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Sample records for cells stress oxydant

  1. Un stress oxydant chronique est associé à une amelioration de la sensibilité à l’insuline et des fonctions mitochondrialesdans le muscle squelettique de souris SAMP8

    OpenAIRE

    Barquissau, Valentin; Denis, Philippe; Jouve, Chrystele; Patrac, Véronique; Rigaudière, Jean-Paul; Feillet Coudray, Christine; Galinier, A; Rieusset, Jennifer; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Morio, Béatrice

    2012-01-01

    De nombreuses études suggèrent que les espèces réactives del’oxygène participent à l’étiologie du diabète de type 2. Ce travail a pour objectifd’étudier l’effet d’un stress oxydant chronique sur le développement de l’insulino-résistance et sur les adaptations des fonctions mitochondriales musculaires.

  2. Influence of deformation behavior, oxydation, and temperature on the long time cyclic stress behavior of high temperature steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maile, K.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of different parameters on the creep-fatigue behavior of several steel alloys was investigated. The higher the temperature the lower the crack initiation value. Pauses during the cycle reduce the damage. Oxidation reduces and protective gas increases the lifetime. Prior loading and prior deformation reduce the lifetime. Short annealing slightly affects the cycle stress behavior. The test results do not satisfactorily agree with methods of extrapolation and damage accumulation.

  3. The results of the lipids peroxidation products on the DNA bases as biological markers of the oxidative stress; Les adduits des produits de la peroxydation lipidique sur les bases de l'ADN comme biomarqueurs du stress oxydant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falletti, O

    2007-10-15

    Different ways of DNA damages have been studied, among these ones the direct way of DNA damages formation by the reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). This way leads to the formation of oxidative DNA damages. In 1990, works have suggested an indirect way of DNA damages formation, the lipids peroxidation. Instead of oxidizing directly DNA, the R.O.S. oxide the lipids present in the cells and their membranes; The products coming from this degradation are able to provoke DNA damages. This way has not been studied very much. The work of this thesis is axed on this DNA theme and lipids peroxidation. In the first chapter, we begin by presenting DNA and the direct way of oxidative damages formation by the R.O.S.Then, we speak about the cell lipids suffering oxidation reactions and the different ways of lipids oxidation. Then, we present how the lipid peroxidation is a source of damages for DNA. (N.C.)

  4. Activité physique et produits dérivés du soja : intérêts dans la prise en charge du stress oxydant associé au diabète de type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Malardé, Ludivine

    2012-01-01

    Oxidant stress (OS) is well known to contribute to the onset and the development of diabetic complications. OS mainly result from marked rises in blood glucose level. Insulin treatment is required to keep patients alive, but fails to prevent long term complications progression, which result from hyperglycemic induced OS.In healthy people, diet and/or physical activity succeed to significantly reduce OS. Physical activity exhibit moreover glucoregulatory properties.Consequently, the aim of thi...

  5. Mechanisms of cell propulsion by active stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, A E, E-mail: aec@wustl.edu [Department of Physics, Washington University, Campus Box 1105, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The mechanisms by which cytoskeletal flows and cell-substrate interactions interact to generate cell motion are explored by using a simplified model of the cytoskeleton as a viscous gel containing active stresses. This model yields explicit general results relating cell speed and traction forces to the distributions of active stress and cell-substrate friction. It is found that (i) the cell velocity is given by a function that quantifies the asymmetry of the active-stress distribution, (ii) gradients in cell-substrate friction can induce motion even when the active stresses are symmetrically distributed, (iii) the traction-force dipole is enhanced by protrusive stresses near the cell edges or contractile stresses near the center of the cell and (iv) the cell velocity depends biphasically on the cell-substrate adhesion strength if active stress is enhanced by adhesion. Specific experimental tests of the calculated dependences are proposed.

  6. Dendritic cells are stressed out in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    A recently paper published in Cell reports that dendritic cells (DCs) are dysfunctional in the tumor environment. Tumor impairs DC function through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response and subsequent disruption of lipid metabolic homeostasis.

  7. Oxidation films morphology; Sur la morphologie des pellicules d'oxydation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paidassi, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    After studying the oxidation of several pure polyvalent metals (Fe, Cu, Mn, Ni, U) and of their oxides at high temperature and atmospheric pressure, the author suggests how to modify the usual representation of the oxide film (a piling of different oxide layers, homogeneous on a micrographic scale with a equi-axial crystallisation, free of mechanical tensions, with flat boundary surfaces) to have it nearer to reality. In this first part, the author exposes the study of the real micrographic structure of the oxidation film and gives examples of precipitation in the oxides during the cooling of the oxidised sample. (author) [French] En se basant sur les etudes qu'il a faites sur l'oxydation aux temperatures elevees et a la pression atmospherique de quelques metaux purs a valences multiples (Fe, Cu, Mn, Ni, U), et de leurs oxydes, l'auteur suggere comment le schema qui representerait la pellicule comme etant une superposition de diverses couches d'oxydes, homogenes micrographiquement, a cristallisations equiaxes, depourvues de tensions mecaniques et separees par des interfaces plans, doit etre modifie pour s'ajuster a la realite. Dans cette premiere partie, l'auteur etudie la structure micrographique reelle des pellicules d'oxydation et donne des exemples de precipitation dans les oxydes au cours du refroidissement des echantillons oxydes. (auteur)

  8. Méthodes générales de synthèse des catalyseurs à base d'oxydes General Synthesis Methods for Mixed Oxide Catalysts

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    Courty Ph.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available De nombreux procédés industriels (industrie céramique, électronique, nucléaire catalyse hétérogène utilisent des matériaux constitués d'oxydes mixtes. Les études fondamentales réalisées en catalyse et leurs applications industrielles montrent qu'au-delà des diverses interprétations fines de l'activité catalytique des oxydes mixtes, une notion plus générale se dégage, celle de l'homogénéité de la phase active, donc du premier intermédiaire de fabrication du catalyseur (le précurseur. Les différentes méthodes de synthèse des oxydes mixtes, puis des catalyseurs, sont alors exposées. Pour chacune d'entre elles, il est montré comment l'obtention d'un précurseur homogène peut être favorisée et maintenue. Un exemple illustre le cas de l'oxyde mixte déposé sur support. Finalement, l'étape de mise en forme de l'oxyde mixte est évoquée, l'aspect économique de la fabrication du catalyseur conclut ce texte. A great mony industrial processes (ceramics, electronics, nuclear energy, hererogeneous catalysis use materials made up of mixed oxides. Fundamental research on catalysis and its industrial applications has shown that, over and beyond the various subtle interpretations of the catalytic activity of mixed oxides, a more general concept emerges, i. e. that of the homogeneity of the active phase, hence of the first catalyst-manufacturing intermediate (the precursor. Different synthesis methods for mixed oxides, and then for cotalysts, are described. The demonstration is made for each of them how the production of a homogeneous precursor con be enhanced and maintained. An example illustrotes the case of a mixed oxide deposited on a carrier. To conclude, the shaping of the mixed oxide is described, followed by the economic aspect of catalyst manufacturing.

  9. Study and fabrication of solid oxide fuel cells through tape casting and co-sintering; Etude et realisation par coulage en bande et co-frittage de cellules de pile a combustible a oxydes solides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosjean, A

    2004-11-15

    This work is dedicated to the devising of a low-cost fabrication process of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Technical requirements impose the shaping method: stripe casting as well as the materials used: Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), nickel and lanthanum manganite doped with strontium (LSM). In order to comply with environmental requirements the developed process uses an aqueous barbotine solvent. We get electrodes and the electrolyte separately, the use of an absorbent drying process has enabled us to join 3 layers to form an elementary cell with great interfacial homogeneity. The resistance of the cell to sintering has been improved through the symmetrization of the deformations of the cell. In order to interpret the low electrical properties of the cell and its quick damaging, transmission microscopy studies have been performed. These studies have shown 2 facts. First, 2 isolating phases appear at the cathode (at the LSM/YSZ interface) because of a too high sintering temperature and secondly, a quick clustering of nickel grains appears during cell operation that leads to a local loss of the nickel grid percolation. This problem has been solved by increasing the size of nickel oxide grains from 0.5 {mu}m to 3 {mu}m) to stabilize the microstructure. The issue of the reactivity at the LSM/YSZ interfaces was tackled in 2 different ways, we have tried to lower the sintering temperature by using a zirconia nano-powder first and then by replacing zirconia in the electrolyte by gadolinium-doped ceria. The use of zirconia nano-powder has failed to decrease sintering temperature while preserving the electrolyte density and the use of ceria has triggered instabilities that have not yet been solved. Despite all these drawbacks, this process allows the fabrication of an excellent anode/electrolyte interface. (A.C.)

  10. Réduction de l'oxyde d'azote par la suie dans les produits de combustion Reduction of Nitric Oxyde by Soot in Combustion Products

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    De Soete G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available On a étudié dans un réacteur à lit fixe la réduction du NO par de la suie formée dans des flammes riches de mélanges éthane/oxygène/argon. Le mélange gazeux traversant le réacteur est de l'argon dopé avec du NO; dans certains cas ce mélange est enrichi d'hydrogène ou d'oxyde de carbone. En présence d'hydrogène ou d'oxyde de carbone, ces vitesses sont nettement plus grandes qu'avec la suie seule. La comparaison avec des vitesses réactionnelles obtenues sur des lits fixes composés d'autres matériaux solides, tels que l'alumine, montre que la réduction de l'oxyde d'azote se fait principalement par une réaction hétérogène avec l'hydrogène et l'oxyde de carbone catalysée par la suie. D'autres matériaux solides,tels que des oxydes réfractaires présentent une activité catalylique aussi importante que la suie. Cette observation fournit une nouvelle explication de l'effet connu de certains additifs sur la réduction de NO dans les flammes. Dans la seconde partie de l'étude, on mesure la réduction des oxydes d'azote dans les flammes fuligineuses de prémélange. De l'argon dopé par de l'oxyde d'azote est injecté dans les produits de combustion de ces flammes chargés de suie; l'introduction du NO est faite à différentes distances derrière le brûleur, correspondant à différents niveaux de température des produits de combustion. La réduction fractionnelle des oxydes d'azote est mesurée en fonction de la concentration en suie, en hydrogène et en oxyde de carbone, en faisant varier la composition du mélange inflammable. Les résultats expérimentaux sont en bon accord avec la réduction calculée en se basant sur les informations cinétiques obtenues en lit fixe. The kinetics of nitric oxide réduction by soot collected from hydrocarbon flames is studied in a fixed-bed reactor. The gas flow traversing thé reactor is either argon with NO, or argon with hydrogen and NO, or argon with carbon monoxide and NO. In th

  11. The cell stress machinery and retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Aguilà, Monica; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Novoselov, Sergey S; Parfitt, David A; Cheetham, Michael E

    2013-06-27

    Retinal degenerations are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterised by progressive loss of vision due to neurodegeneration. The retina is a highly specialised tissue with a unique architecture and maintaining homeostasis in all the different retinal cell types is crucial for healthy vision. The retina can be exposed to a variety of environmental insults and stress, including light-induced damage, oxidative stress and inherited mutations that can lead to protein misfolding. Within retinal cells there are different mechanisms to cope with disturbances in proteostasis, such as the heat shock response, the unfolded protein response and autophagy. In this review, we discuss the multiple responses of the retina to different types of stress involved in retinal degenerations, such as retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Understanding the mechanisms that maintain and re-establish proteostasis in the retina is important for developing new therapeutic approaches to fight blindness.

  12. Pulmonary mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress in response to ozone exposure: Effects of age and an omega-3 enriched diet; Alterations mitochondriales et stress oxydant pulmonaire en reponse a l'ozone: effets de l'age et d'une supplementation en omega-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servais, St.

    2004-04-15

    Ozone (O{sub 3}) is one of the molecular species most reactive to which are exposed living species. O{sub 3} acts primarily on the pulmonary system by inducing oxidative stress. Because susceptibility to oxidative stress varies with age, we studied alterations of pulmonary balance between production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their elimination, in immature (21 days), adult (6 months) and old rats (20 months) during O{sub 3} exposure (0,5 ppm, 12 h/day for 7 days). For this purpose we have specifically studied pulmonary mitochondria as ROS source, main antioxidant enzyme activities, contents in stress protein (HSP72), 8-oxodGuo and DNA adducts resulting from lipid peroxidation. These works have shown that our protocol of O{sub 3} exposure did not induce lung oxidative stress in adult rats. We confirmed that immature and old rats were more sensitive during O{sub 3} challenge than adults. Indeed, O{sub 3} generates oxidative stress which leads to modification of ventilatory function and pulmonary DNA oxidation in these two populations. Parameters which take part in greatest susceptibility to O{sub 3} differ according to the age. We concluded that the mitochondria is not a major source of pulmonary ROS in our model of O{sub 3} exposure. Secondly, with the sights of anti-inflammatory properties of polyunsaturated fatty acids {omega}3, we studied the effect of a {omega}3 supplementation in immature and old rats exposed to O{sub 3}. The supplementation in {omega}3 limits the pulmonary DNA oxidation in immature and old rats. Paradoxically, in old rats this supplementation provokes an increase in lipid peroxidation susceptibility. (author)

  13. Sensing the Heat Stress by Mammalian Cells

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    Cates Jordan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heat-shock response network controls the adaptation and survival of the cell against environmental stress. This network is highly conserved and is connected with many other signaling pathways. A key element of the heat-shock network is the heat-shock transcription factor-1 (HSF, which is transiently activated by elevated temperatures. HSF translocates to the nucleus upon elevated temperatures, forming homotrimeric complexes. The HSF homotrimers bind to the heat shock element on the DNA and control the expression of the hsp70 gene. The Hsp70 proteins protect cells from thermal stress. Thermal stress causes the unfolding of proteins, perturbing thus the pathways under their control. By binding to these proteins, Hsp70 allows them to refold and prevents their aggregation. The modulation of the activity of the hsp70-promoter by the intensity of the input stress is thus critical for cell's survival. The promoter activity starts from a basal level and rapidly increases once the stress is applied, reaches a maximum level and attenuates slowely back to the basal level. This phenomenon is the hallmark of many experimental studies and of all computational network analysis. Results The molecular construct used as a measure of the response to thermal stress is a Hsp70-GFP fusion gene transfected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. The time profile of the GFP protein depends on the transient activity, Transient(t, of the heat shock system. The function Transient(t depends on hsp70 promoter activity, transcriptional regulation and the translation initiation effects elicited by the heat stress. The GFP time profile is recorded using flow cytometry measurements, a technique that allows a quantitative measurement of the fluorescence of a large number of cells (104. The GFP responses to one and two heat shocks were measured for 261 conditions of different temperatures and durations. We found that: (i the response of the cell to two

  14. Effets du titane et du niobium sur l'oxydation à 950circC d'aciers ferritiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issartel, C.; Buscail, H.; Caudron, E.; Cueff, R.; Riffard, F.; El Messki, S.; Karimi, N.; Antoni, L.

    2004-11-01

    Nous avons étudié l'effet du titane et du niobium sur l'oxydation à 950circC d'un acier Fe-Cr chrominoformeur. La DRX in situ montre que le titane semble s'oxyder en formant Cr{2}TiO{5} et TiO{2} qui contribuent à une augmentation de la prise de masse des échantillons. Une partie du titane issu de ces oxydes semble doper la couche de chromine. Sa présence augmente la concentration en lacunes cationiques dans la chromine et augmente donc la diffusion du chrome dans la couche. Nous avons aussi montré que le niobium n'a pas d'influence sur l'oxydation de ce type d'acier à 950circC.

  15. Evaluation de quelques paramètres de la balance oxydants / antioxydants chez des rats diabétiques recevant de la quercétine

    OpenAIRE

    BESSAOUD, Sarra

    2015-01-01

    L’objectif de notre travail est de déterminer l’effet des polyphénols « la quercétine » au cours du diabète comme étant un antioxydant en évaluant le statut oxydant/antioxydant chez les rats diabétiques traités par la quercétine comparés aux rats diabétiques au niveau du plasma et des organes « le foie et le tissu adipeux ». Nos résultats montrent que le diabète favorise le stress oxydatif, sa présence est marquée par une augmentation des protéines carbonylées, une diminution d...

  16. Les oxydes d'azote dans l'environnement Nitrogen Oxides in the Environment

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    Oppeneau J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Le présent article expose les concentrations en oxydes d'azote rencontrées dans l'environnement et fait la part des origines naturelles et anthropogéniques. II présente une des manifestations les plus connues des interactions entre les oxydes d'azote, les molécules organiques, la vapeur d'eau et le rayonnement solaire le brouillard photochimique. Un certain nombre de données sur les effets d'oxydes d'azote sur l'homme et le milieu sont cités et il est mentionné que de nombreuses recherches sont à effectuer pour préciser les connaissances actuelles. Enfin, les réglementations présentes et futures sont décrites. This article describes concentrations of nitrogen oxides found in the environment and explains their natural and anthropogenic origins. It describes one of the best known examples of interactions between nitrogen oxides, organic molecules, water vaporand solorradiation, i. e. photochemical smog. Various data are brought outconcerning the effects of nitrogen oxides on man and the environment, and mention is mode of the many research projects being carried out ta specify current knowledge. Present and future regulations are also described.

  17. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

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    Hyacinthe Le Gall

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic, transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  18. Bridges between mitochondrial oxidative stress, ER stress and mTOR signaling in pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Jingjing

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic β cell dysfunction, i.e., failure to provide insulin in concentrations sufficient to control blood sugar, is central to the etiology of all types of diabetes. Current evidence implicates mitochondrial oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pancreatic β cell loss and impaired insulin secretion. Oxidative and ER stress are interconnected so that misfolded proteins induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production; likewise, oxidative stress disturbs the ER redox state thereby disrupting correct disulfide bond formation and proper protein folding. mTOR signaling regulates many metabolic processes including protein synthesis, cell growth, survival and proliferation. Oxidative stress inhibits mTORC1, which is considered an important suppressor of mitochondrial oxidative stress in β cells, and ultimately, controls cell survival. The interplay between ER stress and mTORC1 is complicated, since the unfolded protein response (UPR) activation can occur upstream or downstream of mTORC1. Persistent activation of mTORC1 initiates protein synthesis and UPR activation, while in the later phase induces ER stress. Chronic activation of ER stress inhibits Akt/mTORC1 pathway, while under particular settings, acute activation of UPR activates Akt-mTOR signaling. Thus, modulating mitochondrial oxidative stress and ER stress via mTOR signaling may be an approach that will effectively suppress obesity- or glucolipotoxicity-induced metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this review, we focus on the regulations between mTOR signaling and mitochondrial oxidative or ER stress in pancreatic β cells.

  19. Optimal matrix rigidity for stress fiber polarization in stem cells

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    Rehfeldt, F.; Brown, A. E. X.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    The shape and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells is especially sensitive to the rigidity of their environment; the physical mechanisms involved are unknown. A theoretical model and experiments demonstrate here that the polarization/alignment of stress-fibers within stem cells is a non-monotonic function of matrix rigidity. We treat the cell as an active elastic inclusion in a surrounding matrix whose polarizability, unlike dead matter, depends on the feedback of cellular forces that develop in response to matrix stresses. The theory correctly predicts the monotonic increase of the cellular forces with the matrix rigidity and the alignment of stress-fibers parallel to the long axis of cells. We show that the anisotropy of this alignment depends non-monotonically on matrix rigidity and demonstrate it experimentally by quantifying the orientational distribution of stress-fibers in stem cells. These findings offer a first physical insight for the dependence of stem cell differentiation on tissue elasticity. PMID:20563235

  20. Optimal shapes and stresses of adherent cells on patterned substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a continuum mechanical model for an adherent cell on two dimensional adhesive micropatterned substrates. The cell is modeled as an isotropic and homogeneous elastic material subject to uniform internal contractile stresses. The build-up of tension from cortical actin bundles at the cell periphery is incorporated by introducing an energy cost for bending of the cell boundary, resulting to a resistance to changes in local curvature. Integrin-based adhesions are modeled as harmonic springs, that pin the cell to adhesive patches of a predefined geometry. Using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical techniques we investigate the competing effects of bulk contractility and cortical bending rigidity in regulating cell shapes on non-adherent regions. We show that the crossover from convex to concave cell edges is controlled by the interplay between contractile stresses and boundary bending rigidity. In particular, the cell boundary becomes concave beyond a critical value of the contractile stress that ...

  1. Effects of Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability

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    Sunday, Brittney; Triantafillu, Ursula; Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun

    2014-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are believed to be the source of tumor formation, are exposed to fluid shear stress as a result of blood flow within the blood vessels. It was theorized that CSCs would be less susceptible to cell death than non-CSCs after both types of cell were exposed to a fluid shear stress, and that higher levels of fluid shear stress would result in lower levels of cell viability for both cell types. To test this hypothesis, U87 glioblastoma cells were cultured adherently (containing smaller populations of CSCs) and spherically (containing larger populations of CSCs). They were exposed to fluid shear stress in a simulated blood flow through a 125-micrometer diameter polyetheretherketone (PEEK) tubing using a syringe pump. After exposure, cell viability data was collected using a BioRad TC20 Automated Cell Counter. Each cell type was tested at three physiological shear stress values: 5, 20, and 60 dynes per centimeter squared. In general, it was found that the CSC-enriched U87 sphere cells had higher cell viability than the CSC-depleted U87 adherent cancer cells. Interestingly, it was also observed that the cell viability was not negatively affected by the higher fluid shear stress values in the tested range. In future follow-up studies, higher shear stresses will be tested. Furthermore, CSCs from different tumor origins (e.g. breast tumor, prostate tumor) will be tested to determine cell-specific shear sensitivity. National Science Foundation Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  2. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

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    Laila Ziko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death. Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death.

  3. Mechanistic insights into aging, cell cycle progression, and stress response

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    Troy Anthony Alan Harkness

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The longevity of an organism depends on the health of its cells. Throughout life cells are exposed to numerous intrinsic and extrinsic stresses, such as free radicals, generated through mitochondrial electron transport, and ultraviolet irradiation. The cell has evolved numerous mechanisms to scavenge free radicals and repair damage induced by these insults. One mechanism employed by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to combat stress utilizes the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC, an essential multi-subunit ubiquitin-protein ligase structurally and functionally conserved from yeast to humans that controls progression through mitosis and G1. We have observed that yeast cells expressing compromised APC subunits are sensitive to multiple stresses and have shorter replicative and chronological lifespans. In a pathway that runs parallel to that regulated by the APC, members of the Forkhead box (Fox transcription factor family also regulate stress responses. The yeast Fox orthologues Fkh1 and Fkh2 appear to drive the transcription of stress response factors and slow early G1 progression, while the APC seems to regulate chromatin structure, chromosome segregation, and resetting of the transcriptome in early G1. In contrast, under non-stress conditions, the Fkhs play a complex role in cell cycle progression, partially through activation of the APC. Direct and indirect interactions between the APC and the yeast Fkhs appear to be pivotal for lifespan determination. Here we explore the potential for these interactions to be evolutionarily conserved as a mechanism to balance cell cycle regulation with stress responses.

  4. Oxidative stress tolerance of early stage diabetic endothelial progenitor cell

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    Dewi Sukmawati

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Primitive BM-EPCs showed vasculogenic dysfunction in early diabetes. However the oxidative stress is not denoted as the major initiating factor of its cause. Our results suggest that primitive BM-KSL cell has the ability to compensate oxidative stress levels in early diabetes by increasing the expression of anti-oxidative enzymes.

  5. La formation de l'oxyde azotique dans les flammes de diffusion de gaz naturel Nitrogen. Oxyde Formation in Natural-Gas Diffusion Flams

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    Portrait L. M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'étude de la formation de l'oxyde azotique dans des flammes de diffusion de ga naturel est effectuée depuis deux ans sur le four expérimental du Groupe d'Etude des Flammes de Gaz Naturel situé à Toulouse. Un certain nombre de variables ont été explorées : type de flamme, excès d'air, préchauffage de l'air, teneur en oxygène du comburant, puissance calorifique, et débit de moment cinétique. L'étude a mis en évidence une corrélation générale, quelle que soit la variable considérée, entre la quantité maximale d'oxyde d'azote formé et la température maximale de la flamme. Certains des résultats précédents ont été exploités à l'Institut Français du Pétrole, en vue d'établir une équation de vitesse de formation de NO applicable aux flammes axiales de diffusion de gaz naturel. Les calculs s'appuient sur les connaissances obtenues lors de l'étude cinétique de formation de NO effectuée au Laboratoire d'Aérothermique Fondamentale. Les résultats du calcul théorique confirment ceux de l'étude sur le four expérimental en ce qui concerne l'influence prépondérante de la température sur la formation de l'oxyde azotique. Par ailleurs, le calcul théorique retrouve bien les résultats obtenus lors de l'étude fondamentale, selon lesquels la cinétique de formation de NO évolue le long de la flamme depuis le front de flamme jusqu'aux gaz brûlés. La généralisation à un grand nombre de flammes de l'équation cinétique expérimentale obtenue nécessite maintenant de prendre en compte certains phénomènes de diffusion négligés jusqu'à présent. Research on the formation of nitrogen oxide in natural-gas diffusion flammes has been going on for two years in the experimental furnace of the Groupe d'Etude des Flammes de Gaz Naturel located in Toulouse. Different variables have been investigoted such as type of flamme, air excess, air preheating, oxygen content in the oxidant, heating power and kinetic moment output

  6. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  7. Multipotent glia-like stem cells mediate stress adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin de Celis, Maria F; Garcia-Martin, Ruben; Wittig, Dierk; Valencia, Gabriela D; Enikolopov, Grigori; Funk, Richard H; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Bornstein, Stefan R; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika

    2015-06-01

    The neural crest-derived adrenal medulla is closely related to the sympathetic nervous system; however, unlike neural tissue, it is characterized by high plasticity which suggests the involvement of stem cells. Here, we show that a defined pool of glia-like nestin-expressing progenitor cells in the adult adrenal medulla contributes to this plasticity. These glia-like cells have features of adrenomedullary sustentacular cells, are multipotent, and are able to differentiate into chromaffin cells and neurons. The adrenal is central to the body's response to stress making its proper adaptation critical to maintaining homeostasis. Our results from stress experiments in vivo show the activation and differentiation of these progenitors into new chromaffin cells. In summary, we demonstrate the involvement of a new glia-like multipotent stem cell population in adrenal tissue adaptation. Our data also suggest the contribution of stem and progenitor cells in the adaptation of neuroendocrine tissue function in general.

  8. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandl, Anita [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Nerlich, Michael [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Angele, Peter, E-mail: Peter.Angele@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  9. Sertraline induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in hepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Xuan, Jiekun; Couch, Letha; Iyer, Advait; Wu, Yuanfeng; Li, Quan-Zhen; Guo, Lei

    2014-08-01

    Sertraline is used for the treatment of depression, and is also used for the treatment of panic, obsessive-compulsive, and post-traumatic stress disorders. Previously, we have demonstrated that sertraline caused hepatic cytotoxicity, with mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis being underlying mechanisms. In this study, we used microarray and other biochemical and molecular analyses to identify endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as a novel molecular mechanism. HepG2 cells were exposed to sertraline and subjected to whole genome gene expression microarray analysis. Pathway analysis revealed that ER stress is among the significantly affected biological changes. We confirmed the increased expression of ER stress makers by real-time PCR and Western blots. The expression of typical ER stress markers such as PERK, IRE1α, and CHOP was significantly increased. To study better ER stress-mediated drug-induced liver toxicity; we established in vitro systems for monitoring ER stress quantitatively and efficiently, using Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) and secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as ER stress reporters. These in vitro systems were validated using well-known ER stress inducers. In these two reporter assays, sertraline inhibited the secretion of Gluc and SEAP. Moreover, we demonstrated that sertraline-induced apoptosis was coupled to ER stress and that the apoptotic effect was attenuated by 4-phenylbutyrate, a potent ER stress inhibitor. In addition, we showed that the MAP4K4-JNK signaling pathway contributed to the process of sertraline-induced ER stress. In summary, we demonstrated that ER stress is a mechanism of sertraline-induced liver toxicity.

  10. Synthèse du mélange cyclohexanol-cyclohexanone par oxydation du cyclohexane par les hydroperoxydes en présence de métaux supportés sur oxydes métalliques.

    OpenAIRE

    REKKAB-nee-HAMMOUMRAOUI, Ilhem

    2014-01-01

    L’objectif de ce travail a été axé sur la préparation des catalyseurs à base de différents métaux (Ru, Pt et Co) supportés sur des oxydes métalliques (Al2O3, TiO2, SiO2, ZrO2, CeO2, Fe2O3 et MgO). Leurs performances ont été par la suite évaluées en oxydation du cyclohexane par l’hydroperoxyde de tertiobutyle (TBHP) en phase liquide. Ces catalyseurs ont été caractérisés par différentes techniques : Mesure de surface par BET, IR de la thermodésorption de la pyridine pour estimer l’a...

  11. On strain and stress in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brian N.; Smith, David W.

    2014-11-01

    Recent theoretical simulations of amelogenesis and network formation and new, simple analyses of the basic multicellular unit (BMU) allow estimation of the order of magnitude of the strain energy density in populations of living cells in their natural environment. A similar simple calculation translates recent measurements of the force-displacement relation for contacting cells (cell-cell adhesion energy) into equivalent volume energy densities, which are formed by averaging the changes in contact energy caused by a cell's migration over the cell's volume. The rates of change of these mechanical energy densities (energy density rates) are then compared to the order of magnitude of the metabolic activity of a cell, expressed as a rate of production of metabolic energy per unit volume. The mechanical energy density rates are 4-5 orders of magnitude smaller than the metabolic energy density rate in amelogenesis or bone remodeling in the BMU, which involve modest cell migration velocities, and 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller for innervation of the gut or angiogenesis, where migration rates are among the highest for all cell types. For representative cell-cell adhesion gradients, the mechanical energy density rate is 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the metabolic energy density rate. The results call into question the validity of using simple constitutive laws to represent living cells. They also imply that cells need not migrate as inanimate objects of gradients in an energy field, but are better regarded as self-powered automata that may elect to be guided by such gradients or move otherwise. Thus Ġel=d/dt 1/2 >[(C11+C12)ɛ02+2μγ02]=(C11+C12)ɛ0ɛ˙0+2μγ0γ˙0 or Ġel=ηEɛ0ɛ˙0+η‧Eγ0γ˙0 with 1.4≤η≤3.4 and 0.7≤η‧≤0.8 for Poisson's ratio in the range 0.2≤ν≤0.4 and η=1.95 and η‧=0.75 for ν=0.3. The spatial distribution of shear strains arising within an individual cell as cells slide past one another during amelogenesis is not known

  12. Effect of salt hyperosmotic stress on yeast cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logothetis Stelios

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During fermentation for ethanol production, yeasts are subjected to different kinds of physico-chemical stresses such as: initially high sugar concentration and low temperature; and later, increased ethanol concentrations. Such conditions trigger a series of biological responses in an effort to maintain cell cycle progress and yeast cell viability. Regarding osmostress, many studies have been focused on transcriptional activation and gene expression in laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The overall aim of this present work was to further our understanding of wine yeast performance during fermentations under osmotic stress conditions. Specifically, the research work focused on the evaluation of NaCl-induced stress responses of an industrial wine yeast strain S. cerevisiae (VIN 13, particularly with regard to yeast cell growth and viability. The hypothesis was that osmostress conditions energized specific genes to enable yeast cells to survive under stressful conditions. Experiments were designed by pretreating cells with different sodium chloride concentrations (NaCl: 4%, 6% and 10% w/v growing in defined media containing D-glucose and evaluating the impact of this on yeast growth and viability. Subsequent fermentation cycles took place with increasing concentrations of D-glucose (20%, 30%, 40% w/v using salt-adapted cells as inocula. We present evidence that osmostress induced by mild salt pre-treatments resulted in beneficial influences on both cell viability and fermentation performance of an industrial wine yeast strain.

  13. Alterations in the growth and adhesion pattern of Vero cells induced by nutritional stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genari, S C; Gomes, L; Wada, M L

    1998-01-01

    The pattern of growth, adhesion and protein synthesis in Vero cells submitted to nutritional stress conditions was investigated. The control cells presented a characteristic pattern, with monolayer growth, while the stressed cells presented multilayered growth, with aggregate or spheroid formation which detached on the flask surface and continued their growth in another region. In the soft agar assay, with reduced amount of nutrients, only the stressed cells presented growth, indicating physical and nutritional independence. A 44-kDa protein was observed in stressed cells and was absent in non-stressed cells. The adhesion index and fibronectin synthesis and distribution were altered in stressed cells. After confluence, control cells presented fibronectin accumulation in lateral cell-cell contact regions, while this fibronectin accumulation pattern was not observed in stressed cells. These alterations may be responsible for the multilayered growth and decreased adhesion index observed in stressed cells which were transformed by nutritional stress conditions.

  14. Heat shock factors: integrators of cell stress, development and lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerfelt, Malin; Morimoto, Richard I; Sistonen, Lea

    2010-08-01

    Heat shock factors (HSFs) are essential for all organisms to survive exposures to acute stress. They are best known as inducible transcriptional regulators of genes encoding molecular chaperones and other stress proteins. Four members of the HSF family are also important for normal development and lifespan-enhancing pathways, and the repertoire of HSF targets has thus expanded well beyond the heat shock genes. These unexpected observations have uncovered complex layers of post-translational regulation of HSFs that integrate the metabolic state of the cell with stress biology, and in doing so control fundamental aspects of the health of the proteome and ageing.

  15. Orientational Polarizability and Stress Response of Biological Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.; de, R.; Zemel, A.

    We present a theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes random forces as well as forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix and those due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate both the static and high frequency limits of the orientational response in terms of the cellular polarizability. For systems in which the forces due to regulation and activity dominate the mechanical forces, we show that there is a non-linear dynamical response which, in the high frequency limit, causes the cell to orient nearly perpendicular to the direction of the applied stress.

  16. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, Sophie [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); ED515 UPMC, 4 place Jussieu 75005 Paris (France); Sliwa, Dominika [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Rustin, Pierre [Inserm, U676, Physiopathology and Therapy of Mitochondrial Disease Laboratory, 75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Faculte de Medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Camadro, Jean-Michel [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Santos, Renata, E-mail: santos.renata@ijm.univ-paris-diderot.fr [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  17. Cocoa phenolic extract protects pancreatic beta cells against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, María Angeles; Ramos, Sonia; Cordero-Herrero, Isabel; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2013-07-31

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE) containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5-20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  18. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bravo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  19. The STATs in cell stress-type responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Best James

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the early 1990's, a new cell signaling pathway was described. This new paradigm, now known as the JAK/STAT pathway, has been extensively investigated in immune-type cells in response to interferons and interleukins. However, recent evidence suggests that the JAK/STAT pathway also mediates diverse cellular responses to various forms of biological stress including hypoxia/reperfusion, endotoxin, ultraviolet light, and hyperosmolarity. The current literature describing the JAK/STAT pathway's role in cellular stress responses has been reviewed herein, but it is clear that our knowledge in this area is far from complete.

  20. Cell differentiation versus cell death: extracellular glucose is a key determinant of cell fate following oxidative stress exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Poulsen, R C; Knowles, H.J.; Carr, A. J.; HULLEY, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Cells, particularly mechano-sensitive musculoskeletal cells such as tenocytes, routinely encounter oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can not only stimulate tissue repair, but also cause damage leading to tissue degeneration. As diabetes is associated with increased oxidative damage as well as increased risk of tendon degeneration, the aim of this study was to determine if extracellular glucose levels alter the response of tendon cells to oxidative stress. Primary human tenocytes were culture...

  1. Oxidative Stress-Induced Dysfunction of Muller Cells During Starvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Gurubaran, Iswariyaraja Sridevi; Madsen, Claus Desler;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE. Muller cells support retinal neurons with essential functions. Here, we aim to examine the impact of starvation and oxidative stress on glutamate uptake and mitochondrial function in Muller cells. METHODS. Cultured human retinal Muller cells (MIO-M1) were exposed to H2O2 and additional...... starvation for 24 hours. Effects of starvation and H2O2 on glutamate uptake and mitochondrial function were assessed by kinetic glutamate uptake assays and Seahorse assays, respectively. Cell survival was evaluated by cell viability assays. mRNA and protein expressions were assessed by quantitative PCR...... and Western blot. RESULTS. Starvation of Muller cells increased the glutamate uptake capacity as well as the expression of the most abundant glutamate transporter, EAAT1. Mitochondrial and glycolytic activity were diminished in starved Muller cells despite unaffected cell viability. Simultaneous starvation...

  2. Film stresses and electrode buckling in organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brand, Vitali

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the film stresses that develop in the polymer films and metal electrodes of poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells. A compressive biaxial stress of ∼-36 MPa was measured in PEDOT:PSS while a tensile stress of ∼6 MPa was measured in the BHJ layer. We then analyze the effect of electrode deposition rate on the film stresses in the Al electrode. Compressive stresses of ∼-100 to -145 MPa in the Al electrode lead to a buckling instability resulting in undulating electrode surface topography. The BHJ layer was found to have the lowest cohesion (∼1.5-1.8 J/m 2) among the layers of the solar cell and dependent on the Al electrode deposition rate. The cohesive failure path in the BHJ layer exhibited the same periodicity and orientation of the Al electrode buckling topography. We discuss the implications of the film stresses on damage processes during device fabrication and operation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell proliferation alterations in Chlorella cells under stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioboo, Carmen [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain); O' Connor, Jose Enrique [Laboratorio de Citomica, Unidad Mixta de Investigacion CIPF-UVEG, Centro de Investigacion Principe Felipe, Avda. Autopista del Saler, 16, 46013 Valencia (Spain); Prado, Raquel; Herrero, Concepcion [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain); Cid, Angeles, E-mail: cid@udc.es [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain)

    2009-09-14

    Very little is known about growth and proliferation in relation to the cell cycle regulation of algae. The lack of knowledge is even greater when referring to the potential toxic effects of pollutants on microalgal cell division. To assess the effect of terbutryn, a triazine herbicide, on the proliferation of the freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris three flow cytometric approaches were used: (1) in vivo cell division using 5-,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining was measured, (2) the growth kinetics were determined by cytometric cell counting and (3) cell viability was evaluated with the membrane-impermeable double-stranded nucleic acid stain propidium iodide (PI). The results obtained in the growth kinetics study using CFSE to identify the microalgal cell progeny were consistent with those determined by cytometric cell counting. In all C. vulgaris cultures, each mother cell had undergone only one round of division through the 96 h of assay and the cell division occurred during the dark period. Cell division of the cultures exposed to the herbicide was asynchronous. Terbutryn altered the normal number of daughter cells (4 autospores) obtained from each mother cell. The number was only two in the cultures treated with 250 nM. The duration of the lag phase after the exposure to terbutryn could be dependent on the existence of a critical cell size to activate cytoplasmic division. Cell size, complexity and fluorescence of chlorophyll a of the microalgal cells presented a marked light/dark (day/night) cycle, except in the non-dividing 500 nM cultures, where terbutryn arrested cell division at the beginning of the cycle. Viability results showed that terbutryn has an algastatic effect in C. vulgaris cells at this concentration. The rapid and precise determination of cell proliferation by CFSE staining has allowed us to develop a model for assessing both the cell cycle of C. vulgaris and the in vivo effects of pollutants on growth and

  4. Shear stress-induced improvement of red blood cell deformability

    OpenAIRE

    Meram, Ece; Yılmaz, Bahar D.; Bas, Ceren; Atac, Nazlı; Yalçın, Ö.; Başkurt, Oguz K.; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Classically, it is known that red blood cell (RBC) deformability is determined by the geometric and material properties of these cells. Experimental evidence accumulated during the last decade has introduced the concept of active regulation of RBC deformability. This regulation is mainly related to altered associations between membrane skeletal proteins and integral proteins, with the latter serving to anchor the skeleton to the lipid matrix. It has been hypothesized that shear stress induces...

  5. Metabolic Stress and Compromised Identity of Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisa, Avital; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval

    2017-01-01

    Beta cell failure is a central feature of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the molecular underpinnings of the process remain only partly understood. It has been suggested that beta cell failure in T2D involves massive cell death. Other studies ascribe beta cell failure to cell exhaustion, due to chronic oxidative or endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to cellular dysfunction. More recently it was proposed that beta cells in T2D may lose their differentiated identity, possibly even gaining features of other islet cell types. The loss of beta cell identity appears to be driven by glucotoxicity inhibiting the activity of key beta cell transcription factors including Pdx1, Nkx6.1, MafA and Pax6, thereby silencing beta cell genes and derepressing alternative islet cell genes. The loss of beta cell identity is at least partly reversible upon normalization of glycemia, with implications for the reversibility of T2D, although it is not known if beta cell failure reaches eventually a point of no return. In this review we discuss current evidence for metabolism-driven compromised beta cell identity, key knowledge gaps and opportunities for utility in the treatment of T2D.

  6. Stress-mediated p38 activation promotes somatic cell reprogramming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinxiu Xu; Quan Wang; Yuan Long; Ru Zhang; Xiaoyuan Wei; Mingzhe Xing; Haifeng Gu

    2013-01-01

    Environmental stress-mediated adaptation plays essential roles in the evolution of life.Cellular adaptation mechanisms usually involve the regulation of chromatin structure,transcription,mRNA stability and translation,which eventually lead to efficient changes in gene expression.Global epigenetic change is also involved in the reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by defined factors.Here we report that environmental stress such as hyperosmosis not only facilitates four factor-mediated reprogramming,but also enhances two or one factor-induced iPS cell generation.Hyperosmosis-induced p38 activation plays a critical role in this process.Constitutive active p38 mimics the positive effect of hyperosmosis,while dominant negative p38 and p38 inhibitor block the effect of hyperosmosis.Further study indicates stress-mediated p38 activation may promote reprogramming by reducing the global DNA methylation level and enhancing the expression of pluripotency genes.Our results demonstrate how simple environmental stress like hyperosmosis helps to alter the fate of cells via intracellular signaling and epigenetic modulation.

  7. High glucose augments stress-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenwen Zhong; Yang Liu; Hui Tian

    2009-01-01

    Hyperglycemia has been identified as one of the important factors involved in the microvascular complications of diabetes, and has been related to increased cardiovascular mortality. Endothelial damage and dysfunction result from diabetes; therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the response of endothelial cells to stressful stimuli, modelled in normal and high glucose concentrations in vitro. Eahy 926 endothelial cells were cultured in 5 mmol/L or 30 mmol/L glucose conditions for a 24 hour period and oxidative stress was induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or tumour necrosis factor- α (TNF- α ), following which the protective effect of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone was assessed. Apoptosis, necrosis and cell viability were determined using an ELISA for DNA fragmentation, an enzymatic lactate dehydrogenase assay and an MTT assay, respectively. High glucose significantly increased the susceptibility of Eahy 926 cells to apoptosis in the presence of 500 μmol/L H2O2, above that induced in normal glucose (P<0.02). A reduction of H2O2- and TNF- α -induced apoptosis occurred in both high and low glucose after treatment with dexametha-sone (P<0.05). Conclusion high glucose is effective in significantly augmenting stress caused by H2O2, but not in causing stress alone. These findings suggest a mechanism by which short term hyperglycemia may facilitate and augment endothelial damage.

  8. N-acetylcysteine reduces oxidative stress in sickle cell patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nur, Erfan; Brandjes, Dees P.; Teerlink, Tom; Otten, Hans-Martin; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Muskiet, Frits; Evers, Ludo M.; ten Cate, Hugo; Biemond, Bart J.; Duits, Ashley J.; Schnog, John-John B.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is of importance in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD). In this open label randomized pilot study the effects of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on phosphatidylserine (PS) expression as marker of cellular oxidative damage (primary end point), and markers of hemolysis, coag

  9. Mitochondrial control of cell death induced by hyperosmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Alfredo; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Lavandero, Sergio; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-01-01

    HeLa and HCT116 cells respond differentially to sorbitol, an osmolyte able to induce hypertonic stress. In these models, sorbitol promoted the phenotypic manifestations of early apoptosis followed by complete loss of viability in a time-, dose-, and cell type-specific fashion, by eliciting distinct yet partially overlapping molecular pathways. In HCT116 but not in HeLa cells, sorbitol caused the mitochondrial release of the caspase-independent death effector AIF, whereas in both cell lines cytochrome c was retained in mitochondria. Despite cytochrome c retention, HeLa cells exhibited the progressive activation of caspase-3, presumably due to the prior activation of caspase-8. Accordingly, caspase inhibition prevented sorbitol-induced killing in HeLa, but only partially in HCT116 cells. Both the knock-out of Bax in HCT116 cells and the knock-down of Bax in A549 cells by RNA interference reduced the AIF release and/or the mitochondrial alterations. While the knock-down of Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) sensitized to sorbitol-induced killing, overexpression of a Bcl-2 variant that specifically localizes to mitochondria (but not of the wild-type nor of a endoplasmic reticulum-targeted form) strongly inhibited sorbitol effects. Thus, hyperosmotic stress kills cells by triggering different molecular pathways, which converge at mitochondria where pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family exert their control.

  10. SIRT1 Activating Compounds Reduce Oxidative Stress and Prevent Cell Death in Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reas S Khan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Activation of SIRT1, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, prevents retinal ganglion cell (RGC loss in optic neuritis, an inflammatory demyelinating optic nerve disease. While SIRT1 deacetylates numerous protein targets, downstream mechanisms of SIRT1 activation mediating this neuroprotective effect are unknown. SIRT1 increases mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative stress in muscle and other cells, and oxidative stress occurs in neuronal degeneration. We examined whether SIRT1 activators reduce oxidative stress and promote mitochondrial function in neuronal cells. Oxidative stress, marked by reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation, was induced in RGC-5 cells by serum deprivation, or addition of doxorubicin or hydrogen peroxide, and resulted in significant cell loss. SIRT1 activators resveratrol and SRTAW04 reduced ROS levels, and promoted cell survival in RGC-5 cells as well as primary RGC cultures. Effects were blocked by SIRT1 siRNA. SIRT1 activators also increased expression of succinate dehydrogenase, a mitochondrial enzyme, and promoted deacetylation of PGC-1α, a co-enzyme involved in mitochondrial function. Results show SIRT1 activators prevent cell loss by reducing oxidative stress and promoting mitochondrial function in a neuronal cell line. Results suggest SIRT1 activators can mediate neuroprotective effects during optic neuritis by these mechanisms, and they have the potential to preserve neurons in other neurodegenerative diseases that involve oxidative stress.

  11. Neural stem cells respond to stress hormones: distinguishing beneficial from detrimental stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassemi eKoutmani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells, the progenitors of the nervous system, control distinct, position-specific functions and are critically involved in the maintenance of homeostasis in the brain. The responses of these cells to various stressful stimuli are shaped by genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors via mechanisms that are age and developmental stage-dependent and still remain, to a great extent, elusive. Increasing evidence advocates for the beneficial impact of the stress response in various settings, complementing the extensive number of studies on the detrimental effects of stress, particularly in the developing brain. In this review, we discuss suggested mechanisms mediating both the beneficial and detrimental effects of stressors on neural stem cell activity across the lifespan. We focus on the specific effects of secreted factors and we propose neural stem cells as a sensor, capable of distinguishing among the different stressors and adapting its functions accordingly. All the above suggest the intriguing hypothesis that neural stem cells are an important part of the adaptive response to stressors via direct and indirect, specific mechanisms.

  12. Effects of constant voltage and constant current stress in PCBM:P3HT solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cester, Andrea; Rizzo, Aldo; Bazzega, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aimof this work is the investigation of forward and reverse bias stress effects, cell self-heating and annealing in roll coated organic solar cells with PCBM:P3HT active layer. In reverse bias stress cells show a constant degradation over time. In forward current stress cells alternate degrad...

  13. Induction of necrotic cell death by oxidative stress in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, J; Zhang, H; Wang, Z; Liu, Q; Zhou, Q; Wang, S

    2013-12-12

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disease of the retina and the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell death and the resultant photoreceptor apoptosis are characteristic of late-stage dry AMD, especially geographic atrophy (GA). Although oxidative stress and inflammation have been associated with GA, the nature and underlying mechanism for RPE cell death remains controversial, which hinders the development of targeted therapy for dry AMD. The purpose of this study is to systematically dissect the mechanism of RPE cell death induced by oxidative stress. Our results show that characteristic features of apoptosis, including DNA fragmentation, caspase 3 activation, chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation, were not observed during RPE cell death induced by either hydrogen peroxide or tert-Butyl hydroperoxide. Instead, this kind of cell death can be prevented by RIP kinase inhibitors necrostatins but not caspase inhibitor z-VAD, suggesting necrotic feature of RPE cell death. Moreover, ATP depletion, receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) aggregation, nuclear and plasma membrane leakage and breakdown, which are the cardinal features of necrosis, were observed in RPE cells upon oxidative stress. Silencing of RIPK3, a key protein in necrosis, largely prevented oxidative stress-induced RPE death. The necrotic nature of RPE death is consistent with the release of nuclear protein high mobility group protein B1 into the cytoplasm and cell medium, which induces the expression of inflammatory gene TNFα in healthy RPE and THP-1 cells. Interestingly, features of pyroptosis or autophagy were not observed in oxidative stress-treated RPE cells. Our results unequivocally show that necrosis, but not apoptosis, is a major type of cell death in RPE cells in response to oxidative stress. This suggests that preventing oxidative stress-induced necrotic RPE death may be a viable approach for late-stage dry

  14. Tensile stress stimulates microtubule outgrowth in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaverina, Irina; Krylyshkina, Olga; Beningo, Karen; Anderson, Kurt; Wang, Yu-Li; Small, J. Victor

    2002-01-01

    Cell motility is driven by the sum of asymmetric traction forces exerted on the substrate through adhesion foci that interface with the actin cytoskeleton. Establishment of this asymmetry involves microtubules, which exert a destabilising effect on adhesion foci via targeting events. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a mechano-sensing mechanism that signals microtubule polymerisation and guidance of the microtubules towards adhesion sites under increased stress. Stress was applied either by manipulating the body of cells moving on glass with a microneedle or by stretching a flexible substrate that cells were migrating on. We propose a model for this mechano-sensing phenomenon whereby microtubule polymerisation is stimulated and guided through the interaction of a microtubule tip complex with actin filaments under tension.

  15. Nuclear lamins and oxidative stress in cell proliferation and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimi, Takeshi; Goldman, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the nuclear lamina is composed of a complex fibrillar network associated with the inner membrane of the nuclear envelope. The lamina provides mechanical support for the nucleus and functions as the major determinant of its size and shape. At its innermost aspect it associates with peripheral components of chromatin and thereby contributes to the organization of interphase chromosomes. The A- and B-type lamins are the major structural components of the lamina, and numerous mutations in the A-type lamin gene have been shown to cause many types of human diseases collectively known as the laminopathies. These mutations have also been shown to cause a disruption in the normal interactions between the A and B lamin networks. The impact of these mutations on nuclear functions is related to the roles of lamins in regulating various essential processes including DNA synthesis and damage repair, transcription and the regulation of genes involved in the response to oxidative stress. The major cause of oxidative stress is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is critically important for cell proliferation and longevity. Moderate increases in ROS act to initiate signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, whereas excessive increases in ROS cause oxidative stress, which in turn induces cell death and/or senescence. In this review, we cover current findings about the role of lamins in regulating cell proliferation and longevity through oxidative stress responses and ROS signaling pathways. We also speculate on the involvement of lamins in tumor cell proliferation through the control of ROS metabolism.

  16. DNA damage by carbonyl stress in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Michael J.; Wondrak, Georg T.; Laurean, Daniel Cervantes; Jacobson, Myron K.; Jacobson, Elaine L

    2003-01-28

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) are potent mediators of cellular carbonyl stress originating from endogenous chemical processes such as lipid peroxidation and glycation. Skin deterioration as observed in photoaging and diabetes has been linked to accumulative protein damage from glycation, but the effects of carbonyl stress on skin cell genomic integrity are ill defined. In this study, the genotoxic effects of acute carbonyl stress on HaCaT keratinocytes and CF3 fibroblasts were assessed. Administration of the {alpha}-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal and methylglyoxal as physiologically relevant RCS inhibited skin cell proliferation, led to intra-cellular protein glycation as evidenced by the accumulation of N{sup {epsilon}}-(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML) in histones, and caused extensive DNA strand cleavage as assessed by the comet assay. These effects were prevented by treatment with the carbonyl scavenger D-penicillamine. Both glyoxal and methylglyoxal damaged DNA in intact cells. Glyoxal caused DNA strand breaks while methylglyoxal produced extensive DNA-protein cross-linking as evidenced by pronounced nuclear condensation and total suppression of comet formation. Glycation by glyoxal and methylglyoxal resulted in histone cross-linking in vitro and induced oxygen-dependent cleavage of plasmid DNA, which was partly suppressed by the hydroxyl scavenger mannitol. We suggest that a chemical mechanism of cellular DNA damage by carbonyl stress occurs in which histone glycoxidation is followed by reactive oxygen induced DNA stand breaks. The genotoxic potential of RCS in cultured skin cells and its suppression by a carbonyl scavenger as described in this study have implications for skin damage and carcinogenesis and its prevention by agents selective for carbonyl stress.

  17. Ignition et oxydation des particules de combustible solide pulvérisé Ignition and Oxidation of Pulverized Solid Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Soete G. G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available On présente dans cet article, en utilisant la méthode du ruban chauffé, une étude de la compétition entre (1 la dévolatilisation et l'oxydation consécutive des produits de pyrolyse et (2 l'ignition de la matrice solide et sa combustion rapide. La comparaison entre le moment de l'ignition et le début de la pyrolyse permet de déterminer en fonction de la température, de la taille des particules et de la concentration en oxygène, le domaine dans lequel l'ignition d'un combustible solide pyrolysable est du type whole coal ignition (c'est-à-dire lorsque l'ignition intervient avant que la pyrolyse devienne mesurable. Les résultats suggèrent que ce type d'ignition doit s'effectuer en règle générale dans les conditions de mise en oeuvre des combustibles solides pulvérisés dans les flammes industrielles. Dans le cas de l'ignition whole coal , la vitesse de combustion de la matrice solide est inhibée dans la période qui suit l'ignition. Cette inhibition est due d'une part à la difficulté pour l'oxygène de diffuser dans les pores pendant la sortie des produits de pyrolyse, et d'autre part à la consommation préférentielle de l'oxygène dans l'oxydation des produits de pyrolyse, principalement dans le cas où cette oxydation se développe sous forme de flamme. Ce n'est que lorsque la pyrolyse s'achève que la vitesse de combustion hétérogène peut atteindre sa valeur stationnaire normale, qui est alors pratiquement identique à celle du coke. Aux températures situées entre la température d'ignition du combustible solide et la température d'extinction du coke résiduel, la combustion est incomplète, une extinction intervenant à un degré de dévolatilisation d'autant plus grande que la température est élevée. Ce phénomène s'explique qualitativement par la théorie classique d'ignition thermique lorsqu'on l'applique au cas particulier des combustibles solides pyrolysables. Les températures d'ignition ainsi que les d

  18. Uranium induces oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Kumar, Felix; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Sharma, Chidananda S.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T. [Texas Southern University, Molecular Neurotoxicology Laboratory/Proteomics Core, Department of Biology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, antitank weapons, tank armor, and also as a pigment to color ceramics and glass. Effective management of waste uranium compounds is necessary to prevent exposure to avoid adverse health effects on the population. Health risks associated with uranium exposure includes kidney disease and respiratory disorders. In addition, several published results have shown uranium or depleted uranium causes DNA damage, mutagenicity, cancer and neurological defects. In the current study, uranium toxicity was evaluated in rat lung epithelial cells. The study shows uranium induces significant oxidative stress in rat lung epithelial cells followed by concomitant decrease in the antioxidant potential of the cells. Treatment with uranium to rat lung epithelial cells also decreased cell proliferation after 72 h in culture. The decrease in cell proliferation was attributed to loss of total glutathione and superoxide dismutase in the presence of uranium. Thus the results indicate the ineffectiveness of antioxidant system's response to the oxidative stress induced by uranium in the cells. (orig.)

  19. Procédé AD-OX d'élimination de polluants organiques non biodégradables (par adsorption puis oxydation catalytique)

    OpenAIRE

    Manole Creanga, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Vers un nouveau procédé séquentiel AD-OX (Adsorption–Oxydation) de traitement d'eau par charbon actif nous avons examiné les deux étapes séparément, pour des polluants peu biodégradables (phénol et acide 4-hydroxybenzoïque (4AHB), seuls et en mélange). Les isothermes d'adsorption sur charbon actif neuf, puis après oxydation catalytique, ont été obtenues à température ambiante et à 150°C. Les mélanges binaires ont aussi été testés montrant l'adsorption très préférentielle du 4AHB. L'oxydation...

  20. Contribution to the study of the sintering of uranium oxide; Contribution a l'etude du frittage de l'oxyde d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bel, A.; Carteret, Y. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The sintering ofnium oxide has been considered and the following factors have been particularly taken in consideration: - the particle size and the particles in shape of the initial powder, - the specific area of the initial powder, - the chemical composition of the oxide, - and the medium in which the sintering was carried out. A method of sintering uranium oxide on semi-industrial scale is presented. (author)Fren. [French] On xamine l'influence de differents facteurs sur le frittage de l'oxyde d'uranium. Sont particulierement prises en consideration: - la taille et la forme des grains de la poudre initiale, - la surface specifique de la poudre initiale, - la composition chimique de l'oxyde, - ainsi que la nature de l'atmosphere durant le frittage. D'autre part, une technique de frittage de l'oxyde d'uranium a l'echelle semi-industrielle est presentee. (auteur)

  1. Mitofusin-2 protects against cold stress-induced cell injury in HEK293 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Yaomin; Yang, Qun; Che, Honglei; Chen, Xiangjun; Yao, Ting; Zhao, Fang; Liu, Mingchao; Ke, Tao [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Chen, Jingyuan, E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Luo, Wenjing, E-mail: luowenj@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondrial impairment is hypothesized to contribute to cell injury during cold stress. Mitochondria fission and fusion are closely related in the function of the mitochondria, but the precise mechanisms whereby these processes regulate cell injury during cold stress remain to be determined. HEK293 cells were cultured in a cold environment (4.0 {+-} 0.1 {sup o}C) for 2, 4, 8, or 12 h. Western blot analyses showed that these cells expressed decreased fission-related protein Drp1 and increased fusion-related protein Mfn2 at 4 h; meanwhile, electron microscopy analysis revealed large and long mitochondrial morphology within these cells, indicating increased mitochondrial fusion. With silencing of Mfn2 but not of Mfn1 by siRNA promoted cold-stress-induced cell death with decreased ATP production in HEK293 cells. Our results show that increased expression of Mfn2 and mitochondrial fusion are important for mitochondrial function as well as cell survival during cold stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of mitochondrial fusion and fission in cold-stress-induced cell injury.

  2. Erythrocyte oxidative stress markers in children with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Bacarin Hermann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine eight parameters of oxidative stress markers in erythrocytes from children with sickle cell disease and compare with the same parameters in erythrocytes from healthy children, since oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease and because this disease is a serious public health problem in many countries. Methods Blood samples were obtained from 45 children with sickle cell disease (21 males and 24 females with a mean age of 9 years; range: 3–13 years and 280 blood samples were obtained from children without hemoglobinopathies (137 males and 143 females with a mean age of 10 years; range: 8–11 years, as a control group. All blood samples were analyzed for methemoglobin, reduced glutathione, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, percentage of hemolysis, reactive oxygen species, and activity of the enzymes glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test and were expressed as the mean ± standard deviation. A p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results Significant differences were observed between children with sickle cell disease and the control group for the parameters methemoglobin, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hemolysis, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and reactive oxygen species, with higher levels in the patients than in the controls. Conclusions Oxidative stress parameters in children's erythrocytes were determined using simple laboratory methods with small volumes of blood; these biomarkers can be useful to evaluate disease progression and outcomes in patients.

  3. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Steven S.; Kim, Jina; Ahn, Kwangmi; Trepat, Xavier; Drake, Kenneth J.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Biswal, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses. PMID:19327344

  4. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Steven S., E-mail: san@jhsph.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Kim, Jina [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Ahn, Kwangmi [Division of Biostatistics, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Trepat, Xavier [CIBER, Enfermedades Respiratorias, 07110 Bunyola (Spain); Drake, Kenneth J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Fredberg, Jeffrey J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Biswal, Shyam [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses.

  5. Oriented cell division affects the global stress and cell packing geometry of a monolayer under stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Zhaoliang

    2016-02-01

    Cell division plays a vital role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, and the division plane is crucial for cell fate. For isolated cells, extensive studies show that the orientation of divisions is sensitive to cell shape and the direction of extrinsic mechanical forces. However, it is poorly understood that how the cell divides within a cell monolayer and how the local stress change, due to the division, affects the global stress of epithelial monolayers. Here, we use the vertex dynamics models to investigate the effects of division orientation on the configurations and mechanics of a cell monolayer under stretch. We examine three scenarios of the divisions: dividing along the stretch axis, dividing along the geometric long axis of cells, and dividing at a random angle. It is found that the division along the long cell axis can induce the minimal energy difference, and the global stress of the monolayer after stretch releases more rapidly in this case. Moreover, the long-axis division can result in more random cell orientations and more isotropic cell shapes within the monolayer, comparing with other two cases. This study helps understand the division orientation of cells within a monolayer under mechanical stimuli, and may shed light on linking individual cell's behaviors to the global mechanics and patterns of tissues.

  6. Cell cycle controls stress response and longevity in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottermusch, Matthias; Lakner, Theresa; Peyman, Tobias; Klein, Marinella; Walz, Gerd; Neumann-Haefelin, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a variety of genes and mechanisms that influence the rate of aging progression. In this study, we identified cell cycle factors as potent regulators of health and longevity in C. elegans. Focusing on the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk-2) and cyclin E (cye-1), we show that inhibition of cell cycle genes leads to tolerance towards environmental stress and longevity. The reproductive system is known as a key regulator of longevity in C. elegans. We uncovered the gonad as the central organ mediating the effects of cell cycle inhibition on lifespan. In particular, the proliferating germ cells were essential for conferring longevity. Steroid hormone signaling and the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 were required for longevity associated with cell cycle inhibition. Furthermore, we discovered that SKN-1 (ortholog of mammalian Nrf proteins) activates protective gene expression and induces longevity when cell cycle genes are inactivated. We conclude that both, germline absence and inhibition through impairment of cell cycle machinery results in longevity through similar pathways. In addition, our studies suggest further roles of cell cycle genes beyond cell cycle progression and support the recently described connection of SKN-1/Nrf to signals deriving from the germline. PMID:27668945

  7. Stress analysis for wall structure in mobile hot cell design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan, E-mail: hannan@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Rahman, Anwar Abdul, E-mail: anwar@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Hamzah, Mohd Arif, E-mail: arif@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Mamat, Mohd Rizal; Azman, Azraf; Hasan, Hasni [Prototype and Plant Development Centre, Technical Services Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is developing a Mobile Hot Cell (MHC) in order to handle and manage Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) such as teletherapy heads and irradiators. At present, there are only two units of MHC in the world, in South Africa and China. Malaysian Mobile Hot cell is developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency with the assistance of IAEA expert, based on the design of South Africa and China, but with improved features. Stress analysis has been performed on the design in order to fulfil the safety requirement in operation of MHC. This paper discusses the loading analysis effect from the sand to the MHC wall structure.

  8. Etude paramétrique des effets de la stratification de la flamme sur les émissions d'oxydes d'azote (première partie Parametric Study of Statification Effects on Nitric Oxyde Emissions from Flam (Part One

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Soete G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available On a étudié les effets de la stratification de flammes de prémélange laminaires, stationnaires et non stationnaires, sur les émissions d'oxydes d'azote formés par le mécanisme thermique et par le mécanisme du fuel-NO. Deux modalités de stratification ont été considérées, l'une juxtaposant sur le même plan les zones de combustion primaires correspond aux fractions individuelles du mélange stratifié (stratification en juxtaposition, l'autre disposant ces zones de combustion primaires sur des plans successifs (stratification en succession. Les émissions d'oxydes d'azote mesurées sur les flammes stratifiées ont été comparées à celles provenant de flammes non stratifiées de même composition globale et brûlant dans des conditions identiques. L'étude montre qu'il y a lieu de distinguer deux types d'effets de stratification. II existe un effet primaire -qui est la simple conséquence du morcellement de la flamme en un certain nombre de zones de combustion primaires (caractérisées par des compositions différentes et qui se traduit par l'additivité des émissions individuelles provenant des fractions respectives du mélange. L'effet total de la stratification se réduit à ce seul effet primaire au cas où les vitesses de formation des oxydes d'azote deviennent nulles après re-mélange des produits de combustion provenant des différentes fractions du mélange stratifié. Il en est ainsi par exemple dans le cas des flammes non stationnaires stratifiées en succession ; il en résulte alors soit une augmentation soit une diminution des émissions d'oxydes d'azote par rapport à celles des flammes non stratifiées, suivant la valeur de la richesse globale et du degré de stratification. Des effets secondaires de stratification se manifestent chaque fois que des produits de combustion, provenant d'une zone de combustion primaire donnée, sont introduits totalement ou partiellement dans un autre front de flamme créé par la

  9. Collective cancer cell invasion induced by coordinated contractile stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Valencia, Angela M; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Yogurtcu, Osman N; Rao, Pranay; DiGiacomo, Josh; Godet, Inês; He, Lijuan; Lee, Meng-Horng; Gilkes, Daniele; Sun, Sean X; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-12-22

    The physical underpinnings of fibrosarcoma cell dissemination from a tumor in a surrounding collagen-rich matrix are poorly understood. Here we show that a tumor spheroid embedded in a 3D collagen matrix exerts large contractile forces on the matrix before invasion. Cell invasion is accompanied by complex spatially and temporally dependent patterns of cell migration within and at the surface of the spheroids that are fundamentally different from migratory patterns of individual fibrosarcoma cells homogeneously distributed in the same type of matrix. Cells display a continuous transition from a round morphology at the spheroid core, to highly aligned elongated morphology at the spheroid periphery, which depends on both β1-integrin-based cell-matrix adhesion and myosin II/ROCK-based cell contractility. This isotropic-to-anisotropic transition corresponds to a shift in migration, from a slow and unpolarized movement at the core, to a fast, polarized and persistent one at the periphery. Our results also show that the ensuing collective invasion of fibrosarcoma cells is induced by anisotropic contractile stresses exerted on the surrounding matrix.

  10. Plasmodesmal-mediated cell-to-cell transport in wheat roots is modulated by anaerobic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, R. E.; Fujiwara, T.; Lucas, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cell-to-cell transport of small molecules and ions occurs in plants through plasmodesmata. Plant roots are frequently subjected to localized anaerobic stress, with a resultant decrease in ATP. In order to determine the effect of this stress on plasmodesmal transport, fluorescent dyes of increasing molecular weight (0.46 to 1OkDa) were injected into epidermal and cortical cells of 3-day-old wheat roots, and their movement into neighboring cells was determined by fluorescence microscopy. Anaerobiosis was generated by N2 gas or simulated by the presence of sodium azide, both of which reduced the ATP levels in the tissue by over 80%. In the absence of such stress, the upper limit for movement, or size exclusion limit (SEL), of cortical plasmodesmata was roots, indicating that plasmodesmata may be conduits for nucleotide (ATP and ADP) exchange between cells. Upon imposition of stress, the SEL rose to between 5 and 10 kDa. This response of plasmodesmata to a decrease in the level of ATP suggests that they are constricted by an ATP-dependent process so as to maintain a restricted SEL. When roots are subjected to anaerobic stress, an increase in SEL may permit enhanced delivery of sugars to the affected cells of the root where anaerobic respiration could regenerate the needed ATP.

  11. Furan fatty acids efficiently rescue brain cells from cell death induced by oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira, A.; Cox, R.C.; Egmond, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of rat brain C6 astroglioma cells with furan fatty acid F6 prior to exposure to hydrogen peroxide shows a strong protective effect of F6 against cell death resulting from oxidative stress. This protective effect is obtained only for F6 administered as a free fatty acid and with an intact f

  12. The creation of a uranium oxide industry, from the laboratory stage to a pilot plant (1961); Creation d'une industrie de l'oxyde d'uranium du laboratoire a l'usine pilote (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillat, R.; Delange, M.; Sauteron, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Hauser, R. [Compagnie Industrielle des Combustibles atomiques frittes (France)

    1961-07-01

    puissance en construction ou en projet. Un effort important a ete consacre, ces dernieres annees en France, a l'etude des procedes susceptibles de transformer l'oxyde d'uranium en poudre en un materiau dense, dont le comportement sous flux de neutrons soit satisfaisant. Les laboratoires de Saclay ont etudie l'aspect physico-chimique des phenomenes qui accompagnent la calcination du peroxyde d'uranium ou de l'uranate d'ammonium en trioxyde d'uranium, puis la reduction de ce dernier en bioxyde ainsi que le frittage des poudres obtenues. Ces travaux ont permis, d'une part, de preparer des poudres de surface specifique connue, d'autre part, de mettre en evidence l'influence predominante de ce facteur, toutes autres choses restant egale par ailleurs, sur leur comportement lors du frittage en atmosphere d'hydrogene. Ils ont abouti a la definition de deux procedes de frittage d'oxyde d'uranium stoechiometrioue de haute densite. L'etude technologique de la preparation de la poudre et la production industrielle de celle-ci sont assurees par l'Usine du Bouchet, qui livre actuellement des poudres de caracteristiques definies, aptes au frittage a 1650 deg. C dans l'hydrogene sans broyage prealable. Le frittage industriel est assure par la Compagnie Industrielle des Combustibles Atomiques Frittes qui a installe une usine pilote de 25 t/an de capacite pour le compte du Commissariat, et exploite cette unite depuis Mai 1958. Un film intitule oxyde d'uranium presente cette installation. (auteur)

  13. Prodigiosin activates endoplasmic reticulum stress cell death pathway in human breast carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Mu-Yun [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yuh-Chiang [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chien-Hsing [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Shu-Yi [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Ho, Tsing-Fen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Peng, Yu-Ta [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Che, E-mail: chia_che@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent cytotoxicity against diverse human cancer cell lines. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is initiated by accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen and may induce cell death when irremediable. In this study, the role of ER stress in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity was elucidated for the first time. Comparable to the ER stress inducer thapsigargin, prodigiosin up-regulated signature ER stress markers GRP78 and CHOP in addition to activating the IRE1, PERK and ATF6 branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in multiple human breast carcinoma cell lines, confirming prodigiosin as an ER stress inducer. Prodigiosin transcriptionally up-regulated CHOP, as evidenced by its promoting effect on the CHOP promoter activity. Of note, knockdown of CHOP effectively lowered prodigiosin's capacity to evoke PARP cleavage, reduce cell viability and suppress colony formation, highlighting an essential role of CHOP in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxic ER stress response. In addition, prodigiosin down-regulated BCL2 in a CHOP-dependent manner. Importantly, restoration of BCL2 expression blocked prodigiosin-induced PARP cleavage and greatly enhanced the survival of prodigiosin-treated cells, suggesting that CHOP-dependent BCL2 suppression mediates prodigiosin-elicited cell death. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or dominant-negative blockade of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation impaired prodigiosin-induced CHOP up-regulation and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these results identified ER stress-mediated cell death as a mode-of-action of prodigiosin's tumoricidal effect. Mechanistically, prodigiosin engages the IRE1–JNK and PERK–eIF2α branches of the UPR signaling to up-regulate CHOP, which in turn mediates BCL2 suppression to induce cell death. Highlights: ► Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent anticancer effect. ► Prodigiosin is herein identified

  14. Residual stresses in a co-sintered SOC half-cell during post-sintering cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlas, Benoit; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Brodersen, Karen;

    2014-01-01

    Due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the layers of a Solid Oxide Cell, residual stresses (thermal stresses) develop during the cooling after sintering. Residual stresses can induce cell curvature for asymmetric cells but more importantly they also result in more fragile cells. Depending...... on the loading conditions, the additional stress needed to break the cells can indeed be smaller due to the initial thermo-mechanical stress state. The residual stresses can for a bilayer cell be approximated by estimating the temperature at which elastic stresses start to build up during the cooling, i.......e. the reference temperature (Tref) or the strain difference based on the curvature. This approximation gives good results for bilayers with a defined cooling temperature profile, where the curvature of the bilayer defines a unique balance between the two unknown residual stress states in the two layers...

  15. N-acetylcysteine reduces oxidative stress in sickle cell patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Erfan; Brandjes, Dees P; Teerlink, Tom; Otten, Hans-Martin; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Muskiet, Frits; Evers, Ludo M; ten Cate, Hugo; Biemond, Bart J; Duits, Ashley J; Schnog, John-John B

    2012-07-01

    Oxidative stress is of importance in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD). In this open label randomized pilot study the effects of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on phosphatidylserine (PS) expression as marker of cellular oxidative damage (primary end point), and markers of hemolysis, coagulation and endothelial activation and NAC tolerability (secondary end points) were studied. Eleven consecutive patients (ten homozygous [HbSS] sickle cell patients, one HbSβ(0)-thalassemia patient) were randomly assigned to treatment with either 1,200 or 2,400 mg NAC daily during 6 weeks. The data indicate an increment in whole blood glutathione levels and a decrease in erythrocyte outer membrane phosphatidylserine exposure, plasma levels of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and cell-free hemoglobin after 6 weeks of NAC treatment in both dose groups. One patient did not tolerate the 2,400 mg dose and continued with the 1,200 mg dose. During the study period, none of the patients experienced painful crises or other significant SCD or NAC related complications. These data indicate that N-acetylcysteine treatment of sickle cell patients may reduce SCD related oxidative stress.

  16. Stress responses and replication of plasmids in bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegrzyn Alicja

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plasmids, DNA (or rarely RNA molecules which replicate in cells autonomously (independently of chromosomes as non-essential genetic elements, play important roles for microbes grown under specific environmental conditions as well as in scientific laboratories and in biotechnology. For example, bacterial plasmids are excellent models in studies on regulation of DNA replication, and their derivatives are the most commonly used vectors in genetic engineering. Detailed mechanisms of replication initiation, which is the crucial process for efficient maintenance of plasmids in cells, have been elucidated for several plasmids. However, to understand plasmid biology, it is necessary to understand regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to different environmental conditions in which host cells exist. Knowledge of such regulatory processes is also very important for those who use plasmids as expression vectors to produce large amounts of recombinant proteins. Variable conditions in large-scale fermentations must influence replication of plasmid DNA in cells, thus affecting the efficiency of recombinant gene expression significantly. Contrary to extensively investigated biochemistry of plasmid replication, molecular mechanisms of regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to various environmental stress conditions are relatively poorly understood. There are, however, recently published studies that add significant data to our knowledge on relations between cellular stress responses and control of plasmid DNA replication. In this review we focus on plasmids derived from bacteriophage λ that are among the best investigated replicons. Nevertheless, recent results of studies on other plasmids are also discussed shortly.

  17. Low zinc environment induces stress signaling, senescence and mixed cell death modalities in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Emil; Rudolf, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    Currently it is not clear what type of the final cellular response (i.e. cell death modality or senescence) is induced upon chronic intracellular zinc depletion in colon cancer cells. To address this question, isogenic colon cancer lines SW480 and SW620 exposed to low zinc environment were studied over the period of 6 weeks. Low zinc environment reduced total as well as free intracellular zinc content in both cell lines. Decreased intracellular zinc content resulted in changes in cellular proliferation, cell cycle distribution and activation of stress signaling. In addition, colonocytes with low zinc content displayed increased levels of oxidative stress, changes in mitochondrial activity but in the absence of significant DNA damage. Towards the end of treatment (4th-6th week), exposed cells started to change morphologically, and typical markers of senescence as well as cell death appeared. Of two examined colon cancer cell lines, SW480 cells proved to activate predominantly senescent phenotype, with frequent form of demise being necrosis and mixed cell death modality but not apoptosis. Conversely, SW620 cells activated mostly cell death, with relatively equal distribution of apoptosis and mixed types, while senescent phenotypes and necrosis were present only in a small fraction of cell populations. Addition of zinc at the beginning of 4th week of treatment significantly suppressed cell death phenotypes in both cell lines but had no significant effect on senescence. In conclusion, presented results demonstrate variability of responses to chronic zinc depletion in colon cancer as modeled in vitro.

  18. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists. PMID:26407887

  19. Metabolic adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to oxygen stress by cell-to-cell clumping and flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.

  20. High glucose-mediated oxidative stress impairs cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L Lamers

    Full Text Available Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that high glucose concentrations inhibit cell migration. Using CHO.K1 cells, NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and primary skin fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats cultured in 5 mM D-glucose (low glucose, LG, 25 mM D-glucose (high glucose, HG or 25 mM L-glucose medium (osmotic control--OC, we analyzed the migration speed, protrusion stability, cell polarity, adhesion maturation and the activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1. We also analyzed the effects of reactive oxygen species by incubating cells with the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC. We observed that HG conditions inhibited cell migration when compared to LG or OC. This inhibition resulted from impaired cell polarity, protrusion destabilization and inhibition of adhesion maturation. Conversely, Rac1 activity, which promotes protrusion and blocks adhesion maturation, was increased in HG conditions, thus providing a mechanistic basis for the HG phenotype. Most of the HG effects were partially or completely rescued by treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate that HG impairs cell migration due to an increase in oxidative stress that causes polarity loss, deficient adhesion and protrusion. These alterations arise, in large part, from increased Rac1 activity and may contribute to the poor wound healing observed in diabetic patients.

  1. Direct measurement of cell wall stress-stiffening and turgor pressure in live bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Yi; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of gram-negative bacteria are governed by a rigid peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall and the turgor pressure generated by the large concentration of solutes in the cytoplasm. The elasticity of the PG has been measured in bulk and in isolated sacculi and shown to be compliant compared to the overall stiffness of the cell itself. However, the stiffness of the cell wall in live cells has not been measured. In particular, the effects that pressure-induced stress might have on the stiffness of the mesh-like PG network have not been addressed even though polymeric materials often exhibit large amounts of stress-stiffening. We study bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. We find strong evidence of power-law stress-stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of $1.07 \\pm 0.25$, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in live cells ($E\\sim32\\pm10$ MPa) than in unpres...

  2. Stress-induced cell death is mediated by ceramide synthesis in Neurospora crassa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesofsky, Nora S; Levery, Steven B; Castle, Sherry A

    2008-01-01

    The combined stresses of moderate heat shock (45 degrees C) and analog-induced glucose deprivation constitute a lethal stress for Neurospora crassa. We found that this cell death requires fatty acid synthesis and the cofactor biotin. In the absence of the cofactor, the stressed cells are particul...

  3. UVC-induced stress granules in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Taha Moutaoufik

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are well characterized cytoplasmic RNA bodies that form under various stress conditions. We have observed that exposure of mammalian cells in culture to low doses of UVC induces the formation of discrete cytoplasmic RNA granules that were detected by immunofluorescence staining using antibodies to RNA-binding proteins. UVC-induced cytoplasmic granules are not Processing Bodies (P-bodies and are bone fide SGs as they contain TIA-1, TIA-1/R, Caprin1, FMRP, G3BP1, PABP1, well known markers, and mRNA. Concomitant with the accumulation of the granules in the cytoplasm, cells enter a quiescent state, as they are arrested in G1 phase of the cell cycle in order to repair DNA damages induced by UVC irradiation. This blockage persists as long as the granules are present. A tight correlation between their decay and re-entry into S-phase was observed. However the kinetics of their formation, their low number per cell, their absence of fusion into larger granules, their persistence over 48 hours and their slow decay, all differ from classical SGs induced by arsenite or heat treatment. The induction of these SGs does not correlate with major translation inhibition nor with phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α. We propose that a restricted subset of mRNAs coding for proteins implicated in cell cycling are removed from the translational apparatus and are sequestered in a repressed form in SGs.

  4. Beta Blockers Suppress Dextrose-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Michael J; Kurban, William; Shah, Harshit; Onstead-Haas, Luisa; Mooradian, Arshag D

    Beta blockers are known to have favorable effects on endothelial function partly because of their capacity to reduce oxidative stress. To determine whether beta blockers can also prevent dextrose-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in addition to their antioxidative effects, human coronary artery endothelial cells and hepatocyte-derived HepG2 cells were treated with 27.5 mM dextrose for 24 hours in the presence of carvedilol (a lipophilic beta blockers with alpha blocking activity), propranolol (a lipophilic nonselective beta blockers), and atenolol (a water-soluble selective beta blockers), and ER stress, oxidative, stress and cell death were measured. ER stress was measured using the placental alkaline phosphatase assay and Western blot analysis of glucose regulated protein 78, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), phospho-JNK, eukaryotic initiating factor 2α (eIF2α), and phospho-eIF2α and measurement of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Superoxide (SO) generation was measured using the superoxide-reactive probe 2-methyl-6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-A]pyrazin-3-one hydrochloride (MCLA) chemiluminescence. Cell viability was measured by propidium iodide staining method. The ER stress, SO production, and cell death induced by 27.5 mM dextrose were inhibited by all 3 beta blockers tested. The antioxidative and ER stress reducing effects of beta blockers were also observed in HepG2 cells. The salutary effects of beta blockers on endothelial cells in reducing both ER stress and oxidative stress may contribute to the cardioprotective effects of these agents.

  5. Furan fatty acids efficiently rescue brain cells from cell death induced by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Antoinette; Cox, Ruud C; Egmond, Maarten R

    2013-08-01

    Treatment of rat brain C6 astroglioma cells with furan fatty acid F6 prior to exposure to hydrogen peroxide shows a strong protective effect of F6 against cell death resulting from oxidative stress. This protective effect is obtained only for F6 administered as a free fatty acid and with an intact furan ring. It is proposed that brain cells are rescued by F6 scavenging radicals elicited by lipid peroxidation within the cell membrane. Oxidative processes outside the cell membrane, such as protein carbonylation, are not affected by F6. Furan fatty acids such as those present in fish oils and marine organisms are likely beneficial for consumption in reducing the risk of diseases that have been implicated to arise from oxidative stress, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai A

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke.

  7. Acrolein induction of oxidative stress and degranulation in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Daniel J; Collaco, Christopher R; Brooks, Edward G

    2014-08-01

    Increases in asthma worldwide have been associated epidemiologically with expanding urban air pollution. The mechanistic relationship between airway hyper-responsiveness, inflammation, and ambient airborne triggers remains ambiguous. Acrolein, a ubiquitous aldehyde pollutant, is a product of incomplete combustion reactions. Acrolein is abundant in cigarette smoke, effluent from industrial smokestacks, diesel exhaust, and even hot oil cooking vapors. Acrolein is a potent airway irritant and can induce airway hyper-responsiveness and inflammation in the lungs of animal models. In the present study, we utilized the mast cell analog, RBL-2H3, to interrogate the responses of cells relevant to airway inflammation and allergic responses as a model for the induction of asthma-like conditions upon exposure to acrolein. We hypothesized that acrolein would induce oxidative stress and degranulation in airway mast cells. Our results indicate that acrolein at 1 ppm initiated degranulation and promoted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Introduction of antioxidants to the system significantly reduced both ROS generation and degranulation. At higher levels of exposure (above 100 ppm), RBL-2H3 cells displayed signs of severe toxicity. This experimental data indicates acrolein can induce an allergic inflammation in mast cell lines, and the initiation of degranulation was moderated by the application of antioxidants.

  8. Prune melanoidins protect against oxidative stress and endothelial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadino, Anna Maria; Cossu, Annalisa; Piga, Antonio; Madrau, Monica Assunta; Del Caro, Alessandra; Colombino, Maria; Paglietti, Bianca; Rubino, Salvatore; Iaccarino, Ciro; Crosio, Claudia; Sanna, Bastiano; Pintus, Gianfranco

    2011-06-01

    The health-promoting effects of fruit and vegetable consumption are thought to be due to phytochemicals contained in fresh plant material. Whether processed plant foods provide the same benefits as unprocessed ones is an open question. Melanoidins from heat-processed plums (prunes) were isolated and their presence confirmed by hydroxymethylfurfural content and browning index. Oxidative-induced endothelial cell (EC) damage is the trigger for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD); therefore the potential protective effect of prune melanoidins on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cell damage was investigated on human endothelial ECV304 cells. Cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox status was assessed by using the novel, redox-sensitive, ratiometric fluorescent protein sensor (roGFP), while mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was investigated with the fluorescent dye, JC-1. Treatment of ECV304 cells with hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently induced both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic oxidation, in addition to MMP dissipation, with ensuing cell death. Pretreatment of ECV304 with prune melanoidins, significantly counteracted and ultimately abolished hydrogen peroxide elicited phenomena, clearly indicating that these polymers protect human EC against oxidative stress.

  9. Cell identity regulators link development and stress responses in the Arabidopsis root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S; Jackson, Terry; Cui, Hongchang; Petricka, Jalean J; Busch, Wolfgang; Tsukagoshi, Hironaka; Benfey, Philip N

    2011-10-18

    Stress responses in plants are tightly coordinated with developmental processes, but interaction of these pathways is poorly understood. We used genome-wide assays at high spatiotemporal resolution to understand the processes that link development and stress in the Arabidopsis root. Our meta-analysis finds little evidence for a universal stress response. However, common stress responses appear to exist with many showing cell type specificity. Common stress responses may be mediated by cell identity regulators because mutations in these genes resulted in altered responses to stress. Evidence for a direct role for cell identity regulators came from genome-wide binding profiling of the key regulator SCARECROW, which showed binding to regulatory regions of stress-responsive genes. Coexpression in response to stress was used to identify genes involved in specific developmental processes. These results reveal surprising linkages between stress and development at cellular resolution, and show the power of multiple genome-wide data sets to elucidate biological processes.

  10. Cell-free layer and wall shear stress variation in microvessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xuewen; Zhang, Junfeng

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we simulated multiple red blood cells flowing through straight microvessels with the immersed-boundary lattice-Boltzmann model to examine the shear stress variation on the microvessel surface and its relation to the properties of cell-free layer. Significant variation in shear stress has been observed due to the irregular configuration of blood cells flowing near the microvessel wall. A low shear stress is typically found at locations where there is a cell flowing close to the wall, and a large shear stress at locations with a relatively wide gap between cell and wall. This relationship between the shear stress magnitude and the distance between cell and wall has been attributed to the reverse pressure difference developed between the front and rear sides of a cell flowing near the vessel wall. We further studied the effects of several hemodynamic factors on the variation of shear stress, including the cell deformability, the flow rate, and the aggregation among red blood cells. These simulations show that the shear stress variation is less profound in situations with wider cell-free layers, since the reverse pressure difference around the edge cells is less evident, and the influence of this pressure difference on wall shear stress becomes weaker. This study also demonstrates the complexity of the flow field in the gap between cell and wall. More precise experimental techniques are required accurately measure such shear stress variation in microcirculation.

  11. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chen-Ming [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shih-Wei [Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tzong-Huei [Graduate Institute of Pharmacognosy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Wen-Pei [Graduate Institute of Sports and Health, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Che-Jen [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shih-Chia [Department of Orthopaedics, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tang, Chih-Hsin, E-mail: chtang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  12. Application de la diffraction des rayons X in situ à haute température pour l'identification d'une nouvelle phase lors de l'oxydation à 900circC de l'acier 304

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffard, F.; Buscail, H.; Caudron, E.; Cueff, R.; Issartel, C.; El Messki, S.; Perrier, S.

    2004-11-01

    Une nouvelle interprétation du comportement atypique couramment appelé "breakaway" observé lors de l'oxydation à haute température d'alliages chromino-formeurs est proposée grâce à l'utilisation de la diffraction des rayons X in situ à haute température. L'acier chromino-formeur AISI 304 doit établir une couche d'oxyde superficielle généralement dense et majoritairement, constituée de chromine, dont la vitesse de croissance est lente, afin d'assurer sa protection contre la corrosion à haute température. Cette faible vitesse de croissance de la couche d'oxyde est effectivement observée à 1000circC. Elle serait favorisée par l'établissement d'une couche de chromine induite par la présence d'une sous-couche continue de silice à l'interface interne. Cette dernière limiterait la diffusion du fer. Le phénomène du "breakaway" est observé à la température de 900circC après 40 heures d'oxydation. Ce phénomène serait lié à la croissance initiale d'oxydes contenant du fer. L'oxyde Fe{7}SiO{10, }a été identifié{ }pour la première fois grâce à la technique de diffraction des rayons X in situ à haute température. Cet oxyde semble piéger le silicium dans la couche d'oxyde, empêchant son accumulation à l'interface interne et la formation d'une couche continue de silice.

  13. Improved Accelerated Stress Tests Based on Fuel Cell Vehicle Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Timothy [Research Engineer; Motupally, Sathya [Research Engineer

    2012-06-01

    UTC will led a top-tier team of industry and national laboratory participants to update and improve DOE’s Accelerated Stress Tests (AST’s) for hydrogen fuel cells. This in-depth investigation will focused on critical fuel cell components (e.g. membrane electrode assemblies - MEA) whose durability represented barriers for widespread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technology. UTC had access to MEA materials that had accrued significant load time under real-world conditions in PureMotion® 120 power plant used in transit buses. These materials are referred to as end-of-life (EOL) components in the rest of this document. Advanced characterization techniques were used to evaluate degradation mode progress using these critical cell components extracted from both bus power plants and corresponding materials tested using the DOE AST’s. These techniques were applied to samples at beginning-of-life (BOL) to serve as a baseline. These comparisons advised the progress of the various failure modes that these critical components were subjected to, such as membrane degradation, catalyst support corrosion, platinum group metal dissolution, and others. Gaps in the existing ASTs predicted the degradation observed in the field in terms of these modes were outlined. Using the gaps, new AST’s were recommended and tested to better reflect the degradation modes seen in field operation. Also, BOL components were degraded in a test vehicle at UTC designed to accelerate the bus field operation.

  14. Cell wall modification in grapevine cells in response to UV stress investigated by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesniewska, E.; Adrian, M.; Klinguer, A.; Pugin, A

    2004-08-15

    Despite cell wall reinforcement being a well-known defence mechanism of plants, it remains poorly characterized from a physical point of view. The objective of this work was to further describe this mechanism. Vitis vinifera cv Gamay cells were treated with UV-light (254 nm), a well-known elicitor of defence mechanisms in grapevines, and physical cell wall modifications were observed using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) under native conditions. The grapevine cell suspensions were continuously observed in their culture medium from 30 min to 24 h after elicitation. In the beginning, cellulose fibrils covered by a matrix surrounded the control and treated cells. After 3 h, the elicited cells displayed sprouted expansions around the cell wall that correspond to pectin chains. These expansions were not observed on untreated grapevine cells. The AFM tip was used to determine the average surface elastic modulus of cell wall that account for cell wall mechanical properties. The elasticity is diminished in UV-treated cells. In a comparative study, grapevine cells showed the same decrease in cell wall elasticity when treated with a fungal biotic elicitor of defence response. These results demonstrate cell wall strengthening by UV stress.

  15. Oxidative stress in NSC-741909-induced apoptosis of cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Peng

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NSC-741909 is a novel anticancer agent that can effectively suppress the growth of several cell lines derived from lung, colon, breast, ovarian, and kidney cancers. We recently showed that NSC-741909-induced antitumor activity is associated with sustained Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK activation, resulting from suppression of JNK dephosphorylation associated with decreased protein levels of MAPK phosphatase-1. However, the mechanisms of NSC-741909-induced antitumor activity remain unclear. Because JNK is frequently activated by oxidative stress in cells, we hypothesized that reactive oxygen species (ROS may be involved in the suppression of JNK dephosphorylation and the cytotoxicity of NSC-741909. Methods The generation of ROS was measured by using the cell-permeable nonfluorescent compound H2DCF-DA and flow cytometry analysis. Cell viability was determined by sulforhodamine B assay. Western blot analysis, immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry assays were used to determine apoptosis and molecular changes induced by NSC-741909. Results Treatment with NSC-741909 induced robust ROS generation and marked MAPK phosphatase-1 and -7 clustering in NSC-741909-sensitive, but not resistant cell lines, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The generation of ROS was detectable as early as 30 min and ROS levels were as high as 6- to 8-fold above basal levels after treatment. Moreover, the NSC-741909-induced ROS generation could be blocked by pretreatment with antioxidants, such as nordihydroguaiaretic acid, aesculetin, baicalein, and caffeic acid, which in turn, inhibited the NSC-741909-induced JNK activation and apoptosis. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the increased ROS production was associated with NSC-741909-induced antitumor activity and that ROS generation and subsequent JNK activation is one of the primary mechanisms of NSC-741909-mediated antitumor cell activity.

  16. Molecular biology of the stress response in the early embryo and its stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puscheck, Elizabeth E; Awonuga, Awoniyi O; Yang, Yu; Jiang, Zhongliang; Rappolee, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Stress is normal during early embryogenesis and transient, elevated stress is commonplace. Stress in the milieu of the peri-implantation embryo is a summation of maternal hormones, and other elements of the maternal milieu, that signal preparedness for development and implantation. Examples discussed here are leptin, adrenaline, cortisol, and progesterone. These hormones signal maternal nutritional status and provide energy, but also signal stress that diverts maternal and embryonic energy from an optimal embryonic developmental trajectory. These hormones communicate endocrine maternal effects and local embryonic effects although signaling mechanisms are not well understood. Other in vivo stresses affect the embryo such as local infection and inflammation, hypoxia, environmental toxins such as benzopyrene, dioxin, or metals, heat shock, and hyperosmotic stress due to dehydration or diabetes. In vitro, stresses include shear during handling, improper culture media and oxygen levels, cryopreservation, and manipulations of the embryo to introduce sperm or mitochondria. We define stress as any stimulus that slows stem cell accumulation or diminishes the ability of cells to produce normal and sufficient parenchymal products upon differentiation. Thus stress deflects downwards the normal trajectories of development, growth and differentiation. Typically stress is inversely proportional to embryonic developmental and proliferative rates, but can be proportional to induction of differentiation of stem cells in the peri-implantation embryo. When modeling stress it is most interesting to produce a 'runting model' where stress exposures slow accumulation but do not create excessive apoptosis or morbidity. Windows of stress sensitivity may occur when major new embryonic developmental programs require large amounts of energy and are exacerbated if nutritional flow decreases and removes energy from the normal developmental programs and stress responses. These windows correspond

  17. K562 cells display different vulnerability to H₂O₂ induced oxidative stress in differing cell cycle phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcakaya, Handan; Dal, Fulya; Tok, Sabiha; Cinar, Suzan-Adin; Nurten, Rustem

    2015-02-01

    Oxidative stress can be defined as the increase of oxidizing agents like reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, or the imbalance between the antioxidative defense mechanism and oxidants. Cell cycle checkpoint response can be defined as the arrest of the cell cycle functioning after damaging chemical exposure. This temporary arrest may be a period of time given to the cells to repair the DNA damage before entering the cycle again and completing mitosis. In order to determine the effects of oxidative stress on several cell cycle phases, human erytroleukemia cell line (K562) was synchronized with mimosine and genistein, and cell cycle analysis carried out. Synchronized cells were exposed to oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at several concentrations and different times. Changes on mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) of K562 cells were analyzed in G1, S, and G2 /M using Rhodamine 123 (Rho 123). To determine apoptosis and necrosis, stressed cells were stained with Annexin V (AnnV) and propidium iodide (PI) for flow cytometry. Changes were observed in the ΔΨm of synchronized and asynchronized cells that were exposed to oxidative stress. Synchronized cells in S phase proved resistant to the effects of oxidative stress and synchronized cells at G2 /M phase were sensitive to the effects of H2O2 -induced oxidative stress at 500 μM and above.

  18. A shift to organismal stress resistance in programmed cell death mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith E Judy

    Full Text Available Animals have many ways of protecting themselves against stress; for example, they can induce animal-wide, stress-protective pathways and they can kill damaged cells via apoptosis. We have discovered an unexpected regulatory relationship between these two types of stress responses. We find that C. elegans mutations blocking the normal course of programmed cell death and clearance confer animal-wide resistance to a specific set of environmental stressors; namely, ER, heat and osmotic stress. Remarkably, this pattern of stress resistance is induced by mutations that affect cell death in different ways, including ced-3 (cell death defective mutations, which block programmed cell death, ced-1 and ced-2 mutations, which prevent the engulfment of dying cells, and progranulin (pgrn-1 mutations, which accelerate the clearance of apoptotic cells. Stress resistance conferred by ced and pgrn-1 mutations is not additive and these mutants share altered patterns of gene expression, suggesting that they may act within the same pathway to achieve stress resistance. Together, our findings demonstrate that programmed cell death effectors influence the degree to which C. elegans tolerates environmental stress. While the mechanism is not entirely clear, it is intriguing that animals lacking the ability to efficiently and correctly remove dying cells should switch to a more global animal-wide system of stress resistance.

  19. Neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells by genotoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Venu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to genotoxic stresses such as radiation and tobacco smoke can cause increased cancer incidence rate as reflected in an in depth meta-analysis of data for women and breast cancer incidence. Published reports have indicated that exposures to low dose radiation and tobacco smoke are factors that contribute to the development of breast cancer. However, there is a scarcity of information on the combinatorial effects of low dose radiation and tobacco smoke on formation and progression of breast cancer. The combination of these two genotoxic insults can induce significant damage to the genetic material of the cells resulting in neoplastic transformation. Methods To study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation and tobacco smoke on breast cells, MCF 10A cells were treated either with radiation (Rad - 0.1 Gray or cigarette smoke condensate (Csc - 10 microgram/ml of medium or a combination of Rad + Csc. Following treatments, cells were analyzed for cell cycle distribution patterns and the ability to extrude the Hoechst 33342 dye. In addition, in vitro invasion and migration as well as mammosphere formation assays were performed. Finally, differential gene expression profiles were generated from the individual and combination treatment. Results Exposure of MCF 10A cells to the combination of radiation plus cigarette smoke condensate generated a neoplastic phenotype. The transformed phenotype promoted increased mammosphere numbers, altered cell cycle phases with a doubling of the population in S phase, and increased invasion and motility. Also, exclusion of Hoechst 33342 dye, a surrogate marker for increased ABC transporters, was observed, which indicates a possible increase in drug resistance. In addition, changes in gene expression include the up regulation of genes encoding proteins involved in metabolic pathways and inflammation. Conclusions The results indicate that when normal breast cells are exposed to low dose

  20. Oxytocin Protects against Stress-Induced Cell Death in Murine Pancreatic β-Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Sayaka; Wei, Fan-Yan; Matsunaga, Tomomi; Matsunaga, Nanami; Kaitsuka, Taku; Tomizawa, Kazuhito

    2016-01-01

    Oxytocin (Oxt) is a key neuropeptide that regulates maternal behaviors as well as social behaviors in mammals. Interestingly, recent studies have shown that the impairment of Oxt signaling is associated with the disturbance of metabolic homeostasis, resulting in obesity and diabetes. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oxt signaling controls metabolic responses is largely unknown. Here, we report that Oxt signaling attenuates the death of pancreatic beta cells in islets exposed to cytotoxic stresses. The protective effect of Oxt was diminished in islets isolated from oxytocin receptor knockout (Oxtr−/−) mice. Oxtr−/− mice developed normally, but exhibited impaired insulin secretion and showed glucose intolerance under a high-fat diet. Mechanistically, the deficiency of Oxtr impaired MAPK/ERK-CREB signaling, which exaggerated the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and ultimately increased the death of beta cells in pancreatic islets under stressed conditions. These results reveal that Oxt protects pancreatic beta cells against death caused by metabolic stress, and Oxt signaling may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27143105

  1. Modeling cell elongation during germ band retraction: cell autonomy versus applied anisotropic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Holley E.; Veldhuis, Jim; Brodland, G. Wayne; Hutson, M. Shane

    2014-05-01

    The morphogenetic process of germ band retraction in Drosophila embryos involves coordinated movements of two epithelial tissues—germ band and amnioserosa. The germ band shortens along its rostral-caudal or head-to-tail axis, widens along its perpendicular dorsal-ventral axis, and uncurls from an initial ‘U’ shape. The amnioserosa mechanically assists this process by pulling on the crook of the U-shaped germ band. The amnioserosa may also provide biochemical signals that drive germ band cells to change shape in a mechanically autonomous fashion. Here, we use a finite-element model to investigate how these two contributions reshape the germ band. We do so by modeling the response to laser-induced wounds in each of the germ band’s spatially distinct segments (T1-T3, A1-A9) during the middle of retraction when segments T1-A3 form the ventral arm of the ‘U’, A4-A7 form its crook, and A8-A9 complete the dorsal arm. We explore these responses under a range of externally applied stresses and internal anisotropy of cell edge tensions—akin to a planar cell polarity that can drive elongation of cells in a direction parallel to the minimum edge tension—and identify regions of parameter space (edge-tension anisotropy versus stress anisotropy) that best match previous experiments for each germ band segment. All but three germ band segments are best fit when the applied stress anisotropy and the edge-tension anisotropy work against one another—i.e., when the isolated effects would elongate cells in perpendicular directions. Segments in the crook of the germ band (A4-A7) have cells that elongate in the direction of maximum external stress, i.e., external stress anisotropy is dominant. In most other segments, the dominant factor is internal edge-tension anisotropy. These results are consistent with models in which the amnioserosa pulls on the crook of the germ band to mechanically assist retraction. In addition, they suggest a mechanical cue for edge

  2. Cell shape, spreading symmetry, and the polarization of stress-fibers in cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemel, A [Institute of Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dental Medicine, and the Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, 91120 (Israel); Rehfeldt, F [III. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universitaet, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Brown, A E X [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Discher, D E [Graduate Group of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Safran, S A [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-05-19

    The active regulation of cellular forces during cell adhesion plays an important role in the determination of cell size, shape, and internal structure. While on flat, homogeneous and isotropic substrates some cells spread isotropically, others spread anisotropically and assume elongated structures. In addition, in their native environment as well as in vitro experiments, the cell shape and spreading asymmetry can be modulated by the local distribution of adhesive molecules and topography of the environment. We present a simple elastic model and experiments on stem cells to explain the variation of cell size with the matrix rigidity. In addition, we predict the experimental consequences of two mechanisms of acto-myosin polarization and focus here on the effect of the cell spreading asymmetry on the regulation of the stress-fiber alignment in the cytoskeleton. We show that when cell spreading is sufficiently asymmetric the alignment of acto-myosin forces in the cell increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity; however, in general this alignment is non-monotonic, as shown previously. These results highlight the importance of the symmetry characteristics of cell spreading in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and suggest a mechanism by which different cell types may acquire different morphologies and internal structures in different mechanical environments.

  3. Cell shape, spreading symmetry, and the polarization of stress-fibers in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, A.; Rehfeldt, F.; Brown, A. E. X.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-05-01

    The active regulation of cellular forces during cell adhesion plays an important role in the determination of cell size, shape, and internal structure. While on flat, homogeneous and isotropic substrates some cells spread isotropically, others spread anisotropically and assume elongated structures. In addition, in their native environment as well as in vitro experiments, the cell shape and spreading asymmetry can be modulated by the local distribution of adhesive molecules and topography of the environment. We present a simple elastic model and experiments on stem cells to explain the variation of cell size with the matrix rigidity. In addition, we predict the experimental consequences of two mechanisms of acto-myosin polarization and focus here on the effect of the cell spreading asymmetry on the regulation of the stress-fiber alignment in the cytoskeleton. We show that when cell spreading is sufficiently asymmetric the alignment of acto-myosin forces in the cell increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity; however, in general this alignment is non-monotonic, as shown previously. These results highlight the importance of the symmetry characteristics of cell spreading in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and suggest a mechanism by which different cell types may acquire different morphologies and internal structures in different mechanical environments.

  4. From START to FINISH: the influence of osmotic stress on the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmaneshfar, Elahe; Kaloriti, Despoina; Gustin, Michael C; Gow, Neil A R; Brown, Alistair J P; Grebogi, Celso; Romano, M Carmen; Thiel, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The cell cycle is a sequence of biochemical events that are controlled by complex but robust molecular machinery. This enables cells to achieve accurate self-reproduction under a broad range of different conditions. Environmental changes are transmitted by molecular signalling networks, which coordinate their action with the cell cycle. The cell cycle process and its responses to environmental stresses arise from intertwined nonlinear interactions among large numbers of simpler components. Yet, understanding of how these pieces fit together into a coherent whole requires a systems biology approach. Here, we present a novel mathematical model that describes the influence of osmotic stress on the entire cell cycle of S. cerevisiae for the first time. Our model incorporates all recently known and several proposed interactions between the osmotic stress response pathway and the cell cycle. This model unveils the mechanisms that emerge as a consequence of the interaction between the cell cycle and stress response networks. Furthermore, it characterises the role of individual components. Moreover, it predicts different phenotypical responses for cells depending on the phase of cells at the onset of the stress. The key predictions of the model are: (i) exposure of cells to osmotic stress during the late S and the early G2/M phase can induce DNA re-replication before cell division occurs, (ii) cells stressed at the late G2/M phase display accelerated exit from mitosis and arrest in the next cell cycle, (iii) osmotic stress delays the G1-to-S and G2-to-M transitions in a dose dependent manner, whereas it accelerates the M-to-G1 transition independently of the stress dose and (iv) the Hog MAPK network compensates the role of the MEN network during cell division of MEN mutant cells. These model predictions are supported by independent experiments in S. cerevisiae and, moreover, have recently been observed in other eukaryotes.

  5. From START to FINISH: the influence of osmotic stress on the cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Radmaneshfar

    Full Text Available The cell cycle is a sequence of biochemical events that are controlled by complex but robust molecular machinery. This enables cells to achieve accurate self-reproduction under a broad range of different conditions. Environmental changes are transmitted by molecular signalling networks, which coordinate their action with the cell cycle. The cell cycle process and its responses to environmental stresses arise from intertwined nonlinear interactions among large numbers of simpler components. Yet, understanding of how these pieces fit together into a coherent whole requires a systems biology approach. Here, we present a novel mathematical model that describes the influence of osmotic stress on the entire cell cycle of S. cerevisiae for the first time. Our model incorporates all recently known and several proposed interactions between the osmotic stress response pathway and the cell cycle. This model unveils the mechanisms that emerge as a consequence of the interaction between the cell cycle and stress response networks. Furthermore, it characterises the role of individual components. Moreover, it predicts different phenotypical responses for cells depending on the phase of cells at the onset of the stress. The key predictions of the model are: (i exposure of cells to osmotic stress during the late S and the early G2/M phase can induce DNA re-replication before cell division occurs, (ii cells stressed at the late G2/M phase display accelerated exit from mitosis and arrest in the next cell cycle, (iii osmotic stress delays the G1-to-S and G2-to-M transitions in a dose dependent manner, whereas it accelerates the M-to-G1 transition independently of the stress dose and (iv the Hog MAPK network compensates the role of the MEN network during cell division of MEN mutant cells. These model predictions are supported by independent experiments in S. cerevisiae and, moreover, have recently been observed in other eukaryotes.

  6. Amnion-Epithelial-Cell-Derived Exosomes Demonstrate Physiologic State of Cell under Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Sheller

    Full Text Available At term, the signals of fetal maturity and feto-placental tissue aging prompt uterine readiness for delivery by transitioning quiescent myometrium to an active stage. It is still unclear how the signals reach the distant myometrium. Exosomes are a specific type of extracellular vesicle (EVs that transport molecular signals between cells, and are released from a wide range of cells, including the maternal and fetal cells. In this study, we hypothesize that i exosomes act as carriers of signals in utero-placental compartments and ii exosomes reflect the physiologic status of the origin cells. The primary aims of this study were to determine exosomal contents in exosomes derived from primary amnion epithelial cells (AEC. We also determined the effect of oxidative stress on AEC derived exosomal cargo contents. AEC were isolated from amniotic membrane obtained from normal, term, not in labor placentae at delivery, and culture under standard conditions. Oxidative stress was induced using cigarette smoke extract for 48 hours. AEC-conditioned media were collected and exosomes isolated by differential centrifugations. Both growth conditions (normal and oxidative stress induced produced cup shaped exosomes of around 50 nm, expressed exosomes enriched markers, such as CD9, CD63, CD81 and HSC70, embryonic stem cell marker Nanog, and contained similar amounts of cell free AEC DNA. Using confocal microscopy, the colocalization of histone (H 3, heat shock protein (HSP 70 and activated form of pro-senescence and term parturition associated marker p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK (P-p38 MAPK co-localized with exosome enrich marker CD9. HSP70 and P-p38 MAPK were significantly higher in exosomes from AEC grown under oxidative stress conditions than standard conditions (p<0.05. Finally, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis identified 221 different proteins involved in immunomodulatory response and cell-to-cell communication. This study determined

  7. Role of Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress in Sickle Cell Trait and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Erica N; Faës, Camille; Connes, Philippe; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Martin, Cyril; Pialoux, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell disease is a class of hemoglobinopathy in humans, which is the most common inherited disease in the world. Although complications of sickle cell disease start from polymerization of red blood cells during its deoxygenating phase, the oxidative stress resulting from the biological processes associated with this disease (ischaemic and hypoxic injuries, hemolysis and inflammation) has been shown to contribute to its pathophysiology. It is widely known that chronic exercise reduces oxidative stress in healthy people, mainly via improvement of antioxidant enzyme efficiency. In addition, recent studies in other diseases, as well as in sickle cell trait carriers and in a mouse model of sickle cell disease, have shown that regular physical activity could decrease oxidative stress. The purpose of this review is to summarize the role of oxidative stress in sickle cell disease and the effects of acute and chronic exercise on the pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance in sickle cell trait and sickle cell disease.

  8. The effect of osmotic stress on the metabolism in guard cells of Vicia faba L.

    OpenAIRE

    Asai, Naoko

    2000-01-01

    When plant is subjected to drought stress (low water potential caused by drying soil and/or low humidity), stomata are closed mainly by the action of a phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) which is synthesized in the mesophyll cells or root cells and transported to the stomata. This stomatal closure causes a delay of wilting. Under drought stress,stomatal guard cells are possible to be exposed to low water potential in the substomatal cavity. However, the protective mechanism of guard cells from ...

  9. Oxydes transparents conducteurs et convertisseurs de photons pour des applications photovoltaïques : les cas de l'oxyde de zinc et de l'oxyde de cérium dopés aux terres rares

    OpenAIRE

    Balestrieri, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to investigate the photon converting properties of rare earths (RE) ions embedded in transparent oxide hosts in view of potential application on silicon solar cells. In particular, the goal was to functionalize thin films that are already used in solar cells such as anti-Reflection coatings or transparent conductive oxides.Two host materials (ZnO and CeO2) have been selected, which are compatible with silicon solar cells.This work shows that RE-Doped transpare...

  10. Adaptive and Pathogenic Responses to Stress by Stem Cells during Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Rappolee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular stress is the basis of a dose-dependent continuum of responses leading to adaptive health or pathogenesis. For all cells, stress leads to reduction in macromolecular synthesis by shared pathways and tissue and stress-specific homeostatic mechanisms. For stem cells during embryonic, fetal, and placental development, higher exposures of stress lead to decreased anabolism, macromolecular synthesis and cell proliferation. Coupled with diminished stem cell proliferation is a stress-induced differentiation which generates minimal necessary function by producing more differentiated product/cell. This compensatory differentiation is accompanied by a second strategy to insure organismal survival as multipotent and pluripotent stem cells differentiate into the lineages in their repertoire. During stressed differentiation, the first lineage in the repertoire is increased and later lineages are suppressed, thus prioritized differentiation occurs. Compensatory and prioritized differentiation is regulated by at least two types of stress enzymes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK which mediates loss of nuclear potency factors and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK that does not. SAPK mediates an increase in the first essential lineage and decreases in later lineages in placental stem cells. The clinical significance of compensatory and prioritized differentiation is that stem cell pools are depleted and imbalanced differentiation leads to gestational diseases and long term postnatal pathologies.

  11. Adaptive and Pathogenic Responses to Stress by Stem Cells during Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Ladan; Xie, Yufen; Rappolee, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stress is the basis of a dose-dependent continuum of responses leading to adaptive health or pathogenesis. For all cells, stress leads to reduction in macromolecular synthesis by shared pathways and tissue and stress-specific homeostatic mechanisms. For stem cells during embryonic, fetal, and placental development, higher exposures of stress lead to decreased anabolism, macromolecular synthesis and cell proliferation. Coupled with diminished stem cell proliferation is a stress-induced differentiation which generates minimal necessary function by producing more differentiated product/cell. This compensatory differentiation is accompanied by a second strategy to insure organismal survival as multipotent and pluripotent stem cells differentiate into the lineages in their repertoire. During stressed differentiation, the first lineage in the repertoire is increased and later lineages are suppressed, thus prioritized differentiation occurs. Compensatory and prioritized differentiation is regulated by at least two types of stress enzymes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) which mediates loss of nuclear potency factors and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) that does not. SAPK mediates an increase in the first essential lineage and decreases in later lineages in placental stem cells. The clinical significance of compensatory and prioritized differentiation is that stem cell pools are depleted and imbalanced differentiation leads to gestational diseases and long term postnatal pathologies.

  12. Targeting Prostate Cancer Cells by Combined Oxidative Stress Induction and Androgen Receptor Antagonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0340 TITLE: Targeting Prostate Cancer Cells by Combined Oxidative Stress Induction and Androgen...COVERED 1 Aug 2014 - 21 Jul 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Prostate Cancer Cells by Combined Oxidative Stress Induction and

  13. Oxydation catalytique du Phénol par le peroxyde d'hydrogène en présence d'argiles pontées par des espèces mixtes [Al-Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellaoui, M.; Barrault, J.; Bouchoule, C.; Srasra, N. F.; Bergaya, F.

    1999-03-01

    Various processes can be used for the treatment of wastewater, but the one we feel to be important and more promising is the wet peroxide oxidation (WPO), in the presence of a solid catalyst, at atmospheric pressure and at room temperature. Different types of materials can be used as catalysts for such reactions, but as shown in previous studies dealing with phenol oxidation clays-based catalysts seem to be attractive. It is well known that natural clays are inactive in the phenol oxidation, but the intercalation of polymeric species changes their properties. When the clay is pillared with pure aluminum oxyhydroxides species, the d{001} spacing and the surface area increase, but the activity is very low. When the clay is pillared with mixed [Al-Cu] species, there is a strong increase of the phenol conversion. Nevertheless W (Wyoming) based solids are more active than H (Haîdoudi) or L (Laponite) based catalysts. The stability, the activity and the percentage of copper depend on the preparation method. Différentes techniques de traitements des eaux usées peuvent être utilisées, et l'une des plus prometteuses est l'oxydation voie humide par le peroxyde d'hydrogène en milieu aqueux dilué (WPO), en présence de catalyseurs supportés, à pression atmosphérique et à 25 ° C. Lors de cette étude, il a été montré que les argiles brutes sont inactives en oxydation du phénol. L'intercalation d'espèces hydroxyaluminiques conduit à une augmentation de la surface spécifique et de l'espace interlamellaire, mais la conversion du phénol reste faible. En revanche, l'insertion d'espèces mixtes [Al-Cu] confère au catalyseur une importante activité. En outre, la quantité de cuivre intercalé est très faible (argile et la méthode de préparation. Néanmoins, la comparaison des divers catalyseurs, montre que l'utilisation de l'argile Wyoming (W), conduit à une activité supérieure à celle des argiles moins bien définies (Haîdoudi) ou à celle de la Laponite

  14. Protective effect of catechin in type I Gaucher disease cells by reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yea-Jin [Department of Biotechnology, Hoseo University, Baebang, Asan, Chungnam, 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Jo, E-mail: sungjo@hoseo.edu [Department of Biotechnology, Hoseo University, Baebang, Asan, Chungnam, 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Tae-Hwe, E-mail: thhur92@catholic.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon 420-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Catechin reduces the expression level of ER stress marker protein in type I Gaucher disease cells. {yields} Catechin induces the proliferation rate of GD cells similar levels to normal cells. {yields} Catechin improves wound healing activity. {yields} Catechin-mediated reductions in ER stress may be associated with enhanced cell survival. {yields} We identified catechin as a protective agent against ER stress in GD cells. -- Abstract: Gaucher disease (GD) is the most common lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) and is divided into three phenotypes, I, II, and III. Type I is the most prevalent form and has its onset in adulthood. The degree of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is one of the factors that determine GD severity. It has recently been reported that antioxidants reduce ER stress and apoptosis by scavenging the oxidants that cause oxidative stress. For this report, we investigated the possibility that catechin can act on type I GD patient cells to alleviate the pathogenic conditions of GD. We treated GD cells with catechin and examined the expression level of GRP78/BiP (an ER stress marker) by western blots and fluorescence microscopy, the proliferation rate of GD cells, and scratch-induced wound healing activity. Our results show that catechin reduces the expression level of GRP78/BiP, leads to cell proliferation rates of GD cells similar levels to normal cells, and improves wound healing activity. We conclude that catechin protects against ER stress in GD cells and catechin-mediated reductions in ER stress may be associated with enhanced cell survival.

  15. Salt Stress-induced Programmed Cell Death in Rice Root Tip Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-You Li; Ai-Liang Jiang; Wei Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Salt stressed rice root tips were used to investigate the changes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant enzymes at the early stages of programmed cell death (PCD). The results indicated that 500 mmol/L NaCl treatment could lead to specific features of PCD in root tips, such as DNA ladder, nuclear condense and deformation, and transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling positive reaction, which were initiated at 4 h of treatment and progressed thereafter. Cytochrome c release from mitochondria into cytoplasm was also observed, which occurred at 2 h and was earlier than the above nuclear events. In the very early phase of PCD, an immediate burst in hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion production rate was accompanied by two-phase changes of superoxide dismutases and ascorbate peroxidase. A short period of increase in the activity was followed by prolonged impairment. Thus,we conclude that salt can induce PCD in rice root tip cells, and propose that in the early phase of rice root tip cell PCD, salt stress-induced oxidative burst increased the antioxidant enzyme activity, which, In turn, scavenged the ROS and abrogated PCD. Also, when the stress is prolonged, the antioxidant system is damaged and accumulated ROS induces the PCD process, which leads to cytochrome c release and nuclear change.

  16. Salinomycin induces cell death with autophagy through activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianliang; Su, Ling; Zhong, Ning; Hao, Xuexi; Zhong, Diansheng; Singhal, Sunil; Liu, Xiangguo

    2013-07-01

    Salinomycin is perhaps the first promising compound that was discovered through high throughput screening in cancer stem cells. This novel agent can selectively eliminate breast and other cancer stem cells, though the mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, we found that salinomycin induced autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that salinomycin stimulated endoplasmic reticulum stress and mediated autophagy via the ATF4-DDIT3/CHOP-TRIB3-AKT1-MTOR axis. Moreover, we found that the autophagy induced by salinomycin played a prosurvival role in human NSCLC cells and attenuated the apoptotic cascade. We also showed that salinomycin triggered more apoptosis and less autophagy in A549 cells in which CDH1 expression was inhibited, suggesting that the inhibition of autophagy might represent a promising strategy to target cancer stem cells. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that combination treatment with salinomycin and pharmacological autophagy inhibitors will be an effective therapeutic strategy for eliminating cancer cells as well as cancer stem cells.

  17. Effect of zinc and nitric oxide on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungmun; Eskin, Suzanne G; Shah, Ankit K; Schildmeyer, Lisa A; McIntire, Larry V

    2012-03-01

    This study describes the effect of zinc on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under different shear stress regimens, which may trigger atherogenesis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to steady shear stress (15 dynes/cm(2) or 1 dyne/cm(2)) or reversing shear stress (time average 1 dyne/cm(2)) for 24 h. In all shear stress regimes, zinc deficiency enhanced THP-1 cell adhesion, while heparinase III reduced monocyte adhesion following reversing shear stress exposure. Unlike other shear stress regimes, reversing shear stress alone enhanced monocyte adhesion, which may be associated with increased H(2)O(2) and superoxide together with relatively low levels of nitric oxide (NO) production. L-N(G)-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treatment increased monocyte adhesion under 15 dynes/cm(2) and under reversing shear stress. After reversing shear stress, monocyte adhesion dramatically increased with heparinase III treatment followed by a zinc scavenger. Static culture experiments supported the reduction of monocyte adhesion by zinc following endothelial cell cytokine activation. These results suggest that endothelial cell zinc levels are important for the inhibition of monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, and may be one of the key factors in the early stages of atherogenesis.

  18. HDLs protect pancreatic β-cells against ER stress by restoring protein folding and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pétremand, Jannick; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Duprez, Jessica; Allagnat, Florent; Frias, Miguel; James, Richard W; Waeber, Gérard; Jonas, Jean-Christophe; Widmann, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis alteration contributes to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and death and favors the development of diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that HDLs protect β-cells against ER stress induced by thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, palmitate, insulin overexpression, and high glucose concentrations. ER stress marker induction and ER morphology disruption mediated by these stimuli were inhibited by HDLs. Using a temperature-sensitive viral glycoprotein folding mutant, we show that HDLs correct impaired protein trafficking and folding induced by thapsigargin and palmitate. The ability of HDLs to protect β-cells against ER stress was inhibited by brefeldin A, an ER to Golgi trafficking blocker. These results indicate that HDLs restore ER homeostasis in response to ER stress, which is required for their ability to promote β-cell survival. This study identifies a cellular mechanism mediating the beneficial effect of HDLs on β-cells against ER stress-inducing factors.

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy determines the susceptibility of melanoma cells to dabrafenib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chao; Zhang, Ziping; Chen, Lihong; Zhou, Kunli; Li, Dongjun; Wang, Ping; Huang, Shuying; Gong, Ting; Cheng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the deadliest skin cancers and accounts for most skin-related deaths due to strong resistance to chemotherapy drugs. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of dabrafenib-induced drug resistance in human melanoma cell lines A375 and MEL624. Our studies support that both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy were induced in the melanoma cells after the treatment with dabrafenib. In addition, ER stress-induced autophagy protects melanoma cells from the toxicity of dabrafenib. Moreover, inhibition of both ER stress and autophagy promote the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. Taken together, the data suggest that ER stress-induced autophagy determines the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. These results provide us with promising evidence that the inhibition of autophagy and ER stress could serve a therapeutic effect for the conventional dabrafenib chemotherapy. PMID:27536070

  20. A thermo-mechanical stress prediction model for contemporary planar sodium sulfur (NaS) cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Keeyoung; Colker, Jeffrey P.; Cao, Yuzhe; Kim, Goun; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a comprehensive finite-element analysis (FEA) computational model to accurately predict the thermo-mechanical stresses at heterogeneous joints and components of large-size sodium sulfur (NaS) cells during thermal cycling. Quantification of the thermo-mechanical stress is important because the accumulation of stress during cell assembly and/or operation is one of the critical issues in developing practical planar NaS cells. The computational model is developed based on relevant experimental assembly and operation conditions to predict the detailed stress field of a state-of-the-art planar NaS cell. Prior to the freeze-and-thaw thermal cycle simulation, residual stresses generated from the actual high temperature cell assembly procedures are calculated and implemented into the subsequent model. The calculation results show that large stresses are developed on the outer surface of the insulating header and the solid electrolyte, where component fracture is frequently observed in the experimental cell fabrication process. The impacts of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of glass materials and the thicknesses of cell container on the stress accumulation are also evaluated to improve the cell manufacturing procedure and to guide the material choices for enhanced thermo-mechanical stability of large-size NaS cells.

  1. Necdin modulates proliferative cell survival of human cells in response to radiation-induced genotoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafontaine Julie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The finite replicative lifespan of cells, termed cellular senescence, has been proposed as a protective mechanism against the proliferation of oncogenically damaged cells, that fuel cancer. This concept is further supported by the induction of premature senescence, a process which is activated when an oncogene is expressed in normal primary cells as well as following intense genotoxic stresses. Thus, deregulation of genes that control this process, like the tumor suppressor p53, may contribute to promoting cancer by allowing cells to bypass senescence. A better understanding of the genes that contribute to the establishment of senescence is therefore warranted. Necdin interacts with p53 and is also a p53 target gene, although the importance of Necdin in the p53 response is not clearly understood. Methods In this study, we first investigated Necdin protein expression during replicative senescence and premature senescence induced by gamma irradiation and by the overexpression of oncogenic RasV12. Gain and loss of function experiments were used to evaluate the contribution of Necdin during the senescence process. Results Necdin expression declined during replicative aging of IMR90 primary human fibroblasts or following induction of premature senescence. Decrease in Necdin expression seemed to be a consequence of the establishment of senescence since the depletion of Necdin in human cells did not induce a senescence-like growth arrest nor a flat morphology or SA-β-galactosidase activity normally associated with senescence. Similarly, overexpression of Necdin did not affect the life span of IMR90 cells. However, we demonstrate that in normal human cells, Necdin expression mimicked the effect of p53 inactivation by increasing radioresistance. Conclusion This result suggests that Necdin potentially attenuate p53 signaling in response to genotoxic stress in human cells and supports similar results describing an inhibitory function

  2. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae-Hoon [Division of Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seongman [Division of Life Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Bin, E-mail: yblim@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  3. Multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells are a primary source of induced pluripotent stem cells in human fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Wakao, Shohei; Kitada, Masaaki; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Shigemoto, Taeko; Matsuse, Dai; Akashi, Hideo; Tanimura, Yukihiro; Tsuchiyama, Kenichiro; Kikuchi, Tomohiko; Goda, Makoto; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Dezawa, Mari

    2011-01-01

    The stochastic and elite models have been proposed for the mechanism of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell generation. In this study we report a system that supports the elite model. We previously identified multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells in human dermal fibroblasts that are characterized by stress tolerance, expression of pluripotency markers, self-renewal, and the ability to differentiate into endodermal-, mesodermal-, and ectodermal-lineage cells from a single c...

  4. Simulation of thermal and sodium expansion stress in aluminum reduction cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jie; WU Yu-yun; LAI Yan-qing; LIU Wei; WANG Zhi-gang; LIU Jie; LIU Ye-xiang

    2008-01-01

    Two finite element(FE) models were built up for analysis of stress field in the lining of aluminum electrolysis cells. Distribution of sodium concentration in cathode carbon blocks was calculated by one FE model of a cathode block. Thermal stress field was calculated by the other slice model of the cell at the end of the heating-up. Then stresses coupling thermal and sodium expansion were considered after 30 d start-up. The results indicate that sodium penetrates to the bottom of the cathode block after 30 d start-up. The semi-graphitic carbon block has the largest stress at the thermal stage. After 30 d start-up the anthracitic carbon has the greatest sodium expansion stress and the graphitized carbon has the lowest sodium expansion stress. Sodium penetration can cause larger deformation and stress in the cathode carbon block than thermal expansion.

  5. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y. [Southern Medical University, Nanfang Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Guangzhou, China, Department of Anesthesia, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Y.; Chen, B. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China); Sun, X. [Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Su, L.; Liu, Z. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-25

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  6. Pseudorabies Virus Induces Viability Changes and Oxidative Stress in Swine Testis Cell-Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Zhan Zhang§1, Ye Chen§1, Hong-Liang Huang§2, Dong-Lei Xu1, Chang-Bao Ren2, Bi-Tao Liu1, Shuo Su1 and Zhao-Xin Tang1, 2*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the association between pseudorabies (PRV virus-induced viability changes and oxidative stress in vitro cultivated swine testis (ST cells. The kinetic of 2, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h during the cell culture with PRV by using a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1 TCID50 per cell were adopted. The results suggested a complex relation between cell viability and oxidative stress during PRV infection. In the early stages of PRV infection, the cell viability was higher than the control group, and the state of cellular oxidative stress remained relatively stable. After 24 h, the cell viability began to decrease, and the amount of the cellular malondialdehyde in ST cells increased significantly, and the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase decreased significantly (P<0.05. Meanwhile, the rising concentrations of cellular hydrogen peroxide were detected prior to the changes in cell viability and oxidative stress. In conclusion, the PRV infection of ST cells leads to oxidative stress, and this stress could play a crucial role on the cell viability as the PRV infection time progresses.

  7. Hydrogels with tunable stress relaxation regulate stem cell fate and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Gu, Luo; Klumpers, Darinka; Darnell, Max; Bencherif, Sidi A.; Weaver, James C.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Lee, Hong-Pyo; Lippens, Evi; Duda, Georg N.; Mooney, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Natural extracellular matrices (ECMs) are viscoelastic and exhibit stress relaxation. However, hydrogels used as synthetic ECMs for three-dimensional (3D) culture are typically elastic. Here, we report a materials approach to tune the rate of stress relaxation of hydrogels for 3D culture, independently of the hydrogel's initial elastic modulus, degradation, and cell-adhesion-ligand density. We find that cell spreading, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are all enhanced in cells cultured in gels with faster relaxation. Strikingly, MSCs form a mineralized, collagen-1-rich matrix similar to bone in rapidly relaxing hydrogels with an initial elastic modulus of 17 kPa. We also show that the effects of stress relaxation are mediated by adhesion-ligand binding, actomyosin contractility and mechanical clustering of adhesion ligands. Our findings highlight stress relaxation as a key characteristic of cell-ECM interactions and as an important design parameter of biomaterials for cell culture.

  8. Laminar shear stress delivers cell cycle arrest and anti-apoptosis to mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Luo; Wei Xiong; Jun Zhou; Zhong Fang; Wenjian Chen; Yubo Fan; Feng Li

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanical forces are emerging as critical regulators of cell function and fluid flow is a potent mechanical stimulus. Although the mechanisms of osteoblasts and osteocytes responding to fluid flow are being elucidated,little is known about how the osteoprogenitors, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), respond to fluid flow. Here, we examined the effects of laminar shear stress (LSS) on MSCs in vitro. MSCs from bone marrow of SpragueDawley rats were isolated, purified, and subjected to physiological levels of LSS. DNA synthesis and cell cycle were measured through [3H]thymidine and by flow cytometry,respectively, to detect the cellular proliferation. Annexin V immunostaining and Bcl-2/Bax mRNA expression were evaluated to determine the effect of LSS on MSCs apoptosis. Results showed that fluid shear stress caused a doserelated reduction of MSCs' proliferation rate with the majority of cells being arrested in the Go or G1 phase.Moreover, it was found that physiological levels of LSS exerted a potent suppression effect on MSC apoptosis, In summary, these data revealed a critical role of LSS in maintaining the quiescence of MSCs.

  9. Glycemic control in diabetes is restored by therapeutic manipulation of cytokines that regulate beta cell stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Sumaira Z; Borg, Danielle J; Harcourt, Brooke E; Tong, Hui; Sheng, Yonghua H; Ng, Choa Ping; Das, Indrajit; Wang, Ran; Chen, Alice C-H; Loudovaris, Thomas; Kay, Thomas W; Thomas, Helen E; Whitehead, Jonathan P; Forbes, Josephine M; Prins, Johannes B; McGuckin, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    In type 2 diabetes, hyperglycemia is present when an increased demand for insulin, typically due to insulin resistance, is not met as a result of progressive pancreatic beta cell dysfunction. This defect in beta cell activity is typically characterized by impaired insulin biosynthesis and secretion, usually accompanied by oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We demonstrate that multiple inflammatory cytokines elevated in diabetic pancreatic islets induce beta cell oxidative and ER stress, with interleukin-23 (IL-23), IL-24 and IL-33 being the most potent. Conversely, we show that islet-endogenous and exogenous IL-22, by regulating oxidative stress pathways, suppresses oxidative and ER stress caused by cytokines or glucolipotoxicity in mouse and human beta cells. In obese mice, antibody neutralization of IL-23 or IL-24 partially reduced beta cell ER stress and improved glucose tolerance, whereas IL-22 administration modulated oxidative stress regulatory genes in islets, suppressed ER stress and inflammation, promoted secretion of high-quality efficacious insulin and fully restored glucose homeostasis followed by restitution of insulin sensitivity. Thus, therapeutic manipulation of immune regulators of beta cell stress reverses the hyperglycemia central to diabetes pathology.

  10. Simulation and in situ measurement of stress distribution in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Javier; Cano, Ulises; Romero, Tatiana

    2016-10-01

    A critical parameter for PEM fuel cell's electric contact is the nominal clamping pressure. Predicting the mechanical behavior of all components in a fuel cell stack is a very complex task due to the diversity of materials properties. Prior to the integration of a 3 kW PEMFC power plant, a numerical simulation was performed in order to obtain the mechanical stress distribution for two of the most pressure sensitive components of the stack: the membrane, and the graphite plates. The stress distribution of the above mentioned components was numerically simulated by finite element analysis and the stress magnitude for the membrane was confirmed using pressure films. Stress values were found within the elastic zone which guarantees mechanical integrity of fuel cell components. These low stress levels particularly for the membrane will allow prolonging the life and integrity of the fuel cell stack according to its design specifications.

  11. The shear stress of it all: the cell membrane and mechanochemical transduction

    OpenAIRE

    White, Charles R; Frangos, John A.

    2007-01-01

    As the inner lining of the vessel wall, vascular endothelial cells are poised to act as a signal transduction interface between haemodynamic forces and the underlying vascular smooth-muscle cells. Detailed analyses of fluid mechanics in atherosclerosis-susceptible regions of the vasculature reveal a strong correlation between endothelial cell dysfunction and areas of low mean shear stress and oscillatory flow with flow recirculation. Conversely, steady shear stress stimulates cellular respons...

  12. Étude par diffraction des rayons X de la nitruration plasma d'un acier 304L Influence sur l'oxydation à 1000 ^{circ}C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marot, L.; Buscail, H.; Straboni, A.; Riffard, F.; Caudron, E.; Cueff, R.

    2002-07-01

    This work presents the influence of various nitridation parameters on the 304L steel oxidation at 1000 ^{circ}C, in air under atmospheric pressure. Nitridation temperatures were ranging between 300 ^{circ}C and 430 ^{circ}C with exposure times lasting from 2 to 8 hours. At 300 and 430 ^{circ}C, the nitridation treatment leads to the solid solution surface formation γ-N without any nitride formation. After oxidation at 1000 ^{circ}C of blank specimens, X ray diffraction reveals the FeCr2O4 spinel formation. This oxide does not act as a good diffusion barrier. With nitrogen treated specimens, the higher the nitridation temperature is and the longer the exposure time is, better is the oxidation behaviour at 1000 ^{circ}C. We then observe that the Cr{1,3}Fe{0,7}O3 oxide is more present in the oxide sale from the very beginning of the oxidation test which is correlated to a final lower mass gain. Cette étude porte sur l'influence des paramètres de nitruration plasma sur l'oxydation de l'acier 304L à 1000 ^{circ}C, sous air, à la pression atmosphérique. Les températures employées lors de la nitruration ont été de 300 ^{circ}C et 430 ^{circ}C pour des durées de nitruration variant entre 2 et 8 heures. A 300 et 430 ^{circ}C, la nitruration conduit à la formation d'une solution solide γ-N en surface sans provoquer la formation de nitrures. Après oxydation à 1000 ^{circ}C du 304L non nitruré, la diffraction des rayons X révèle la formation d'une couche de type spinelle FeCr2O4 qui ne semble pas jouer le rôle de barrière de diffusion. Pour les échantillons préalablement nitrurés, plus la température de nitruration est élevée et plus la durée du traitement est longue, meilleur est le comportement en oxydation. Nous observons alors l'oxyde Cr{1,3}Fe{0,7}O3 en proportion importante dès le début de l'oxydation et une prise de masse finale plus faible.

  13. Cigarette-Smoke- and Age-Dependent Oxidative Stress Effects in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisgen Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Le stress oxydatif est un mécanisme fondamental, à l'oeuvre tant dans les pathologies liées au tabagisme qu'à celles liées à l'âge. Dans le but de déterminer si le tabagisme affecte, dans une même mesure, les organismes jeunes, vieux et ceux soumis à un régime limité en calories, nous avons suivi les paramètres de stress oxydatif au niveau des poumons, du coeur et du foie de rats Fischer 344 de sexe mâle (individus âgés à 4 mois et individus âgés de 19 à 22 mois exposés à l'air ou à une fumée principale de cigarette. Des effets liés au tabac ont été observés en suivant les paramètres tels que les lésions ADN, la peroxydation lipidique, l'oxydation des protéines et la glycoxydation. Aucun effet lié au tabac n'a été observé en termes de lésions de l'ADN dans les poumons et le coeur (test des comètes et de présence de malondialdéhyde dans les poumons. Les rats âgés ont présenté des réactions plus intenses liées au tabac que les rats plus jeunes en termes de présence de 8-hydroxy-déoxyguanosine (8-OHdG dans le coeur et le foie, de lésions ADN au niveau du foie et de groupements carbonyles dans les protéines des poumons; néanmoins, peu de preuves ont été apportées d'un effet suradditif du tabagisme sur le vieillissement. Il s'est avéré également qu'un régime limité en calories, connu pour son effet de retardement du processus de vieillissement, n'exerçait qu'une faible incidence sur l'oxydation liée au tabagisme. [Beitr. Tabakforsch. Int. 26 (2014 109-120

  14. Cell surface estrogen receptor alpha is upregulated during subchronic metabolic stress and inhibits neuronal cell degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Barbati

    Full Text Available In addition to the classical nuclear estrogen receptor, the expression of non-nuclear estrogen receptors localized to the cell surface membrane (mER has recently been demonstrated. Estrogen and its receptors have been implicated in the development or progression of numerous neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, the pathogenesis of these diseases has been associated with disturbances of two key cellular programs: apoptosis and autophagy. An excess of apoptosis or a defect in autophagy has been implicated in neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of ER in determining neuronal cell fate and the possible implication of these receptors in regulating either apoptosis or autophagy. The human neuronal cell line SH-SY5Y and mouse neuronal cells in primary culture were thus exposed to chronic minimal peroxide treatment (CMP, a form of subcytotoxic minimal chronic stress previously that mimics multiple aspects of long-term cell stress and represents a limited molecular proxy for neurodegenerative processes. We actually found that either E2 or E2-bovine serum albumin construct (E2BSA, i.e. a non-permeant form of E2 was capable of modulating intracellular cell signals and regulating cell survival and death. In particular, under CMP, the up-regulation of mERα, but not mERβ, was associated with functional signals (ERK phosphorylation and p38 dephosphorylation compatible with autophagic cytoprotection triggering and leading to cell survival. The mERα trafficking appeared to be independent of the microfilament system cytoskeletal network but was seemingly associated with microtubular apparatus network, i.e., to MAP2 molecular chaperone. Importantly, antioxidant treatments, administration of siRNA to ERα, or the presence of antagonist of ERα hindered these events. These results support that the surface expression of mERα plays a pivotal role in determining cell fate, and that ligand-induced activation of mER signalling exerts a

  15. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells resist elongation due to shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinitz, Adam; DeStefano, Jackson; Ye, Mao; Wong, Andrew D; Searson, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    Endothelial cells in straight sections of vessels are known to elongate and align in the direction of flow. This phenotype has been replicated in confluent monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in cell culture under physiological shear stress. Here we report on the morphological response of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in confluent monolayers in response to shear stress. Using a microfluidic platform we image confluent monolayers of HBMECs and HUVECs under shear stresses up to 16 dyne cm(-2). From live-cell imaging we quantitatively analyze the cell morphology and cell speed as a function of time. We show that HBMECs do not undergo a classical transition from cobblestone to spindle-like morphology in response to shear stress. We further show that under shear stress, actin fibers are randomly oriented in the cells indicating that there is no cytoskeletal remodeling. These results suggest that HBMECs are programmed to resist elongation and alignment under shear stress, a phenotype that may be associated with the unique properties of the blood-brain barrier.

  16. Lanthanum Prevents Salt Stress-induced Programmed Cell Death in Rice Root Tip Cells by Controlling Early Induction Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, a salt stress-induced programmed cell death (PCD) model was established in rice root tip cells. Here,by using Wuyunjing 8th rice seedlings, the effects of lanthanum on salt stress-induced PCD early events were studied. The peroxidase (APX). Imidazole (20 mmol/L), the inhibitor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (NADPH oxidase), could alleviate the occurrence of PCD obviously, and such alleviation could be enhanced by the addition of La3+,indicating the involvement of NADPH oxidase in the salt stress-induced PCD process. Taken together, lanthanum could prevent salt stress-induced PCD occurrence in the rice root tip cells by blocking the calcium influx under stress, which was followed by inhibiting calcium-dependent NADPH oxidase activity to prevent O2·-production and, enhancing the cytosolic antioxidative enzyme activities to scavenge the reactive oxygen species.

  17. Cell biological mechanism for triggering of ABA accumulation under water stress in Vicia faba leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D; He, F; Jia, W

    2001-08-01

    Water stress-induced ABA accumulation is a cellular signaling process from water stress perception to activation of genes encoding key enzymes of ABA biosynthesis, of which the water stress-signal perception by cells or triggering mechanism of the ABA accumulation is the center in the whole process of ABA related-stress signaling in plants. The cell biological mechanism for triggering of ABA accumulation under water stress was studied in leaves of Vicia faba. Mannitol at 890 mmol * kg(-1) osmotic concentration induced an increase of more than 5 times in ABA concentration in detached leaf tissues, but the same concentration of mannitol only induced an increase of less than 40 % in ABA concentration in protoplasts. Like in detached leaf tissues, ABA concentration in isolated cells increased more than 10 times under the treatment of mannitol at 890 mmol * kg(-1) concentration, suggesting that the interaction between plasmalemma and cell wall was essential to triggering of the water stress-induced ABA accumulation. Neither Ca(2+)-chelating agent EGTA nor Ca(2+)channel activator A23187 nor the two cytoskeleton inhibitors, colchicine and cytochalasin B, had any effect on water stress-induced ABA accumulation. Interestingly water stress-induced ABA accumulation was effectively inhibited by a non-plasmalemma-permeable sulfhydryl-modifier PCMBS (p-chloromercuriphenyl-sulfonic acid), suggesting that plasmalemma protein(s) may be involved in the triggering of water stress-induced ABA accumulation, and the protein may contain sulfhydryl group at its function domain.

  18. Beller Lectureship Talk: Active response of biological cells to mechanical stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. We present a simple and generic theoretical model for the active response of biological cells to mechanical stress. The theory includes cell activity and mechanical forces as well as random forces as factors that determine the polarizability that relates cell orientation to stress. This allows us to explain the puzzling observation of parallel (or sometimes random) alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency and compare the theory with recent experiments. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material distinguishes cells whose activity is controlled by stress from those controlled by strain. We have extended the theory to generalize the treatment of elastic inclusions in solids to ''living'' inclusions (cells) whose active polarizability, analogous to the polarizability of non-living matter, results in the feedback of cellular forces that develop in response to matrix stresses. We use this to explain recent observations of the non-monotonic dependence of stress-fiber polarization in stem cells on matrix rigidity. These findings provide a mechanical correlate for the existence of an optimal substrate elasticity for cell differentiation and function. [3pt] *In collaboration with R. De (Brown University), Y. Biton (Weizmann Institute), and A. Zemel (Hebrew University) and the experimental groups: Max Planck Institute, Stuttgart: S. Jungbauer, R. Kemkemer, J. Spatz; University of Pennsylvania: A. Brown, D. Discher, F. Rehfeldt.

  19. Le champ critique de claquage de films d'oxyde de polyphénylène réalisés par voie électrochimique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adohi, B.; Gosse, J. P.; Gosse, B.

    1991-10-01

    The electrical breakdown of thin films of polyphenylene oxide electrochemically deposited on stainless steel plane substrates has been studied. First it was examined the dependence of the medium surrounding the dielectric and the electrodes (nature, hydrostatic pressure) on the breakdown voltage and on its statistical distribution. Between sphere and plane electrodes, it appears that even for pressurified gases, breakdown of the film is caused by the gas breakdown. We have analysed the discharges occurring at atmosphere pressure in the test cell. Breakdown of the film occurred when the electric field due to the charge deposited on its surface was about 230 V/μm. We have also studied self-healing capacitors with PPO as a dielectric, and determined the life-time of this material. On a étudié le claquage électrique de films minces d'oxyde de polyphénylène de quelques microns d'épaisseur déposés par voie électrochimique sur un plan en acier inoxydable. L'étude a d'abord été faite en rampe de tension continue dans la géométrie d'électrodes sphèreplan, en fonction du milieu ambiant liquide ou gazeux. L'influence de la pression sur la rigidité diélectrique du matériau, les distributions statistiques de Weibull et les cratères formés au moment du claquage, dans les différents milieux et dans les deux polarités de l'électrode sphérique montrent que le claquage du matériau est causé par des décharges qui se produisent dans le milieu environnant. A partir de l'analyse quantitative de ces décharges, on propose comme critère de caractérisation de la rupture d'un matériau sounmis aux décharges, le champ créé au moment de la rupture par les charges déposées à sa surface. On a réalisé ensuite des échantillons plans > par dépôt de couches minces d'aluminium (quelques milliers d'Å d'épaisseur) sur le film de PPO. On étudie dans cette configuration la durée de vie du matériau.

  20. Copolymères (carbazolylène-pyrrolylène) : synthèse par oxydation chimique et propriétés

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucard, V.; Adès, D.; Siove, A.

    1998-06-01

    Conditions in which (carbazolylene-pyrrolylene) random copolymers could be synthetized directly by chemical oxidation by FeCl3 were studied. A substantial amount of soluble copolymers is obtained after work-up in the conditions corresponding to carbazole/pyrrole/2 FeCl3 molar proportions. An important fraction of polypyrrole was obtained beside a fraction of species soluble in ethanol (carbazole and dimer) and an other fraction of products soluble in water (pyrrole accompanied by the first terms of the oligomeric series). Soluble copolymers were characterized by means of SEC, NMR and UV-Visible spectroscopies. Cyclic voltammetry analysis disclosed that these copolymers exhibit both the carbazolic and the pyrrolic features. Les conditions dans lesquelles des copolymères statistiques (carbazo lylène-pyrrolylène) pouvaient être synthétisés directement par oxydation chimique par FeCl3 ont été étudiées. Des quantités substantielles de copolymères solubles en milieu organique sont obtenues par extraction lorsque les proportions molaires en réactifs carbazole/pyrrole/2 FeCl3 sont utilisées. Une fraction importante de polypyrrole est obtenue à côté d'une fraction d'espèces solubles dans l'éthanol (carbazole et son dimère) et d'une fraction de produits solubles dans l'eau (pyrrole et les premiers termes oligomères). Les copolymères solubles ont été caractérisés par CES, spectroscopies RMN et UV-Visible. L'analyse voltampérométrique de ces matériaux révèle qu'ils possèdent à la fois les caractéristiques des entités carbazolylènes et celles des entités pyrrolylènes.

  1. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter protein MCU is involved in oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yajin; Hao, Yumin; Chen, Hong; He, Qing; Yuan, Zengqiang; Cheng, Jinbo

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is a conserved Ca(2+) transporter at mitochondrial in eukaryotic cells. However, the role of MCU protein in oxidative stress-induced cell death remains unclear. Here, we showed that ectopically expressed MCU is mitochondrial localized in both HeLa and primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Knockdown of endogenous MCU decreases mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake following histamine stimulation and attenuates cell death induced by oxidative stress in both HeLa cells and CGNs. We also found MCU interacts with VDAC1 and mediates VDAC1 overexpression-induced cell death in CGNs. This finding demonstrates that MCU-VDAC1 complex regulates mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, which might represent therapeutic targets for oxidative stress related diseases.

  2. A vertex-based model relating cell shape and mechanical stress in an epithelium

    CERN Document Server

    Nestor-Bergmann, Alexander; Woolner, Sarah; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Using a popular vertex-based model to describe a spatially disordered planar epithelial monolayer, we examine the relationship between cell shape and mechanical stress at the cell and tissue level. Deriving expressions for stress tensors starting from an energetic formulation of the model, we show that the principal axes of stress for an individual cell align with the principal axes of shape, and we determine the bulk effective tissue pressure when the monolayer is isotropic at the tissue level. Using simulations for a monolayer that is not under peripheral stress, we fit parameters of the model to experimental data for Xenopus embryonic tissue. The model predicts that mechanical interactions can generate mesoscopic patterns within the monolayer that exhibit long-range correlations in cell shape. The model also suggests that the orientation of mechanical and geometric cues for processes such as cell division are likely to be strongly correlated in real epithelia.

  3. Cells in 3D matrices under interstitial flow: effects of extracellular matrix alignment on cell shear stress and drag forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, John A; Lichter, Seth; Swartz, Melody A

    2010-03-22

    Interstitial flow is an important regulator of various cell behaviors both in vitro and in vivo, yet the forces that fluid flow imposes on cells embedded in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM), and the effects of matrix architecture on those forces, are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate how fiber alignment can affect the shear and pressure forces on the cell and ECM. Using computational fluid dynamics simulations, we show that while the solutions of the Brinkman equation accurately estimate the average fluid shear stress and the drag forces on a cell within a 3D fibrous medium, the distribution of shear stress on the cellular surface as well as the peak shear stresses remain intimately related to the pericellular fiber architecture and cannot be estimated using bulk-averaged properties. We demonstrate that perpendicular fiber alignment of the ECM yields lower shear stress and pressure forces on the cells and higher stresses on the ECM, leading to decreased permeability, while parallel fiber alignment leads to higher stresses on cells and increased permeability, as compared to a cubic lattice arrangement. The Spielman-Goren permeability relationships for fibrous media agreed well with CFD simulations of flow with explicitly considered fibers. These results suggest that the experimentally observed active remodeling of ECM fibers by fibroblasts under interstitial flow to a perpendicular alignment could serve to decrease the shear and drag forces on the cell.

  4. Acute Stress-Induced Changes in Follicular Dermal Papilla Cells and Mobilization of Mast Cells: Implications for Hair Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyoseung; Choi, Soon-Jin; Cho, A-Ri; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Kyu Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress is a known cause of hair loss in many species. Objective In this study, we investigated the role of acute stress on hair growth using a rat model. Methods Rats were immobilized for 24 hours and blood samples, and skin biopsies were taken. The effect of stress-serum on the in vitro proliferation of rat and human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs), as well as serum cortisol and corticotropin-releasing hormone levels, were measured. Mast cell staining was performed on the biopsied tissue. In addition, Western blot and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction were used to assess mast cell tryptase and cytokine expression, respectively in rat skin biopsies. Results Stress-serum treatment reduced significantly the number of viable hDPCs and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase, compared to serum from unrestrained rats (p<0.05, respectively). Moreover, restrained rats had significantly higher levels of cortisol in serum than unrestrained rats (p<0.01). Acute stress serum increased mast cell numbers and mast cell tryptase expression, as well as inducing interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β up-regulation. Conclusion These results suggest that acute stress also has an inhibitory effect on hair growth via cortisol release in addition to substance P-mast cell pathway. PMID:27746640

  5. Effects of the Curing Process on the Residual Stress in Solar Cell Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidu Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Panels using solar power require high reliability, and the residual stress in the solar panel has an important effect on its reliability and lifetime. The finite element method was adopted to simulate the impacts of the rectangular solar panel encapsulation process parameters, such as the elastic modulus, the thickness of adhesive, and the curing temperature on the residual stress in the solar cell module. The results show that the residual stress in the solar cell module increases linearly with the increase in these three factors. The residual strain is consistent with that of the stress. The generation mechanism and distribution evolution of stress are discussed in detail. Both the thickness and the elastic modulus of the silicone rubber have significant impact on the residual stress. However, the influence of the curing temperature is less observable.

  6. Effects of extracellular fiber architecture on cell membrane shear stress in a 3D fibrous matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, John A; Boschetti, Federica; Swartz, Melody A

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow has been shown to affect the organization and behavior of cells in 3D environments in vivo and in vitro, yet the forces driving such responses are not clear. Due to the complex architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the difficulty of measuring fluid flow near cells embedded in it, the levels of shear stress experienced by cells in this environment are typically estimated using bulk-averaged matrix parameters such as hydraulic permeability. While this is useful for estimating average stresses, it cannot yield insight into how local matrix fiber architecture-which is cell-controlled in the immediate pericellular environment-affects the local stresses imposed on the cell surface. To address this, we used computational fluid dynamics to study flow through an idealized mesh constructed of a cubic lattice of fibers simulating a typical in vitro collagen gel. We found that, in such high porosity matrices, the fibers strongly affect the flow fields near the cell, with peak shear stresses up to five times higher than those predicted by the Brinkman equation. We also found that minor remodeling of the fibers near the cell surface had major effects on the shear stress profile on the cell. These findings demonstrate the importance of fiber architecture to the fluid forces on a cell embedded in a 3D matrix, and also show how small modifications in the local ECM can lead to large changes in the mechanical environment of the cell.

  7. Cooperative effects of matrix stiffness and fluid shear stress on endothelial cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Julie C; Zhou, Dennis W; Bordeleau, François; Zhou, Allen L; Mason, Brooke N; Mitchell, Michael J; King, Michael R; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-02-03

    Arterial hemodynamic shear stress and blood vessel stiffening both significantly influence the arterial endothelial cell (EC) phenotype and atherosclerosis progression, and both have been shown to signal through cell-matrix adhesions. However, the cooperative effects of fluid shear stress and matrix stiffness on ECs remain unknown. To investigate these cooperative effects, we cultured bovine aortic ECs on hydrogels matching the elasticity of the intima of compliant, young, or stiff, aging arteries. The cells were then exposed to laminar fluid shear stress of 12 dyn/cm(2). Cells grown on more compliant matrices displayed increased elongation and tighter EC-cell junctions. Notably, cells cultured on more compliant substrates also showed decreased RhoA activation under laminar shear stress. Additionally, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in response to fluid shear stress occurred more rapidly in ECs cultured on more compliant substrates, and nitric oxide production was enhanced. Together, our results demonstrate that a signaling cross talk between stiffness and fluid shear stress exists within the vascular microenvironment, and, importantly, matrices mimicking young and healthy blood vessels can promote and augment the atheroprotective signals induced by fluid shear stress. These data suggest that targeting intimal stiffening and/or the EC response to intima stiffening clinically may improve vascular health.

  8. Radio-induced oxidation of n-paraffins for obtaining biodegradable detergents; L'oxydation radioinduite des n-paraffines pour l'obtention de detergents biodegradables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, J.R.; Laizier, J.; Blin, M.F.; Marchand, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    N-paraffins oxidation is a feasible way to obtain biodegradable detergents. This reaction can be radio-initiated and it proceeds by a branched chain mechanism, with an induction pseudo-period. A suitable analysis of the reaction is allowed by the semi-logarithmic plot of its evolution. Influence of the different parameters of the reaction is studied, results show that the use of radiation for initiating the reaction is of no economical interest. (authors) [French] L'oxydation des n-paraffines est une voie possible d'obtention des detergents biodegradables. Cette reaction, qui peut etre radioinitiee, procede d'un mecanisme en chaine branchee et presente une pseudoperiode d'induction. La representation semi-logarithmique de l'avancement de la reaction permet une analyse commode de celle-ci. L'influence des differents parametres est etudiee. Les resultats montrent que l'utilisation du rayonnement pour l'initiation de la reaction est sans interet economique. (auteurs)

  9. Preconditioning L6 Muscle Cells with Naringin Ameliorates Oxidative Stress and Increases Glucose Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    R. Dhanya; K B Arun; Nisha, V. M.; H P Syama; Nisha, P.; T R Santhosh Kumar; Jayamurthy, P.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to pathological changes in diabetes and its complications. Thus, strategies to reduce oxidative stress may alleviate these pathogenic processes. Herein, we have investigated Naringin mediated regulation of glutathione (GSH) & intracellular free radical levels and modulation of glucose uptake under oxidative stress in L6 cell lines. The results from the study demonstrated a marked decrease in glutathione with a subsequent increase in free radical levels, w...

  10. Complete relaxation of residual stresses during reduction of solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2015-01-01

    reduce significantly over minutes. In this work the stresses are measured in-situ before and after the reduction by use of XRD. The phenomenon of accelerated creep has to be considered both in the production of stacks and in the analysis of the stress field in a stack based on anode supported SOFCs.......To asses the reliability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks during operation, the stress field in the stack must be known. During operation the stress field will depend on time as creep processes relax stresses. This work reports further details on a newly discovered creep phenomenon......, accelerated creep, taking place during the reduction of the anode. This relaxes stresses at a much higher rate (~×104) than creep during operation. The phenomenon has previously been studied by simultaneous loading and reduction. With the recorded high creep rates, the stresses at the time of reduction should...

  11. ET-67SUICIDE GENE THERAPY FOR GLIOMA USING MULTILINEAGE-DEFFERENTIATING STRESS ENDURING (MUSE) CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Wakao, Shohei; Kawaji, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tomo; Kamio, Yoshinobu; AMANO, SHINJI; Sameshima, Tetsuro; Sakai, Naoto; TOKUYAMA, TSUTOMU; Dezawa, Mari; Namba, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have been investigating cell-based glioma gene therapy using various kinds of stem cells transduced with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSVtk). In our previous study, we used SSEA3/CD105 double-positive multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells transduced with HSVtk (Muse-tk cells) as the vehicle for HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV) gene therapy. We demonstrated a potent in vitro tumoricidal bystander effect for various glioma cells. In the present stu...

  12. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Andrés Orellana

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression.

  13. A Numerical Investigation of the Thermal Stresses of a Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Pianko-Oprych

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A typical operating temperature of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC is quite high above 750 °C and affects the thermomechanical behavior of the cell. Thermal stresses may cause microstructural instability and sub-critical cracking. Therefore, a joint analysis by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD and computational structural mechanics based on the finite element method (FEM was carried out to analyze thermal stresses in a planar SOFC and to predict potential failure locations in the cell. A full numerical model was based on the coupling of thermo-fluid model with the thermo-mechanical model. Based on a temperature distribution from the thermo-fluid model, stress distribution including the von Mises stress, shear stress as well as the operating principal stress were derived in the thermo-mechanical model. The FEM calculations were performed under different working conditions of the planar SOFC. The highest total stress was noticed at the lower operating voltage of 0.3 V, while the lowest total stress was determined at the voltage of 0.7 V. The obtained stress distributions allowed a better understanding of details of internal processes occurring within the SOFC and provided helpful guidance in the optimization of a new SOFC design.

  14. Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb.......Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb....

  15. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this...

  16. Residual stresses in a co-sintered SOC half-cell during post-sintering cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlas, Benoit; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Brodersen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    . This methodology is however not valid for more layers, as several configurations of residual stresses in the layers can result in the same curvature. Therefore the development of residual stresses of co-sintered multilayer cells during the cooling after sintering is here studied by a finite element model...

  17. Erythrocyte oxidative stress is associated with cell deformability in patients with retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becatti, M; Marcucci, R; Gori, A M; Mannini, L; Grifoni, E; Alessandrello Liotta, A; Sodi, A; Tartaro, R; Taddei, N; Rizzo, S; Prisco, D; Abbate, R; Fiorillo, C

    2016-11-01

    Essentials Retinal vein occlusion (RVO), characterized by blood hyperviscosity, has an unclear pathogenesis. We aimed to find out if hemorheological profile is altered by oxidative stress in RVO patients. Red blood cell (RBC) oxidative stress is associated to whole blood viscosity and RBC deformability. Reactive oxygen species alter RBC membrane rigidity, playing a key role in RVO pathogenesis.

  18. Amélioration par ajout d’un métal de transition de la régénération in situ d’un charbon actif par oxydation catalytique

    OpenAIRE

    Benhamed, Imane

    2015-01-01

    En raison de la réglementation plus sévère sur la pollution de l’eau, l’oxydation chimique (CWAO et AOP) et l’hybridation adsorption / régénération par oxydation sont de plus en plus envisagées pour éliminer les polluants réfractaires. L’objectif de ce travail est d’étudier l’effet de l’imprégnation du fer ou du cuivre sur l’activité du charbon actif dans l’oxydation catalytique en voie humide (avec ou sans ajout d’H202), ainsi que sur sa durée de vie comme adsorbant / catalyseur dans le proc...

  19. Alveolar Type II Cells Escape Stress Failure Caused by Tonic Stretch through Transient Focal Adhesion Disassembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yang Liu, Xiao-Fei Chen, Yan-Hong Ren, Qing-Yuan Zhan, Chen Wang, Chun Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation-induced excessive stretch of alveoli is reported to induce cellular stress failure and subsequent lung injury, and is therefore an injurious factor to the lung. Avoiding cellular stress failure is crucial to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI treatment. In the present study, primary rat alveolar type II (ATII cells were isolated to evaluate their viability and the mechanism of their survival under tonic stretch. By the annexin V/ PI staining and flow cytometry assay, we demonstrated that tonic stretch-induced cell death is an immediate injury of mechanical stress. In addition, immunofluorescence and immunoblots assay showed that the cells experienced an expansion-contraction-reexpansion process, accompanied by partial focal adhesion (FA disassembly during contraction. Manipulation of integrin adherent affinity by altering bivalent cation levels in the culture medium and applying an integrin neutralizing antibody showed that facilitated adhesion affinity promoted cell death under tonic stretch, while lower level of adhesion protected the cells from stretch-induced stress failure. Finally, a simplified numerical model was established to reveal that adequate disassembly of FAs reduced the forces transmitting throughout the cell. Taken together, these results indicate that ATII cells escape stress failure caused by tonic stretch via active cell morphological remodeling, during which cells transiently disassemble FAs to unload mechanical forces.

  20. The influence of chronic stress on T cell immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Sommershof, Annette

    2010-01-01

    Chronic environmental and psychological stress has long been suspected to increase the susceptibility and outcome of numerous infectious and inflammatory diseases. The release of neurotransmitters (catecholamines) and adrenal hormones (glucocorticoids) has been well documented as the basis for a connection between the central nervous system and peripheral components of the immune system. Glucocorticoids, the end products of stress-induced neuroendocrine pathways and the hypothalamic-pituitary...

  1. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle W Clark

    Full Text Available Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH, no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5 the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2-7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress.

  2. Theory to predict shear stress on cells in turbulent blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Khandakar Niaz; Bark, David; Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress on blood cells and platelets transported in a turbulent flow dictates the fate and biological activity of these cells. We present a theoretical link between energy dissipation in turbulent flows to the shear stress that cells experience and show that for the case of physiological turbulent blood flow: (a) the Newtonian assumption is valid, (b) turbulent eddies are universal for the most complex of blood flow problems, and (c) shear stress distribution on turbulent blood flows is possibly universal. Further we resolve a long standing inconsistency in hemolysis between laminar and turbulent flow using the theoretical framework. This work demonstrates that energy dissipation as opposed to bulk shear stress in laminar or turbulent blood flow dictates local mechanical environment of blood cells and platelets universally.

  3. Chronic stress induces ageing-associated degeneration in rat Leydig cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei-Fei Wang; Qian Wang; Yong Chen; Qiang Lin; Hui-Bao Gao; Ping Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that stress and ageing exert inhibitory effects on rat Leydig cells.In a pattern similar to the normal process of Leydig cell ageing,stress-mediated increases in glucocorticoid levels inhibit steroidogenic enzyme expression that then results in decreased testosterone secretion.We hypothesized that chronic stress accelerates the degenerative changes associated with ageing in Leydig cells.To test this hypothesis,we established a model of chronic stress to evaluate stress-induced morphological and functional alterations in Brown Norway rat Leydig cells; additionally,intracellular lipofuscin levels,reactive oxygen species (ROS)levels and DNA damage were assessed.The results showed that chronic stress accelerated ageing-related changes:ultrastructural alterations associated with ageing,cellular lipofuscin accumulation,increased ROS levels and more extensive DNA damage were observed.Additionally,testosterone levels were decreased.This study sheds new light on the idea that chronic stress contributes to the degenerative changes associated with ageing in rat Leydig cells in vivo.

  4. Stem cell function and stress response are controlled by protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Sandra; Bandiera, Roberto; Popis, Martyna; Hussain, Shobbir; Lombard, Patrick; Aleksic, Jelena; Sajini, Abdulrahim; Tanna, Hinal; Cortés-Garrido, Rosana; Gkatza, Nikoletta; Dietmann, Sabine; Frye, Michaela

    2016-06-15

    Whether protein synthesis and cellular stress response pathways interact to control stem cell function is currently unknown. Here we show that mouse skin stem cells synthesize less protein than their immediate progenitors in vivo, even when forced to proliferate. Our analyses reveal that activation of stress response pathways drives both a global reduction of protein synthesis and altered translational programmes that together promote stem cell functions and tumorigenesis. Mechanistically, we show that inhibition of post-transcriptional cytosine-5 methylation locks tumour-initiating cells in this distinct translational inhibition programme. Paradoxically, this inhibition renders stem cells hypersensitive to cytotoxic stress, as tumour regeneration after treatment with 5-fluorouracil is blocked. Thus, stem cells must revoke translation inhibition pathways to regenerate a tissue or tumour.

  5. Conception et calibration d'un sonoreacteur pour l'oxydation de la cellulose par le systeme TEMPO/NaOCl/NaBr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Michel

    Avec le contexte economique actuel dans le domaine des pates et papiers au Canada, l'industrie se doit de diversifier ses produits mis en marche. La fermeture de plus de 20 usines depuis 2005, une baisse du PIB de l'industrie de 1,4 milliard CAD entre 1999--2008, une baisse de la demande de 2,4 %, une diminution du prix de la pate de 20,9 % depuis juillet 2009. La delocalisation du secteur vers l'Asie et l'hemisphere sud sont autant de raisons pour laquelle l'industrie se doit d'etre a l'avant plan de nouvelle technologie a base de fibre de bois. Pour augmenter leur rentabilite, l'industrie se doit de diversifier ses produits dans d'autres secteurs que le simple fabricant de papier impression-ecriture. Sa diversification passe par l'elaboration de nouveaux papiers a valeur ajoutee (papier conducteur, papier bioactif, etc.), par l'utilisation de la biomasse forestiere pour la production d'energie, par l'utilisation de la biomasse forestiere pour l'elaboration d'une plateforme de chimie verte, par l'utilisation de la lignine pour le developpement de polymeres et par l'utilisation de la fibre cellulosique pour la fabrication de nanomateriaux. La fabrication de nanofibrille de cellulose peut devenir un des produits qui servira a diversifier la production des usines de pates et papiers. Les nanofibrilles de cellulose possedent des proprietes mecaniques et chimiques exceptionnelles. Les nanofibrilles de cellulose sont fabriquees a partir d'une oxydation selective de la pate kraft de feuillu avec le systeme TEMPO-NaOCl-NaBr. L'oxydation selective de l'alcool primaire en C6 du monomere de glucose sous forme de carboxylates engendre une modification chimique de la cellulose qui accroit l'hydrophilicite des fibrilles. Suite a cette oxydation, nous devons effectuer une desintegration mecanique de la fibre kraft de feuillu oxydee pour separer les fibrilles. Le processus d'oxydation de la fibre par le systeme TEMPO-NaOCl-NaBr et sa defibrillation par la suite engendre une

  6. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jintao Zhang; Man Yi; Longying Zha; Siqiang Chen; Zhijia Li; Cheng Li; Mingxing Gong; Hong Deng; Xinwei Chu; Jiehua Chen; Zheqing Zhang; Limei Mao; Suxia Sun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated au...

  7. Oxidative stress-induced epigenetic changes associated with malignant transformation of human kidney epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingaiah, Prathap Kumar S; Ponnusamy, Logeswari; Singh, Kamaleshwar P

    2016-09-17

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) in humans is positively influenced by oxidative stress status in kidneys. We recently reported that adaptive response to low level of chronic oxidative stress induces malignant transformation of immortalized human renal tubular epithelial cells. Epigenetic alterations in human RCC are well documented, but its role in oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation of kidney cells is not known. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the potential role of epigenetic changes in chronic oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation of HK-2, human renal tubular epithelial cells. The results revealed aberrant expression of epigenetic regulatory genes involved in DNA methylation (DNMT1, DNMT3a and MBD4) and histone modifications (HDAC1, HMT1 and HAT1) in HK-2 cells malignantly transformed by chronic oxidative stress. Additionally, both in vitro soft agar assay and in vivo nude mice study showing decreased tumorigenic potential of malignantly transformed HK-2 cells following treatment with DNA de-methylating agent 5-aza 2' dC further confirmed the crucial role of DNA hypermethyaltion in oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation. Changes observed in global histone H3 acetylation (H3K9, H3K18, H3K27 and H3K14) and decrease in phospho-H2AX (Ser139) also suggest potential role of histone modifications in increased survival and malignant transformation of HK-2 cells by oxidative stress. In summary, the results of this study suggest that epigenetic reprogramming induced by low levels of oxidative stress act as driver for malignant transformation of kidney epithelial cells. Findings of this study are highly relevant in potential clinical application of epigenetic-based therapeutics for treatments of kidney cancers.

  8. In vitro investigation of ultrasound-induced oxidative stress on human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwei, Patrick; Alex Gong, Cihun-Siyong; Luo, Li-Jyuan; Lin, Meng-Bo; Lai, Jui-Yang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2017-01-22

    The effect of ultrasound exposure on human lens epithelial cells (HLE-B3) was investigated in vitro, specifically on the generation of oxidative stress upon ultrasound application using various clinically-relevant settings. In addition to ultrasound-induced heat effects, oxidative stress has been recently proposed as one of the main mechanisms for ultrasound-induced effects on human cells. In this work, the levels of biocompatibility and generation of oxidative stress by exposure of ultrasound to HLE-B3 were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively by the MTT assay, Live/Dead assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intracellular calcium level. Oxidative stress induction is traditionally achieved through administrations of H2O2 and thus the administration of H2O2 was used as the positive control group for comparison herein. Concerning the administrations of H2O2 are considered invasive and may potentially have side effects, ultrasound as physical stimulation could be a safer and non-invasive method to induce similar oxidative stress environments. The effect of ultrasound on cell viability and induction of oxidative stress increases with ultrasound intensity. The result reveals that the continuous ultrasound has a positive impact on the oxidative stress levels but does negatively on the cell viability, as compared to the pulsed ultrasound. Furthermore, our work demonstrates that the exposure of 58 kPa continuous ultrasound without microbubbles can maintain acceptable cell viability and produce oxidative stress effects similar to the traditional administrations of H2O2. In summary, exposure of ultrasound can generate oxidative stress comparable to traditional administrations of H2O2. The effect of generating oxidative stress is adjustable through ultrasound parameters, including the pulsed or continuous wave, the intensity of ultrasound and addition of microbubbles.

  9. Influence of Water Stress on Endogenous Hormone Contents and Cell Damage of Maize Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunrong Wang; Aifang Yang; Haiying Yin; Juren Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Phytohormones play critical roles In regulating plant responses to stress. We Investigated the effects of water stress Induced by adding 12% (w/v) polyethylene glycol to the root medium on the levels of abscisic acid (ABA), indole-3-acid (IAA), zeatin (ZT), and gibberellin3 (GA3) in maize leaves. The results suggested that water stress had significant effects on the four hormone levels. There was a transient increase in the IAA content during the initial stage of adaptation to water stress in maize leaves, but it dropped sharply thereafter in response to water stress. ABA content increased dramatically in maize leaves after 24 h of exposure to water stress, and then the high levels of ABA were maintained to the end, The contents Of ZT and GA3 rapidly declined in maize leaves subjected to water stress. The effects of water stress on chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde levels in maize leaves were also studied. The variation of cell damage was negatively correlated with ZT and GA3 levels in maize leaves under water stress. Thus, we explored the roles of ZT and GA3 on the growth of maize seedlings under water stress by exogenous application. It is possible that both ZT and GA3 were effective in protecting maize seedlings from water stress, which would be of great importance for the improvement of drought tolerance in maize by genetic manipulation.

  10. The effect of diffusion induced lattice stress on the open-circuit voltage in silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizer, V. G.; Godlewski, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    It is demonstrated that diffusion induced stresses in low resistivity silicon solar cells can significantly reduce both the open-circuit voltage and collection efficiency. The degradation mechanism involves stress induced changes in both the minority carrier mobility and the diffusion length. Thermal recovery characteristics indicate that the stresses are relieved at higher temperatures by divacancy flow (silicon self diffusion). The level of residual stress in as-fabricated cells was found to be negligible in the cells tested.

  11. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jung Ar [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Sil [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Ho [Department of Pathology, Pochon CHA University, College of Medicine, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Jung, E-mail: khj57@yuhs.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young Do, E-mail: ydy1130@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  12. Naphthoquinone Derivative PPE8 Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in p53 Null H1299 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Cherng Lien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER plays a key role in synthesizing secretory proteins and sensing signal function in eukaryotic cells. Responding to calcium disturbance, oxidation state change, or pharmacological agents, ER transmembrane protein, inositol-regulating enzyme 1 (IRE1, senses the stress and triggers downstream signals. Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78 dissociates from IRE1 to assist protein folding and guard against cell death. In prolonged ER stress, IRE1 recruits and activates apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 as well as downstream JNK for cell death. Naphthoquinones are widespread natural phenolic compounds. Vitamin K3, a derivative of naphthoquinone, inhibits variant tumor cell growth via oxygen uptake and oxygen stress. We synthesized a novel naphthoquinone derivative PPE8 and evaluated capacity to induce ER stress in p53 null H1299 and p53 wild-type A549 cells. In H1299 cells, PPE8 induced ER enlargement, GRP78 expression, and transient IER1 activation. Activated IRE1 recruited ASK1 for downstream JNK phosphorylation. IRE1 knockdown by siRNA attenuated PPE8-induced JNK phosphorylation and cytotoxicity. Prolonged JNK phosphorylation may be involved in PPE8-induced cytotoxicity. Such results did not arise in A549 cells, but p53 knockdown by siRNA restored PPE8-induced GRP78 expression and JNK phosphorylation. We offer a novel compound to induce ER stress and cytotoxicity in p53-deficient cancer cells, presenting an opportunity for treatment.

  13. The Natural Polyphenol Epigallocatechin Gallate Protects Intervertebral Disc Cells from Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Krupkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress-related phenotypic changes and a decline in the number of viable cells are crucial contributors to intervertebral disc degeneration. The polyphenol epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG can interfere with painful disc degeneration by reducing inflammation, catabolism, and pain. In this study, we hypothesized that EGCG furthermore protects against senescence and/or cell death, induced by oxidative stress. Sublethal and lethal oxidative stress were induced in primary human intervertebral disc cells with H2O2 (total n=36. Under sublethal conditions, the effects of EGCG on p53-p21 activation, proliferative capacity, and accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase were tested. Further, the effects of EGCG on mitochondria depolarization and cell viability were analyzed in lethal oxidative stress. The inhibitor LY249002 was applied to investigate the PI3K/Akt pathway. EGCG inhibited accumulation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase but did not affect the loss of proliferative capacity, suggesting that EGCG did not fully neutralize exogenous radicals. Furthermore, EGCG increased the survival of IVD cells in lethal oxidative stress via activation of prosurvival PI3K/Akt and protection of mitochondria. We demonstrated that EGCG not only inhibits inflammation but also can enhance the survival of disc cells in oxidative stress, which makes it a suitable candidate for the development of novel therapies targeting disc degeneration.

  14. Cell division plane orientation based on tensile stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louveaux, Marion; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Mirabet, Vincent; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2016-07-26

    Cell geometry has long been proposed to play a key role in the orientation of symmetric cell division planes. In particular, the recently proposed Besson-Dumais rule generalizes Errera's rule and predicts that cells divide along one of the local minima of plane area. However, this rule has been tested only on tissues with rather local spherical shape and homogeneous growth. Here, we tested the application of the Besson-Dumais rule to the divisions occurring in the Arabidopsis shoot apex, which contains domains with anisotropic curvature and differential growth. We found that the Besson-Dumais rule works well in the central part of the apex, but fails to account for cell division planes in the saddle-shaped boundary region. Because curvature anisotropy and differential growth prescribe directional tensile stress in that region, we tested the putative contribution of anisotropic stress fields to cell division plane orientation at the shoot apex. To do so, we compared two division rules: geometrical (new plane along the shortest path) and mechanical (new plane along maximal tension). The mechanical division rule reproduced the enrichment of long planes observed in the boundary region. Experimental perturbation of mechanical stress pattern further supported a contribution of anisotropic tensile stress in division plane orientation. Importantly, simulations of tissues growing in an isotropic stress field, and dividing along maximal tension, provided division plane distributions comparable to those obtained with the geometrical rule. We thus propose that division plane orientation by tensile stress offers a general rule for symmetric cell division in plants.

  15. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Rocca, Rosanna; Tallerico, Rossana; Hassan, Almosawy Talib;

    2014-01-01

    treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells...... between 700–1800 cm-1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased...

  16. Cell mechanics and stress: from molecular details to the 'universal cell reaction' and hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, Paul S

    2007-04-01

    The 'universal cell reaction' (UCR), a coordinated biphasic response to external (noxious and other) stimuli observed in all living cells, was described by Nasonov and his colleagues in the mid-20th century. This work has received no attention from cell biologists in the West, but the UCR merits serious consideration. Although it is non-specific, it is likely to be underpinned by precise mechanisms and, if these mechanisms were characterized and their relationship to the UCR elucidated, then our understanding of the integration of cellular function could be improved. As a step towards identifying such mechanisms, I review some recent advances in understanding cell mechanics and the stress response and I suggest potentially testable hypotheses. There is a particular need for time-course studies of cellular responses to different stimulus doses or intensities. I also suggest a correspondence with hormesis; re-investigation of the UCR using modern biophysical and molecular-biological techniques might throw light on this much-discussed phenomenon.

  17. Salidroside Suppresses HUVECs Cell Injury Induced by Oxidative Stress through Activating the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Liu, Wei-Wei; Shi, Ai-Wu; Gu, Ning

    2016-08-09

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Salidroside (SAL), one of the main effective constituents of Rhodiola rosea, has been reported to suppress oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury and necrosis by promoting transcription of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone1) (NQO1). However, it has not been indicated whether SAL might ameliorate endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress. Here, our study demonstrated that SAL might suppress HUVEC cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. The results of our study indicated that SAL decreased the levels of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), resulting in protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cell damage in HUVECs. It suppressed oxidative stress damage by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activating the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme genes such as HO-1 and NQO1 in HUVECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA abolished the cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, decreased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO1, and inhibited the nucleus translocation of Nrf2 in HUVECs. This study is the first to demonstrate that SAL suppresses HUVECs cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  18. Salidroside Suppresses HUVECs Cell Injury Induced by Oxidative Stress through Activating the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Zhu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Salidroside (SAL, one of the main effective constituents of Rhodiola rosea, has been reported to suppress oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury and necrosis by promoting transcription of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2-regulated genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and NAD(PH dehydrogenase (quinone1 (NQO1. However, it has not been indicated whether SAL might ameliorate endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress. Here, our study demonstrated that SAL might suppress HUVEC cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. The results of our study indicated that SAL decreased the levels of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA, and improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, resulting in protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cell damage in HUVECs. It suppressed oxidative stress damage by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activating the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme genes such as HO-1 and NQO1 in HUVECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA abolished the cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, decreased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO1, and inhibited the nucleus translocation of Nrf2 in HUVECs. This study is the first to demonstrate that SAL suppresses HUVECs cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  19. Effects of curcumin on bleomycin‑induced oxidative stress in malignant testicular germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cort, Aysegul; Ozdemir, Evrim; Timur, Mujgan; Ozben, Tomris

    2012-10-01

    Bleomycin is commonly used in the treatment of testicular cancer. Bleomycin generates oxygen radicals, induces the oxidative cleavage of DNA strands and induces cancer cell apoptosis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a potent antioxidant and chief component of the spice turmeric. No study investigating the effects of curcumin on intrinsic and bleomycin-induced oxidative stress in testicular germ cell tumors has been reported in the literature. For this reason, the present study aimed to examine the effects of curcumin on oxidative stress produced in wild-type NTera-2 and p53-mutant NCCIT testicular cancer cells incubated with bleomycin and the results were compared with cells treated with H2O2 which directly produces oxidative stress. The protein carbonyl content, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione (GSH), 8-isoprostane, lipid hydroperoxide (LPO) levels and total antioxidant capacity in the two testicular cancer cell lines were determined. Results showed that bleomycin and H2O2 significantly increased protein carbonyl, TBARS, 8-isoprostane and LPO levels in the NTera-2 and NCCIT cell lines. Bleomycin and H2O2 significantly decreased the antioxidant capacity and GSH levels in NTera-2 cells. Curcumin significantly decreased LPO, 8-isoprostane and protein carbonyl content, and TBARS levels increased in cells treated with bleomycin and H2O2. Curcumin enhanced GSH levels and the antioxidant capacity of NTera-2 cells. In conclusion, curcumin inhibits bleomycin and H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human testicular cancer cells.

  20. RIPK1 regulates survival of human melanoma cells upon endoplasmic reticulum stress through autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Qi; Jin, Lei; Jiang, Chen Chen; Tay, Kwang Hong; Lai, Fritz; Liu, Xiao Ying; Liu, Yi Lun; Guo, Su Tang; Li, Chun Ying; Yan, Xu Guang; Tseng, Hsin-Yi; Zhang, Xu Dong

    2015-01-01

    Although RIPK1 (receptor [TNFRSF]-interacting protein kinase 1) is emerging as a critical determinant of cell fate in response to cellular stress resulting from activation of death receptors and DNA damage, its potential role in cell response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress remains undefined. Here we report that RIPK1 functions as an important prosurvival mechanism in melanoma cells undergoing pharmacological ER stress induced by tunicamycin (TM) or thapsigargin (TG) through activation of autophagy. While treatment with TM or TG upregulated RIPK1 and triggered autophagy in melanoma cells, knockdown of RIPK1 inhibited autophagy and rendered the cells sensitive to killing by TM or TG, recapitulating the effect of inhibition of autophagy. Consistently, overexpression of RIPK1 enhanced induction of autophagy and conferred resistance of melanoma cells to TM- or TG-induced cell death. Activation of MAPK8/JNK1 or MAPK9/JNK2, which phosphorylated BCL2L11/BIM leading to its dissociation from BECN1/Beclin 1, was involved in TM- or TG-induced, RIPK1-mediated activation of autophagy; whereas, activation of the transcription factor HSF1 (heat shock factor protein 1) downstream of the ERN1/IRE1-XBP1 axis of the unfolded protein response was responsible for the increase in RIPK1 in melanoma cells undergoing pharmacological ER stress. Collectively, these results identify upregulation of RIPK1 as an important resistance mechanism of melanoma cells to TM- or TG-induced ER stress by protecting against cell death through activation of autophagy, and suggest that targeting the autophagy-activating mechanism of RIPK1 may be a useful strategy to enhance sensitivity of melanoma cells to therapeutic agents that induce ER stress.

  1. A balanced JA/ABA status may correlate with adaptation to osmotic stress in Vitis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Seo, Mitsunori; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kamiya, Yuji; Nick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Water-related stress is considered a major type of plant stress. Osmotic stress, in particular, represents the common part of all water-related stresses. Therefore, plants have evolved different adaptive mechanisms to cope with osmotic-related disturbances. In the current work, two grapevine cell lines that differ in their osmotic adaptability, Vitis rupestris and Vitis riparia, were investigated under mannitol-induced osmotic stress. To dissect signals that lead to adaptability from those related to sensitivity, osmotic-triggered responses with respect to jasmonic acid (JA) and its active form JA-Ile, abscisic acid (ABA), and stilbene compounds, as well as the expression of their related genes were observed. In addition, the transcript levels of the cellular homeostasis gene NHX1 were examined. The data are discussed with a hypothesis suggesting that a balance of JA and ABA status might correlate with cellular responses, either guiding cells to sensitivity or to progress toward adaptation.

  2. Emergence of endoplasmic reticulum stress and activated microglia in Purkinje cell degeneration mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyuhou, Shin-ichi; Kato, Nobuo; Gemba, Hisae

    2006-03-27

    In the current studies, we characterized the molecular and cellular mechanism of cell death in Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) mice using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. It appears that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in this degeneration of Purkinje cells because ER stress-related substrates, such as CHOP and caspase 12, were strongly activated in Purkinje cells of pcd mice during the third postnatal (P) week. A significant increase in the expression of the ER-specific chaperone BiP suggested that unfolded protein responses were induced. We also found that Purkinje cells underwent apoptosis via the activation of caspase 3 and subsequent fragmentation of DNA. In addition to the activation of apoptosis in Purkinje cells, many activated microglial cells are found to be present in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. In the later phase of degeneration, there was conspicuous expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and some Purkinje cells were strongly labeled with an antibody to nitrotyrosine, suggesting that Purkinje cells in pcd mice are damaged by nitric oxide released from microglial cells. Administration of minocycline, which may inhibit iNOS expression, delayed the death of Purkinje cells in pcd mice and mildly improved their motor abilities. These findings suggest that ER stress participates in the degeneration of Purkinje cells and that activation of microglia accelerates Purkinje cell death in pcd mice.

  3. Hsp70 as an indicator of stress in the cells after contact with nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardilová, Šárka; Havrdová, Markéta; Panáček, Aleš; Kvítek, Libor; Zbořil, Radek

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, production of nanoparticles is increased and thus grows our contact with them too. Question of safety is closely related to the issue of use nanoparticles. There are a number of tests that monitor the viability, ROS production, the effect on the DNA and cell cycle, however, rarely encountered studies on stress in the cells after contact with nanoparticles. Heat shock proteins (HSP) are among the substances that can be used for monitoring stress in cells. HSP are structures with a chaperone activity. They are evolutionarily very old, conservative and they are found with a high degree of homology in prokaryotes and eukaryotes including humans. They exist at low concentrations under physiological conditions, while in the denaturing conditions e.g. high or low temperature, radiation, exposure to chemicals, heavy metals, or nanoparticles their expression is changed. HSPs are involved in maintaining homeostasis in the cell that the denatured protein conformations allow recovery to the original stage. One of the most common proteins from HSP family is Hsp70 - protein with a molecular weight of 70 kDa. The level of Hsp70 in a cell after exposure to the stress changes depending on the stress level to which the cell is exposed to and a time period during which lasted stressful conditions. Our research monitors stress levels of cells manifesting by Hsp70 production after contact with silver nanoparticles. Nanoparticles show different toxicity towards different types of target cells, which is reflected in the values of IC50 - concentration that kills 50% tested cells. Concentration of test substance toxic to one cell type may be innocuous to cells of another type. IC50 obtained from the MTT assay provides a suitable default data and if multiples of IC50 values are used, we can compare and generalize. Studies can be used to compare stress levels in cells that show different sensitivity to the tested nanoparticles compared with cells under optimal growth

  4. Downregulation of miR-205 modulates cell susceptibility to oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses in renal tubular cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyo Muratsu-Ikeda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress play a crucial role in tubular damage in both acute kidney injury (AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD. While the pathophysiological contribution of microRNAs (miRNA to renal damage has also been highlighted, the effect of miRNA on renal damage under oxidative and ER stresses conditions remains elusive. METHODS: We assessed changes in miRNA expression in the cultured renal tubular cell line HK-2 under hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced oxidative stress or ER stress using miRNA microarray assay and real-time RT-PCR. The pathophysiological effect of miRNA was evaluated by cell survival rate, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level, and anti-oxidant enzyme expression in miRNA-inhibited HK-2 or miRNA-overexpressed HK-2 under these stress conditions. The target gene of miRNA was identified by 3'-UTR-luciferase assay. RESULTS: We identified 8 and 10 miRNAs whose expression was significantly altered by oxidative and ER stresses, respectively. Among these, expression of miR-205 was markedly decreased in both stress conditions. Functional analysis revealed that decreased miR-205 led to an increase in cell susceptibility to oxidative and ER stresses, and that this increase was associated with the induction of intracellular ROS and suppression of anti-oxidant enzymes. While increased miR-205 by itself made no change in cell growth or morphology, cell viability under oxidative or ER stress conditions was partially restored. Further, miR-205 bound to the 3'-UTR of the prolyl hydroxylase 1 (PHD1/EGLN2 gene and suppressed the transcription level of EGLN2, which modulates both intracellular ROS level and ER stress state. CONCLUSIONS: miR-205 serves a protective role against both oxidative and ER stresses via the suppression of EGLN2 and subsequent decrease in intracellular ROS. miR-205 may represent a novel therapeutic target in AKI and CKD associated with oxidative or ER stress in tubules.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to acetylcholine receptor degradation by promoting endocytosis in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ailian; Huang, Shiqian; Zhao, Xiaonan; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Lixun; Ding, Ji; Xu, Congfeng

    2016-01-15

    After binding by acetylcholine released from a motor neuron, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction produces a localized end-plate potential, which leads to muscle contraction. Improper turnover and renewal of acetylcholine receptors contributes to the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. In the present study, we demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contributes to acetylcholine receptor degradation in C2C12 myocytes. We further show that ER stress promotes acetylcholine receptor endocytosis and lysosomal degradation, which was dampened by blocking endocytosis or treating with lysosome inhibitor. Knockdown of ER stress proteins inhibited acetylcholine receptor endocytosis and degradation, while rescue assay restored its endocytosis and degradation, confirming the effects of ER stress on promoting endocytosis-mediated degradation of junction acetylcholine receptors. Thus, our studies identify ER stress as a factor promoting acetylcholine receptor degradation through accelerating endocytosis in muscle cells. Blocking ER stress and/or endocytosis might provide a novel therapeutic approach for myasthenia gravis.

  6. Using a co-culture microsystem for cell migration under fluid shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Tsai, Shen-Hsing; Wu, Li-Wha; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2011-08-01

    We have successfully developed a microsystem to co-cultivate two types of cells with a minimum defined gap of 50 μm, and to quantitatively study the impact of fluid shear stress on the mutual influence of cell migration velocity and distance. We used the hydrostatic pressure to seed two different cells, endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), on opposite sides of various gap sizes (500 μm, 200 μm, 100 μm, and 50 μm). After cultivating the cells for 12 h and peeling the co-culture microchip from the culture dish, we studied the impacts of gap size on the migration of either cell type in the absence or presence of fluid shear stress (7 dyne cm(-2) and 12 dyne cm(-2)) influence. We found that both gap size and shear stress have profound influence on cell migration. Smaller gap sizes (100 μm and 50 μm) significantly enhanced cell migration, suggesting a requirement of an effective concentration of released factor(s) by either cell type in the gap region. Flow-induced shear stress delayed the migration onset of either cell type in a dose-dependent manner regardless of the gap size. Moreover, shear stress-induced decrease of cell migration becomes evident when the gap size was 500 μm. We have developed a co-culture microsystem for two kinds of cells and overcome the conventional difficulties in observation and mixed culture, and it would have more application for bio-manipulation and tissue repair engineering.

  7. Effects of wall shear stress and its gradient on tumor cell adhesion in curved microvessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W W; Cai, B; Liu, Y; Fu, B M

    2012-05-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to vessel walls in the microcirculation is one critical step in cancer metastasis. In this paper, the hypothesis that tumor cells prefer to adhere at the microvessels with localized shear stresses and their gradients, such as in the curved microvessels, was examined both experimentally and computationally. Our in vivo experiments were performed on the microvessels (post-capillary venules, 30-50 μm diameter) of rat mesentery. A straight or curved microvessel was cannulated and perfused with tumor cells by a glass micropipette at a velocity of ~1mm/s. At less than 10 min after perfusion, there was a significant difference in cell adhesion to the straight and curved vessel walls. In 60 min, the averaged adhesion rate in the curved vessels (n = 14) was ~1.5-fold of that in the straight vessels (n = 19). In 51 curved segments, 45% of cell adhesion was initiated at the inner side, 25% at outer side, and 30% at both sides of the curved vessels. To investigate the mechanical mechanism by which tumor cells prefer adhering at curved sites, we performed a computational study, in which the fluid dynamics was carried out by the lattice Boltzmann method , and the tumor cell dynamics was governed by the Newton's law of translation and rotation. A modified adhesive dynamics model that included the influence of wall shear stress/gradient on the association/dissociation rates of tumor cell adhesion was proposed, in which the positive wall shear stress/gradient jump would enhance tumor cell adhesion while the negative wall shear stress/gradient jump would weaken tumor cell adhesion. It was found that the wall shear stress/gradient, over a threshold, had significant contribution to tumor cell adhesion by activating or inactivating cell adhesion molecules. Our results elucidated why the tumor cell adhesion prefers to occur at the positive curvature of curved microvessels with very low Reynolds number (in the order of 10(-2)) laminar flow.

  8. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K; Bergman, Heidi A; Himanen, Samu V; Kallio, Marko J; Roos-Mattjus, Pia; Sistonen, Lea

    2014-09-15

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis.

  9. Involvement of DNA methylation in the control of cell growth during heat stress in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centomani, Isabella; Sgobba, Alessandra; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Dipierro, Nunzio; Paradiso, Annalisa; De Gara, Laura; Dipierro, Silvio; Viggiano, Luigi; de Pinto, Maria Concetta

    2015-11-01

    The alteration of growth patterns, through the adjustment of cell division and expansion, is a characteristic response of plants to environmental stress. In order to study this response in more depth, the effect of heat stress on growth was investigated in tobacco BY-2 cells. The results indicate that heat stress inhibited cell division, by slowing cell cycle progression. Cells were stopped in the pre-mitotic phases, as shown by the increased expression of CycD3-1 and by the decrease in the NtCycA13, NtCyc29 and CDKB1-1 transcripts. The decrease in cell length and the reduced expression of Nt-EXPA5 indicated that cell expansion was also inhibited. Since DNA methylation plays a key role in controlling gene expression, the possibility that the altered expression of genes involved in the control of cell growth, observed during heat stress, could be due to changes in the methylation state of their promoters was investigated. The results show that the altered expression of CycD3-1 and Nt-EXPA5 was consistent with changes in the methylation state of the upstream region of these genes. These results suggest that DNA methylation, controlling the expression of genes involved in plant development, contributes to growth alteration occurring in response to environmental changes.

  10. Cytotoxicity of citral against melanoma cells: The involvement of oxidative stress generation and cell growth protein reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Larissa Juliani; Marinello, Poliana Camila; Panis, Carolina; Fagundes, Tatiane Renata; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; de-Freitas-Junior, Julio Cesar Madureira; Cecchini, Rubens; Cecchini, Alessandra Lourenço; Luiz, Rodrigo Cabral

    2017-03-01

    Citral is a natural compound that has shown cytotoxic and antiproliferative effects on breast and hematopoietic cancer cells; however, there are few studies on melanoma cells. Oxidative stress is known to be involved in all stages of melanoma development and is able to modulate intracellular pathways related to cellular proliferation and death. In this study, we hypothesize that citral exerts its cytotoxic effect on melanoma cells by the modulation of cellular oxidative status and/or intracellular signaling. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of citral on B16F10 murine melanoma cells evaluating its effects on cellular oxidative stress, DNA damage, cell death, and important signaling pathways, as these pathways, namely, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), AKT, and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, are involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. The p53 and nuclear factor kappa B were also investigated due to their ability to respond to intracellular stress. We observed that citral exerted antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects in B16F10; induced oxidative stress, DNA lesions, and p53 nuclear translocation; and reduced nitric oxide levels and nuclear factor kappa B, ERK1/2, and AKT. To investigate citral specificity, we used non-neoplastic human and murine cells, HaCaT (human skin keratinocytes) and NIH-3T3 cells (murine fibroblasts), and observed that although citral effects were not specific for cancer cells, non-neoplastic cells were more resistant to citral than B16F10. These findings highlight the potential clinical utility of citral in melanoma, with a mechanism of action involving the oxidative stress generation, nitric oxide depletion, and interference in signaling pathways related to cell proliferation.

  11. Hypothermia enhances bcl-2 expression and protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slikker, W; Desai, V G; Duhart, H; Feuers, R; Imam, S Z

    2001-08-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major causes of cellular injury. Various reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species such as superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite, and nitric oxide are involved in the manifestations of different types of organ toxicity and the resultant syndromes, symptoms, or diseases. Hypothermic conditions have been reported to reduce the oxidative stress in various in vitro and in vivo studies. In the present study, we sought to determine the effect of lowered temperatures on oxidative stress-induced cell death in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We also investigated the oxidative stress-induced alterations in the expression of anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2, in CHO cells at lowered temperatures. CHO cells were incubated at four different temperatures of 30, 32, 35, and 37 degrees C (control temperature) from 1 to 4 d. In another set, the cells were incubated with 100 microM hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) for 30 min before harvesting at different time points. The cells were harvested at 1, 2, 3, and 4 d. Cell survival was significantly higher at 30 degrees C as compared to 37 degrees C over 4 d of incubation. In cells incubated with H(2)O(2), significantly higher cell viability was observed at lower temperatures as compared to the cells incubated at 37 degrees C. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) also increased significantly at lower temperatures. Lowered temperature also provided a significant increase in the expression of anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2 after 4 d of incubation. These data suggest that hypothermic conditions lowers the risk of oxidative stress-induced cellular damage and programmed cell death by increasing the activity of GSH-Px and by the induction in the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2.

  12. Angiogenin Mediates Cell-Autonomous Translational Control under Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Attenuates Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mami, Iadh; Bouvier, Nicolas; El Karoui, Khalil; Gallazzini, Morgan; Rabant, Marion; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Li, Shuping; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Beaune, Philippe; Thervet, Eric; Chevet, Eric; Hu, Guo-Fu; Pallet, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the pathophysiology of kidney disease and aging, but the molecular bases underlying the biologic outcomes on the evolution of renal disease remain mostly unknown. Angiogenin (ANG) is a ribonuclease that promotes cellular adaptation under stress but its contribution to ER stress signaling remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the ANG-mediated contribution to the signaling and biologic outcomes of ER stress in kidney injury. ANG expression was significantly higher in samples from injured human kidneys than in samples from normal human kidneys, and in mouse and rat kidneys, ANG expression was specifically induced under ER stress. In human renal epithelial cells, ER stress induced ANG expression in a manner dependent on the activity of transcription factor XBP1, and ANG promoted cellular adaptation to ER stress through induction of stress granules and inhibition of translation. Moreover, the severity of renal lesions induced by ER stress was dramatically greater in ANG knockout mice (Ang(-/-)) mice than in wild-type mice. These results indicate that ANG is a critical mediator of tissue adaptation to kidney injury and reveal a physiologically relevant ER stress-mediated adaptive translational control mechanism.

  13. Accelerated fat cell aging links oxidative stress and insulin resistance in adipocytes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Finny Monickaraj; Sankaramoorthy Aravind; Pichamoorthy Nandhini; Paramasivam Prabu; Chandrakumar Sathishkumar; Viswanathan Mohan; Muthuswamy Balasubramanyam

    2013-03-01

    Telomere shortening is emerging as a biological indicator of accelerated aging and aging-related diseases including type 2 diabetes. While telomere length measurements were largely done in white blood cells, there is lack of studies on telomere length in relation to oxidative stress in target tissues affected in diabetes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to induct oxidative stress in adipocytes and to test whether these adipocytes exhibit shortened telomeres, senescence and functional impairment. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were subjected to oxidative stress and senescence induction by a variety of means for 2 weeks (exogenous application of H2O2, glucose oxidase, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and glucose oscillations). Cells were probed for reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), DNA damage, mRNA and protein expression of senescent and pro-inflammatory markers, telomere length and glucose uptake. Compared to untreated cells, both ROS generation and DNA damage were significantly higher in cells subjected to oxidative stress and senescence. Adipocytes subjected to oxidative stress also showed shortened telomeres and increased mRNA and protein expression of p53, p21, TNF and IL-6. Senescent cells were also characterized by decreased levels of adiponectin and impaired glucose uptake. Briefly, adipocytes under oxidative stress exhibited increased ROS generation, DNA damage, shortened telomeres and switched to senescent/pro-inflammatory phenotype with impaired glucose uptake.

  14. Oxidative stress-associated senescence in dermal papilla cells of men with androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, James H; Hannen, Rosalind F; Bahta, Adiam W; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Philpott, Michael P

    2015-05-01

    Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) taken from male androgenetic alopecia (AGA) patients undergo premature senescence in vitro in association with the expression of p16(INK4a), suggesting that DPCs from balding scalp are more sensitive to environmental stress than nonbalding cells. As one of the major triggers of senescence in vitro stems from the cell "culture shock" owing to oxidative stress, we have further investigated the effects of oxidative stress on balding and occipital scalp DPCs. Patient-matched DPCs from balding and occipital scalp were cultured at atmospheric (21%) or physiologically normal (2%) O2. At 21% O2, DPCs showed flattened morphology and a significant reduction in mobility, population doubling, increased levels of reactive oxygen species and senescence-associated β-Gal activity, and increased expression of p16(INK4a) and pRB. Balding DPCs secreted higher levels of the negative hair growth regulators transforming growth factor beta 1 and 2 in response to H2O2 but not cell culture-associated oxidative stress. Balding DPCs had higher levels of catalase and total glutathione but appear to be less able to handle oxidative stress compared with occipital DPCs. These in vitro findings suggest that there may be a role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of AGA both in relation to cell senescence and migration but also secretion of known hair follicle inhibitory factors.

  15. The involvement of PUMP from mitochondria of Araucaria angustifolia embryogenic cells in response to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Caroline; Pasqualim, Patrícia; Jacomasso, Thiago; Maurer, Juliana Bello Baron; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi de; Martinez, Glaucia Regina; Rocha, Maria Eliane Merlin; Carnieri, Eva Gunilla Skare; Cadena, Sílvia Maria Suter Correia

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the responses of plant uncoupling mitochondrial protein (PUMP) and alternative oxidase (AOX) in mitochondria from embryogenic cells of A. angustifolia subjected to cold stress (4°C for 24 h or 48 h) is reported. In the mitochondria of stressed cells, PUMP activity increased by approximately 45% (at 24h and 48 h), which was determined by measuring the oxygen consumption after the addition of linoleic acid and the inhibition by BSA and ATP. PUMP activation was confirmed using transmembrane electrical potential (Δψ) assays. Immunoblot assays showed an increase of PUMP expression by 40% and 150% after 24h and 48 h of cold stress, respectively. AOX activity, measured under conditions similar to those of the PUMP assays, was only slightly increased in the mitochondria from stressed cells (at 24h and 48 h), as demonstrated by oxygen consumption experiments. Cell viability was unaffected by cold stress, indicating that the effects on PUMP and AOX were not caused by cell death. These results show that the main response of this gymnosperm to cold stress is the activation of PUMP, which suggests that this protein may be involved in the control of reactive oxygen species generation, which has been previously associated with this condition.

  16. Mangiferin induces cell death against rhabdomyosarcoma through sustained oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Vishwanadha Vijaya Padma; Palanisamy Kalaiselvi; Rangasamy Yuvaraj; M. Rabeeth

    2015-01-01

    Background: Embryonic rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) is the most prevalent type of cancer among children. The present study aimed to investigate cell death induced by mangiferin in RD cells. Methods: The Inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of mangiferin was determined by an MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide) assay. Cell death induced by mangiferin against RD cells was determined through lactate dehydrogenase and nitric oxide release, intracellular calcium levels, r...

  17. Toxicity and oxidative stress of canine mesenchymal stromal cells from adipose tissue in different culture passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arícia Gomes Sprada

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stem cells in regenerative therapy have received attention from researchers in recent decades. The culture of these cells allows studies about their behavior and metabolism. Thus, cell culture is the basis for cell therapy and tissue engineering researches. A major concern regarding the use of cultivated stem cell in human or veterinary clinical routine is the risk of carcinogenesis. Cellular activities require a balanced redox state. However, when there is an imbalance in this state, oxidative stress occurs. Oxidative stress contributes to cytotoxicity, which may result in cell death or genomic alterations, favoring the development of cancer cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences in the behavior of cultured mesenchymal stem cells from canine adipose tissue according to its site of collection (omentum and subcutaneous evaluating the rate of proliferation, viability, level of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity over six passages. For this experiment, two samples of adipose tissue from subcutaneous and omentum where taken from a female dog corpse, 13 years old, Pitbull. The results showed greater levels of oxidative stress in the first and last passages of both groups, favoring cytotoxicity and cell death.

  18. Mechanical stress downregulates MHC class I expression on human cancer cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna La Rocca

    Full Text Available In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal, depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700-1800 cm(-1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK cells cytotoxic recognition.

  19. Mechanical stress downregulates MHC class I expression on human cancer cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rocca, Rosanna; Tallerico, Rossana; Talib Hassan, Almosawy; Das, Gobind; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Tadepally, Lakshmikanth; Matteucci, Marco; Liberale, Carlo; Mesuraca, Maria; Scumaci, Domenica; Gentile, Francesco; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Perozziello, Gerardo; Ammendolia, Antonio; Gallo, Adriana; Kärre, Klas; Cuda, Giovanni; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Carbone, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700-1800 cm(-1), indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK) cells cytotoxic recognition.

  20. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    KAUST Repository

    La Rocca, Rosanna

    2014-12-26

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700–1800 cm−1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK) cells cytotoxic recognition.

  1. Protection by 6-aminonicotinamide against oxidative stress in cardiac cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofgaard, Johannes P; Sigurdardottir, Kristin Sigridur; Treiman, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress at the time of reperfusion is a major aspect of ischemia-reperfusion injury in heart as well as in other organs. There is a continuing interest in development of pharmacological approaches to alleviate this injury. 6-Aminonicotinamide (6AN) has been shown to diminish myocardial n...

  2. The transcription factor NFAT5 is required for cyclin expression and cell cycle progression in cells exposed to hypertonic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Drews-Elger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertonicity can perturb cellular functions, induce DNA damage-like responses and inhibit proliferation. The transcription factor NFAT5 induces osmoprotective gene products that allow cells to adapt to sustained hypertonic conditions. Although it is known that NFAT5-deficient lymphocytes and renal medullary cells have reduced proliferative capacity and viability under hypertonic stress, less is understood about the contribution of this factor to DNA damage responses and cell cycle regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated conditional knockout mice to obtain NFAT5(-/- T lymphocytes, which we used as a model of proliferating cells to study NFAT5-dependent responses. We show that hypertonicity triggered an early, NFAT5-independent, genotoxic stress-like response with induction of p53, p21 and GADD45, downregulation of cyclins, and cell cycle arrest. This was followed by an NFAT5-dependent adaptive phase in wild-type cells, which induced an osmoprotective gene expression program, downregulated stress markers, resumed cyclin expression and proliferation, and displayed enhanced NFAT5 transcriptional activity in S and G2/M. In contrast, NFAT5(-/- cells failed to induce osmoprotective genes and exhibited poorer viability. Although surviving NFAT5(-/- cells downregulated genotoxic stress markers, they underwent cell cycle arrest in G1/S and G2/M, which was associated with reduced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1. We also show that pathologic hypertonicity levels, as occurring in plasma of patients and animal models of osmoregulatory disorders, inhibited the induction of cyclins and aurora B kinase in response to T cell receptor stimulation in fresh NFAT5(-/- lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that NFAT5 facilitates cell proliferation under hypertonic conditions by inducing an osmoadaptive response that enables cells to express fundamental regulators needed for cell cycle progression.

  3. Osmotic stress affects functional properties of human melanoma cell lines

    CERN Document Server

    La Porta, Caterina A M; Pasini, Maria; Laurson, Lasse; Alava, Mikko J; Zapperi, Stefano; Amar, Martine Ben

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of microenvironment in cancer growth and metastasis is a key issue for cancer research. Here, we study the effect of osmotic pressure on the functional properties of primary and metastatic melanoma cell lines. In particular, we experimentally quantify individual cell motility and transmigration capability. We then perform a circular scratch assay to study how a cancer cell front invades an empty space. Our results show that primary melanoma cells are sensitive to a low osmotic pressure, while metastatic cells are less. To better understand the experimental results, we introduce and study a continuous model for the dynamics of a cell layer and a stochastic discrete model for cell proliferation and diffusion. The two models capture essential features of the experimental results and allow to make predictions for a wide range of experimentally measurable parameters.

  4. Stress factor – dependent differences in molecular mechanisms of premature cell senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrova N. V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell senescence is an established cell stress response in the form of a permanent proliferation arrest accompanied by a complex phenotype. Senescent cells share several crucial features, such as lack of DNA synthesis, increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Most of these universal senescence markers are indicative not only for cell senescence but for other types of growth arrest as well. Along with ubiquitous markers, cell senescence has accessory characteristics, which mostly depend on senescence-inducing stimulus and/or cell type. Here, we review main markers and mechanisms involved in the induction of cell senescence with a focus on stress factor-dependent differences in signaling pathways activated in senescence.

  5. ATM regulation of IL-8 links oxidative stress to cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ta; Ebelt, Nancy D; Stracker, Travis H; Xhemalce, Blerta; Van Den Berg, Carla L; Miller, Kyle M

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase regulates the DNA damage response (DDR) and is associated with cancer suppression. Here we report a cancer-promoting role for ATM. ATM depletion in metastatic cancer cells reduced cell migration and invasion. Transcription analyses identified a gene network, including the chemokine IL-8, regulated by ATM. IL-8 expression required ATM and was regulated by oxidative stress. IL-8 was validated as an ATM target by its ability to rescue cell migration and invasion defects in ATM-depleted cells. Finally, ATM-depletion in human breast cancer cells reduced lung tumors in a mouse xenograft model and clinical data validated IL-8 in lung metastasis. These findings provide insights into how ATM activation by oxidative stress regulates IL-8 to sustain cell migration and invasion in cancer cells to promote metastatic potential. Thus, in addition to well-established roles in tumor suppression, these findings identify a role for ATM in tumor progression.

  6. Analysis of phosphorylation of human heat shock factor 1 in cells experiencing a stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane William S

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat shock factor (HSF/HSF1 not only is the transcription factor primarily responsible for the transcriptional response of cells to physical and chemical stress but also coregulates other important signaling pathways. The factor mediates the stress-induced expression of heat shock or stress proteins (HSPs. HSF/HSF1 is inactive in unstressed cells and is activated during stress. Activation is accompanied by hyperphosphorylation of the factor. The regulatory importance of this phosphorylation has remained incompletely understood. Several previous studies on human HSF1 were concerned with phosphorylation on Ser303, Ser307 and Ser363, which phosphorylation appears to be related to factor deactivation subsequent to stress, and one study reported stress-induced phosphorylation of Ser230 contributing to factor activation. However, no previous study attempted to fully describe the phosphorylation status of an HSF/HSF1 in stressed cells and to systematically identify phosphoresidues involved in factor activation. The present study reports such an analysis for human HSF1 in heat-stressed cells. Results An alanine scan of all Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of human HSF1 was carried out using a validated transactivation assay, and residues phosphorylated in HSF1 were identified by mass spectrometry and sequencing. HSF1 activated by heat treatment was phosphorylated on Ser121, Ser230, Ser292, Ser303, Ser307, Ser314, Ser319, Ser326, Ser344, Ser363, Ser419, and Ser444. Phosphorylation of Ser326 but none of the other Ser residues was found to contribute significantly to activation of the factor by heat stress. Phosphorylation on Ser326 increased rapidly during heat stress as shown by experiments using a pSer326 phosphopeptide antibody. Heat stress-induced DNA binding and nuclear translocation of a S326A substitution mutant was not impaired in HSF1-negative cells, but the mutant stimulated HSP70 expression several times less well than wild type

  7. The cell specificity of gene expression in the response to heat stress in corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traylor-Knowles, N; Rose, N H; Palumbi, S R

    2017-03-02

    Previous transcriptional studies in heat stressed corals have shown that many genes are responsive to generalized heat stress whereas the expression patterns of specific gene networks after heat stress show strong correlations with variation in bleaching outcomes. However, where these specific genes are expressed is unknown. Here we employed in situ hybridization to identify patterns of spatial gene expression of genes previously predicted to be involved in general stress response and bleaching. We found that Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors (TNFRs), known to be strong responders to heat stress, were not expressed in gastrodermal symbiont-containing cells but were widely expressed in specific cells of the epidermal layer. The transcription factors AP-1 and FosB implicated as early signals of heat stress and were widely expressed throughout the oral gastrodermis and epidermis. By contrast, a G-protein coupled receptor gene (GPCR), and a fructose bisphosphate aldolase C gene (Aldolase), previously implicated in bleaching, was expressed in symbiont containing gastrodermal cells, and in epidermal tissue. Finally, Chordin-like/Kielin (Chordin-like) a gene highly correlated to bleaching was expressed solely in the oral gastrodermis. From this study we confirm that heat responsive genes occur widely in coral tissues outside of symbiont containing cells, and that gene expression in response to heat stress that causes bleaching does not signal by itself that a gene is expressed in the symbiotic cells where bleaching occurs. Joint information about expression patterns in response to heat and cell specificity will allow greater dissection of the regulatory pathways and specific cell reactions that lead to coral bleaching.

  8. Response of mesenchymal stem cells to shear stress in tissue-engineered vascular grafts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-de DONG; Yong-quan GU; Chun-min LI; Chun-ren WANG; Zeng-guo FENG; Rong-xin QIU; Bing CHEN; Jian-xin LI; Shu-wen ZHANG; Zhong-gao WANG; Jian ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Recent studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into endothelial cells. The effect of shear stress on MSC differentiation is incompletely understood, and most studies have been based on two-dimen-sional systems. We used a model of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) to investigate the effects of shear stress on MSC differentiation.Methods: MSCs were isolated from canine bone marrow. The TEVG was constructed by seeding MSCs onto poly-ε-caprolactone and lactic acid (PCLA) scaffolds and subjecting them to shear stress provided by a pulsatile bioreactor for four days (two days at 1 dyne/cm2 to 15 dyne/cm2 and two days at 15 dyne/cm2).Results: Shear stress significantly increased the expression of endothelial cell markers, such as platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), VE-cadherin, and CD34, at both the mRNA and protein levels as compared with static control cells. Protein levels of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and calponin were substantially reduced in shear stress-cultured cells. There was no significant change in the expression of α-SMA, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMMHC)or calponin at the mRNA level.Conclusion: Shear stress upregulated the expression of endothelial cell-related markers and downregulated smooth muscle-related markers in canine MSCs. This study may serve as a basis for further investigation of the effects of shear stress on MSC differentiation in TEVGs.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase gene expressions might be oxidative stress targets in gastric cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salih Gencer; Anil Cebeci; Meliha Burcu Irmak-Yazicioglu

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Oxidative stress is linked to increased risk of gastric cancer and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important in the invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer.We aimed to analyze the effect of the accumulation of oxidative stress in the gastric cancer MKN-45 and 23132/87 cells following hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure on the expression patterns of MMP-1,MMP-3,MMP-7,MMP-9,MMP-10,MMP-11,MMP-12,MMP-14,MMP-15,MMP-17,MMP-23,MMP-28,and β-catenin genes.Methods:The mRNA transcripts in the cells were determined by RT-PCR.Following H2O2 exposure,oxidative stress in the viable cells was analyzed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA).Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) was used to eliminate oxidative stress and the consequence of H2O2 exposure and its removal on the expressions of the genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR.Results:The expressions of MMP-1,MMP-7,MMP-14,MMP-15,MMP-17 and β-catenin in MKN-45 cells and only the expression of MMP-15 in 23132/87 cells were increased.Removal of the oxidative stress resulted in decrease in the expressions of MMP genes of which the expressions were increased after H2O2 exposure.β-catenin,a transcription factor for many genes including MMPs,also displayed decreased levels of expression in both of the cell lines following CAPE treatment.Conclusions:Our data suggest that there is a remarkable link between the accumulation of oxidative stress and the increased expressions of MMP genes in the gastric cancer cells and MMPs should be considered as potential targets of therapy in gastric cancers due to its continuous exposure to oxidative stress.

  10. The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome supports cell survival in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meifan Chen

    Full Text Available The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C is a multi-subunit ubiquitin ligase that regulates exit from mitosis and G1 phase of the cell cycle. Although the regulation and function of APC/C(Cdh1 in the unperturbed cell cycle is well studied, little is known of its role in non-genotoxic stress responses. Here, we demonstrate the role of APC/C(Cdh1 (APC/C activated by Cdh1 protein in cellular protection from endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Activation of APC/C(Cdh1 under ER stress conditions is evidenced by Cdh1-dependent degradation of its substrates. Importantly, the activity of APC/C(Cdh1 maintains the ER stress checkpoint, as depletion of Cdh1 by RNAi impairs cell cycle arrest and accelerates cell death following ER stress. Our findings identify APC/C(Cdh1 as a regulator of cell cycle checkpoint and cell survival in response to proteotoxic insults.

  11. Oxidative Stress Type Influences the Properties of Antioxidants Containing Polyphenols in RINm5F Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Auberval

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro methods currently used to screen bioactive compounds focus on the use of a single model of oxidative stress. However, this simplistic view may lead to conflicting results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties of two natural extracts (a mix of red wine polyphenols (RWPs and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG with three models of oxidative stress induced with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, a mixture of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase (HX/XO, or streptozotocin (STZ in RINm5F beta cells. We employed multiple approaches to validate their potential as therapeutic treatment options, including cell viability, reactive oxygen species production, and antioxidant enzymes expression. All three oxidative stresses induced a decrease in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, whereas the level of ROS production was variable depending on the type of stress. The highest level of ROS was found for the HX/XO-induced stress, an increase that was reflected by higher expression antioxidant enzymes. Further, both antioxidant compounds presented beneficial effects during oxidative stress, but EGCG appeared to be a more efficient antioxidant. These data indicate that the efficiency of natural antioxidants is dependent on both the nature of the compound and the type of oxidative stress generated.

  12. Oxidative Stress Type Influences the Properties of Antioxidants Containing Polyphenols in RINm5F Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auberval, Nathalie; Dal, Stéphanie; Bietiger, William; Seyfritz, Elodie; Peluso, Jean; Muller, Christian; Zhao, Minjie; Marchioni, Eric; Pinget, Michel; Jeandidier, Nathalie; Maillard, Elisa; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Sigrist, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro methods currently used to screen bioactive compounds focus on the use of a single model of oxidative stress. However, this simplistic view may lead to conflicting results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties of two natural extracts (a mix of red wine polyphenols (RWPs) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)) with three models of oxidative stress induced with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a mixture of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase (HX/XO), or streptozotocin (STZ) in RINm5F beta cells. We employed multiple approaches to validate their potential as therapeutic treatment options, including cell viability, reactive oxygen species production, and antioxidant enzymes expression. All three oxidative stresses induced a decrease in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, whereas the level of ROS production was variable depending on the type of stress. The highest level of ROS was found for the HX/XO-induced stress, an increase that was reflected by higher expression antioxidant enzymes. Further, both antioxidant compounds presented beneficial effects during oxidative stress, but EGCG appeared to be a more efficient antioxidant. These data indicate that the efficiency of natural antioxidants is dependent on both the nature of the compound and the type of oxidative stress generated. PMID:26508986

  13. The clinical relevance of cell-based therapy for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a common disorder affecting the quality of life for millions of women worldwide. Effective surgical procedures involving synthetic permanent meshes exist, but significant short- and long-term complications occur. Cell-based therapy using autologous stem cells...

  14. Regulation of YKL-40 expression during genotoxic or microenvironmental stress in human glioblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Nanna; Johansen, Julia S; Hansen, Lasse T;

    2005-01-01

    material from glioblastomas patients. We investigated the expression of YKL-40 in three human malignant glioma cell lines exposed to different types of stress. Whereas a polymerase chain reaction transcript was detectable in all three cell lines, only U87 produced measurable amounts of YKL-40 protein. In U...

  15. Optimal matrix rigidity for stress-fibre polarization in stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, A.; Rehfeldt, F.; Brown, A. E. X.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-06-01

    The shape and differentiated state of many cell types are highly sensitive to the rigidity of the microenvironment. The physical mechanisms involved, however, are unknown. Here, we present a theoretical model and experiments demonstrating that the alignment of stress fibres within stem cells is a non-monotonic function of matrix rigidity. We treat the cell as an active elastic inclusion in a surrounding matrix, allowing the actomyosin forces to polarize in response to elastic stresses developed in the cell. The theory correctly predicts the monotonic increase of the cellular forces with the matrix rigidity and the alignment of stress fibres parallel to the long axis of cells. We show that the anisotropy of this alignment depends non-monotonically on matrix rigidity and demonstrate it experimentally by quantifying the orientational distribution of stress fibres in stem cells. These findings offer physical insight into the sensitivity of stem-cell differentiation to tissue elasticity and, more generally, introduce a cell-type-specific parameter for actomyosin polarizability.

  16. The Contribution of Cell Surface Components to the Neutrophil Mechanosensitivity to Shear Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Akenhead

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses the regulation of neutrophils by fluid shear stress in the context of factors that may govern cell mechanosensitivity and its influence on cell functions. There is substantial evidence that mechanoreceptors located on the peripheral membrane contribute to the ability of shear stress to regulate cell activity. In the case of neutrophils, the formyl peptide receptor (FPR and the CD18 integrins on the cell membrane have been shown to provide neutrophils with the ability to sense shear stresses in their local environment and alter their physiological state, accordingly. This configuration is also found for other types of cells, although they involve different cell-specific mechanoreceptors. Moreover, from an examination of the neutrophil mechanotransducing capacity, it is apparent that cellular mechanosensitivity depends on a number of factors that, if altered, contribute to dysregulation and ultimately pathophysiology. To exemplify this, we first describe the neutrophil responses to shear exposure. We then review two neutrophil mechanoreceptors, specifically FPR and CD18 integrins, which participate in controlling cell activity levels under physiological conditions. Next, we discuss the various factors that may alter neutrophil mechanosensitivity to shear stress and how these may underlie the circulatory pathobiology of two cardiovascular disease states: hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Based on the material presented, it is conceivable that cell mechanosensitivity is a powerful global metric that permits a more efficient approach to understanding the contribution of mechanobiology to physiology and to disease processes.

  17. Induction of oxidative stress and oxidative damage in rat glial cells by acrylonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamendulis, L M; Jiang, J; Xu, Y; Klaunig, J E

    1999-08-01

    Chronic treatment of rats with acrylonitrile (ACN) resulted in a dose-related increase in glial cell tumors (astrocytomas). While the exact mechanism(s) for ACN-induced carcinogenicity remains unresolved, non-genotoxic and possibly tumor promotion modes of action appear to be involved in the induction of glial tumors. Recent studies have shown that ACN induced oxidative stress selectively in rat brain in a dose-responsive manner. The present study examined the ability of ACN to induce oxidative stress in a rat glial cell line, a target tissue, and in cultured rat hepatocytes, a non-target tissue of ACN carcinogenicity. Glial cells and hepatocytes were treated for 1, 4 and 24 h with sublethal concentrations of ACN. ACN induced an increase in oxidative DNA damage, as evidenced by increased production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) in glial cells but not in rat hepatocytes. Hydroxyl radical formation following ACN treatment was also selectively increased in glial cells. Following 1 and 4 h of ACN exposure, the levels of the non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione, as well as the activities of the enzymatic antioxidants catalase and superoxide dismutase were significantly decreased in the rat glial cells. Lipid peroxidation and the activity of glutathione peroxidase were not affected by ACN treatment in rat glial cells. No changes in any of these biomarkers of oxidative stress were observed in hepatocytes treated with ACN. These data indicate that ACN selectively induced oxidative stress in rat glial cells.

  18. Endothelial cell activation, oxidative stress and inflammation induced by a panel of metal-based nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin;

    2015-01-01

    The importance of composition, size, crystal structure, charge and coating of metal-based nanomaterials (NMs) were evaluated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and/or THP-1 monocytic cells. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation were assessed because they are important...

  19. Research of the Effect of the Shear Stress on Endothelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionCellular mechanism is one of the foundations of regenerating medicine and tissue engineering, which is also an advanced subject in cell mechanism in recent years~([1]). The form and function of a cell, and the growing, reproducing and death, even canceration are related to the characteristics of cell mechanism. While the research of the shear stress on endothelial cells is an important field in cell mechanism. The main bio-functions of endothelial cells are as follows: anti-cruor, regulating t...

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the β-Cell Pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hoon Back

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder characterized by high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency by β-cell failure. Even if the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of β-cell failure are still under investigation, recent increasing genetic, experimental, and clinical evidence indicate that hyperactivation of the unfolded protein response (UPR to counteract metabolic stresses is closely related to β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis. Signaling pathways of the UPR are “a double-edged sword” that can promote adaptation or apoptosis depending on the nature of the ER stress condition. In this paper, we summarized our current understanding of the mechanisms and components related to ER stress in the β-cell pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  1. Lysosome dysfunction enhances oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through ubiquitinated protein accumulation in Hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunyan; Huang, Xiaowei; Xu, Ye; Li, Hongyan; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jiateng; Kang, Jinsong; Liu, Yuhe; Sun, Liankun

    2013-01-01

    The role of lysosomal system in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cancer cells is not fully understood. Menadione is frequently used as oxidative stress model. It is indicated that menadione could induce autophagy in Hela cells. In the present study, we examined whether the lysosomal inhibitor, ammonium chloride (NH(4)Cl) could prevent the autophagy flux by inhibiting the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes and enhance apoptosis induced by menadione via mitochondrial pathway. The results demonstrated generation and accumulation of reactive oxygen species and increased levels of ubiquitinated proteins and GRP78 in cells treated with both menadione and NH(4)Cl. Our data indicates that lysosomal system through autophagy plays an important role in preventing menadione-induced apoptosis in Hela cells by clearing misfolded proteins, which alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  2. Temperature propagation in prismatic lithium-ion-cells after short term thermal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Pamina; Liebig, Gerd; Komsiyska, Lidiya; Wittstock, Gunther

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a 3D model based on the thermal material characteristics of an automotive prismatic Li-NiMnCoO2 (NMC) cell was created in COMSOL Multiphysics® in order to simulate the temperature propagation in the cell during short term thermal stress. The thermal characteristics of the battery components were experimentally determined via laser flash analysis (LFA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and used as an input parameter for the models. In order to validate the modelling approach, an experimental setup was built to measure the temperature propagation during thermal stresses within a dummy cell, equipped with temperature sensors. After validating, the model is used to describe the temperature propagation after a short-term temperature stress on automotive prismatic lithium-ion cells, simulating welding of the contact leads.

  3. The role of ER stress response on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sang; Kim, Kwang Seok; Woo, Sang Keun; Lee, Yong Jin; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Kang, Seong Man; Lim, Young Bin [Laboratory of Radiation Effect, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathologic factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury. However, mechanism involved in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is triggered by perturbation of the ER functions, leading to the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive signaling cascade aimed at restoring ER homeostasis by facilitating the degradation of misfolded proteins and expanding the protein folding capacity of the cell. Recently, IR has also been shown to induce ER stress, thereby activating the UPR signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we report the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhance IR-induced caspase3 activation. Knockdown of xbp1 or atf6 with siRNA leads to inhibition of IR-induced caspase3 activation. Taken together, our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our findings could contribute to the development of new strategies based on modulating ER stress responses to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  4. Neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells by genotoxic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Raman Venu; Winnard Paul T; Botlagunta Mahendran

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Exposure to genotoxic stresses such as radiation and tobacco smoke can cause increased cancer incidence rate as reflected in an in depth meta-analysis of data for women and breast cancer incidence. Published reports have indicated that exposures to low dose radiation and tobacco smoke are factors that contribute to the development of breast cancer. However, there is a scarcity of information on the combinatorial effects of low dose radiation and tobacco smoke on formation ...

  5. Stem cells for stress urinary incontinence: the adipose promise

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Régis; Festy, Franck; Fritel, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the most common type of incontinence in women, is a frequent and costly ailment responsible for an alteration in the quality of life. Although medical treatment gives some rather deceiving results, surgical techniques that include colposuspension or tension-free vaginal tape, employed in cases of urethral support defect, give a 5-year cure rate of more than 80%. However, these techniques could lead to complications or recurrence of symptoms. Recentl...

  6. Comparative expression profiling of distinct T cell subsets undergoing oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Lichtenfels

    Full Text Available The clinical outcome of adoptive T cell transfer-based immunotherapies is often limited due to different escape mechanisms established by tumors in order to evade the hosts' immune system. The establishment of an immunosuppressive micromilieu by tumor cells along with distinct subsets of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes is often associated with oxidative stress that can affect antigen-specific memory/effector cytotoxic T cells thereby substantially reducing their frequency and functional activation. Therefore, protection of tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes from oxidative stress may enhance the anti-tumor-directed immune response. In order to better define the key pathways/proteins involved in the response to oxidative stress a comparative 2-DE-based proteome analysis of naïve CD45RA(+ and their memory/effector CD45RO(+ T cell counterparts in the presence and absence of low dose hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 was performed in this pilot study. Based on the profiling data of these T cell subpopulations under the various conditions, a series of differentially expressed spots were defined, members thereof identified by mass spectrometry and subsequently classified according to their cellular function and localization. Representative targets responding to oxidative stress including proteins involved in signaling pathways, in regulating the cellular redox status as well as in shaping/maintaining the structural cell integrity were independently verified at the transcript and protein level under the same conditions in both T cell subsets. In conclusion the resulting profiling data describe complex, oxidative stress-induced, but not strictly concordant changes within the respective expression profiles of CD45RA(+ and CD45RO(+ T cells. Some of the differentially expressed genes/proteins might be further exploited as potential targets toward modulating the redox capacity of the distinct lymphocyte subsets thereby providing the basis for further studies

  7. Aluminium oxide nanoparticles induced morphological changes, cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in Chinook salmon (CHSE-214) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Koigoora; Mahajan, Amit; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando Costa; Venkateswara Rao, Janapala

    2015-10-01

    Aluminium oxide nanoparticles (Al2 O3 NPs) are increasingly used in diverse applications that has raised concern about their safety. Recent studies suggested that Al2 O3 NPs induced oxidative stress may be the cause of toxicity in algae, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Caenorhabditis elegans and Danio rerio. However, there is paucity on the toxicity of Al2 O3 NPs on fish cell lines. The current study was aimed to investigate Al2 O3 NPs induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and morphological abnormality of Chinnok salmon cells (CHSE-214). A dose-dependent decline in cell viability was observed in CHSE-214 cells exposed to Al2 O3 NPs. Oxidative stress induced by Al2 O3 NPs in CHSE-214 cells has resulted in the significant reduction of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione in a dose-dependent manner. However, a significant increase in glutathione sulfo-transferase and lipid peroxidation was observed in CHSE-214 cells exposed to Al2 O3 NPs in a dose-dependent manner. Significant morphological changes in CHSE-214 cells were observed when exposed to Al2 O3 NPs at 6, 12 and 24 h. The cells started to detach and appear spherical at 6 h followed by loss of cellular contents resulting in the shrinking of the cells. At 24 h, the cells started to disintegrate and resulted in cell death. Our data demonstrate that Al2 O3 NPs induce cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner in CHSE-214 cells. Thus, our current work may serve as a base-line study for future evaluation of toxicity studies using CHSE-214 cells.

  8. Repurposing a Prokaryotic Toxin-Antitoxin System for the Selective Killing of Oncogenically Stressed Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Mark A; Pimentel, Belén; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Dionne, Isabelle; Turnbull, Alice; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Prokaryotes express intracellular toxins that pass unnoticed to carrying cells until coexpressed antitoxin partners are degraded in response to stress. Although not evolved to function in eukaryotes, one of these toxins, Kid, induces apoptosis in mammalian cells, an effect that is neutralized by its cognate antitoxin, Kis. Here we engineered this toxin-antitoxin pair to create a synthetic system that becomes active in human cells suffering a specific oncogenic stress. Inspired by the way Kid becomes active in bacterial cells, we produced a Kis variant that is selectively degraded in human cells expressing oncoprotein E6. The resulting toxin-antitoxin system functions autonomously in human cells, distinguishing those that suffer the oncogenic insult, which are killed by Kid, from those that do not, which remain protected by Kis. Our results provide a framework for developing personalized anticancer strategies avoiding off-target effects, a challenge that has been hardly tractable by other means thus far.

  9. Inflammatory cytokines protect retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative stress-induced death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Helene B; Faber, Carsten; Svendsen, Signe Goul

    2013-01-01

    -mediated induction of the anti-oxidative stress response, upregulating protective anti-oxidant pathway(s). These findings suggest caution for the clinical use of anti-inflammatory agents in the management of immune-associated eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.......PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress on cell survival of the human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line, ARPE-19. METHODS: Confluent RPE cells were treated with peripheral blood mononuclear cells-conditioned medium (PCM), H2O2, NaIO3, interferon...... (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, or combinations of these. Cell viability was determined by viability assays and by light microscopy. Effector molecules of cell death were investigated by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Microarrays were performed to screen for differential...

  10. Characterization at the individual cell level and in whole blood samples of shear stress preventing red blood cells aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K; Kinnunen, M; Danilina, A V; Ustinov, V D; Shin, S; Meglinski, I; Priezzhev, A V

    2016-05-03

    The aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is an intrinsic feature of blood that has a strong impact on its microcirculation. For a number of years it has been attracting a great attention in basic research and clinical studies. Here, we study a relationship between the RBC aggregation parameters measured at the individual cell level and in a whole blood sample. The home made optical tweezers were used to measure the aggregating and disaggregating forces for a pair of interacting RBCs, at the individual cell level, in order to evaluate the corresponding shear stresses. The RheoScan aggregometer was used for the measurements of critical shear stress (CSS) in whole blood samples. The correlation between CSS and the shear stress required to stop an RBC pair from aggregating was found. The shear stress required to disaggregate a pair of RBCs using the double channel optical tweezers appeared to be about 10 times higher than CSS. The correlation between shear stresses required to prevent RBCs from aggregation at the individual cell level and in whole blood samples was estimated and assessed quantitatively. The experimental approach developed has a high potential for advancing hemorheological studies.

  11. Multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells are a primary source of induced pluripotent stem cells in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakao, Shohei; Kitada, Masaaki; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Shigemoto, Taeko; Matsuse, Dai; Akashi, Hideo; Tanimura, Yukihiro; Tsuchiyama, Kenichiro; Kikuchi, Tomohiko; Goda, Makoto; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Dezawa, Mari

    2011-06-14

    The stochastic and elite models have been proposed for the mechanism of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell generation. In this study we report a system that supports the elite model. We previously identified multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells in human dermal fibroblasts that are characterized by stress tolerance, expression of pluripotency markers, self-renewal, and the ability to differentiate into endodermal-, mesodermal-, and ectodermal-lineage cells from a single cell. They can be isolated as stage-specific embryonic antigen-3/CD105 double-positive cells. When human fibroblasts were separated into Muse and non-Muse cells and transduced with Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, iPS cells were generated exclusively from Muse cells but not from non-Muse cells. Although some colonies were formed from non-Muse cells, they were unlike iPS cells. Furthermore, epigenetic alterations were not seen, and some of the major pluripotency markers were not expressed for the entire period during iPS cell generation. These findings were confirmed further using cells transduced with a single polycistronic virus vector encoding all four factors. The results demonstrate that in adult human fibroblasts a subset of preexisting adult stem cells whose properties are similar in some respects to those of iPS cells selectively become iPS cells, but the remaining cells make no contribution to the generation of iPS cells. Therefore this system seems to fit the elite model rather than the stochastic model.

  12. Tart Cherry Extracts Reduce Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Signaling in Microglial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Megan E. Kelly; Donna F. Bielinski; Fisher, Derek R.

    2016-01-01

    Tart cherries contain an array of polyphenols that can decrease inflammation and oxidative stress (OS), which contribute to cognitive declines seen in aging populations. Previous studies have shown that polyphenols from dark-colored fruits can reduce stress-mediated signaling in BV-2 mouse microglial cells, leading to decreases in nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Thus, the present study sought to determine if tart cherries—which improved cogn...

  13. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  14. Profile of stress and toxicity gene expression in human hepatic cells treated with Efavirenz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Sucerquia, Leysa J; Blas-Garcia, Ana; Marti-Cabrera, Miguel; Esplugues, Juan V; Apostolova, Nadezda

    2012-06-01

    Hepatic toxicity and metabolic disorders are major adverse effects elicited during the pharmacological treatment of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Efavirenz (EFV), the most widely used non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), has been associated with these events, with recent studies implicating it in stress responses involving mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in human hepatic cells. To expand these findings, we analyzed the influence of EFV on the expression profile of selected stress and toxicity genes in these cells. Significant up-regulation was observed with Cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (CYP1A1), which indicated metabolic stress. Several genes directly related to oxidative stress and damage exhibited increased expression, including Methalothionein 2A (MT2A), Heat shock 70kDa protein 6 (HSPA6), Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) and DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3). In addition, Early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) was enhanced, whereas mRNA levels of the inflammatory genes Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10) and Serpin peptidase inhibitor (nexin, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1), member 1 (SERPINE1) decreased and increased, respectively. This profile of gene expression supports previous data demonstrating altered mitochondrial function and presence of oxidative stress/damage in EFV-treated hepatic cells, and may be of relevance in the search for molecular targets with therapeutic potential to be employed in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the hepatic toxicity associated with HIV therapy.

  15. Transcription of Satellite III non-coding RNAs is a general stress response in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Rossi, Antonio; Bazzini, Silvia; Ghigna, Claudia; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    In heat-shocked human cells, heat shock factor 1 activates transcription of tandem arrays of repetitive Satellite III (SatIII) DNA in pericentromeric heterochromatin. Satellite III RNAs remain associated with sites of transcription in nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here we use real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of these genomic regions. Transcription is highly asymmetrical and most of the transcripts contain the G-rich strand of the repeat. A low level of G-rich RNAs is detectable in unstressed cells and a 104-fold induction occurs after heat shock. G-rich RNAs are induced by a wide range of stress treatments including heavy metals, UV-C, oxidative and hyper-osmotic stress. Differences exist among stressing agents both for the kinetics and the extent of induction (>100- to 80.000-fold). In all cases, G-rich transcripts are associated with nSBs. On the contrary, C-rich transcripts are almost undetectable in unstressed cells and modestly increase after stress. Production of SatIII RNAs after hyper-osmotic stress depends on the Tonicity Element Binding Protein indicating that activation of the arrays is triggered by different transcription factors. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA whose transcription is controlled by different transcription factors under different growth conditions. PMID:18039709

  16. Laparotomy in mice induces blood cell expression of inflammatory and stress genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Fred; Isoda, Fumiko; Mobbs, Charles

    2015-04-01

    Surgical trauma induces immune and stress responses although its effects on postsurgical inflammatory and stress gene expression remain poorly characterized. This study sought to improve current scientific knowledge by investigating the effects of laparotomy on mouse blood cell inflammatory and stress gene expression. Three-month-old male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 2% isoflurane or 2% isoflurane with laparotomy and sacrificed 4 h postintervention. Blood was collected and blood cell expression of 158 genes central to inflammatory and stress responses was assayed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction arrays. Mice subjected to isoflurane with laparotomy, compared with mice receiving isoflurane alone, had >2-fold upregulation of genes in inflammation (Osm, IL1rn, IL1b, and Csf1), oxidative stress (Hmox1), heat shock (Hspa1b), growth arrest (Cdkn1a), and DNA repair (Ugt1a2). These genes demonstrated similar expression patterns by Pearson correlation and cluster analysis. Thus, laparotomy induces coordinated, postsurgical blood cell expression of unique inflammatory and stress genes whose roles in influencing surgical outcomes need further investigation.

  17. The role of DJ-1 in the oxidative stress cell death cascade after stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolina Pantcheva; Maya Elias; Kelsey Duncan; Cesar V.Borlongan; Naoki Tajiri; Yuji Kaneko

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is closely associated with secondary cell death in many disorders of the central nervous system including stroke, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease. Among many aber-rant oxidative stress-associated proteins, DJ-1 has been associated with the oxidative stress cell death cascade primarily in Parkinson’s disease. Although principally expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus, DJ-1 can be secreted into the serum under pathological condition. Recently, a close pathological association between DJ-1 and oxidative stress in stroke has been implicated. To this end, we and others have demonstrated the important role of mitochondria in neuroprotection for stroke by demonstrating that the translocation of DJ-1 in the mitochondria could potentially mitigate mitochondrial injury. Here, we discuss our recent ifndings testing the hypothesis that DJ-1 not only functions as a form of intracellular protection from oxidative stress, but that it also utilizes paracrine and/or autocrine cues in order to accomplish extracellular signaling between neighboring neuronal cells, resulting in neuroprotection. This article highlights recent evidence supporting the status of DJ-1 as key anti-oxidative stress therapeutic target for stroke.

  18. A model for studying the effect of shear stress on interactions between vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jeng-Jiann; Chen, Li-Jing; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Lee, Pei-Ling; Lee, Chih-I

    2004-04-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly subjected to blood flow-induced shear stress and the influences of neighboring smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In the present study, a coculture flow system was developed to study the effect of shear stress on EC-SMC interactions. ECs and SMCs were separated by a porous membrane with only the EC side subjected to the flow condition. When ECs were exposed to a shear stress of 12 dynes/cm2 for 24 h, the cocultured SMCs tended to orient perpendicularly to the flow direction. This perpendicular orientation of the cocultured SMCs to flow direction was not observed when ECs were exposed to a shear stress of 2 dynes/cm2. Under the static condition, long and parallel actin bundles were observed in the central regions of the cocultured SMCs, whereas the actin filaments localized mainly at the periphery of the cocultured ECs. After 24 h of flow application, the cocultured ECs displayed very long, well-organized, parallel actin stress fibers aligned with the flow direction in the central regions of the cells. Immunostaining of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 confirmed the elongation and alignment of the cocultured ECs with the flow direction. Coculture with SMCs under static condition induced EC gene expressions of growth-related oncogene-alpha and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and shear stress was found to abolish these SMC-induced gene expressions. Our results suggest that shear stress may serve as a down-regulator for the pathophysiologically relevant gene expression in ECs cocultured with SMCs.

  19. Synthèse de monoglycérides par transestérification catalysée par des oxydes basiques

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    Bancquart Sébastien

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available La préparation de monoglycérides à partir d’acides ou d’esters méthyliques gras et de glycérol peut être effectuée en présence de catalyseurs acides ou basiques. L’emploi de catalyseurs basiques solides pourrait limiter les réactions secondaires menant à la dégradation des réactifs, notamment du glycérol. Une comparaison de plusieurs solides basiques (MgO, CeO2, La2O3 et ZnO a montré que plus la basicité intrinsèque du catalyseur est importante, plus il est actif. Afin d’augmenter les performances de ces solides, plusieurs méthodes ont été utilisées pour la préparation de MgO. Un dopage alcalin a ensuite été tenté afin d’augmenter la basicité et l’activité de MgO. L’oxyde de magnésium préparé par hydratation d’un oxyde commercial et dopé au lithium, suivi de sa déshydratation, est le catalyseur le plus actif.

  20. The Role of Plant Cell Wall Proteins in Response to Salt Stress

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    Lyuben Zagorchev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary agriculture is facing new challenges with the increasing population and demand for food on Earth and the decrease in crop productivity due to abiotic stresses such as water deficit, high salinity, and extreme fluctuations of temperatures. The knowledge of plant stress responses, though widely extended in recent years, is still unable to provide efficient strategies for improvement of agriculture. The focus of study has been shifted to the plant cell wall as a dynamic and crucial component of the plant cell that could immediately respond to changes in the environment. The investigation of plant cell wall proteins, especially in commercially important monocot crops revealed the high involvement of this compartment in plants stress responses, but there is still much more to be comprehended. The aim of this review is to summarize the available data on this issue and to point out the future areas of interest that should be studied in detail.

  1. Dichloroacetate Decreases Cell Health and Activates Oxidative Stress Defense Pathways in Rat Alveolar Type II Pneumocytes

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    Alexis Valauri-Orton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dichloroacetate (DCA is a water purification byproduct that is known to be hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic and to induce peripheral neuropathy and damage macrophages. This study characterizes the effects of the haloacetate on lung cells by exposing rat alveolar type II (L2 cells to 0–24 mM DCA for 6–24 hours. Increasing DCA concentration and the combination of increasing DCA concentration plus longer exposures decrease measures of cellular health. Length of exposure has no effect on oxidative stress biomarkers, glutathione, SOD, or CAT. Increasing DCA concentration alone does not affect total glutathione or its redox ratio but does increase activity in the SOD/CAT oxidative stress defense pathway. These data suggest that alveolar type II cells rely on SOD and CAT more than glutathione to combat DCA-induced stress.

  2. Ethylene is involved in stress responses induced by fusicoccin in sycamore cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Massimo; Crosti, Paolo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2010-11-15

    The phytohormone ethylene is involved in many physiological and developmental processes of plants, as well as in stress responses and in the development of disease resistance. Fusicoccin (FC) is a well-known phytotoxin, that in sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, induces a set of stress responses, including synthesis of ethylene. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of ethylene in the FC-induced stress responses of sycamore cells by means of Co(2+), a well-known specific inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis. Co(2+) inhibited the accumulation of dead cells in the culture, the production of nitric oxide (NO) and of the molecular chaperone Binding Protein (BiP) in the endoplasmic reticulum induced by FC. By contrast, Co(2+) was ineffective on the FC-induced accumulation of cells with fragmented DNA, production of H(2)O(2) and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion, and only partially reduced the accumulation of regulative 14-3-3 proteins in the cytosol. In addition, we compared the effect of FC on the above parameters with that of the ethylene-releasing compound ethephon (2-chloroethane phosphonic acid). The results suggest that ethylene is involved in several stress responses induced by FC in sycamore cells, including a form of cell death that does not show apoptotic features and possibly involves NO as a signaling molecule.

  3. When Supply Does Not Meet Demand-ER Stress and Plant Programmed Cell Death

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    Brett eWilliams

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the central organelle in the eukaryotic secretory pathway. The ER functions in protein synthesis and maturation and is crucial for proper maintenance of cellular homeostasis and adaptation to adverse environments. Acting as a cellular sentinel, the ER is exquisitely sensitive to changing environments principally via the ER quality control machinery. When perturbed, ER-stress triggers a tightly regulated and highly conserved, signal transduction pathway known as the unfolded protein response (UPR that prevents the dangerous accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins. In situations where excessive UPR activity surpasses threshold levels, cells deteriorate and eventually trigger programmed cell death (PCD as a way for the organism to cope with dysfunctional or toxic signals. The programmed cell death that results from excessive ER stress in mammalian systems contributes to several important diseases including hypoxia, neurodegeneration and diabetes. Importantly, hallmark features and markers of cell death that are associated with ER stress in mammals are also found in plants. In particular, there is a common, conserved set of chaperones that modulate ER cell death signalling. Here we review the elements of plant cell death responses to ER stress and note that an increasing number of plant-pathogen interactions are being identified in which the host ER is targeted by plant pathogens to establish compatibility.

  4. Increased Oxidative Stress in Cultured 3T3-L1 Cells was Attenuated by Berberine Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shi-Fen; Yasui, Naomi; Negishb, Hiroko; Kishimoto, Aya; Sun, Jian-Ning; Ikeda, Katsumi

    2015-06-01

    The 3T3-L1 cell line is one of the most well-characterized and reliable models for studying adipocytes. Increased oxidative stress in accumulated fat was found in 3T3-L1 cells. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, could suppress fat deposition in 3T3-L1 cells; however, whether berberine suppresses increased oxidative stress is not well known. In this study, we observed the effect of berberine on increased oxidative stress in 3T3-L1 cells. 3T3-L1 cells were cultured and treated with berberine (5-20 μM) from day 3 to day 8. We confirmed that berberine markedly inhibited fat accumulation and lipid droplets in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and decreased triglyceride content. Berberine inhibited increased oxidative stress in 3T3-L1 cells by suppressing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) gene expression and GPx activity. Berberine also markedly reduced adipokines secreted by adipocytes, including leptin and resistin.

  5. Diffusible Factors Secreted by Glioblastoma and Medulloblastoma Cells Induce Oxidative Stress in Bystander Neural Stem Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neha; Colangelo, Nicholas W; de Toledo, Sonia M; Azzam, Edouard I

    2016-08-01

    Harmful effects that alter the homeostasis of neural stem or progenitor cells (NSPs) can affect regenerative processes in the central nervous system. We investigated the effect of soluble factors secreted by control or (137)Cs-γ-irradiated glioblastoma or medulloblastoma cells on redox-modulated endpoints in recipient human NSPs. Growth medium harvested from the nonirradiated brain tumor cells, following 24 h of growth, induced prominent oxidative stress in recipient NSPs as judged by overall increases in mitochondrial superoxide radical levels (p p21(Waf1) and p27(Kip1), and perturbations in cell cycle progression (p cells to radiation only slightly altered the induced oxidative changes in the bystander NSPs, except for medium from irradiated medulloblastoma cells that was more potent at inducing apoptosis in the NSPs than medium from nonirradiated cells (p cells is often used to support the growth of stem cells.

  6. Chronic stress impairs learning and hippocampal cell proliferation in senescence-accelerated prone mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Weihong; Zhang, Ting; Jia, Weiping; Sun, Xiaojiang; Liu, Xueyuan

    2011-02-25

    Chronic stress can induce cognitive impairment. It is unclear whether a higher susceptibility to chronic stress is associated with the progression of pathological brain aging. Senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 (SAMP8) is a naturally occurring animal model of accelerated brain aging. Senescence-accelerated resistant mouse 1 (SAMR1) is usually used as the normal control. In this study, we examined the effects of chronic restraint stress (CRS) on learning in the Y-maze, hippocampal cell proliferation, and the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of 4-month-old SAMP8 and SAMR1. The results showed that exposure to CRS impaired learning and hippocampal cell proliferation in SAMP8 and SAMR1 but to a much greater extent in SAMP8. Furthermore, CRS significantly decreased the expression of BDNF protein and mRNA in the hippocampus of SAMP8 and SAMR1. These data indicated that SAMP8 is more sensitive to the deleterious effects of CRS on learning than SAMR1. A greater decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation caused by chronic stress may be part of the underlying mechanism for the more severe learning deficit observed in SAMP8. In addition, our findings suggested a role of BDNF in the stress-induced impairment of learning and hippocampal cell proliferation in both strains.

  7. Nature's rheologists: Lymphatic endothelial cells control migration in response to shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Gerald; Dunn, Alex; Surya, Vinay

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) line the inner surface of blood and lymphatic vessels and are sensitive to fluid flow as part of their physiological function. EC organization, migration and vessel development are profoundly influenced by shear stresses, with important implications in cardiovascular disease and tumor metastasis. How ECs sense fluid flow is a central and unanswered question in cardiovascular biology. We developed a high-throughput live-cell flow chamber that models the gradients in wall shear stress experienced by ECs in vivo. Live-cell imaging allows us to probe cellular responses to flow, most notably EC migration, which has a key role in vessel remodeling. We find that most EC subtypes, including ECs from the venous, arterial, and microvascular systems, migrate in the flow direction. In contrast, human lymphatic microvascular ECs (hLMVECs) migrate against flow and up spatial gradients in wall shear stress. Further experiments reveal that hLMVECs are sensitive to the magnitude, direction, and the local spatial gradients in wall shear stress. Lastly, recent efforts have aimed to link this directional migration to spatial gradients in cell-mediated small molecule emission that may be linked to the gradient in wall shear stress.

  8. Early perturbation in mitochondria redox homeostasis in response to environmental stress predicts cell fate in diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Creveld, Shiri Graff; Rosenwasser, Shilo; Schatz, Daniella; Koren, Ilan; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-02-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous marine photosynthetic eukaryotes that are responsible for about 20% of global photosynthesis. Nevertheless, little is known about the redox-based mechanisms that mediate diatom sensing and acclimation to environmental stress. Here we used a redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein sensor targeted to various subcellular organelles in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, to map the spatial and temporal oxidation patterns in response to environmental stresses. Specific organelle oxidation patterns were found in response to various stress conditions such as oxidative stress, nutrient limitation and exposure to diatom-derived infochemicals. We found a strong correlation between the mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) redox potential (EGSH) and subsequent induction of cell death in response to the diatom-derived unsaturated aldehyde 2E,4E/Z-decadienal (DD), and a volatile halocarbon (BrCN) that mediate trophic-level interactions in marine diatoms. Induction of cell death in response to DD was mediated by oxidation of mitochondrial EGSH and was reversible by application of GSH only within a narrow time frame. We found that cell fate can be accurately predicted by a distinct life-death threshold of mitochondrial EGSH (-335 mV). We propose that compartmentalized redox-based signaling can integrate the input of diverse environmental cues and will determine cell fate decisions as part of algal acclimation to stress conditions.

  9. Accelerated stress testing and diagnostic analysis of degradation in CdTe solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, David S.

    2008-08-01

    Solar cell module reliability is inextricably linked to cell-level reliability. This is particularly so with thin-film technologies. In CdTe, reliability issues historically associate with back contact stability and the use of Cu as an extrinsic dopant. Using a simple approach by which identical cells are heated under open-circuit bias and 1-sun illumination, degradation activation energies of 0.63 and 2.94 eV in laboratory-scale CdS/CdTe devices were identified in the accelerated stress temperature range of 60 to 120 °C. At lower stress temperatures, cell performance changes were linearly correlated with changes in both fill factor (FF) and short-circuit current (Jsc). At higher stress temperatures, changes in efficiency were correlated with changes in FF and open-circuit voltage (Voc). The measured activation energy of 0.63 is associated with Cu-diffusion. During the early stage of stress testing, which may provide additional back contact annealing, improvements in FF were due to Cu-diffusion. Decreased performance observed at longer stress times (decreased FF and Voc), according to a two-diode Pspice model, were due to both increased space-charge recombination (near the junction) and decreased recombination in the bulk. Kirkendall void formation (S-outdiffusion) at the CdS/CdTe interface is given as responsible for the 2.9 eV degradation mechanism.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eGiannattasio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications.

  11. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B.; Zholobak, Nadezhda M. [Zabolotny Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv D0368 (Ukraine); Baranchikov, Alexander E. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ryabova, Anastasia V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Vladimir K., E-mail: van@igic.ras.ru [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus.

  12. From microgravity to osmotic conditions: mechanical integration of plant cells in response to stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtaszek, Przemyslaw; Kasprowicz, Anna; Michalak, Michal; Janczara, Renata; Volkmann, Dieter; Baluska, Frantisek

    Chemical reactions and interactions between molecules are commonly thought of as being at the basis of Life. Research of recent years, however, is more and more evidently indicating that physical forces are profoundly affecting the functioning of life at all levels of its organiza-tion. To detect and to respond to such forces, plant cells need to be integrated mechanically. Cell walls are the outermost functional zone of plant cells. They surround the individual cells, and also form a part of the apoplast. In cell suspensions, cell walls are embedded in the cul-ture medium which can be considered as a superapoplast. Through physical and chemical interactions they provide a basis for the structural and functional cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton (WMC) continuum spanning the whole cell. Here, the working of WMC contin-uum, and the participation of signalling molecules, like NO, would be presented in the context of plant responses to stress. In addition, the effects of the changing composition of WMC continuum will be considered, with particular attention paid to the modifications of the WMC components. Plant cells are normally adapted to changing osmotic conditions, resulting from variable wa-ter availability. The appearance of the osmotic stress activates adaptory mechanisms. If the strength of osmotic stress grows relatively slowly over longer period of time, the cells are able to adapt to conditions that are lethal to non-adapted cells. During stepwise adaptation of tobacco BY-2 suspension cells to the presence of various osmotically active agents, cells diverged into independent, osmoticum type-specific lines. In response to ionic agents (NaCl, KCl), the adhe-sive properties were increased and randomly dividing cells formed clumps, while cells adapted to nonionic osmotica (mannitol, sorbitol, PEG) revealed ordered pattern of precisely positioned cell divisions, resulting in the formation of long cell files. Changes in the growth patterns were accompanied by

  13. The shear stress of it all: the cell membrane and mechanochemical transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles R; Frangos, John A

    2007-08-29

    As the inner lining of the vessel wall, vascular endothelial cells are poised to act as a signal transduction interface between haemodynamic forces and the underlying vascular smooth-muscle cells. Detailed analyses of fluid mechanics in atherosclerosis-susceptible regions of the vasculature reveal a strong correlation between endothelial cell dysfunction and areas of low mean shear stress and oscillatory flow with flow recirculation. Conversely, steady shear stress stimulates cellular responses that are essential for endothelial cell function and are atheroprotective. The molecular basis of shear-induced mechanochemical signal transduction and the endothelium's ability to discriminate between flow profiles remains largely unclear. Given that fluid shear stress does not involve a traditional receptor/ligand interaction, identification of the molecule(s) responsible for sensing fluid flow and mechanical force discrimination has been difficult. This review will provide an overview of the haemodynamic forces experienced by the vascular endothelium and its role in localizing atherosclerotic lesions within specific regions of the vasculature. Also reviewed are several recent lines of evidence suggesting that both changes in membrane microviscosity linked to heterotrimeric G proteins, and the transmission of tension across the cell membrane to the cell-cell junction where known shear-sensitive proteins are localized, may serve as the primary force-sensing elements of the cell.

  14. Optical studies of oxidative stress in pulmonary artery endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanian, Zahra; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Eis, Annie; Kondouri, Ganesh; Ranji, Mahsa

    2015-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an essential role in facilitating signal transduction processes within the cell and modulating the injuries. However, the generation of ROS is tightly controlled both spatially and temporally within the cell, making the study of ROS dynamics particularly difficult. This study present a novel protocol to quantify the dynamic of the mitochondrial superoxide as a precursor of reactive oxygen species. To regulate the mitochondrial superoxide level, metabolic perturbation was induced by administration of potassium cyanide (KCN). The presented method was able to monitor and measure the superoxide production rate over time. Our results demonstrated that the metabolic inhibitor, potassium cyanide (KCN) induced a significant increase in the rate of superoxide production in mitochondria of fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cells (FPAEC). Presented method sets the stage to study different ROS mediated injuries in vitro.

  15. Assessing corrosion problems in photovoltaic cells via electrochemical stress testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, H.

    1985-01-01

    A series of accelerated electrochemical experiments to study the degradation properties of polyvinylbutyral-encapsulated silicon solar cells has been carried out. The cells' electrical performance with silk screen-silver and nickel-solder contacts was evaluated. The degradation mechanism was shown to be electrochemical corrosion of the cell contacts; metallization elements migrate into the encapsulating material, which acts as an ionic conducting medium. The corrosion products form a conductive path which results in a gradual loss of the insulation characteristics of the encapsulant. The precipitation of corrosion products in the encapsulant also contributes to its discoloration which in turn leads to a reduction in its transparency and the consequent optical loss. Delamination of the encapsulating layers could be attributed to electrochemical gas evolution reactions. The usefulness of the testing technique in qualitatively establishing a reliability difference between metallizations and antireflection coating types is demonstrated.

  16. Gamma-Glutamylcysteine Inhibits Oxidative Stress in Human Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    GGC treatment and pooled. Then, cells were suspended and lysed with hypotonic buffer and 10% (w/v) Nonidet P - 40 . After spinning, the cell pellet was...correlation with PPARγ DNA binding levels (pb0.05) and positive correlation trends with NF-κB p65 DNA binding ( p =0.059), 8-epi- PGF2α, ( p =0.080), and...TBARS ( p =0.129) levels through Pearson’s correlations. GSH synthetase (GSS) expression We found statistically lower GSS protein levels (0.93 to 0.85

  17. The influence of calreticulin on oxidative stress i n MCF-7 cells

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    Sree Jaya S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Calreticulin (CRT, a multifunctional protein that regulates varied important cell functions, in addition CRT recently drawn notice that the function of oxidative stress induced apoptosis. At this point, the role of CRT through oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death is focused. Herein, we used mammary gland adenocarcinoma cell cells (MCF-7 in vitroto investigate the role CRT overexpression in cell death by promoting ROS induced apoptosis. Human CRT gene was isolated from blood, cDNA was synthesized, CRT was cloned to the XhoI/EcoRI restriction sites of a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1 and plasmid was transfected in to MCF-7 cell line to promote apoptosis. After 24 h and 48 h transfection, cell proliferation, LDH leakage, lipid peroxidation, total protein, and glutathione concentrations were measured. CRT transfected cells expressed higher concentrations of lipid peroxidation and LDHleakage than control MCF -7 cells. There was a significant negative correlation between lipid peroxidation and cell proliferation. Glutathione did not appear to be a significant factor. Therefore, stimulation of CRT may modulate the growth inhibitory effects in human breast cancer cells. One mechanism of growth inhibition may be through increased lipid peroxidation.

  18. Autophagy prevents autophagic cell death in Tetrahymena in response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si-Wei; Feng, Jiang-Nan; Cao, Yi; Meng, Li-Ping; Wang, Shu-Lin

    2015-05-18

    Autophagy is a major cellular pathway used to degrade long-lived proteins or organelles that may be damaged due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by cellular stress. Autophagy typically enhances cell survival, but it may also act to promote cell death under certain conditions. The mechanism underlying this paradox, however, remains unclear. We showed that Tetrahymena cells exerted increased membrane-bound vacuoles characteristic of autophagy followed by autophagic cell death (referred to as cell death with autophagy) after exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine or 3-methyladenine significantly augmented autophagic cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. Blockage of the mitochondrial electron transport chain or starvation triggered activation of autophagy followed by cell death by inducing the production of ROS due to the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. This indicated a regulatory role of mitochondrial ROS in programming autophagy and autophagic cell death in Tetrahymena. Importantly, suppression of autophagy enhanced autophagic cell death in Tetrahymena in response to elevated ROS production from starvation, and this was reversed by antioxidants. Therefore, our results suggest that autophagy was activated upon oxidative stress to prevent the initiation of autophagic cell death in Tetrahymena until the accumulation of ROS passed the point of no return, leading to delayed cell death in Tetrahymena.

  19. Low infra red laser light irradiation on cultured neural cells: effects on mitochondria and cell viability after oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giardino Luciana

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerable interest has been aroused in recent years by the well-known notion that biological systems are sensitive to visible light. With clinical applications of visible radiation in the far-red to near-infrared region of the spectrum in mind, we explored the effect of coherent red light irradiation with extremely low energy transfer on a neural cell line derived from rat pheochromocytoma. We focused on the effect of pulsed light laser irradiation vis-à-vis two distinct biological effects: neurite elongation under NGF stimulus on laminin-collagen substrate and cell viability during oxidative stress. Methods We used a 670 nm laser, with extremely low peak power output (3 mW/cm2 and at an extremely low dose (0.45 mJ/cm2. Neurite elongation was measured over three days in culture. The effect of coherent red light irradiation on cell reaction to oxidative stress was evaluated through live-recording of mitochondria membrane potential (MMP using JC1 vital dye and laser-confocal microscopy, in the absence (photo bleaching and in the presence (oxidative stress of H2O2, and by means of the MTT cell viability assay. Results We found that laser irradiation stimulates NGF-induced neurite elongation on a laminin-collagen coated substrate and protects PC12 cells against oxidative stress. Conclusion These data suggest that red light radiation protects the viability of cell culture in case of oxidative stress, as indicated by MMP measurement and MTT assay. It also stimulates neurite outgrowth, and this effect could also have positive implications for axonal protection.

  20. Toxico-genomics of uranium-induced cell stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prat, O.; Berenguer, F.; Malard, V.; Quemeneur, V. [CEA Centre de Marcoule (DSV/DIEP/SBTN), 30 - Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2006-07-01

    The possibility of exposure of workers or population to materials originating from nuclear fuel process is a major concern worldwide. The radiological hazards have been the matter of intensive research for decades, and are consequently well understood. However, the chemical toxicity of most compounds originating from the nuclear industry certainly requires further research. In this respect, uranium is an interesting model since, due to its very long half-life, it is not considered as a major radiological hazard. At large concentrations, it induces harmful effects on human health, at the level of the respiratory system in case of inhalation, of kidneys and bones after entering into the blood-stream (Bleise et al. 2003). The kidney functional regions most at risk to injury are the proximal tubule and, to a lesser extent, the glomerulus (Leggett 1989). However, the consequences of chronic uranium exposure at very low concentration are largely unknown. In particular, the conservation of response mechanisms and/or adaptative mechanisms at such low levels are still to be demonstrated. The use of mics methodologies in the pharmaceutical industry has demonstrated its tremendous potential and allowed great progress to be made both in the understanding of the pathogenesis and in the design of novel treatments. Today, these methods invest the field of toxicology by measuring global changes in biological samples exposed to toxic agents (Hamadeh et al. 2002). This approach pursues three goals: (i) the improvement of the knowledge of mechanisms ruling toxicity, (ii) the research of a signature of each toxicant i.e. a minimal number of genes or proteins able to distinguish between an exposed state and a normal state in a biological system, (iii) the research of proteins as early bio-markers of effect. With these goals in mind, we used transcriptomics and proteomics to analyze human cultured cells exposed to uranyl containing media. To identify robust targets, we compared several

  1. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors of terrestrial solar cells. First annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, J.L.; Lathrop, J.W.

    1979-05-01

    The results of accelerated stress testing of four different types of silicon terrestrial solar cells are discussed. The accelerated stress tests used included bias-temperature tests, bias-temperature-humidity tests, thermal cycle and thermal shock tests, and power cycle tests. Characterization of the cells was performed before stress testing and at periodic down-times, using electrical measurement, visual inspection, and metal adherence pull tests. Electrical parameters measured included short-circuit current, I/sub sc/, open circuit voltage, V/sub oc/, and output power, voltage, and current at the maximum power point, P/sub m/, V/sub m/, and I/sub m/ respectively. Incorporated in the report are the distributions of the prestress electrical data for all cell types. Data was also obtained on cell series and shunt resistance. Significant differences in the response to the various stress tests was observed between cell types. On the basis of the experience gained in this research work, a suggested Reliability Qualification Test Schedule was developed.

  2. Oxidative Stress Induces Endothelial Cell Senescence via Downregulation of Sirt6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has shown that diabetes accelerates aging and endothelial cell senescence is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, including diabetic retinopathy. Oxidative stress is recognized as a key factor in the induction of endothelial senescence and diabetic retinopathy. However, specific mechanisms involved in oxidative stress-induced endothelial senescence have not been elucidated. We hypothesized that Sirt6, which is a nuclear, chromatin-bound protein critically involved in many pathophysiologic processes such as aging and inflammation, may have a role in oxidative stress-induced vascular cell senescence. Measurement of Sirt6 expression in human endothelial cells revealed that H2O2 treatment significantly reduced Sirt6 protein. The loss of Sirt6 was associated with an induction of a senescence phenotype in endothelial cells, including decreased cell growth, proliferation and angiogenic ability, and increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Additionally, H2O2 treatment reduced eNOS expression, enhanced p21 expression, and dephosphorylated (activated retinoblastoma (Rb protein. All of these alternations were attenuated by overexpression of Sirt6, while partial knockdown of Sirt6 expression by siRNA mimicked the effect of H2O2. In conclusion, these results suggest that Sirt6 is a critical regulator of endothelial senescence and oxidative stress-induced downregulation of Sirt6 is likely involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy.

  3. Staufen1 impairs stress granule formation in skeletal muscle cells from myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel-Chapuis, Aymeric; Klein Gunnewiek, Amanda; Bélanger, Guy; Crawford Parks, Tara E.; Côté, Jocelyn; Jasmin, Bernard J.

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is caused by an expansion of CUG repeats (CUGexp) in the DMPK mRNA 3′UTR. CUGexp-containing mRNAs become toxic to cells by misregulating RNA-binding proteins. Here we investigated the consequence of this RNA toxicity on the cellular stress response. We report that cell stress efficiently triggers formation of stress granules (SGs) in proliferating, quiescent, and differentiated muscle cells, as shown by the appearance of distinct cytoplasmic TIA-1– and DDX3-containing foci. We show that Staufen1 is also dynamically recruited into these granules. Moreover, we discovered that DM1 myoblasts fail to properly form SGs in response to arsenite. This blockage was not observed in DM1 fibroblasts, demonstrating a cell type–specific defect. DM1 myoblasts display increased expression and sequestration of toxic CUGexp mRNAs compared with fibroblasts. Of importance, down-regulation of Staufen1 in DM1 myoblasts rescues SG formation. Together our data show that Staufen1 participates in the inhibition of SG formation in DM1 myoblasts. These results reveal that DM1 muscle cells fail to properly respond to stress, thereby likely contributing to the complex pathogenesis of DM1. PMID:27030674

  4. Extracellular stress stimuli alter galectin expression profiles and adhesion characteristics of HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshenko, A V; Lanteigne, J; Kozak, K

    2016-02-01

    Galectins, a family of soluble β-galactoside-binding proteins, are involved in the regulation of various cellular functions, which are essential for adaptive cellular stress responses (CSRs). Although expression patterns of galectins and galectin-binding glycans change during tissue development and cancer, the requirement and role of galectin networks in the CSRs are not completely understood. In this study, we report that the treatment of human promyelocytic HL-60 cells with stimuli mimicking hypoxia (CoCl2), inducing the endoplasmic reticulum stress (tunicamycin), and stimulating cell differentiation, result in stress-specific differential expression of galectin transcripts. In addition, we show that CoCl2 increases the expression of cell surface glycans recognized by both β-galactoside- and GlcNAc-binding lectins. Thus, microenvironmental stress changes the glycobiological status of cells representing expression profiles of endogenous lectins and corresponding glycans. These findings introduce a novel classification of galectins in HL-60 cells, which suggests diverse functions of galectin members in CSRs.

  5. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Autophagy, and Apoptosis in Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Glomerular Mesangial Cell Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chih-Kang; Wang, Ching-Chia; Lu, Tien-Fong; Huang, Kuo-How; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs)-induced mesangial cell death is one of major causes of glomerulus dysfunction in diabetic nephropathy. Both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy are adaptive responses in cells under environmental stress and participate in the renal diseases. The role of ER stress and autophagy in AGEs-induced mesangial cell death is still unclear. Here, we investigated the effect and mechanism of AGEs on glomerular mesangial cells. AGEs dose-dependently decreased mesangial cell viability and induced cell apoptosis. AGEs also induced ER stress signals in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of ER stress with 4-phenylbutyric acid effectively inhibited the activation of eIF2α and CHOP signals and reversed AGEs-induced cell apoptosis. AGEs also activated LC-3 cleavage, increased Atg5 expression, and decreased p62 expression, which indicated the autophagy induction in mesangial cells. Inhibition of autophagy by Atg5 siRNAs transfection aggravated AGEs-induced mesangial cell apoptosis. Moreover, ER stress inhibition by 4-phenylbutyric acid significantly reversed AGEs-induced autophagy, but autophagy inhibition did not influence the AGEs-induced ER stress-related signals activation. These results suggest that AGEs induce mesangial cell apoptosis via an ER stress-triggered signaling pathway. Atg5-dependent autophagy plays a protective role. These findings may offer a new strategy against AGEs toxicity in the kidney. PMID:27665710

  6. Oxidative stress in plant cell culture: a role in production of beta-thujaplicin by Cupresssus lusitanica suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Fujita, Koki; Sakai, Kokki

    2005-06-05

    Oxidative stress is a common physiological stress that often challenges plants. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are major factors in oxidative stress that significantly affect plant cell growth and secondary metabolism. Here we used beta-thujaplicin production by Cupressus lusitanica cell culture as an example to demonstrate the common occurrence of oxidative stress in cultivated plant cells and its effect on multiple aspects of cell culture process. C. lusitanica cells cultivated under Fe(2+) stress generate a significant level of ROS, and oxidative stress also occurs at late stages of C. lusitanica cell cultures under normal conditions. ROS production inhibited cell growth, induced lipid peroxidation and cell death, and enhanced ethylene and beta-thujaplicin production. It is demonstrated that Fe(2+) stress enhances ROS production via the Fenton reaction and promotes beta-thujaplicin production via ROS-induced lipid peroxidation that may activate cyclic oxylipin and ethylene pathways. Results further indicate that H(2)O(2) is a positive signal for beta-thujaplicin production, whereas superoxide anion radical (O(2) (- )) negatively affects beta-thujaplicin induction and strongly induces cell death. The study suggests that evaluating the oxidative stress and plant responses in a cell culture process is very necessary and important for understanding biochemical processes and for gaining the maximal productivity of target secondary metabolites.

  7. Control of Oxidative Stress and Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-like Cells by Jun Dimerization Protein 2

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    Chiou, Shyh-Shin, E-mail: chiouss@kmu.edu.tw [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, 807 Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Wang, Sophie Sheng-Wen; Wu, Deng-Chyang [Department of Gastroenterology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ying-Chu [School of Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Kao, Li-Pin [Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, 807 Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-26

    We report here that the Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) plays a critical role as a cofactor for the transcription factors nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and MafK in the regulation of the antioxidants and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). JDP2 associates with Nrf2 and MafK (Nrf2-MafK) to increase the transcription of antioxidant response element-dependent genes. Oxidative-stress-inducing reagent led to an increase in the intracellular accumulation of ROS and cell proliferation in Jdp2 knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In Jdp2-Cre mice mated with reporter mice, the expression of JDP2 was restricted to granule cells in the brain cerebellum. The induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC)-like cells were generated from DAOY medulloblastoma cell by introduction of JDP2, and the defined factor OCT4. iPSC-like cells expressed stem cell-like characteristics including alkaline phosphatase activity and some stem cell markers. However, such iPSC-like cells also proliferated rapidly, became neoplastic, and potentiated cell malignancy at a later stage in SCID mice. This study suggests that medulloblastoma cells can be reprogrammed successfully by JDP2 and OCT4 to become iPSC-like cells. These cells will be helpful for studying the generation of cancer stem cells and ROS homeostasis.

  8. Control of Oxidative Stress and Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-like Cells by Jun Dimerization Protein 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Yamaguchi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report here that the Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2 plays a critical role as a cofactor for the transcription factors nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and MafK in the regulation of the antioxidants and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. JDP2 associates with Nrf2 and MafK (Nrf2-MafK to increase the transcription of antioxidant response element-dependent genes. Oxidative-stress-inducing reagent led to an increase in the intracellular accumulation of ROS and cell proliferation in Jdp2 knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In Jdp2-Cre mice mated with reporter mice, the expression of JDP2 was restricted to granule cells in the brain cerebellum. The induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-like cells were generated from DAOY medulloblastoma cell by introduction of JDP2, and the defined factor OCT4. iPSC-like cells expressed stem cell-like characteristics including alkaline phosphatase activity and some stem cell markers. However, such iPSC-like cells also proliferated rapidly, became neoplastic, and potentiated cell malignancy at a later stage in SCID mice. This study suggests that medulloblastoma cells can be reprogrammed successfully by JDP2 and OCT4 to become iPSC-like cells. These cells will be helpful for studying the generation of cancer stem cells and ROS homeostasis.

  9. Multiparametric flow cytometry and cell sorting for the assessment of viable, injured, and dead bifidobacterium cells during bile salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Kaouther Ben; Breeuwer, Pieter; Verbaarschot, Patrick; Rombouts, Frank M; Akkermans, Antoon D L; De Vos, Willem M; Abee, Tjakko

    2002-11-01

    Using a flow cytometry-based approach, we assessed the viability of Bifidobacterium lactis DSM 10140 and Bifidobacterium adolescentis DSM 20083 during exposure to bile salt stress. Carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA), propidium iodide (PI), and oxonol [DiBAC4(3)] were used to monitor esterase activity, membrane integrity, and membrane potential, respectively, as indicators of bacterial viability. Single staining with these probes rapidly and noticeably reflected the behavior of the two strains during stress exposure. However, the flow cytometry results tended to overestimate the viability of the two strains compared to plate counts, which appeared to be related to the nonculturability of a fraction of the population as a result of sublethal injury caused by bile salts. When the cells were simultaneously stained with cFDA and PI, flow cytometry and cell sorting revealed a striking physiological heterogeneity within the stressed bifidobacterium population. Three subpopulations could be identified based on their differential uptake of the probes: cF-stained, cF and PI double-stained, and PI-stained subpopulations, representing viable, injured, and dead cells, respectively. Following sorting and recovery, a significant fraction of the double-stained subpopulation (40%) could resume growth on agar plates. Our results show that in situ assessment of the physiological activity of stressed bifidobacteria using multiparameter flow cytometry and cell sorting may provide a powerful and sensitive tool for assessment of the viability and stability of probiotics.

  10. Natural resistance to ascorbic acid induced oxidative stress is mainly mediated by catalase activity in human cancer cells and catalase-silencing sensitizes to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingelhoeffer Christoph

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ascorbic acid demonstrates a cytotoxic effect by generating hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species (ROS involved in oxidative cell stress. A panel of eleven human cancer cell lines, glioblastoma and carcinoma, were exposed to serial dilutions of ascorbic acid (5-100 mmol/L. The purpose of this study was to analyse the impact of catalase, an important hydrogen peroxide-detoxifying enzyme, on the resistance of cancer cells to ascorbic acid mediated oxidative stress. Methods Effective concentration (EC50 values, which indicate the concentration of ascorbic acid that reduced the number of viable cells by 50%, were detected with the crystal violet assay. The level of intracellular catalase protein and enzyme activity was determined. Expression of catalase was silenced by catalase-specific short hairpin RNA (sh-RNA in BT-20 breast carcinoma cells. Oxidative cell stress induced apoptosis was measured by a caspase luminescent assay. Results The tested human cancer cell lines demonstrated obvious differences in their resistance to ascorbic acid mediated oxidative cell stress. Forty-five percent of the cell lines had an EC50 > 20 mmol/L and fifty-five percent had an EC50 50 of 2.6–5.5 mmol/L, glioblastoma cells were the most susceptible cancer cell lines analysed in this study. A correlation between catalase activity and the susceptibility to ascorbic acid was observed. To study the possible protective role of catalase on the resistance of cancer cells to oxidative cell stress, the expression of catalase in the breast carcinoma cell line BT-20, which cells were highly resistant to the exposure to ascorbic acid (EC50: 94,9 mmol/L, was silenced with specific sh-RNA. The effect was that catalase-silenced BT-20 cells (BT-20 KD-CAT became more susceptible to high concentrations of ascorbic acid (50 and 100 mmol/L. Conclusions Fifty-five percent of the human cancer cell lines tested were unable to protect themselves

  11. Ultrasound-induced stress responses of Panax ginseng cells: enzymatic browning and phenolics production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianyong; Lin, Lidong

    2002-01-01

    The stress metabolic activities of Panax ginseng (P. ginseng) cells induced by low-energy ultrasound (US) were examined. P. ginseng cells in suspension cultures were exposed to 38.5 kHz US at two power levels (power density 13.7 and 61 mW/cm(3)) for 2 min. The US treatment caused rapid increase in the intracellular levels of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (PO), and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and the production of polyphenols (PP) and phenolic compounds. The US-induced enzyme activities and phenolics production are part of plant stress responses to a mechanical stimulus. The much higher PPO activity and rate of PP production in the sonicated cultures are correlated to enzymatic browning, suggestive of physical damage and membrane permeabilization of the cells by US. The cells after sonication also showed decreased water content and cell volume, which may also be attributed to US-induced cell membrane permeabilization and water release. High-pressure shock and fluid shear stress arising from acoustic cavitation were regarded as the major causes of the responses. Nevertheless, the US exposure caused only temporary cell growth depression but no net loss of biomass yield of the culture.

  12. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 protects gastric mucosa cells against DNA damage caused by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yantao; Gao, Yaohui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Yinan; Jiang, Yannan; Ji, Jun; Zhang, Jianian; Chen, Xuehua; Yang, Qiumeng; Su, Liping; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Zhenggang; Wang, Lishun; Yu, Yingyan

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a member of the aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily and is involved with the metabolic processing of aldehydes. ALDH2 plays a cytoprotective role by removing aldehydes produced during normal metabolism. We examined the cytoprotective role of ALDH2 specifically in gastric mucosa cells. Overexpression of ALDH2 increased the viability of gastric mucosa cells treated with H2O2, while knockdown of ALDH2 had an opposite effect. Moreover, overexpression of ALDH2 protected gastric mucosa cells against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis as determined by flow cytometry, Hoechst 33342, and TUNEL assays. Consistently, ALDH2 knockdown had an opposite effect. Additionally, DNA damage was ameliorated in ALDH2-overexpressing gastric mucosa cells treated with H2O2. We further identified that this cytoprotective role of ALDH2 was mediated by metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Consistently, 4-HNE mimicked the oxidative stress induced by H2O2 in gastric mucosa cells. Treatment with 4-HNE increased levels of DNA damage in ALDH2-knockdown GES-1 cells, while overexpression of ALDH2 decreased 4-HNE-induced DNA damage. These findings suggest that ALDH2 can protect gastric mucosa cells against DNA damage caused by oxidative stress by reducing levels of 4-HNE.

  13. FUNCTION OF MALATDEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX OF MAIZE MESOPHYLL AND BUNDLE SHEATH CELLS UNDER SALT STRESS CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Еprintsev А.Т.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Salt-induced changes in malatdehydrogenase system activity make the essential contribution to cell adaptation to stress condition. The enzyme systems of C4-plants are most interesting due to their ability for adaptation to environment conditions. The role of separate components of malatdehydrogenase complex of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of corn in formation of adaptive reaction in stressful conditions is investigated in presented work.The activation of all enzymes of malatdehydrogenase system and the subsequent decrease in their activity was observed in mesophyll durring the first stage of adaptation to salt influence. In bundle sheath cells such parameters are differed from control less essentially. Fast accumulation of piruvate in cells and malate in both investigated tissues was induced. The further salinity led to falling of concentration this intermediate. The concentration of piruvate was below control level, and it was raised by the end of an exposition.The results show that sodium chloride causes induction of Krebs-cycle in mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of corn and intensification of Hatch-Slack cycle. The described differences in function malatdehydrogenase systems of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of leaves of corn under salinity mainly consist of the activity of enzymes of a studied complex in bundle sheath cells is subject to the minimal changes in comparison with mesophyll. Role of this enzymesystem in mechanisms of adaptive reaction of various tissues of corn to salt stress is discussed.

  14. Chromatin remodeling regulates catalase expression during cancer cells adaptation to chronic oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Christophe; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Dejeans, Nicolas; Garbe, James C; Dieu, Marc; Verrax, Julien; Renard, Patricia; Huang, Peng; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2016-10-01

    Regulation of ROS metabolism plays a major role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress in cancer cells, but the molecular mechanism that regulates catalase, a key antioxidant enzyme responsible for conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen, remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the transcriptional regulatory mechanism controlling catalase expression in three human mammary cell lines: the normal mammary epithelial 250MK primary cells, the breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and an experimental model of MCF-7 cells resistant against oxidative stress resulting from chronic exposure to H2O2 (Resox), in which catalase was overexpressed. Here we identify a novel promoter region responsible for the regulation of catalase expression at -1518/-1226 locus and the key molecules that interact with this promoter and affect catalase transcription. We show that the AP-1 family member JunB and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) mediate catalase transcriptional activation and repression, respectively, by controlling chromatin remodeling through a histone deacetylases-dependent mechanism. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in redox adaptation to chronic exposure to H2O2 in breast cancer cells. Our study suggests that cancer adaptation to oxidative stress may be regulated by transcriptional factors through chromatin remodeling, and reveals a potential new mechanism to target cancer cells.

  15. The Lcn2-engineered HEK-293 cells show senescence under stressful condition

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    Bahareh Bahmani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Lipocalin2 (Lcn2 gene is highly expressed in response to various types of cellular stresses. The precise role of Lcn2 has not been fully understood yet. However, it plays a key role in controlling vital cellular processes such as proliferation, apoptosis and metabolism. Recently it was shown that Lcn2 decreases senescence and increases proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC with finite life span under either normal or oxidative stress conditions. However, Lcn2 effects on immortal cell line with infinite proliferation are not defined completely.  Materials and Material and Methods: HEK-293 cells were transfected with recombinant pcDNA3.1 containing Lcn2 fragment (pcDNA3.1-Lcn2. Expression of lipocalin2 in transfected cells was evaluated by RT-PCR, real time RT-PCR, and ELISA. Different cell groups were treated with H2O2 and WST-1 assay was performed to determine their proliferation rate. Senescence was studied by β-galactosidase and gimsa staining methods as well as evaluation of the expression of senescence-related genes by real time RT-PCR. Results: Lcn2 increased cell proliferation under normal culture condition, while the proliferation slightly decreased under oxidative stress.  This decrease was further found to be attributed to senescence. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that under harmful conditions, Lcn2 gene is responsible for the regulation of cell survival through senescence.

  16. Psychological Stress-Derived Prolactin Modulates Occludin Expression in Vaginal Epithelial Cells to Compromise Barrier Function

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    Xueyan Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The causative factors of the vaginitis are not fully understood yet. Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of vaginitis. This study aims to investigate the role of prolactin (PRL in the causing the vaginal epithelial barrier dysfunction. Methods: Adult rats were treated with water-avoid-stress. The serum levels of PRL were determined by ELISA. T84 cell (T84 cells; a vaginal epithelial cell line monolayers were prepared to be used assessing the epithelial barrier functions. The expression of occludin in T84 cells was assessed by Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, methylation specifIc PCR, real time quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results: The results showed that psychological stress markedly increased the serum levels of PRL in the rat vaginal epithelia. Exposure of T84 cells to PRL in the culture markedly increased the phosphorylation of STAT3 and suppressed the expression of occludin in the cells; the transepithelial electric resistance was decreased and the permeability to a macromolecular tracer was increased in the T84 monolayers, which was mimicked by blocking STAT3, or abolished by over expression of occludin in the epithelial cells. Conclusions: Psychological stress-derived PRL induces vaginal epithelial barrier dysfunction by inhibiting the expression of occludin.

  17. The Plant Hormone Cytokinin Confers Protection against Oxidative Stress in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Eman; Stopper, Helga

    2016-01-01

    Modulating key dynamics of plant growth and development, the effects of the plant hormone cytokinin on animal cells gained much attention recently. Most previous studies on cytokinin effects on mammalian cells have been conducted with elevated cytokinin concentration (in the μM range). However, to examine physiologically relevant dose effects of cytokinins on animal cells, we systematically analyzed the impact of kinetin in cultured cells at low and high concentrations (1nM-10μM) and examined cytotoxic and genotoxic conditions. We furthermore measured the intrinsic antioxidant activity of kinetin in a cell-free system using the Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assay and in cells using the dihydroethidium staining method. Monitoring viability, we looked at kinetin effects in mammalian cells such as HL60 cells, HaCaT human keratinocyte cells, NRK rat epithelial kidney cells and human peripheral lymphocytes. Kinetin manifests no antioxidant activity in the cell free system and high doses of kinetin (500 nM and higher) reduce cell viability and mediate DNA damage in vitro. In contrast, low doses (concentrations up to 100 nM) of kinetin confer protection in cells against oxidative stress. Moreover, our results show that pretreatment of the cells with kinetin significantly reduces 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide mediated reactive oxygen species production. Also, pretreatment with kinetin retains cellular GSH levels when they are also treated with the GSH-depleting agent patulin. Our results explicitly show that low kinetin doses reduce apoptosis and protect cells from oxidative stress mediated cell death. Future studies on the interaction between cytokinins and human cellular pathway targets will be intriguing. PMID:28005918

  18. Dexamethasone-Induced Oxidative Stress Enhances Myeloma Cell Radiosensitization While Sparing Normal Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis

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    Soumen Bera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Dexamethasone (Dex and radiation therapy are established modalities in multiple myeloma. In this study, we propose a novel combination of Dex plus radiation that shows superior clonogenic cell killing and apoptosis of myeloma cells and selectively eliminates myeloma cells when cocultured with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs. Dex was found to inhibit the release of interleukin-6 from irradiated BMSCs, which is an established myeloma cell proproliferative cytokine. In 5TGM1 model, the combination of Dex with skeletal targeted radiotherapy (153-Sm-EDTMP prolonged median survival time and inhibited radiation-induced myelosuppression. A two-cycle treatment of Dex plus 153-Sm-EDTMP was well tolerated and further improved median survival time. Mechanistically, Dex increased superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production and augmented radiation-induced oxidative stress and cell death of myeloma cells. In contrast, Dex inhibited radiation-induced increase in pro-oxidant levels and enhanced the clonogenic survival in normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Treatment with either N-acetylcysteine or the combination of polyethylene glycol (PEG-conjugated copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase, and PEG-catalase significantly protected myeloma cells from Dex-induced clonogenic death. Overall, these results demonstrate that Dex in combination with radiotherapy enhances the killing of myeloma cells while protecting normal bone marrow hematopoiesis through a mechanism that involves selective increases in oxidative stress.

  19. Prediction of matrix-to-cell stress transfer in heart valve tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Siyao; Huang, Hsiao-Ying Shadow

    2015-01-01

    Non-linear and anisotropic heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics manifest principally from the stratification, orientation, and inhomogeneity of their collagenous microstructures. Disturbance of the native collagen fiber network has clear consequences for valve and leaflet tissue mechanics and presumably, by virtue of their intimate embedment, on the valvular interstitial cell stress-strain state and concomitant phenotype. In the current study, a set of virtual biaxial stretch experiments were conducted on porcine pulmonary valve leaflet tissue photomicrographs via an image-based finite element approach. Stress distribution evolution during diastolic valve closure was predicted at both the tissue and cellular levels. Orthotropic material properties consistent with distinct stages of diastolic loading were applied. Virtual experiments predicted tissue- and cellular-level stress fields, providing insight into how matrix-to-cell stress transfer may be influenced by the inhomogeneous collagen fiber architecture, tissue anisotropic material properties, and the cellular distribution within the leaflet tissue. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study reporting on the evolution of stress fields at both the tissue and cellular levels in valvular tissue and thus contributes toward refining our collective understanding of valvular tissue micromechanics while providing a computational tool enabling the further study of valvular cell-matrix interactions.

  20. The Arctic Alzheimer mutation enhances sensitivity to toxic stress in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Nilsberth, Camilla; Stenh, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    The E693G (Arctic) mutation of the amyloid precursor protein was recently found to lead to early-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Swedish family. In the present study, we report that the Arctic mutation decreases cell viability in human neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability, as measured by the MTT...... their secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein. The enhanced sensitivity to toxic stress in cells with the Arctic mutation most likely contributes to the pathogenic pathway leading to Alzheimer's disease....

  1. Nanoparticle induced oxidative stress in cancer cells: adding new pieces to an incomplete jigsaw puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Daniele Rubert; Rolim, Clarice M Bueno; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging field with many promising applications in drug delivery systems. Because of outstanding developments in this field, rapidly increasing research is directed to the development of nanocarriers that may enhance the availability of drugs to the target sites. Substantial fraction of information has been added into the existing scientific literature focusing on the fact that nanoparticles usually generate reactive oxygen species to a greater extent than micro-sized particles. It is worth mentioning that oxidative stress regulates an array of cell signaling cascades that resulted in cancer cell damage. Accumulating experimental evidence over the years has shown that wide-ranging biological mechanisms are triggered by these NPs in cultured cells due to the unique properties of engineered nanoparticles. In this review, we have attempted to provide an overview of the signaling cascades that are activated by oxidative stress in cancer cells in response to different kinds of nanomaterials, including quantum dots, metallic and polymeric nanoparticles.

  2. Fluid shear stress activates YAP1 to promote cancer cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Diaz, Miguel F.; Price, Katherine M.; Ozuna, Joyce A.; Zhang, Songlin; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Hagan, John P.; Wenzel, Pamela L.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stress is pervasive in egress routes of malignancy, yet the intrinsic effects of force on tumour cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that frictional force characteristic of flow in the lymphatics stimulates YAP1 to drive cancer cell migration; whereas intensities of fluid wall shear stress (WSS) typical of venous or arterial flow inhibit taxis. YAP1, but not TAZ, is strictly required for WSS-enhanced cell movement, as blockade of YAP1, TEAD1-4 or the YAP1-TEAD interaction reduces cellular velocity to levels observed without flow. Silencing of TEAD phenocopies loss of YAP1, implicating transcriptional transactivation function in mediating force-enhanced cell migration. WSS dictates expression of a network of YAP1 effectors with executive roles in invasion, chemotaxis and adhesion downstream of the ROCK-LIMK-cofilin signalling axis. Altogether, these data implicate YAP1 as a fluid mechanosensor that functions to regulate genes that promote metastasis.

  3. Stress-related hormone norepinephrine induces interleukin-6 expression in GES-1 cells

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    Yang, R.; Lin, Q.; Gao, H.B.; Zhang, P. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-02-17

    In the current literature, there is evidence that psychological factors can affect the incidence and progression of some cancers. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is known to be elevated in individuals experiencing chronic stress and is also involved in oncogenesis and cancer progression. However, the precise mechanism of IL-6 induction by the stress-related hormone norepinephrine (NE) is not clear, and, furthermore, there are no reports about the effect of NE on IL-6 expression in gastric epithelial cells. In this study, we examined the effect of NE on IL-6 expression in immortalized human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1 cells). Using real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunoassay, we demonstrated that NE can induce IL-6 mRNA and protein expression in GES-1 cells. The induction is through the β-adrenergic receptor-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway and mainly at the transcriptional level. Progressive 5′-deletions and site-directed mutagenesis of the parental construct show that, although activating-protein-1 (AP-1), cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), CCAAT-enhancer binding protein-β (C/EBP-β), and nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) binding sites are all required in the basal transcription of IL-6, only AP-1 and CREB binding sites in the IL-6 promoter are required in NE-induced IL-6 expression. The results suggest that chronic stress may increase IL-6 secretion of human gastric epithelial cells, at least in part, by the stress-associated hormone norepinephrine, and provides basic data on stress and gastric cancer progression.

  4. Prenatal stress is a vulnerability factor for altered morphology and biological activity of microglia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eŚlusarczyk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence suggest that the dysregulation of the immune system is an important factor in the development of depression. Microglia are the resident macrophages of the central nervous system and a key player in innate immunity of the brain. We hypothesized that prenatal stress (an animal model of depression as a priming factor could affect microglial cells and might lead to depressive-like disturbances in adult male rat offspring. We investigated the behavioral changes (sucrose preference test, Porsolt test, the expression of C1q and CD40 mRNA and the level of microglia (Iba1 positive in 3 month old control and prenatally stressed male offspring rats. In addition, we characterized the morphological and biochemical parameters of potentially harmful (NO, iNOS, IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6, TNF-α, CCL2, CXCL12, CCR2, CXCR4 and beneficial (IGF-1, BDNF phenotypes in cultures of microglia obtained from the cortices of 1-2 days old control and prenatally stressed pups. The adult prenatally stressed rats showed behavioral (anhedonic- and depression-like disturbances, enhanced expression of microglial activation markers and an increased number of Iba1-immunopositive cells in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. The morphology of glia was altered in cultures from prenatally stressed rats, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Moreover, in these cultures, we observed enhanced expression of CD40 and MHC II and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-18, TNF-α and IL-6. Prenatal stress significantly up-regulated levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL12 and altered expression of their receptors, CCR2 and CXCR4 while IGF-1 production was suppressed in cultures of microglia from prenatally stressed rats.Our results suggest that prenatal stress may lead to excessive microglia activation and contribute to the behavioral changes observed in depression in adulthood.

  5. Galectin-3 Determines Tumor Cell Adaptive Strategies in Stressed Tumor Microenvironments

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    Cardoso, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Andrade, Luciana Nogueira de Sousa; Bustos, Silvina Odete; Chammas, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a member of the β-galactoside-binding lectin family, whose expression is often dysregulated in cancers. While galectin-3 is usually an intracellular protein found in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, under certain conditions, galectin-3 can be secreted by an yet unknown mechanism. Under stressing conditions (e.g., hypoxia and nutrient deprivation) galectin-3 is upregulated, through the activity of transcription factors, such as HIF-1α and NF-κB. Here, we review evidence that indicates a positive role for galectin-3 in MAPK family signal transduction, leading to cell proliferation and cell survival. Galectin-3 serves as a scaffold protein, which favors the spatial organization of signaling proteins as K-RAS. Upon secretion, extracellular galectin-3 interacts with a variety of cell surface glycoproteins, such as growth factor receptors, integrins, cadherins, and members of the Notch family, among other glycoproteins, besides different extracellular matrix molecules. Through its ability to oligomerize, galectin-3 forms lectin lattices that act as scaffolds that sustain the spatial organization of signaling receptors on the cell surface, dictating its maintenance on the plasma membrane or their endocytosis. Galectin-3 induces tumor cell, endothelial cell, and leukocyte migration, favoring either the exit of tumor cells from a stressed microenvironment or the entry of endothelial cells and leukocytes, such as monocytes/macrophages into the tumor organoid. Therefore, galectin-3 plays homeostatic roles in tumors, as (i) it favors tumor cell adaptation for survival in stressed conditions; (ii) upon secretion, galectin-3 induces tumor cell detachment and migration; and (iii) it attracts monocyte/macrophage and endothelial cells to the tumor mass, inducing both directly and indirectly the process of angiogenesis. The two latter activities are potentially targetable, and specific interventions may be designed to counteract the protumoral role of extracellular

  6. Fucoidan induces cancer cell apoptosis by modulating the endoplasmic reticulum stress cascades.

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    Shaohua Chen

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis is the main cause leading to disease recurrence and high mortality in cancer patients. Therefore, inhibiting metastasis process or killing metastatic cancer cells by inducing apoptosis is of clinical importance in improving cancer patient survival. Previous studies revealed that fucoidan, a fucose-rich polysaccharide isolated from marine brown alga, is a promising natural product with significant anti-cancer activity. However, little is known about the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in fucoidan-induced cell apoptosis.We reported that fucoidan treatment inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Fucoidan treatments resulted in down-regulation of the glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78 in the metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, and of the ER protein 29 (ERp29 in the metastatic HCT116 colon cancer cells. However, fucoidan treatment promoted ER Ca2+-dependent calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII phosphorylation, Bcl-associated X protein (Bax and caspase 12 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells, but not in HCT116 cells. In both types of cancer cells, fucoidan activated the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (p-eIF2α\\CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP pro-apoptotic cascade and inhibited the phosphorylation of inositol-requiring kinase 1 (p-IRE-1\\X-box binding proteins 1 splicing (XBP-1s pro-survival cascade. Furthermore, CHOP knockdown prevented DNA damage and cell death induced by fucoidan.Fucoidan exerts its anti-tumor function by modulating ER stress cascades. Contribution of ER stress to the fucoidan-induced cell apoptosis augments our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying its anti-tumour activity and provides evidence for the therapeutic application of fucoidan in cancer.

  7. Emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in the adaptive response of tumour cells to microenvironmental stress

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    Paulina Kucharzewska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells are constantly subjected to various types of endogenous and exogenous stressful stimuli, which can cause serious and even permanent damage. The ability of a cell to sense and adapt to environmental alterations is thus vital to maintain tissue homeostasis during development and adult life. Here, we review some of the major phenotypic characteristics of the hostile tumour microenvironment and the emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in these events.

  8. Modulation of Apoptosis Pathways by Oxidative Stress and Autophagy in β Cells

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    Maorong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human islets isolated for transplantation are exposed to multiple stresses including oxidative stress and hypoxia resulting in significant loss of functional β cell mass. In this study we examined the modulation of apoptosis pathway genes in islets exposed to hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, hypoxia, and cytokines. We observed parallel induction of pro- and antiapoptotic pathways and identified several novel genes including BFAR, CARD8, BNIP3, and CIDE-A. As BNIP3 is an inducer of autophagy, we examined this pathway in MIN6 cells, a mouse beta cell line and in human islets. Culture of MIN6 cells under low serum conditions increased the levels of several proteins in autophagy pathway, including ATG4, Beclin 1, LAMP-2, and UVRAG. Amino acid deprivation led to induction of autophagy in human islets. Preconditioning of islets with inducers of autophagy protected them from hypoxia-induced apoptosis. However, induction of autophagy during hypoxia exacerbated apoptotic cell death. ER stress led to induction of autophagy and apoptosis in β cells. Overexpression of MnSOD, an enzyme that scavenges free radicals, resulted in protection of MIN6 cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis. Ceramide, a mediator of cytokine-induced injury, reduced the active phosphorylated form of Akt and downregulated the promoter activity of the antiapoptotic gene bcl-2. Furthermore, cytokine-stimulated JNK pathway downregulated the bcl-2 promoter activity which was reversed by preincubation with SP600125, a JNK inhibitor. Our findings suggest that β cell apoptosis by multiple stresses in islets isolated for transplantation is the result of orchestrated gene expression in apoptosis pathway.

  9. Prohibitin 1 modulates mitochondrial stress-related autophagy in human colonic epithelial cells.

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    Arwa S Kathiria

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Autophagy is an adaptive response to extracellular and intracellular stress by which cytoplasmic components and organelles, including damaged mitochondria, are degraded to promote cell survival and restore cell homeostasis. Certain genes involved in autophagy confer susceptibility to Crohn's disease. Reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, both of which are increased during active inflammatory bowel disease, promote cellular injury and autophagy via mitochondrial damage. Prohibitin (PHB, which plays a role in maintaining normal mitochondrial respiratory function, is decreased during active inflammatory bowel disease. Restoration of colonic epithelial PHB expression protects mice from experimental colitis and combats oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the potential role of PHB in modulating mitochondrial stress-related autophagy in intestinal epithelial cells. METHODS: We measured autophagy activation in response to knockdown of PHB expression by RNA interference in Caco2-BBE and HCT116 WT and p53 null cells. The effect of exogenous PHB expression on TNFα- and IFNγ-induced autophagy was assessed. Autophagy was inhibited using Bafilomycin A(1 or siATG16L1 during PHB knockdown and the affect on intracellular oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell viability were determined. The requirement of intracellular ROS in siPHB-induced autophagy was assessed using the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine. RESULTS: TNFα and IFNγ-induced autophagy inversely correlated with PHB protein expression. Exogenous PHB expression reduced basal autophagy and TNFα-induced autophagy. Gene silencing of PHB in epithelial cells induces mitochondrial autophagy via increased intracellular ROS. Inhibition of autophagy during PHB knockdown exacerbates mitochondrial depolarization and reduces cell viability. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased PHB levels coupled with dysfunctional

  10. Genes and Gene Networks Involved in Sodium Fluoride-Elicited Cell Death Accompanying Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Oral Epithelial Cells

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    Yoshiaki Tabuchi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Here, to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cell death induced by sodium fluoride (NaF, we analyzed gene expression patterns in rat oral epithelial ROE2 cells exposed to NaF using global-scale microarrays and bioinformatics tools. A relatively high concentration of NaF (2 mM induced cell death concomitant with decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential, chromatin condensation and caspase-3 activation. Using 980 probe sets, we identified 432 up-regulated and 548 down-regulated genes, that were differentially expressed by >2.5-fold in the cells treated with 2 mM of NaF and categorized them into 4 groups by K-means clustering. Ingenuity® pathway analysis revealed several gene networks from gene clusters. The gene networks Up-I and Up-II included many up-regulated genes that were mainly associated with the biological function of induction or prevention of cell death, respectively, such as Atf3, Ddit3 and Fos (for Up-I and Atf4 and Hspa5 (for Up-II. Interestingly, knockdown of Ddit3 and Hspa5 significantly increased and decreased the number of viable cells, respectively. Moreover, several endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-related genes including, Ddit3, Atf4 and Hapa5, were observed in these gene networks. These findings will provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms of NaF-induced cell death accompanying ER stress in oral epithelial cells.

  11. Isolation, culture and evaluation of multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells.

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    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Wakao, Shohei; Kitada, Masaaki; Murakami, Toru; Nojima, Makoto; Dezawa, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells are distinct stem cells in mesenchymal cell populations with the capacity to self-renew, to differentiate into cells representative of all three germ layers from a single cell, and to repair damaged tissues by spontaneous differentiation into tissue-specific cells without forming teratomas. We describe step-by-step procedures for isolating and evaluating these cells. Muse cells are also a practical cell source for human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells with markedly high generation efficiency. They can be collected as cells that are double positive for stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3) and CD105 from commercially available mesenchymal cells, such as adult human bone marrow stromal cells and dermal fibroblasts, or from fresh adult human bone marrow samples. Under both spontaneous and induced differentiation conditions, they show triploblastic differentiation. It takes 4-6 h to collect and 2 weeks to confirm the differentiation and self-renewal capacity of Muse cells.

  12. Selenite induces apoptosis in sarcomatoid malignant mesothelioma cells through oxidative stress.

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    Nilsonne, Gustav; Sun, Xiaojuan; Nyström, Christina; Rundlöf, Anna-Klara; Potamitou Fernandes, Aristi; Björnstedt, Mikael; Dobra, Katalin

    2006-09-15

    Malignant mesothelioma cells differentiate into sarcomatoid or epithelioid phenotypes. The sarcomatoid cell type is more resistant to chemotherapy and gives a worse prognosis. We have investigated whether selenite alone and in combination with doxorubicin induced apoptosis in variously differentiated mesothelioma cells. Selenite in concentrations that could potentially be administered to patients strongly inhibited the growth of the sarcomatoid mesothelioma cells (IC50 = 7.5 microM), whereas epithelioid cells were more sensitive to doxorubicin. Benign mesothelial cells remained largely unaffected. Selenite potentiated doxorubicin treatment. Apoptosis was the dominating mode of cell death. The toxicity of selenite was mediated by oxidative stress. Furthermore the activity of the thioredoxin system was directly dependent on the concentration of selenite. This offers a possible mechanism of action of selenite treatment. Our findings suggest that selenite is a promising new drug for the treatment of malignant mesothelioma.

  13. Calcium Homeostasis and ER Stress in Control of Autophagy in Cancer Cells

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    Elżbieta Kania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic catabolic process, serving as an internal engine during responses to various cellular stresses. As regards cancer, autophagy may play a tumor suppressive role by preserving cellular integrity during tumor development and by possible contribution to cell death. However, autophagy may also exert oncogenic effects by promoting tumor cell survival and preventing cell death, for example, upon anticancer treatment. The major factors influencing autophagy are Ca2+ homeostasis perturbation and starvation. Several Ca2+ channels like voltage-gated T- and L-type channels, IP3 receptors, or CRAC are involved in autophagy regulation. Glucose transporters, mainly from GLUT family, which are often upregulated in cancer, are also prominent targets for autophagy induction. Signals from both Ca2+ perturbations and glucose transport blockage might be integrated at UPR and ER stress activation. Molecular pathways such as IRE 1-JNK-Bcl-2, PERK-eIF2α-ATF4, or ATF6-XBP 1-ATG are related to autophagy induced through ER stress. Moreover ER molecular chaperones such as GRP78/BiP and transcription factors like CHOP participate in regulation of ER stress-mediated autophagy. Autophagy modulation might be promising in anticancer therapies; however, it is a context-dependent matter whether inhibition or activation of autophagy leads to tumor cell death.

  14. Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronical epithelial cells exposed to zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to zincJenna M. Currier1,2, Wan-Yun Cheng1, Rory Conolly1, Brian N. Chorley1Zinc is a ubiquitous contaminant of ambient air that presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung...

  15. [Effects of silicon on the ultrastructures of wheat radical cells under copper stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dai-Jing; Ma, Jian-Hui; Yang, Shu-Fang; Chen, Hui-Ting; Liu, Pei; Wang, Wen-Fei; Li, Chun-Xi

    2014-08-01

    To explore the alleviation effect of silicon on wheat growth under copper stress, cultivar Aikang 58 was chosen as the experimental material. The growth, root activities and root tip ultrastructures of wheat seedlings, which were cultured in Hoagland nutrient solution with five different treatments (control, 15 mg x L(-1) Cu2+, 30 mg x L(-1) Cu2+, 15 mg x L(-1) Cu2+ and 50 mg x L(-1) silicon, 30 mg x L(-1) Cu2+ and 50 mg x L(-1) silicon), were fully analyzed. The results showed that root length, plant height and root activities of wheat seedlings were significantly restrained under the copper treatments compared with the control (P silicon to copper-stress Hoagland nutrient solution. Under copper stress, the cell wall and cell membrane of wheat seedling root tips suffered to varying degrees of destruction, which caused the increase of intercellular space and the disappearance of some organelles. After adding silicon, the cell structure was maintained intact, although some cells and organelles were still slightly deformed compared with the control. In conclusion, exogenous silicon could alleviate the copper stress damages on wheat seedlings and cellular components to some extent.

  16. Decreased cell proliferation and higher oxidative stress in fibroblasts from Down Syndrome fetuses. Preliminary study.

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    Gimeno, Amparo; García-Giménez, José Luis; Audí, Laura; Toran, Nuria; Andaluz, Pilar; Dasí, Francisco; Viña, José; Pallardó, Federico V

    2014-01-01

    Down Syndrome is the most common chromosomal disease and is also known for its decreased incidence of solid tumors and its progeroid phenotype. Cellular and systemic oxidative stress has been considered as one of the Down Syndrome phenotype causes. We correlated, in a preliminary study, the fibroblast proliferation rate and different cell proliferation key regulators, like Rcan1 and the telomere length from Down Syndrome fetuses, with their oxidative stress profile and the Ribonucleic acid and protein expression of the main antioxidant enzymes together with their activity. Increased oxidized glutathione/glutathione ratio and high peroxide production were found in our cell model. These results correlated with a distorted antioxidant shield. The messenger RNA (SOD1) and protein levels of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase were increased together with a decreased mRNA expression and protein levels of glutathione peroxidase (GPx). As a consequence the [Cu/ZnSOD/(catalase+GPx)] activity ratio increases which explains the oxidative stress generated in the cell model. In addition, the expression of thioredoxin 1 and glutaredoxin 1 is decreased. The results obtained show a decreased antioxidant phenotype that correlates with increased levels of Regulator of calcineurin 1 and attrition of telomeres, both related to oxidative stress and cell cycle impairment. Our preliminary results may explain the proneness to a progeroid phenotype.

  17. Early life low intensity stress experience modifies acute stress effects on juvenile brain cell proliferation of European sea bass (D. Labrax).

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    Fokos, S; Pavlidis, M; Yiotis, T; Tsalafouta, A; Papandroulakis, N; Dermon, C R

    2017-01-15

    Early life adversity may be critical for the brain structural plasticity that in turn would influence juvenile behaviour. To address this, we questioned whether early life environment has an impact on stress responses latter in life, using European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, as a model organism. Unpredictable chronic low intensity stress (UCLIS), using a variety of moderate intensity stressors, was applied during two early ontogenetic stages, flexion or formation all fins. At juvenile stage, fish were exposed to acute stress and plasma cortisol, brain mRNA expression of corticosteroid receptors' genes (gr1, gr2, mr) and brain cell proliferation (using BrdU immunohistochemistry) were determined in experimental and matched controls. UCLIS treatment specifically decreased brain gr1 expression in juveniles, but had no effect on the juvenile brain cell proliferation pattern within the major neurogenic zones studied of dorsal (Dm, Dld) and ventral (Vv) telencephalic, preoptic (NPO) areas, periventricular tectum gray zone (PGZ) and valvula cerebellum (VCe). In contrast, exposure to acute stress induced significant plasma cortisol rise, decreases of cerebral cell proliferation in juveniles, not previously exposed to UCLIS, but no effect detected on the expression levels of gr1, gr2 and mr in all groups of different early life history. Interestingly, juveniles with UCLIS history showed modified responses to acute stress, attenuating acute stress-induced cell proliferation decreases, indicating a long-lasting effect of early life treatment. Taken together, early life mild stress experience influences an acute stress plasticity end-point, cerebral cell proliferation, independently of the stress-axis activation, possibly leading to more effective coping styles.

  18. Protective effect of wheat peptides against indomethacin-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6 cells.

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    Yin, Hong; Pan, Xingchang; Song, Zhixiu; Wang, Shaokang; Yang, Ligang; Sun, Guiju

    2014-01-29

    Recent studies have demonstrated that wheat peptides protected rats against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced small intestinal epithelial cells damage, but the mechanism of action is unclear. In the present study, an indomethacin-induced oxidative stress model was used to investigate the effect of wheat peptides on the nuclear factor-κB(NF-κB)-inducible nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide signal pathway in intestinal epithelial cells-6 cells. IEC-6 cells were treated with wheat peptides (0, 125, 500 and 2000 mg/L) for 24 h, followed by 90 mg/L indomethacin for 12 h. Wheat peptides significantly attenuated the indomethacin-induced decrease in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity. Wheat peptides at 2000 mg/L markedly decreased the expression of the NF-κB in response to indomethacin-induced oxidative stress. This study demonstrated that the addition of wheat peptides to a culture medium significantly inhibited the indomethacin-induced release of malondialdehyde and nitrogen monoxide, and increased antioxidant enzyme activity in IEC-6 cells, thereby providing a possible explanation for the protective effect proposed for wheat peptides in the prevention of indomethacin-induced oxidative stress in small intestinal epithelial cells.

  19. Protective Effect of Wheat Peptides against Indomethacin-Induced Oxidative Stress in IEC-6 Cells

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    Hong Yin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that wheat peptides protected rats against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced small intestinal epithelial cells damage, but the mechanism of action is unclear. In the present study, an indomethacin-induced oxidative stress model was used to investigate the effect of wheat peptides on the nuclear factor-κB(NF-κB-inducible nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide signal pathway in intestinal epithelial cells-6 cells. IEC-6 cells were treated with wheat peptides (0, 125, 500 and 2000 mg/L for 24 h, followed by 90 mg/L indomethacin for 12 h. Wheat peptides significantly attenuated the indomethacin-induced decrease in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity. Wheat peptides at 2000 mg/L markedly decreased the expression of the NF-κB in response to indomethacin-induced oxidative stress. This study demonstrated that the addition of wheat peptides to a culture medium significantly inhibited the indomethacin-induced release of malondialdehyde and nitrogen monoxide, and increased antioxidant enzyme activity in IEC-6 cells, thereby providing a possible explanation for the protective effect proposed for wheat peptides in the prevention of indomethacin-induced oxidative stress in small intestinal epithelial cells.

  20. Oxidative stress plays a role in high glucose-induced activation of pancreatic stellate cells

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    Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Lee, Esder; Chun, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho, E-mail: kihos@catholic.ac.kr

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •High glucose increased production of reactive oxygen species in cultured pancreatic stellate cells. •High glucose facilitated the activation of these cells. •Antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced activation of these cells. -- Abstract: The activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) is thought to be a potential mechanism underlying islet fibrosis, which may contribute to progressive β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Recently, we demonstrated that antioxidants reduced islet fibrosis in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. However, there is no in vitro study demonstrating that high glucose itself can induce oxidative stress in PSCs. Thus, PSCs were isolated and cultured from Sprague Dawley rats, and treated with high glucose for 72 h. High glucose increased the production of reactive oxygen species. When treated with high glucose, freshly isolated PSCs exhibited myofibroblastic transformation. During early culture (passage 1), PSCs treated with high glucose contained an increased number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. During late culture (passages 2–5), PSCs treated with high glucose exhibited increases in cell proliferation, the expression of fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor, release of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-β and collagen, and cell migration. Finally, the treatment of PSCs with high glucose and antioxidants attenuated these changes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high glucose increased oxidative stress in primary rat PSCs, thereby facilitating the activation of these cells, while antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced PSC activation.

  1. Depletion of the cereblon gene activates the unfolded protein response and protects cells from ER stress-induced cell death.

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    Lee, Kwang Min; Yang, Seung-Joo; Park, Sojung; Choi, Yoo Duk; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Pak, Jhang Ho; Park, Chul-Seung; Kim, Inki

    2015-02-27

    Previous studies showed that cereblon (CRBN) binds to various cellular target proteins, implying that CRBN regulates a wide range of cell responses. In this study, we found that deletion of the Crbn gene desensitized mouse embryonic fibroblast cells to various cell death-promoting stimuli, including endoplasmic reticulum stress inducers. Mechanistically, deletion of Crbn activates pathways involved in the unfolded protein response prior to ER stress induction. Loss of Crbn activated PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) with enhanced phosphorylation of eIF2α. Following ER stress induction, loss of Crbn delayed dephosphorylation of eIF2α, while reconstitution of Crbn reversed enhanced phosphorylation of PERK and eIF2α. Lastly, we found that activation of the PERK/eIF2α pathway following Crbn deletion is caused by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We propose that CRBN plays a role in cellular stress signaling, including the unfolded protein response, by controlling the activity of AMPK.

  2. The oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol increases β-amyloid and oxidative stress in retinal pigment epithelial cells

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    Dasari Bhanu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD and age-related macular degeneration (AMD share several pathological features including β-amyloid (Aβ peptide accumulation, oxidative damage, and cell death. The causes of AD and AMD are not known but several studies suggest disturbances in cholesterol metabolism as a culprit of these diseases. We have recently shown that the cholesterol oxidation metabolite 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC causes AD-like pathology in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and in organotypic hippocampal slices. However, the extent to which and the mechanisms by which 27-OHC may also cause pathological hallmarks related to AMD are ill-defined. In this study, the effects of 27-OHC on AMD-related pathology were determined in ARPE-19 cells. These cells have structural and functional properties relevant to retinal pigmented epithelial cells, a target in the course of AMD. Methods ARPE-19 cells were treated with 0, 10 or 25 μM 27-OHC for 24 hours. Levels of Aβ peptide, mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress markers, Ca2+ homeostasis, glutathione depletion, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, inflammation and cell death were assessed using ELISA, Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and specific assays. Results 27-OHC dose-dependently increased Aβ peptide production, increased levels of ER stress specific markers caspase 12 and gadd153 (also called CHOP, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, triggered Ca2+ dyshomeostasis, increased levels of the nuclear factor κB (NFκB and heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1, two proteins activated by oxidative stress. Additionally, 27-OHC caused glutathione depletion, ROS generation, inflammation and apoptotic-mediated cell death. Conclusions The cholesterol metabolite 27-OHC is toxic to RPE cells. The deleterious effects of this oxysterol ranged from Aβ accumulation to oxidative cell damage. Our results suggest that high levels of 27-OHC may represent a common pathogenic factor for

  3. Oxidative stress enhances Axl-mediated cell migration through an Akt1/Rac1-dependent mechanism.

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    Huang, Jhy-Shrian; Cho, Chun-Yu; Hong, Chih-Chen; Yan, Ming-De; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Lay, Jong-Ding; Lai, Gi-Ming; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Chuang, Shuang-En

    2013-12-01

    Persistent oxidative stress is common in cancer cells because of abnormal generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and has been associated with malignant phenotypes, such as chemotherapy resistance and metastasis. Both overexpression of Axl and abnormal ROS elevation have been linked to cell transformation and increased cell migration. However, the relationship between Axl and ROS in malignant cell migration has not been previously evaluated. Using an in vitro human lung cancer model, we examined the redox state of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines of low metastatic (CL1-0) and high metastatic (CL1-5) potentials. Here we report that Axl activation elicits ROS accumulation through the oxidase-coupled small GTPase Rac1. We also observed that oxidative stress could activate Axl phosphorylation to synergistically enhance cell migration. Further, Axl signaling activated by H2O2 treatment results in enhancement of cell migration via a PI3K/Akt-dependent pathway. The kinase activity of Axl is required for the Axl-mediated cell migration and prolongs the half-life of phospho-Akt under oxidative stress. Finally, downregulation of Akt1, but not Akt2, by RNAi in Axl-overexpressing cells inhibits the amount of activated Rac1 and the ability to migrate induced by H2O2 treatment. Together, these results show that a novel Axl-signaling cascade induced by H2O2 treatment triggers cell migration through the PI3K/Akt1/Rac1 pathway. Elucidation of redox regulation in Axl-related malignant migration may provide new molecular insights into the mechanisms underlying tumor progression.

  4. Cis-hydroxyproline-induced inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth is mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Mueller; Joerg Emmrich; Robert Jaster; Dagmar Braun; Stefan Liebe; Gisela Sparmann

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the biological effects of cishydroxyproline (CHP) on the rat pancreatic carcinoma cell line DSL6A, and to examine the underlying molecular mechanisms.METHODS: The effect of CHP on DSL6A cell proliferation was assessed by using BrdU incorporation. The expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was characterized by Western blotting and immunofluorescence.Induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was investigated by using RT-PCR and Western blotting for the glucose-related protein-78 (GRP78) and growth arrest and DNA inducible gene (GADD153). Cell viability was determined through measuring the metabolic activity based on the reduction potential of DSL6A cells. Apoptosis was analyzed by detection of caspase-3 activation and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) as well as DNA laddering.RESULTS: In addition to inhibition of proliferation,incubation with CHP induced proteolytic cleavage of FAK and a delocalisation of the enzyme from focal adhesions,followed by a loss of cell adherence. Simultaneously,we could show an increased expression of GRP78 and GADD153, indicating a CHP-mediated activation of the ER stress cascade in the DSL6A cell line. Prolonged incubation of DSL6A cells with CHP finally resulted in apoptotic cell death. Beside L-proline, the inhibition of intracellular proteolysis by addition of a broad spectrum protease inhibitor could abolish the effects of CHP on cellular functions and the molecular processes. In contrast, impeding the activity of apoptosis-executing caspases had no influence on CHP-mediated cell damage.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that the initiation of ER stress machinery by CHP leads to an activation of intracellular proteolytic processes, including caspaseindependent FAK degradation, resulting in damaging pancreatic carcinoma cells.

  5. Yeast CUP1 protects HeLa cells against copper-induced stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, X.X. [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Shanghai (China); College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou (China); Ma, Y.F.; Wang, Q.S.; Chen, Z.L.; Liao, R.R.; Pan, Y.C. [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-12

    As an essential trace element, copper can be toxic in mammalian cells when present in excess. Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich proteins that avidly bind copper and thus play an important role in detoxification. YeastCUP1 is a member of the MT gene family. The aim of this study was to determine whether yeast CUP1 could bind copper effectively and protect cells against copper stress. In this study,CUP1 expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and copper content was detected by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. Cellular viability was detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the cell cycle distribution of CUP1 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The data indicated that overexpression of yeast CUP1 in HeLa cells played a protective role against copper-induced stress, leading to increased cellular viability (P<0.05) and decreased ROS production (P<0.05). It was also observed that overexpression of yeast CUP1 reduced the percentage of G1 cells and increased the percentage of S cells, which suggested that it contributed to cell viability. We found that overexpression of yeast CUP1 protected HeLa cells against copper stress. These results offer useful data to elucidate the mechanism of the MT gene on copper metabolism in mammalian cells.

  6. Chronic psychological stress suppresses contact hypersensitivity: potential roles of dysregulated cell trafficking and decreased IFN-γ production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jessica M F; Witter, Alexandra R; Racine, Ronny R; Berg, Rance E; Podawiltz, Alan; Jones, Harlan; Mummert, Mark E

    2014-02-01

    Increasing evidence shows that psychological stress can have dramatic impacts on the immune system, particularly the cutaneous immune response in dermatological disorders. While there have been many studies examining the impact of acute psychological stress on contact hypersensitivity there are relatively few studies concerning the impact of chronic psychological stress. Furthermore, the local immunological mechanisms by which chronic psychological stress impacts contact hypersensitivity still remain to be explored. Here we show that restraint-induced chronic psychological stress stimulates activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and delays weight gain in female BALB/c mice. We observed that chronic psychological stress reduces the cutaneous immune response as evidence by reduced ear swelling. This correlated with a significant decrease in the inflammatory cell infiltrate. On the other hand, chronic psychological stress does not influence T cell proliferation, activation, or sensitivity to corticosterone but does increase CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell percentages in draining lymph nodes during a contact hypersensitivity reaction. Chronic psychological stress induces a decrease in overall circulating white blood cells, lymphocytes, and monocytes during a contact hypersensitivity reaction suggesting extravasation from the circulation. Finally, we found markedly reduced local IFN-γ production in chronically stressed animals. Based on these findings we propose that chronic psychological stress reduces contact hypersensitivity due to dysregulated cell trafficking and reduced production of IFN-γ.

  7. Lipocalin 2, a new GADD153 target gene, as an apoptosis inducer of endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsin, I-Lun; Hsiao, Yueh-Chieh [Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Fang [Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Jan, Ming-Shiou [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Tang, Sheau-Chung; Lin, Yu-Wen [Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chung-Ping, E-mail: cliff@vghtc.com.tw [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Veterans General Hospital—Taichung, Taichung 40705, Taiwan (China); Department of Surgery, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine and Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Ko, Jiunn-Liang, E-mail: jlko@csmu.edu.tw [Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is activated under severe cellular conditions. GADD153, a member of the C/EBP family, is an unfolded protein response (UPR) responsive transcription factor. Increased levels of lipocalin 2, an acute phase protein, have been found in several epithelial cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the function of lipocalin 2 in lung cancer cells under ER stress. Treatment with thapsigargin, an ER stress activator, led to increases in cytotoxicity, ER stress, apoptosis, and lipocalin 2 expression in A549 cells. GADD153 silencing decreased lipocalin 2 expression in A549 cells. On chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, ER stress increased GADD153 DNA binding to lipocalin 2 promoter. Furthermore, silencing of lipocalin 2 mitigated ER stress-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells. Our findings demonstrated that lipocalin 2 is a new GADD153 target gene that mediates ER stress-induced apoptosis. Highlights: ► We demonstrate that Lipocalin 2 is a new GADD153 target gene. ► Lipocalin 2 mediates ER stress-induced apoptosis. ► ER stress-induced lipocalin 2 expression is calcium-independent in A549 cells. ► Lipocalin 2 dose not play a major role in ER stress-induced autophagy.

  8. Micro-environmental mechanical stress controls tumor spheroid size and morphology by suppressing proliferation and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Cheng

    Full Text Available Compressive mechanical stress produced during growth in a confining matrix limits the size of tumor spheroids, but little is known about the dynamics of stress accumulation, how the stress affects cancer cell phenotype, or the molecular pathways involved.We co-embedded single cancer cells with fluorescent micro-beads in agarose gels and, using confocal microscopy, recorded the 3D distribution of micro-beads surrounding growing spheroids. The change in micro-bead density was then converted to strain in the gel, from which we estimated the spatial distribution of compressive stress around the spheroids. We found a strong correlation between the peri-spheroid solid stress distribution and spheroid shape, a result of the suppression of cell proliferation and induction of apoptotic cell death in regions of high mechanical stress. By compressing spheroids consisting of cancer cells overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes, we demonstrate that mechanical stress-induced apoptosis occurs via the mitochondrial pathway.Our results provide detailed, quantitative insight into the role of micro-environmental mechanical stress in tumor spheroid growth dynamics, and suggest how tumors grow in confined locations where the level of solid stress becomes high. An important implication is that apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, induced by compressive stress, may be involved in tumor dormancy, in which tumor growth is held in check by a balance of apoptosis and proliferation.

  9. Naturally occurring and stress induced tubular structures from mammalian cells, a survival mechanism

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    He Jian

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tubular shaped mammalian cells in response to dehydration have not been previously reported. This may be due to the invisibility of these cells in aqueous solution, and because sugars and salts added to the cell culture for manipulation of the osmotic conditions inhibit transformation of normal cells into tubular shaped structures. Results We report the transformation of normal spherical mammalian cells into tubular shaped structures in response to stress. We have termed these transformed structures 'straw cells' which we have associated with a variety of human tissue types, including fresh, post mortem and frozen lung, liver, skin, and heart. We have also documented the presence of straw cells in bovine brain and prostate tissues of mice. The number of straw cells in heart, lung tissues, and collapsed straw cells in urine increases with the age of the mammal. Straw cells were also reproduced in vitro from human cancer cells (THP1, CACO2, and MCF7 and mouse stem cells (D1 and adipose D1 by dehydrating cultured cells. The tubular center of the straw cells is much smaller than the original cell; houses condensed organelles and have filamentous extensions that are covered with microscopic hair-like structures and circular openings. When rehydrated, the filaments uptake water rapidly. The straw cell walls, have a range of 120 nm to 200 nm and are composed of sulfated-glucose polymers and glycosylated acidic proteins. The transformation from normal cell to straw cells takes 5 to 8 hr in open-air. This process is characterized by an increase in metabolic activity. When rehydrated, the straw cells regain their normal spherical shape and begin to divide in 10 to 15 days. Like various types of microbial spores, straw cells are resistant to harsh environmental conditions such as UV-C radiation. Conclusion Straw cells are specialized cellular structures and not artifacts from spontaneous polymerization, which are generated in response

  10. Physical properties of beryllium oxide - Irradiation effects; Proprietes physiques et caracteristiques mecaniques de l'oxyde de beryllium fritte - Effet de l'irradiation et guerison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elston, J.; Caillat, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    This work has been carried out in view of determining several physical properties of hot-pressed beryllium oxide under various conditions and the change of these properties after irradiation. Special attention has been paid on to the measurement of the thermal conductivity coefficient and thermal diffusivity coefficient. Several designs for the measurement of the thermal conductivity coefficient have been achieved. They permit its determination between 50 and 300 deg. C, between 400 and 800 deg. C. Some measurements have been made above 1000 deg. C. In order to measure the thermal diffusivity coefficient, we heat a perfectly flat surface of a sample in such a way that the heat flux is modulated (amplitude and frequency being adjustable). The thermal diffusivity coefficient is deduced from the variations of temperature observed on several spots. Tensile strength; compressive strength; expansion coefficient; sound velocity and crystal parameters have been also measured. Some of the measurements have been carried out after neutron irradiation. Some data have been obtained on the change of the properties of beryllium oxide depending on the integrated neutron flux. (author)Fren. [French] L'objet de cette etude est la determination de plusieurs proprietes physiques de l'oxyde de beryllium fritte sous charge dans differentes conditions et l'evolution de ces proprietes apres irradiation. Une attention particuliere a ete portee sur la mesure de la conductibilite et de la diffusivite thermiques. Differents montages ont ete realises pour mesurer la conductibilite thermique. Ils permettent la determination entre 50 et 300 deg. C, entre 400 et 800 deg. C; quelques mesures ont ete faites au-dessus de 1000 deg. C. Pour la mesure du coefficient de diffusivite thermique, on realise une attaque thermique, de frequence et d'amplitude reglables d'une face parfaitement plane d'un echantillon d'oxyde de beryllium. Les variations de temperature sont

  11. Mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate induces oxidative stress responses in human placental cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetz, Lauren M., E-mail: ltetz@umich.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States); Cheng, Adrienne A.; Korte, Cassandra S. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States); Giese, Roger W.; Wang, Poguang [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Northeastern University, 360 Huntingon Ave, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harris, Craig; Meeker, John D.; Loch-Caruso, Rita [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is an environmental contaminant commonly used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride products. Exposure to DEHP has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans including preterm birth, low birth-weight, and pregnancy loss. Although oxidative stress is linked to the pathology of adverse pregnancy outcomes, effects of DEHP metabolites, including the active metabolite, mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), on oxidative stress responses in placental cells have not been previously evaluated. The objective of the current study is to identify MEHP-stimulated oxidative stress responses in human placental cells. We treated a human placental cell line, HTR-8/SVneo, with MEHP and then measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation using the dichlorofluorescein assay, oxidized thymine with mass-spectrometry, redox-sensitive gene expression with qRT-PCR, and apoptosis using a luminescence assay for caspase 3/7 activity. Treatment of HTR-8 cells with 180 μM MEHP increased ROS generation, oxidative DNA damage, and caspase 3/7 activity, and resulted in differential expression of redox-sensitive genes. Notably, 90 and 180 μM MEHP significantly induced mRNA expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), an enzyme important for synthesis of prostaglandins implicated in initiation of labor. The results from the present study are the first to demonstrate that MEHP stimulates oxidative stress responses in placental cells. Furthermore, the MEHP concentrations used were within an order of magnitude of the highest concentrations measured previously in human umbilical cord or maternal serum. The findings from the current study warrant future mechanistic studies of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prostaglandins as molecular mediators of DEHP/MEHP-associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. - Highlights: ► MEHP increased reactive oxygen species, oxidative DNA damage, and caspase activity. ► MEHP induced expression of PTGS2, a gene

  12. Agmatine increases proliferation of cultured hippocampal progenitor cells and hippocampal neurogenesis in chronically stressed mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-feng LI; Hong-xia CHEN; Ying LIU; You-zhi ZHANG; Yan-qin LIU; Jin LI

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To explore the mechanism of agmatine's antidepressant action.Methods: Male mice were subjected to a variety of unpredictable stressors on a daily basis over a 24-d period.The open-field behaviors of the mice were displayed and recorded using a Videomex-V image analytic system automatically.For bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU;thymidine analog as a marker for dividing cells) labeling,the mice were injected with BrdU (100 mg/kg,ip,twice per d for 2 d),and the hippocampal neurogenesis in stressed mice was measured by immunohistochemistry.The proliferation of cultured hippocampal progenitor cells from neonatal rats was determined by colorimetric assay (cell counting kit-8) and 3H-thymidine incorporation assay.Results:After the onset of chronic stress,the locomotor activity of the mice in the open field significantly decreased,while coadministration of agmatine 10 mg/kg (po) blocked it.Furthermore,the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus significantly decreased in chronically stressed mice, which was also blocked by chronic coadministration with agmatine 10 mg/kg (po). Four weeks after the BrdU injection, some of the new born cells matured and became neurons, as determined by double labeling for BrdU and neuron specific enolase (NSE), a marker for mature neurons.In vitro treatment with agmatine 0.1-10 μmo1/L for 3 d significantly increased the proliferation of the cultured hippocampal progenitor cells in a dose-dependent manner.Conclusion:We have found that agmatine increases proliferation of hippocampal progenitor cells in vitro and the hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo in chronically stressed mice.This may be one of the important mechanisms involved in agmatine's antidepressant action.

  13. Curcumin targeting the thioredoxin system elevates oxidative stress in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenqing; Zhang, Baoxin; Duan, Dongzhu; Wu, Jincai; Fang, Jianguo

    2012-08-01

    The thioredoxin system, composed of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), thioredoxin (Trx), and NADPH, is ubiquitous in all cells and involved in many redox-dependent signaling pathways. Curcumin, a naturally occurring pigment that gives a specific yellow color in curry food, is consumed in normal diet up to 100mg per day. This molecule has also been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Curcumin has numerous biological functions, and many of these functions are related to induction of oxidative stress. However, how curcumin elicits oxidative stress in cells is unclear. Our previous work has demonstrated the way by which curcumin interacts with recombinant TrxR1 and alters the antioxidant enzyme into a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generator in vitro. Herein we reported that curcumin can target the cytosolic/nuclear thioredoxin system to eventually elevate oxidative stress in HeLa cells. Curcumin-modified TrxR1 dose-dependently and quantitatively transfers electrons from NADPH to oxygen with the production of ROS. Also, curcumin can drastically down-regulate Trx1 protein level as well as its enzyme activity in HeLa cells, which in turn remarkably decreases intracellular free thiols, shifting the intracellular redox balance to a more oxidative state, and subsequently induces DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, curcumin-pretreated HeLa cells are more sensitive to oxidative stress. Knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes HeLa cells to curcumin cytotoxicity, highlighting the physiological significance of targeting TrxR1 by curcumin. Taken together, our data disclose a previously unrecognized prooxidant mechanism of curcumin in cells, and provide a deep insight in understanding how curcumin works in vivo.

  14. Oxidative stress mediated apoptosis induced by nickel ferrite nanoparticles in cultured A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Ahmad, Javed; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; AlSalhi, Mohamad S; Alrokayan, Salman A

    2011-05-10

    Due to the interesting magnetic and electrical properties with good chemical and thermal stabilities, nickel ferrite nanoparticles are being utilized in many applications including magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery and hyperthermia. Recent studies have shown that nickel ferrite nanoparticles produce cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. However, there is very limited information concerning the toxicity of nickel ferrite nanoparticles at the cellular and molecular level. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis induction by well-characterized nickel ferrite nanoparticles (size 26 nm) in human lung epithelial (A549) cells. Nickel ferrite nanoparticles induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in A549 cells demonstrated by MTT, NRU and LDH assays. Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were also found to induce oxidative stress evidenced by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of antioxidant glutathione (GSH). Further, co-treatment with the antioxidant L-ascorbic acid mitigated the ROS generation and GSH depletion due to nickel ferrite nanoparticles suggesting the potential mechanism of oxidative stress. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that following the exposure of A549 cells to nickel ferrite nanoparticles, the level of mRNA expressions of cell cycle checkpoint protein p53 and apoptotic proteins (bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9) were significantly up-regulated, whereas the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin and bcl-2) were down-regulated. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9 enzymes were also significantly higher in nickel ferrite nanoparticles exposed cells. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report showing that nickel ferrite nanoparticles induced apoptosis in A549 cells through ROS generation and oxidative stress via p53, survivin, bax/bcl-2 and caspase pathways.

  15. Analysis of the role of nerve growth factor in promoting cell survival during endoplasmic reticulum stress in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoke, Koji; Sasaya, Harue; Ikeuchi, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) was first described by Rita Levi-Montalcini in the early 1960s from her studies of peripheral neurons. It has since been reported that NGF has the potential to elongate neurites or to prevent apoptosis via specific intracellular mechanisms. It has further been reported that as a component of these mechanisms, NGF binds to a specific receptor, TrkA, and thereby contributes to peripheral nerve cell functions or neuronal functions. It is noteworthy in this regard that pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells express TrkA and respond to neurite outgrowth or anti-apoptotic signals by binding to NGF. Hence, PC12 cells have been used as an in vitro model system for the study of neuronal functions. It has been reported that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease. The common link with regard to ER stress is that the neuronal cells die in these pathologies via specific intracellular mechanisms. This type of cell death, if it is apoptotic in nature, is termed ER stress-mediated apoptosis. In the process of ER stress-mediated apoptosis, the cleavage of pro-caspase-12 residing on the ER and the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) can be observed. The expression of GRP78 protein is a characteristic of an unfolded protein response (UPR) via specific signal transduction pathways mediated by the unfolded protein response element (UPRE) in the upstream region of the grp78 gene so on. In ER stress-mediated apoptosis, a caspase cascade is also observed. To further clarify the mechanisms underlying ER stress-mediated apoptosis, a better understanding of the UPR is therefore important. In our current study, we describe a method for detecting gene induction via the UPR, focusing on GRP78 and caspase activities as the measurement end-points. The information generated by our method will accelerate our understanding of the pathophysiological processes leading

  16. Early single cell bifurcation of pro- and antiapoptotic states during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Venugopalan D; Yuen, Tony; Olanow, C Warren; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2004-06-25

    In a population of cells undergoing oxidative stress, an individual cell either succumbs to apoptotic cell death or maintains homeostasis and survives. Exposure of PC-12-D(2)R cells to 200 microm hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) induces apoptosis in about half of cells after 24 h. After 1-h exposure to 200 microm H(2)O(2), both antiapoptotic extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and pro-apoptotic Ser-15-p53 phosphorylation are observed. Microarray and real-time PCR assays of gene expression after H(2)O(2) exposure identified several transcripts, including egr1, that are rapidly induced downstream of ERK. Single cell analysis of egr1 induction and of phospho-ERK and phospho-p53 formation revealed the presence of two distinct cellular programs. Whereas the proportion of cells activating ERK versus p53 at 1 h depended on H(2)O(2) concentration, individual cells showed exclusively either phospho-p53 formation or activation of ERK and egr1 induction. Exposure to H(2)O(2) for 1 h also elicited these two non-overlapping cellular responses in both dopaminergic SN4741 cells and differentiated postmitotic PC-12-D(2)R cells. Repressing p53 with pifithrin-alpha or small interfering RNA increased ERK phosphorylation by H(2)O(2), indicating that p53-dependent suppression of ERK activity may contribute to the bi-stable single cell responses observed. By 24 h, the subset of cells in which ERK activity was suppressed exhibit caspase 3 activation and the nuclear condensation characteristic of apoptosis. These studies suggest that the individual cell rapidly and stochastically processes the oxidative stress stimulus, leading to an all-or-none cytoprotective or pro-apoptotic signaling response.

  17. Puerarin prevents high glucose-induced apoptosis of Schwann cells by inhibiting oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingying Wu; Bing Xue; Xiaojin Li; Hongchen Liu

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress may be the unifying factor for the injury caused by hyperglycemia in diabeticperipheral neuropathy.Puerarin is the major isoflavonoid derived from Radix puerariae and has been shown to be effective in increasing superoxide dismutase activity.This study sought to investigate the neuroprotective effect of puerarin on high glucose-induced oxidative stress and Schwann cell apoptosis in vitro.Intracellular reactive oxygen radicals and mitochondrial transmembrane potential were detected by flow cytometry analysis.Apoptosis was confirmed by TUNEL and oxidative stress was monitored using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the DNA marker 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine.The expression levels of bax and bcl-2 were analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR,while protein expression of cleaved caspase-3 and-9 were analyzed by means of western blotting.Results suggested that puerarin treatment inhibited high glucose-induced oxidative stress,mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner.Furthermore,puerarin treatment downregulated Bax expression,upregulated bcl-2 expression and attenuated the activation of caspase-3 and-9.Overall,our results indicated that puerarin antagonized high glucose-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in Schwann cells.

  18. Dexamethasone acts as a radiosensitizer in three astrocytoma cell lines via oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Martínez, Sylvia

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs), which act on stress pathways, are well-established in the co-treatment of different kinds of tumors; however, the underlying mechanisms by which GCs act are not yet well elucidated. As such, this work investigates the role of glucocorticoids, specifically dexamethasone (DEXA), in the processes referred to as DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR), establishing a new approach in three astrocytomas cell lines (CT2A, APP.PS1 L.1 and APP.PS1 L.3). The results show that DEXA administration increased the basal levels of gamma-H2AX foci, keeping them higher 4h after irradiation (IR) of the cells, compared to untreated cells. This means that DEXA might cause increased radiosensitivity in these cell lines. On the other hand, DEXA did not have an apparent effect on the formation and disappearance of the 53BP1 foci. Furthermore, it was found that DEXA administered 2h before IR led to a radical change in DNA repair kinetics, even DEXA does not affect cell cycle. It is important to highlight that DEXA produced cell death in these cell lines compared to untreated cells. Finally and most important, the high levels of gamma-H2AX could be reversed by administration of ascorbic acid, a potent blocker of reactive oxygen species, suggesting that DEXA acts by causing DNA damage via oxidative stress. These exiting findings suggest that DEXA might promote radiosensitivity in brain tumors, specifically in astrocytoma-like tumors.

  19. A Role of Fluoride on Free Radical Generation and Oxidative Stress in BV-2 Microglia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Shuhua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of ROS and lipid peroxidation has been considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic fluoride toxicity. In the present study, we observed that fluoride activated BV-2 microglia cell line by observing OX-42 expression in immunocytochemistry. Intracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA, reactive oxygen species (ROS, superoxide anions (O2∙-, nitric oxide synthase (NOS, nitrotyrosine (NT and nitric oxide (NO, NOS in cell medium were determined for oxidative stress assessment. Our study found that NaF of concentration from 5 to 20 mg/L can stimuli BV-2 cells to change into activated microglia displaying upregulated OX-42 expression. SOD activities significantly decreased in fluoride-treated BV-2 cells as compared with control, and MDA concentrations and contents of ROS and O2∙- increased in NaF-treated cells. Activities of NOS in cells and medium significantly increased with fluoride concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. NT concentrations also increased significantly in 10 and 50 mg/L NaF-treated cells compared with the control cells. Our present study demonstrated that toxic effects of fluoride on the central nervous system possibly partly ascribed to activiting of microglia, which enhanced oxidative stress induced by ROS and reactive nitrogen species.

  20. Effect of Nɛ-carboxymethyllysine on oxidative stress and the glutathione system in beta cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniëlle M.P.H.J. Boesten

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the pathways involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications is the formation of excessive levels of advanced glycation end (AGE products. Nɛ-carboxymethyllysine (CML is one of the best-characterized AGEs. Because little is known about the effects of AGEs on pancreatic beta cells, we investigated the effect of CML on human pancreatic cells and determined the activity and gene expression of glutathione system components. CML at a concentration of 0.5 mM induced cell death in human pancreatic beta cells, which was accompanied by increased intracellular oxidative stress. No changes in the gene expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE were found, although an increase in the level of a target cytokine of RAGE after CML exposure was observed. Additionally we found that CML lowered the levels of GSH and affected the activity and expression of other components of the glutathione system. These changes indicate that the cells are even more vulnerable for oxidative stress after exposure to CML. Since beta cells are low in antioxidant enzymes and repair for oxidized DNA, CML, but most likely also other AGEs, accelerates beta cell dysfunction and increases beta cell death during chronic hyperglycemia.

  1. Dissecting Regional Variations in Stress Fiber Mechanics in Living Cells with Laser Nanosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, Kandice; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina J; Kumar, Sanjay

    2010-03-02

    The ability of a cell to distribute contractile stresses across the extracellular matrix in a spatially heterogeneous fashion underlies many cellular behaviors, including motility and tissue assembly. Here we investigate the biophysical basis of this phenomenon by using femtosecond laser nanosurgery to measure the viscoelastic recoil and cell-shape contributions of contractile stress fibers (SFs) located in specific compartments of living cells. Upon photodisruption and recoil, myosin light chain kinase-dependent SFs located along the cell periphery display much lower effective elasticities and higher plateau retraction distances than Rho-associated kinase-dependent SFs located in the cell center, with severing of peripheral fibers uniquely triggering a dramatic contraction of the entire cell within minutes of fiber irradiation. Image correlation spectroscopy reveals that when one population of SFs is pharmacologically dissipated, actin density flows toward the other population. Furthermore, dissipation of peripheral fibers reduces the elasticity and increases the plateau retraction distance of central fibers, and severing central fibers under these conditions triggers cellular contraction. Together, these findings show that SFs regulated by different myosin activators exhibit different mechanical properties and cell shape contributions. They also suggest that some fibers can absorb components and assume mechanical roles of other fibers to stabilize cell shape.

  2. A novel transcription factor, ERD15 (Early Responsive to Dehydration 15), connects endoplasmic reticulum stress with an osmotic stress-induced cell death signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Murilo S; Reis, Pedro A B; Dadalto, Silvana P; Faria, Jerusa A Q A; Fontes, Elizabeth P B; Fietto, Luciano G

    2011-06-03

    As in all other eukaryotic organisms, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers the evolutionarily conserved unfolded protein response in soybean, but it also communicates with other adaptive signaling responses, such as osmotic stress-induced and ER stress-induced programmed cell death. These two signaling pathways converge at the level of gene transcription to activate an integrated cascade that is mediated by N-rich proteins (NRPs). Here, we describe a novel transcription factor, GmERD15 (Glycine max Early Responsive to Dehydration 15), which is induced by ER stress and osmotic stress to activate the expression of NRP genes. GmERD15 was isolated because of its capacity to stably associate with the NRP-B promoter in yeast. It specifically binds to a 187-bp fragment of the NRP-B promoter in vitro and activates the transcription of a reporter gene in yeast. Furthermore, GmERD15 was found in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, and a ChIP assay revealed that it binds to the NRP-B promoter in vivo. Expression of GmERD15 in soybean protoplasts activated the NRP-B promoter and induced expression of the NRP-B gene. Collectively, these results support the interpretation that GmERD15 functions as an upstream component of stress-induced NRP-B-mediated signaling to connect stress in the ER to an osmotic stress-induced cell death signal.

  3. Changes in human pluripotent stem cell gene expression after genotoxic stress exposures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mykyta; V; Sokolov; Ronald; D; Neumann

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells(h PSCs) represent heterogeneous populations, including induced pluripotent stem cells(i PSCs), endogenous plastic somatic cells, and embryonic stem cells(ESCs). Human ESCs are derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst, and they are characterized by the abilities to self-renew indefinitely, and to give rise to all cell types of embryonic lineage(pluripotency) under the guidance of the appropriate chemical, mechanical and environmental cues. The combination of these critical features is unique to h ESCs, and set them apart from other human cells. The expectations are high to utilize h ESCs for treating injuries and degenerative diseases; for modeling of complex illnesses and development; for screening and testing of pharmacological products; and for examining toxicity, mutagenicity, teratogenicity, and potential carcinogenic effects of a variety of environmental factors, including ionizing radiation(IR). Exposures to genotoxic stresses, such as background IR, are unavoidable; moreover, IR is widely used in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in medicine on a routine basis. One of the key outcomes of cell exposures to IR is the change in gene expression, which may underlie the ultimate h ESCs fate after such a stress. However, gaps in our knowledge about basic biology of h ESCs impose a serious limitation to fully realize the potential of h ESCs in practice. The purpose of this review is to examine the available evidence of alterations in gene expression in human pluripotent stem cells after genotoxic stress, and to discuss strategies for future research in this important area.

  4. Changes in human pluripotent stem cell gene expression after genotoxic stress exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta V; Neumann, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent heterogeneous populations, including induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), endogenous plastic somatic cells, and embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Human ESCs are derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst, and they are characterized by the abilities to self-renew indefinitely, and to give rise to all cell types of embryonic lineage (pluripotency) under the guidance of the appropriate chemical, mechanical and environmental cues. The combination of these critical features is unique to hESCs, and set them apart from other human cells. The expectations are high to utilize hESCs for treating injuries and degenerative diseases; for modeling of complex illnesses and development; for screening and testing of pharmacological products; and for examining toxicity, mutagenicity, teratogenicity, and potential carcinogenic effects of a variety of environmental factors, including ionizing radiation (IR). Exposures to genotoxic stresses, such as background IR, are unavoidable; moreover, IR is widely used in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in medicine on a routine basis. One of the key outcomes of cell exposures to IR is the change in gene expression, which may underlie the ultimate hESCs fate after such a stress. However, gaps in our knowledge about basic biology of hESCs impose a serious limitation to fully realize the potential of hESCs in practice. The purpose of this review is to examine the available evidence of alterations in gene expression in human pluripotent stem cells after genotoxic stress, and to discuss strategies for future research in this important area. PMID:25426256

  5. Cadmium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis of Human Liver Carcinoma Cells via Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Skipper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a heavy metal that has been shown to cause its toxicity in humans and animals. Many documented studies have shown that cadmium produces various genotoxic effects such as DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations. Ailments such as bone disease, renal damage, and several forms of cancer are attributed to overexposure to cadmium.  Although there have been numerous studies examining the effects of cadmium in animal models and a few case studies involving communities where cadmium contamination has occurred, its molecular mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a key role in cadmium chloride-induced toxicity, DNA damage, and apoptosis of human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells. To test our hypothesis, cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Lipid hydroperoxide content stress was estimated by lipid peroxidation assay. Genotoxic damage was tested by the means of alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry assessment (Annexin-V/PI assay. The result of MTT assay indicated that cadmium chloride induces toxicity to HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, showing a 48 hr-LD50 of 3.6 µg/mL. Data generated from lipid peroxidation assay resulted in a significant (p < 0.05 increase of hydroperoxide production, specifically at the highest concentration tested. Data obtained from the Comet assay indicated that cadmium chloride causes DNA damage in HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. A strong concentration-response relationship (p < 0.05 was recorded between annexin V positive cells and cadmium chloride exposure. In summary, these in vitro studies provide clear evidence that cadmium chloride induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and programmed cell death in human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells.

  6. Copper ions stimulate the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells via oxygen stress in vitro.

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    Xu, San-qing; Zhu, Hui-yun; Lin, Jian-guo; Su, Tang-feng; Liu, Yan; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the effect of copper ions on the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the role of oxidative stress in this process in order to gain insight into the mechanism of hepatic fibrosis in Wilson's disease. LX-2 cells, a cell line of human HSCs, were cultured in vitro and treated with different agents including copper sulfate, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) for different time. The proliferation of LX-2 cells was measured by non-radioactive cell proliferation assay. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β subunit (PDGFβR), ELISA to determine the level of glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), dichlorofluorescein assay to measure the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lipid hydroperoxide assay to quantify the level of lipid peroxide (LPO). The results showed that copper sulfate over a certain concentration range could promote the proliferation of LX-2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effect was most manifest when LX-2 cells were treated with copper sulfate at a concentration of 100 μmol/L for 24 h. Additionally, copper sulfate could dose-dependently increase the levels of ROS and LPO, and decrease the ratio of GSH/GSSG in LX-2 cells. The copper-induced increase in mRNA and protein expression of PDGFβR was significantly inhibited in LX-2 cells pre-treated with NAC, a precursor of GSH, and this phenomenon could be reversed by the intervention of BSO, an inhibitor of NAC. It was concluded that copper ions may directly stimulate the proliferation of HSCs via oxidative stress. Anti-oxidative stress therapies may help suppress the copper-induced activation and proliferation of HSCs.

  7. Vascular endothelial cell membranes differentiate between stretch and shear stress through transitions in their lipid phases.

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    Yamamoto, Kimiko; Ando, Joji

    2015-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) respond to the hemodynamic forces stretch and shear stress by altering their morphology, functions, and gene expression. However, how they sense and differentiate between these two forces has remained unknown. Here we report that the plasma membrane itself differentiates between stretch and shear stress by undergoing transitions in its lipid phases. Uniaxial stretching and hypotonic swelling increased the lipid order of human pulmonary artery EC plasma membranes, thereby causing a transition from the liquid-disordered phase to the liquid-ordered phase in some areas, along with a decrease in membrane fluidity. In contrast, shear stress decreased the membrane lipid order and increased membrane fluidity. A similar increase in lipid order occurred when the artificial lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles were stretched by hypotonic swelling, indicating that this is a physical phenomenon. The cholesterol content of EC plasma membranes significantly increased in response to stretch but clearly decreased in response to shear stress. Blocking these changes in the membrane lipid order by depleting membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by adding cholesterol resulted in a marked inhibition of the EC response specific to stretch and shear stress, i.e., phosphorylation of PDGF receptors and phosphorylation of VEGF receptors, respectively. These findings indicate that EC plasma membranes differently respond to stretch and shear stress by changing their lipid order, fluidity, and cholesterol content in opposite directions and that these changes in membrane physical properties are involved in the mechanotransduction that activates membrane receptors specific to each force.

  8. Functional melanocytes are readily reprogrammable from multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (muse) cells, distinct stem cells in human fibroblasts.

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    Tsuchiyama, Kenichiro; Wakao, Shohei; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Ogura, Fumitaka; Nojima, Makoto; Sawaya, Natsue; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Aiba, Setsuya; Dezawa, Mari

    2013-10-01

    The induction of melanocytes from easily accessible stem cells has attracted attention for the treatment of melanocyte dysfunctions. We found that multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells, a distinct stem cell type among human dermal fibroblasts, can be readily reprogrammed into functional melanocytes, whereas the remainder of the fibroblasts do not contribute to melanocyte differentiation. Muse cells can be isolated as cells positive for stage-specific embryonic antigen-3, a marker for undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells, and differentiate into cells representative of all three germ layers from a single cell, while also being nontumorigenic. The use of certain combinations of factors induces Muse cells to express melanocyte markers such as tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and to show positivity for the 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine reaction. When Muse cell-derived melanocytes were incorporated into three-dimensional (3D) cultured skin models, they localized themselves in the basal layer of the epidermis and produced melanin in the same manner as authentic melanocytes. They also maintained their melanin production even after the 3D cultured skin was transplanted to immunodeficient mice. This technique may be applicable to the efficient production of melanocytes from accessible human fibroblasts by using Muse cells, thereby contributing to autologous transplantation for melanocyte dysfunctions, such as vitiligo.

  9. Impact of oxidative stress on Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondrial bioenergetics depends on cell growth stage.

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    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Koziel, Agnieszka; Antos-Krzeminska, Nina; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2011-06-01

    Addition of a moderate (1.4 mM) concentration of H(2)O(2) to protozoon Acanthamoeba castellanii cell cultures at different growth phases caused a different response to oxidative stress. H(2)O(2) treatment of exponentially growing cells significantly delayed their growth; however, in mitochondria isolated from these cells, no damage to their bioenergetic function was observed. In contrast, addition of H(2)O(2) to A. castellanii cells approaching the stationary phase did not influence their growth and viability while seriously affecting mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Although mitochondrial integrity was maintained, oxidative damage was revealed in the reduction of cytochrome pathway activity, uncoupling protein activity, and the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation as well as the membrane potential and the endogenous ubiquinone reduction level of the resting state. An increase in the alternative oxidase protein level and activity as well as an increase in the membranous ubiquinone content were observed in mitochondria isolated from late H(2)O(2)-treated cells. For the first time, the regulation of ubiquinone content in the inner mitochondrial membrane is shown to play a role in the response to oxidative stress. A physiological role for the higher activity of the alternative oxidase in response to oxidative stress in unicellular organisms, such as amoeba A. castellanii, is discussed.

  10. Stochastic modeling and experimental analysis of phenotypic switching and survival of cancer cells under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani Dahaj, Seyed Alireza; Kumar, Niraj; Sundaram, Bala; Celli, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Rahul

    The phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells is critical to their survival under stress. A significant contribution to heterogeneity of cancer calls derives from the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a conserved cellular program that is crucial for embryonic development. Several studies have investigated the role of EMT in growth of early stage tumors into invasive malignancies. Also, EMT has been closely associated with the acquisition of chemoresistance properties in cancer cells. Motivated by these studies, we analyze multi-phenotype stochastic models of the evolution of cancers cell populations under stress. We derive analytical results for time-dependent probability distributions that provide insights into the competing rates underlying phenotypic switching (e.g. during EMT) and the corresponding survival of cancer cells. Experimentally, we evaluate these model-based predictions by imaging human pancreatic cancer cell lines grown with and without cytotoxic agents and measure growth kinetics, survival, morphological changes and (terminal evaluation of) biomarkers with associated epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes. The results derived suggest approaches for distinguishing between adaptation and selection scenarios for survival in the presence of external stresses.

  11. Constituents of French Marigold (Tagetes patula L. Flowers Protect Jurkat T-Cells against Oxidative Stress

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    Irakli Chkhikvishvili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flowers of French marigold (Tagetes patula L. are widely used in folk medicine, in particular for treating inflammation-related disorders. However, cellular mechanisms of this activity demand further investigation. In the present work, we studied the potential of T. patula compounds to alleviate the oxidative stress in hydrogen peroxide-challenged human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cells. Crude extracts of marigold flowers and purified fractions containing flavonoids patuletin, quercetagetin, and quercetin and their derivatives, as well as the carotenoid lutein, were brought in contact with Jurkat cells challenged with 25 or 50 μM H2O2. Hydrogen peroxide caused oxidative stress in the cells, manifested as generation of superoxide and peroxyl radicals, reduced viability, arrested cell cycle, and enhanced apoptosis. The stress was alleviated by marigold ingredients that demonstrated high radical-scavenging capacity and enhanced the activity of antioxidant enzymes involved in neutralization of reactive oxygen species. Flavonoid fraction rich in quercetin and quercetagetin showed the highest cytoprotective activity, while patuletin in high dose exerted a cytotoxic effect associated with its anticancer potential. T. patula compounds enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant interleukin-10 (IL-10 in Jurkat cells. Both direct radical-scavenging capacity and stimulation of protective cellular mechanisms can underlay the anti-inflammatory properties of marigold flowers.

  12. Acidosis Activates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathways through GPR4 in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

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    Lixue Dong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acidosis commonly exists in the tissue microenvironment of various pathophysiological conditions such as tumors, inflammation, ischemia, metabolic disease, and respiratory disease. For instance, the tumor microenvironment is characterized by acidosis and hypoxia due to tumor heterogeneity, aerobic glycolysis (the “Warburg effect”, and the defective vasculature that cannot efficiently deliver oxygen and nutrients or remove metabolic acid byproduct. How the acidic microenvironment affects the function of blood vessels, however, is not well defined. GPR4 (G protein-coupled receptor 4 is a member of the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptors and it has high expression in endothelial cells (ECs. We have previously reported that acidosis induces a broad inflammatory response in ECs. Acidosis also increases the expression of several endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response genes such as CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein and ATF3 (activating transcription factor 3. In the current study, we have examined acidosis/GPR4- induced ER stress pathways in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and other types of ECs. All three arms of the ER stress/unfolded protein response (UPR pathways were activated by acidosis in ECs as an increased expression of phosphorylated eIF2α (eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, phosphorylated IRE1α (inositol-requiring enzyme 1α, and cleaved ATF6 upon acidic pH treatment was observed. The expression of other downstream mediators of the UPR, such as ATF4, ATF3, and spliced XBP-1 (X box-binding protein 1, was also induced by acidosis. Through genetic and pharmacological approaches to modulate the expression level or activity of GPR4 in HUVEC, we found that GPR4 plays an important role in mediating the ER stress response induced by acidosis. As ER stress/UPR can cause inflammation and cell apoptosis, acidosis/GPR4-induced ER stress pathways in ECs may regulate vascular growth and inflammatory response in the acidic

  13. Prediction of stress-strain behavior of ceramic matrix composites using unit cell model

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    Suzuki Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the elastic modulus and the stress-strain curve of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs were predicted by using the unit cell model that consists of fiber bundles and matrix. The unit cell model was developed based on the observation of cross sections of CMCs. The elastic modulus of CMCs was calculated from the results of finite element analysis using the developed model. The non-linear behavior of stress-strain curve of CMCs was also predicted by taking the degradation of the elastic modulus into consideration, where the degradation was related to the experimentally measured crack density in CMCs. The approach using the unit cell model was applied to two kinds of CMCs, and good agreement was obtained between the experimental and the calculated results.

  14. Stress Hyperglycemia, Insulin Treatment, and Innate Immune Cells

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    Fangming Xiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia (HG and insulin resistance are the hallmarks of a profoundly altered metabolism in critical illness resulting from the release of cortisol, catecholamines, and cytokines, as well as glucagon and growth hormone. Recent studies have proposed a fundamental role of the immune system towards the development of insulin resistance in traumatic patients. A comprehensive review of published literatures on the effects of hyperglycemia and insulin on innate immunity in critical illness was conducted. This review explored the interaction between the innate immune system and trauma-induced hypermetabolism, while providing greater insight into unraveling the relationship between innate immune cells and hyperglycemia. Critical illness substantially disturbs glucose metabolism resulting in a state of hyperglycemia. Alterations in glucose and insulin regulation affect the immune function of cellular components comprising the innate immunity system. Innate immune system dysfunction via hyperglycemia is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality in critical illness. Along with others, we hypothesize that reduction in morbidity and mortality observed in patients receiving insulin treatment is partially due to its effect on the attenuation of the immune response. However, there still remains substantial controversy regarding moderate versus intensive insulin treatment. Future studies need to determine the integrated effects of HG and insulin on the regulation of innate immunity in order to provide more effective insulin treatment regimen for these patients.

  15. Therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced changes in the hippocampus of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saravana Kumar Sampath Kumar; Saraswathi Perumal; Vijayaraghavan Rajagopalan

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced neuronal changes in hippocampal CA1 region of Wistar rats. Bone marrow mes-enchymal stem cells were isolated from a 6-week-old Wistar rat. Bone marrow from adult femora and tibia was collected and mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in minimal essential medium containing 10% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum and were sub-cultured. Passage 3 cells were analyzed by lfow cytometry for positive expression of CD44 and CD90 and negative expression of CD45. Once CD44 and CD90 positive expression was achieved, the cells were cultured again to 90% conlfuence for later experiments. Twenty-four rats aged 8 weeks old were randomly and evenly divided into normal control, cold water swim stress (cold stress), cold stress + PBS (intra-venous infusion), and cold stress + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (1 × 106; intravenous infusion) groups. The total period of study was 60 days which included 1 month stress period followed by 1 month treatment. Behavioral functional test was performed during the entire study period. After treatment, rats were sacriifced for histological studies. Treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells signiifcantly increased the number of neuronal cells in hippocampal CA1 region. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells injected by intravenous administration show potential therapeutic effects in cognitive decline associated with stress-related lesions.

  16. Bmi1 confers resistance to oxidative stress on hematopoietic stem cells.

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    Shunsuke Nakamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The polycomb-group (PcG proteins function as general regulators of stem cells. We previously reported that retrovirus-mediated overexpression of Bmi1, a gene encoding a core component of polycomb repressive complex (PRC 1, maintained self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during long-term culture. However, the effects of overexpression of Bmi1 on HSCs in vivo remained to be precisely addressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we generated a mouse line where Bmi1 can be conditionally overexpressed under the control of the endogenous Rosa26 promoter in a hematopoietic cell-specific fashion (Tie2-Cre;R26Stop(FLBmi1. Although overexpression of Bmi1 did not significantly affect steady state hematopoiesis, it promoted expansion of functional HSCs during ex vivo culture and efficiently protected HSCs against loss of self-renewal capacity during serial transplantation. Overexpression of Bmi1 had no effect on DNA damage response triggered by ionizing radiation. In contrast, Tie2-Cre;R26Stop(FLBmi1 HSCs under oxidative stress maintained a multipotent state and generally tolerated oxidative stress better than the control. Unexpectedly, overexpression of Bmi1 had no impact on the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that overexpression of Bmi1 confers resistance to stresses, particularly oxidative stress, onto HSCs. This thereby enhances their regenerative capacity and suggests that Bmi1 is located downstream of ROS signaling and negatively regulated by it.

  17. Heat stress induces apoptotic-like cell death in two Pleurotus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chi; Chen, Qiang; Wu, Xiangli; Zhang, Jinxia; Huang, Chenyang

    2014-11-01

    High temperature is an important environmental factor that affects the growth and development of most edible fungi, however, the mechanism(s) for resistance to high temperature remains elusive. Nitric oxide is known to be able to effectively alleviate oxidative damage and plays an important role in the regulation of trehalose accumulation during heat stress in mycelia of Pleurotus eryngii var. tuoliensis. In this paper, we investigated whether heat stress can activate apoptosis-like cell death in mycelia of Pleurotus. Two Pleurotus species were used to detect morphological features characteristic of apoptosis including nuclear condensation, reactive oxygen species accumulation, and DNA fragmentation when exposed to heat stress (42 °C). The results showed that these classical apoptosis markers were apparent in Pleurotus strains after heat treatment. The heat-induced apoptosis-like cell death in Pleurotus was further probed using oligomycin and N-acetylcysteine, both of which were shown to block processes leading to apoptosis. This is the first report that apoptosis-like cell death occurs in Pleurotus species as a result of abiotic stress, and that this process can be inhibited with chemicals that block mitochondrial-induced apoptotic pathways and/or with ROS-scavenging compounds.

  18. Optogenetically enhanced pituitary corticotroph cell activity post-stress onset causes rapid organizing effects on behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Rodrigo J.; Thiemann, Theresa; Groneberg, Antonia H.; Herget, Ulrich; Ryu, Soojin

    2016-01-01

    The anterior pituitary is the major link between nervous and hormonal systems, which allow the brain to generate adequate and flexible behaviour. Here, we address its role in mediating behavioural adjustments that aid in coping with acutely threatening environments. For this we combine optogenetic manipulation of pituitary corticotroph cells in larval zebrafish with newly developed assays for measuring goal-directed actions in very short timescales. Our results reveal modulatory actions of corticotroph cell activity on locomotion, avoidance behaviours and stimulus responsiveness directly after the onset of stress. Altogether, the findings uncover the significance of endocrine pituitary cells for rapidly optimizing behaviour in local antagonistic environments. PMID:27646867

  19. Stanniocalcin 2 enhances mesenchymal stem cell survival by suppressing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Na, Sang-Su; Lee, Bomnaerin; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2015-12-01

    To overcome the disadvantages of stem cell-based cell therapy like low cell survival at the disease site, we used stanniocalcin 2 (STC2), a family of secreted glycoprotein hormones that function to inhibit apoptosis and oxidative damage and to induce proliferation. STC2 gene was transfected into two kinds of stem cells to prolong cell survival and protect the cells from the damage by oxidative stress. The stem cells expressing STC2 exhibited increased cell viability and improved cell survival as well as elevated expression of the pluripotency and self-renewal markers (Oct4 and Nanog) under sub-lethal oxidative conditions. Up-regulation of CDK2 and CDK4 and down-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors p16 and p21 were observed after the delivery of STC2. Furthermore, STC2 transduction activated pAKT and pERK 1/2 signal pathways. Taken together, the STC2 can be used to enhance cell survival and maintain long-term stemness in therapeutic use of stem cells.

  20. Investigation of reliability attributes and accelerated stress factors on terrestrial solar cells. Third annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lathrop, J.W.; Hartman, R.A.; Saylor, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The third year of the accelerated reliability testing program concentrated on electrical measurement instrumentation and in modeling cell behavior in the second quadrant. In addition, some preliminary work was done on correlating cell color changes with electrical degradation. Not reported are results of continuing accelerated stress tests on state of the art cells. A number of new cells were added to the program, but not in time for sufficient data to be obtained, while the older cells are undergoing extended test periods and new data are not yet available on them. The all-digital, microprocessor controlled, short interval tester, which was designed and fabricated, has replaced the manual measurement procedure formerly used. This has improved measurement accuracy and repeatability, reduced measurement time, and through coordinated data management procedures, eliminated data errors. A complete description of the tester including schematics and software is given and its operating procedures described. A computer model, based on the thermal and electrical properties of the cells and encapsulating materials, was developed to relate cell temperature to electrical characteristics in the second quadrant. This model adequately predicted the behavior of both encapsulated and unencapsulated cells, although accurate temperature measurements on encapsulated cells were difficult to obtain. In addition, only cells of one type were used for comparison and other cell types may require different parameter values for fitting. Use of the model should permit the prediction of a cell's sensitivity to degradation in the second quadrant. The computer program is listed together with a description of its operation.

  1. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis.

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    Jintao Zhang

    Full Text Available Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells.Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29 were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5-5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining, and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot.Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II, beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin and genetic

  2. Latin America multidisciplinary research on heat shock proteins and cell stress: proceedings of the first conference of the Latin America Chapter of the Cell Stress Society International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausero, María A

    2015-09-01

    The First Conference of the Latin America Chapter of the Cell Stress Society International (CSSI) organized by CSSI was held in Montevideo, Uruguay, on March 11-14, 2014. The Latin America Chapter of the CSSI (LAC-CSSI) was established at the Workshop on the Molecular Biology of the Stress Response, Porto Alegre, Brazil, May 2012. The chapter's first meeting took place in the beautiful city of Montevideo and was chaired by the first (LAC-CSSI) elected president Professor María Bausero. Forty-two invited speakers presented their work to more than 100 scientists. The first day of the conference was dedicated to an introductory program for students, young investigators, and participants new to the field of molecular chaperones and the stress response. These seminars were held in the Pasteur Institute of Montevideo and the Faculty of Sciences of the University of the Republic. These institutions were carefully selected to give foreign participants a broad view of the diversity of students and institutions doing research in Uruguay, as well as an opportunity for direct interaction with our scientists and students. Invited speakers for the seminar series were Dr. Wolfgang Schumann, Dr. Cristina Bonorino, Dr. Antonio De Maio, Dr. Ian Brown, Dr. Rafael Radi, Dr. Daniel Ciocca, and Dr. Celia Quijano. The remaining days of the conference took place at the Sheraton Hotel in Montevideo, and the scientific sessions are discussed below.

  3. Mitochondria are targets for peroxisome-derived oxidative stress in cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Brees, Chantal; Rubio, Noemí; Nordgren, Marcus; Apanasets, Oksana; Kunze, Markus; Baes, Myriam; Agostinis, Patrizia; Fransen, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Many cellular processes are driven by spatially and temporally regulated redox-dependent signaling events. Although mounting evidence indicates that organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria can function as signaling platforms for oxidative stress-regulated pathways, little is known about the role of peroxisomes in these processes. In this study, we employ targeted variants of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed to gain a better insight into the interplay between peroxisomes and cellular oxidative stress. We show that the phototoxic effects of peroxisomal KillerRed induce mitochondria-mediated cell death and that this process can be counteracted by targeted overexpression of a select set of antioxidant enzymes, including peroxisomal glutathione S-transferase kappa 1, superoxide dismutase 1, and mitochondrial catalase. We also present evidence that peroxisomal disease cell lines deficient in plasmalogen biosynthesis or peroxisome assembly are more sensitive to KillerRed-induced oxidative stress than control cells. Collectively, these findings confirm and extend previous observations suggesting that disturbances in peroxisomal redox control and metabolism can sensitize cells to oxidative stress. In addition, they lend strong support to the ideas that peroxisomes and mitochondria share a redox-sensitive relationship and that the redox communication between these organelles is not only mediated by diffusion of reactive oxygen species from one compartment to the other. Finally, these findings indicate that mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress, and this may have profound implications for our views on cellular aging and age-related diseases.

  4. The neuroprotective properties of palmitoylethanolamine against oxidative stress in a neuronal cell line

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    Chapman Kent D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-acylethanolamines (NAEs are lipids upregulated in response to cell and tissue injury and are involved in cytoprotection. Arachidonylethanolamide (AEA is a well characterized NAE that is an endogenous ligand at cannabinoid and vanilloid receptors, but it exists in small quantities relative to other NAE types. The abundance of other NAE species, such as palmitoylethanolamine (PEA, together with their largely unknown function and receptors, has prompted us to examine the neuroprotective properties and mechanism of action of PEA. We hypothesized that PEA protects HT22 cells from oxidative stress and activates neuroprotective kinase signaling pathways. Results Indeed PEA protected HT22 cells from oxidative stress in part by mediating an increase in phosphorylated Akt (pAkt and ERK1/2 immunoreactivity as well as pAkt nuclear translocation. These changes take place within a time frame consistent with neuroprotection. Furthermore, we determined that changes in pAkt immunoreactivity elicited by PEA were not mediated by activation of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2, thus indicating a novel mechanism of action. These results establish a role for PEA as a neuroprotectant against oxidative stress, which occurs in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Conclusions The results from this study reveal that PEA protects HT22 cells from oxidative stress and alters the localization and expression levels of kinases known to be involved in neuroprotection by a novel mechanism. Overall, these results identify PEA as a neuroprotectant with potential as a possible therapeutic agent in neurodegenerative diseases involving oxidative stress.

  5. Tat-biliverdin reductase A protects INS-1 cells from human islet amyloid polypeptide-induced cytotoxicity by alleviating oxidative stress and ER stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Jin; Kang, Hyung Kyung; Eum, Won Sik; Park, Jinseu; Choi, Soo Young; Kwon, Hyeok Yil

    2017-02-15

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a major constituent of islet amyloid deposits, induces pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and eventually contributes to β-cell deficit in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this study, Tat-mediated transduction of biliverdin reductase A (BLVRA) was investigated in INS-1 cells to examine whether exogenous supplementation of BLVRA prevented hIAPP-induced apoptosis and dysfunction in insulin secretion in β-cells. Tat-BLVRA fusion protein was efficiently delivered into INS-1 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Exposure of cells to hIAPP induced apoptotic cell death, which was dose-dependently inhibited by pre-treatment with Tat-BLVRA for 1 h. Transduced Tat-BLVRA reduced hIAPP-evoked generation of reactive oxygen species, a crucial mediator of β-cell destruction. Immunoblot analysis showed that Tat-BLVRA suppressed hIAPP-induced increase in the levels of proteins involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis signaling. Transduced Tat-BLVRA also recovered hIAPP-induced dysfunction in basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretions. These results suggested that transduced Tat-BLVRA enhanced the tolerance of β-cells against IAPP-induced cytotoxicity by alleviating oxidative stress and ER stress. Therefore, Tat-mediated transduction of BLVRA may provide a potential tool to ameliorate β-cell deficit in pancreas with T2DM.

  6. In vitro toxicity of nanosized copper particles in PC12 cells induced by oxidative stress

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    Xu Pengjuan; Xu Jing; Liu Shichang [Nankai University, College of Medicine (China); Ren, Guogang [University of Hertfordshire, School of Aerospace Engineering (United Kingdom); Yang Zhuo, E-mail: zhuoyang@nankai.edu.cn [Nankai University, College of Medicine (China)

    2012-06-15

    Recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials, which are widely used in many fields, have health effects. In order to investigate the cytotoxicity induced by nanosized copper particles (nano-Cu), PC12 cells, which were widely used as an in vitro model for the neuron research, were treated with different concentrations (0, 1, 10, 30, and 100 {mu}g/mL) of nano-Cu. The cell viability was determined by measurement of the reduction product of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). The oxidative stress induced by nano-Cu and its possible mechanism were studied in relation to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the cellular activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD). Results showed that incubation of PC12 cells with increasing concentrations of nano-Cu induced a decrease of cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In addition, flow cytometry assay using Annexin V-FITC/PI staining was used to investigate the mode of nano-Cu-induced cell death and quantified the percentage of apoptotic cells. Results showed that nano-Cu induced the significant apoptosis in PC12 cells. Meanwhile, intracellular accumulation of ROS was increased with the increased concentrations of nano-Cu and it was associated with decreased SOD activity, which was probably due to protect effects against the oxidative stress in PC12 cells. Results suggested that both excessive intracellular ROS and decreased SOD contributed to nano-Cu-induced cytotoxicity. In other words, the increasing of oxidative stress was a key mechanism in PC12 apoptosis induced by nano-Cu.

  7. Airborne Fine Particulate Matter Induces Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Human Nasal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhicong; Guo, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Ruxin; Xu, Jian; Dong, Weiyang; Zhuang, Guoshun; Deng, Congrui

    2016-01-01

    Airborne fine particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter equal to or smaller than 2.5 μm is abbreviated as PM2.5, which is one of the main components in air pollution. Exposure to PM2.5 is associated with increased risk of many human diseases, including chronic and allergic rhinitis, but the underlying molecular mechanism for its toxicity has not been fully elucidated. We have hypothesized that PM2.5 may cause oxidative stress and enhance inflammatory responses in nasal epithelial cells. Accordingly, we used human RPMI 2650 cells, derived from squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal septum, as a model of nasal epithelial cells, and exposed them to PM2.5 that was collected at Fudan University (31.3°N, 121.5°E) in Shanghai, China. PM2.5 exposure decreased the viability of RPMI 2650 cells, suggesting that PM2.5 may impair the barrier function of nasal epithelial cells. Moreover, PM2.5 increased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the nuclear translocation of NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2). Importantly, PM2.5 also decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Pretreatment with N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (an anti-oxidant) reduced the degree of the PM2.5-induced oxidative stress in RPMI 2650 cells. In addition, PM2.5 increased the production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-13 and eotaxin (C-C motif chemokine ligand 11), each of which initiates and/or augments local inflammation. These results suggest that PM2.5 may induce oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in human nasal epithelial cells, thereby leading to nasal inflammatory diseases. The present study provides insights into cellular injury induced by PM2.5.

  8. On-Chip Quantitative Measurement of Mechanical Stresses During Cell Migration with Emulsion Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, D.; Quignard, S.; Gruget, C.; Pincet, F.; Chen, Y.; Piel, M.; Fattaccioli, J.

    2016-07-01

    The ability of immune cells to migrate within narrow and crowded spaces is a critical feature involved in various physiological processes from immune response to metastasis. Several in-vitro techniques have been developed so far to study the behaviour of migrating cells, the most recent being based on the fabrication of microchannels within which cells move. To address the question of the mechanical stress a cell is able to produce during the encounter of an obstacle while migrating, we developed a hybrid microchip made of parallel PDMS channels in which oil droplets are sparsely distributed and serve as deformable obstacles. We thus show that cells strongly deform droplets while passing them. Then, we show that the microdevice can be used to study the influence of drugs on migration at the population level. Finally, we describe a quantitative analysis method of the droplet deformation that allows measuring in real-time the mechanical stress exerted by a single cell. The method presented herein thus constitutes a powerful analytical tool for cell migration studies under confinement.

  9. Protection of human HepG2 cells against oxidative stress by the flavonoid epicatechin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, María Angeles; Ramos, Sonia; Mateos, Raquel; Izquierdo-Pulido, María; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2010-04-01

    Flavanols, such as epicatechin (EC), constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in green tea, grapes and cocoa and possess different biological activities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic. This study investigated the potential chemo-protective effect of EC against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) on human HepG2 cells. Cell viability by lactate dehydrogenase assay and markers of oxidative status: reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) were evaluated. Pretreatment of cells with EC for 20 h prevented the enhanced cell damage and GPx and GR activities as well as the decrease in GSH induced by t-BOOH. The increased ROS generation induced by t-BOOH was also partly prevented by a pretreatment for 20 h with EC. In addition, pretreatment of cells with EC for 20 h recovered the t-BOOH-induced MDA concentration to control values. A pretreatment for 2 h with EC did not reduce cell damage but partly recovered GSH, reduced ROS levels and muffled the increase of GPx and GR after exposure to t-BOOH. Treatment of HepG2 cells with concentrations of EC in the micromolar range confers a significant protection against oxidative stress.

  10. Perivascular Mast Cells Govern Shear Stress-Induced Arteriogenesis by Orchestrating Leukocyte Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omary Chillo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The body has the capacity to compensate for an occluded artery by creating a natural bypass upon increased fluid shear stress. How this mechanical force is translated into collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis is unresolved. We show that extravasation of neutrophils mediated by the platelet receptor GPIbα and uPA results in Nox2-derived reactive oxygen radicals, which activate perivascular mast cells. These c-kit+/CXCR-4+ cells stimulate arteriogenesis by recruiting additional neutrophils as well as growth-promoting monocytes and T cells. Additionally, mast cells may directly contribute to vascular remodeling and vascular cell proliferation through increased MMP activity and by supplying growth-promoting factors. Boosting mast cell recruitment and activation effectively promotes arteriogenesis, thereby protecting tissue from severe ischemic damage. We thus find that perivascular mast cells are central regulators of shear stress-induced arteriogenesis by orchestrating leukocyte function and growth factor/cytokine release, thus providing a therapeutic target for treatment of vascular occlusive diseases.

  11. Microscopic analysis of cell death by metabolic stress-induced autophagy in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changou, Chun; Cheng, R. Holland; Bold, Richard; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y. S.

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular recycling mechanism that helps cells to survive against environmental stress and nutritional starvation. We have recently shown that prostate cancers undergo metabolic stress and caspase-independent cell death following exposure to arginine deiminase (ADI, an enzyme that degrades arginine in tissue). The aims of our current investigation into the application of ADI as a novel cancer therapy are to identify the components mediating tumor cell death, and to determine the role of autophagy (stimulated by ADI and/or rapamycin) on cell death. Using advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques including 3D deconvolution and superresolution structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), we show that prostate tumor cells that are killed after exposure to ADI for extended periods, exhibit a morphology that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis; and that autophagosomes forming as a result of ADI stimulation contain DAPI-stained nuclear material. Fluorescence imaging (as well as cryo-electron microscopy) show a breakdown of both the inner and outer nuclear membranes at the interface between the cell nucleus and aggregated autophagolysosomes. Finally, the addition of N-acetyl cysteine (or NAC, a scavenger for reactive oxygen species) effectively abolishes the appearance of autophagolysosomes containing nuclear material. We hope to continue this research to understand the processes that govern the survival or death of these tumor cells, in order to develop methods to improve the efficacy of cancer pharmacotherapy.

  12. On-Chip Quantitative Measurement of Mechanical Stresses During Cell Migration with Emulsion Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, D.; Quignard, S.; Gruget, C.; Pincet, F.; Chen, Y.; Piel, M.; Fattaccioli, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of immune cells to migrate within narrow and crowded spaces is a critical feature involved in various physiological processes from immune response to metastasis. Several in-vitro techniques have been developed so far to study the behaviour of migrating cells, the most recent being based on the fabrication of microchannels within which cells move. To address the question of the mechanical stress a cell is able to produce during the encounter of an obstacle while migrating, we developed a hybrid microchip made of parallel PDMS channels in which oil droplets are sparsely distributed and serve as deformable obstacles. We thus show that cells strongly deform droplets while passing them. Then, we show that the microdevice can be used to study the influence of drugs on migration at the population level. Finally, we describe a quantitative analysis method of the droplet deformation that allows measuring in real-time the mechanical stress exerted by a single cell. The method presented herein thus constitutes a powerful analytical tool for cell migration studies under confinement. PMID:27373558

  13. 3-Bromopyruvate treatment induces alterations of metabolic and stress-related pathways in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasserini, Davide; Davidescu, Magdalena; Orvietani, Pier Luigi; Susta, Federica; Macchioni, Lara; Petricciuolo, Maya; Castigli, Emilia; Roberti, Rita; Binaglia, Luciano; Corazzi, Lanfranco

    2017-01-30

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumour of adults. The metabolic phenotype of GBM cells is highly dependent on glycolysis; therefore, therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with glycolytic pathways are under consideration. 3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is a potent antiglycolytic agent, with a variety of targets and possible effects on global cell metabolism. Here we analyzed the changes in protein expression on a GBM cell line (GL15 cells) caused by 3BP treatment using a global proteomic approach. Validation of differential protein expression was performed with immunoblotting and enzyme activity assays in GL15 and U251 cell lines. The results show that treatment of GL15 cells with 3BP leads to extensive changes in the expression of glycolytic enzymes and stress related proteins. Importantly, other metabolisms were also affected, including pentose phosphate pathway, aminoacid synthesis, and glucose derivatives production. 3BP elicited the activation of stress response proteins, as shown by the phosphorylation of HSPB1 at serine 82, caused by the concomitant activation of the p38 pathway. Our results show that inhibition of glycolysis in GL15 cells by 3BP influences different but interconnected pathways. Proteome analysis may help in the molecular characterization of the glioblastoma response induced by pharmacological treatment with antiglycolytic agents.

  14. Tat-HSP22 inhibits oxidative stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death by regulation of the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hyo Sang; Kim, Dae Won; Shin, Min Jea; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Son, Ora; Cho, Sung-Woo; Kim, Duk-Soo; Yu, Yeon Hee; Lee, Keun Wook; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2017-01-04

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the progression of various neuronal diseases including ischemia. Heat shock protein 22 (HSP22) is known to protect cells against oxidative stress. However, the protective effects and mechanisms of HSP22 in hippocampal neuronal cells under oxidative stress remain unknown. In this study, we determined whether HSP22 protects against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in HT-22 using Tat-HSP22 fusion protein. We found that Tat-HSP22 transduced into HT-22 cells and that H2O2-induced cell death, oxidative stress, and DNA damage were significantly reduced by Tat-HSP22. In addition, Tat-HSP22 markedly inhibited H2O2-induced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, cleaved caspase-3, and Bax expression levels, while Bcl-2 expression levels were increased in HT-22 cells. Further, we showed that Tat-HSP22 transduced into animal brain and inhibited cleaved-caspase-3 expression levels as well as significantly inhibited hippocampal neuronal cell death in the CA1 region of animals in the ischemic animal model. In the present study, we demonstrated that transduced Tat-HSP22 attenuates oxidative stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death through the mitochondrial signaling pathway and plays a crucial role in inhibiting neuronal cell death, suggesting that Tat-HSP22 protein may be used to prevent oxidative stress-related brain diseases including ischemia.

  15. Stress-related changes to immune cells in the skin prior to wounding may impair subsequent healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschwanez, Heidi; Vurnek, Maja; Weinman, John; Tarlton, John; Whiting, Christine; Amirapu, Satya; Colgan, Sarah; Long, David; Jarrett, Paul; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    Higher psychological stress is associated with slower dermal wound healing, but the immunological mechanisms behind this effect are only partially understood. This paper aims to investigate whether immune cells present in the skin prior to wounding can affect subsequent healing in high-stress and low-stress participants. Two studies are presented in which skin biopsies were analysed using immunohistochemistry for numbers of macrophages and Langerhans cells, and immune cell activation (Study 2 only). Immune cells were related to perceived stress levels and subsequent healing. Study 1 included 19 healthy older adults and showed that higher stress was associated with significantly fewer macrophages in the skin. Study 2 included 22 younger adults and showed that higher stress was associated with significantly lower activation of immune cells in the skin. Furthermore, lower activation of immune cells (as measured by human leukocyte antigen (HLA expression)) and fewer Langerhans cells were associated with slower healing. Together these studies show the first preliminary evidence that the number and activation of immune cells in the skin prior to wounding are affected by stress and can impact healing. Larger studies are needed to confirm these effects.

  16. Auranofin induces apoptosis and necrosis in HeLa cells via oxidative stress and glutathione depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Bo Ra; Shin, Hye Rim; Han, Bo Ram; Kim, Suhn Hee; Park, Woo Hyun

    2015-02-01

    Auranofin (Au), an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase, is a known anti‑cancer drug. In the present study, the anti‑growth effect of Au on HeLa cervical cancer cells was examined in association with levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH). Au inhibited the growth of HeLa cells with an IC50 of ~2 µM at 24 h. This agent induced apoptosis and necrosis, accompanied by the cleavage of poly (ADP‑ribose) polymerase and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. The pan‑caspase inhibitor, benzyloxycarbonyl‑Val‑Ala‑Asp‑fluoromethylketone, prevented apoptotic cell death and each of the assessed caspase inhibitors inhibited necrotic cell death induced by Au. With respect to the levels of ROS and GSH, Au increased intracellular O2•- in the HeLa cells and induced GSH depletion. The pan‑caspase inhibitor reduced the levels of O2•- and GSH depletion in Au‑treated HeLa cells. The antioxidant, N‑acetyl cysteine, not only attenuated apoptosis and necrosis in the Au‑treated HeLa cells, but also decreased the levels of O2•- and GSH depletion in the cells. By contrast, L‑buthionine sulfoximine, a GSH synthesis inhibitor, intensified cell death O2•- and GSH depletion in the Au‑treated HeLa cells. In conclusion, Au induced apoptosis and necrosis in HeLa cells via the induction of oxidative stress and the depletion of GSH.

  17. Matrix mechanics and fluid shear stress control stem cells fate in three dimensional microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guobao; Lv, Yonggang; Guo, Pan; Lin, Chongwen; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yang, Li; Xu, Zhiling

    2013-07-01

    Stem cells have the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple mature cell types during early life and growth. Stem cells adhesion, proliferation, migration and differentiation are affected by biochemical, mechanical and physical surface properties of the surrounding matrix in which stem cells reside and stem cells can sensitively feel and respond to the microenvironment of this matrix. More and more researches have proven that three dimensional (3D) culture can reduce the gap between cell culture and physiological environment where cells always live in vivo. This review summarized recent findings on the studies of matrix mechanics that control stem cells (primarily mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)) fate in 3D environment, including matrix stiffness and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness. Considering the exchange of oxygen and nutrients in 3D culture, the effect of fluid shear stress (FSS) on fate decision of stem cells was also discussed in detail. Further, the difference of MSCs response to matrix stiffness between two dimensional (2D) and 3D conditions was compared. Finally, the mechanism of mechanotransduction of stem cells activated by matrix mechanics and FSS in 3D culture was briefly pointed out.

  18. Flow rate dependency of critical wall shear stress in a radial-flow cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, J.G.; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Sindic, M.

    2009-01-01

    of a water or ethanol suspension of starch granules on the surfaces. Depending on the substrate and on the suspending liquid, the aggregates differed in size and shape. Aggregate removal was studied at two flow rates. At the lower flow rate (Re-inlet = 955), the values of critical wall shear stress......In the present work, a radial-flow cell was used to study the removal of starch particle aggregates from several solid substrates (glass, stainless steel, polystyrene and PTFE) in order to determine the critical wall shear stress value for each case. The particle aggregates were formed by aspersion...... for the different surfaces suggested that capillary forces were, for all of them, playing an important role in aggregate adhesion since aqueous based aggregates were always more difficult to remove. At the higher flow rate (Re-inlet = 2016) the critical wall shear stress increased as a result of the change...

  19. Telomere dynamics in human mesenchymal stem cells after exposure to acute oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, M.; Koelvraa, S.; Serakinci, N.;

    2012-01-01

    A gradual shortening of telomeres due to replication can be measured using the standard telomere restriction fragments (TRF) assay and other methods by measuring the mean length of all the telomeres in a cell. In contrast, stress-induced telomere shortening, which is believed to be just...... as important for causing cellular senescence, cannot be measured properly using these methods. Stress-induced telomere shortening caused by, e.g. oxidative damage happens in a stochastic manner leaving just a few single telomeres critically short. It is now possible to visualize these few ultra-short telomeres...... due to the advantages of the newly developed Universal single telomere length assay (STELA), and we therefore believe that this method should be considered the method of choice when measuring the length of telomeres after exposure to oxidative stress. In order to test our hypothesis, cultured human...

  20. JNK and NADPH Oxidase Involved in Fluoride-Induced Oxidative Stress in BV-2 Microglia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive fluoride may cause central nervous system (CNS dysfunction, and oxidative stress is a recognized mode of action of fluoride toxicity. In CNS, activated microglial cells can release more reactive oxygen species (ROS, and NADPH oxidase (NOX is the major enzyme for the production of extracellular superoxide in microglia. ROS have been characterized as an important secondary messenger and modulator for various mammalian intracellular signaling pathways, including the MAPK pathways. In this study we examined ROS production and TNF-α, IL-1β inflammatory cytokines releasing, and the expression of MAPKs in BV-2 microglia cells treated with fluoride. We found that fluoride increased JNK phosphorylation level of BV-2 cells and pretreatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125 markedly reduced the levels of intracellular and NO. NOX inhibitor apocynin and iNOS inhibitor SMT dramatically decreased NaF-induced ROS and NO generations, respectively. Antioxidant melatonin (MEL resulted in a reduction in JNK phosphorylation in fluoride-stimulated BV-2 microglia. The results confirmed that NOX and iNOS played an important role in fluoride inducing oxidative stress and NO production and JNK took part in the oxidative stress induced by fluoride and meanwhile also could be activated by ROS in fluoride-treated BV-2 cells.

  1. Regulation of mitochondrial function and endoplasmic reticulum stress by nitric oxide in pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballano-Infantes, Estefania; Terron-Bautista, José; Beltrán-Povea, Amparo; Cahuana, Gladys M; Soria, Bernat; Nabil, Hajji; Bedoya, Francisco J; Tejedo, Juan R

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) are global processes that are interrelated and regulated by several stress factors. Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional biomolecule with many varieties of physiological and pathological functions, such as the regulation of cytochrome c inhibition and activation of the immune response, ERS and DNA damage; these actions are dose-dependent. It has been reported that in embryonic stem cells, NO has a dual role, controlling differentiation, survival and pluripotency, but the molecular mechanisms by which it modulates these functions are not yet known. Low levels of NO maintain pluripotency and induce mitochondrial biogenesis. It is well established that NO disrupts the mitochondrial respiratory chain and causes changes in mitochondrial Ca2+ flux that induce ERS. Thus, at high concentrations, NO becomes a potential differentiation agent due to the relationship between ERS and the unfolded protein response in many differentiated cell lines. Nevertheless, many studies have demonstrated the need for physiological levels of NO for a proper ERS response. In this review, we stress the importance of the relationships between NO levels, ERS and mitochondrial dysfunction that control stem cell fate as a new approach to possible cell therapy strategies. PMID:28289506

  2. Tula hantavirus triggers pro-apoptotic signals of ER stress in Vero E6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Lankinen, Hilkka; Putkuri, Niina; Vapalahti, Olli; Vaheri, Antti

    2005-03-01

    Tula virus is a member of the Hantavirus genus of the family Bunyaviridae. Viruses of this family have an unusual pattern of intracellular maturation at the ER-Golgi compartment. We recently found that Tula virus, similar to several other hantaviruses, is able to induce apoptosis in cultured cells [Li, X.D., Kukkonen, S., Vapalahti, O., Plyusnin, A., Lankinen, H., Vaheri, A., 2004. Tula hantavirus infection of Vero E6 cells induces apoptosis involving caspase 8 activation. J. Gen. Virol. 85, 3261-3268.]. However, the cellular mechanisms remain to be clarified. In this study, we demonstrate that the progressive replication of Tula virus in Vero E6 cells initiates several death programs that are intimately associated with ER stress: (1) early activation of ER-resident caspase-12; (2) phosphorylation of Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and its downstream target transcriptional factor, c-jun; (3) induction of the pro-apoptotic transcriptional factor, growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153, or C/EBP homologous protein (Gadd153/chop); and (4) changes in the ER-membrane protein BAP31 implying cross-talk with the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, we confirmed that a sustained ER stress was induced marked by an increased expression of an ER chaperone Grp78/BiP. Taken together, we have identified involvement of ER stress-mediated death program in Tula virus-infected Vero E6 cells which provides a new approach to understand the mechanisms in hantavirus-induced apoptosis.

  3. Combinations of Ashwagandha leaf extracts protect brain-derived cells against oxidative stress and induce differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjot Shah

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha, a traditional Indian herb, has been known for its variety of therapeutic activities. We earlier demonstrated anticancer activities in the alcoholic and water extracts of the leaves that were mediated by activation of tumor suppressor functions and oxidative stress in cancer cells. Low doses of these extracts were shown to possess neuroprotective activities in vitro and in vivo assays.We used cultured glioblastoma and neuroblastoma cells to examine the effect of extracts (alcoholic and water as well as their bioactive components for neuroprotective activities against oxidative stress. Various biochemical and imaging assays on the marker proteins of glial and neuronal cells were performed along with their survival profiles in control, stressed and recovered conditions. We found that the extracts and one of the purified components, withanone, when used at a low dose, protected the glial and neuronal cells from oxidative as well as glutamate insult, and induced their differentiation per se. Furthermore, the combinations of extracts and active component were highly potent endorsing the therapeutic merit of the combinational approach.Ashwagandha leaf derived bioactive compounds have neuroprotective potential and may serve as supplement for brain health.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in the proapoptotic action of edelfosine in solid tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Miguel, Teresa; Fonteriz, Rosalba I; Vay, Laura; Gajate, Consuelo; López-Hernández, Silvia; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2007-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been posited as a potential anticancer target. The synthetic antitumor alkyl-lysophospholipid analogue edelfosine accumulates in the ER of solid tumor cells. This ER accumulation of the drug leads to the inhibition of phosphatidylcholine and protein synthesis, G(2)-M arrest, depletion of ER-stored Ca(2+), Bax up-regulation and activation, transcriptional factor growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 up-regulation, caspase-4 and caspase-8 activation, and eventually to apoptosis. Edelfosine prompted ER stress apoptotic signaling, but not the survival unfolded protein response. Edelfosine also induced persistent c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Gene transfer-mediated overexpression of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, which plays a crucial role in ER stress, enhanced edelfosine-induced JNK activation and apoptosis. Inhibition of JNK, caspase-4, or caspase-8 activation diminished edelfosine-induced apoptosis. Edelfosine treatment led to the generation of the p20 caspase-8 cleavage fragment of BAP31, directing proapoptotic signals between the ER and the mitochondria. bax(-/-)bak(-/-) double-knockout cells fail to undergo edelfosine-induced ER-stored Ca(2+) release and apoptosis. Wild-type and bax(-/-)bak(-/-) cells showed similar patterns of phosphatidylcholine and protein synthesis inhibition, despite their differences in drug sensitivity. Thus, edelfosine-induced apoptosis is dependent on Bax/Bak-mediated ER-stored Ca(2+) release, but phosphatidylcholine and protein synthesis inhibition is not critical. Transfection-enforced expression of Bcl-X(L), which localizes specifically in mitochondria, prevented apoptosis without inhibiting ER-stored Ca(2+) release. These data reveal that edelfosine induces an ER stress response in solid tumor cells, providing novel insights into the edelfosine-mediated antitumor activity. Our data also indicate that mitochondria are indispensable for this edelfosine-induced cell

  5. Mécanismes de la peroxydation lipidique et des anti-oxydations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cillard Josiane

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid peroxidation is a general phenomenon which takes place in foods as well as in cellular membranes and lipoproteins. It leads to oxidative dammages with consequences to food preservation and to the development of various diseases. The targets of lipid oxidation are the polyunsaturated fatty acids. Owing to the fact that oxygen can exist under 2 states, a ground state (3O2 and an excited state (1O2, lipid peroxidation can proceed by 2 different reactions. One which involves (3O2, is a free-radical chain reaction with 3 steps (initiation by free radicals, propagation and terminaison, the other which involves (1O2 is a fast reaction with direct addition of oxygen to the double bonds of fatty acids. Both reactions lead to the formation of hydroperoxides as primary products. Hydroperoxides decomposed rapidly to give many secondary products such as lipid free radicals which contribute to increase the oxidation of other molecules such as proteins, nucleic acids and other lipids. Ketones, alkanes (pentane, ethane and aldehydes (MDA, 4HNE are also formed by hydroperoxide decomposition. Aldehydes are reactive compounds which bind to the amino group of proteins, nucleic acids and lipids causing dammages to these molecules. The consequences for membranes are alterations of their functions which could lead to cell death. In food hydroperoxide decomposition give rise to qualitative alterations. Lipid peroxidation is a major problem for food industry as well as for human health since it is associated to many diseases. Antioxidants can prevent or delay lipid peroxidation by different mechanisms.

  6. Microstructure et proprietes electriques de l'oxyde de vanadium pour les microbolometres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux, Catherine

    section contains V3O7 in addition to the multiple orientations of V2O5. Those germinations which have already been observed but not explained in literature can be attributed to the accumulation of germination centers, a stress buildup for the crystalline sections, and a substrate heating caused by the ions bombardment. This last effect is also suggested to be the cause of the amorphous phase crystallisation for the films with longer deposition times. Films deposited at different temperatures show the same microstructure transitions. Two different behavior regimes can be proposed as function of the adatoms' energy. For low temperature, increasing the adatom energy increases the diffusion which promotes the formation of the lowest surface energy stoichiometry and orientation, V2O 5(001). At higher temperature, energy is sufficient to form more energetically expensive orientation and phases. Resistivity is strongly dependant on grain boundaries density as seen by its relationship with lateral grain size. The thin film resistivity is also increased with the number of different crystallographic orientation present in it. To circumvent the high sheet resistance of the deposited single layer films, a multilayer stacking of alternating oxides and metal layers has been deposited. This approach has permitted this project's industrial collaborator to obtain a sheet resistance of 250 kO/□and a TCR of -1.59 %/K. The microstructure of the multilayer is however very heterogeneous. Not only can the metal layers be identified, it is also possible to observe the amorphous to polycrystalline transition described higher for every oxide layer. This multilayer, as well as the best single layer film produced have been annealed for 2 hours at 400°C in high vacuum. The annealed multilayer doesn't show any diffraction peaks, has very low resistance, and an almost null TCR generally attributed to metallic compounds We suggest that the diffusion of the vanadium layers into the stack created a

  7. The clinical relevance of cell-based therapy for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a common disorder affecting the quality of life for millions of women worldwide. Effective surgical procedures involving synthetic permanent meshes exist, but significant short- and long-term complications occur. Cell-based therapy using autologous stem cells...... or progenitor cells presents an alternative approach, which aims at repairing the anatomical components of the urethral continence mechanism. In vitro expanded progenitor cells isolated from muscle biopsies have been most intensely investigated, and both preclinical trials and a few clinical trials have...... provided proof of concept for the idea. An initial enthusiasm caused by positive results from early clinical trials has been dampened by the recognition of scientific irregularities. At the same time, the safety issue for cell-based therapy has been highlighted by the appearance of new and comprehensive...

  8. Comment on "Intracellular stresses in patterned cell assemblies" by M. Moussus et al., Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 2414.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Dhananjay T; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2014-10-21

    To quantify intercellular stresses in a cell sheet, Moussus et al. have recently proposed an approach which, under appropriate circumstances, may lead to significant simplification of the calculations required for stress recovery. Central to their approach is the assumption that the displacement fields of the substrate and the cells are continuous across the cell/substrate boundary. The purpose of this comment is to assess the validity and to highlight the implications of the displacement continuity assumption.

  9. Antioxidant effect of mogrosides against oxidative stress induced by palmitic acid in mouse insulinoma NIT-1 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Q.; Chen, S. Y.; Deng,L.D.; Feng, L.P.; Huang,L.Z.; R. R. Yu

    2013-01-01

    Excessive oxidative stress in pancreatic β cells, caused by glucose and fatty acids, is associated with the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Mogrosides have shown antioxidant and antidiabetic activities in animal models of diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study evaluated the antioxidant effect of mogrosides on insulinoma cells under oxidative stress caused by palmitic acid, and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. Mouse insulinoma NIT-1 cells were cult...

  10. Antioxidant effect of mogrosides against oxidative stress induced by palmitic acid in mouse insulinoma NIT-1 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Q.; Chen, S. Y.; Deng,L.D.; Feng, L.P.; Huang,L.Z.; R. R. Yu

    2013-01-01

    Excessive oxidative stress in pancreatic β cells, caused by glucose and fatty acids, is associated with the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Mogrosides have shown antioxidant and antidiabetic activities in animal models of diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study evaluated the antioxidant effect of mogrosides on insulinoma cells under oxidative stress caused by palmitic acid, and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. Mouse insulinoma NIT-1 cells were...

  11. A review of adaptive mechanisms in cell responses towards oxidative stress caused by dental resin monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krifka, Stephanie; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Schmalz, Gottfried; Schweikl, Helmut

    2013-06-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. Monomers like triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) or 2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA) are cytotoxic via apoptosis, induce genotoxic effects, and delay the cell cycle. Monomers also influence the response of cells of the innate immune system, inhibit specific odontoblast cell functions, or delay the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization processes in pulp-derived cells including stem cells. These observations indicate that resin monomers act as environmental stressors which inevitably disturb regulatory cellular networks through interference with signal transduction pathways. We hypothesize that an understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying these phenomena will provide a better estimation of the consequences associated with dental therapy using composite materials, and lead to innovative therapeutic strategies and improved materials being used at tissue interfaces within the oral cavity. Current findings strongly suggest that monomers enhance the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is most likely the cause of biological reactions activated by dental composites and resin monomers. The aim of the present review manuscript is to discuss adaptive cell responses to oxidative stress caused by monomers. The particular significance of a tightly controlled network of non-enzymatic as well as enzymatic antioxidants for the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis and antioxidant defense in monomer-exposed cells will be addressed. The expression of ROS-metabolizing antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1/2), and catalase in cells exposed to monomers will be discussed with particular emphasis on the role

  12. Polyethylene terephthalate membrane grafted with peptidomimetics: endothelial cell compatibility and retention under shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémy, Murielle; Bareille, Reine; Rerat, Vincent; Bourget, Chantal; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Bordenave, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    The present work aimed to treat a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surface to make the biomaterial more 'attractive' in terms of attachment and shear stress response to endothelial cells with a view to possible applications in vascular grafting. A surface wet-chemistry protocol was applied to graft track-etched PET membranes with RGD peptidomimetics based on the tyrosine template and active at the nano-level vs. isolated human αvβ3 receptor, which was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy for characterization. A primary culture of human saphenous vein endothelial cells was used before and after sterilization of the membranes (heat treatment or γ-ray irradiation) to test the benefit of grafting. The optimal surface concentrations of grafted molecules were around 50 pmol/cm². Compared to GRGDS, the peptidomimetics promoted cell attachment with similar or slightly better performances. Endothelialized grafted supports were further exposed to 2 h of shear stress mimicking arterial conditions. Cells were lost on non-grafted PET whereas cells on grafted polymers sterilized by γ-ray irradiation withstood forces with no significant difference in focal contacts. At the mRNA level, cells on functionalized PET were able to respond to shear stress with NFkB upregulation. Thus, grafting of peptidomimetics as ligands of the αvβ3 integrin could be a relevant strategy to improve the adhesion of human endothelial cells and to obtain an efficient endothelialized PET for the surgery of small-diameter vascular prostheses.

  13. A Sensitive Sensor Cell Line for the Detection of Oxidative Stress Responses in Cultured Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hofmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the progress of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis, chemicals that cause the generation of reactive oxygen species trigger a heat shock response in keratinocytes. In this study, an optical sensor cell line based on cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the control of the stress-inducible HSP70B’ promoter were constructed. Exposure of HaCaT sensor cells to 25 µM cadmium, a model substance for oxidative stress induction, provoked a 1.7-fold increase in total glutathione and a ~300-fold induction of transcript level of the gene coding for heat shock protein HSP70B’. An extract of Arnica montana flowers resulted in a strong induction of the HSP70B’ gene and a pronounced decrease of total glutathione in keratinocytes. The HSP70B’ promoter-based sensor cells conveniently detected cadmium-induced stress using GFP fluorescence as read-out with a limit of detection of 6 µM cadmium. In addition the sensor cells responded to exposure of cells to A. montana extract with induction of GFP fluorescence. Thus, the HaCaT sensor cells provide a means for the automated detection of the compromised redox status of keratinocytes as an early indicator of the development of human skin disorders and could be applied for the prediction of skin irritation in more complex in vitro 3D human skin models and in the development of micro-total analysis systems (µTAS that may be utilized in dermatology, toxicology, pharmacology and drug screenings.

  14. A sensitive sensor cell line for the detection of oxidative stress responses in cultured human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ute; Priem, Melanie; Bartzsch, Christine; Winckler, Thomas; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2014-06-25

    In the progress of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis, chemicals that cause the generation of reactive oxygen species trigger a heat shock response in keratinocytes. In this study, an optical sensor cell line based on cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the stress-inducible HSP70B' promoter were constructed. Exposure of HaCaT sensor cells to 25 µM cadmium, a model substance for oxidative stress induction, provoked a 1.7-fold increase in total glutathione and a ~300-fold induction of transcript level of the gene coding for heat shock protein HSP70B'. An extract of Arnica montana flowers resulted in a strong induction of the HSP70B' gene and a pronounced decrease of total glutathione in keratinocytes. The HSP70B' promoter-based sensor cells conveniently detected cadmium-induced stress using GFP fluorescence as read-out with a limit of detection of 6 µM cadmium. In addition the sensor cells responded to exposure of cells to A. montana extract with induction of GFP fluorescence. Thus, the HaCaT sensor cells provide a means for the automated detection of the compromised redox status of keratinocytes as an early indicator of the development of human skin disorders and could be applied for the prediction of skin irritation in more complex in vitro 3D human skin models and in the development of micro-total analysis systems (µTAS) that may be utilized in dermatology, toxicology, pharmacology and drug screenings.

  15. Alterations in cancer cell mechanical properties after fluid shear stress exposure: a micropipette aspiration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chivukula VK

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Venkat Keshav Chivukula,1 Benjamin L Krog,1,2 Jones T Nauseef,2 Michael D Henry,2 Sarah C Vigmostad1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, USA Abstract: Over 90% of cancer deaths result not from primary tumor development, but from metastatic tumors that arise after cancer cells circulate to distal sites via the circulatory system. While it is known that metastasis is an inefficient process, the effect of hemodynamic parameters such as fluid shear stress (FSS on the viability and efficacy of metastasis is not well understood. Recent work has shown that select cancer cells may be able to survive and possibly even adapt to FSS in vitro. The current research seeks to characterize the effect of FSS on the mechanical properties of suspended cancer cells in vitro. Nontransformed prostate epithelial cells (PrEC LH and transformed prostate cancer cells (PC-3 were used in this study. The Young's modulus was determined using micropipette aspiration. We examined cells in suspension but not exposed to FSS (unsheared and immediately after exposure to high (6,400 dyn/cm2 and low (510 dyn/cm2 FSS. The PrEC LH cells were ~140% stiffer than the PC-3 cells not exposed to FSS. Post-FSS exposure, there was an increase of ~77% in Young's modulus after exposure to high FSS and a ~47% increase in Young's modulus after exposure to low FSS for the PC-3 cells. There was no significant change in the Young's modulus of PrEC LH cells post-FSS exposure. Our findings indicate that cancer cells adapt to FSS, with an increased Young's modulus being one of the adaptive responses, and that this adaptation is specific only to PC-3 cells and is not seen in PrEC LH cells. Moreover, this adaptation appears to be graded in response to the magnitude of FSS experienced by the cancer cells. This is the first study

  16. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R. [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Redondo, Santiago [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Peçanha, Franck [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Martín, Angela [Departamento de Bioquímica, Fisiología y Genética Molecular, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922, Alcorcón (Spain); Fortuño, Ana [Área de Ciencias Cardiovasculares, Centro de Investigación Médica Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31008, Pamplona (Spain); Cachofeiro, Victoria [Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Tejerina, Teresa [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Salaices, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.salaices@uam.es [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  17. Low-concentration uranium enters the HepG2 cell nucleus rapidly and induces cell stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguen, Yann; Suhard, David; Poisson, Clémentine; Manens, Line; Elie, Christelle; Landon, Géraldine; Bouvier-Capely, Céline; Rouas, Caroline; Benderitter, Marc; Tessier, Christine

    2015-12-25

    This study aimed to compare the cell stress effects of low and high uranium concentrations and relate them to its localization, precipitate formation, and exposure time. The time-course analysis shows that uranium appears in cell nuclei as a soluble form within 5 min of exposure, and quickly induces expression of antioxidant and DNA repair genes. On the other hand, precipitate formations began at the very beginning of exposure at the 300-μM concentration, but took longer to appear at lower concentrations. Adaptive response might occur at low concentrations but are overwhelmed at high concentrations, especially when uranium precipitates are abundant.

  18. Multi wall carbon nanotubes induce oxidative stress and cytotoxicity in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Anreddy Rama Narsimha; Reddy, Yellu Narsimha; Krishna, Devarakonda Rama; Himabindu, Vurimindi

    2010-06-04

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the potential toxicity and the general mechanism involved in multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)-induced cytotoxicity using human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293) cells. Two multi wall carbon nanotubes (coded as MWCNT1, size: 90-150nm and MWCNT2, size: 60-80nm) used in this study are MWCNT1 (produced by the electric arc method and size of the nanotubes was 90-150nm) and MWCNT2 (produced by the chemical vapor deposition method with size of 60-80nm). To elucidate the possible mechanisms of MWCNT induced cytotoxicity, cell viability, mitochondrial function (MTT assay), cell membrane damage (LDH assay), reduced glutathione (GSH), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and lipid peroxidation levels were quantitatively assessed under carbon nanotubes exposed (48h) conditions. Exposure of different sizes of two carbon nanotubes at dosage levels between 3 and 300mug/ml decreased cell viability in a concentration dependent manner. The IC(50) values (concentration of nanoparticles to induce 50% cell mortality) of two (MWCNT1, MWCNT2) nanoparticles were found as 42.10 and 36.95mug/ml. Exposure of MWCNT (10-100mug/ml) to HEK cells resulted in concentration dependent cell membrane damage (as indicated by the increased levels of LDH), increased production of IL-8, increased TBARS and decreased intracellular glutathione levels. The cytotoxicity and oxidative stress was significantly more in MWCNT2 exposed cells than MWCNT1. In summary, exposure of carbon nanotubes resulted in a concentration dependent cytotoxicity in cultured HEK293 cells that was associated with increased oxidative stress.

  19. Enzymatic Oxydate-Triggered Self-Illuminated Photoelectrochemical Sensing Platform for Portable Immunoassay Using Digital Multimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jian; Qiu, Zhenli; Zhou, Qian; Lin, Youxiu; Lu, Minghua; Tang, Dianping

    2016-03-01

    Herein a novel split-type photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensing platform was designed for sensitive detection of low-abundance biomarkers (prostate-specific antigen, PSA, used in this case) by coupling a peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence (PO-CL) self-illuminated system with digital multimeter (DMM) readout. The PEC detection device consisted of a capacitor/DMM-joined electronic circuit and a PO-CL-based self-illuminated cell. Initially, reduced graphene oxide-doped BiVO4 (BiVO4-rGO) photovoltaic materials with good photoelectric properties was integrated into the capacitor/DMM-joined circuit for photocurrent generation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, as the hole-trapping reagent). A sandwich-type immunoreaction with target PSA was carried out in capture antibody-coated microplates by using glucose oxidase/detection antibody-conjugating gold nanoparticle (pAb2-AuNP-GOx). Accompanying the sandwiched immunocomplex, the labeled GOx could oxidize glucose to produce H2O2. The as-generated H2O2 could act as the coreaction reagent to trigger the chemiluminescence of the peroxyoxalate system and the PEC reaction of the BiVO4-rGO. Meanwhile, the self-illuminated light could induce photovoltaic material (BiVO4-rGO) to produce a voltage that was utilized to charge an external capacitor. With the switch closed, the capacitor could discharge through the DMM and provide an instantaneous current. Different from conventional PEC immunoassays, the as-generated photoelectron was stored in the capacitor and released instantaneously to amplify the photocurrent. Under the optimal conditions, the transient current increased with the increasing target PSA concentration in the dynamic working range from 10 pg mL(-1) to 80 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit (LOD) of 3 pg mL(-1). This work demonstrated for the first time that the peroxyoxalate CL system could be used as a suitable substitute of physical light source to apply in PEC immunoassay. In addition, this methodology

  20. Urate Oxidase Knockdown Decreases Oxidative Stress in a Murine Hepatic Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth M. Cleveland

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans, birds, and some primates do not express the uric acid degrading enzyme urate oxidase (UOX and, as a result, have plasma uric acid concentrations higher than UOX expressing animals. Although high uric acid concentrations are suggested to increase the antioxidant defense system and provide a health advantage to animals without UOX, knockout mice lacking UOX develop pathological complications including gout and kidney failure. As an alternative to the knockout model, RNA interference was used to decrease UOX expression using stable transfection in a mouse hepatic cell line (ATCC, FL83B. Urate oxidase mRNA was reduced 66% (p < 0.05 compared to wild type, as measured by real time RT-PCR. To determine if UOX knockdown resulted in enhanced protection against oxidative stress, cells were challenged with hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI or 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1. Compared to wild type, cells with UOX knockdown exhibited a 37.2 ± 3.5% reduction (p < 0.05 in the electron spin resonance (ESR signal after being exposed to Cr(VI and displayed less DNA fragmentation (p < 0.05 following SIN-1 treatment. Cell viability decreased in wild type cells (p < 0.05, but not cells with UOX knockdown, after treatment with SIN-1. These results are consistent with an increased intracellular uric acid concentration and an increased defense against oxidative stress.

  1. Chokeberry Anthocyanin Extract as Pancreatic β-Cell Protectors in Two Models of Induced Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitriţa Rugină

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of a chokeberry anthocyanin extract (CAE on pancreatic β-cells (βTC3 exposed to hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2- and high glucose- (HG- induced oxidative stress conditions. In order to quantify individual anthocyanins high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC coupled to photodiode array (PDA was used. The identification of the fragment ion pattern of anthocyanins was carried out by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS. The results showed that physiologically achievable concentrations of CAE (1, 5, and 10 μM protect βTC3 against H2O2- and HG-induced cytotoxicity. Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were increased in pancreatic β-cells pretreated with CAE compared to cells exposed to the prooxidant agents. GSH levels initially reduced after exposure to H2O2 and HG were restored by pretreatment with CAE. Insulin secretion in βTC3 cells was enhanced by CAE pretreatment. CAE restored the insulin pool and diminished the intracellular reactive oxygen species level in glucose-induced stress condition in βTC3 cells. These results demonstrate that anthocyanins from CAE were biologically active, showing a secretagogue potential and an antioxidative protection of enzymatic systems, conferring protection against H2O2 and glucose toxicity in βTC3 cells.

  2. Oxidative stress activates the TRPM2-Ca(2+)-CaMKII-ROS signaling loop to induce cell death in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Huang, Lihong; Yue, Jianbo

    2016-12-20

    High intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause oxidative stress that results in numerous pathologies, including cell death. Transient potential receptor melastatin-2 (TRPM2), a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel, is mainly activated by intracellular adenosine diphosphate ribose (ADPR) in response to oxidative stress. Here we studied the role and mechanisms of TRPM2-mediated Ca(2+) influx on oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer cells. We found that oxidative stress activated the TRPM2-Ca(2+)-CaMKII cascade to inhibit early autophagy induction, which ultimately led to cell death in TRPM2 expressing cancer cells. On the other hand, TRPM2 knockdown switched cells from cell death to autophagy for survival in response to oxidative stress. Moreover, we found that oxidative stress activated the TRPM2-CaMKII cascade to further induce intracellular ROS production, which led to mitochondria fragmentation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In summary, our data demonstrated that oxidative stress activates the TRPM2-Ca(2+)-CaMKII-ROS signal loop to inhibit autophagy and induce cell death.

  3. Dengue-induced autophagy, virus replication and protection from cell death require ER stress (PERK) pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datan, E; Roy, S G; Germain, G; Zali, N; McLean, J E; Golshan, G; Harbajan, S; Lockshin, R A; Zakeri, Z

    2016-03-03

    A virus that reproduces in a host without killing cells can easily establish a successful infection. Previously, we showed that dengue-2, a virus that threatens 40% of the world, induces autophagy, enabling dengue to reproduce in cells without triggering cell death. Autophagy further protects the virus-laden cells from further insults. In this study, we evaluate how it does so; we show that dengue upregulates host pathways that increase autophagy, namely endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling followed by production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Inhibition of ER stress or ATM signaling abrogates the dengue-conferred protection against other cell stressors. Direct inhibition of ER stress response in infected cells decreases autophagosome turnover, reduces ROS production and limits reproduction of dengue virus. Blocking ATM activation, which is an early response to infection, decreases transcription of ER stress response proteins, but ATM has limited impact on production of ROS and virus titers. Production of ROS determines only late-onset autophagy in infected cells and is not necessary for dengue-induced protection from stressors. Collectively, these results demonstrate that among the multiple autophagy-inducing pathways during infection, ER stress signaling is more important to viral replication and protection of cells than either ATM or ROS-mediated signaling. To limit virus production and survival of dengue-infected cells, one must address the earliest phase of autophagy, induced by ER stress.

  4. Protective effect of alpha-mangostin against oxidative stress induced-retinal cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuan; Su, Tu; Qiu, Xiaorong; Mao, Pingan; Xu, Yidan; Hu, Zizhong; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Xinhua; Xie, Ping; Liu, Qinghuai

    2016-01-01

    It is known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathogenesis. Alpha-mangostin is the main xanthone purified from mangosteen known as anti-oxidative properties. The aim of the study was to test the protective effect of alpha-mangostin against oxidative stress both in retina of light-damaged mice model and in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-stressed RPE cells. We observed that alpha-mangostin significantly inhibited light-induced degeneration of photoreceptors and 200 μM H2O2-induced apoptosis of RPE cells. 200 μM H2O2-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and light-induced generation of malondialdehyde (MDA) were suppressed by alpha-mangostin. Alpha-mangostin stimulation resulted in an increase of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity and glutathione (GSH) content both in vivo and vitro. Furthermore, the mechanism of retinal protection against oxidative stress by alpha-mangostin involves accumulation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-E2-related factor (Nrf2) along with up-regulation the expression of heme oxygenas-1 (HO-1). Meanwhile, alpha-mangostin can activate the expression of PKC-δ and down-regulate the expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including ERK1/2, JNK, P38. The results suggest that alpha-mangostin could be a new approach to suspend the onset and development of AMD. PMID:26888416

  5. Elevated copper and oxidative stress in cancer cells as a target for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupte, Anshul; Mumper, Russell J

    2009-02-01

    As we gain a better understanding of the factors affecting cancer etiology, we can design improved treatment strategies. Over the past three to four decades, there have been numerous successful efforts in recognizing important cellular proteins essential in cancer growth and therefore these proteins have been targeted for cancer treatment. However, studies have shown that targeting one or two proteins in the complex cancer cascade may not be sufficient in controlling and/or inhibiting cancer growth. Therefore, there is a need to examine features which are potentially involved in multiple facets of cancer development. In this review we discuss the targeting of the elevated copper (both in serum and tumor) and oxidative stress levels in cancer with the aid of a copper chelator d-penicillamine (d-pen) for potential cancer treatment. Numerous studies in the literature have reported that both the serum and tumor copper levels are elevated in a variety of malignancies, including both solid tumor and blood cancer. Further, the elevated copper levels have been shown to be directly correlated to cancer progression. Enhanced levels of intrinsic oxidative stress has been shown in variety of tumors, possibly due to the combination of factors such as elevated active metabolism, mitochondrial mutation, cytokines, and inflammation. The cancer cells under sustained ROS stress tend to heavily utilize adaptation mechanisms and may exhaust cellular ROS-buffering capacity. Therefore, the elevated copper levels and increased oxidative stress in cancer cells provide for a prospect of selective cancer treatment.

  6. Toxin release in response to oxidative stress and programmed cell death in the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Cliff [Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, 701 Seaway Drive, Ft. Pierce, FL 34949 (United States)]. E-mail: Ross@sms.si.edu; Santiago-Vazquez, Lory [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (United States); Paul, Valerie [Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, 701 Seaway Drive, Ft. Pierce, FL 34949 (United States)

    2006-06-10

    An unprecedented bloom of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Kuetz. occurred in the St. Lucie Estuary, FL in the summer of 2005. Samples were analyzed for toxicity by ELISA and by use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific oligonucleotide primers for the mcyB gene that has previously been correlated with the biosynthesis of toxic microcystins. Despite the fact that secreted toxin levels were relatively low in dense natural assemblages (3.5 {mu}g l{sup -1}), detectable toxin levels increased by 90% when M. aeruginosa was stressed by an increase in salinity, physical injury, application of the chemical herbicide paraquat, or UV irradiation. The application of the same stressors caused a three-fold increase in the production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} when compared to non-stressed cells. The application of micromolar concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induced programmed cell death (PCD) as measured by a caspase protease assay. Catalase was capable of inhibiting PCD, implicating H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as the inducing oxidative species. Our results indicate that physical stressors induce oxidative stress, which results in PCD and a concomitant release of toxin into the surrounding media. Remediation strategies that induce cellular stress should be approached with caution since these protocols are capable of releasing elevated levels of microcystins into the environment.

  7. Shared signatures of social stress and aging in peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder-Mackler, Noah; Somel, Mehmet; Tung, Jenny

    2014-10-01

    Chronic social stress is a predictor of both aging-related disease and mortality risk. Hence, chronic stress has been hypothesized to directly exacerbate the process of physiological aging. Here, we evaluated this hypothesis at the level of gene regulation. We compared two data sets of genome-wide gene expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs): one that captured aging effects and another that focused on chronic social stress. Overall, we found that the direction, although not necessarily the magnitude, of significant gene expression changes tends to be shared between the two data sets. This overlap was observable at three levels: (i) individual genes; (ii) general functional categories of genes; and (iii) molecular pathways implicated in aging. However, we also found evidence that heterogeneity in PBMC composition limits the power to detect more extensive similarities, suggesting that our findings reflect an underestimate of the degree to which age and social stress influence gene regulation in parallel. Cell type-specific data on gene regulation will be important to overcome this limitation in the future studies.

  8. Bcl-2 family members inhibit oxidative stress-induced programmed cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Rong; Dunigan, David D; Dickman, Martin B

    2003-05-15

    Selected antiapoptotic genes were expressed in baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to evaluate cytoprotective effects during oxidative stress. When exposed to treatments resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including H(2)O(2), menadione, or heat shock, wild-type yeast died and exhibited apoptotic-like characteristics, consistent with previous studies. Yeast strains were generated expressing nematode ced-9, human bcl-2, or chicken bcl-xl genes. These transformants tolerated a range of oxidative stresses, did not display features associated with apoptosis, and remained viable under conditions that were lethal to wild-type yeast. Yeast strains expressing a mutant antiapoptotic gene (bcl-2 deltaalpha 5-6), known to be nonfunctional in mammalian cells, were unable to tolerate any of the ROS-generating insults. These data are the first report showing CED-9 has cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, and add CED-9 to the list of Bcl-2 protein family members that modulate ROS-mediated programmed cell death. In addition, these data indicate that Bcl-2 family members protect wild-type yeast from physiological stresses. Taken together, these data support the concept of the broad evolutionary conservation and functional similarity of the apoptotic processes in eukaryotic organisms.

  9. Cannabidiol protects oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from inflammation-induced apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecha, M; Torrao, A S; Mestre, L; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Mechoulam, R; Guaza, C

    2012-06-28

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is the most abundant cannabinoid in Cannabis sativa that has no psychoactive properties. CBD has been approved to treat inflammation, pain and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), of which demyelination and oligodendrocyte loss are hallmarks. Thus, we investigated the protective effects of CBD against the damage to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) mediated by the immune system. Doses of 1 μM CBD protect OPCs from oxidative stress by decreasing the production of reactive oxygen species. CBD also protects OPCs from apoptosis induced by LPS/IFNγ through the decrease of caspase 3 induction via mechanisms that do not involve CB1, CB2, TRPV1 or PPARγ receptors. Tunicamycin-induced OPC death was attenuated by CBD, suggesting a role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the mode of action of CBD. This protection against ER stress-induced apoptosis was associated with reduced phosphorylation of eiF2α, one of the initiators of the ER stress pathway. Indeed, CBD diminished the phosphorylation of PKR and eiF2α induced by LPS/IFNγ. The pro-survival effects of CBD in OPCs were accompanied by decreases in the expression of ER apoptotic effectors (CHOP, Bax and caspase 12), and increased expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. These findings suggest that attenuation of the ER stress pathway is involved in the 'oligoprotective' effects of CBD during inflammation.

  10. Pulsatile atheroprone shear stress affects the expression of transient receptor potential channels in human endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Vorderwülbecke, Bernd J; Marki, Alex;

    2012-01-01

    shear stress, producing a constant laminar flow (generating a shear stress of 6 dyne/cm(2)), laminar pulsatile atheroprotective flow (with a mean shear stress of 20 dyne/cm(2)), or laminar atheroprone bidirectional flow (with a mean shear stress of 0 dyne/cm(2)) differentially induced TRPC6 and TRPV1 m......RNA as measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and normalized to GAPDH expression. Thereby, TRPC6 and TRPV1 mRNA expressions were significantly increased after 24 hours of exposure to an atheroprone flow profile compared with an atheroprotective flow profile. Furthermore, the expression of transcription factors...... GATA1 and GATA4 was significantly correlated with the expression of TRPC6 mRNA. In contrast, after 24 hours of constant laminar flow, the expression of TRPC6 and TRPV1 mRNA was unchanged, whereas the expression of TRPC3 and TRPM7 was significantly higher in endothelial cells exposed to shear stress...

  11. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutant R132H sensitizes glioma cells to BCNU-induced oxidative stress and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrenz, Isabelle Vanessa; Antonietti, Patrick; Pusch, Stefan; Capper, David; Balss, Jörg; Voigt, Sophia; Weissert, Susanne; Mukrowsky, Alicia; Frank, Jan; Senft, Christian; Seifert, Volker; von Deimling, Andreas; Kögel, Donat

    2013-11-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) decarboxylates isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) leading to generation of NADPH, which is required to regenerate reduced glutathione (GSH), the major cellular ROS scavenger. Mutation of R132 of IDH1 abrogates generation of α-KG and leads to conversion of α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate. We hypothesized that glioma cells expressing mutant IDH1 have a diminished antioxidative capacity and therefore may encounter an ensuing loss of cytoprotection under conditions of oxidative stress. Our study was performed with LN229 cells stably overexpressing IDH1 R132H and wild type IDH1 or with a lentiviral IDH1 knockdown. Quantification of GSH under basal conditions and following treatment with the glutathione reductase inhibitor BCNU revealed significantly lower GSH levels in IDH1 R132H expressing cells and IDH1 KD cells compared to their respective controls. FACS analysis of cell death and ROS production also demonstrated an increased sensitivity of IDH1-R132H-expressing cells and IDH1 KD cells to BCNU, but not to temozolomide. The sensitivity of IDH1-R132H-expressing cells and IDH1 KD cells to ROS induction and cell death was further enhanced with the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid and under glutamine free conditions, indicating that these cells were more addicted to glutaminolysis. Increased sensitivity to BCNU-induced ROS production and cell death was confirmed in HEK293 cells inducibly expressing the IDH1 mutants R132H, R132C and R132L. Based on these findings we propose that in addition to its established pro-tumorigenic effects, mutant IDH1 may also limit the resistance of gliomas to specific death stimuli, therefore opening new perspectives for therapy.

  12. Protective effect of hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol against oxidative stress in kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loru, D; Incani, A; Deiana, M; Corona, G; Atzeri, A; Melis, M P; Rosa, A; Dessì, M A

    2009-01-01

    Bioavailability studies in animals and humans fed with extravirgin olive oil demonstrated that hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol, the major simple phenolic compounds in extravirgin olive oil, are dose-dependently absorbed and excreted. Once absorbed, they undergo extensive metabolism; hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol concentrate mainly in the kidney, where they may exert an important role in the prevention of oxidative stress induced renal dysfunction. In this study we monitored the ability of hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol to protect renal cells (LLC-PK1) following oxidative damage induced by H2O2. Oxidative stress was evaluated by monitoring the changes of the membrane lipid fraction. Hydroxytyrosol exerted a significant antioxidant action, inhibiting the production of MDA, fatty acids hydroperoxides and 7-ketocholesterol, major oxidation products of unsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol, and thus protecting the cells from H2O2-induced damage. Tyrosol, instead, in this experimental model, did not exert any protective effect.

  13. Regulation of SUMO2 Target Proteins by the Proteasome in Human Cells Exposed to Replication Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2015-01-01

    In human cells, SUMO2 is predominantly conjugated to target proteins in response to cellular stress. Previous studies suggested that proteins conjugated to SUMO2, but not to SUMO1, could be regulated by the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome system. Hence, we set out to understand the role of the prot......In human cells, SUMO2 is predominantly conjugated to target proteins in response to cellular stress. Previous studies suggested that proteins conjugated to SUMO2, but not to SUMO1, could be regulated by the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome system. Hence, we set out to understand the role...... of genome instability, which is suggested to drive tumorigenesis and possibly aging, our data will facilitate future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology....

  14. Effects of Cigarette Smoke Condensate on Oxidative Stress, Apoptotic Cell Death, and HIV Replication in Human Monocytic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pss Rao

    Full Text Available While cigarette smoking is prevalent amongst HIV-infected patients, the effects of cigarette smoke constituents in cells of myeloid lineage are poorly known. Recently, we have shown that nicotine induces oxidative stress through cytochrome P450 (CYP 2A6-mediated pathway in U937 monocytic cells. The present study was designed to examine the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC, which contains majority of tobacco constituents, on oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, expression of CYP1A1, and/or HIV-1 replication in HIV-infected (U1 and uninfected U937 cells. The effects of CSC on induction of CYP1 enzymes in HIV-infected primary macrophages were also analyzed. The results showed that the CSC-mediated increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in U937 cells is dose- and time-dependent. Moreover, CSC treatment was found to induce cytotoxicity in U937 cells through the apoptotic pathway via activation of caspase-3. Importantly, pretreatment with vitamin C blocked the CSC-mediated production of ROS and induction of caspase-3 activity. In U1 cells, acute treatment of CSC increased ROS production at 6H (>2-fold and both ROS (>2 fold and HIV-1 replication (>3-fold after chronic treatment. The CSC mediated effects were associated with robust induction in the expression of CYP1A1 mRNA upon acute CSC treatment of U937 and U1 cells (>20-fold, and upon chronic CSC treatment to U1 cells (>30-fold. In addition, the CYP1A1 induction in U937 cells was mediated through the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor pathway. Lastly, CSC, which is known to increase viral replication in primary macrophages, was also found to induce CYP1 enzymes in HIV-infected primary macrophages. While mRNA levels of both CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 were elevated following CSC treatment, only CYP1B1 protein levels were increased in HIV-infected primary macrophages. In conclusion, these results suggest a possible association between oxidative stress, CYP1 expression, and viral replication in

  15. Adaptation of endothelial cells to physiologically-modeled, variable shear stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S Uzarski

    Full Text Available Endothelial cell (EC function is mediated by variable hemodynamic shear stress patterns at the vascular wall, where complex shear stress profiles directly correlate with blood flow conditions that vary temporally based on metabolic demand. The interactions of these more complex and variable shear fields with EC have not been represented in hemodynamic flow models. We hypothesized that EC exposed to pulsatile shear stress that changes in magnitude and duration, modeled directly from real-time physiological variations in heart rate, would elicit phenotypic changes as relevant to their critical roles in thrombosis, hemostasis, and inflammation. Here we designed a physiological flow (PF model based on short-term temporal changes in blood flow observed in vivo and compared it to static culture and steady flow (SF at a fixed pulse frequency of 1.3 Hz. Results show significant changes in gene regulation as a function of temporally variable flow, indicating a reduced wound phenotype more representative of quiescence. EC cultured under PF exhibited significantly higher endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activity (PF: 176.0±11.9 nmol/10(5 EC; SF: 115.0±12.5 nmol/10(5 EC, p = 0.002 and lower TNF-a-induced HL-60 leukocyte adhesion (PF: 37±6 HL-60 cells/mm(2; SF: 111±18 HL-60/mm(2, p = 0.003 than cells cultured under SF which is consistent with a more quiescent anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic phenotype. In vitro models have become increasingly adept at mimicking natural physiology and in doing so have clarified the importance of both chemical and physical cues that drive cell function. These data illustrate that the variability in metabolic demand and subsequent changes in perfusion resulting in constantly variable shear stress plays a key role in EC function that has not previously been described.

  16. Mitochondria are required for ATM activation by extranuclear oxidative stress in cultured human hepatoblastoma cell line Hep G2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Akinori, E-mail: morita@tokushima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medicine, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Department of Radiological Science, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8509 (Japan); Tanimoto, Keiji; Murakami, Tomoki; Morinaga, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Medicine, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Hosoi, Yoshio, E-mail: hosoi@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medicine, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Department of Radiation Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Oxidative ATM activation can occur in the absence of nuclear DNA damage response. • The oxidized Hep G2 cells were subjected to subcellular fractionation. • The obtained results suggest that the ATM activation occurs in mitochondria. • ATM failed to respond to oxidative stress in mitochondria-depleted Hep G2 cells. • Mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. - Abstract: Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a central role in DNA damage response (DDR). A recent study reported that oxidized ATM can be active in the absence of DDR. However, the issue of where ATM is activated by oxidative stress remains unclear. Regarding the localization of ATM, two possible locations, namely, mitochondria and peroxisomes are possible. We report herein that ATM can be activated when exposed to hydrogen peroxide without inducing nuclear DDR in Hep G2 cells, and the oxidized cells could be subjected to subcellular fractionation. The first detergent-based fractionation experiment revealed that active, phosphorylated ATM was located in the second fraction, which also contained both mitochondria and peroxisomes. An alternative fractionation method involving homogenization and differential centrifugation, which permits the light membrane fraction containing peroxisomes to be produced, but not mitochondria, revealed that the light membrane fraction contained only traces of ATM. In contrast, the heavy membrane fraction, which mainly contained mitochondrial components, was enriched in ATM and active ATM, suggesting that the oxidative activation of ATM occurs in mitochondria and not in peroxisomes. In Rho 0-Hep G2 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA and functional mitochondria, ATM failed to respond to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. These findings strongly suggest that ATM can be activated in response to oxidative stress in mitochondria

  17. Metabolic stress responses in Drosophila are modulated by brain neurosecretory cells that produce multiple neuropeptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Kahsai

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, neurosecretory cells that release peptide hormones play a prominent role in the regulation of development, growth, metabolism, and reproduction. Several types of peptidergic neurosecretory cells have been identified in the brain of Drosophila with release sites in the corpora cardiaca and anterior aorta. We show here that in adult flies the products of three neuropeptide precursors are colocalized in five pairs of large protocerebral neurosecretory cells in two clusters (designated ipc-1 and ipc-2a: Drosophila tachykinin (DTK, short neuropeptide F (sNPF and ion transport peptide (ITP. These peptides were detected by immunocytochemistry in combination with GFP expression driven by the enhancer trap Gal4 lines c929 and Kurs-6, both of which are expressed in ipc-1 and 2a cells. This mix of colocalized peptides with seemingly unrelated functions is intriguing and prompted us to initiate analysis of the function of the ten neurosecretory cells. We investigated the role of peptide signaling from large ipc-1 and 2a cells in stress responses by monitoring the effect of starvation and desiccation in flies with levels of DTK or sNPF diminished by RNA interference. Using the Gal4-UAS system we targeted the peptide knockdown specifically to ipc-1 and 2a cells with the c929 and Kurs-6 drivers. Flies with reduced DTK or sNPF levels in these cells displayed decreased survival time at desiccation and starvation, as well as increased water loss at desiccation. Our data suggest that homeostasis during metabolic stress requires intact peptide signaling by ipc-1 and 2a neurosecretory cells.

  18. Effects of Selenium Yeast on Oxidative Stress, Growth Inhibition, and Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chih-Hung; Hsia, Simon; Shih, Min-Yi; Hsieh, Fang-Chin; Chen, Pei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that selenium (Se) yeast may exhibit potential anti-cancer properties; whereas the precise mechanisms remain unknown. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Se yeast on oxidative stress, growth inhibition, and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Treatments of ER-positive MCF-7 and triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with Se yeast (100, 750, and 1500 ng Se/mL), methylseleninic acid (MSA, 1500 ng Se/mL), or methylselenocysteine (MSC, 1500 ng Se/mL) at a time course experiment (at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h) were analyzed. Se yeast inhibited the growth of these cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared with the same level of MSA, cancer cells exposure to Se yeast exhibited a lower growth-inhibitory response. The latter has also lower superoxide production and reduced antioxidant enzyme activities. Furthermore, MSA (1500 ng Se/mL)-exposed non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) have a significant growth inhibitory effect, but not Se yeast and MSC. Compared with MSA, Se yeast resulted in a greater increase in the early apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as well as a lower proportion of early and late apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, nuclear morphological changes and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were observed. In conclusion, a dose of 100 to 1500 ng Se/mL of Se yeast can increase oxidative stress, and stimulate growth inhibitory effects and apoptosis induction in breast cancer cell lines, but does not affect non-tumorigenic cells.

  19. Reduction of uranium and plutonium oxides by aluminum. Application to the recycling of plutonium; Reduction des oxydes d'uranium et de plutonium par l'aluminium application au recyclage du plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallay, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Valduc (France). Centre d' Etudes

    1968-07-01

    A process for treating plutonium oxide calcined at high temperatures (1000 to 2000 deg. C) with a view to recovering the metal consists in the reduction of this oxide dissolved in a mixture of aluminium, sodium and calcium fluorides by aluminium at about 1180 deg. C. The first part of the report presents the results of reduction tests carried out on the uranium oxides UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}; these are in agreement with the thermodynamic calculations of the exchange reaction at equilibrium. The second part describes the application of this method to plutonium oxides. The Pu-Al alloy obtained (60 per cent Pu) is then recycled in an aqueous medium. (author) [French] Un procede de traitement de l'oxyde de plutonium calcine a haute temperature (1000 deg. C a 2000 deg. C), en vue de la recuperation du metal, consiste a reduire cet oxyde dissous dans un melange de fluorures d'aluminium, de sodium et de calcium, par l'aluminium vers 1180 deg. C. Une premiere partie du rapport presente les resultats des essais de reduction des oxydes d'uranium UO{sub 2} et U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, en accord avec les resultats du calcul thermodynamique de la reaction d'echange a l'equilibre. Une seconde partie rend compte de l'application de cette methode a l'oxyde de plutonium. L'alliage Pu-Al obtenu (60 pour cent Pu) est ensuite recycle par voie aqueuse. (auteur)

  20. Controlling Shear Stress in 3D Bioprinting is a Key Factor to Balance Printing Resolution and Stem Cell Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaeser, Andreas; Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Puster, Uta; Richtering, Walter; Stevens, Molly M; Fischer, Horst

    2016-02-04

    A microvalve-based bioprinting system for the manufacturing of high-resolution, multimaterial 3D-structures is reported. Applying a straightforward fluid-dynamics model, the shear stress at the nozzle site can precisely be controlled. Using this system, a broad study on how cell viability and proliferation potential are affected by different levels of shear stress is conducted. Complex, multimaterial 3D structures are printed with high resolution. This work pioneers the investigation of shear stress-induced cell damage in 3D bioprinting and might help to comprehend and improve the outcome of cell-printing studies in the future.

  1. Astaxanthin from Haematococcus pluvialis Prevents Oxidative Stress on Human Endothelial Cells without Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnier, Philippe; Bastias, Jorge; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Violeta; Caballero-Casero, Noelia; Caballo, Carmen; Sicilia, Dolores; Fuentes, Axelle; Maire, Murielle; Crepin, Michel; Letourneur, Didier; Gueguen, Virginie; Rubio, Soledad; Pavon-Djavid, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    Astaxanthin, a powerful antioxidant, is a good candidate for the prevention of intracellular oxidative stress. The aim of the study was to compare the antioxidant activity of astaxanthin present in two natural extracts from Haematococcus pluvialis, a microalgae strain, with that of synthetic astaxanthin. Natural extracts were obtained either by solvent or supercritical extraction methods. UV, HPLC-DAD and (HPLC-(atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)+)/ion trap-MS) characterizations of both natural extracts showed similar compositions of carotenoids, but different percentages in free astaxanthin and its ester derivatives. The Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay showed that natural extracts containing esters displayed stronger antioxidant activities than free astaxanthin. Their antioxidant capacities to inhibit intracellular oxidative stress were then evaluated on HUVEC cells. The intracellular antioxidant activity in natural extracts was approximately 90-times higher than synthetic astaxanthin (5 µM). No modification, neither in the morphology nor in the viability, of vascular human cells was observed by in vitro biocompatibility study up to 10 µM astaxanthin concentrations. Therefore, these results revealed the therapeutic potential of the natural extracts in vascular human cell protection against oxidative stress without toxicity, which could be exploited in prevention and/or treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25962124

  2. Loss of PINK1 impairs stress-induced autophagy and cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajana Parganlija

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial kinase PINK1 and the ubiquitin ligase Parkin are participating in quality control after CCCP- or ROS-induced mitochondrial damage, and their dysfunction is associated with the development and progression of Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, PINK1 expression is also induced by starvation indicating an additional role for PINK1 in stress response. Therefore, the effects of PINK1 deficiency on the autophago-lysosomal pathway during stress were investigated. Under trophic deprivation SH-SY5Y cells with stable PINK1 knockdown showed downregulation of key autophagic genes, including Beclin, LC3 and LAMP-2. In good agreement, protein levels of LC3-II and LAMP-2 but not of LAMP-1 were reduced in different cell model systems with PINK1 knockdown or knockout after addition of different stressors. This downregulation of autophagic factors caused increased apoptosis, which could be rescued by overexpression of LC3 or PINK1. Taken together, the PINK1-mediated reduction of autophagic key factors during stress resulted in increased cell death, thus defining an additional pathway that could contribute to the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients with PINK1 mutations.

  3. Astaxanthin from Haematococcus pluvialis Prevents Oxidative Stress on Human Endothelial Cells without Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Régnier

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin, a powerful antioxidant, is a good candidate for the prevention of intracellular oxidative stress. The aim of the study was to compare the antioxidant activity of astaxanthin present in two natural extracts from Haematococcus pluvialis, a microalgae strain, with that of synthetic astaxanthin. Natural extracts were obtained either by solvent or supercritical extraction methods. UV, HPLC-DAD and (HPLC-(atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI+/ion trap-MS characterizations of both natural extracts showed similar compositions of carotenoids, but different percentages in free astaxanthin and its ester derivatives. The Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC assay showed that natural extracts containing esters displayed stronger antioxidant activities than free astaxanthin. Their antioxidant capacities to inhibit intracellular oxidative stress were then evaluated on HUVEC cells. The intracellular antioxidant activity in natural extracts was approximately 90-times higher than synthetic astaxanthin (5 µM. No modification, neither in the morphology nor in the viability, of vascular human cells was observed by in vitro biocompatibility study up to 10 µM astaxanthin concentrations. Therefore, these results revealed the therapeutic potential of the natural extracts in vascular human cell protection against oxidative stress without toxicity, which could be exploited in prevention and/or treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  4. The influence of hydroxyurea on oxidative stress in sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiane de Souza Torres

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The oxidative stress in 20 sickle cell anemia patients taking hydroxyurea and 13 sickle cell anemia patients who did not take hydroxyurea was compared with a control group of 96 individuals without any hemoglobinopathy. METHODS: Oxidative stress was assessed by thiobarbituric acid reactive species production, the Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity and plasma glutathione levels. RESULTS: Thiobarbituric acid reactive species values were higher in patients without specific medication, followed by patients taking hydroxyurea and the Control Group (p < 0.0001. The antioxidant capacity was higher in patients taking hydroxyurea and lower in the Control Group (p = 0.0002 for Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity and p < 0.0292 for plasma glutathione. Thiobarbituric acid reactive species levels were correlated with higher hemoglobin S levels (r = 0.55; p = 0.0040 and lower hemoglobin F concentrations(r = -0.52; p = 0.0067. On the other hand, plasma glutathione levels were negatively correlated with hemoglobin S levels (r = -0.49; p = 0.0111 and positively associated with hemoglobin F values (r = 0.56; p = 0.0031. CONCLUSION: Sickle cell anemia patients have high oxidative stress and, conversely, increased antioxidant activity. The increase in hemoglobin F levels provided by hydroxyurea and its antioxidant action may explain the reduction in lipid peroxidation and increased antioxidant defenses in these individuals.

  5. Astaxanthin from Haematococcus pluvialis Prevents Oxidative Stress on Human Endothelial Cells without Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnier, Philippe; Bastias, Jorge; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Violeta; Caballero-Casero, Noelia; Caballo, Carmen; Sicilia, Dolores; Fuentes, Axelle; Maire, Murielle; Crepin, Michel; Letourneur, Didier; Gueguen, Virginie; Rubio, Soledad; Pavon-Djavid, Graciela

    2015-05-07

    Astaxanthin, a powerful antioxidant, is a good candidate for the prevention of intracellular oxidative stress. The aim of the study was to compare the antioxidant activity of astaxanthin present in two natural extracts from Haematococcus pluvialis, a microalgae strain, with that of synthetic astaxanthin. Natural extracts were obtained either by solvent or supercritical extraction methods. UV, HPLC-DAD and (HPLC-(atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)+)/ion trap-MS) characterizations of both natural extracts showed similar compositions of carotenoids, but different percentages in free astaxanthin and its ester derivatives. The Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay showed that natural extracts containing esters displayed stronger antioxidant activities than free astaxanthin. Their antioxidant capacities to inhibit intracellular oxidative stress were then evaluated on HUVEC cells. The intracellular antioxidant activity in natural extracts was approximately 90-times higher than synthetic astaxanthin (5 µM). No modification, neither in the morphology nor in the viability, of vascular human cells was observed by in vitro biocompatibility study up to 10 µM astaxanthin concentrations. Therefore, these results revealed the therapeutic potential of the natural extracts in vascular human cell protection against oxidative stress without toxicity, which could be exploited in prevention and/or treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. The influence of hydroxyurea on oxidative stress in sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lidiane de Souza; da Silva, Danilo Grünig Humberto; Belini Junior, Edis; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves; Lobo, Clarisse Lopes de Castro; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini; Ruiz, Milton Artur; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia Regina

    2012-01-01

    Objective The oxidative stress in 20 sickle cell anemia patients taking hydroxyurea and 13 sickle cell anemia patients who did not take hydroxyurea was compared with a control group of 96 individuals without any hemoglobinopathy. Methods Oxidative stress was assessed by thiobarbituric acid reactive species production, the Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity and plasma glutathione levels. Results Thiobarbituric acid reactive species values were higher in patients without specific medication, followed by patients taking hydroxyurea and the Control Group (p < 0.0001). The antioxidant capacity was higher in patients taking hydroxyurea and lower in the Control Group (p = 0.0002 for Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity and p < 0.0292 for plasma glutathione). Thiobarbituric acid reactive species levels were correlated with higher hemoglobin S levels (r = 0.55; p = 0.0040) and lower hemoglobin F concentrations(r = -0.52; p = 0.0067). On the other hand, plasma glutathione levels were negatively correlated with hemoglobin S levels (r = -0.49; p = 0.0111) and positively associated with hemoglobin F values (r = 0.56; p = 0.0031). Conclusion Sickle cell anemia patients have high oxidative stress and, conversely, increased antioxidant activity. The increase in hemoglobin F levels provided by hydroxyurea and its antioxidant action may explain the reduction in lipid peroxidation and increased antioxidant defenses in these individuals. PMID:23323065

  7. Cell Wall Amine Oxidases: New Players in Root Xylem Differentiation under Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip A. Ghuge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines (PAs are aliphatic polycations present in all living organisms. A growing body of evidence reveals their involvement as regulators in a variety of physiological and pathological events. They are oxidatively deaminated by amine oxidases (AOs, including copper amine oxidases (CuAOs and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD-dependent polyamine oxidases (PAOs. The biologically-active hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is a shared compound in all of the AO-catalyzed reactions, and it has been reported to play important roles in PA-mediated developmental and stress-induced processes. In particular, the AO-driven H2O2 biosynthesis in the cell wall is well known to be involved in plant wound healing and pathogen attack responses by both triggering peroxidase-mediated wall-stiffening events and signaling modulation of defense gene expression. Extensive investigation by a variety of methodological approaches revealed high levels of expression of cell wall-localized AOs in root xylem tissues and vascular parenchyma of different plant species. Here, the recent progresses in understanding the role of cell wall-localized AOs as mediators of root xylem differentiation during development and/or under stress conditions are reviewed. A number of experimental pieces of evidence supports the involvement of apoplastic H2O2 derived from PA oxidation in xylem tissue maturation under stress-simulated conditions.

  8. Targeting the replisome with transduced monoclonal antibodies triggers lethal DNA replication stress in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplancq, Dominique; Freund, Guillaume; Conic, Sascha; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Didier, Pascal; Stoessel, Audrey; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Vigneron, Marc; Wagner, Jérôme; Mély, Yves; Chatton, Bruno; Tora, Laszlo; Weiss, Etienne

    2016-03-15

    Although chemical inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) in cancer cells triggers cell death, it is not clear if the fork blockade achieved with inhibitors that neutralise proteins of the replisome is sufficient on its own to overcome the DDR. Monoclonal antibodies to PCNA, which block the DNA elongation process in vitro, have been developed. When these antibodies were transduced into cancer cells, they are able to inhibit the incorporation of nucleoside analogues. When co-delivered with anti-PCNA siRNA, the cells were flattened and the size of their nuclei increased by up to 3-fold, prior to cell death. Analysis of these nuclei by super-resolution microscopy revealed the presence of large numbers of phosphorylated histone H2AX foci. A senescence-like phenotype of the transduced cells was also observed upon delivery of the corresponding Fab molecules or following PCNA gene disruption or when the Fab fragment of an antibody that neutralises DNA polymerase alpha was used. Primary melanoma cells and leukaemia cells that are resistant to chemical inhibitors were similarly affected by these antibody treatments. These results demonstrate that transduced antibodies can trigger a lethal DNA replication stress, which kills cancer cells by abolishing the biological activity of several constituents of the replisome.

  9. Stem Cell Therapy for Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: The Current Status and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukui Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress urinary incontinence (SUI is a common urinary system disease that mostly affects women. Current treatments still do not solve the critical problem of urethral sphincter dysfunction. In recent years, there have been major developments in techniques to obtain, culture, and characterize autologous stem cells as well as many studies describing their applications for the treatment of SUI. In this paper, we review recent publications and clinical trials investigating the applications of several stem cell types as potential treatments for SUI and the underlying challenges of such therapy.

  10. Human PIF1 helicase supports DNA replication and cell growth under oncogenic-stress

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Unwinding duplex DNA is a critical processing step during replication, repair and transcription. Pif1 are highly conserved non-processive 5′->3′ DNA helicases with well-established roles in maintenance of yeast genome stability. However, the function of the sole member of Pif1 family in humans remains unclear. Human PIF1 is essential for tumour cell viability, particularly during replication stress, but is dispensable in non-cancerous cells and Pif1 deficient mice. Here we report that suppres...

  11. In situ stress measurement with the new LVDT - Cell - method description and verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakala, M. [KMS Hakala Oy, Nokia (Finland); Christiansson, R. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Martin, D. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Siren, T.; Kemppainen, K.

    2013-11-15

    Posiva Oy and SKB (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB) tested the suitability a new LVDT-cell (Linear Variable Differential Transducer cell) to measure the induced stresses in the vicinity of an excavated surface and further to use these results to interpret the in situ state of stress. It utilises the overcoring methodology, measuring the radial convergence of four diameters using eight LVDTs, and is similar in concept to the USBM-gauge. A 127 mm diameter pilot-hole is required and the overcore diameter is 200 mm. The minimum overcoring length is 350 mm, and hence a compact drill can be utilised. Extensive testing of the LVDT-cell shows it to be robust and suitable for use in an underground environment. Sensitivity tests also show that the cell can withstand a range of operating conditions and still provide acceptable results. The in situ stress at the measurement location can be solved by numerical inversion using the results of at least three overcoring measurements around the three-dimensional tunnel section. The large dimensions of the measurement tool and the ability to utilise multiple measurements at various locations in a tunnel section, provides flexibility in selecting an appropriate rock mass volume. Because the inversion technique relies on knowing the exact location of the measurements and the geometry profile of the tunnel, modern survey techniques such as Lidar or photogrammetric technology should be used. Checks using traditional surveying techniques should also be used to ensure adequate survey resolution, specially in case of sidecoring measurements. To evaluate the suitability of the LVDT-cell to provide the in situ state of stress, tests were carried out in the drill-and-blast TASS tunnel and TBM tunnel at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The state of stress established using the LVDT-cell was in agreement with the state of stress established previously using traditional overcoring and hydraulic fracturing methods. In this study, the

  12. Chronic stress in adulthood followed by intermittent stress impairs spatial memory and the survival of newborn hippocampal cells in aging animals: prevention by FGL, a peptide mimetic of neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borcel, Erika; Pérez-Alvarez, Laura; Herrero, Ana Isabel;

    2008-01-01

    the decrease in the total number of granular neurons that resulted from prolonged exposure to stress. These findings suggest that the development of new drugs that mimic neural cell adhesion molecule activity might be of therapeutic relevance to treat stress-induced cognitive impairment....

  13. Benzothiazole Amphiphiles Ameliorate Amyloid β-Related Cell Toxicity and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifelli, Jessica L; Chung, Tim S; Liu, Haiyan; Prangkio, Panchika; Mayer, Michael; Yang, Jerry

    2016-06-15

    Oxidative stress from the increase of reactive oxygen species in cells is a common part of the normal aging process and is accelerated in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Herein, we report the evaluation of three benzothiazole amphiphiles (BAMs) that exhibit improved biocompatibility without loss of biological activity against amyloid-β induced cell damage compared to a previously reported hexa(ethylene glycol) derivative of benzothiazole aniline (BTA-EG6). The reduced toxicity of these BAM agents compared to BTA-EG6 corresponded with their reduced propensity to induce membrane lysis. In addition, all of the new BAMs were capable of protecting differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells from toxicity and concomitant oxidative stress induced by AD-related aggregated Aβ (1-42) peptides. Binding and microscopy studies support that these BAM agents target Aβ and inhibit the interactions of catalase with Aβ in cells, which, in turn, can account for an observed inhibition of Aβ-induced increases in hydrogen peroxide in cells treated with these compounds. These results support that this family of benzothiazole amphiphiles may have therapeutic potential for treating cellular damage associated with AD and other Aβ-related neurologic diseases.

  14. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistreri, Giuseppe; Viiliäinen, Johanna; Turunen, Mikko; Diaz, Raquel; Lyly, Lauri; Pekkonen, Pirita; Rantala, Juha; Ojala, Krista; Sarek, Grzegorz; Teesalu, Mari; Denisova, Oxana; Peltonen, Karita; Julkunen, Ilkka; Varjosalo, Markku; Kainov, Denis; Kallioniemi, Olli; Laiho, Marikki; Taipale, Jussi; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Ojala, Päivi M

    2016-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) causes Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored efficient activation of the viral lytic transcription program and viral reactivation. During lytic replication cells activated a p53 response, accumulated DNA damage and arrested at G2-phase. Depletion of p21, a p53 target gene, restored cell cycle progression and thereby impaired the virus reactivation cascade delaying the onset of virus replication induced cytopathic effect. Herpesviruses are known to reactivate in response to different kinds of stress, and our study now highlights the molecular events in the stressed host cell that KSHV has evolved to utilize to ensure efficient viral lytic replication.

  15. Protective mechanism of agmatine pretreatment on RGC-5 cells injured by oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Iizuka

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Agmatine has neuroprotective effects on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs as well as cortical and spinal neurons. It protects RGCs from oxidative stress even when it is not present at the time of injury. As agmatine has high affinity for various cellular receptors, we assessed protective mechanisms of agmatine using transformed RGCs (RGC-5 cell line. Differentiated RGC-5 cells were pretreated with 100 μM agmatine and consecutively exposed to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Cell viability was determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and the effects of selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine (0-500 nM and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor agonist NMDA (0-100 µM were evaluated. Agmatine’s protective effect was compared to a selective NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. After a 16-h exposure to H2O2, the LDH assay showed cell loss greater than 50%, which was reduced to about 30% when agmatine was pretreated before injury. Yohimbine almost completely inhibited agmatine’s protective effect, but NMDA did not. In addition, MK-801 (0-100 µM did not significantly attenuate the H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that neuroprotective effects of agmatine on RGCs under oxidative stress may be mainly attributed to the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor signaling pathway.

  16. Safety of Desmodium adscendens extract on hepatocytes and renal cells. Protective effect against oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Francois

    2015-03-01

    RESULTS: A viability test (MTS, a cytotoxicity assay (LDH release and a study of the cell morphology revealed that pretreatment with 1 mg/ml or 10 mg/ml DA did not alter viability or LDH release in HEPG2 or LLCPK1 cells. However, DA at the dose of 100 mg/ml significantly decreased cell viability, by about 40% (P <0.05. Further, MTS studies revealed that DA 1 mg/ml or 10 mg/ml protected LLC-PK1 cells against a glucose-induced oxidative stress of 24 hours (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Hence, the lowest concentrations of DA (1mg/ml and 10mg/ml were safe for HEPG2 and LLCPK1 and protective against an oxidative stress in LLC-PK1 cells. These data suggest that DA extracts used as a traditional herbal as food health supplements should be used at the lowest dosage. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(1.000: 1-5

  17. Effect of heat stress on intestinal barrier function of human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-zhen XIAO

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the heat stress-induced dysfunction of intestinal barrier including intestinal tight junction and apoptosis of epithelial cells. Methods Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell monolayers, serving as the intestinal barrier model, were exposed to different temperature (37-43℃ for designated time. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and horseradish peroxidase (HRP flux permeability were measured to evaluate barrier integrity. Level of tight junction (TJ protein occludin was analyzed by Western blotting. Cell apoptosis rate was determined using Annexin V-FITC/PI kit by flow cytometry. Results Compared with the 37℃ group, TEER lowered and the permeability for HRP increased significantly after heat exposure (P<0.01 in 39℃, 41℃ and 43℃ groups. The expression of occludin increased when the temperature was elevated from 37℃ to 41℃, and it reached the maximal level at 41℃. However, its expression gradually decreased with passage of time at 43℃. Cell apoptosis was enhanced with elevation of the temperature (P<0.05 or P<0.01. Conclusion Heat stress can induce damage to tight junction and enhance apoptosis of epithelial cells, thus causing dysfunction of intestinal epithelial barrier.

  18. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Balistreri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV causes Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored efficient activation of the viral lytic transcription program and viral reactivation. During lytic replication cells activated a p53 response, accumulated DNA damage and arrested at G2-phase. Depletion of p21, a p53 target gene, restored cell cycle progression and thereby impaired the virus reactivation cascade delaying the onset of virus replication induced cytopathic effect. Herpesviruses are known to reactivate in response to different kinds of stress, and our study now highlights the molecular events in the stressed host cell that KSHV has evolved to utilize to ensure efficient viral lytic replication.

  19. Reverting p53 activation after recovery of cellular stress to resume with cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Pedro A

    2017-05-01

    The activation of p53 in response to different types of cellular stress induces several protective reactions including cell cycle arrest, senescence or cell death. These protective effects are a consequence of the activation of p53 by specific phosphorylation performed by several kinases. The reversion of the cell cycle arrest, induced by p53, is a consequence of the phosphorylated and activated p53, which triggers its own downregulation and that of its positive regulators. The different down-regulatory processes have a sequential and temporal order of events. The mechanisms implicated in p53 down-regulation include phosphatases, deacetylases, and protein degradation by the proteasome or autophagy, which also affect different p53 protein targets and functions. The necessary first step is the dephosphorylation of p53 to make it available for interaction with mdm2 ubiquitin-ligase, which requires the activation of phosphatases targeting both p53 and p53-activating kinases. In addition, deacetylation of p53 is required to make lysine residues accessible to ubiquitin ligases. The combined action of these downregulatory mechanisms brings p53 protein back to its basal levels, and cell cycle progression can resume if cells have overcome the stress or damage situation. The specific targeting of these down-regulatory mechanisms can be exploited for therapeutic purposes in cancers harbouring wild-type p53.

  20. Relevance of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Cell Signaling in Liver Cold Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Folch-Puy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is involved in calcium homeostasis, protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Perturbations in its normal functions lead to a condition called endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS. This can be triggered by many physiopathological conditions such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, insulin resistance or ischemia-reperfusion injury. The cell reacts to ERS by initiating a defensive process known as the unfolded protein response (UPR, which comprises cellular mechanisms for adaptation and the safeguarding of cell survival or, in cases of excessively severe stress, for the initiation of the cell death program. Recent experimental data suggest the involvement of ERS in ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI of the liver graft, which has been considered as one of major problems influencing outcome after liver transplantation. The purpose of this review is to summarize updated data on the molecular mechanisms of ERS/UPR and the consequences of this pathology, focusing specifically on solid organ preservation and liver transplantation models. We will also discuss the potential role of ERS, beyond the simple adaptive response and the regulation of cell death, in the modification of cell functional properties and phenotypic changes.

  1. Selective modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers in prostate cancer cells by a standardized mangosteen fruit extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongbo Li

    Full Text Available The increased proliferation of cancer cells is directly dependent on the increased activity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER machinery which is responsible for protein folding, assembly, and transport. In fact, it is so critical that perturbations in the endoplasmic reticulum can lead to apoptosis. This carefully regulated organelle represents a unique target of cancer cells while sparing healthy cells. In this study, a standardized mangosteen fruit extract (MFE was evaluated for modulating ER stress proteins in prostate cancer. Two human prostate cancer cell lines, 22Rv1 and LNCaP, and prostate epithelial cells (PrECs procured from two patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were treated with MFE. Flow cytometry, MTT, BrdU and Western blot were used to evaluate cell apoptosis, viability, proliferation and ER stress. Next, we evaluated MFE for microsomal stability and anti-cancer activity in nude mice. MFE induced apoptosis, decreased viability and proliferation in prostate cancer cells. MFE increased the expression of ER stress proteins. Interestingly, MFE selectively promotes ER stress in prostate cancer cells while sparing PrECs. MFE suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft tumor model without obvious toxicity. Mangosteen fruit extract selectively promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress in cancer cells while sparing non-tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells. Furthermore, in an in vivo setting mangosteen fruit extract significantly reduces xenograft tumor formation.

  2. Selective modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers in prostate cancer cells by a standardized mangosteen fruit extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gongbo; Petiwala, Sakina M; Pierce, Dana R; Nonn, Larisa; Johnson, Jeremy J

    2013-01-01

    The increased proliferation of cancer cells is directly dependent on the increased activity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) machinery which is responsible for protein folding, assembly, and transport. In fact, it is so critical that perturbations in the endoplasmic reticulum can lead to apoptosis. This carefully regulated organelle represents a unique target of cancer cells while sparing healthy cells. In this study, a standardized mangosteen fruit extract (MFE) was evaluated for modulating ER stress proteins in prostate cancer. Two human prostate cancer cell lines, 22Rv1 and LNCaP, and prostate epithelial cells (PrECs) procured from two patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were treated with MFE. Flow cytometry, MTT, BrdU and Western blot were used to evaluate cell apoptosis, viability, proliferation and ER stress. Next, we evaluated MFE for microsomal stability and anti-cancer activity in nude mice. MFE induced apoptosis, decreased viability and proliferation in prostate cancer cells. MFE increased the expression of ER stress proteins. Interestingly, MFE selectively promotes ER stress in prostate cancer cells while sparing PrECs. MFE suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft tumor model without obvious toxicity. Mangosteen fruit extract selectively promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress in cancer cells while sparing non-tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells. Furthermore, in an in vivo setting mangosteen fruit extract significantly reduces xenograft tumor formation.

  3. Thioredoxin Binding Protein-2 Regulates Autophagy of Human Lens Epithelial Cells under Oxidative Stress via Inhibition of Akt Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ke; Zhang, Yidong; Chen, Guangdi; Lai, Kairan; Yin, Houfa

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an essential role in the development of age-related cataract. Thioredoxin binding protein-2 (TBP-2) is a negative regulator of thioredoxin (Trx), which deteriorates cellular antioxidant system. Our study focused on the autophagy-regulating effect of TBP-2 under oxidative stress in human lens epithelial cells (LECs). Human lens epithelial cells were used for cell culture and treatment. Lentiviral-based transfection system was used for overexpression of TBP-2. Cytotoxicity assay, western blot analysis, GFP/mCherry-fused LC3 plasmid, immunofluorescence, and transmission electronic microscopy were performed. The results showed that autophagic response of LECs with increased LC3-II, p62, and GFP/mCherry-LC3 puncta (P < 0.01) was induced by oxidative stress. Overexpression of TBP-2 further strengthens this response and worsens the cell viability (P < 0.01). Knockdown of TBP-2 attenuates the autophagic response and cell viability loss induced by oxidative stress. TBP-2 mainly regulates autophagy in the initiation stage, which is mTOR-independent and probably caused by the dephosphorylation of Akt under oxidative stress. These findings suggest a novel role of TBP-2 in human LECs under oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can cause cell injury and autophagy in LECs, and TBP-2 regulates this response. Hence, this study provides evidence regarding the role of TBP-2 in lens and the possible mechanism of cataract development. PMID:27656263

  4. Cell wall pectic arabinans influence the mechanical properties of Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems and their response to mechanical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhertbruggen, Yves; Marcus, Susan E; Chen, Jianshe; Knox, J Paul

    2013-08-01

    Little is known of the dynamics of plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides in response to the impact of mechanical stress on plant organs. The capacity of the imposition of a mechanical stress (periodic brushing) to reduce the height of the inflorescence stem of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings has been used to study the role of pectic arabinans in the mechanical properties and stress responsiveness of a plant organ. The arabinan-deficient-1 (arad1) mutation that affects arabinan structures in epidermal cell walls of inflorescence stems is demonstrated to reduce the impact on inflorescence stem heights caused by mechanical stress. The arabinan-deficient-2 (arad2) mutation, that does not have detectable impact on arabinan structures, is also shown to reduce the impact on stem heights caused by mechanical stress. The LM13 linear arabinan epitope is specifically detected in epidermal cell walls of the younger, flexible regions of inflorescence stems and increases in abundance at the base of inflorescence stems in response to an imposed mechanical stress. The strain (percentage deformation) of stem epidermal cells in the double mutant arad1 × arad2 is lower in unbrushed plants than in wild-type plants, but rises to wild-type levels in response to brushing. The study demonstrates the complexity of arabinan structures within plant cell walls and also that their contribution to cell wall mechanical properties is a factor influencing responsiveness to mechanical stress.

  5. Revealing stiffening and brittling of chronic myelogenous leukemia hematopoietic primary cells through their temporal response to shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Nicolini, F. E.; Martinez-Torres, C.; Arneodo, A.; Maguer Satta, V.; Argoul, F.

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cell transformation is often accompanied by a modification of their viscoelastic properties. When capturing the stress-to-strain response of primary chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells, from two data sets of CD34+ hematopoietic cells isolated from healthy and leukemic bone marrows, we show that the mean shear relaxation modulus increases upon cancer transformation. This stiffening of the cells comes along with local rupture events, detected as reinforced sharp local maxima of this modulus, suggesting that these cancer cells respond to a local mechanical stress by a cascade of local brittle failure events.

  6. ER-mediated stress induces mitochondrial-dependent caspases activation in NT2 neuron-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Daniela M; Esteves, A Raquel; Domingues, A Filipa; Pereira, Claudia M F; Cardoso, Sandra M; Oliveira, Catarina R

    2009-11-30

    Recent studies have revealed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) disturbance is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders, contributing to the activation of the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway. Therefore, we investigated here the molecular mechanisms underlying the ER-mitochondria axis, focusing on calcium as a potential mediator of cell death signals. Using NT2 cells treated with brefeldin A or tunicamycin, we observed that ER stress induces changes in the mitochondrial function, impairing mitochondrial membrane potential and distressing mitochondrial respiratory chain complex Moreover, stress stimuli at ER level evoked calcium fluxes between ER and mitochondria. Under these conditions, ER stress activated the unfolded protein response by an overexpression of GRP78, and also caspase-4 and-2, both involved upstream of caspase-9. Our findings show that ER and mitochondria interconnection plays a prominent role in the induction of neuronal cell death under particular stress circumstances.

  7. Oxidative stress induces caveolin 1 degradation and impairs caveolae functions in skeletal muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Mougeolle

    Full Text Available Increased level of oxidative stress, a major actor of cellular aging, impairs the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle and leads to the reduction in the number and size of muscle fibers causing sarcopenia. Caveolin 1 is the major component of caveolae, small membrane invaginations involved in signaling and endocytic trafficking. Their role has recently expanded to mechanosensing and to the regulation of oxidative stress-induced pathways. Here, we increased the amount of reactive oxidative species in myoblasts by addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 at non-toxic concentrations. The expression level of caveolin 1 was significantly decreased as early as 10 min after 500 μM H2O2 treatment. This reduction was not observed in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor, suggesting that caveolin 1 was rapidly degraded by the proteasome. In spite of caveolin 1 decrease, caveolae were still able to assemble at the plasma membrane. Their functions however were significantly perturbed by oxidative stress. Endocytosis of a ceramide analog monitored by flow cytometry was significantly diminished after H2O2 treatment, indicating that oxidative stress impaired its selective internalization via caveolae. The contribution of caveolae to the plasma membrane reservoir has been monitored after osmotic cell swelling. H2O2 treatment increased membrane fragility revealing that treated cells were more sensitive to an acute mechanical stress. Altogether, our results indicate that H2O2 decreased caveolin 1 expression and impaired caveolae functions. These data give new insights on age-related deficiencies in skeletal muscle.

  8. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium adhesion and cytotoxicity during epithelial cell stress is reduced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkholder Kristin M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physiological stressors may alter susceptibility of the host intestinal epithelium to infection by enteric pathogens. In the current study, cytotoxic effect, adhesion and invasion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium to Caco-2 cells exposed to thermal stress (41°C, 1 h was investigated. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to reduce interaction of pathogens with the epithelium under non-stress conditions and may have a significant effect on epithelial viability during infection; however, probiotic effect on pathogen interaction with epithelial cells under physiological stress is not known. Therefore, we investigated the influence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus gasseri on Salmonella adhesion and Salmonella-induced cytotoxicity of Caco-2 cells subjected to thermal stress. Results Thermal stress increased the cytotoxic effect of both S. Typhimurium (P = 0.0001 and nonpathogenic E. coli K12 (P = 0.004 to Caco-2 cells, and resulted in greater susceptibility of cell monolayers to S. Typhimurium adhesion (P = 0.001. Thermal stress had no significant impact on inflammatory cytokines released by Caco-2 cells, although exposure to S. Typhimurium resulted in greater than 80% increase in production of IL-6 and IL-8. Blocking S. Typhimurium with anti-ShdA antibody prior to exposure of Salmonella decreased adhesion (P = 0.01 to non-stressed and thermal-stressed Caco-2 cells. Pre-exposure of Caco-2 cells to L. rhamnosus GG significantly reduced Salmonella-induced cytotoxicity (P = 0.001 and Salmonella adhesion (P = 0.001 to Caco-2 cells during thermal stress, while L. gasseri had no effect. Conclusion Results suggest that thermal stress increases susceptibility of intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells to Salmonella adhesion, and increases the cytotoxic effect of Salmonella during infection. Use of L. rhamnosus GG as a probiotic may reduce the severity of infection during epithelial cell stress. Mechanisms

  9. The elite and stochastic model for iPS cell generation: multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse) cells are readily reprogrammable into iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakao, Shohei; Kitada, Masaaki; Dezawa, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have attracted a great deal of attention, although the mechanism by which they are generated is still not fully understood. Currently, two theories, the stochastic and elite models, have been proposed. Some reports provide theoretical support for the stochastic model. Other reports, however, support the elite model. For example, some human fibroblasts, such as Multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse) cells, are reported to be pluripotent and a primary source of iPS cells. Thus, the mechanism of iPS cell generation continues to be debated. In this review, we discuss the properties of the original cell source, such as the components of the original populations and the potential of each population to become iPS cells, and further discuss the implications of the two theories for iPS cell research.

  10. Dexamethasone acts as a radiosensitizer in three astrocytoma cell lines via oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Ortega-Martínez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs, which act on stress pathways, are well-established in the co-treatment of different kinds of tumors; however, the underlying mechanisms by which GCs act are not yet well elucidated. As such, this work investigates the role of glucocorticoids, specifically dexamethasone (DEXA, in the processes referred to as DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR, establishing a new approach in three astrocytomas cell lines (CT2A, APP.PS1 L.1 and APP.PS1 L.3. The results show that DEXA administration increased the basal levels of gamma-H2AX foci, keeping them higher 4 h after irradiation (IR of the cells, compared to untreated cells. This means that DEXA might cause increased radiosensitivity in these cell lines. On the other hand, DEXA did not have an apparent effect on the formation and disappearance of the 53BP1 foci. Furthermore, it was found that DEXA administered 2 h before IR led to a radical change in DNA repair kinetics, even DEXA does not affect cell cycle. It is important to highlight that DEXA produced cell death in these cell lines compared to untreated cells. Finally and most important, the high levels of gamma-H2AX could be reversed by administration of ascorbic acid, a potent blocker of reactive oxygen species, suggesting that DEXA acts by causing DNA damage via oxidative stress. These exiting findings suggest that DEXA might promote radiosensitivity in brain tumors, specifically in astrocytoma-like tumors.

  11. Copper ferrite nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alshamsan, Aws

    2016-06-01

    Copper ferrite (CuFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) are important magnetic materials currently under research due to their applicability in nanomedicine. However, information concerning the biological interaction of copper ferrite NPs is largely lacking. In this study, we investigated the cellular response of copper ferrite NPs in human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. Copper ferrite NPs were prepared by co-precipitation technique with the thermal effect. Prepared NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Characterization data showed that copper ferrite NPs were crystalline, spherical with smooth surfaces and average diameter of 15nm. Biochemical studies showed that copper ferrite NPs induce cell viability reduction and membrane damage in MCF-7 cells and degree of induction was dose- and time-dependent. High SubG1 cell population during cell cycle progression and MMP loss with a concomitant up-regulation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 genes suggested that copper ferrite NP-induced cell death through mitochondrial pathway. Copper ferrite NP was also found to induce oxidative stress in MCF-7 cells as indicated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and glutathione depletion. Cytotoxicity due to copper ferrite NPs exposure was effectively abrogated by N-acetyl-cysteine (ROS scavenger) suggesting that oxidative stress could be the plausible mechanism of copper ferrite NPs toxicity. Further studies are underway to explore the toxicity mechanisms of copper ferrite NPs in different types of human cells. This study warrants further generation of extensive biointeraction data before their application in nanomedicine.

  12. Introduction of Pea DNA Helicase 45 Into Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. Hybrid) Enhances Cell Membrane Thermostability And Upregulation Of Stress-responsive Genes Leads To Abiotic Stress Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Sruthy Maria; Ashwin Narayan, J; Syamaladevi, Divya P; Appunu, C; Chakravarthi, M; Ravichandran, V; Tuteja, Narendra; Subramonian, N

    2015-05-01

    DNA helicases are motor proteins that play an essential role in nucleic acid metabolism, by providing a duplex-unwinding function. To improve the drought and salinity tolerance of sugarcane, a DEAD-box helicase gene isolated from pea with a constitutive promoter, Port Ubi 2.3 was transformed into the commercial sugarcane variety Co 86032 through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and the transgenics were screened for tolerance to soil moisture stress and salinity. The transgene integration was confirmed through polymerase chain reaction, and the V 0 transgenic events showed significantly higher cell membrane thermostability under normal irrigated conditions. The V 1 transgenic events were screened for tolerance to soil moisture stress and exhibited significantly higher cell membrane thermostability, transgene expression, relative water content, gas exchange parameters, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic efficiency under soil moisture stress compared to wild-type (WT). The overexpression of PDH45 transgenic sugarcane also led to the upregulation of DREB2-induced downstream stress-related genes. The transgenic events demonstrated higher germination ability and better chlorophyll retention than WT under salinity stress. Our results suggest the possibility for development of increased abiotic stress tolerant sugarcane cultivars through overexpression of PDH45 gene. Perhaps this is the first report, which provides evidence for increased drought and salinity tolerance in sugarcane through overexpression of PDH45.

  13. Mechanism of oxidative stress involved in the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles against eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saliani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO NPs (zinc oxide nanoparticles has generated significant scientific i