh support for particle-in-cell methods in magnetic fusion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Eisung; Shephard, Mark S.; Seol, E. Seegyoung; Kalyanaraman, Kaushik; Ibanez, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    As supercomputing power continues to increase Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods are being widely adopted for transport simulations of magnetic fusion devices. Current implementations place a copy of the entire continuum mesh and its fields used in the PIC calculations on every node. This is in general not a scalable solution as computational power continues to grow faster than node level memory. To address this scalability issue, while still maintaining sufficient mesh per node to control costly inter-node communication, a new unstructured mesh distribution methods and associated mesh based PIC calculation procedure is being developed building on the parallel unstructured mesh infrastructure (PUMI). Key components to be outlined in the presentation include (i) the mesh distribution strategy, (ii) how the particles are tracked during a push cycle taking advantage of the unstructured mesh adjacency structures and searches based on that structure, and (iii) how the field solve steps and particle migration are controlled. Performance comparisons to the current approach will also be presented.

  19. Zirconium oxide ceramic foam: a promising supporting biomaterial for massive production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-wei; Li, Wen-qiang; Wang, Jun-kui; Ma, Xian-cang; Liang, Chen; Liu, Peng; Chu, Zheng; Dang, Yong-hui

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the potential application of a zirconium oxide (ZrO2) ceramic foam culturing system to the production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Three sets of ZrO2 ceramic foams with different pore densities of 10, 20, and 30 pores per linear inch (PPI) were prepared to support a 3D culturing system. After primary astrocytes were cultured in these systems, production yields of GDNF were evaluated. The biomaterial biocompatibility, cell proliferation and activation of cellular signaling pathways in GDNF synthesis and secretion in the culturing systems were also assessed and compared with a conventional culturing system. In this study, we found that the ZrO2 ceramic foam culturing system was biocompatible, using which the GDNF yields were elevated and sustained by stimulated cell proliferation and activation of signaling pathways in astrocytes cultured in the system. In conclusion, the ZrO2 ceramic foam is promising for the development of a GDNF mass production device for Parkinson's disease treatment.

  20. Direct ceramic inkjet printing of yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte layers for anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomov, R.I.; Hopkins, S.C. [Applied Superconductivity and Cryoscience Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB4 3QZ (United Kingdom); Krauz, M.; Kluczowski, J.R. [Institute of Power Engineering, Ceramic Department CEREL, 36-040 Boguchwala (Poland); Jewulski, J. [Institute of Power Engineering, Fuel Cells Department, 02-981 Warsaw (Poland); Glowacka, D.M. [Detector Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Glowacki, B.A. [Applied Superconductivity and Cryoscience Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB4 3QZ (United Kingdom); Institute of Power Engineering, Fuel Cells Department, 02-981 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-11-01

    Electromagnetic drop-on-demand direct ceramic inkjet printing (EM/DCIJP) was employed to fabricate dense yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte layers on a porous NiO-YSZ anode support from ceramic suspensions. Printing parameters including pressure, nozzle opening time and droplet overlapping were studied in order to optimize the surface quality of the YSZ coating. It was found that moderate overlapping and multiple coatings produce the desired membrane quality. A single fuel cell with a NiO-YSZ/YSZ ({proportional_to}6 {mu}m)/LSM + YSZ/LSM architecture was successfully prepared. The cell was tested using humidified hydrogen as the fuel and ambient air as the oxidant. The cell provided a power density of 170 mW cm{sup -2} at 800 C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a highly coherent dense YSZ electrolyte layer with no open porosity. These results suggest that the EM/DCIJP inkjet printing technique can be successfully implemented to fabricate electrolyte coatings for SOFC thinner than 10 {mu}m and comparable in quality to those fabricated by more conventional ceramic processing methods. (author)

  1. International stem cell tourism and the need for effective regulation. Part II: Developing sound oversight measures and effective patient support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Cynthia B; Cohen, Peter J

    2010-09-01

    Part I of this article, published in the March 2010 issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, traces and addresses the provision of unproven stem cell treatments in Russia and India, examines the concept of innovative treatment, and concludes that stronger regulations are needed to protect the health and informed choices of patients. The current paper, Part II, proposes that the regulatory frameworks for the development of safe and efficacious treatments in effect in the United States and the United Kingdom provide examples of strong oversight measures from which countries seeking to obtain international credibility for their biotechnological competence could draw when developing regulations for stem cell treatments. Major sources of information available to persons who consider receiving such unproven treatments are explored in order to understand and address their concerns. The paper concludes with proposed measures to inform those considering the pursuit of unproven stem cell treatments abroad more accurately about their efficacy and safety and provide them with improved medical and social support in their home countries.

  2. Effect of PEG additive on anode microstructure and cell performance of anode-supported MT-SOFCs fabricated by phase inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Cong; Liu, Tong; Maturavongsadit, Panita; Luckanagul, Jittima Amie; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-04-01

    Anode-supported micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs) have been fabricated by phase inversion method. For the anode support preparation, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), polyethersulfone (PESf) and poly ethylene glycol (PEG) were applied as solvent, polymer binder and additive, respectively. The effect of molecular weight and amount of PEG additive on the thermodynamics of the casting solutions was characterized by measuring the coagulation value. Viscosity of the casting slurries was also measured and the influence of PEG additive on viscosity was studied and discussed. The presence of PEG in the casting slurry can significantly influence the final anode support microstructure. Based on the microstructure result and the measured gas permeation value, two anode supports were selected for cell fabrication. For cell with the anode support fabricated using slurry with PEG additive, a maximum cell power density of 704 mW cm-2 is obtained at 750 °C with humidified hydrogen as fuel and ambient air as oxidant; cell fabricated without any PEG additive shows the peak cell power density of 331 mW cm-2. The relationship between anode microstructure and cell performance was discussed.

  3. Anion-exchange purification of recombinant factor IX from cell culture supernatant using different chromatography supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Daniel A; Passos, Douglas F; Ferraz, Helen C; Castilho, Leda R

    2013-11-01

    Both recombinant and plasma-derived factor IX concentrates are used in replacement therapies for the treatment of haemophilia B. In the present work, the capture step for a recombinant FIX (rFIX) purification process was investigated. Different strong anion-exchange chromatography media (the resins Q Sepharose(®) FF and Fractogel(®) TMAE, the monolith CIM(®) QA and the membrane adsorber Sartobind(®) Q) were tested for their rFIX binding capacity under dynamic conditions. In these experiments, crude supernatant from CHO cells was used, thus in the presence of supernatant contaminants and mimicking process conditions. The highest dynamic binding capacity was obtained for the monolith, which was then further investigated. To study pseudoaffinity elution of functional rFIX with Ca(2+) ions, a design of experiments to evaluate the effects of pH, NaCl and CaCl2 on yield and purification factor was carried out. The effect of pH was not statistically significant, and a combination of no NaCl and 45mM CaCl2 yielded a good purification factor combined with a high yield of active rFIX. Under these conditions, activity yield of rFIX was higher than the mass yield, confirming selective elution of functional, γ-carboxylated rFIX. Scaling-up of this process 8 fold resulted in very similar process performance. Monitoring of the undesired activated FIX (FIXa) revealed that the FIXa/FIX ratio (1.94%) was higher in the eluate than in the loaded sample, but was still within an acceptable range. HCP and DNA clearances were high (1256 and 7182 fold, respectively), indicating that the proposed process is adequate for the intended rFIX capture step.

  4. THE PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF TREATMENT OFADVANCED AND RECURRENT MALIGNANT LYMPHOMA BY BEAC REGIMEN SUPPORTED WITH AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS TRANSPLANTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄慧强; 姜文奇; 何友兼; 孙晓非; 刘冬耕; 徐瑞华; 张力; 周中梅; 林桐榆; 李宇红; 管忠震

    2002-01-01

    Objective: High dose chemotherapy supported by autologous hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (AHSCT) has developed dramaticly in recent years and become the most effective approach to improve radical treatment for the chemo-sensitive lymphoma. The purposes of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of preparative regimen BEAC and hematopoietic reconsti- tution after high dose chemotherapy in Chinese patients with advanced and recurrent lymphoma. Methods: After confirmed complete or partial remission from conventional chemotherapy, 24 patients with advanced or recurrent lymphoma including 1 recurrent HD and 23 NHL, 16 male and 8 female with median age of 29 (13(50) years, were enrolled into this study and treated by BEAC regimen (CTX 3600(4000 mg/m2, VP-16 1200 mg/m2. BCNU 300 mg/m2 and Ara-C 1500(2000 mg/m2). 3 patients were supported by ABMT and 21 by APBSCT. Mobilization regimen for APBSCT was CTX 3500 mg/m2 + G-CSF 3.5(5 (g/kg + Dexamethasone 10 mg. Autologous hematopoietic stem cells was re-infused 24(48 h after completion of high dose chemotherapy. Results: MNC 1.3 (1.0(1.7) (108/kg and MNC 1.8 (1.0(4.4) (108, CFU-GM 5.1 (1.9(9.6) (105/kg plus CD34 + cells 2.9 (1.9(8.7) (106/kg were re-infused in the ABMT group and APBSCT group respectively. All patients obtained prompt and sustained hematopoietic reconstitution. ANC (0.5 (109/L and Pt (2.0 (109/L were at day 9 (6(17) and day 10 (0(31) respectively. 16 patients were alive with median 21 (2(69) months follow-up till end of May, 2001. 1, 2 and 3 years survival rate were 60.5%, 50.1% and 50.1%, respectively. Non-hematologic toxicity was mild and tolerable. Conclusions: High dose chemotherapy supported by AHSCT in the treatment of previously-untreated poor- prognostic and recurrent lymphoma was a safe and effective modality. Further investigation was warranted.

  5. Human placenta-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells support culture expansion of long-term culture-initiating cells from cord blood CD34+ cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YiZhanga; ChangdongLi; XiaoxiaJiang; ShuangxiZhang; YingWu; BingLiu; PeihsienTang; NingMao

    2005-01-01

    Objective. Allogeneic transplantation with umbilical cord blood (UCB) in adult recipients is limited mainly by a low CD34+ cell dose. To overcome this shortcoming, human placenta as a novel source of human mesenchymal progenitor cell (MPC) was incorporated in an attempt to expand CD34+ ceils from UCB in vitro.Materials and Methods. Human placenta MPC was isolated and characterized by morphologic,immunophenotypical, and functional analysis. UCB CD34+ cells were expanded by coculturewith placeutal MPC. Suitable aliquots of cells were used to monitor cell production, elonogenie activity, and tong-term culture-initiating culture (LTC-IC) output. Finally, the immunoregulatory effect of placental MPC was evaluated by T-cell proliferation assay.Results. In its undifferentiated state, placental MPC displayed fibroblastoid morphology; was CD73, CD105, CD29, CD44, HLA-ABC, and CD166 positive; produced fibronectin, laminin,and vimentin; but was negative for CD14, CD31, CD34, CD45, HLA-DR, and α-smooth muscle actin. Functionally, it could be induced into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes.In vitro expansion of UCB hematopoietic cells, when cocultured with placental MPC in the presence of eytokines, was significantly enhanced: CD34+ cells by 14.89±2.32 fold; colonyforming cell (CFC) by 36.73±5.79 told; and LTC-IC by 7.43±2.66 fold. Moreover, placental MPC could suppress T-cell proliferation induced by cellular stimuli.Conclusion. These results strongly suggest that human placental MPC may be a suitable feeder layer for expansion of hematopoietic progenitors from UCB in vitro.

  6. Synthesis and electrochemical characterization of TixTayAlzN1-δOγ for fuel cell catalyst supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Ryo H.; Abruña, Héctor D.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2017-02-01

    Quinary TixTayAlzN1-δOγ of various compositions have been prepared by a co-precipitation method followed by ammonolysis. The nitride samples were examined as potential catalyst supports in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The nitride products crystallized in the rock salt (NaCl) structure over a wide range of compositions. The addition of Ta and Al was highly beneficial towards improving the chemical and electrochemical stability of TiN, without a significant loss of electrical conductivity. Platinum particles were successfully deposited on the (oxy)nitride samples, and the composite samples at some compositions were found to be comparable to Pt/carbon in their stability and catalytic activity even without optimizing the Pt deposition and dispersion processes.

  7. Effect of the state of distribution of supported Pt nanoparticles on effective Pt utilization in polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Makoto; Park, Young-Chul; Kakinuma, Katsuyoshi; Yano, Hiroshi; Tryk, Donald A; Kamino, Takeo; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2013-07-21

    In polymer electrolyte fuel cells, it is essential to minimize Pt loading, particularly at the cathode, without serious loss of performance. From this point of view, we will report an advanced concept for the design of high performance catalysts and membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs): first, the evaluation of Pt particle distributions on both the interior and exterior walls of various types of carbon black (CB) particles used as supports with respect to the "effective surface (ES)"; second, control of both size and location of Pt particles by means of a new preparation method (nanocapsule method); and finally, a new evaluation method for the properties of MEAs based on the Pt utilization (UPt), mass activity (MA), and effectiveness of Pt (EfPt), based on the ES concept. The amounts of Pt catalyst particles located in the CB nanopores were directly evaluated using the transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and corresponding three-dimensional images. By use of the nanocapsule method and optimization of the ionomer, increased MA and EfPt values for the MEA were achieved. The improvement in the cathode performance can be attributed to the sharp particle-size distribution for Pt and the highly uniform dispersion on the exterior surface of graphitized carbon black (GCB) supports.

  8. Laser 3D printing with sub-microscale resolution of porous elastomeric scaffolds for supporting human bone stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrochenko, Peter E; Torgersen, Jan; Gruber, Peter; Hicks, Lucas A; Zheng, Jiwen; Kumar, Girish; Narayan, Roger J; Goering, Peter L; Liska, Robert; Stampfl, Jürgen; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr

    2015-04-01

    A reproducible method is needed to fabricate 3D scaffold constructs that results in periodic and uniform structures with precise control at sub-micrometer and micrometer length scales. In this study, fabrication of scaffolds by two-photon polymerization (2PP) of a biodegradable urethane and acrylate-based photoelastomer is demonstrated. This material supports 2PP processing with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. The high photoreactivity of the biophotoelastomer permits 2PP processing at a scanning speed of 1000 mm s(-1), facilitating rapid fabrication of relatively large structures (>5 mm(3)). These structures are custom printed for in vitro assay screening in 96-well plates and are sufficiently flexible to enable facile handling and transplantation. These results indicate that stable scaffolds with porosities of greater than 60% can be produced using 2PP. Human bone marrow stromal cells grown on 3D scaffolds exhibit increased growth and proliferation compared to smooth 2D scaffold controls. 3D scaffolds adsorb larger amounts of protein than smooth 2D scaffolds due to their larger surface area; the scaffolds also allow cells to attach in multiple planes and to completely infiltrate the porous scaffolds. The flexible photoelastomer material is biocompatible in vitro and is associated with facile handling, making it a viable candidate for further study of complex 3D-printed scaffolds.

  9. Automated detection of retinal cell nuclei in 3D micro-CT images of zebrafish using support vector machine classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yifu; Tavolara, Thomas; Cheng, Keith

    2016-03-01

    Our group is developing a method to examine biological specimens in cellular detail using synchrotron microCT. The method can acquire 3D images of tissue at micrometer-scale resolutions, allowing for individual cell types to be visualized in the context of the entire specimen. For model organism research, this tool will enable the rapid characterization of tissue architecture and cellular morphology from every organ system. This characterization is critical for proposed and ongoing "phenome" projects that aim to phenotype whole-organism mutants and diseased tissues from different organisms including humans. With the envisioned collection of hundreds to thousands of images for a phenome project, it is important to develop quantitative image analysis tools for the automated scoring of organism phenotypes across organ systems. Here we present a first step towards that goal, demonstrating the use of support vector machines (SVM) in detecting retinal cell nuclei in 3D images of wild-type zebrafish. In addition, we apply the SVM classifier on a mutant zebrafish to examine whether SVMs can be used to capture phenotypic differences in these images. The longterm goal of this work is to allow cellular and tissue morphology to be characterized quantitatively for many organ systems, at the level of the whole-organism.

  10. Development of high-performance cathode catalyst of polypyrrole modified carbon supported CoOOH for direct borohydride fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Zhu, Cai; Chen, Kaijian; Wang, Juan; Qin, Haiying; Liu, Jiabin; Yan, Shuai; Yang, Ke; Li, Aiguo

    2017-01-01

    Polypyrrole modified carbon supported CoOOH electrocatalyst (CoOOH-PPy-C) is prepared by impregnation-chemical method, and the catalytic properties for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media are investigated. The X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results confirm the presence of the expected CoOOH. The electrochemical tests show that the CoOOH-PPy-C catalyst exhibits good electrocatalytic activity towards ORR. The direct borohydride fuel cell using CoOOH-PPy-C as the cathode catalyst demonstrates a good stability performance. There is only 4% decrease of the cell voltage after 80-h operation. The ORR occurs an average 4-electron transfer pathway on the CoOOH-PPy-C catalyst. The good catalytic activity towards ORR benefits from the Cosbnd N bond, which is identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy test. X-ray absorption fine structure experiments further show that two nearest O atoms are substituted by two N atoms bonding to Co ion at a distance of 1.64 Å. The CoOOH-PPy-C exhibits better electrochemical properties than the Co(OH)2 counterpart even though the valence state of Co ion is +3 in CoOOH-PPy-C. Those results indicate that the bonding of Co ion with N atoms should be a key issue regardless the valence of Co ion.

  11. GLUT3 and PKM2 regulate OCT4 expression and support the hypoxic culture of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, David R; Calder, Philip C; Houghton, Franchesca D

    2015-12-07

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the capacity to differentiate into all cell types and thus have great potential for regenerative medicine. hESCs cultured at low oxygen tensions are more pluripotent and display an increased glycolytic rate but how this is regulated is unknown. This study therefore aimed to investigate the regulation of glucose metabolism in hESCs and whether this might impact OCT4 expression. In contrast to the glucose transporter GLUT1, GLUT3 was regulated by environmental oxygen and localised to hESC membranes. Silencing GLUT3 caused a reduction in glucose uptake and lactate production as well as OCT4 expression. GLUT3 and OCT4 expression were correlated suggesting that hESC self-renewal is regulated by the rate of glucose uptake. Surprisingly, PKM2, a rate limiting enzyme of glycolysis displayed a nuclear localisation in hESCs and silencing PKM2 did not alter glucose metabolism suggesting a role other than as a glycolytic enzyme. PKM2 expression was increased in hESCs cultured at 5% oxygen compared to 20% oxygen and silencing PKM2 reduced OCT4 expression highlighting a transcriptional role for PKM2 in hESCs. Together, these data demonstrate two separate mechanisms by which genes regulating glucose uptake and metabolism are involved in the hypoxic support of pluripotency in hESCs.

  12. Transport parameters of thin, supported cathode layers in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs); Transportparameter duenner, getraegerter Kathodenschichten der oxidkeramischen Brennstoffzelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedershoven, Christian

    2010-12-22

    The aim of this work was to determine the transport properties of thin cathode layers, which are part of the composite layer of a fabricated anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The transport properties of the anode and cathode have a significant influence on the electrochemical performance of a fuel cell stack and therefore represent an important parameter when designing fuel cell stacks. In order to determine the transport parameters of the cathode layers in a fabricated SOFC, it is necessary to permeate the thin cathode layer deposited on the gas-tight electrolyte with a defined gas transport. These thin cathode layers cannot be fabricated as mechanically stable single layers and cannot therefore be investigated in the diffusion and permeation experiments usually used to determine transport parameters. The setup of these experiments - particularly the sample holder - was therefore altered in this work. The result of this altered setup was a three-dimensional flow configuration. Compared to the conventional setup, it was no longer possible to describe the gas transport in the experiments with an analytical one-dimensional solution. A numerical solution process had to be used to evaluate the measurements. The new setup permitted a sufficiently symmetrical gas distribution and thus allowed the description of the transport to be reduced to a two-dimensional description, which significantly reduced the computational effort required to evaluate the measurements. For pressure-induced transport, a parametrized coherent expression of transport could be derived. This expression is equivalent to the analytical description of the transport in conventional measurement setups, with the exception of parameters that describe the geometry of the gas diffusion. In this case, a numerical process is not necessary for the evaluation. Using the transport parameters of mechanically stable anode substrates, which can be measured both in the old and the new setups, the old and

  13. Co-regulation of the Notch and Wnt signaling pathways promotes supporting cell proliferation and hair cell regeneration in mouse utricles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingfang; Li, Wenyan; Lin, Chen; Chen, Yan; Cheng, Cheng; Sun, Shan; Tang, Mingliang; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    This work sought to determine the crosstalk between the Notch and Wnt signaling pathways in regulating supporting cell (SC) proliferation and hair cell (HC) regeneration in mouse utricles. We cultured postnatal day (P)3 and P60 mouse utricles, damaged the HCs with gentamicin, and treated the utricles with the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT to inhibit the Notch pathway and with the Wnt agonist QS11 to active the Wnt pathway. We also used Sox2-CreER, Notch1-flox (exon 1), and Catnb-flox (exon 3) transgenic mice to knock out the Notch pathway and activate the Wnt pathway in Sox2+ SCs. Notch inhibition alone increased SC proliferation and HC number in both undamaged and damaged utricles. Wnt activation alone promoted SC proliferation, but the HC number was not significantly increased. Here we demonstrated the cumulative effects of Notch inhibition and Wnt activation in regulating SC proliferation and HC regeneration. Simultaneously inhibiting Notch and overexpressing Wnt led to significantly greater SC proliferation and greater numbers of HCs than manipulating either pathway alone. Similar results were observed in the transgenic mice. This study suggests that the combination of Notch inhibition and Wnt activation can significantly promote SC proliferation and increase the number of regenerated HCs in mouse utricle. PMID:27435629

  14. The Postnatal Accumulation of Junctional E-cadherin Is Inversely Correlated with the Capacity for Supporting Cells to Convert Directly into Sensory Hair Cells in Mammalian Balance Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Maria Sol; Thiede, Benjamin R.; Baker, Wendy; Askew, Charles; Igbani, Lisa M.; Corwin, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Mammals experience permanent impairments from hair cell (HC) losses, but birds and other non-mammals quickly recover hearing and balance senses after supporting cells (SCs) give rise to replacement HCs. Avian HC epithelia express little or no E-cadherin, and differences in the thickness of F-actin belts at SC junctions strongly correlate with different species’ capacities for HC replacement, so we investigated junctional cadherins in human and murine ears. We found strong E-cadherin expression at SC-SC junctions that increases >6-fold postnatally in mice. When we cultured utricles from young mice with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), striolar SCs completely internalized their E-cadherin, without affecting N-cadherin. Hes and Hey expression also decreased and the SCs began to express Atoh1. After 48 h, those SCs expressed myosins VI and VIIA, and by 72 h they developed hair bundles. However, some scattered striolar SCs retained E-cadherin and the SC phenotype. In extrastriolar regions the vast majority of SCs also retained E-cadherin and failed to convert into HCs even after long GSI treatments. Microscopic measurements revealed that the junctions between extrastriolar SCs were more developed than those between striolar SCs. In GSI-treated utricles as old as P12, differentiated striolar SCs converted into HCs, but such responses declined with age and ceased by P16. Thus, temporal and spatial differences in postnatal SC-to-HC phenotype conversion capacity are linked to the structural attributes of E-cadherin containing SC junctions in mammals, which differ substantially from their counterparts in non-mammalian vertebrates that readily recover from hearing and balance deficits through hair cell regeneration. PMID:21849546

  15. The postnatal accumulation of junctional E-cadherin is inversely correlated with the capacity for supporting cells to convert directly into sensory hair cells in mammalian balance organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Maria Sol; Thiede, Benjamin R; Baker, Wendy; Askew, Charles; Igbani, Lisa M; Corwin, Jeffrey T

    2011-08-17

    Mammals experience permanent impairments from hair cell (HC) losses, but birds and other non-mammals quickly recover hearing and balance senses after supporting cells (SCs) give rise to replacement HCs. Avian HC epithelia express little or no E-cadherin, and differences in the thickness of F-actin belts at SC junctions strongly correlate with different species' capacities for HC replacement, so we investigated junctional cadherins in human and murine ears. We found strong E-cadherin expression at SC-SC junctions that increases more than sixfold postnatally in mice. When we cultured utricles from young mice with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), striolar SCs completely internalized their E-cadherin, without affecting N-cadherin. Hes and Hey expression also decreased and the SCs began to express Atoh1. After 48 h, those SCs expressed myosins VI and VIIA, and by 72 h, they developed hair bundles. However, some scattered striolar SCs retained E-cadherin and the SC phenotype. In extrastriolar regions, the vast majority of SCs also retained E-cadherin and failed to convert into HCs even after long GSI treatments. Microscopic measurements revealed that the junctions between extrastriolar SCs were more developed than those between striolar SCs. In GSI-treated utricles as old as P12, differentiated striolar SCs converted into HCs, but such responses declined with age and ceased by P16. Thus, temporal and spatial differences in postnatal SC-to-HC phenotype conversion capacity are linked to the structural attributes of E-cadherin containing SC junctions in mammals, which differ substantially from their counterparts in non-mammalian vertebrates that readily recover from hearing and balance deficits through hair cell regeneration.

  16. Early and extensive CD55 loss from red blood cells supports a causal role in malarial anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwamaka Moses

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Levels of complement regulatory proteins (CrP on the surface of red blood cells (RBC decrease during severe malarial anaemia and as part of cell ageing process. It remains unclear whether CrP changes seen during malaria contribute to the development of anaemia, or result from an altered RBC age distribution due to suppressive effects of malaria on erythropoiesis. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in the north-east coast of Tanzania to investigate whether the changes in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored complement regulatory proteins (CD55 and CD59 contributes to malaria anaemia. Blood samples were collected from a cohort of children under intensive surveillance for Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia and illness. Levels of CD55 and CD59 were measured by flow cytometer and compared between anaemic (8.08 g/dl and non- anaemic children (11.42 g/dl. Results Levels of CD55 and CD59 decreased with increased RBC age. CD55 levels were lower in anaemic children and the difference was seen in RBC of all ages. Levels of CD59 were lower in anaemic children, but these differences were not significant. CD55, but not CD59, levels correlated positively with the level of haemoglobin in anaemic children. Conclusion The extent of CD55 loss from RBC of all ages early in the course of malarial anaemia and the correlation of CD55 with haemoglobin levels support the hypothesis that CD55 may play a causal role in this disorder.

  17. Differentiation and Distribution of Marrow Stem Cells in Flex-Flow Environments Demonstrate Support of the Valvular Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasmita Rath

    Full Text Available For treatment of critical heart valve diseases, prosthetic valves perform fairly well in most adults; however, for pediatric patients, there is the added requirement that the replacement valve grows with the child, thus extremely limiting current treatment options. Tissue engineered heart valves (TEHV, such as those derived from autologous bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs, have the potential to recapitulate native valve architecture and accommodate somatic growth. However, a fundamental pre-cursor in promoting directed integration with native tissues rather than random, uncontrolled growth requires an understanding of BMSC mechanobiological responses to valve-relevant mechanical environments. Here, we report on the responses of human BMSC-seeded polymer constructs to the valve-relevant stress states of: (i steady flow alone, (ii cyclic flexure alone, and (iii the combination of cyclic flexure and steady flow (flex-flow. BMSCs were seeded onto a PGA: PLLA polymer scaffold and cultured in static culture for 8 days. Subsequently, the aforementioned mechanical conditions, (groups consisting of steady flow alone-850ml/min, cyclic flexure alone-1 Hz, and flex-flow-850ml/min and 1 Hz were applied for an additional two weeks. We found samples from the flex-flow group exhibited a valve-like distribution of cells that expressed endothelial (preference to the surfaces and myofibroblast (preference to the intermediate region phenotypes. We interpret that this was likely due to the presence of both appreciable fluid-induced shear stress magnitudes and oscillatory shear stresses, which were concomitantly imparted onto the samples. These results indicate that flex-flow mechanical environments support directed in vitro differentiation of BMSCs uniquely towards a heart valve phenotype, as evident by cellular distribution and expression of specific gene markers. A priori guidance of BMSC-derived, engineered tissue growth under flex-flow conditions may serve to

  18. Outcome of Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants Who Require Intensive Care Unit Support: A Single Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Becerra, Samantha; Labastida-Mercado, Nancy; Rosales-Padrón, Jaime; García-Chavez, Jessica; Soto-Vega, Elena; Rivadeneyra-Espinoza, Liliana; León-Peña, Andres A; Fernández-Lara, Danitza; Dominguez-Cid, Monica; Anthon-Méndez, Javier; Arizpe-Bravo, Daniel; Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2015-01-01

    Admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a patient who has been grafted with hematopoietic stem cells is a serious event, but the role of the ICU in this setting remains controversial. Data were analyzed from patients who underwent autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation at the Centro de Hematología y Medicina Interna de Puebla, México, between May 1993 and October 2014. In total, 339 patients were grafted: 150 autografts and 189 allografts; 68 of the grafted patients (20%) were admitted to the ICU after transplantation: 27% of the allografted and 11% of the autografted patients (p = 0.2). Two of 17 autografted patients (12%) and 5 of 51 allografted patients (10%) survived. All patients who required insertion of an endotracheal tube died, whereas 7 of 11 patients without invasive mechanical ventilation survived (p = 0.001). Only 10% of the grafted patients survived their stay in the ICU; this figure is lower than those reported from other centers and may reflect several facts, varying from the quality of the ICU support to ICU admission criteria to the initial management of all the grafts in an outpatient setting, which could somehow delay the arrival of patients to the hospital.

  19. The Molecular Structure of Human Red Blood Cell Membranes from Highly Oriented, Solid Supported Multi-Lamellar Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himbert, Sebastian; Alsop, Richard J.; Rose, Markus; Hertz, Laura; Dhaliwal, Alexander; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Verschoor, Chris P.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.; Kaestner, Lars; Wagner, Christian; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2017-01-01

    We prepared highly oriented, multi-lamellar stacks of human red blood cell (RBC) membranes applied on silicon wafers. RBC ghosts were prepared by hemolysis and applied onto functionalized silicon chips and annealed into multi-lamellar RBC membranes. High resolution X-ray diffraction was used to determine the molecular structure of the stacked membranes. We present direct experimental evidence that these RBC membranes consist of nanometer sized domains of integral coiled-coil peptides, as well as liquid ordered (lo) and liquid disordered (ld) lipids. Lamellar spacings, membrane and hydration water layer thicknesses, areas per lipid tail and domain sizes were determined. The common drug aspirin was added to the RBC membranes and found to interact with RBC membranes and preferably partition in the head group region of the lo domain leading to a fluidification of the membranes, i.e., a thinning of the bilayers and an increase in lipid tail spacing. Our results further support current models of RBC membranes as patchy structures and provide unprecedented structural details of the molecular organization in the different domains.

  20. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/carbon fiber paper composite to support Pt nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yi, Xi-bin; Liu, Shuo; Fan, Hui-Li; Ju, Wei; Wang, Qi-Chun; Ma, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is introduced as a catalyst support material for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Well dispersed Pt nanoparticles on VACNTs surface are prepared by impregnation-reduction method. The VACNTs on CFP possess well-maintained alignment, large surface area and good electrical conductivity, which leading to the formation of Pt particles with a smaller size and enhance the Pt utilization rate. The structure and nature of resulting Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalysts for methanol oxidation are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). With the aid of VACNTs, well-dispersed Pt catalysts enable the reversibly rapid redox kinetic since electron transport efficiently passes through a one-dimensional pathway, which leads to enhance the catalytic activity and Pt utilization rate. Compared with the Pt/XC-72/CFP electrode, the electrochemical measurements results display that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalyst shows much higher electrocatalytic activity and better stability for methanol oxidation. In addition, the oxidation current from 200 to 1200 s decayed more slowly for the Pt/VACNTs/CFP than that of the Pt/XC-72/CFP catalysts, indicating less accumulation of adsorbed CO species. All those results imply that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP has a great potential for applications in DMFCs.

  1. Load cycle durability of a graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst in polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Chikara; Kakinuma, Katsuyoshi; Kawashima, Kazuhito; Tashiro, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    We focus on Pt degradation occurring during fuel cell vehicle (FCV) combined drive cycles involving load and open circuit voltage (OCV) just after startup and during idling. Load cycle durability is evaluated as a function of OCV/load holding time, load rate and relative humidity (RH) with a graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst (Pt/GCB) in the cathode. The degradation of Pt/GCB is suppressed for shorter OCV holding times, lower load rates and lower RH. Scanning ion microscopy (SIM) images of membrane cross-sections indicate that the amount of Pt deposited in the membrane decreases during drive cycles involving load with short OCV holding times. Investigations of the Pt distribution in the cathode catalyst layer (CL) by using scanning TEM-EDX show that the dissolution of Pt is suppressed on the membrane side in the CL. The Pt dissolution is accelerated by the high Pt oxidation due to the long OCV holding time. A load cycle with both long OCV holding time and low load inhibits the Pt2+ migration into the membrane but accelerates the Pt particle growth due to electrochemical Ostwald ripening; meanwhile, a load cycle with long OCV holding time at lower RH prevents both the Pt dissolution and particle growth.

  2. Ultrasensitive enzyme-free immunoassay for squamous cell carcinoma antigen using carbon supported Pd-Au as electrocatalytic labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Du, Bin; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Guo, Aiping; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Dan; Ma, Hongmin; Wei, Qin

    2014-06-23

    A novel nonenzymatic sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor has been developed to detect squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA). Nitrogen-doped graphene sheet (N-GS) was used to increase capacity of capturing primary antibodies (Ab1). Carbon-supported Pd-Au binary nanoparticles (Pd-Au/C) were synthesized and used to label secondary antibodies (Ab2). The specific binding of SCCA and antibodies enabled a quantitative attachment of Pd-Au/C on the electrode surface. Electrocatalytic analysis showed that the prepared Pd-Au/C exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We use current response of electrocatalytic labels Pd-Au/C to detect the concentration of SCCA. The unique nonenzymatic immunosensor exhibits a relatively wide linear range from 0.005 to 2 ng mL(-1) and high sensitivity with a low detection limit of 1.7 pg mL(-1). The immunsensor also shows good reproducibility (4.2%) and stability (5.8%), which makes it an enormous application prospect in clinical research.

  3. Model study on the stability of carbon support materials under polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode operation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colmenares, L.C.; Jusys, Z.; Behm, R.J. [Institute of Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, Ulm University, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Wurth, A. [TS-IM-IM-CB Inorganic Materials, Evonik Degussa GmbH, D-50997 Cologne (Germany)

    2009-05-01

    The electrochemical oxidation and corrosion resistance of differently prepared and post-treated (graphitization, surface oxidation) carbon support materials, whose surface area and composition were characterized by adsorption measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, were investigated in model studies performed under fuel cell cathode relevant potential conditions. These included also the abnormal cathode potentials (up to 1.5 V{sub RHE}) occurring during start-up and shut-down procedures. Reversible surface oxidation, leading, e.g., to the formation of quinones/hydroquinones, and irreversible oxidation to CO{sub 2} were discriminated by combining electrochemical and on-line mass spectrometry measurements. Oxygenated surface carbon species were found to affect the surface area normalized electrooxidation activity much more than the surface area and porosity of the material, with graphitized carbon with low porosity and low oxygen surface content being most resistant towards reversible oxidation and towards irreversible oxidation at high potentials. Trapped CO{sub 2}, formed upon carbon oxidation at high potentials, is proposed to be at least partly responsible for CO{sub 2} release at low potentials, below the standard potential for electrochemical carbon oxidation. (author)

  4. Development of Integrated TiO2 on Carburized Si Nanowires as a Catalyst/Support Structure for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Adam J.

    Due to a combination of environmental and economic motivations, there is a strong impetus to transition away from fossil fuels towards renewable sources of energy. Critical to achieving this goal will be technologies that allow for the storage and transmission of energy derived from renewable sources. Hydrogen fuel cells may play a significant role in making this a reality, allowing for the use of hydrogen as a non-carbon based fuel, in particular for vehicle applications. Hydrogen fuel cells directly convert chemical energy into electrical energy, with only water vapor and heat as waste products. There are challenges facing fuel cell technology that inhibit its wider implementation. One of the most significant of these is the cost of the platinum that is typically used in fuel cells to catalyze the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is the bottleneck reaction in hydrogen fuel cells. The rarity and expense of platinum significantly add to the cost of fuel cells, thus reducing their economic viability. Therefore there is much interest in developing catalysts from alternative materials with a lower cost. A second, and related issue facing fuel cells is the degradation over time of the support structure that puts the catalyst into electrical connection with the external load. The carbon structure that currently serves as the standard catalyst support degrades over time under the harsh operating conditions of the cell, leading to catalyst agglomeration and reducing the lifetime of the cell. It is therefore desirable to develop support structures that will be more stable, while still providing electrical conductivity. The following presents original research pertaining to the development of catalyst/support materials making use of non-noble metal oxides synthesized by means of wet chemical methods. Metal oxides such as manganese oxide and titanium oxide are capable of serving as support materials and (in the case of alkaline fuel cells) even as catalysts. Wet

  5. Novel light-weight, high-performance anode-supported microtubular solid oxide fuel cells with an active anode functional layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Wang, Yao; Ren, Cong; Fang, Shumin; Mao, Yating; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-10-01

    Influence of the air-gap, the distance from the tube-in-orifice spinneret to the upper surface of the external coagulant bath during the extrusion/phase-inversion process, on the microstructure of nickel - yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) hollow fibers has been systematically studied. When the air-gap is 0 cm, the obtained Ni-YSZ hollow fiber has a sandwich microstructure. However, when the air-gap is increased to 15 cm, a bi-layer Ni-YSZ hollow fiber consisting of a thin layer with small pores and a thick support with highly porous fingerlike macrovoids has been achieved. The output power density of microtubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs) with a cell configuration of Ni-YSZ/YSZ/YSZ-LSM increases from 594 mW cm-2 for the cells with the Ni-YSZ anode of sandwich microstructure to 832 mW cm-2 for the cells with the Ni-YSZ anode of bi-layer microstructure at 750 °C, implying that to achieve the same output power density, the weight of the cells with the bi-layer anode support can be reduced to 41.5% compared with that of the cells with the sandwich anode support. Thermal-cycling test shows no obvious degradation on the open-circuit-voltage (OCV), indicating that the MT-SOFCs have robust resistance to thermal cycling.

  6. Performance improvement of anode-supported electrolytes for planar solid oxide fuel cells via a tape-casting/lamination/co-firing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae-Gu; Moon, Hwan; Park, Sung-Chul; Lee, Jong-Jin; Yoon, Daeil; Hyun, Sang-Hoon [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); Kim, Do-Heyoung [Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Kyuongpook 790-600 (Korea)

    2010-05-01

    Recently, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have attracted considerable attention because of their low emissions, high-energy conversion efficiency, and flexible usage of various fuels. One of the key problems of applying flat-type SOFCs to large-scale power generation is that unit cells of large area and with a high degree of flatness cannot be manufactured satisfactorily. In this study, the effects of tape-casting, laminating, and co-firing conditions on the flatness of anode-supported electrolyte unit cells have been investigated to improve the cell performance of unit cells. The cells are composed of a Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode, a Ni-YSZ anode functional layer (AFL), a YSZ electrolyte, and a lanthanum strontium manganate (LSM)-YSZ cathode. The flatness of the anode-supported electrolyte is optimized by controlling the firing schedule, the lamination method, and the applied load during firing. A 5 cm x 5 cm (active area 4 cm x 4 cm) unit cell having a reasonable flatness of 55 {mu}m/5 cm shows a higher power output of 11.4 W as compared with 7.7 W a unit cell with a flatness of 200 {mu}m/5 cm, when operating at 800 C with humidified hydrogen fuel. (author)

  7. Comparison of the Degradation of the Polarisation Resistance of Symmetrical LSM-YSZ cells, with Anode Supported Ni-YSZ/YSZ/LSM-YSZ SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres da Silva, Iris Maura; Nielsen, Jimmi; Hjelm, Johan;

    2009-01-01

    Impedance spectra of a symmetrical cell with SOFC cathodes (LSM-YSZ/YSZ/LSM-YSZ) and an anode supported planar SOFC (Ni-YSZ/YSZ/LSM-YSZ) were collected at OCV at 650{degree sign}C in air (cathode) and humidified (4%) hydrogen (anode), over 155 hours. The impedance was affected by degradation over...

  8. Intelligent thermoresponsive substrate from modified overhead projection sheet as a tool for construction and support of cell sheets in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithya, Joseph; Kumar, P R Anil; Tilak, Prasad; Leena, Joseph; Sreenivasan, K; Kumary, T V

    2011-02-01

    Cell sheet engineering using thermoresponsive culture dishes allows harvesting of intact in vitro cell sheet. In this study, commercially available polyethylene terephthalate-based overhead projection transparency sheet (OHPS) was identified as a substrate for coating thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-glycidylmethacrylate) (NGMA) copolymer having lower critical solution temperature of 28°C. Since OHPS is highly hydrophobic and rigid, the surface was modified by alkali treatment (OHPS-M) to functionalize the surface with carboxyl and hydroxyl groups so as to make it more suitable for efficient coating of NGMA copolymer and cell culture. To impart thermoresponsiveness, OHPS-M was coated with NGMA (OHPS-MC). Surface morphology, surface chemistry, and thermoresponsive coating were analyzed by profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, water contact angle, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity, cell adhesion, and proliferation on OHPS-M and OHPS-MC were analyzed using L929 cells. Specific cytocompatibility analysis was done using SIRC (Rabbit corneal) cells. Data revealed cytocompatible nature of OHPS-M and OHPS-MC. Suitability of OHPS-MC for cell sheet harvest and transfer efficiency was assessed using primary corneal cells. Corneal cell sheet constructs retrieved by temperature variation was characterized by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for markers specific to differentiated corneal cells (keratin 3 and keratin 12) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and assessed for viability using fluorescein diacetate staining, tissue architecture by scanning electron microscopy, and cell-cell contacts by connexin-43 staining. The retrieved cell sheets retained corneal epithelial characteristics such as keratin 3/12, viability, and tissue architecture with intact cell-cell contacts as in native tissue. The results proved that surface modification and coating with NGMA on OHPS offer a novel biocompatible thermosensitive

  9. Additive effect of Ce, Mo and K to nickel-cobalt aluminate supported solid oxide fuel cell for direct internal reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Bu Ho; Park, Jungdeok; Yoon, Heechul; Kim, Hyeon Hui; Kim, Lim; Chung, Jong Shik [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Direct internal reforming of methane (steam/carbon=0.031, 850 .deg. C) is tested using button cells of Ni-YSZ/YSZ/LSM in which the anode layer is supported either on Ni-YSZ or on Ni-CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The Ni-CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} supported cell shows little degradation with operating time, as a result of higher resistance against carbon deposition, whereas the Ni-YSZ supported cell deactivates quickly and suffers fracture in 50 h. Upon incorporation of additives such as K, Ce, or Mo into the Ni-CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} support, cells with 0.5 wt% CeO{sub 2} exhibit the best stable performance as a result of reduced coke formation. Cells with 0.5 wt% Mo exhibit the lowest performance. Although no carbon deposit is detected in the cells with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} additives, their performance is worse than that in the CeO{sub 2} case, and, in constant-current mode, there is a sudden voltage drop to zero after a certain period of time; this time becomes shorter with increasing K content. The injection of potassium into the anode side facilitates the generation of OH{sup -} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} in the anode and promotes the diffusion of these ions to the cathode. Increased polarization resistance at the cathode and increased electrolyte resistance result in such a sudden failure.

  10. Anode regeneration following carbon depositions in an industrial-sized anode supported solid oxide fuel cell operating on synthetic diesel reformate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotić, Vanja; Schluckner, Christoph; Mathe, Jörg; Rechberger, Jürgen; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Hochenauer, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    Carbon deposition is a primary concern during operation of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) fueled with carbon-containing fuels. It leads to cell degradation and thus reduces SOFC sustained operation and durability. This paper reports on an experimental investigation of carbon formation on the nickel/yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni/YSZ) anode of an anode-supported SOFC and its regeneration. The cell was fueled with a synthetically produced diesel reformate to investigate and simulate the cell behavior under real operating conditions. For this purpose the cell was operated under load to determine the critical operating time. Rapid carbon generation, such as at open circuit voltage (OCV), can be prevented when the cell is under load. Carbon depositions were detected using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and further analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Industrial-size cells suitable for commercial applications were studied. This study proves the reversibility of carbon formation and the reproducibility of the regeneration process. It shows that carbon formations can be recognized and effectively, fully and cell-protecting regenerated. It indicates the excellent possibility of using SOFCs in the automotive industry as an auxiliary power unit (APU) or combined power-heat unit, operated with diesel reformate, without danger from cell degradation caused by carbon-containing fuels.

  11. Investigation into the diffusion and oxidation behavior of the interface between a plasma-sprayed anode and a porous steel support for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu; Liu, Meilin; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Porous metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have attracted much attention because their potential to dramatically reduce the cost while enhancing the robustness and manufacturability. In particular, 430 ferritic steel (430L) is one of the popular choice for SOFC support because of its superior performance and low cost. In this study, we investigate the oxidation and diffusion behavior of the interface between a Ni-based anode and porous 430L support exposed to a humidified (3% H2O) hydrogen atmosphere at 700 °C. The Ni-GDC (Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ) cermet anodes are deposited on the porous 430L support by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The effect of exposure time on the microstructure and phase structure of the anode and the supports is studied and the element diffusion across the support/anode interface is characterized. Results indicate that the main oxidation product of the 430L support is Cr2O3, and that Cr and Fe will diffuse to the anode and the diffusion thickness increases with the exposure time. The diffusion thickness of Cr and Fe reach about 5 and 2 μm, respectively, after 1000 h exposure. However, the element diffusion and oxidation has little influence on the area-specific resistance, indicating that the porous 430L steel and plasma sprayed Ni-GDC anode are promising for durable SOFCs.

  12. Methanol-Tolerant Platinum-Palladium Catalyst Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber for High Concentration Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pt-Pd catalyst supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (N-CNF was prepared and evaluated as a cathode electrode of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. The N-CNF, which was directly synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition from acetonitrile at 640 °C, was verified as having a change of electrochemical surface properties such as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR activities and the electrochemical double layer compared with common carbon black (CB. To attain the competitive oxygen reduction reaction activity with methanol tolerance, the Pt and Pd metals were supported on the CB or the N-CNF. The physical and electrochemical characteristics of the N-CNF–supported Pt-Pd catalyst were examined and compared with catalyst supported on the CB. In addition, DMFC single cells using these catalysts as the cathode electrode were applied to obtain I-V polarization curves and constant current operating performances with high-concentration methanol as the fuel. Pt-Pd catalysts had obvious ORR activity even in the presence of methanol. The higher power density was obtained at all the methanol concentrations when it applied to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA of the DMFC. When the N-CNF is used as the catalyst support material, a better performance with high-concentration methanol is expected.

  13. Embryonic stem cells growing in 3-dimensions shift from reliance on the substrate to each other for mechanical support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Ailing; Lim, Mayasari; Weihs, Daphne

    2015-07-16

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) grow into three-dimensional (3D) spheroid structures en-route to tissue growth. In vitro spheroids can be controllably induced on a two-dimensional (2D) substrate with high viability. Here we use a method for inducing pluripotent embryoid body (EB) formation on flat polyacrylamide gels while simultaneously evaluating the dynamic changes in the mechano-biology of the growing 3D spheroids. During colony growth in 3D, pluripotency is conserved while the spheroid-substrate interactions change significantly. We correlate colony-size, cell-applied traction-forces, and expressions of cell-surface molecules indicating cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, while verifying pluripotency. We show that as the colony size increases with time, the stresses applied by the spheroid to the gel decrease in the 3D growing EBs; control cells growing in 2D-monolayers maintain unvarying forces. Concurrently, focal-adhesion mediated cell-substrate interactions give way to E-cadherin cell-cell connections, while pluripotency. The mechano-biological changes occurring in the growing embryoid body are required for stabilization of the growing pluripotent 3D-structure, and can affect its potential uses including differentiation. This could enable development of more effective expansion, differentiation, and separation approaches for clinical purposes.

  14. T Cell Migration from Inflamed Skin to Draining Lymph Nodes Requires Intralymphatic Crawling Supported by ICAM-1/LFA-1 Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teijeira, Alvaro; Hunter, Morgan C; Russo, Erica; Proulx, Steven T; Frei, Thomas; Debes, Gudrun F; Coles, Marc; Melero, Ignacio; Detmar, Michael; Rouzaut, Ana; Halin, Cornelia

    2017-01-24

    T cells are the most abundant cell type found in afferent lymph, but their migration through lymphatic vessels (LVs) remains poorly understood. Performing intravital microscopy in the murine skin, we imaged T cell migration through afferent LVs in vivo. T cells entered into and actively migrated within lymphatic capillaries but were passively transported in contractile collecting vessels. Intralymphatic T cell number and motility were increased during contact-hypersensitivity-induced inflammation and dependent on ICAM-1/LFA-1 interactions. In vitro, blockade of endothelial cell-expressed ICAM-1 reduced T cell adhesion, crawling, and transmigration across lymphatic endothelium and decreased T cell advancement from capillaries into lymphatic collectors in skin explants. In vivo, T cell migration to draining lymph nodes was significantly reduced upon ICAM-1 or LFA-1 blockade. Our findings indicate that T cell migration through LVs occurs in distinct steps and reveal a key role for ICAM-1/LFA-1 interactions in this process.

  15. Fibrocyte-like cells recruited to the spleen support innate and adaptive immune responses to acute injury or infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisseleva, Tatiana; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Reichart, Donna; McGillvray, Shauna M; Wingender, Gerhard; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Glass, Christopher K; Nizet, Victor; Brenner, David A

    2011-10-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived fibrocytes are a population of CD45(+) and collagen Type I-expressing cells that migrate to the spleen and to target injured organs, such as skin, lungs, kidneys, and liver. While CD45(+)Col(+) fibrocytes contribute to collagen deposition at the site of injury, the role of CD45(+)Col(+) cells in spleen has not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that hepatotoxic injury (CCl(4)), TGF-β1, lipopolysaccharide, or infection with Listeria monocytogenes induce rapid recruitment of CD45(+)Col(+) fibrocyte-like cells to the spleen. These cells have a gene expression pattern that includes antimicrobial factors (myleoperoxidase, cathelicidin, and defensins) and MHC II at higher levels than found on quiescent or activated macrophages. The immune functions of these splenic CD45(+)Col(+) fibrocyte-like cells include entrapment of bacteria into extracellular DNA-based structures containing cathelicidin and presentation of antigens to naïve CD8(+) T cells to induce their proliferation. Stimulation of these splenic fibrocyte-like cells with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor or macrophage-colony stimulating factor induces downregulation of collagen expression and terminal differentiation into the dendritic cells or macrophage. Thus, splenic CD45(+)Col(+) cells are a population of rapidly mobilized BM-derived fibrocyte-like cells that respond to inflammation or infection to participate in innate and adaptive immune responses.

  16. Development of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from mouse embryonic stem cells, in vitro, supported by ectopic human HOXB4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilat, Sandra; Carotta, Sebastian; Klump, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells can recapitulate many aspects of hematopoiesis, in vitro, and can even generate cells capable of long-term multilineage repopulation after transplantation into recipient mice, when the homeodomain transcription factor HOXB4 is ectopically expressed. Thus, the ES-cell differentiation system is of great value for a detailed understanding of the process of blood formation. Furthermore, it is also promising for future application in hematopoietic cell and gene therapy. Since the arrival of techniques which allow the reprogramming of somatic cells back to an ES cell-like state, the generation of hematopoietic stem cells from patient-specific so-called induced pluripotent stem cells shows great promise for future therapeutic applications. In this chapter, we describe how to cultivate a certain feeder cell-independent mouse embryonic stem cell line, to manipulate these cells by retroviral gene transfer to ectopically express HOXB4, to differentiate these ES cells via embryoid body formation, and to selectively expand the arising, HOXB4-expressing hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

  17. Fabrication of anode-supported zirconia thin film electrolyte based core-shell particle structure for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Li; John T.S.Irvinen

    2013-01-01

    With a view to produce intermediate temperature SOFCs, yttria and scandia doped zirconia with a core-shell structure was prepared, then an anode supported fuel cell was fabricated by a spray method. The influences of the scandia content in the electrolyte and atmosphere conditions used in the testing experiments on phase composition, microstructure and fuel cell performance were investigated. The electrolyte was composed of cubic and tetragonal phases and SEM pictures revealed very fine grain sizes and a smooth surface of the electrolyte film, though some defects were observed in samples with high Scandia content. Coating scandia on partially stabilized zirconium particles improves both ionic conductivity of the electrolyte and power density of the fuel cell distinctly below 750 1C. Anodes were pre-sintered at 1200 1C before co-sintering with the electrolyte film to ensure that the shrinkage percentage was close to that of the electrolyte during co-sintering, avoiding warping of cell.

  18. Primary T-cells from human CD4/CCR5-transgenic rats support all early steps of HIV-1 replication including integration, but display impaired viral gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Volker

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo studies on HIV-1 pathogenesis and testing of antiviral strategies have been hampered by the lack of an immunocompetent small animal model that is highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection. Since native rodents are non-permissive, we developed transgenic rats that selectively express the HIV-1 receptor complex, hCD4 and hCCR5, on relevant target cells. These animals display a transient low-level plasma viremia after HIV-1YU-2 infection, demonstrating HIV-1 susceptibility in vivo. However, unlike macrophages, primary CD4 T-cells from double-transgenic animals fail to support viral spread ex vivo. To identify quantitative limitations or absolute blocks in this rodent species, we quantitatively assessed the efficiency of key steps in the early phase of the viral replication cycle in a side-by-side comparison in infected cell lines and primary T-cells from hCD4/hCCR5-transgenic rats and human donors. Results Levels of virus entry, HIV-1 cDNA synthesis, nuclear import, and integration into the host genome were shown to be remarkably similar in cell lines and, where technically accessible, in primary T-cells from both species. In contrast, a profound impairment at the level of early HIV gene expression was disclosed at the single-cell level in primary rat T-cells and most other rat-derived cells. Macrophages were a notable exception, possibly reflecting the unique transcriptional milieu in this evolutionarily conserved target cell of all lentiviruses. Importantly, transient trans-complementation by ex vivo nucleofection with the Tat-interacting protein Cyclin T1 of human origin markedly elevated HIV gene expression in primary rat T-cells. Conclusion This is the first study that has quantitatively determined the efficiency of consecutive steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle in infected primary HIV target cells from a candidate transgenic small animal and compared it to human cells. Unlike cells derived from mice or rabbits, rat

  19. Target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers for reverse transcription support retroviral infection at low efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Alexander; Lund, Anders H; Hansen, Anette C;

    2002-01-01

    by cases of correction of single mismatches between Akv-MLV vectors and complementary tRNA primers toward the primer sequence in the integrated vector. Thus, target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers are able to initiate first-strand cDNA synthesis and plus-strand transfer leading to a complete provirus......Reverse transcription of a retroviral genome takes place in the cytoplasm of an infected cell by a process primed by a producer-cell-derived tRNA annealed to an 18-nucleotide primer-binding site (PBS). By an assay involving primer complementation of PBS-mutated vectors we analyzed whether tRNA...... primers derived from the target cell can sustain reverse transcription during murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection. Transduction efficiencies were 4-5 orders of magnitude below those of comparable producer-cell complementations. However, successful usage of a target-cell-derived tRNA primer was proven...

  20. Survivin as a potential mediator to support autoreactive cell survival in myasthenia gravis: a human and animal model study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda L Kusner

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that underlie the development and maintenance of autoimmunity in myasthenia gravis are poorly understood. In this investigation, we evaluate the role of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, in humans and in two animal models. We identified survivin expression in cells with B lymphocyte and plasma cells markers, and in the thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis. A portion of survivin-expressing cells specifically bound a peptide derived from the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptor indicating that they recognize the peptide. Thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis had large numbers of survivin-positive cells with fewer cells in the thymuses of corticosteroid-treated patients. Application of a survivin vaccination strategy in mouse and rat models of myasthenia gravis demonstrated improved motor assessment, a reduction in acetylcholine receptor specific autoantibodies, and a retention of acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction, associated with marked reduction of survivin-expressing circulating CD20+ cells. These data strongly suggest that survivin expression in cells with lymphocyte and plasma cell markers occurs in patients with myasthenia gravis and in two animal models of myasthenia gravis. Survivin expression may be part of a mechanism that inhibits the apoptosis of autoreactive B cells in myasthenia gravis and other autoimmune disorders.

  1. Survivin as a potential mediator to support autoreactive cell survival in myasthenia gravis: a human and animal model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusner, Linda L; Ciesielski, Michael J; Marx, Alexander; Kaminski, Henry J; Fenstermaker, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the development and maintenance of autoimmunity in myasthenia gravis are poorly understood. In this investigation, we evaluate the role of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, in humans and in two animal models. We identified survivin expression in cells with B lymphocyte and plasma cells markers, and in the thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis. A portion of survivin-expressing cells specifically bound a peptide derived from the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptor indicating that they recognize the peptide. Thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis had large numbers of survivin-positive cells with fewer cells in the thymuses of corticosteroid-treated patients. Application of a survivin vaccination strategy in mouse and rat models of myasthenia gravis demonstrated improved motor assessment, a reduction in acetylcholine receptor specific autoantibodies, and a retention of acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction, associated with marked reduction of survivin-expressing circulating CD20+ cells. These data strongly suggest that survivin expression in cells with lymphocyte and plasma cell markers occurs in patients with myasthenia gravis and in two animal models of myasthenia gravis. Survivin expression may be part of a mechanism that inhibits the apoptosis of autoreactive B cells in myasthenia gravis and other autoimmune disorders.

  2. Use of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Support Topical Skin Adhesive for Wound Closure: A Preliminary Report from Animal In Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Nowacki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the local and systemic effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs as a component of topical skin adhesive in an animal artificial wound closure model. In presented study the cosmetic effects, histological analysis, mechanical properties, and cell migration have been assessed to evaluate the usefulness of ADSCs as supporting factor for octyl blend cyanoacrylate adhesive. The total of 40 rats were used and divided into six groups. In the Study Group, ADSCs were administered by multipoint injection of the six surrounding intrawound areas with additional freely leaving procedure of the cells between the skin flaps just before applying adhesive to close the wound. Five control groups without using ADSCs, utilizing different types of standard wound closure, were created in order to check efficiency of experimental stem cell therapy. In our study, we proved that ADSCs could be used effectively also as a supportive tool in topical skin adhesive for wound closure. However we did not achieve any spectacular differences related to such aspects as better mechanical properties or special biological breakthroughs in wound healing properties. The use of stem cells, especially ADSCs for wound closure can provide an inspiring development in plastic and dermatologic surgery.

  3. The effect of porosity gradient in a Nickel/Yttria Stabilized Zirconia anode for an anode-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Chung Min; Sammes, Nigel [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Song, Jung-Hoon [RIST, Pohang (Korea); Kang, Inyong [Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, a graded Ni/YSZ cermet anode, an 8 mol.%YSZ electrolyte, and a lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode were used to fabricate a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) unit. An anode-supported cell was prepared using a tape casting technique followed by hot pressing lamination and a single step co-firing process, allowing for the creation of a thin layer of dense electrolyte on a porous anode support. To reduce activation and concentration overpotential in the unit cell, a porosity gradient was developed in the anode using different percentages of pore former to a number of different tape-slurries, followed by tape casting and lamination of the tapes. The unit cell demonstrated that a concentration distribution of porosity in the anode increases the power in the unit cell from 76 mW cm{sup -2} to 101 mW cm{sup -2} at 600 C in humidified hydrogen. Although the results have not been optimized for good performance, the effect of the porosity gradient is quite apparent and has potential in developing superior anode systems. (author)

  4. Supporting data of spatiotemporal proliferation of human stromal cells adjusts to nutrient availability and leads to stanniocalcin-1 expression in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Higuera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article contains seven figures and two tables supporting the research article entitled: spatiotemporal proliferation of human stromal cells adjusts to nutrient availability and leads to stanniocalcin-1 expression in vitro and in vivo [1]. The data explain the culture of stromal cells in vitro in three culture systems: discs, scaffolds and scaffolds in a perfusion bioreactor system. Also, quantification of extracellular matrix components (ECM in vitro and staining of ECM components in vivo can be found here. Finally the quantification of blood vessels dimensions from CD31 signals and representative histograms of stanniocalcin-1 fluorescent signals in negative controls and experimental conditions in vivo are presented.

  5. Electrochemical corrosion studies of carbon supports and electrocatalysts and their effects on the durability of low-temperature PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlapalli, Madhusudhana R.

    Performance of a PEM fuel cell relies heavily on the durability of the platinum and platinum-alloy based electrocatalysts supported on carbon blacks. Carbon corrosion has been widely accepted as an important issue affecting the degradation of the catalytic layer in PEMFCs. Traditional carbon blacks used in today's fuel cell industry are not tailored to suit the corrosive conditions encountered in PEMFCs. Advanced carbon supports should have excellent electrochemical corrosion resistance, good conductivity, high surface area and optimum hydrophilic properties. The principal objective of this work is to investigate the corrosive behavior of carbon blacks and electrocatalysts supported on such carbon blacks in conditions that are typical for fuel cells. Physical and chemical changes during oxidation of these carbon blacks have been reviewed along with methodology for studying their corrosion in a low-temperature fuel cell environment. This study provides an ex-situ corrosion measurement protocol and a gas diffusion electrode half-cell setup to study the electrochemical oxidation resistance behavior of standard carbon blacks, modified carbon blacks, and advanced carbon supports in acid electrolyte at 25°C. Corrosion current-time relationships were evaluated and transient mode of corrosion study was employed to simulate automobile startup/shutdown. The effects of various surface modifications on carbon corrosion behavior have been studied in detail. The aggravated corrosion of carbon supports at potentials higher than the thermodynamic stable regime of water was investigated and a mechanism is proposed to address the same. The role of the metal phase on carbon corrosion at the catalyst-support interphase has also been investigated. The corrosion current dependence on the microstructure and nature of surface groups present on these carbons was examined. Further, measuring carbon corrosion effects on the durability of a single membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) cathode

  6. Influence of temperature and atmosphere on the strength and elastic modulus of solid oxide fuel cell anode supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, De Wei; Charlas, Benoit; Kwok, Kawai;

    2016-01-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells are subjected to significant stresses during production and operation. The various stress-generating conditions impose strength requirements on the cell components, and thus the mechanical properties of the critical load bearing materials at relevant operational conditions ...

  7. TP53 supports basal-like differentiation of mammary epithelial cells by preventing translocation of deltaNp63 into nucleoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munne, Pauliina M.; Gu, Yuexi; Tumiati, Manuela; Gao, Ping; Koopal, Sonja; Uusivirta, Sanna; Sawicki, Janet; Wei, Gong-Hong; Kuznetsov, Sergey G.

    2014-04-01

    Multiple observations suggest a cell type-specific role for TP53 in mammary epithelia. We developed an in vitro assay, in which primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (mMECs) progressed from lumenal to basal-like phenotypes based on expression of Krt18 or ΔNp63, respectively. Such transition was markedly delayed in Trp53-/- mMECs suggesting that Trp53 is required for specification of the basal, but not lumenal cells. Evidence from human basal-like cell lines suggests that TP53 may support the activity of ΔNp63 by preventing its translocation from nucleoplasm into nucleoli. In human lumenal cells, activation of TP53 by inhibiting MDM2 or BRCA1 restored the nucleoplasmic expression of ΔNp63. Trp53-/- mMECs eventually lost epithelial features resulting in upregulation of MDM2 and translocation of ΔNp63 into nucleoli. We propose that TP63 may contribute to TP53-mediated oncogenic transformation of epithelial cells and shed light on tissue- and cell type-specific biases observed for TP53-related cancers.

  8. SF20/IL-25, a novel bone marrow stroma-derived growth factor that binds to mouse thymic shared antigen-1 and supports lymphoid cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulin, E E; Onoda, N; Nakata, Y; Maeda, M; Hasegawa, M; Nomura, H; Kitamura, T

    2001-12-01

    Using a forward genetic approach and phenotype-based complementation screening to search for factors that stimulate cell proliferation, we have isolated a novel secreted bone marrow stroma-derived growth factor, which we termed SF20/IL-25. This protein signals cells to proliferate via its receptor, which we have identified as mouse thymic shared Ag-1 (TSA-1). Enforced expression of TSA-1 in IL-3-dependent Ba/F3 cells that do not express endogenous TSA-1 rendered cells to proliferate in a dose-dependent manner when stimulated with SF20/IL-25. FDCP2, a factor-dependent hemopoietic cell line that expresses endogenous TSA-1, could also be stimulated to proliferate with SF20/IL-25. Binding of SF20 to TSA-1 was blocked by anti-TSA-1 Ab and SF20-induced proliferation of TSA-1-expressing cells was inhibited by anti-TSA-1. In vitro assay revealed that SF20/IL-25 has no detectable myelopoietic activity but supports proliferation of cells in the lymphoid lineage.

  9. T-cell-rich large B-cell lymphoma. A study of 30 cases, supporting its histologic heterogeneity and lack of clinical distinctiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, J; Wallberg, K; Frizzera, G

    1994-05-01

    To determine whether correlations existed between morphologic and immunophenotypic findings and clinical characteristics, 30 cases of T-cell-rich large B-cell lymphomas (TBL) were evaluated by histopathology, immunostaining, and polymerase chain reaction on paraffin-embedded material. All were characterized by a polymorphic cell composition, including a variable mixture of small and large lymphoid cells and reactive cell. Most cases (87%) fitted into one of three main histologic types of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (diffuse, mixed cell; diffuse, large cell; follicular and diffuse, mixed cell), and one group of eight cases had the prototypic features described by Ramsay et al. (17). All cases showed a component of large CD20(L26)+ MB2+ B cells in a predominant back-ground of reactive T cells (> 50% of the total lymphoid forms). Clonality was demonstrated by light chain restriction in 67% of cases and by rearrangement of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene and bcl-2 gene in 64% and 28% of cases, respectively. The patients were predominantly men (70%), ages 18-83 years (median of 62.5), and were initially seen predominantly with nodal disease (and extranodal involvement in 20%) at advanced stages (III-IV: 77%). Treatment was mostly aggressive chemotherapy, and the outcomes were favorable (84% alive and well). These features are not distinctive as compared with those of typical large-cell lymphoma, nor did subgroups within the series (prototypic cases versus others; cases with less [ 70%] T-cell infiltration) significantly differ in clinical presentation or outcome. Thus, this study confirms that TBL, while useful as a diagnostic variant to be distinguished from both peripheral T-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease, is a heterogeneous assortment of diverse histopathologic categories rather than a clinicopathologic entity. The term "T-cell rich" might, however, be usefully retained as a morphologic specification to be added to recognized histologic categories of lymphoma.

  10. The oncogenic fusion protein RUNX1-CBFA2T1 supports proliferation and inhibits senescence in t(8;21-positive leukaemic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordheim Alfred

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fusion protein RUNX1-CBFA2T1 associated with t(8;21-positive acute myeloid leukaemia is a potent inhibitor of haematopoetic differentiation. The role of RUNX1-CBFA2T1 in leukaemic cell proliferation is less clear. We examined the consequences of siRNA-mediated RUNX1-CBFA2T1 depletion regarding proliferation and clonogenicity of t(8;21-positive cell lines. Methods The t(8;21-positive cell line Kasumi-1 was electroporated with RUNX1-CBFA2T1 or control siRNAs followed by analysis of proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and senescence. Results Electroporation of Kasumi-1 cells with RUNX1-CBFA2T1 siRNAs, but not with control siRNAs, resulted in RUNX1-CBFA2T1 suppression which lasted for at least 5 days. A single electroporation with RUNX1-CBFA2T1 siRNA severely diminished the clonogenicity of Kasumi-1 cells. Prolonged RUNX1-CBFA2T1 depletion inhibited proliferation in suspension culture and G1-S transition during the cell cycle, diminished the number of apoptotic cells, but induced cellular senescence. The addition of haematopoetic growth factors could not rescue RUNX1-CBFA2T1-depleted cells from senescence, and could only partially restore their clonogenicity. Conclusions RUNX1-CBFA2T1 supports the proliferation and expansion of t(8;21-positive leukaemic cells by preventing cellular senescence. These findings suggest a central role of RUNX1-CBFA2T1 in the maintenance of the leukaemia. Therefore, RUNX1-CBFA2T1 is a promising and leukaemia-specific target for molecularly defined therapeutic approaches.

  11. Production of high-performance and improved-durability Pt-catalyst /support for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells with pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting-Wei; Qayyum, Hamza; Lin, Guan-Ren; Chen, Szu-yuan; Tseng, Chung-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Pulsed laser deposition in Ar atmosphere is used to deposit Pt nanoparticles onto gas diffusion layer, and its application to proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell is optimized and characterized. When used at anode side, with a Pt loading of 17 μg cm-2 the fuel-cell current density at 0.6 V reaches 1.08 A cm-2, which is close to that of a cell with the anode made by conventional slurry process using E-TEK Pt /C of 200 μg cm-2 Pt loading. The usage of Pt is decreased by 12 fold. Such a low usage of Pt prepared by pulsed laser deposition can be ascribed to the prevention of forming isolated regions that occurs with Pt /C slurry, good dispersion of Pt particles on support, and small particle sizes of 2-3 nm. Furthermore, using accelerated degradation test, it is found that the pulsed laser deposition sample retains 60% of its initial electrochemical surface area after 5000 potential cycles, much higher than that with E-TEK Pt /C, which retains only 7% of its initial electrochemical surface area. The higher electrochemical durability can be attributed to the higher degree of graphitization in the gas diffusion layer used as compared with the carbon black in E-TEK Pt /C, which leads to stronger binding of the Pt nanoparticles onto the carbon support and stronger corrosion resistance of the carbon support.

  12. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis supports Th17 differentiation and limits de novo regulatory T cell induction by directly interfering with T cell receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasztoi, Maria; Bonifacius, Agnes; Pezoldt, Joern; Kulkarni, Devesha; Niemz, Jana; Yang, Juhao; Teich, René; Hajek, Janina; Pisano, Fabio; Rohde, Manfred; Dersch, Petra; Huehn, Jochen

    2017-04-04

    Adaptive immunity critically contributes to control acute infection with enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis; however, the role of CD4(+) T cell subsets in establishing infection and allowing pathogen persistence remains elusive. Here, we assessed the modulatory capacity of Y. pseudotuberculosis on CD4(+) T cell differentiation. Using in vivo assays, we report that infection with Y. pseudotuberculosis resulted in enhanced priming of IL-17-producing T cells (Th17 cells), whereas induction of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) was severely disrupted in gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs), in line with altered frequencies of tolerogenic and proinflammatory dendritic cell (DC) subsets within mLNs. Additionally, by using a DC-free in vitro system, we could demonstrate that Y. pseudotuberculosis can directly modulate T cell receptor (TCR) downstream signaling within naïve CD4(+) T cells and Tregs via injection of effector molecules through the type III secretion system, thereby affecting their functional properties. Importantly, modulation of naïve CD4(+) T cells by Y. pseudotuberculosis resulted in an enhanced Th17 differentiation and decreased induction of Foxp3(+) Tregs in vitro. These findings shed light to the adjustment of the Th17-Treg axis in response to acute Y. pseudotuberculosis infection and highlight the direct modulation of CD4(+) T cell subsets by altering their TCR downstream signaling.

  13. A chimeric vitronectin: IGF-I protein supports feeder-cell-free and serum-free culture of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manton, Kerry J; Richards, Sean; Van Lonkhuyzen, Derek; Cormack, Luke; Leavesley, David; Upton, Zee

    2010-09-01

    The therapeutic use of human embryonic stem (hES) cells is severely limited by safety concerns regarding their culture in media containing animal-derived or nondefined factors and on animal-derived feeder cells. Thus, there is a pressing need to develop culture techniques that are xeno-free, fully defined, and synthetic. Our laboratory has discovered that insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and vitronectin (VN) bind to each other resulting in synergistic short-term functional effects in several cell types, including keratinocytes and breast epithelial cells. We have further refined this complex into a single chimeric VN:IGF-I protein that functionally mimics the effects obtained upon binding of IGF-I to VN. The aim of the current study was to determine whether hES cells can be serially propagated in feeder-cell-free and serum-free conditions using medium containing our novel chimeric VN:IGF-I protein. Here we demonstrate that hES cells can be serially propagated and retain their undifferentiated state in vitro for up to 35 passages in our feeder-cell-free, serum-free, chemically defined media. We have utilized real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunofluorescence, and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis to show that the hES cells have maintained an undifferentiated phenotype. In vitro differentiation assays demonstrated that the hES cells retain their pluripotent potential and the karyotype of the hES cells remains unchanged. This study demonstrates that the novel, fully defined, synthetic VN:IGF-I chimera-containing medium described herein is a viable alternative to media containing serum, and that in conjunction with laminin-coated plates facilitates feeder-cell-free and serum-free growth of hES.

  14. A novel signaling pathway associated with Lyn, PI 3-kinase and Akt supports the proliferation of myeloma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Mohd S. [Department of Bio-Signal Analysis, Applied Medical Engineering Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Enteric and Food Microbiology Laboratory, Laboratory Sciences Division, International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, P.O. Box 128, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Tsuyama, Naohiro [Department of Analytical Molecular Medicine and Devices, Division of Frontier Medical Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Obata, Masanori [Department of Bio-Signal Analysis, Applied Medical Engineering Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Ishikawa, Hideaki, E-mail: hishika@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Bio-Signal Analysis, Applied Medical Engineering Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a growth factor for human myeloma cells. We have recently found that in myeloma cells the activation of both signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 is not sufficient for the IL-6-induced proliferation, which further requires the activation of the src family kinases, such as Lyn. Here we showed that the Lyn-overexpressed myeloma cell lines had the higher proliferative rate with IL-6 and the enhanced activation of the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and Akt. The IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 was not up-regulated in the Lyn-overexpressed cells, indicating that the Lyn-PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway is independent of these pathways. The PI 3-kinase was co-precipitated with Lyn in the Lyn-overexpressed cells of which proliferation with IL-6 was abrogated by the specific inhibitors for PI 3-kinase or Akt, suggesting that the activation of the PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway associated with Lyn is indeed related to the concomitant augmentation of myeloma cell growth. Furthermore, the decreased expression of p53 and p21{sup Cip1} proteins was observed in the Lyn-overexpressed cells, implicating a possible downstream target of Akt. This study identifies a novel IL-6-mediated signaling pathway that certainly plays a role in the proliferation of myeloma cells and this novel mechanism of MM tumor cell growth associated with Lyn would eventually contribute to the development of MM treatment.

  15. Mitomycin C, 5-fluoruracil, colchicine and etoposide tested in the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test (MNvit) in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 at Novartis in support of OECD draft Test Guideline 487.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhajouji, Azeddine

    2010-10-29

    The following reference genotoxic agents were tested in the in vitro micronucleus test, at Novartis, Basel, Switzerland. Mitomycin C, 5-fluoruracil, colchicine and etoposide were tested in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6, with and without cytokinesis block (in the presence of cytochalasin B). This was done in support of the toxicity measures recommended in the draft OECD Test Guideline on In Vitro Mammalian Cell Micronucleus Test (MNvit) and was part of an international collaborative work. As toxicity measures, detecting cytostasis and cell death, relative cell counts (RCC), relative increase in cell counts (RICC), and relative population doubling (RPD) were used for treatments in the absence of cytokinesis block, and replication index (RI) or cytokinesis-blocked proliferation in the presence of cytokinesis block. All four reference agents were positive in the assay with and without cytokinesis block at concentrations giving approximately 50% toxicity or less as assessed by all of the toxicity measures used. Accordingly, the results of this work support the use of relative population doubling and relative increase in cell counts, as well as relative cell counts, as appropriate measures of toxicity for the non-cytokinesis-blocked in vitro micronucleus assay.

  16. Metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells with impregnated SrFe0.75Mo0.25O3 cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yucun; Meng, Xie; Ye, Xiaofeng; Li, Junliang; Wang, Shaorong; Zhan, Zhongliang

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication in reducing atmospheres of SrFe0.75Mo0.25O3 (SFMO)-8 mol%Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) composites by impregnating Sr2+-, Fe3+- and Mo7O246--containing solutions into the porous YSZ backbones, which would find important applications as cathodes for co-fired metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells. X-ray diffraction examination shows that as-synthesized infiltrates consist of perovskite SFMO oxides and metallic Fe. In situ oxidation during the fuel cell operation eliminates metallic Fe, and SFMO oxides become the predominant component with some minor SrMoO4 impurities. Impedance measurements on symmetric cathode fuel cells show that such impregnated SFMO-YSZ composites exhibit low polarization resistances in air, e.g., 0.06 Ω cm2 at 800 °C. Metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells, consisting of porous 430L stainless steel substrates, Ni-YSZ active anodes, YSZ electrolytes and impregnated SFMO-YSZ composite cathodes, are fabricated using tape casting, tape lamination, co-sintering and solution impregnation techniques, and show maximum power densities of 438 mW cm-2 at 800 °C and 221 mW cm-2 at 700 °C.

  17. Anionic polymers and 10 nm Fe₃O₄@UA wound dressings support human foetal stem cells normal development and exhibit great antimicrobial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Lazar, Veronica; Andrei, Eugen; Constantinescu, Andrei; Maniu, Horia

    2014-03-25

    The aims of this study were the development, characterization and bioevaluation of a novel biocompatible, resorbable and bio-active wound dressing prototype, based on anionic polymers (sodium alginate--AlgNa, carboximethylcellulose--CMC) and magnetic nanoparticles loaded with usnic acid (Fe₃O₄@UA). The antimicrobial activity was tested against Staphylococcus aureus grown in biofilms. The biocompatibility testing model included an endothelial cell line from human umbilical vein and human foetal progenitor cells derived from the amniotic fluid, that express a wide spectrum of surface molecules involved in different vascular functions and inflammatory response, and may be used as skin regenerative support. The obtained results demonstrated that CMC/Fe₃O₄@UA and AlgNa/Fe₃O₄@UA are exhibiting structural and functional properties that recommend them for further applications in the biomedical field. They could be used alone or coated with different bio-active compounds, such as Fe₃O₄@UA, for the development of novel, multifunctional porous materials used in tissues regeneration, as antimicrobial substances releasing devices, providing also a mechanical support for the eukaryotic cells adhesion, and exhibiting the advantage of low cytotoxicity on human progenitor cells. The great antimicrobial properties exhibited by the newly synthesized nano-bioactive coatings are recommending them as successful candidates for improving the implanted devices surfaces used in regenerative medicine.

  18. Modeling of Membrane-Electrode-Assembly Degradation in Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cells - Local H2 Starvation and Start-Stop Induced Carbon-Support Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenbin; Yu, Paul T.; Carter, Robert N.; Makharia, Rohit; Gasteiger, Hubert A.

    Carbon-support corrosion causes electrode structure damage and thus electrode degradation. This chapter discusses fundamental models developed to predict cathode carbon-support corrosion induced by local H2 starvation and start-stop in a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Kinetic models based on the balance of current among the various electrode reactions are illustrative, yielding much insight on the origin of carbon corrosion and its implications for future materials developments. They are particularly useful in assessing carbon corrosion rates at a quasi-steady-state when an H2-rich region serves as a power source that drives an H2-free region as a load. Coupled kinetic and transport models are essential in predicting when local H2 starvation occurs and how it affects the carbon corrosion rate. They are specifically needed to estimate length scales at which H2 will be depleted and time scales that are valuable for developing mitigation strategies. To predict carbon-support loss distributions over an entire active area, incorporating the electrode pseudo-capacitance appears necessary for situations with shorter residence times such as start-stop events. As carbon-support corrosion is observed under normal transient operations, further model improvement shall be focused on finding the carbon corrosion kinetics associated with voltage cycling and incorporating mechanisms that can quantify voltage decay with carbon-support loss.

  19. Primitive stem cells derived from bone marrow express glial and neuronal markers and support revascularization in injured retina exposed to ischemic and mechanical damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Avraham-Lubin, Bat-Chen R; Sadikov, Tamilla; Goldstein, Ronald S; Askenasy, Nadir

    2012-06-10

    Ischemic or mechanical injury to the optic nerve is an irreversible cause of vision loss, associated with limited regeneration and poor response to neuroprotective agents. The aim of this study was to assess the capacity of adult bone marrow cells to participate in retinal regeneration following the induction of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and optic nerve crush (ONC) in a rodent model. The small-sized subset of cells isolated by elutriation and lineage depletion (Fr25lin(-)) was found to be negative for the neuroglial markers nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Syngeneic donor cells, identified by genomic marker in sex-mismatched transplants and green fluorescent protein, incorporated into the injured retina (AION and ONC) at a frequency of 0.35%-0.45% after intravenous infusion and 1.8%-2% after intravitreous implantation. Perivascular cells with astrocytic morphology expressing GFAP and vimentin were of the predominant lineage that engrafted after AION injury; 10%-18% of the donor cells incorporated in the retinal ganglion cell layer and expressed NeuN, Thy-1, neurofilament, and beta-tubulin III. The Fr25lin(-) cells displayed an excellent capacity to migrate to sites of tissue disruption and developed coordinated site-specific morphological and phenotypic neural and glial markers. In addition to cellular reconstitution of the injured retinal layers, these cells contributed to endothelial revascularization and apparently supported remodeling by secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1. These results suggest that elutriated autologous adult bone marrow-derived stem cells may serve as an accessible source for cellular reconstitution of the retina following injury.

  20. Assessment of the performance of Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes in anode-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells operating on H 2-CO syngas fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiao-Feng; Wang, S. R.; Zhou, J.; Zeng, F. R.; Nie, H. W.; Wen, T. L.

    Anode-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) with Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode have been fabricated and studied using H 2-CO syngas fuels. Syngas fuels with different compositions of H 2-CO are supplied and the cell performance is measured at 750 °C. A high CO content has caused carbon deposition and crack formation in the Ni-YSZ anode after long-term operation, even though it is diluted with H 2O and N 2. However, it was found that a Cu-CeO 2 coating on Ni-YSZ can greatly improve the anode stability in syngas by facilitating the water gas shift reaction. The optimized single cell has run in sygas with a composition of 65%H 2-32%CO-3%H 2O for 1050 h without obvious degradation of its performance.

  1. High performance anode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells fabricated by a novel slurry-casting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Nan-Qi; Yan, Dong; Chi, Bo; Pu, Jian; Jian, Li

    2015-02-01

    Tubular solid oxide fuel cells were fabricated and evaluated for their microstructure and electrochemical performance. The tubular substrate was prepared by casting NiO-Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) slurry on the inner wall of a plastic mold (tube). The wall thickness and uniformity were controlled by slurry viscosity and rotation speed of the tube. The cells consisted of Ni-YSZ functional anode, YSZ electrolyte and (La0.8Sr0.2)0.95MnO3-δ (LSM)-YSZ cathode prepared in sequence on the substrate by dip-coating and sintering. Their dimension was 50 mm in length, 0.8 mm in thickness and 10.5 mm in outside diameter. The peak power density of the cell at temperatures between 650 and 850°C was in the range from 85 to 522 mW cm-2 and was greatly enhanced to the range from 308 to 1220 mW cm-2 by impregnating PdO into LSM-YSZ cathode. During a cell testing at 0.7 A cm-2 and 750°C for 282 h, the impregnated PdO particles grew by coalescence, which increased the cathode polarization resistance and so that decreased the cell performance. According to the degradation tendency, the cell performance will be stabilized in a longer run.

  2. NASA-approved rotary bioreactor enhances proliferation of human epidermal stem cells and supports formation of 3D epidermis-like structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hua Lei

    Full Text Available The skin is susceptible to different injuries and diseases. One major obstacle in skin tissue engineering is how to develop functional three-dimensional (3D substitute for damaged skin. Previous studies have proved a 3D dynamic simulated microgravity (SMG culture system as a "stimulatory" environment for the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. Here, we employed the NASA-approved rotary bioreactor to investigate the proliferation and differentiation of human epidermal stem cells (hEpSCs. hEpSCs were isolated from children foreskins and enriched by collecting epidermal stem cell colonies. Cytodex-3 micro-carriers and hEpSCs were co-cultured in the rotary bioreactor and 6-well dish for 15 days. The result showed that hEpSCs cultured in rotary bioreactor exhibited enhanced proliferation and viability surpassing those cultured in static conditions. Additionally, immunostaining analysis confirmed higher percentage of ki67 positive cells in rotary bioreactor compared with the static culture. In contrast, comparing with static culture, cells in the rotary bioreactor displayed a low expression of involucrin at day 10. Histological analysis revealed that cells cultured in rotary bioreactor aggregated on the micro-carriers and formed multilayer 3D epidermis structures. In conclusion, our research suggests that NASA-approved rotary bioreactor can support the proliferation of hEpSCs and provide a strategy to form multilayer epidermis structure.

  3. A long-term degradation study of power generation characteristics of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells using LaNi(Fe)O{sub 3} electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Takeshi; Watanabe, Kimitaka; Arakawa, Masayasu; Arai, Hajime [NTT Corporation, NTT Energy and Environment Systems Laboratories, Morinosato-Wakamiya 3-1, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2009-09-05

    The long-term operation of an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell was examined to study the degradation factor. The cell was constructed using LaNi{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LNF), alumina-doped scandia stabilized zirconia (SASZ), and NiO-SASZ as the cathode, electrolyte, and anode respectively. The cell had Pt current collectors and was operated for 6500 h. The test was carried out at 1073 K with a constant load of 0.4 A cm{sup -2} and included thermal cycling. The cell voltage degradation rate was below 0.86%/1000 h when the cell was operated for up to 5200 h. Changes in the resistance of the cells during the experiments were analyzed by impedance spectroscopy. The cathode polarization resistance and ohmic resistance increased with time. The elements (Si and B) contained in the water condensed from the cathode exhaust gas were identified using inductively coupled plasma (ICP). (author)

  4. Data supporting the role of electric field and electrode material on the improvement of the ageing effects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuto, Andrea; Valenti, Luca; Pierro, Silvio; Foti, Marina; Gerardi, Cosimo; Battaglia, Anna; Lombardo, Salvatore

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) solar cells are strongly affected by the well known Staebler-Wronski effect. This is a worsening of solar cell performances under light soaking which results in a substantial loss of cell power conversion efficiency compared to time zero performance. It is believed not to be an extrinsic effect, but rather a basic phenomenon related to the nature of a-Si:H and to the stability and motion of H-related species in the a-Si:H lattice. This work has been designed in support of the research article entitled "Role of electric field and electrode material on the improvement of the ageing effects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells" in Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells (Scuto et al. [1]), which discusses an electrical method based on reverse bias stress to improve the solar cell parameters, and in particular the effect of temperature, electric field intensity and illumination level as a function of the stress time. Here we provide a further set of the obtained experimental data results.

  5. Durability of Carbon Nanofiber (CNF) & Carbon Nanotube (CNT) as Catalyst Support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Borghei, Maryam; Lund, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    gravimetric analysis (TGA), cyclic voltammetry (CV), polarization curve and impedance spectroscopy were applied on the samples under accelerated stress conditions. The carbon nano-materials demonstrated better stability as support for nano-sized platinum catalyst under PEMFC related operating conditions. Due...

  6. Development and manufacturing of tape casted, anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells; Entwicklung und Herstellung von foliengegossenen, anodengestuetzten Festoxidbrennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafbauer, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells offer high potential in transforming the chemical energy of hydrogen or natural gas into electrical energy. Due to the high efficiency of fuel cells, lots of effort has been made in the improvement of net efficiency and in materials development during the last years. Recently, the introduction of high performance, low-cost production technologies become more and more important. At the Institute of Energy Research IEF-1 of Forschungszentrum Julich, standard SOFCs were processed by time and work consuming methods. On the way to market entrance, product costs have to be reduced drastically. The aim of this thesis is the introduction of a high efficient low-cost processing route for the SOFC manufacturing. Therefore, the well-known and well established shaping technology tape casting was used for generating the anode substrates. As the first goal of this approach, two different tape casting slurries were developed in order to get substrates in the thickness range from 300 to 500 {mu}m after sintering. After shaping of the substrates, sinter regimes for the different necessary coatings were adapted to the novel substrate types in order to obtain cells with high performance and strength. Therefore, the different coating technologies like screen printing and vacuum slip casting were used for cell manufacturing. The optimization of the different coating steps during cell manufacturing led to high performance SOFCs with a 10% higher power output compared to the Julich state-of-the-art SOFC. Additional experiments verified the workability of the novel tape cast substrates for the manufacturing of near-net-shape SOFC. Finally, the novel cell types based on tape cast substrates were assembled to stacks with up to ten repeating units. Stack tests showed identical performance and degradation compared to stacks containing state-of-the-art SOFCs. Thus, the complete lifetime circle of a SOFC starting from powder preparation to stack assembly has been

  7. The cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12 supports cell adhesion through syndecans and triggers signaling events that lead to beta1 integrin-dependent cell spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, K; Albrechtsen, R; Gilpin, B;

    2000-01-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of proteins is involved in a variety of cellular interactions, including cell adhesion and ecto- domain shedding. Here we show that ADAM 12 binds to cell surface syndecans. Three forms of recombinant ADAM 12 were used in these experiments: the ...

  8. Characterization of 430L porous supports obtained by powder extrusion moulding for their application in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotomayor, María Eugenia, E-mail: msotomay@ing.uc3m.es; Ospina, Liliana María, E-mail: lilianaospinazuluaga@hotmail.com; Levenfeld, Belén, E-mail: bll@ing.uc3m.es; Várez, Alejandro, E-mail: alvar@ing.uc3m.es

    2013-12-15

    The characterization of 430L stainless steel planar porous supports obtained by powder extrusion moulding was performed in this work. A thermoplastic multicomponent binder based on high density polyethylene and paraffin wax was selected for the process. Green supports were shaped by extrusion moulding, and subsequently the binder was removed by a thermal cycle previously optimized. Sintering was carried out at different temperatures in low vacuum. Density of sintered parts was measured by Archimedes' method and porosity was also evaluated through a microstructural analysis by optical microscopy. The porosity degree of samples sintered at low temperature was close to 35% which is a very suitable value for their application in SOFCs. Tensile tests were carried out in order to determine mechanical strength as a function of porosity degree. Based on these results, the best feedstock composition and processing parameters were selected. The oxidation behaviour in static air at high temperature was studied, and formed oxides were characterized in a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays. X-ray diffraction experiments were performed in order to identify the formed oxides based on formula Fe{sub 2−x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3}. The results of these studies showed that this kind of ferritic stainless steel would be more suitable to be used as anodic supports where a rich hydrogen atmosphere is employed. Preliminary deposition tests allowed obtaining a homogeneous Ni–YSZ anode layer with a thickness of 10 μm on the porous metallic substrates. - Highlights: • 430L stainless steel porous supports were obtained by powder extrusion moulding. • Porosity degree was controlled sintering at different temperatures in low vacuum. • Tensile tests allowed determining mechanical strength of porous supports. • A study about its oxidation behaviour in static air at high temperature was realized. • After oxidation, formed oxides were

  9. On the role of reactant transport and (surface) alloy formation for the CO tolerance of carbon supported PtRu polymer electrolyte fuel cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, J.; Colmenares, L.; Jusys, Z.; Behm, R.J. [Abt. Oberflaechenchemie und Katalyse, Universitaet Ulm (Germany); Moertel, R.; Boennemann, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim a.d. Ruhr (Germany); Koehl, G.; Modrow, H.; Hormes, J. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    The role of atomic scale intermixing for the electrocatalytic activity of bimetallic PtRu anode catalysts in reformate operated polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) was investigated, exploiting the specific properties of colloid based catalyst synthesis for the selective preparation of alloyed and non-alloyed bimetallic catalysts. Three different carbon supported PtRu catalysts with different degrees of Pt and Ru intermixing, consisting of (i) carbon supported PtRu alloy particles (PtRu/C), (ii) Pt and Ru particles co-deposited on the same carbon support (Pt+Ru/C), and (iii) a mixture of carbon supported Pt and carbon supported Ru (Pt/C+Ru/C) as well as the respective monometallic Pt/C and Ru/C catalysts were prepared and characterized by electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and CO stripping. Their performance as PEFC anode catalysts was evaluated by oxidation of a H{sub 2}/2%CO gas mixture (simulated reformate) under fuel cell relevant conditions (elevated temperature, continuous reaction and controlled reactant transport) in a rotating disk electrode (RDE) set-up. The CO tolerance and H{sub 2} oxidation activity of the three catalysts is comparable and distinctly different from that of the monometallic catalysts. The results indicate significant transport of the reactants, CO{sub ad} and/or OH{sub ad}, between Pt and Ru surface areas and particles for all three catalysts, with only subtle differences from the alloy catalyst to the physical mixture. The high activity and CO tolerance of the bimetallic catalysts, through the formation of bimetallic surfaces, is explained, e.g., by contact formation in nanoparticle agglomerates or by material transport and subsequent surface decoration/surface alloy formation during catalyst preparation, conditioning, and operation. The instability and mobility of the catalysts under these conditions closely resembles concepts in gas phase catalysis. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species Limit the Ability of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Support Hematopoietic Reconstitution in Aging Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Rahul; Krishnan, Shyam; Roy, Sushmita; Chattopadhyay, Saborni; Kumar, Vikash

    2016-01-01

    Aging of organ and abnormal tissue regeneration are recurrent problems in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. This is most crucial in case of high-turnover tissues, like bone marrow (BM). Using reciprocal transplantation experiments in mouse, we have shown that self-renewal potential of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and BM cellularity are markedly influenced with the age of the recipient mice rather than donor mice. Moreover, accumulation of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) in BM stromal cells compared to HSPC compartment, in time-dependent manner, suggests that oxidative stress is involved in suppression of BM cellularity by affecting microenvironment in aged mice. Treatment of these mice with a polyphenolic antioxidant curcumin is found to partially quench ROS, thereby rescues stromal cells from oxidative stress-dependent cellular injury. This rejuvenation of stromal cells significantly improves hematopoietic reconstitution in 18-month-old mice compared to age control mice. In conclusion, this study implicates the role of ROS in perturbation of stromal cell function upon aging, which in turn affects BM's reconstitution ability in aged mice. Thus, a rejuvenation therapy using curcumin, before HSPC transplantation, is found to be an efficient strategy for successful marrow reconstitution in older mice. PMID:27140293

  11. Use of Pistacia terebinthus resin as immobilization support for Lactobacillus casei cells and application in selected dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoina, Vasiliki; Terpou, Antonia; Angelika-Ioanna, Gialleli; Koutinas, Athanasios; Kanellaki, Maria; Bosnea, Loulouda

    2015-09-01

    Resin from Pistacia terebinthus tree was used for the immobilization of L. casei ATCC 393 cells. The encapsulated L. casei cells biocatalysts were added as adjuncts during yogurt production at 45 °C and probiotic viability was assessed during storage at 4 °C. For comparison reasons yogurt with free L. casei cells were prepared. The effect of encapsulated bacteria as adjuncts in yogurt on pH, lactic acid, lactose and other physicochemical parameters were studied for 60 storage days at 4 °C. Samples were also tested for the microbiological and organoleptic characteristics during storage at 4 °C. Encapsulation matrix seems to sustain the viability of embedded L. casei cells at levels more than 7 logcfug(-1) after 60 days of storage at 4 °C. Furthermore, the absence of pathogens such as Salmonella, Staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae and coliforms in the produced yogurts is noteworthy where spoilage microorganisms such as yeasts and molds seem to affect yogurt quality only in absence of Pistacia terebinthus resin. The effect of the resin on production of aroma-related compounds responsible for yogurt flavor was also studied using the solid phase microextraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. Alpha and beta- pinene were the major aroma compounds detected in produced yogurts (over 60 % of total aromatic compounds detected). Yogurts with immobilized cells on P.terebintus resin had a fine aroma and taste characteristic of the resin.

  12. Stiffness of hyaluronic acid gels containing liver extracellular matrix supports human hepatocyte function and alters cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Daniel B; Zimmerman, Cynthia; Skardal, Aleksander; Atala, Anthony; Shupe, Thomas D

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineering and cell based liver therapies have utilized primary hepatocytes with limited success due to the failure of hepatocytes to maintain their phenotype in vitro. In order to overcome this challenge, hyaluronic acid (HA) cell culture substrates were formulated to closely mimic the composition and stiffness of the normal liver cellular microenvironment. The stiffness of the substrate was modulated by adjusting HA hydrogel crosslinking. Additionally, the repertoire of bioactive molecules within the HA substrate was bolstered by supplementation with normal liver extracellular matrix (ECM). Primary human hepatocyte viability and phenotype were determined over a narrow physiologically relevant range of substrate stiffnesses from 600 to 4600Pa in both the presence and absence of liver ECM. Cell attachment, viability, and organization of the actin cytoskeleton improved with increased stiffness up to 4600Pa. These differences were not evident in earlier time points or substrates containing only HA. However, gene expression for the hepatocyte markers hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and albumin significantly decreased on the 4600Pa stiffness at day 7 indicating that cells may not have maintained their phenotype long-term at this stiffness. Function, as measured by albumin secretion, varied with both stiffness and time in culture and peaked at day 7 at the 1200Pa stiffness, slightly below the stiffness of normal liver ECM at 3000Pa. Overall, gel stiffness affected primary human hepatocyte cell adhesion, functional marker expression, and morphological characteristics dependent on both the presence of liver ECM in gel substrates and time in culture.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of dengue virus-specific responses supports an HLA-linked protective role for CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Daniela; Angelo, Michael A; de Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Sidney, John; Greenbaum, Jason A; Fernando, Anira N; Broadwater, Anne; Kolla, Ravi V; De Silva, Aruna D; de Silva, Aravinda M; Mattia, Kimberly A; Doranz, Benjamin J; Grey, Howard M; Shresta, Sujan; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-05-28

    The role of CD8(+) T cells in dengue virus infection and subsequent disease manifestations is not fully understood. According to the original antigenic sin theory, skewing of T-cell responses induced by primary infection with one serotype causes less effective response upon secondary infection with a different serotype, predisposing individuals to severe disease. A comprehensive analysis of CD8(+) responses in the general population from the Sri Lankan hyperendemic area, involving the measurement of ex vivo IFNγ responses associated with more than 400 epitopes, challenges the original antigenic sin theory. Although skewing of responses toward primary infecting viruses was detected, this was not associated with impairment of responses either qualitatively or quantitatively. Furthermore, we demonstrate higher magnitude and more polyfunctional responses for HLA alleles associated with decreased susceptibility to severe disease, suggesting that a vigorous response by multifunctional CD8(+) T cells is associated with protection from dengue virus disease.

  14. Support schemes and ownership structures - the policy context for fuel cell based micro-combined heat and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Sascha Thorsten; Costa, Ana; Obé, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, fuel cell based micro-combined heat and power (mCHP) has received increasing attention due to its potential contribution to European energy policy goals, i.e., sustainability, competitiveness and security of supply. Besides technical advances, regulatory framework and ownership s...... for fuel cell mCHP. This can be used for improved analysis of operational strategies. The interaction of this plethora of elements necessitates careful balancing from a private- and socio-economic point of view.......In recent years, fuel cell based micro-combined heat and power (mCHP) has received increasing attention due to its potential contribution to European energy policy goals, i.e., sustainability, competitiveness and security of supply. Besides technical advances, regulatory framework and ownership...

  15. INCB16562, a JAK1/2 Selective Inhibitor, Is Efficacious against Multiple Myeloma Cells and Reverses the Protective Effects of Cytokine and Stromal Cell Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines in the bone marrow of multiple myeloma patients activate Janus kinase (JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT signaling pathways in tumor cells and promote tumor growth, survival, and drug resistance. INCB16562 was developed as a novel, selective, and orally bioavailable small-molecule inhibitor of JAK1 and JAK2 markedly selective over JAK3. The specific cellular activity of the inhibitor was demonstrated by its potent and dose-dependent inhibition of cytokine-dependent JAK/STAT signaling and cell proliferation in the absence of effects on Bcr-Abl-expressing cells. Treatment of myeloma cells with INCB16562 potently inhibited interleukin-6 (IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3. Moreover, the proliferation and survival of myeloma cells dependent on IL-6 for growth, as well as the IL-6-induced growth of primary bone marrow-derived plasma cells from a multiple myeloma patient, were inhibited by INCB16562. Induction of caspase activation and apoptosis was observed and attributed, at least in part, to the suppression of Mcl-1 expression. Importantly, INCB16562 abrogated the protective effects of recombinant cytokines or bone marrow stromal cells and sensitized myeloma cells to cell death by exposure to dexamethasone, melphalan, or bortezomib. Oral administration of INCB16562 antagonized the growth of myeloma xenografts in mice and enhanced the antitumor activity of relevant agents in combination studies. Taken together, these data suggest that INCB16562 is a potent JAK1/2 inhibitor and that mitigation of JAK/STAT signaling by targeting JAK1 and JAK2 will be beneficial in the treatment of myeloma patients, particularly in combination with other agents.

  16. The retinol esterifying enzyme LRAT supports cell signaling by retinol-binding protein and its receptor STRA6

    OpenAIRE

    Marwarha, Gurdeep; Berry, Daniel C.; Croniger, Colleen M.; Noy, Noa

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin A, retinol, circulates in blood bound to retinol-binding protein (RBP). At some tissues, holo-RBP is recognized by a plasma membrane receptor termed STRA6, which serves a dual role: it mediates transport of retinol from RBP into cells, and it functions as a cytokine receptor that, on binding holo-RBP, activates JAK2/STAT5 signaling. As STAT target genes include SOCS3, an inhibitor of insulin receptor, holo-RBP suppresses insulin responses in STRA6-expressing cells. We have shown previ...

  17. Stainless steel mesh supported nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers for binder-free cathode in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuiliang; Chen, Yu; He, Guanghua; He, Shuijian; Schröder, Uwe; Hou, Haoqing

    2012-04-15

    In this communication, we report a binder-free oxygen reduction cathode for microbial fuel cells. The binder-free cathode is prepared by growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (NCNFs) on stainless steel mesh (SSM) via simple pyrolysis of pyridine. The interaction force between NCNFs and SSM surface is very strong which is able to tolerate water flush. The NCNFs/SSM cathode shows high and stable electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction, which is comparable to that of Pt/SSM and ferricyanide cathode. This study proposes a promising low-cost binder-free cathode for microbial fuel cells.

  18. Cyclophosphazene based conductive polymer-carbon nanotube composite as novel supporting material for methanol fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Dakshinamoorthy; Selvaraj, Vaithilingam

    2016-06-15

    This present study reports the development of novel catalyst support of amine terminated cyclophosphazene/cyclophosphazene/hexafluoroisopropylidenedianiline-carbon nanotube (ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT) composite. The ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT composite has been used as a catalyst support for platinum (Pt) and platinum-gold (Pt-Au) nanoparticles towards electrooxidation of methanol in alkaline medium. The obtained anode materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Electrocatalytic performances of Pt/ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT and Pt-Au/ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT catalysts were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping and chronoamperometric techniques. The electrooxidation of methanol and CO stripping results conclude that the metal nanocatalyst embedded with ATCP/CP/HFPA-CNT composite shows significantly higher anodic oxidation current, more CO tolerance and lower onset potential when compared to that of the Pt/CNT and Pt/C (Vulcan carbon) catalysts.

  19. Fast preparation of PtRu catalysts supported on carbon nanofibers by the microwave-polyol method and their application to fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Masaharu; Kubokawa, Masatoshi; Yano, Ryuto; Miyamae, Nobuhiro; Tsuji, Takeshi; Jun, Mun-Suk; Hong, Seonghwa; Lim, Seongyop; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Mochida, Isao

    2007-01-16

    PtRu alloy nanoparticles (24 +/- 1 wt %, Ru/Pt atomic ratios = 0.91-0.97) supported on carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were prepared within a few minutes by using a microwave-polyol method. Three types of CNFs with very different surface structures, such as platelet, herringbone, and tubular ones, were used as new carbon supports. The dependence of particles sizes and electrochemical properties on the structures of CNFs was examined. It was found that the methanol fuel cell activities of PtRu/CNF catalysts were in the order of platelet > tubular > herringbone. The methanol fuel cell activities of PtRu/CNFs measured at 60 degrees C were 1.7-3.0 times higher than that of a standard PtRu (29 wt %, Ru/Pt atomic ratio = 0.92) catalyst loaded on carbon black (Vulcan XC72R) support. The best electrocatalytic activity was obtained for the platelet CNF, which is characterized by its edge surface and high graphitization degree.

  20. Direct fabrication of metal-free hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure as efficient cathode catalysts of fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanqi; Liu, Mingda; Nie, Huagui; Gu, Cancan; Liu, Ming; Yang, Zhi; Yang, Keqin; Chen, Xi'an; Huang, Shaoming

    2016-06-01

    Despite the good progress in developing carbon catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the current metal-free carbon catalysts are still far from satisfactory for large-scale applications of fuel cell. Developing hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure is considered to be an ideal method to inhibit graphene stacking and improve their catalytic performance. Herein, we fabricated metal-free hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure, through using a new strategy that involves direct metal-free catalytic growth from assembly of SiO2 spheres. To our knowledge, although much researches involving the synthesis of graphene balls have been reported, investigations into the direct metal-free catalytic growth of hollow graphene balls are rare. Furthermore, the electrocatalytic performance shows that the resulting hollow graphene balls have significantly high catalytic activity. More importantly, such catalysts also possess much improved stability and better methanol tolerance in alkaline media during the ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalysts. The outstanding performances coupled with an easy and inexpensive preparing method indicated the great potential of the hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure in large-scale applications of fuel cell.

  1. Human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal stroma cells (hES-MSCs engraft in vivo and support hematopoiesis without suppressing immune function: implications for off-the shelf ES-MSC therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou Li

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stroma cells (MSCs have a high potential for novel cell therapy approaches in clinical transplantation. Commonly used bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs, however, have a restricted proliferative capacity and cultures are difficult to standardize. Recently developed human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal stroma cells (hES-MSCs might represent an alternative and unlimited source of hMSCs. We therefore compared human ES-cell-derived MSCs (hES-MP002.5 cells to normal human bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs. hES-MP002.5 cells had lower yet reasonable CFU-F capacity compared with BM-MSC (8±3 versus 29±13 CFU-F per 100 cells. Both cell types showed similar immunophenotypic properties, i.e. cells were positive for CD105, CD73, CD166, HLA-ABC, CD44, CD146, CD90, and negative for CD45, CD34, CD14, CD31, CD117, CD19, CD 271, SSEA-4 and HLA-DR. hES-MP002.5 cells, like BM-MSCs, could be differentiated into adipocytes, osteoblasts and chondrocytes in vitro. Neither hES-MP002.5 cells nor BM-MSCs homed to the bone marrow of immune-deficient NSG mice following intravenous transplantation, whereas intra-femoral transplantation into NSG mice resulted in engraftment for both cell types. In vitro long-term culture-initiating cell assays and in vivo co-transplantation experiments with cord blood CD34+ hematopoietic cells demonstrated furthermore that hES-MP002.5 cells, like BM-MSCs, possess potent stroma support function. In contrast to BM-MSCs, however, hES-MP002.5 cells showed no or only little activity in mixed lymphocyte cultures and phytohemagglutinin (PHA lymphocyte stimulation assays. In summary, ES-cell derived MSCs might be an attractive unlimited source for stroma transplantation approaches without suppressing immune function.

  2. During seminiferous tubule maturation testosterone and synergistic action of FSH with estradiol support germ cell survival while estradiol alone has pro-apoptotic effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Marchlewsk

    2008-04-01

    Testosterone eliminates estradiol--induced germ cell apoptosis when both hormones act in concert. 4 FSH in concert with estradiol, but neither one of the hormone alone, accelerate Sertoli cell differentiation and effectively inhibit germ cell apoptosis. 5 During seminiferous tubule maturation testosterone and the synergistic action of FSH with estradiol support germ cell survival while estradiol alone has an inhibitory, pro-apoptotic effect.

  3. CO tolerant PtRu-MoO{sub x} nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers for direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiouvaras, N.; Pena, M.A.; Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Huerta, M.V. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad de La Laguna, Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38071, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Moliner, R.; Lazaro, M.J. [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Rodriguez, J.L.; Pastor, E. [Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad de La Laguna, Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38071, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    Novel nanostructured catalysts based on PtRu-MoO{sub x} nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers have been investigated for CO and methanol electrooxidation. Carbon nanofibers are prepared by thermocatalytic decomposition of methane (NF), and functionalized with HNO{sub 3} (NF.F). Electrocatalysts are obtained using a two-step procedure: (1) Pt and Ru are incorporated on the carbon substrates (Vulcan XC 72R, NF and NF.F), and (2) Mo is loaded on the PtRu/C samples. Differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) analyses establish that the incorporation of Mo increases significantly the CO tolerance than respective binary counterparts. The nature of the carbon support affects considerably the stabilization of MoO{sub x} nanoparticles and also the performance in methanol electrooxidation. Accordingly, a significant increase of methanol oxidation is obtained in PtRu-MoO{sub x} nanoparticles supported on non-functionalized carbon nanofiber, in parallel with a large reduction of the Pt amount in comparison with binary counterparts and commercial catalyst. (author)

  4. Promoting the selection and maintenance of fetal liver stem/progenitor cell colonies by layer-by-layer polypeptide tethered supported lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Chi; Liu, Yung-Chiang; Tsai, Hsuan-Ang; Shen, Chia-Ning; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2014-12-10

    In this study, we designed and constructed a series of layer-by-layer polypeptide adsorbed supported lipid bilayer (SLB) films as a novel and label-free platform for the isolation and maintenance of rare populated stem cells. In particular, four alternative layers of anionic poly-l-glutamic acid and cationic poly-l-lysine were sequentially deposited on an anionic SLB. We found that the fetal liver stem/progenitor cells from the primary culture were selected and formed colonies on all layer-by-layer polypeptide adsorbed SLB surfaces, regardless of the number of alternative layers and the net charges on those layers. Interestingly, these isolated stem/progenitor cells formed colonies which were maintained for an 8 day observation period. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation measurements showed that all SLB-polypeptide films were protein resistant with serum levels significantly lower than those on the polypeptide multilayer films without an underlying SLB. We suggest the fluidic SLB promotes selective binding while minimizing the cell-surface interaction due to its nonfouling nature, thus limiting stem cell colonies from spreading.

  5. Scientific Assessment in support of the Materials Roadmap enabling Low Carbon Energy Technologies: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerri, I.; Lefebvre-Joud, F.; Holtappels, Peter

    A group of experts from European research organisations and industry have assessed the state of the art and future needs for materials' R&D for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The work was performed as input to the European Commission's roadmapping exercise on materials for the European...

  6. Ontology driven decision support systems for medical diagnosis - an interactive form for consultation in patients with plasma cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donfack Guefack, Valéry; Bertaud Gounot, Valérie; Duvauferrier, Régis; Bourde, Annabel; Morelli, John; Lasbleiz, Jérémy

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant disorder characterized by the monoclonal proliferation of B cell derived plasma cells in the bone marrow. The diagnosis depends on the identification of abnormal monoclonal marrow plasma cells, monoclonal protein in the serum or urine, evidence of end-organ damage, and a clinical picture consistent with MM. The distinction between MM stages- monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or indolent myeloma-is critical in guiding therapy. This paper describes how to produce ontology-driven semiological rules base (SRB) and a consultation form to aid in the diagnosis of plasma cells diseases. We have extracted the MM sub-ontology from the NCI Thesaurus. Using Protégé 3.4.2 and owl1, criteria in the literature for the diagnosis and staging of MM have been added to the ontology. All quantitative parameters have been transformed to a qualitative format. A formal description of MM variants and stages has been given. The obtained ontology has been checked by a reasoner and instantiated to obtain a SRB. The form created has been tested and evaluated utilizing 63 clinical medical reports. The likelihood for a disease being the correct diagnosis is determined by computing a ratio. The resulting tool is relevant for MM diagnosis and staging.

  7. HIGH-DOSE CHEMOTHERAPY WITH STEM-CELL REINFUSION AND GROWTH-FACTOR SUPPORT FOR SOLID TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIES, EGE; DEGRAAF, H; VANDERGRAAF, WTA; MULDER, NH; Boonstra, A.

    1995-01-01

    With the help of stem cell reinfusion and hematopoietic growth factors, it is possible to get up to a ten-fold dose increase for certain chemotherapeutic drugs, A number of reasons may have made high-dose chemotherapy less dangerous and the fore more acceptable in a more upfront treatment setting, O

  8. Etoposide; colchicine; mitomycin C and cyclophosphamide tested in the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test (MNvit) in Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cells at Covance laboratories; Harrogate UK in support of OECD draft Test Guideline 487.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Paul; Whitwell, James; Jeffrey, Laura; Young, Jamie; Smith, Katie; Kirkland, David

    2010-10-29

    The following genotoxic chemicals were tested in the in vitro micronucleus assay, at Covance Laboratories, Harrogate, UK in the Chinese hamster lung cell line CHL. Etoposide (a topoisomerase inhibitor), colchicine (an aneugen), mitomycin C (a DNA cross linking agent) and cyclophosphamide (an alkylating agent requiring metabolic activation) were treated with and without cytokinesis block (by addition of cytochalasin B). This work formed part of a collaborative evaluation of the toxicity measures recommended in the draft OECD Test Guideline 487 for the in vitro micronucleus test. The toxicity measures used, detecting both cytostasis and cell death, were relative population doubling, relative increase in cell counts and relative cell counts for treatments in the absence of cytokinesis block, and replication index or cytokinesis blocked proliferation index in the presence of cytokinesis block. All of the chemicals tested gave significant increases in the percentage of micronucleated cells with and without cytokinesis block at concentrations giving approximately 60% toxicity (cytostasis and cell death) or less by all of the toxicity measures used. The outcomes from this series of tests support the use of relative increase in cell counts and relative population doubling, as well as relative cell counts, as appropriate measures of cytotoxicity for the non-cytokinesis blocked in vitro micronucleus assay.

  9. Cadmium chloride, benzo[a]pyrene and cyclophosphamide tested in the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test (MNvit) in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 at Covance laboratories, Harrogate UK in support of OECD draft Test Guideline 487.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Paul; Whitwell, James; Jeffrey, Laura; Young, Jamie; Smith, Katie; Kirkland, David

    2010-10-29

    The following genotoxic chemicals were tested in the in vitro micronucleus assay, at Covance Laboratories, Harrogate, UK in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Cadmium chloride (an inorganic carcinogen), benzo[a]pyrene (a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon requiring metabolic activation) and cyclophosphamide (an alkylating agent requiring metabolic activation) were treated with and without cytokinesis block (by addition of cytochalasin B). This work formed part of a collaborative evaluation of the toxicity measures recommended in the draft OECD Test Guideline 487 for the in vitro micronucleus test. The toxicity measures used, capable of detecting both cytostasis and cell death, were relative population doubling, relative increase in cell counts and relative cell counts for treatments in the absence of cytokinesis block, and replication index or cytokinesis blocked proliferation index in the presence of cytokinesis block. All of the chemicals tested gave significant increases in the percentage of micronucleated cells with and without cytokinesis block at concentrations giving approximately 60% toxicity (cytostasis and cell death) or less by all of the toxicity measures used. The outcomes from this series of tests support the use of relative increase in cell counts and relative population doubling, as well as relative cell counts, as appropriate measures of cytotoxicity for the non-cytokinesis blocked in the in vitro micronucleus assay.

  10. Comparative degradation study of carbon supported proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrocatalysts - The influence of the platinum to carbon ratio on the degradation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speder, Jozsef; Zana, Alessandro; Spanos, Ioannis; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J. K.; Mortensen, Kell; Hanzlik, Marianne; Arenz, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    A colloidal synthesis approach is used to prepare supported proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalysts with various Pt loadings - from low to extremely high ones. The catalyst samples are used to continue our investigation of the role of the Pt:C ratio in the degradation processes. The influence of the platinum loading on the electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss is evaluated in a systematic electrochemical study by using two commercially available carbon blacks, namely Vulcan XC72R and Ketjenblack EC-300J. Accelerated degradation tests simulating load cycle and start-up/shutdown conditions are carried out in accordance with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Conference of Japan (FCCJ) recommendations. Under conditions simulating the load cycle of PEM fuel cells no unambiguous correlation between the ECSA loss and the Pt:C ratio is found. By contrast, under conditions simulating the repetitive start-up/shutdown processes of PEMFCs the ECSA loss first increases with increasing Pt loading. However, it decreases again for very high loadings. Furthermore, the Vulcan samples exhibited higher ECSA losses than the Ketjenblack samples, indicating the important role of the physical and chemical properties of pristine carbon supports in the carbon degradation mechanism.

  11. Impact of nanostructured anode on low-temperature performance of thin-film-based anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Hoon; Han, Seung Min; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Kim, Hyoungchul; Hong, Jongsup; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Jong-Ho; Son, Ji-Won

    2016-05-01

    The impact of a nanostructured Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) anode on low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LT-SOFC) performance is investigated. By modifying processing techniques for the anode support, anode-supported SOFCs based on thin-film (∼1 μm) electrolytes (TF-SOFCs) with and without the nanostructured Ni-YSZ (grain size ∼100 nm) anode are fabricated and a direct comparison of the TF-SOFCs to reveal the role of the nanostructured anode at low temperature is made. The cell performance of the nanostructured Ni-YSZ anode significantly increases as compared to that of the cell without it, especially at low temperatures (500 °C). The electrochemical analyses confirm that increasing the triple-phase boundary (TPB) density near the electrolyte and anode interface by the particle-size reduction of the anode increases the number of sites available for charge transfer. Thus, the nanostructured anode not only secures the structural integrity of the thin-film components over it, it is also essential for lowering the operating temperature of the TF-SOFC. Although it is widely considered that the cathode is the main factor that determines the performance of LT-SOFCs, this study directly proves that anode performance also significantly affects the low-temperature performance.

  12. Inhibition of MEK and GSK3 supports ES cell-like domed colony formation from avian and reptile embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanoh, Shota; Okazaki, Kenji; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2013-07-01

    As amniotes diversified, mammals may have modified mechanisms of cellular pluripotency along with the acquisition of a placenta. What then defined pluripotent states in the ancestral amniotes? To study the evolutionary background of pluripotency in amniotes, we tested the effects of extracellular effectors on primary culture cells from avian and reptile embryos in serum-free medium. When treated with a combination of a MEK inhibitor and a GSK3 inhibitor (2i condition), chicken early embryos formed domed colonies (DCs), which were morphologically indistinguishable from the colonies formed by mouse and rat naïve embryonic stem cells. However, no DCs formed when cells from further-developed embryos were cultured in the 2i condition, indicating that there is a clear boundary of DC-forming ability at around the stage of primitive streak elongation. Quail embryos at the blastoderm and cleavage stages also formed DCs in the 2i condition, which is consistent with the notion that the appearance of DCs corresponds with the presence of pluripotent cells in embryos. Gecko blastoderms also formed DCs in the 2i condition, but gastrulas did not. ERK activation by bFGF caused an effect opposite to that of the 2i condition, namely, it dispersed colonies of cells even from early embryos in all species examined. These results suggest that the regulation of pluripotency by FGF/ERK signaling may date back at least to the common ancestor of mammals, birds, and reptiles. However, gene expression analysis indicated the possibility that mammalian pluripotency transcription factors function differently in non-mammalian amniotes.

  13. Nutritional support in patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a multicentre survey of the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO) transplant programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Stefano; Liptrott, Sarah Jayne; Gargiulo, Gianpaolo; Orlando, Laura

    2015-01-01

    A survey within Italian haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) programmes was performed, in order to obtain a snapshot of nutritional support (NS) in patients undergoing HSCT. The primary objective was to verify whether an evidence-based practice (EBP) approach to NS was implemented in HSCT centres. A multicentre survey was performed by questionnaire, covering the main areas of NS (screening, treatment planning, monitoring, nutritional counselling, and methods of nutritional support). The results indicated a significant variation between clinical practice and evidence-based guidelines in terms of clinical pathways, decision-making, and care provision regarding NS. Further research is required to identify reasons for the limited application of EBP and measures that may be undertaken to address such issues. Development of a multidisciplinary educational programme in order to raise awareness of the issue should be undertaken.

  14. A mutation in MYD88 (L265P) supports the survival of lymphoplasmacytic cells by activation of Bruton tyrosine kinase in Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Zhou, Yangsheng; Liu, Xia; Xu, Lian; Cao, Yang; Manning, Robert J; Patterson, Christopher J; Buhrlage, Sara J; Gray, Nathanael; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C; Hunter, Zachary R; Treon, Steven P

    2013-08-15

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MYD88) L265P somatic mutation is highly prevalent in Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) and supports malignant growth through nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). The signaling cascade(s) by which MYD88 L265P promotes NF-κB activation in WM remain unclear. By lentiviral knockdown or use of a MYD88 inhibitor, decreased phosphorylation of the NF-κB gatekeeper IκBα and survival occurred in MYD88 L265P-expressing WM cells. Conversely, WM cells engineered to overexpress MYD88 L265P showed enhanced survival. Coimmunoprecipitation studies identified Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) complexed to MYD88 in L265P-expressing WM cells, with preferential binding of MYD88 to phosphorylated BTK (pBTK). Increased pBTK was also observed in WM cells transduced to overexpress L265P vs wild-type MYD88. Importantly, MYD88 binding to BTK was abrogated following treatment of MYD88 L265P-expressing cells with a BTK kinase inhibitor. Inhibition of BTK or interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 and 4 (IRAK-1 and -4) kinase activity induced apoptosis of WM cells, and their combination resulted in more robust inhibition of NF-κB signaling and synergistic WM cell killing. The results establish BTK as a downstream target of MYD88 L265P signaling, and provide a framework for the study of BTK inhibitors alone, and in combination with IRAK inhibitors for the treatment of WM.

  15. Stem cell factor leads to reduced blood processing during apheresis or the use of whole blood aliquots to support dose-intensive chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, A; Testa, N G

    1998-07-01

    The addition of stem cell factor (SCF) to G-CSF and chemotherapy results in a dose-dependent, significantly increased mobilisation of peripheral blood progenitor cells compared with the use of chemotherapy and G-CSF alone. The enhanced mobilisation may benefit patients in several ways. Firstly, in clinical settings where currently multiple aphereses are having to be performed to obtain a specified target number of cells, the addition of SCF may lead to a reduction in this number. Alternatively, when only a single apheresis is currently being performed to obtain sufficient cells then the addition of SCF to the mobilisation regimen would allow between 5- and 8-fold reduction in the volume of blood required to be processed during the apheresis procedure to obtain a specified target of GM-CFC, CD34+ cells and LTC-IC for those receiving the highest dose of SCF (20 microg/kg) plus G-CSF following chemotherapy compared with those patients receiving G-CSF alone following chemotherapy. The increased mobilisation resulting from the addition of SCF to the regimen makes feasible the use of whole blood aliquots to support dose-intensive therapy. We have calculated that in patients mobilised using cyclophosphamide 3 g/m2, SCF 20 microg/kg and G-CSF 5 microg/kg a median 512 ml aliquot of whole blood would contain 2 x 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells and over 3.7 x 10(5)/kg GM-CFC. This aliquot would be sufficient to rescue the patient following a myeloablative therapy. Significantly, because less individual variation was seen after the administration of SCF the patient who showed the worst mobilisation in that group would have the usually required content of 2 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg and 1 x 10(5) GM-CFC/kg in only 731 ml of blood.

  16. Investigation of nanostructured platinum-nickel supported on the titanium surface as electrocatalysts for alkaline fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamašauskaitė-Tamašiūnaitė, L.; Balčiūnaitė, A.; Vaiciukevičienė, A.; Selskis, A.; Pakštas, V.

    2012-06-01

    This study involves the formation of nanostructured platinum-nickel supported on the titanium surface catalysts using the galvanic displacement technique and investigation of their electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of borohydride, methanol and ethanol in an alkaline media by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Scanning electron microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the surface structure, composition and morphology. The nanoPt(Ni)/Ti and nanoPt/Ti catalysts exhibited a higher catalytic efficiency to the oxidation of borohydride, ethanol and methanol as compared with that of pure Pt.

  17. Activin/Nodal Signaling Supports Retinal Progenitor Specification in a Narrow Time Window during Pluripotent Stem Cell Neuralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertacchi, Michele; Lupo, Giuseppe; Pandolfini, Luca; Casarosa, Simona; D’Onofrio, Mara; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.; Cremisi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Summary Retinal progenitors are initially found in the anterior neural plate region known as the eye field, whereas neighboring areas undertake telencephalic or hypothalamic development. Eye field cells become specified by switching on a network of eye field transcription factors, but the extracellular cues activating this network remain unclear. In this study, we used chemically defined media to induce in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) toward eye field fates. Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling was sufficient to drive ESCs to telencephalic, but not retinal, fates. Instead, retinal progenitors could be generated from competent differentiating mouse ESCs by activation of Activin/Nodal signaling within a narrow temporal window corresponding to the emergence of primitive anterior neural progenitors. Activin also promoted eye field gene expression in differentiating human ESCs. Our results reveal insights into the mechanisms of eye field specification and open new avenues toward the generation of retinal progenitors for translational medicine. PMID:26388287

  18. Activin/Nodal Signaling Supports Retinal Progenitor Specification in a Narrow Time Window during Pluripotent Stem Cell Neuralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Bertacchi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Retinal progenitors are initially found in the anterior neural plate region known as the eye field, whereas neighboring areas undertake telencephalic or hypothalamic development. Eye field cells become specified by switching on a network of eye field transcription factors, but the extracellular cues activating this network remain unclear. In this study, we used chemically defined media to induce in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs toward eye field fates. Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling was sufficient to drive ESCs to telencephalic, but not retinal, fates. Instead, retinal progenitors could be generated from competent differentiating mouse ESCs by activation of Activin/Nodal signaling within a narrow temporal window corresponding to the emergence of primitive anterior neural progenitors. Activin also promoted eye field gene expression in differentiating human ESCs. Our results reveal insights into the mechanisms of eye field specification and open new avenues toward the generation of retinal progenitors for translational medicine.

  19. Early infections in patients undergoing high-dose treatment with stem cell support: a comparison of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, A O; Arpi, M.; Gang, U.J.O.;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Infections are life-threatening complications in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell support (HDT). Knowledge of the infectious pathogens is essential to make a safe outpatient setting. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 208 patients treated with HDT...... related mortality was similar between the groups. Conclusion: The frequency of isolated pathogens, positive blood cultures, and the diversity of pathogens were higher in MM patients as compared to NHL patients. However, this did not translate into higher transplantation-related mortality, probably because...

  20. The toxicity of radiotherapy following high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood serum cell support in high-risk breast cancer: a preliminary analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, E. van der; Schaake-Koning, C.C.E.; Zandwijk, N. van [Nederlands Kanker Inst. `Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis`, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    High-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow and/or peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) support is increasingly employed in the adjuvant treatment of high-risk breast cancer. Subsequent radiotherapy has been reported to be associated with morbidity and mortality resulting from pulmonary toxicity. In addition, the course of radiation therapy may be hampered by excess myelosuppression. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution to radiation-induced toxicity of a high-dose chemotherapy regimen (CTC) that incorporates cyclophosphamide, thiotepa and carboplatin, in patients with high-risk breast cancer. (author).

  1. N-Acetyl Cysteine May Support Dopamine Neurons in Parkinson's Disease: Preliminary Clinical and Cell Line Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Monti

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the biological and clinical effects of n-acetyl-cysteine (NAC in Parkinson's disease (PD.The overarching goal of this pilot study was to generate additional data about potentially protective properties of NAC in PD, using an in vitro and in vivo approach. In preparation for the clinical study we performed a cell tissue culture study with human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived midbrain dopamine (mDA neurons that were treated with rotenone as a model for PD. The primary outcome in the cell tissue cultures was the number of cells that survived the insult with the neurotoxin rotenone. In the clinical study, patients continued their standard of care and were randomized to receive either daily NAC or were a waitlist control. Patients were evaluated before and after 3 months of receiving the NAC with DaTscan to measure dopamine transporter (DAT binding and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS to measure clinical symptoms.The cell line study showed that NAC exposure resulted in significantly more mDA neurons surviving after exposure to rotenone compared to no NAC, consistent with the protective effects of NAC previously observed. The clinical study showed significantly increased DAT binding in the caudate and putamen (mean increase ranging from 4.4% to 7.8%; p<0.05 for all values in the PD group treated with NAC, and no measurable changes in the control group. UPDRS scores were also significantly improved in the NAC group (mean improvement of 12.9%, p = 0.01.The results of this preliminary study demonstrate for the first time a potential direct effect of NAC on the dopamine system in PD patients, and this observation may be associated with positive clinical effects. A large-scale clinical trial to test the therapeutic efficacy of NAC in this population and to better elucidate the mechanism of action is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02445651.

  2. CeO2 nanocubes-graphene oxide as durable and highly active catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, M; Wang, Z B; Li, J S; Tang, H L; Liu, W J; Wang, Y G

    2014-12-10

    Rapid degradation of cell performance still remains a significant challenge for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In this work, we develop novel CeO2 nanocubes-graphene oxide nanocomposites as durable and highly active catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell. We show that the use of CeO2 as the radical scavenger in the catalysts remarkably improves the durability of the catalyst. The catalytic activity retention of Pt-graphene oxide-8 wt.% CeO2 nanocomposites reaches as high as 69% after 5000 CV-cycles at a high voltage range of 0.8-1.23 V, in contrast to 19% for that of the Pt-graphene oxide composites. The excellent durability of the Pt-CeO2 nanocubes-graphene oxide catalyst is attributed to the free radical scavenging activity of CeO2, which significantly slows down the chemical degradation of Nafion binder in catalytic layers, and then alleviates the decay of Pt catalysts, resulting in the excellent cycle life of Pt-CeO2-graphene oxide nanocomposite catalysts. Additionally, the performance of single cell assembled with Nafion 211 membrane and Pt-CeO2-graphene oxide catalysts with different CeO2 contents in the cathode as well as the Pt-C catalysts in the anode are also recorded and discussed in this study.

  3. Silorane resin supports proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of MLO-A5 bone cells in vitro and bone formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, J David; Barragan-Adjemian, Cielo; Rosser, Jennifer; Melander, Jennifer R; Dusevich, Vladimir; Weiler, Rachel A; Miller, Bradley D; Kilway, Kathleen V; Dallas, Mark R; Bi, Lianxing; Nalvarte, Elisabet L; Bonewald, Lynda F

    2012-04-01

    Methyl methacrylate used in bone cements has drawbacks of toxicity, high exotherm, and considerable shrinkage. A new resin, based on silorane/oxirane chemistry, has been shown to have little toxicity, low exotherm, and low shrinkage. We hypothesized that silorane-based resins may also be useful as components of bone cements as well as other bone applications and began testing on bone cell function in vitro and in vivo. MLO-A5, late osteoblast cells, were exposed to polymerized silorane (SilMix) resin (and a standard polymerized bisGMA/TEGDMA methacrylate (BT) resin and compared to culture wells without resins as control. A significant cytotoxic effect was observed with the BT resin resulting in no cell growth, whereas in contrast, SilMix resin had no toxic effects on MLO-A5 cell proliferation, differentiation, nor mineralization. The cells cultured with SilMix produced increasing amounts of alkaline phosphatase (1.8-fold) compared to control cultures. Compared to control cultures, an actual enhancement of mineralization was observed in the silorane resin-containing cultures at days 10 and 11 as determined by von Kossa (1.8-2.0 fold increase) and Alizarin red staining (1.8-fold increase). A normal bone calcium/phosphate atomic ratio was observed by elemental analysis along with normal collagen formation. When used in vivo to stabilize osteotomies, no inflammatory response was observed, and the bone continued to heal. In conclusion, the silorane resin, SilMix, was shown to not only be non cytototoxic, but actually supported bone cell function. Therefore, this resin has significant potential for the development of a nontoxic bone cement or bone stabilizer.

  4. Silorane resin supports proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of MLO-A5 bone cells in vitro and bone formation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, J. David; Barragan-Adjemian, Cielo; Rosser, Jennifer; Melander, Jennifer R.; Dusevich, Vladimir; Weiler, Rachel A.; Miller, Bradley D.; Kilway, Kathleen V.; Dallas, Mark R.; Bi, Lianxing; Nalvarte, Elisabet L.; Bonewald, Lynda F.

    2015-01-01

    Methyl methacrylate used in bone cements has drawbacks of toxicity, high exotherm, and considerable shrinkage. A new resin, based on silorane/oxirane chemistry, has been shown to have little toxicity, low exotherm, and low shrinkage. We hypothesized that silorane-based resins may also be useful as components of bone cements as well as other bone applications and began testing on bone cell function in vitro and in vivo. MLO-A5, late osteoblast cells, were exposed to polymerized silorane (SilMix) resin (and a standard polymerized bisGMA/TEGDMA methacrylate (BT) resin and compared to culture wells without resins as control. A significant cytotoxic effect was observed with the BT resin resulting in no cell growth, whereas in contrast, SilMix resin had no toxic effects on MLO-A5 cell proliferation, differentiation, nor mineralization. The cells cultured with SilMix produced increasing amounts of alkaline phosphatase (1.8-fold) compared to control cultures. Compared to control cultures, an actual enhancement of mineralization was observed in the silorane resin-containing cultures at days 10 and 11 as determined by von Kossa (1.8–2.0 fold increase) and Alizarin red staining (1.8-fold increase). A normal bone calcium/phosphate atomic ratio was observed by elemental analysis along with normal collagen formation. When used in vivo to stabilize osteotomies, no inflammatory response was observed, and the bone continued to heal. In conclusion, the silorane resin, SilMix, was shown to not only be non cytototoxic, but actually supported bone cell function. Therefore, this resin has significant potential for the development of a nontoxic bone cement or bone stabilizer. PMID:22278990

  5. An experimentally supported model for the origin of charge transport barrier in Zn(O,S)/CIGSSe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chua, Rou Hua [Energy Research Institute @ NTU - ERI@N, Interdisciplinary Graduate School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Robert Bosch (SEA) Pte Ltd, 11 Bishan St. 21, Singapore 573943 (Singapore); Li, Xianglin [Energy Research Institute @ NTU - ERI@N, Interdisciplinary Graduate School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Walter, Thomas [Hochschule Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 55, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Teh, Lay Kuan [Robert Bosch (SEA) Pte Ltd, 11 Bishan St. 21, Singapore 573943 (Singapore); Hahn, Thomas; Hergert, Frank [Bosch Solar CISTech GmbH, Münstersche Str. 24, 14772 Brandenburg an der Havel (Germany); Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Wong, Lydia Helena, E-mail: lydiawong@ntu.edu.sg [Energy Research Institute @ NTU - ERI@N, Interdisciplinary Graduate School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2016-01-25

    Zinc oxysulfide buffer layers with [O]:[S] of 1:0, 6:1, 4:1, 2:1, and 1:1 ratios were deposited by atomic layer deposition on Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} absorbers and made into finished solar cells. We demonstrate using Time-Resolved Photoluminescence that the minority carrier lifetime of Zn(O,S) buffered solar cells is dependent on the sulfur content of the buffer layer. τ{sub 1} for devices with [O]:[S] of 1:0–4:1 are <10 ns, indicating efficient charge separation in devices with low sulfur content. An additional τ{sub 2} is observed for relaxed devices with [O]:[S] of 2:1 and both relaxed and light soaked devices with [O]:[S] of 1:1. Corroborated with one-dimensional electronic band structure simulation results, we attribute this additional decay lifetime to radiative recombination in the absorber due to excessive acceptor-type defects in sulfur-rich Zn(O,S) buffer layer that causes a buildup in interface-barrier for charge transport. A light soaking step shortens the carrier lifetime for the moderately sulfur-rich 2:1 device when excess acceptors are passivated in the buffer, reducing the crossover in the dark and illuminated I-V curves. However, when a high concentration of excess acceptors exist in the buffer and cannot be passivated by light soaking, as with the sulfur-rich 1:1 device, then cell efficiency of the device will remain low.

  6. Grafted functional groups on expanded tetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) support for fuel cell and water transport membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Timothy J.; Jiang, Ruichun

    2017-01-24

    A method for forming a modified solid polymer includes a step of contacting a solid fluorinated polymer with a sodium sodium-naphthalenide solution to form a treated fluorinated solid polymer. The treated fluorinated solid polymer is contacted with carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, or sulfur trioxide to form a solid grafted fluorinated polymer. Characteristically, the grafted fluorinated polymer includes appended CO.sub.2H or SO.sub.2H or SO.sub.3H groups. The solid grafted fluorinated polymer is advantageously incorporated into a fuel cell as part of the ion-conducting membrane or a water transport membrane in a humidifier.

  7. Research data supporting “Towards Cellular Sieving: Exploring the Limits of Scaffold Accessibility for Cell-Type Specific Invasion”

    OpenAIRE

    Ashworth, Jennifer C; Mehr, Marco; Buxton, Paul G.; Best, Serena M.; Cameron, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Zip folder containing sample reconstructed Micro-CT scans (.tif files) from each scaffold condition. Image pixel size is 3.1 μm. Each image plane is perpendicular to the direction of cell invasion (i.e. parallel to the seeding plane). Two Microsoft Excel files, containing the raw measurements of pore size and of L and d (as defined in the manuscript) for calculation of percolation diameter. Units are in pixels unless specified. Zip folder containing raw images (.png files) of each scaffold se...

  8. Carbon Nanotubes Supported Pt-Ru-Ni as Methanol Electro-Oxidation Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Ye; Shengzhou Chen; Xinfa Dong; Weiming Lin

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported Pt-Ru and Pt-Ru-Ni catalysts were prepared by chemical reduction of metal precursors with sodium borohydride at room temperature. The crystallographic properties and composition of the catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, and the catalytic activity and stability for methanol electro-oxidation were measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear sweep voltammetries (LSV), and chronoamperometry (CA). The results show that the catalysts exhibit face-centered cubic (fcc) structure.The particle size of Pt-Ru-Ni/CNTs catalyst is about 4.8 nm. The catalytic activity and stability of the Pt-Ru-Ni/CNTs catalyst are higher than those of Pt-Ru/CNTs catalyst.

  9. Carbon-Nanotube-Supported Bio-Inspired Nickel Catalyst and Its Integration in Hybrid Hydrogen/Air Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentil, Solène [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, DCM UMR 5250, 38000 Grenoble France; Laboratoire de Chimie et Biologie des Métaux, Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS UMR5249, CEA, 38000 Grenoble France; Lalaoui, Noémie [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, DCM UMR 5250, 38000 Grenoble France; Dutta, Arnab [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99532 USA; Current address: Chemistry Department, IIT Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382355 India; Nedellec, Yannig [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, DCM UMR 5250, 38000 Grenoble France; Cosnier, Serge [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, DCM UMR 5250, 38000 Grenoble France; Shaw, Wendy J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99532 USA; Artero, Vincent [Laboratoire de Chimie et Biologie des Métaux, Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS UMR5249, CEA, 38000 Grenoble France; Le Goff, Alan [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, DCM UMR 5250, 38000 Grenoble France

    2017-01-12

    A biomimetic nickel bis-diphosphine complex incorporating the amino-acid arginine in the outer coordination sphere, was immobilized on modified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through electrostatic interactions. The sur-face-confined catalyst is characterized by a reversible 2-electron/2-proton redox process at potentials close to the equibrium potential of the H+/H2 couple. Consequently, the functionalized redox nanomaterial exhibits reversible electrocatalytic activity for the H2/2H+ interconversion over a broad range of pH. This system exhibits catalytic bias, analogous to hydrogenases, resulting in high turnover frequencies at low overpotentials for electrocatalytic H2 oxida-tion between pH 0 and 7. This allowed integrating such bio-inspired nanomaterial together with a multicopper oxi-dase at the cathode side in a hybrid bioinspired/enzymatic hydrogen fuel cell. This device delivers ~2 mW cm–2 with an open-circuit voltage of 1.0 V at room temperature and pH 5, which sets a new efficiency record for a bio-related hydrogen fuel cell with base metal catalysts.

  10. Application of Co-naphthalocyanine (CoNPc) as alternative cathode catalyst and support structure for microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Rae; Kim, Jy-Yeon; Han, Sang-Beom; Park, Kyung-Won; Saratale, G D; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2011-01-01

    Co-naphthalocyanine (CoNPc) was prepared by heat treatment for cathode catalysts to be used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Four different catalysts (Carbon black, NPc/C, CoNPc/C, Pt/C) were compared and characterized using XPS, EDAX and TEM. The electrochemical characteristics of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were compared by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The Co-macrocyclic complex improves the catalyst dispersion and oxygen reduction reaction of CoNPc/C. The maximum power of CoNPc/C was 64.7 mW/m(2) at 0.25 mA as compared with 81.3 mW/m(2) of Pt/C, 29.7 mW/m(2) of NPc/C and 9.3 mW/m(2) of carbon black when the cathodes were implemented in H-type MFCs. The steady state cell, cathode and anode potential of MFC with using CoNPc/C were comparable to those of Pt/C.

  11. Systematic dissection of coding exons at single nucleotide resolution supports an additional role in cell-specific transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Y Birnbaum

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their protein coding function, exons can also serve as transcriptional enhancers. Mutations in these exonic-enhancers (eExons could alter both protein function and transcription. However, the functional consequence of eExon mutations is not well known. Here, using massively parallel reporter assays, we dissect the enhancer activity of three liver eExons (SORL1 exon 17, TRAF3IP2 exon 2, PPARG exon 6 at single nucleotide resolution in the mouse liver. We find that both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations have similar effects on enhancer activity and many of the deleterious mutation clusters overlap known liver-associated transcription factor binding sites. Carrying a similar massively parallel reporter assay in HeLa cells with these three eExons found differences in their mutation profiles compared to the liver, suggesting that enhancers could have distinct operating profiles in different tissues. Our results demonstrate that eExon mutations could lead to multiple phenotypes by disrupting both the protein sequence and enhancer activity and that enhancers can have distinct mutation profiles in different cell types.

  12. TiO2 Nanotube-Carbon (TNT-C) as Support for Pt-based Catalyst for High Methanol Oxidation Reaction in Direct Methanol Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M; Kamarudin, S K; Shyuan, L K

    2016-12-01

    In this study, TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs) were synthesized via a hydrothermal method using highly concentrated NaOH solutions varying from 6 to 12 M at 180 °C for 48 h. The effects of the NaOH concentration and the TNT crystal structure on the performance for methanol oxidation were investigated to determine the best catalyst support for Pt-based catalysts. The results showed that TNTs produced with 10 M NaOH exhibited a length and a diameter of 550 and 70 nm, respectively; these TNTs showed the best nanotube structure and were further used as catalyst supports for a Pt-based catalyst in a direct methanol fuel cell. The synthesized TNT and Pt-based catalysts were analysed by FESEM, TEM, BET, EDX, XRD and FTIR. The electrochemical performance of the catalysts was investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometric (CA) analysis to further understand the methanol oxidation in the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Finally, the result proves that Pt-Ru/TNT-C catalyst shows high performance in methanol oxidation as the highest current density achieved at 3.3 mA/cm(2) (normalised by electrochemically active surface area) and high catalyst tolerance towards poisoning species was established.

  13. Modeling the cathode in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using density functional theory How the carbon support can affect durability and activity of a platinum catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Michael Nelson

    The current global energy and environmental challenges need to be addressed by developing a new portfolio of clean power producing devices. The proton exchange membrane fuel cell has the potential to be included and can fit into a variety of niches ranging from portable electronics to stationary residential applications. One of the many barriers to commercial viability is the cost of the cathode layer which requires too much platinum metal to achieve a comparable power output as well as would need to be replaced more frequently when compared to conventional sources for most applications. Using density functional theory, an ab initio modeling technique, these durability and activity issues are examined for platinum catalysts on graphene and carbon nanotube supports. The carbon supports were also doped by replacing individual carbon atoms with other second row elements (beryllium, boron, nitrogen, and oxygen) and the effect on the platinum-surface interaction along with the interaction between the platinum and the oxygen reduction reaction intermediates are discussed. Keywords: proton exchange membrane fuel cell, density functional theory, platinum catalyst, oxygen reduction reaction, doped carbon surfaces

  14. TiO2 Nanotube-Carbon (TNT-C) as Support for Pt-based Catalyst for High Methanol Oxidation Reaction in Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Shyuan, L. K.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs) were synthesized via a hydrothermal method using highly concentrated NaOH solutions varying from 6 to 12 M at 180 °C for 48 h. The effects of the NaOH concentration and the TNT crystal structure on the performance for methanol oxidation were investigated to determine the best catalyst support for Pt-based catalysts. The results showed that TNTs produced with 10 M NaOH exhibited a length and a diameter of 550 and 70 nm, respectively; these TNTs showed the best nanotube structure and were further used as catalyst supports for a Pt-based catalyst in a direct methanol fuel cell. The synthesized TNT and Pt-based catalysts were analysed by FESEM, TEM, BET, EDX, XRD and FTIR. The electrochemical performance of the catalysts was investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometric (CA) analysis to further understand the methanol oxidation in the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Finally, the result proves that Pt-Ru/TNT-C catalyst shows high performance in methanol oxidation as the highest current density achieved at 3.3 mA/cm2 (normalised by electrochemically active surface area) and high catalyst tolerance towards poisoning species was established.

  15. Disposable self-support paper-based multi-anode microbial fuel cell (PMMFC) integrated with power management system (PMS) as the real time "shock" biosensor for wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiheng; Liu, Yucheng; Williams, Isaiah; Li, Yan; Qian, Fengyu; Zhang, Hui; Cai, Dingyi; Wang, Lei; Li, Baikun

    2016-11-15

    A paper-based multi-anode microbial fuel cell (PMMFC) integrated with power management system (PMS) was developed as a disposable self-support real-time "shock" biosensor for wastewater. PMMFCs were examined at three types of shocks (chromium, hypochlorite and acetate) in a batch-mode chamber, and exhibited various responses to shock types and concentrations. The power output of PMMFC sensor was four times as the carbon cloth (CC)-based MFCs, indicating the advantage of paper-based anode for bacterial adhesion. The power output was more sensitive than the voltage output under shocks, and thus preventing the false signals. The simulation of power harvest using PMS indicated that PMMFC could accomplish more frequent data transmission than single-anode MFCs (PSMFC) and CC anode MFCs (CCMMFC), making the self-support wastewater monitor and data transmission possible. Compared with traditional MFC sensors, PMMFCs integrated with PMS exhibit the distinct advantages of tight paper-packed structure, short acclimation period, high power output, and high sensitivity to a wide range of shocks, posing a great potential as "disposable self-support shock sensor" for real time in situ monitoring of wastewater quality.

  16. Ni/Carbon Hybrid Prepared by Hydrothermal Carbonization and Thermal Treatment as Support for PtRu Nanoparticles for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcelo Marques Tusi; Michele Brandalise; Nataly Soares de Oliveira Polanco; Olandir Vercino Correa; Antonio Carlos da Silva; Juan Carlo Villalba; Fauze Jaco Anaissi

    2013-01-01

    Ni/Carbon was prepared in two steps:initially cellulose as carbon source and NiCl2.6H20 as catalyst of the carbonization process were submitted to hydrothermal treatment at 200 ℃ and further to thermal treatment at 900 ℃ under argon atmosphere.The obtained material contains Ni nanoparticles with face-centered cubic (fcc) structure dispersed on amorphous carbon with graphitic domains.PtRu/C electrocatalysts (carbonsupported PtRu nanoparticles) were prepared by an alcohol-reduction process using Ni/Carbon as support.The materials were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis,energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,X-ray diffraction,transmission electron microscopy and tested as anodes in single direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC).The performances of PtRu/C electrocatalysts using Ni/Carbon as support were superior to those obtained for PtRu/C using commercial carbon black Vulcan XC72 as support.

  17. Quality of life, social challenges, and psychosocial support for long-term survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, Maxim; Hsu, Jack W; Wingard, John R

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades quality of life (QoL) and the social challenges of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) survivors have been emerging as subjects of extensive research and are now considered as very important aspects in the pretransplant evaluation and management of allo-HSCT recipients. Recognition of QoL challenges in allo-HSCT survivors allows timely interventions leading to improvement of post-transplant outcomes. It needs to be recognized that long-lasting life changes associated with survivorship after allo-HSCT also significantly affect QoL of partners of allo-HSCT survivors. Currently, resources should be focused on how research findings can be used by patients, their partners, and physicians to optimize QoL and psychosocial adjustment.

  18. Molecular and immunohistochemical studies do not support a role for papillomaviruses in canine oral squamous cell carcinoma development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, John S; French, Adrienne; Harvey, Catherine J

    2015-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) are common neoplasms of dogs and are of unknown cause. Whereas papillomaviruses (PVs) are an established cause of human OSCCs, few studies have investigated canine OSCCs for a PV aetiology. In humans, a PV aetiology can be determined by detecting PV DNA and PV-induced increased p16(CDKN2A) protein (p16) within the OSCC. In this study, PCR, using four different primer sets and p16 immunohistochemistry, was used to evaluate 28 canine OSCCs for a possible PV aetiology. None of the primers amplified PV DNA from any of the OSCCs although four neoplasms contained intense p16 immunostaining. Intense p16 immunostaining would indicate a PV aetiology in a human OSCC but the absence of PV DNA suggests that the increase in p16 was not due to PV infection. Overall the results indicated that PVs are not a significant cause of canine OSCCs.

  19. Fibronectin Binding Proteins SpsD and SpsL Both Support Invasion of Canine Epithelial Cells by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrocola, Giampiero; Gianotti, Valentina; Richards, Amy; Nobile, Giulia; Geoghegan, Joan A; Rindi, Simonetta; Monk, Ian R; Bordt, Andrea S; Foster, Timothy J; Fitzgerald, J Ross; Speziale, Pietro

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the cell wall-anchored fibronectin-binding proteins SpsD and SpsL from the canine commensal and pathogen Staphylococcus pseudintermedius for their role in promoting bacterial invasion of canine progenitor epidermal keratinocytes (CPEK). Invasion was examined by the gentamicin protection assay and fluorescence microscopy. An ΔspsD ΔspsL mutant of strain ED99 had a dramatically reduced capacity to invade CPEK monolayers, while no difference in the invasion level was observed with single mutants. Lactococcus lactis transformed with plasmids expressing SpsD and SpsL promoted invasion, showing that both proteins are important. Soluble fibronectin was required for invasion, and an RGD-containing peptide or antibodies recognizing the integrin α5β1 markedly reduced invasion, suggesting an important role for the integrin in this process. Src kinase inhibitors effectively blocked internalization, suggesting a functional role for the kinase in invasion. In order to identify the minimal fibronectin-binding region of SpsD and SpsL involved in the internalization process, recombinant fragments of both proteins were produced. The SpsD520-846 and SpsL538-823 regions harboring the major fibronectin-binding sites inhibited S. pseudintermedius internalization. Finally, the effects of staphylococcal invasion on the integrity of different cell lines were examined. Because SpsD and SpsL are critical factors for adhesion and invasion, blocking these processes could provide a strategy for future approaches to treating infections.

  20. Hydrogen production for fuel cells by autothermal reforming of methane over sulfide nickel catalyst on a gamma alumina support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, D. L.; Chan, S. H.; Ding, O. L.

    Experimental and modelling studies have been conducted on catalytic autothermal reforming (ATR) of methane for hydrogen production over a sulfide nickel catalyst on a gamma alumina support. The experiments are performed with different feedstock under thermally neutral conditions. The results show that the performance of the reformer is dependent on the molar air-to-fuel ratio (A/F), the molar water-to-fuel ratio (W/F) and the flowrate of the feedstock mixture. The optimum conditions for high methane conversion and high hydrogen yield are A/F = 3-3.5, W/F = 2-2.5 and a fuel flowrate below 120-250 l h -1. Under these conditions, a methane conversion of 95-99% and a hydrogen yield of 39-41% on a dry basis can be achieved and 1 mole of methane can produce 1.8 moles of hydrogen at an equilibrium reactor temperature of not exceeding 850 °C. A two-dimensional reactor model is developed to simulate the conversion behaviour of the reactor for further study of the reforming process. The model includes all aspects of the major chemical kinetics and the heat and mass transfer phenomena in the reactor. The predicted results are successfully validated with experimental data.

  1. Nutritional Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional support is therapy for people who cannot get enough nourishment by eating or drinking. You may ... absorb nutrients through your digestive system You receive nutritional support through a needle or catheter placed in ...

  2. Enhancing Stability of PEM Fuel Cell Catalysts via Support Changing%通过载体提高燃料电池催化剂的稳定性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢小红; 魏子栋

    2015-01-01

    Pt/C是目前质子交换膜燃料电池使用最广泛的一种催化剂,制约其实际应用的关键技术之一是稳定性,增强燃料电池催化剂稳定性研究一直是该领域的热点.本文结合作者课题组的研究工作,综述了通过改进载体材料来提高Pt基催化剂稳定性的一些方法,指出采用更稳定的载体材料以及发展与金属催化剂纳米颗粒有强相互作用的载体材料,是增强催化剂稳定性的努力方向.%The Pt/C catalyst with highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon has been widely used as the state-of the-art catalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs),while the durability of Pt/C is one of the major barriers for largescale applications of PEMFCs.Thus,enhancing the stability of Pt/C has been a hot issue in this field.In this review,we summarize the recent progress in enhancing the catalyst stability in the view of support material.The future prospects of the PEMFCs catalyst should focus on adopting more stable supports or strengthening the interactions between Pt and supports.

  3. Copper indium disulfide nanocrystals supported on carbonized chicken eggshell membranes as efficient counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidan; He, Jianxin; Zhou, Mengjuan; Zhao, Shuyuan; Wang, Qian; Ding, Bin

    2016-05-01

    A domestic waste, chicken eggshell membrane (ESM), is used as a raw material to fabricate carbonized ESM loaded with chalcopyrite CuInS2 nanocrystals (denoted CESM-CuInS2) by a simple liquid impregnation and carbonization method. The CESM-CuInS2 composite possesses a natural three-dimensional macroporous network structure in which numerous CuInS2 nanocrystals with a size of about 25 nm are inlaid in carbon submicron fibers that form a microporous network. The CESM-CuInS2 composite is used as the counter electrode in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and its photoelectric performance is tested. The DSSC with a CESM-CuInS2 counter electrode exhibits a short-circuit current density of 12.48 mA cm-2, open-circuit voltage of 0.78 V and power conversion efficiency of 5.8%; better than the corresponding values for a DSSC with a CESM counter electrode, and comparable to that of a reference DSSC with a platinum counter electrode. The favorable photoelectric performance of the CESM-CuInS2 counter electrode is attributed to its hierarchical structure, which provides a large specific surface area and numerous catalytically active sites to facilitate the oxidation of the electrolyte. This new composite material has many advantages, such as low cost and simple preparation, compared with Pt and pure CuInS2 counter electrodes.

  4. Application of 8YSZ Nanopowder Synthesized by the Modified Solvothermal Process for Anode Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meepho, Malinee; Wattanasiriwech, Suthee; Angkavatana, Pavadee; Wattanasiriwech, Darunee

    2015-03-01

    Thin electrolyte yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) films were coated on the porous solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode substrates for the use at an intermediate temperature range. Nano-8YSZ powder with a particle size of about 5 nm was synthesized using the modified solvothermal process. The electrolyte suspension was prepared by dispersion the synthesized 8YSZ nanopowder in ethanol, with PVB and 1,3-propanediol as a binder and a charging agent respectively. The 8YSZ suspension was subsequently deposited on the pre-sintered NiO-YSZ porous substrates by the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. In order to obtain high quality electrolyte films, preparation process was optimized through two strategic approaches; (i) adjustment of suspension's rheological property and (ii) compatibility of anode-electrolyte sintering shrinkage. Rheological property of the suspension was improved with an addition of 1,3-propanediol. The zeta potential of this suspension was increased and reached the value of +24 mV so the well-dispersed slurry was finally obtained. The second approach was achieved by using a proper composite anode powders. Dense and uniform 8YSZ electrolyte films with a thickness of about 1 thickness successfully be formed on the NiO-YSZ porous substrates after co-sintering at 1400 °C for 2 h.

  5. Phytic acid and myo-inositol support adipocyte differentiation and improve insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Nam; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Hye-Kyeong

    2014-08-01

    Phytic acid, also known as myo-inositol hexaphosphate, has been shown to lower blood glucose levels and to improve insulin sensitivity in rodents. We investigated the effects of phytic acid and myo-inositol on differentiation, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, and lipolysis of adipocytes to test the hypothesis that the antidiabetic properties of phytic acid and myo-inositol are mediated directly through adipocytes. 3T3-L1 cells were treated with 10, 50, or 200 μmol/L of phytic acid or myo-inositol. Oil Red O staining and an intracellular triacylglycerol assay were used to determine lipid accumulation during adipocyte differentiation. Immunoblotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed to evaluate expression of transcription factors, a target protein, and insulin signaling molecules. Phytic acid and myo-inositol exposures increased lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner (P acid synthase increased upon treatments with phytic acid and myo-inositol (P phytic acid and myo-inositol treatments (P phytic acid and myo-inositol treatments. In fully differentiated adipocytes, phytic acid and myo-inositol reduced basal lipolysis dose dependently (P phytic acid and myo-inositol increase insulin sensitivity in adipocytes by increasing lipid storage capacity, improving glucose uptake, and inhibiting lipolysis.

  6. Fabrication and tests of anode supported solid oxide fuel cell; Fabricacao e testes de celula a combustivel de oxido solido suportada no anodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florio, D.Z. de [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: dzflorio@ipen.br; Fonseca, F.C.; Franca, Y.V.; Muccillo, E.N.S.; Muccillo, R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Berton, M.A.C.; Garcia, C.M. [LACTEC - Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    A laboratory setup was designed and put into operation for the development of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Ceramic single cells were fabricated by low-cost methods, and emphasis was given to the use of ready available raw materials. The whole project consisted of the preparation of the component materials - anode, cathode, and electrolyte - and the buildup of a hydrogen leaking-free sample chamber with platinum leads and current collectors for measuring the electrochemical properties of single SOFCs. Anode-supported single SOFCs of the type (ZrO{sub 2}:Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} + NiO) anode / (ZrO{sub 2}:Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) electrolyte / (La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3} + ZrO{sub 2}:Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) cathode have been prepared and tested at 700 deg C and 800 deg C after in situ H{sub 2} anode reduction. The main results show that the slurry coating method resulted in single-cells with good reproducibility and reasonable performance, suggesting that this method can be considered for fabrication of SOFCs. (author)

  7. Investigation of carbon supported PtW catalysts as CO tolerant anodes at high temperature in proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ayaz; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    2016-09-01

    The CO tolerance mechanism and the stability of carbon supported PtW electrocatalysts are evaluated in the anode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at two different temperatures. The electrocatalysts are characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron spectroscopy. Employed electrochemical techniques include cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping, fuel cell polarization, and online mass spectrometry. At a cell temperature of 85 °C, the PtW/C catalyst shows higher CO tolerance compared to Pt/C due an electronic effect of WOx in the Pt 5d band, which reduces the CO adsorption. An increase in hydrogen oxidation activity in the presence of CO is observed for both the catalysts at a higher temperature, due to the decrease of the Pt-CO coverage. A reduction in the current densities occurs for the PtW/C catalyst in both polarization curves and cyclic voltammograms after 5000 cycles of the anode in the range of 0.1-0.7 V vs. RHE at 50 mVs-1. This decrease in performance is assigned to the dissolution of W, with a consequent increase in the membrane resistivity. However, the observed decline of performance is small either in the presence of pure H2 or in the presence of H2/CO.

  8. Graphene supported Co-g-C3N4 as a novel metal-macrocyclic electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiao; Zhang, Junyan

    2013-03-19

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) polymer was doped with cobalt species and supported on a similar sp(2) structure graphene, to form a novel nitrogen-metal macrocyclic catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline fuel cells. The structural characterizations confirmed the formation of Co-N bonds and the close electron coupling between Co-g-C3N4 and graphene sheets. The electrocatalytic measurements demonstrated Co-g-C3N4-catalyzed reduction of oxygen mainly in a four electron pathway. The improvement of ORR activity is closely related to the abundant accessible Co-Nx active sites and fast charge transfer at the interfaces of Co-g-C3N4/graphene. Also, Co-g-C3N4@graphene exhibited comparable ORR activity, better durability, and methanol tolerance ability in comparison to Pt/C, and bodes well for a promising non-noble cathode catalyst for the application of direct methanol fuel cells. The chemical doping strategy in this work would be helpful to improve other present catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  9. MiR-21 is an Ngf-modulated microRNA that supports Ngf signaling and regulates neuronal degeneration in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalban, Enrica; Mattugini, Nicola; Ciarapica, Roberta; Provenzano, Claudia; Savino, Mauro; Scagnoli, Fiorella; Prosperini, Gianluca; Carissimi, Claudia; Fulci, Valerio; Matrone, Carmela; Calissano, Pietro; Nasi, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    The neurotrophins Ngf, Bdnf, NT-3, NT4-5 have key roles in development, survival, and plasticity of neuronal cells. Their action involves broad gene expression changes at the level of transcription and translation. MicroRNAs (miRs)-small RNA molecules that control gene expression post-transcriptionally-are increasingly implicated in regulating development and plasticity of neural cells. Using PC12 cells as a model system, we show that Ngf modulates changes in expression of a variety of microRNAs, including miRs known to be modulated by neurotrophins-such as the miR-212/132 cluster-and several others, such as miR-21, miR-29c, miR-30c, miR-93, miR-103, miR-207, miR-691, and miR-709. Pathway analysis indicates that Ngf-modulated miRs may regulate many protein components of signaling pathways involved in neuronal development and disease. In particular, we show that miR-21 enhances neurotrophin signaling and controls neuronal differentiation induced by Ngf. Notably, in a situation mimicking neurodegeneration-differentiated neurons deprived of Ngf-this microRNA is able to preserve the neurite network and to support viability of the neurons. These findings uncover a broad role of microRNAs in regulating neurotrophin signaling and suggest that aberrant expression of one or more Ngf-modulated miRs may be involved in neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Evaluation of the different supported bifunctional electrocatalysts for unified regenerative cells; Evaluacion de diferentes soportes de electrocatalizadores bifuncionales para celdas regenerativas unificadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurrola, M. P.; Torres-Amaya, D. S.; Duron-Torres, S. M.; Escalante-Garcia, I. L. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ciencias Quimicas, Zacatecas (Mexico)]. E-mail: duronsm@prodigy.net.mx; Arriaga-Hurtado, L.G. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    Unified regenerative fuel cells (URFC) represent an alternative to normal regenerative cells, providing decreased costs and space in one single device. The challenges of these systems are even greater than those for conventional fuel cells, with the most pressing technical problem being the optimization of the oxygen electrode. The high operating potentials of these devices in the electrolyzer mode, E >1.6 V vs. ENH, limit the use of supported Pt/Vulcan electrodes. The electroactivity of Pt is not sufficient to catalyze the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and at these potentials carbon-based supports undergo corrosion. In addition to studies of materials that function as bifunctional catalysts, a significant amount of research is being aimed at the search of new matrixes for use in supporting electrocatalysts for OER and ORR{sup 1,2}. This work presents the preliminary results of the kinetic study of oxygen reactions on different Pt combinations, with IrO{sub 2} and RuO{sub 2} supported by different forms of carbon and substoichiometric titanium oxide. The studies were conducted using cyclical (CV) and linear (LV) voltamperometry for OER and rotary disc electrode (RDE) for the ORR in watery H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 0.5M solutions. The chronoamperometry (CA) technique provided information about the electrochemical stability of the electrodes. The results indicate that the performance of the electrodes supported by different forms of carbon decreases gradually as a result of corrosion when consecutive cycles of oxygen reduction and formation reactions occur. Titanium oxide provides the greatest stability to electrodes constructed on that material and thus can potentially support oxygen electrodes based on combinations of Pt, IrO{sub 2} and RuO{sub 2} as binfunctional electrocatalysts for the URFC. [Spanish] Las celdas de combustible regenerativas unificadas (URFC) representan una alternativa a las celdas regenerativas normales que implica disminucion de costos y espacio en

  11. The fragile environments of inexpensive CD4+ T-cell enumeration in the least developed countries: strategies for accessible support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Christoph H

    2008-01-01

    With the advent of affordable antiretroviral treatment (ART), flow cytometry has ventured out of the exclusive realms of First World research to the resource-strapped clinical environment of developing countries (DCs). Flow cytometric instrumentation for ART has become more cost-efficient, thanks to simplified, yet accurate protocols and smart technologies. These positive developments have, however, not taken shape without problems, as health care in DCs remains weak due to chronic underfunding of their primary health systems. In addition, the multiplicity of donors has created parallel infrastructures that are difficult to manage and may undermine the responsibilities of public services. Hence, there is a prevailing lack of attention to maintenance, support, and human resource development. Not uncommonly, the procurement of high-value equipment is guided by nontechnical interests with mixed results. As conventional service contracts are unpopular, the sustainability of equipment is under serious threat after warranty periods, with environmental factors such as dust and unreliable power supplies being well-known culprits. Reagent supplies and servicing constitute further challenges, where a combination of short reagent shelf life, cold-box shipping, huge distances across poor infrastructures, rigid accounting procedures, and erratic customs requirements cause significant delays and extra costs. Although excellent, highly trained or trainable local staff is available, it is frequently diverted by brain drain from the government sector to privately funded hospitals, research facilities, and overseas postings. Despite these challenges, corporate service management has commonly remained loyal to its roots in the developed world.A number of propositions address the current situation: "Reagent-rental" agreements represent an attractive alternative to service contracts, while smart instrument design has started to make inroads into more robust device concepts. To avoid

  12. Electrochemical Deposition of Platinum and Palladium on Gold Nanoparticles Loaded Carbon Nanotube Support for Oxidation Reactions in Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surin Saipanya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pt and Pd sequentially electrodeposited Au nanoparticles loaded carbon nanotube (Au-CNT was prepared for the electrocatalytic study of methanol, ethanol, and formic acid oxidations. All electrochemical measurements were carried out in a three-electrode cell. A platinum wire and Ag/AgCl were used as auxiliary and reference electrodes, respectively. Suspension of the Au-CNT, phosphate buffer, isopropanol, and Nafion was mixed and dropped on glassy carbon as a working electrode. By sequential deposition method, PdPtPt/Au-CNT, PtPdPd/Au-CNT, and PtPdPt/Au-CNT catalysts were prepared. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs of those catalysts in 1 M H2SO4 solution showed hydrogen adsorption and hydrogen desorption reactions. CV responses for those three catalysts in methanol, ethanol, and formic acid electrooxidations studied in 2 M CH3OH, CH3CH2OH, and HCOOH in 1 M H2SO4 show characteristic oxidation peaks. The oxidation peaks at anodic scan contribute to those organic substance oxidations while the peaks at cathodic scan are related with the reoxidation of the adsorbed carbonaceous species. Comparing all those three catalysts, it can be found that the PdPtPt/Au-CNT catalyst is good at methanol oxidation; the PtPdPt/Au-CNT effectively enhances ethanol oxidation while the PtPdPd/Au-CNT exceptionally catalyzes formic acid oxidation. Therefore, a different stoichiometry affects the electrochemical active surface area of the catalysts to achieve the catalytic oxidation reactions.

  13. Enabling the Distributed Generation Market of High Temperature Fuel Cell and Absorption Chiller Systems to Support Critical and Commercial Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMola, Ashley M.

    Buildings account for over 18% of the world's anthropogenic Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. As a result, a technology that can offset GHG emissions associated with buildings has the potential to save over 9 Giga-tons of GHG emissions per year. High temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller (HTFC/AC) technology offers a relatively low-carbon option for meeting cooling and electric loads for buildings while producing almost no criteria pollutants. GHG emissions in the state of California would decrease by 7.48 million metric tons per year if every commercial building in the State used HTFC/AC technology to meet its power and cooling requirements. In order to realize the benefits of HTFC/AC technology on a wide scale, the distributed generation market needs to be exposed to the technology and informed of its economic viability and real-world potential. This work characterizes the economics associated with HTFC/AC technology using select scenarios that are representative of realistic applications. The financial impacts of various input factors are evaluated and the HTFC/AC simulations are compared to the economics of traditional building utilities. It is shown that, in addition to the emissions reductions derived from the systems, HTFC/AC technology is financially preferable in all of the scenarios evaluated. This work also presents the design of a showcase environment, centered on a beta-test application, that presents (1) system operating data gathered using a custom data acquisition module, and (2) HTFC/AC technology in a clear and approachable manner in order to serve the target audience of market stakeholders.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of sorafenib compared to best supportive care in second line renal cell cancer from a payer perspective in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Panagiotis Ke; Talias, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the cost effectiveness of sorafenib as a second line treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma compared to standard best supportive care (BSC) in Cyprus. A probabilistic Decision analytic Markov Model was created to simulate disease progression and data from landmark trials were used. Actual local costs were set according to current guidelines in Cyprus. The incremental cost per quality adjusted life year of sorafenib versus BSC was €102,059. The probability of sorafenib to be cost effective at the threshold of €60,000 was 0%. Total costs were sensitive to the price of product, its effectiveness and to a lesser degree to the utility values. Sorafenib demonstrated superior clinical effectiveness compared to BSC, but it's not cost effective under current willingness to pay threshold. Its orphan status along with solidarity principle may justify reimbursement on an individual patient basis.

  15. Electrooxidation of H{sub 2}/CO on carbon-supported PtRuMo nanoparticles for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiouvaras, N.; Pena, M.A.; Fierro, J.L.G.; Martinez-Huerta, M.V. [CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica; Alcaide, F.; Alvarez, G. [CIDETEC-IK4, Donostia, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Ternary anodic PtRuMo catalysts have been prepared following a two step procedure. All catalysts prepared present PtRu metal loading of 30%wt and a Mo load of 0, 1, 2.5 and 5%wt supported on Vulcan XC 72R. Different physicochemical techniques have been employed for the analysis of the catalysts as well as electrochemical techniques in combination with FTIR for in situ studies. The fuel cell performance was evaluated at 80 C in a PEMFC fed with H{sub 2}/CO (10 ppm). Catalysts obtained exhibit good dispersion and small particle size (2.6 nm). FTIR results obtained in CO saturated confirm that lower amounts of CO are adsorbed on ternary catalysts compared with binary catalyst, whichever Mo composition was used. However, polarization curves of the catalysts show that the activity strongly depend on the composition, where PtRu-Mo(1%wt)/C displays the highest CO tolerance. (orig.)

  16. Detailed impedance characterization of a well performing and durable Ni:CGO infiltrated cermet anode for metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Klemensø, Trine; Blennow Tullmar, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Further knowledge of the novel, well performing and durable Ni:CGO infiltrated cermet anode for metal supported fuel cells has been acquired by means of a detailed impedance spectroscopy study. The anode impedance was shown to consist of three arcs. Porous electrode theory (PET) represented...... as a transmission line response could account for the intermediate frequency arc. The PET model enabled a detailed insight into the effect of adding minor amounts of Ni into the infiltrated CGO and allowed an estimation of important characteristics such as the electrochemical utilization thickness of the anode...... of the infiltrated submicron sized particles was surprisingly robust. TEM analysis revealed the nano sized Ni particles to be trapped within the CGO matrix, which along the self limiting grain growth of the CGO seem to be able to stabilize the submicron structured anode....

  17. Highly porous PEM fuel cell cathodes based on low density carbon aerogels as Pt-support: Experimental study of the mass-transport losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Julien; Chenitz, Regis; Chatenet, Marian; Berthon-Fabry, Sandrine; Cornet, Nathalie; Achard, Patrick

    Carbon aerogels exhibiting high porous volumes and high surface areas, differentiated by their pore-size distributions were used as Pt-supports in the cathode catalytic layer of H 2/air-fed PEM fuel cell. The cathodes were tested as 50 cm 2 membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The porous structure of the synthesized catalytic layers was impacted by the nanostructure of the Pt-doped carbon aerogels (Pt/CAs). In this paper thus we present an experimental study aiming at establishing links between the porous structure of the cathode catalytic layers and the MEAs performances. For that purpose, the polarization curves of the MEAs were decomposed in 3 contributions: the kinetic loss, the ohmic loss and the mass-transport loss. We showed that the MEAs made with the different carbon aerogels had similar kinetic activities (low current density performance) but very different mass-transport voltage losses. It was found that the higher the pore-size of the initial carbon aerogel, the higher the mass-transport voltage losses. Supported by our porosimetry (N 2-adsorption and Hg-porosimetry) measurement, we interpret this apparent contradiction as the consequence of the more important Nafion penetration into the carbon aeorogel with larger pore-size. Indeed, the catalytic layers made from the larger pore-size carbon aerogel had lower porosities. We thus show in this work that carbon aerogels are materials with tailored nanostructured structure which can be used as model materials for experimentally testing the optimization of the PEM fuel cell catalytic layers.

  18. 阴极支撑管式固体氧化物燃料电池%Cathode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells:a critical review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄克勤

    2013-01-01

    This review provides a close look into the world leading cathodes-supported tubular solid ox-ide fuel cell (SOFC) technology. It starts from the basic facts of a SOFC,where the working principle,advantag-es,types and applications are specifically discussed. It then focuses on cathode-supported tubular SOFCs,one important branch of SOFCs,by providing detailed information on engineering innovations,materials advances, manufacturing processes and electrical performance of both traditional cylindrical and flattened ribbed tubular cells. The review ends with a high-level summary on the SOFC generator systems manufactured and demonstrat-ed by Siemens/Westinghouse over the past half-century.%  介绍了世界领先的阴极支撑管式固体氧化物燃料电池(SOFC)技术。从SOFC的基本组成开始阐述SOFC的工作原理、优点、类型及应用。作为SOFC的一个重要分支,重点讨论了阴极支撑管式SOFC,详细介绍了其工艺创新、材料、制备工艺,以及传统的圆管(cylindrical)和扁管电池的电性能。然后对过去半个世纪以来西门子/西屋公司制造并且示范验证的SOFC发电系统进行了详细的总结。

  19. 90y-Ibritumumab Tiuxetan (Zevalin®-BEAM/C with Autologous Stem Cell Support as Therapy for Advanced Mantle Cell Lymphoma. - Preliminary Results From the Third Nordic II Study (MCL3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolstad, Arne; Laurell, Anna; Andersen, Niels S

    The Nordic Lymphoma Group has since 1996 conducted three consecutive phase II trials for front-line treatment of MCL patients ≤ 65 years of age. The first protocol (MCL1) 1996-2000 introduced high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support (unpurged or ex vivo purged) as consolidation...... with alternating cycles of maxi-CHOP-rituximab (3 cycles) and Ara-C-rituximab (3 cycles). Response evaluation was done after cycle 5. PET/CT was recommended, but could not influence the response evaluation, which was done according to the International Workshop criteria. Responders underwent in vivo purged harvest...

  20. Enhanced methane steam reforming activity and electrochemical performance of Ni0.9Fe0.1-supported solid oxide fuel cells with infiltrated Ni-TiO2 particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Jia, Lichao; Wang, Xin; Pu, Jian; Chi, Bo; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Ni0.9Fe0.1 alloy-supported solid oxide fuel cells with NiTiO3 (NTO) infiltrated into the cell support from 0 to 4 wt.% are prepared and investigated for CH4 steam reforming activity and electrochemical performance. The infiltrated NiTiO3 is reduced to TiO2-supported Ni particles in H2 at 650 °C. The reforming activity of the Ni0.9Fe0.1-support is increased by the presence of the TiO2-supported Ni particles; 3 wt.% is the optimal value of the added NTO, corresponding to the highest reforming activity, resistance to carbon deposition and electrochemical performance of the cell. Fueled wet CH4 at 100 mL min−1, the cell with 3 wt.% of NTO demonstrates a peak power density of 1.20 W cm−2 and a high limiting current density of 2.83 A cm−2 at 650 °C. It performs steadily for 96 h at 0.4 A cm−2 without the presence of deposited carbon in the Ni0.9Fe0.1-support and functional anode. Five polarization processes are identified by deconvoluting and data-fitting the electrochemical impedance spectra of the cells under the testing conditions; and the addition of TiO2-supported Ni particles into the Ni0.9Fe0.1-support reduces the polarization resistance of the processes ascribed to CH4 steam reforming and gas diffusion in the Ni0.9Fe0.1-support and functional anode. PMID:27775092