WorldWideScience

Sample records for cells harboring arbuscules

  1. Medicago truncatula and Glomus intraradices gene expression in cortical cells harboring arbuscules in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Yuhong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most vascular flowering plants have the capacity to form symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi. The symbiosis develops in the roots where AM fungi colonize the root cortex and form arbuscules within the cortical cells. Arbuscules are enveloped in a novel plant membrane and their establishment requires the coordinated cellular activities of both symbiotic partners. The arbuscule-cortical cell interface is the primary functional interface of the symbiosis and is of central importance in nutrient exchange. To determine the molecular events the underlie arbuscule development and function, it is first necessary to identify genes that may play a role in this process. Toward this goal we used the Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array to document the M. truncatula transcript profiles associated with AM symbiosis, and then developed laser microdissection (LM of M. truncatula root cortical cells to enable analyses of gene expression in individual cell types by RT-PCR. Results This approach led to the identification of novel M. truncatula and G. intraradices genes expressed in colonized cortical cells and in arbuscules. Within the arbuscule, expression of genes associated with the urea cycle, amino acid biosynthesis and cellular autophagy was detected. Analysis of gene expression in the colonized cortical cell revealed up-regulation of a lysine motif (LysM-receptor like kinase, members of the GRAS transcription factor family and a symbiosis-specific ammonium transporter that is a likely candidate for mediating ammonium transport in the AM symbiosis. Conclusion Transcript profiling using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array provided new insights into gene expression in M. truncatula roots during AM symbiosis and revealed the existence of several G. intraradices genes on the M. truncatula GeneChip®. A laser microdissection protocol that incorporates low-melting temperature Steedman's wax, was

  2. Transcripts for genes encoding soluble acid invertase and sucrose synthase accumulate in root tip and cortical cells containing mycorrhizal arbuscules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blee, Kristopher A; Anderson, Anne J

    2002-09-01

    Arbuscule formation by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices (Schenck & Smith) was limited to cortical cells immediately adjacent to the endodermis. Because these cortical cells are the first to intercept photosynthate exiting the vascular cylinder, transcript levels for sucrose metabolizing-enzymes were compared between mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal roots. The probes corresponded to genes encoding a soluble acid invertase with potential vacuolar targeting, which we generated from Phaseolus vulgaris roots, a Rhizobium-responsive sucrose synthase of soybean and a cell wall acid invertase of carrot. Transcripts in non-mycorrhizal roots were developmentally regulated and abundant in the root tips for all three probes but in differentiated roots of P. vulgaris they were predominantly located in phloem tissues for sucrose synthase or the endodermis and phloem for soluble acid invertase. In mycorrhizal roots increased accumulations of transcripts for sucrose synthase and vacuolar invertase were both observed in the same cortical cells bearing arbuscules that fluoresce. There was no effect on the expression of the cell wall invertase gene in fluorescent carrot cells containing arbuscules. Thus, it appears that presence of the fungal hyphae in the fluorescent arbusculated cell stimulates discrete alterations in expression of sucrose metabolizing enzymes to increase the sink potential of the cell. PMID:12175013

  3. Hyphal Branching during Arbuscule Development Requires Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhiza11[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Jin; Floss, Daniela S.; Levesque-Tremblay, Veronique; Bravo, Armando

    2015-01-01

    During arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, arbuscule development in the root cortical cell and simultaneous deposition of the plant periarbuscular membrane generate the interface for symbiotic nutrient exchange. The transcriptional changes that accompany arbuscule development are extensive and well documented. By contrast, the transcriptional regulators that control these programs are largely unknown. Here, we provide a detailed characterization of an insertion allele of Medicago truncatula Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhiza1 (RAM1), ram1-3, which reveals that RAM1 is not necessary to enable hyphopodium formation or hyphal entry into the root but is essential to support arbuscule branching. In ram1-3, arbuscules consist only of the arbuscule trunk and in some cases, a few initial thick hyphal branches. ram1-3 is also insensitive to phosphate-mediated regulation of the symbiosis. Transcript analysis of ram1-3 and ectopic expression of RAM1 indicate that RAM1 regulates expression of EXO70I and Stunted Arbuscule, two genes whose loss of function impacts arbuscule branching. Furthermore, RAM1 regulates expression of a transcription factor Required for Arbuscule Development (RAD1). RAD1 is also required for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, and rad1 mutants show reduced colonization. RAM1 itself is induced in colonized root cortical cells, and expression of RAM1 and RAD1 is modulated by DELLAs. Thus, the data suggest that DELLAs regulate arbuscule development through modulation of RAM1 and RAD1 and that the precise transcriptional control essential to place proteins in the periarbuscular membrane is controlled, at least in part, by RAM1. PMID:26511916

  4. Cloning arbuscule-related genes from mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Until recently little was known about the identity of the genes expressed in the arbuscules of mycorrhizas, due in part to problems associated with cloning genes from the tissues of an obligate symbiont. However, the combination of advanced molecular techniques, innovative use of the materials...... available and fortuitous cloning has resulted in the recent identification of a number of arbuscule-related genes. This article provides a brief summary of the genes involved in arbuscule development, function and regulation, and the techniques used to study them. Molecular techniques include differential...

  5. Improved detection suggests all Merkel cell carcinomas harbor Merkel polyomavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Scott J Rodig; Cheng, Jingwei; Wardzala, Jacek; Dorosario, Andrew; Scanlon, Jessica J.; Laga, Alvaro C.; Martinez-Fernandez, Alejandro; Barletta, Justine A.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Sadasivam, Subhashini; Holloway, Dustin T.; Cooper, Dylan J.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Wang, Linda C; DeCaprio, James A.

    2012-01-01

    A human polyomavirus was recently discovered in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) specimens. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) genome undergoes clonal integration into the host cell chromosomes of MCC tumors and expresses small T antigen and truncated large T antigen. Previous studies have consistently reported that MCPyV can be detected in approximately 80% of all MCC tumors. We sought to increase the sensitivity of detection of MCPyV in MCC by developing antibodies capable of detecting large T...

  6. Improved detection suggests all Merkel cell carcinomas harbor Merkel polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodig, Scott J; Cheng, Jingwei; Wardzala, Jacek; DoRosario, Andrew; Scanlon, Jessica J; Laga, Alvaro C; Martinez-Fernandez, Alejandro; Barletta, Justine A; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Sadasivam, Subhashini; Holloway, Dustin T; Cooper, Dylan J; Kupper, Thomas S; Wang, Linda C; DeCaprio, James A

    2012-12-01

    A human polyomavirus was recently discovered in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) specimens. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) genome undergoes clonal integration into the host cell chromosomes of MCC tumors and expresses small T antigen and truncated large T antigen. Previous studies have consistently reported that MCPyV can be detected in approximately 80% of all MCC tumors. We sought to increase the sensitivity of detection of MCPyV in MCC by developing antibodies capable of detecting large T antigen by immunohistochemistry. In addition, we expanded the repertoire of quantitative PCR primers specific for MCPyV to improve the detection of viral DNA in MCC. Here we report that a novel monoclonal antibody detected MCPyV large T antigen expression in 56 of 58 (97%) unique MCC tumors. PCR analysis specifically detected viral DNA in all 60 unique MCC tumors tested. We also detected inactivating point substitution mutations of TP53 in the two MCC specimens that lacked large T antigen expression and in only 1 of 56 tumors positive for large T antigen. These results indicate that MCPyV is present in MCC tumors more frequently than previously reported and that mutations in TP53 tend to occur in MCC tumors that fail to express MCPyV large T antigen. PMID:23114601

  7. Improved detection suggests all Merkel cell carcinomas harbor Merkel polyomavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodig, Scott J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Wardzala, Jacek; DoRosario, Andrew; Scanlon, Jessica J.; Laga, Alvaro C.; Martinez-Fernandez, Alejandro; Barletta, Justine A.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Sadasivam, Subhashini; Holloway, Dustin T.; Cooper, Dylan J.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Wang, Linda C.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2012-01-01

    A human polyomavirus was recently discovered in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) specimens. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) genome undergoes clonal integration into the host cell chromosomes of MCC tumors and expresses small T antigen and truncated large T antigen. Previous studies have consistently reported that MCPyV can be detected in approximately 80% of all MCC tumors. We sought to increase the sensitivity of detection of MCPyV in MCC by developing antibodies capable of detecting large T antigen by immunohistochemistry. In addition, we expanded the repertoire of quantitative PCR primers specific for MCPyV to improve the detection of viral DNA in MCC. Here we report that a novel monoclonal antibody detected MCPyV large T antigen expression in 56 of 58 (97%) unique MCC tumors. PCR analysis specifically detected viral DNA in all 60 unique MCC tumors tested. We also detected inactivating point substitution mutations of TP53 in the two MCC specimens that lacked large T antigen expression and in only 1 of 56 tumors positive for large T antigen. These results indicate that MCPyV is present in MCC tumors more frequently than previously reported and that mutations in TP53 tend to occur in MCC tumors that fail to express MCPyV large T antigen. PMID:23114601

  8. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in six harbor seals (Phoca vitulina spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Jennifer E; Gamble, Kathryn C; Stone, Michael; Lyons, Jeremiah A; Maganti, Rajanikanth J; Tuomi, Pamela A; Olds, June E; Sims, Michele A; Gauger, Phillip; Tuttle, Allison D

    2014-09-01

    Six cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were identified in six captive adult Pacific (Phoca vitulina richardsii; n = 2) and Atlantic (Phoca vitulina concolor; n = 4) harbor seals. These seals presented with intermittent dysphagia, regurgitation, inappetence, and abnormal posturing. Common clinical pathology findings in these seals included azotemia, hyperproteinemia, hyperglobulinemia, and leukocytosis. Gastrointestinal endoscopy commonly revealed an ulcerated mass near the gastroesophageal junction. Each seal was euthanized (n = 3) due to poor prognosis, subsequently died while undergoing an anesthetic procedure (n = 2), or found dead (n = 1). The diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma was confirmed via biopsy of esophageal mucosa during endoscopy or histopathologic examination of affected tissues after necropsy. On the basis of clinical and postmortem findings, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in aged harbor seals exhibiting clinical signs of regurgitation, decreased appetite or anorexia, vomiting, and/or abnormal posturing. PMID:25314830

  9. Brown adipose tissue harbors a distinct sub-population of regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasa Medrikova

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are critical determinants of both immune responses and metabolic control. Here we show that systemic ablation of Treg cells compromised the adaptation of whole-body energy expenditure to cold exposure, correlating with impairment in thermogenic marker gene expression and massive invasion of pro-inflammatory macrophages in brown adipose tissue (BAT. Indeed, BAT harbored a unique sub-set of Treg cells characterized by a unique gene signature. As these Treg cells respond to BAT activation upon cold exposure, this study defines a BAT-specific Treg sub-set with direct implications for the regulation of energy homeostasis in response to environmental stress.

  10. Oral keratinocytes support non-replicative infection and transfer of harbored HIV-1 to permissive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacaman Rodrigo A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral keratinocytes on the mucosal surface are frequently exposed to HIV-1 through contact with infected sexual partners or nursing mothers. To determine the plausibility that oral keratinocytes are primary targets of HIV-1, we tested the hypothesis that HIV-1 infects oral keratinocytes in a restricted manner. Results To study the fate of HIV-1, immortalized oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT-2; TERT-2 cells were characterized for the fate of HIV-specific RNA and DNA. At 6 h post inoculation with X4 or R5-tropic HIV-1, HIV-1gag RNA was detected maximally within TERT-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase activity in TERT-2 cells was confirmed by VSV-G-mediated infection with HIV-NL4-3Δenv-EGFP. AZT inhibited EGFP expression in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that viral replication can be supported if receptors are bypassed. Within 3 h post inoculation, integrated HIV-1 DNA was detected in TERT-2 cell nuclei and persisted after subculture. Multiply spliced and unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs were not detectable up to 72 h post inoculation, suggesting that HIV replication may abort and that infection is non-productive. Within 48 h post inoculation, however, virus harbored by CD4 negative TERT-2 cells trans infected co-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or MOLT4 cells (CD4+ CCR5+ by direct cell-to-cell transfer or by releasing low levels of infectious virions. Primary tonsil epithelial cells also trans infected HIV-1 to permissive cells in a donor-specific manner. Conclusion Oral keratinocytes appear, therefore, to support stable non-replicative integration, while harboring and transmitting infectious X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 to permissive cells for up to 48 h.

  11. Matrine Activates PTEN to Induce Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis in V600EBRAF Harboring Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiying Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a natural chemical Matrine, which exhibits anti-melanoma potential with its PTEN activation mechanism. Matrine effectively inhibited proliferation of several carcinoma cell lines, including melanoma V600EBRAF harboring M21 cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed Matrine induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in M21 cells dose-dependently. Apoptosis in M21 cells induced by Matrine was identified by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL analysis and Annexin-V/FITC staining. Molecular mechanistic study suggested that Matrine upregulated both mRNA level and protein expression level of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN, leading to inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Downregulation of phosphor-Aktser473 by Matrine activated p21 and Bax, which contributed to G0/G1 cell cycle and apoptosis. Besides, Matrine enhanced the PI3K/Akt inhibition effects to inhibit the cell proliferation with PI3K inhibitor, LY2940002. In summary, our findings suggest Matrine is a promising antitumor drug candidate with its possible PTEN activation mechanisms for treating cancer diseases, such as melanomas.

  12. Sensitization of human pancreatic cancer cells harboring mutated K-ras to apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shen

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a devastating human malignancy and gain of functional mutations in K-ras oncogene is observed in 75%-90% of the patients. Studies have shown that oncogenic ras is not only able to promote cell growth or survival, but also apoptosis, depending upon circumstances. Using pancreatic cancer cell lines with or without expressing mutated K-ras, we demonstrated that the inhibition of endogenous PKC activity sensitized human pancreatic cancer cells (MIA and PANC-1 expressing mutated K-ras to apoptosis, which had no apoptotic effect on BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells that contain a normal Ras as well as human lung epithelial BAES-2B cells. In this apoptotic process, the level of ROS was increased and PUMA was upregulated in a p73-dependent fashion in MIA and PANC-1 cells. Subsequently, caspase-3 was cleaved. A full induction of apoptosis required the activation of both ROS- and p73-mediated pathways. The data suggest that PKC is a crucial factor that copes with aberrant K-ras to maintain the homeostasis of the pancreatic cancer cells harboring mutated K-ras. However, the suppression or loss of PKC disrupts the balance and initiates an apoptotic crisis, in which ROS and p73 appear the potential, key targets.

  13. In Vitro Exposure of Harbor Seal Immune Cells to Aroclor 1260 Alters Phocine Distemper Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolni, Andrea; Frasca, Salvatore; Levin, Milton; Matassa, Keith; Nielsen, Ole; Waring, Gordon; De Guise, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    In the last 30 years, several large-scale marine mammal mortality events have occurred, often in close association with highly polluted regions, leading to suspicions that contaminant-induced immunosuppression contributed to these epizootics. Some of these recent events also identified morbillivirus as a cause of or contributor to death. The role of contaminant exposures regarding morbillivirus mortality is still unclear. The results of this study aimed to address the potential for a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), specifically Aroclor 1260, to alter harbor seal T-lymphocyte proliferation and to assess if exposure resulted in increased likelihood of phocine distemper virus (PDV USA 2006) to infect susceptible seals in an in vitro system. Exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to Aroclor 1260 did not significantly alter lymphocyte proliferation (1, 5, 10, and 20 ppm). However, using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), lymphocytes exposed to 20 ppm Aroclor 1260 exhibited a significant decrease in PDV replication at day 7 and a significant increase at day 11 compared with unexposed control cells. Similar and significant differences were apparent on exposure to Aroclor 1260 in monocytes and supernatant. The results here indicate that in harbor seals, Aroclor 1260 exposure results in a decrease in virus early during infection and an increase during late infection. The consequences of this contaminant-induced infection pattern in a highly susceptible host could result in a greater potential for systemic infection with greater viral load, which could explain the correlative findings seen in wild populations exposed to a range of persistent contaminants that suffer from morbillivirus epizootics. PMID:26142119

  14. A subset of prostatic basal cell carcinomas harbor the MYB rearrangement of adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Justin A; Yonescu, Raluca; Epstein, Jonathan I; Westra, William H

    2015-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a basaloid tumor consisting of myoepithelial and ductal cells typically arranged in a cribriform pattern. Adenoid cystic carcinoma is generally regarded as a form of salivary gland carcinoma, but it can arise from sites unassociated with salivary tissue. A rare form of prostate carcinoma exhibits ACC-like features; it is no longer regarded as a true ACC but rather as prostatic basal cell carcinoma (PBCC) and within the spectrum of basaloid prostatic proliferations. True ACCs often harbor MYB translocations resulting in the MYB-NFIB fusion protein. MYB analysis could clarify the true nature of prostatic carcinomas that exhibit ACC features and thus help refine the classification of prostatic basaloid proliferations. Twelve PBCCs were identified from the pathology consultation files of Johns Hopkins Hospital. The histopathologic features were reviewed, and break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization for MYB was performed. All 12 cases exhibited prominent basaloid histology. Four were purely solid, 7 exhibited a cribriform pattern reminiscent of salivary ACC, and 1 had a mixed pattern. The MYB rearrangement was detected in 2 (29%) of 7 ACC-like carcinomas but in none (0%) of the 5 PBCCs with a prominent solid pattern. True ACCs can arise in the prostate as is evidenced by the presence of the characteristic MYB rearrangement. When dealing with malignant basaloid proliferations in the prostate, recommendations to consolidate ACCs with other tumor types may need to be reassessed, particularly in light of the rapidly advancing field of biologic therapy where the identification of tumor-specific genetic alterations presents novel therapeutic targets. PMID:26089205

  15. Transcriptome profiling identifies genes and pathways deregulated upon floxuridine treatment in colorectal cancer cells harboring GOF mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Arindam; Dey, Sanjib; Das, Pijush; Alam, Sk Kayum; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2016-06-01

    Mutation in TP53 is a common genetic alteration in human cancers. Certain tumor associated p53 missense mutants acquire gain-of-function (GOF) properties and confer oncogenic phenotypes including enhanced chemoresistance. The colorectal cancers (CRC) harboring mutant p53 are generally aggressive in nature and difficult to treat. To identify a potential gene expression signature of GOF mutant p53-driven acquired chemoresistance in CRC, we performed transcriptome profiling of floxuridine (FUdR) treated SW480 cells expressing mutant p53(R273H) (GEO#: GSE77533). We obtained several genes differentially regulated between FUdR treated and untreated cells. Further, functional characterization and pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of crucial biological processes and pathways upon FUdR treatment in SW480 cells. Our data suggest that in response to chemotherapeutics treatment, cancer cells with GOF mutant p53 can modulate key cellular pathways to withstand the cytotoxic effect of the drugs. The genes and pathways identified in the present study can be further validated and targeted for better chemotherapy response in colorectal cancer patients harboring mutant p53. PMID:27114909

  16. Decreased heat shock protein 27 expression and altered autophagy in human cells harboring A8344G mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Yi; Chen, Hsueh-Fu; Gi, Siao-Jhen; Chi, Tang-Hao; Cheng, Che-Kun; Hsu, Chi-Fu; Ma, Yi-Shing; Wei, Yau-Huei; Liu, Chin-Shan; Hsieh, Mingli

    2011-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are responsible for human neuromuscular diseases caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Myoclonus epilepsy associated with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) is a maternally inherited mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with various syndromes involving both muscular and nervous systems. The most common mutation in MERRF syndrome, A8344G mutation in mtDNA, has been associated with severe defects in protein synthesis. This defect impairs assembly of complexes in electron transport chain and results in decreased respiratory function of mitochondria. In this study, we showed a significant decrease of the heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a MERRF patient and in cybrid cells harboring MERRF A8344G mutation. However, normal cytoplasmic distributions of Hsp27 and normal heat shock responses were observed in both wild type and mutant cybrids. Furthermore, overexpression of wild type Hsp27 in mutant MERRF cybrids significantly decreased cell death under staurosporine (STS) treatment, suggesting a protective function of Hsp27 in cells harboring the A8344G mutation of mtDNA. Meanwhile, reverse transcriptase PCR showed no difference in the mRNA level between normal and mutant cybrids, indicating that alterations may occur at the protein level. Evidenced by the decreased levels of Hsp27 upon treatment with proteasome inhibitor, starvation and rapamycin and the accumulation of Hsp27 upon lysosomal inhibitor treatment; Hsp27 may be degraded by the autophagic pathway. In addition, the increased formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes was found in MERRF cybrids under the basal condition, indicating a constitutively-activated autophagic pathway. It may explain, at least partially, the faster turnover of Hsp27 in MERRF cybrids. This study provides information for us to understand that Hsp27 is degraded through the autophagic pathway and that Hsp27 may have a protective role in MERRF cells. Regulating Hsp27 and the autophagic pathway

  17. Human Lymphoid Tissues Harbor a Distinct CD69+CXCR6+ NK Cell Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugthart, Gertjan; Melsen, Janine E; Vervat, Carly; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, Monique M; Corver, Willem E; Roelen, Dave L; van Bergen, Jeroen; van Tol, Maarten J D; Lankester, Arjan C; Schilham, Marco W

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of human NK cells is based primarily on conventional CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from blood. However, most cellular immune interactions occur in lymphoid organs. Based on the coexpression of CD69 and CXCR6, we identified a third major NK cell subset in lymphoid tissues. This population represents 30-60% of NK cells in marrow, spleen, and lymph node but is absent from blood. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells have an intermediate expression of CD56 and high expression of NKp46 and ICAM-1. In contrast to circulating NK cells, they have a bimodal expression of the activating receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells do not express the early markers c-kit and IL-7Rα, nor killer cell Ig-like receptors or other late-differentiation markers. After cytokine stimulation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells produce IFN-γ at levels comparable to CD56(dim) NK cells. They constitutively express perforin but require preactivation to express granzyme B and exert cytotoxicity. After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells do not exhibit the hyperexpansion observed for both conventional NK cell populations. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells constitute a separate NK cell population with a distinct phenotype and function. The identification of this NK cell population in lymphoid tissues provides tools to further evaluate the cellular interactions and role of NK cells in human immunity. PMID:27226093

  18. B cells and platelets harbor prion infectivity in the blood of deer infected with chronic wasting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiason, Candace K; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette; Hays, Sheila A; Powers, Jenny; Osborn, David A; Dahmes, Sallie J; Miller, Karl V; Warren, Robert J; Mason, Gary L; Telling, Glenn C; Young, Alan J; Hoover, Edward A

    2010-05-01

    Substantial evidence for prion transmission via blood transfusion exists for many transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases. Determining which cell phenotype(s) is responsible for trafficking infectivity has important implications for our understanding of the dissemination of prions, as well as their detection and elimination from blood products. We used bioassay studies of native white-tailed deer and transgenic cervidized mice to determine (i) if chronic wasting disease (CWD) blood infectivity is associated with the cellular versus the cell-free/plasma fraction of blood and (ii) in particular if B-cell (MAb 2-104(+)), platelet (CD41/61(+)), or CD14(+) monocyte blood cell phenotypes harbor infectious prions. All four deer transfused with the blood mononuclear cell fraction from CWD(+) donor deer became PrP(CWD) positive by 19 months postinoculation, whereas none of the four deer inoculated with cell-free plasma from the same source developed prion infection. All four of the deer injected with B cells and three of four deer receiving platelets from CWD(+) donor deer became PrP(CWD) positive in as little as 6 months postinoculation, whereas none of the four deer receiving blood CD14(+) monocytes developed evidence of CWD infection (immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis) after 19 months of observation. Results of the Tg(CerPrP) mouse bioassays mirrored those of the native cervid host. These results indicate that CWD blood infectivity is cell associated and suggest a significant role for B cells and platelets in trafficking CWD infectivity in vivo and support earlier tissue-based studies associating putative follicular B cells with PrP(CWD). Localization of CWD infectivity with leukocyte subpopulations may aid in enhancing the sensitivity of blood-based diagnostic assays for CWD and other TSEs. PMID:20219916

  19. Induction of mouse melioidosis with meningitis by CD11b+ phagocytic cells harboring intracellular B. pseudomallei as a Trojan horse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ju Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 3-5% of patients with melioidosis manifest CNS symptoms; however, the clinical data regarding neurological melioidosis are limited. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We established a mouse model of melioidosis with meningitis characterized by neutrophil infiltration into the meninges histologically and B. pseudomallei in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF by bacteriological culturing methods. As the disease progresses, the bacteria successively colonize the spleen, liver, bone marrow (BM and brain and invade splenic and BM cells by days 2 and 6 post-infection, respectively. The predominant cell types intracellularly infected with B. pseudomallei were splenic and BM CD11b(+ populations. The CD11b(+Ly6C(high inflamed monocytes, CD11b(+Ly6C(low resident monocytes, CD11b(+Ly6G(+ neutrophils, CD11b(+F4/80(+ macrophages and CD11b(+CD19(+ B cells were expanded in the spleen and BM during the progression of melioidosis. After adoptive transfer of CD11b populations harboring B. pseudomallei, the infected CD11b(+ cells induced bacterial colonization in the brain, whereas CD11b(- cells only partially induced colonization; extracellular (free B. pseudomallei were unable to colonize the brain. CD62L (selectin was absent on splenic CD11b(+ cells on day 4 but was expressed on day 10 post-infection. Adoptive transfer of CD11b(+ cells expressing CD62L (harvested on day 10 post-infection resulted in meningitis in the recipients, but transfer of CD11b(+ CD62L-negative cells did not. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that B. pseudomallei-infected CD11b(+ selectin-expressing cells act as a Trojan horse and are able to transmigrate across endothelial cells, resulting in melioidosis with meningitis.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Extra Ocular Muscle Harbor Neuroectodermal Differentiation Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darilang Mawrie

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been proposed as suitable candidates for cell therapy for neurological disorderssince they exhibit good neuronal differentiation capacity. However, for better therapeutic outcomes, it is necessary to isolate MSC from a suitable tissue sourcethat posses high neuronal differentiation. In this context, we isolated MSC from extra ocular muscle (EOM tissue and tested the in vitro neuronal differentiation potential. In the current study, EOM tissue derived MSC were characterized and compared with bone marrow derived MSC. We found that EOM derived MSC proliferated as a monolayer and showed similarities in morphology, growth properties and cell surface marker expression with bone marrow derived MSC and expressed high levels of NES, OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 in its undifferentiated state. They also expressed embryonic cell surface marker SSEA4 and their intracellular mitochondrial distribution pattern was similar to that of multipotent stem cells. Although EOM derived MSC differentiated readily into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, they differentiated more efficiently into neuroectodermal cells. The differentiation into neuroectodermal cellswas confirmed by the expression of neuronal markers NGFR and MAP2B. Thus, EOM derived MSC might be good candidates for stem cell based therapies for treating neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Extra Ocular Muscle Harbor Neuroectodermal Differentiation Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalene, Damaris; Bhattacharyya, Jina; Jaganathan, Bithiah Grace

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been proposed as suitable candidates for cell therapy for neurological disorderssince they exhibit good neuronal differentiation capacity. However, for better therapeutic outcomes, it is necessary to isolate MSC from a suitable tissue sourcethat posses high neuronal differentiation. In this context, we isolated MSC from extra ocular muscle (EOM) tissue and tested the in vitro neuronal differentiation potential. In the current study, EOM tissue derived MSC were characterized and compared with bone marrow derived MSC. We found that EOM derived MSC proliferated as a monolayer and showed similarities in morphology, growth properties and cell surface marker expression with bone marrow derived MSC and expressed high levels of NES, OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 in its undifferentiated state. They also expressed embryonic cell surface marker SSEA4 and their intracellular mitochondrial distribution pattern was similar to that of multipotent stem cells. Although EOM derived MSC differentiated readily into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, they differentiated more efficiently into neuroectodermal cells. The differentiation into neuroectodermal cellswas confirmed by the expression of neuronal markers NGFR and MAP2B. Thus, EOM derived MSC might be good candidates for stem cell based therapies for treating neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27248788

  2. Altered mitochondrial dynamics and response to insulin in cybrid cells harboring a diabetes-susceptible mitochondrial DNA haplogroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hsiao-Mei; Weng, Shao-Wen; Chang, Alice Y W; Huang, Hung-Tu; Lin, Hung-Yu; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Liou, Chia-Wei; Tai, Ming-Hong; Lin, Ching-Yi; Wang, Pei-Wen

    2016-07-01

    The advantage of using a cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) model to study the genetic effects of mitochondria is that the cells have the same nuclear genomic background. We previously demonstrated the independent role of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance (IR) and pro-inflammation in type 2 diabetes. In this study, we compared mitochondrial dynamics and related physiological functions between cybrid cells harboring diabetes-susceptible (B4) and diabetes-protective (D4) mitochondrial haplogroups, especially the responses before and after insulin stimulation. Cybrid B4 showed a more fragmented mitochondrial network, impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics, increased apoptosis and ineffective mitophagy and a low expression of fusion-related molecules. Upon insulin stimulation, increases in network formation, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, and ATP production were observed only in cybrid D4. Insulin promoted a pro-fusion dynamic status in both cybrids, but the trend was greater in cybrid D4. In cybrid B4, the imbalance of mitochondrial dynamics and impaired biogenesis and bioenergetics, and increased apoptosis were significantly improved in response to antioxidant treatment. We concluded that diabetes-susceptible mtDNA variants are themselves resistant to insulin. PMID:27107769

  3. Gene expression pattern in transmitochondrial cytoplasmic hybrid cells harboring type 2 diabetes-associated mitochondrial DNA haplogroups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwoo Hwang

    Full Text Available Decreased mitochondrial function plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Recently, it was reported that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups confer genetic susceptibility to T2DM in Koreans and Japanese. Particularly, mtDNA haplogroup N9a is associated with a decreased risk of T2DM, whereas haplogroups D5 and F are associated with an increased risk. To examine functional consequences of these haplogroups without being confounded by the heterogeneous nuclear genomic backgrounds of different subjects, we constructed transmitochondrial cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid cells harboring each of the three haplogroups (N9a, D5, and F in a background of a shared nuclear genome. We compared the functional consequences of the three haplogroups using cell-based assays and gene expression microarrays. Cell-based assays did not detect differences in mitochondrial functions among the haplogroups in terms of ATP generation, reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cellular dehydrogenase activity. However, differential expression and clustering analyses of microarray data revealed that the three haplogroups exhibit a distinctive nuclear gene expression pattern that correlates with their susceptibility to T2DM. Pathway analysis of microarray data identified several differentially regulated metabolic pathways. Notably, compared to the T2DM-resistant haplogroup N9a, the T2DM-susceptible haplogroup F showed down-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation and up-regulation of glycolysis. These results suggest that variations in mtDNA can affect the expression of nuclear genes regulating mitochondrial functions or cellular energetics. Given that impaired mitochondrial function caused by T2DM-associated mtDNA haplogroups is compensated by the nuclear genome, we speculate that defective nuclear compensation, under certain circumstances, might lead to the development of T2DM.

  4. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients harboring T315I BCR-ABL mutated leukemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck Emmanuel; Basak, Grzegorz W; Soverini, Simona;

    2011-01-01

    , still alive]) for those with chronic myeloid leukemia in the blast phase and 7.4 months (range 1.4 months to not reached [ie, still alive]) for those with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia but has not yet been reached for those in the chronic and accelerated phases of chronic...... myeloid leukemia. The occurrence of chronic GVHD had a positive impact on overall survival (P = .047). Transplant-related mortality rates were low. Multivariate analysis identified only blast phase at transplantation (hazard ratio 3.68, P = .0011) and unrelated stem cell donor (hazard ratio 2.98, P = .011...

  5. Gluten-specific antibodies of celiac disease gut plasma cells recognize long proteolytic fragments that typically harbor T-cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dørum, Siri; Steinsbø, Øyvind; Bergseng, Elin; Arntzen, Magnus Ø; de Souza, Gustavo A; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify proteolytic fragments of gluten proteins recognized by recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibodies generated from single IgA plasma cells of celiac disease lesions. Peptides bound by monoclonal antibodies in complex gut-enzyme digests of gluten treated with the deamidating enzyme transglutaminase 2, were identified by mass spectrometry after antibody pull-down with protein G beads. The antibody bound peptides were long deamidated peptide fragments that contained the substrate recognition sequence of transglutaminase 2. Characteristically, the fragments contained epitopes with the sequence QPEQPFP and variants thereof in multiple copies, and they typically also harbored many different gluten T-cell epitopes. In the pull-down setting where antibodies were immobilized on a solid phase, peptide fragments with multivalent display of epitopes were targeted. This scenario resembles the situation of the B-cell receptor on the surface of B cells. Conceivably, B cells of celiac disease patients select gluten epitopes that are repeated multiple times in long peptide fragments generated by gut digestive enzymes. As the fragments also contain many different T-cell epitopes, this will lead to generation of strong antibody responses by effective presentation of several distinct T-cell epitopes and establishment of T-cell help to B cells. PMID:27146306

  6. Gluten-specific antibodies of celiac disease gut plasma cells recognize long proteolytic fragments that typically harbor T-cell epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dørum, Siri; Steinsbø, Øyvind; Bergseng, Elin; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; de Souza, Gustavo A.; Sollid, Ludvig M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify proteolytic fragments of gluten proteins recognized by recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibodies generated from single IgA plasma cells of celiac disease lesions. Peptides bound by monoclonal antibodies in complex gut-enzyme digests of gluten treated with the deamidating enzyme transglutaminase 2, were identified by mass spectrometry after antibody pull-down with protein G beads. The antibody bound peptides were long deamidated peptide fragments that contained the substrate recognition sequence of transglutaminase 2. Characteristically, the fragments contained epitopes with the sequence QPEQPFP and variants thereof in multiple copies, and they typically also harbored many different gluten T-cell epitopes. In the pull-down setting where antibodies were immobilized on a solid phase, peptide fragments with multivalent display of epitopes were targeted. This scenario resembles the situation of the B-cell receptor on the surface of B cells. Conceivably, B cells of celiac disease patients select gluten epitopes that are repeated multiple times in long peptide fragments generated by gut digestive enzymes. As the fragments also contain many different T-cell epitopes, this will lead to generation of strong antibody responses by effective presentation of several distinct T-cell epitopes and establishment of T-cell help to B cells. PMID:27146306

  7. Cecum lymph node dendritic cells harbor slow-growing bacteria phenotypically tolerant to antibiotic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Kaiser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN, the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%-20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103⁺CX₃CR1⁻CD11c⁺ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics.

  8. Renal cell carcinomas of chronic kidney disease patients harbor the mutational signature of carcinogenic aristolochic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelaković, Bojan; Castells, Xavier; Tomić, Karla; Ardin, Maude; Karanović, Sandra; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-06-15

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent dietary cytotoxin and carcinogen, and an established etiological agent underlying severe human nephropathies and associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, collectively designated aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Its genome-wide mutational signature, marked by predominant A:T > T:A transversions occurring in the 5'-CpApG-3' trinucleotide context and enriched on the nontranscribed gene strand, has been identified in human upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas from East Asian patients and in experimental systems. Here we report a whole-exome sequencing screen performed on DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinomas (RCC) arising in chronic renal disease patients from a Balkan endemic nephropathy (EN) region. In the EN regions, the disease results from the consumption of bread made from wheat contaminated by seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, an AA-containing plant. In five of eight (62.5%) tested RCC tumor specimens, we observed the characteristic global mutational signature consistent with the mutagenic effects of AA. This signature was absent in the control RCC samples obtained from patients from a nonendemic, metropolitan region. By identifying a new tumor type associated with the AA-driven genome-wide mutagenic process in the context of renal disease, our results suggest new epidemiological and public health implications for the RCC incidence worldwide, particularly for the high-risk regions with unregulated use of AA-containing traditional herbal medicines. PMID:25403517

  9. Hepatocyte growth factor reduces sensitivity to the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, gefitinib, in lung adenocarcinoma cells harboring wild-type EGFR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Wang, Rong; Peng, Shunli; Chen, Longhua; Li, Qi; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) therapy is an option for lung cancers harboring wild-type EGFR when chemotherapeutic reagents have failed. In this study, we found that the EGFR-TKI, gefitinib, modestly suppressed proliferation of the lung cancer cell lines, A549 and H358, which both harbor wild-type EGFR. Treatment with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) reduced the sensitivity to gefitinib, whereas sensitivity was restored by treatment with an HGF antibody, a MET inhibitor, or depletion of MET but not ErbB3 gene. Moreover, both PI3K/mTOR inhibitors and MEK inhibitors suppressed proliferation of A549 cells, whereas only PI3K/mTOR inhibitors effectively suppressed cell viability of EGFR mutant PC-9 cells. Our findings suggest that HGF reduced the gefitinib sensitivity through MET and downstream PI3K and MAPK pathways. Combined use of EGFR-TKI and MET inhibitors or inhibition of downstream signaling molecules might be a better second or third line choice for a group of patients with advanced lung cancer harboring wild-type EGFR. PMID:26919104

  10. Meta-Analysis of First-Line Therapies in Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Harboring EGFR-Activating Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Haaland, Benjamin; Tan, Pui San; Castro, Gilberto de; Lopes, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib have been compared with chemotherapy as first-line therapies for patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer harboring epidermal growth factor receptor–activating mutations. This meta-analysis compares gefitinib, erlotinib, afatinib, and chemotherapy. Methods: Literature search was performed using relevant keywords. Direct and indirect meta-estimates were generated using log-linear mixed-effects models, with ran...

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia of donor origin after allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a sibling who harbors germline XPD and XRCC3 homozygous polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Dayse A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 54-year-old woman was diagnosed with infiltrative ductal breast carcinoma. Two years after treatment, the patient developed an acute myeloid leukemia (AML which harbored del(11q23 in 8% of the blast cells. The patient was submitted for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (aSCT from her HLA-compatible sister. Ten months after transplantation, she relapsed with an AML with basophilic maturation characterized by CD45low CD33high, CD117+, CD13-/+, HLA Drhigh, CD123high, and CD203c+ blast cells lacking expression of CD7, CD10, CD34, CD15, CD14, CD56, CD36, CD64, and cytoplasmic tryptase. Karyotype analysis showed the emergence of a new clone with t(2;14 and FISH analysis indicated the presence of MLL gene rearrangement consistent with del(11q23. Interestingly, AML blast cell DNA tested with microsatellite markers showed the same pattern as the donor's, suggesting that this AML emerged from donor cells. Additionally, polymorphisms of the XPA, XPD, XRCC1, XRCC3 and RAD51 DNA repair genes revealed three unfavorable alleles with low DNA repair capacity. In summary, we report the first case of AML involving XPD and XRCC3 polymorphisms from donor origin following allogeneic stem cell transplantation and highlight the potential need for careful analysis of DNA repair gene polymorphisms in selecting candidate donors prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  12. The preferred substrates for transglutaminase 2 in a complex wheat gluten digest are Peptide fragments harboring celiac disease T-cell epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siri Dørum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is a T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory disorder of the gut that is induced by dietary exposure to gluten proteins. CD4+ T cells of the intestinal lesion recognize gluten peptides in the context of HLA-DQ2.5 or HLA-DQ8 and the gluten derived peptides become better T-cell antigens after deamidation catalyzed by the enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2. In this study we aimed to identify the preferred peptide substrates of TG2 in a heterogeneous proteolytic digest of whole wheat gluten. METHODS: A method was established to enrich for preferred TG2 substrates in a complex gluten peptide mixture by tagging with 5-biotinamido-pentylamine. Tagged peptides were isolated and then identified by nano-liquid chromatography online-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, database searching and final manual data validation. RESULTS: We identified 31 different peptides as preferred substrates of TG2. Strikingly, the majority of these peptides were harboring known gluten T-cell epitopes. Five TG2 peptide substrates that were predicted to bind to HLA-DQ2.5 did not contain previously characterized sequences of T-cell epitopes. Two of these peptides elicited T-cell responses when tested for recognition by intestinal T-cell lines of celiac disease patients, and thus they contain novel candidate T-cell epitopes. We also found that the intact 9mer core sequences of the respective epitopes were not present in all peptide substrates. Interestingly, those epitopes that were represented by intact forms were frequently recognized by T cells in celiac disease patients, whereas those that were present in truncated versions were infrequently recognized. CONCLUSION: TG2 as well as gastrointestinal proteolysis play important roles in the selection of gluten T-cell epitopes in celiac disease.

  13. Genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed receptors harboring TAG-72-specific camelid single domain antibodies as targeting agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A;

    2013-01-01

    Despite the preclinical success of adoptive therapy with T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed antigen receptors (CARs), certain limitations of this therapeutic approach such as the immunogenicity of the antigen binding domain, the emergence of tumor cell escape variants and the blocking...... expressing tumor cells, the combination of CD3ζ, OX40, CD28 as well as the CH3-CH2-hinge-hinge domains most efficiently triggered T cell activation. Importantly, CAR mediated functions were not blocked by the soluble TAG-72 antigen at a supraphysiological concentration. Our approach may have the potential to...

  14. Identification of hepatic niche harboring human acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells via the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itaru Kato

    Full Text Available In acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients, the bone marrow niche is widely known to be an important element of treatment response and relapse. Furthermore, a characteristic liver pathology observed in ALL patients implies that the hepatic microenvironment provides an extramedullary niche for leukemic cells. However, it remains unclear whether the liver actually provides a specific niche. The mechanism underlying this pathology is also poorly understood. Here, to answer these questions, we reconstituted the histopathology of leukemic liver by using patients-derived primary ALL cells into NOD/SCID/Yc (null mice. The liver pathology in this model was similar to that observed in the patients. By using this model, we clearly demonstrated that bile duct epithelial cells form a hepatic niche that supports infiltration and proliferation of ALL cells in the liver. Furthermore, we showed that functions of the niche are maintained by the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis, proposing a novel therapeutic approach targeting the extramedullary niche by inhibition of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the liver dissemination of leukemia is not due to nonselective infiltration, but rather systematic invasion and proliferation of leukemic cells in hepatic niche. Although the contribution of SDF-1/CXCR4 axis is reported in some cancer cells or leukemic niches such as bone marrow, we demonstrated that this axis works even in the extramedullary niche of leukemic cells. Our findings form the basis for therapeutic approaches that target the extramedullary niche by inhibiting the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  15. The protective roles of phosphorylated heat shock protein 27 in human cells harboring myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibers A8344G mtDNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsueh-Fu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Lin, Ting-Hui; Huang, Zhao-Wei; Chi, Tang-Hao; Ma, Yi-Shing; Wu, Shi-Bei; Wei, Yau-Huei; Hsieh, Mingli

    2012-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are associated with a large number of neuromuscular diseases. Myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) syndrome is a mitochondrial disease inherited through the maternal lineage. The most common mutation in MERRF syndrome, the A8344G mutation of mtDNA, is associated with severe defects in mitochondrial protein synthesis, which impair the assembly and function of the respiratory chain. We have previously shown that there is a decreased level of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a MERRF patient and in cytoplasmic hybrids (cybrids) harboring the A8344G mutation of mtDNA. In the present study, we found a dramatic decrease in the level of phosphorylated HSP27 (p-HSP27) in the mutant cybrids. Even though the steady-state level of p-HSP27 was reduced in the mutant cybrids, normal phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were observed upon exposure to stress, indicating normal kinase and phosphatase activities. To explore the roles that p-HSP27 may play, transfection experiments with HSP27 mutants, in which three specific serines were replaced with alanine or aspartic acid, showed that the phosphomimicking HSP27 desensitized mutant cybrids to apoptotic stress induced by staurosporine (STS). After heat shock stress, p-HSP27 was found to enter the nucleus immediately, and with a prolonged interval of recovery, p-HSP27 returned to the cytoplasm in wild-type cybrids but not in mutant cybrids. The translocation of p-HSP27 was correlated with cell viability, as shown by the increased number of apoptotic cells after p-HSP27 returned to the cytoplasm. In summary, our results demonstrate that p-HSP27 provides significant protection when cells are exposed to different stresses in the cell model of MERRF syndrome. Therapeutic agents targeting anomalous HSP27 phosphorylation might represent a potential treatment for mitochondrial diseases. PMID:22742457

  16. Perturbation of energy metabolism by fatty-acid derivative AIC-47 and imatinib in BCR-ABL-harboring leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Haruka; Kumazaki, Minami; Minami, Yosuke; Ito, Yuko; Sugito, Nobuhiko; Kuranaga, Yuki; Taniguchi, Kohei; Yamada, Nami; Otsuki, Yoshinori; Naoe, Tomoki; Akao, Yukihiro

    2016-02-01

    In Ph-positive leukemia, imatinib brought marked clinical improvement; however, further improvement is needed to prevent relapse. Cancer cells efficiently use limited energy sources, and drugs targeting cellular metabolism improve the efficacy of therapy. In this study, we characterized the effects of novel anti-cancer fatty-acid derivative AIC-47 and imatinib, focusing on cancer-specific energy metabolism in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. AIC-47 and imatinib in combination exhibited a significant synergic cytotoxicity. Imatinib inhibited only the phosphorylation of BCR-ABL; whereas AIC-47 suppressed the expression of the protein itself. Both AIC-47 and imatinib modulated the expression of pyruvate kinase M (PKM) isoforms from PKM2 to PKM1 through the down-regulation of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1). PTBP1 functions as alternative splicing repressor of PKM1, resulting in expression of PKM2, which is an inactive form of pyruvate kinase for the last step of glycolysis. Although inactivation of BCR-ABL by imatinib strongly suppressed glycolysis, compensatory fatty-acid oxidation (FAO) activation supported glucose-independent cell survival by up-regulating CPT1C, the rate-limiting FAO enzyme. In contrast, AIC-47 inhibited the expression of CPT1C and directly fatty-acid metabolism. These findings were also observed in the CD34(+) fraction of Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. These results suggest that AIC-47 in combination with imatinib strengthened the attack on cancer energy metabolism, in terms of both glycolysis and compensatory activation of FAO. PMID:26607903

  17. B Cells and Platelets Harbor Prion Infectivity in the Blood of Deer Infected with Chronic Wasting Disease▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Candace K Mathiason; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette; Hays, Sheila A.; Powers, Jenny; Osborn, David A.; Dahmes, Sallie J.; Miller, Karl V.; Warren, Robert J., II; Mason, Gary L.; Telling, Glenn C.; Young, Alan J; Hoover, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    Substantial evidence for prion transmission via blood transfusion exists for many transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases. Determining which cell phenotype(s) is responsible for trafficking infectivity has important implications for our understanding of the dissemination of prions, as well as their detection and elimination from blood products. We used bioassay studies of native white-tailed deer and transgenic cervidized mice to determine (i) if chronic wasting disease (CWD) b...

  18. Patients with lung cancer and paraneoplastic Hu syndrome harbor HuD-specific type 2 CD8+ T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Wendy K.; DeLuca, Ilana J.; Thomas, Ashby; Fak, John; Williams, Travis; Buckley, Noreen; Dousmanis, Athanasios G.; Posner, Jerome B.; Robert B Darnell

    2009-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders (PNDs) offer an uncommon opportunity to study human tumor immunity and autoimmunity. In small cell lung cancer (SCLC), expression of the HuD neuronal antigen is thought to lead to immune recognition, suppression of tumor growth, and, in a subset of patients, triggering of the Hu paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome. Antigen-specific CTLs believed to contribute to disease pathophysiology were described 10 years ago in paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. De...

  19. Integrated genomic approaches identify upregulation of SCRN1 as a novel mechanism associated with acquired resistance to erlotinib in PC9 cells harboring oncogenic EGFR mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nayoung; Cho, Ahye; Watanabe, Hideo; Choi, Yoon-La; Aziz, Meraj; Kassner, Michelle; Joung, Je-Gun; Park, Angela KJ; Francis, Joshua M.; Bae, Joon Seol; Ahn, Soo-min; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Woong-Yang; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Koo, Jaehyung; Yin, Hongwei Holly; Cho, Jeonghee

    2016-01-01

    Therapies targeting the tyrosine kinase activity of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) have been proven to be effective in treating a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring activating EGFR mutations. Inevitably these patients develop resistance to the EGFR-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Here, we performed integrated genomic analyses using an in vitro system to uncover alternative genomic mechanisms responsible for acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs. Specifically, we identified 80 genes whose expression is significantly increased in the erlotinib-resistant clones. RNAi-based systematic synthetic lethal screening of these candidate genes revealed that suppression of one upregulated transcript, SCRN1, a secernin family member, restores sensitivity to erlotinib by enhancing inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed increased levels of SCRN1 in 5 of 11 lung tumor specimens from EGFR-TKIs resistant patients. Taken together, we propose that upregulation of SCRN1 is an additional mechanism associated with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs and that its suppression serves as a novel therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in these patients. PMID:26883194

  20. Port and Harbor Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T; Guthmuller, H; DeWeert, M

    2004-12-15

    Port and Harbor Security is a daunting task to which optics and photonics offers significant solutions. We are pleased to report that the 2005 Defense and Security Symposium (DSS, Orlando, FL) will include reports on active and passive photonic systems operating from both airborne and subsurface platforms. In addition to imaging techniques, there are various photonic applications, such as total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF), which can be used to ''sniff'' for traces of explosives or contaminants in marine. These non-imaging technologies are beyond the scope of this article, but will also be represented at DSS 2005. We encourage colleagues to join our technical group to help us to make our ports and harbors safer and more secure.

  1. Intact Cohesion, Anaphase, and Chromosome Segregation in Human Cells Harboring Tumor-Derived Mutations in STAG2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Sik Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations of the cohesin complex subunit STAG2 are present in diverse tumor types. We and others have shown that STAG2 inactivation can lead to loss of sister chromatid cohesion and alterations in chromosome copy number in experimental systems. However, studies of naturally occurring human tumors have demonstrated little, if any, correlation between STAG2 mutational status and aneuploidy, and have further shown that STAG2-deficient tumors are often euploid. In an effort to provide insight into these discrepancies, here we analyze the effect of tumor-derived STAG2 mutations on the protein composition of cohesin and the expected mitotic phenotypes of STAG2 mutation. We find that many mutant STAG2 proteins retain their ability to interact with cohesin; however, the presence of mutant STAG2 resulted in a reduction in the ability of regulatory subunits WAPL, PDS5A, and PDS5B to interact with the core cohesin ring. Using AAV-mediated gene targeting, we then introduced nine tumor-derived mutations into the endogenous allele of STAG2 in cultured human cells. While all nonsense mutations led to defects in sister chromatid cohesion and a subset induced anaphase defects, missense mutations behaved like wild-type in these assays. Furthermore, only one of nine tumor-derived mutations tested induced overt alterations in chromosome counts. These data indicate that not all tumor-derived STAG2 mutations confer defects in cohesion, chromosome segregation, and ploidy, suggesting that there are likely to be other functional effects of STAG2 inactivation in human cancer cells that are relevant to cancer pathogenesis.

  2. Anodic biofilms in microbial fuel cells harbor low numbers of higher-power-producing bacteria than abundant genera

    KAUST Repository

    Kiely, Patrick D.

    2010-07-15

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode communities often reveal just a few genera, but it is not known to what extent less abundant bacteria could be important for improving performance. We examined the microbial community in an MFC fed with formic acid for more than 1 year and determined using 16S rRNA gene cloning and fluorescent in situ hybridization that members of the Paracoccus genus comprised most (~30%) of the anode community. A Paracoccus isolate obtained from this biofilm (Paracoccus denitrificans strain PS-1) produced only 5.6 mW/m 2, whereas the original mixed culture produced up to 10 mW/m 2. Despite the absence of any Shewanella species in the clone library, we isolated a strain of Shewanella putrefaciens (strain PS-2) from the same biofilm capable of producing a higher-power density (17.4 mW/m2) than the mixed culture, although voltage generation was variable. Our results suggest that the numerical abundance of microorganisms in biofilms cannot be assumed a priori to correlate to capacities of these predominant species for high-power production. Detailed screening of bacterial biofilms may therefore be needed to identify important strains capable of high-power generation for specific substrates. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Effets des mycorhizes à arbuscules sur la tolérance à un stress hydrique de quatre arbres fruitiers : Balanites aegyptiaca (L) Del., Parkiabiglobosa (Jacq.) Benth., Tamarindus indica L et Zizyphus mauritiana Lam.

    OpenAIRE

    Guissou, T.; Ba, A.M.; Plenchette, C; Guinko, S.; Duponnois, Robin

    2001-01-01

    L'influence de l'inoculation par un champignon mycorhizien à arbuscules (MA), #Glomus aggregatum$ Schenk et Smith emend Koske, sur la tolérance à un stress hydrique de 4 arbres fruitiers #Balanites aegyptiaca$ ((L.) Del., #Parkia biglobosa$ (Jacq.) Benth., #Tamarindus indica$ L. et #Zizphus mauritiana$ Lam. a été étudiée dans un sol déficient en P assimilable (2,18 microgr/g de P, Bray-1). Les pots inoculés ou non ont été maintenus par arrosage quotidien à la capacité au champ pendant les 4 p...

  4. Synergistic growth inhibition of cancer cells harboring the RET/PTC1 oncogene by staurosporine and rotenone involves enhanced cell death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    António Pedro Gonçalves; Arnaldo Videira; Valdemar Máximo; Paula Soares

    2011-09-01

    TPC-1 is a highly proliferative thyroid papillary carcinoma-derived cell line. These cells express the RET/PTC1 fusion protein, whose isoforms are characterized in this work. The bacterial alkaloid staurosporine and the plant extract rotenone are death-inducing drugs that have an inhibitory synergistic effect on the growth of TPC-1 cells. We show that this synergism is accompanied by an enhancement of the induction of cell death. Staurosporine alone induces cell cycle arrest in G1, whereas rotenone induces arrest in G2/M. We suggest that this additive pressure may drive cells to die, resulting in the synergistic interaction of the drug combination. These data emphasize the potential use of the staurosporine plus rotenone combination as an anticancer tool.

  5. Analysis of apoptosis-related gene expression after X-ray irradiation in human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells harboring wild-type or mutated p53 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumoto, Junichi; Imai, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken; Yuki, Kazue; Kirita, Tadaaki; Ohnishi, Takeo [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene have recently been reported to have an impact on clinical trials of several human tumors, including head and neck cancers. To confirm the p53-dependence of X-ray induced apoptosis, we used two cell lines derived from a human squamous cell carcinoma (SAS) with identical genetic backgrounds, except for the p53 gene, which are SAS/mp53 cells with mp53 and SAS/neo cells with wtp53. We previously reported that the radiosensitivity, Caspase-3 activity and apoptosis frequency in SAS/neo cells were clearly high as compared with SAS/mp53 cells. In order to elucidate the expression of apoptosis-related genes after irradiation, we used cDNA array analysis. The expressions of apoptosis-inductive genes, such as DFF40, Caspase-3, Caspase-8, Caspase-9, Caspase-10 and CRADD, were increased by X-ray irradiation in SAS cells with wtp53, but not in SAS cells expressing mp53. These results suggest that the X-ray sensitivity of wtp53 cells may come from the expression of these apoptosis-related genes. (author)

  6. Analysis of apoptosis-related gene expression after X-ray irradiation in human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells harboring wild-type or mutated p53 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene have recently been reported to have an impact on clinical trials of several human tumors, including head and neck cancers. To confirm the p53-dependence of X-ray induced apoptosis, we used two cell lines derived from a human squamous cell carcinoma (SAS) with identical genetic backgrounds, except for the p53 gene, which are SAS/mp53 cells with mp53 and SAS/neo cells with wtp53. We previously reported that the radiosensitivity, Caspase-3 activity and apoptosis frequency in SAS/neo cells were clearly high as compared with SAS/mp53 cells. In order to elucidate the expression of apoptosis-related genes after irradiation, we used cDNA array analysis. The expressions of apoptosis-inductive genes, such as DFF40, Caspase-3, Caspase-8, Caspase-9, Caspase-10 and CRADD, were increased by X-ray irradiation in SAS cells with wtp53, but not in SAS cells expressing mp53. These results suggest that the X-ray sensitivity of wtp53 cells may come from the expression of these apoptosis-related genes. (author)

  7. Harbor systems; Kowan system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumoto, K.; Mitsuhashi, M. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-10

    Container terminals these days are required to be enlarged, automated in operation, and enhanced in reliability so that they can properly deal with ships growing larger in size and containers increasing in number. Stable supply of electric power and efficient monitor and control of the related equipment are very important in securing stabilized, continuous operation for such container terminals. Outlined in this report are the electrical equipment of a modern container terminal and the large-capacity voltage fluctuation compensation unit delivered by Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., to West 5 Container Terminal, Nagoya Harbor. The electrical equipment of a terminal is a special high voltage reception/transformation facility capable of loop reception at 66kV. The 66kV cubicle type gas-insulated switch is provided with a current transformer for a sectionalized protection relay, current transformer for bus protection, and VCT bypass disconnector. The main transformer is a gas-insulated transformer, and a molded transformer is adopted for the special high voltage reception/transformation facility. The equipment monitor and control system employs a UNIX-base computer as the central processing system, and the information LAN is so designed as to be connectable to the Ethernet and P-link. 6 figs.

  8. Selective killing of CD4+ cells harboring a human immunodeficiency virus-inducible suicide gene prevents viral spread in an infected cell population.

    OpenAIRE

    Caruso, M; Klatzmann, D

    1992-01-01

    We have stably expressed in CD4+ lymphoid cells the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) gene under the control of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter and transactivation response element sequences. Upon HIV infection these regulatory sequences were transactivated, switching on high-level expression of HSV1-TK. This in turn caused the death of HIV-infected cells when they were cultured in the presence of acyclovir, a nucleoside analog that becomes toxic after pho...

  9. Alaska Harbor Seal Glacial Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Floating glacial ice serves as a haul-out substrate for a significant number (10-15%) of Alaskan harbor seals, and thus surveying tidewater glacial fjords is an...

  10. Sediment toxicity in Savannah Harbor

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Savannah Harbor, located near the mouth of the Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina, is impacted by industrial and municipal effluents. Contaminants released...

  11. 2007 China Harbor Ten People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ 2007 China Harbor Ten People elected the entrepreneurs who contributed a lot to port economy and enterprises this year trough their talent management.These ten people embody their social responsibility,professional skills,creative ability,and charming personality.Bearing full confidence in China's port economy,the port entrepreneurs are brave enough to explore a brand new area,so as to promote harbor economic development.

  12. Caractérisation de gènes de pois (Pisum sativum L.) impliqués dans la formation et le fonctionnement de la mycorhize à arbuscules

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetsova, Elena

    2010-01-01

    L'association mycorhizienne à arbuscules (AM) est le résultat d'une interaction compatible entre les génomes des deux partenaires symbiotiques. Dans ce contexte, le but de mes recherches a été de mieux caractériser le rôle des gènes de pois liés aux stades tardifs de la symbiose, PsSym36, PsSym33 and PsSym40, dans le fonctionnement de la symbiose MA (i) en étudiant l'effet des mutations de ces trois gènes sur l'expression des gènes de la plante et du champignon, et (ii) en créant les conditio...

  13. Codon optimization of the human papillomavirus E7 oncogene induces a CD8+ T cell response to a cryptic epitope not harbored by wild-type E7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix K M Lorenz

    Full Text Available Codon optimization of nucleotide sequences is a widely used method to achieve high levels of transgene expression for basic and clinical research. Until now, immunological side effects have not been described. To trigger T cell responses against human papillomavirus, we incubated T cells with dendritic cells that were pulsed with RNA encoding the codon-optimized E7 oncogene. All T cell receptors isolated from responding T cell clones recognized target cells expressing the codon-optimized E7 gene but not the wild type E7 sequence. Epitope mapping revealed recognition of a cryptic epitope from the +3 alternative reading frame of codon-optimized E7, which is not encoded by the wild type E7 sequence. The introduction of a stop codon into the +3 alternative reading frame protected the transgene product from recognition by T cell receptor gene-modified T cells. This is the first experimental study demonstrating that codon optimization can render a transgene artificially immunogenic through generation of a dominant cryptic epitope. This finding may be of great importance for the clinical field of gene therapy to avoid rejection of gene-corrected cells and for the design of DNA- and RNA-based vaccines, where codon optimization may artificially add a strong immunogenic component to the vaccine.

  14. Acquired EGFR C797S mediates resistance to AZD9291 in advanced non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR T790M

    OpenAIRE

    Thress, Kenneth S.; Paweletz, Cloud P.; Felip, Enriqueta; Cho, Byoung Chul; Stetson, Daniel; Dougherty, Brian; Lai, Zhongwu; Markovets, Aleksandra; Vivancos, Ana; Kuang, Yanan; Ercan, Dalia; Matthews, Sarah; Cantarini, Mireille; Barrett, J. Carl; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we studied cell-free plasma DNA (cfDNA) collected from subjects with advanced lung cancer whose tumors had developed resistance to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) AZD9291. We first performed next-generation sequencing of cfDNA from seven subjects and detected an acquired EGFR C797S mutation in one; expression of this mutant EGFR construct in a cell line rendered it resistant to AZD9291. We then performed droplet digital PCR on serial cfDNA spec...

  15. Oxidase-deficient neutrophils from X-linked chronic granulomatous disease iPS cells: functional correction by zinc finger nuclease–mediated safe harbor targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Jizhong; Sweeney, Colin L; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Choi, Uimook; Pan, Jason; WANG, HONGMEI; Dowey, Sarah N.; Cheng, Linzhao; Malech, Harry L.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a patient with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), a defect of neutrophil microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation resulting from gp91phox deficiency. We demonstrated that mature neutrophils differentiated from X-CGD iPSCs lack ROS production, reproducing the pathognomonic CGD cellular phenotype. Targeted gene transfer into iPSCs, with subsequent selection and full characterization to ensure no off-target c...

  16. Clinical efficacy of first-generation EGFR-TKIs in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer harboring EGFR exon 20 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Dan Chen,1 Zhengbo Song,2 Guoping Cheng3 1Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 2Department of Chemotherapy, 3Department of Pathology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Subsets of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations carry uncommon subtypes. We evaluated the efficacy of first-generation EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors...

  17. Biomarkers of erlotinib response in non-small cell lung cancer tumors that do not harbor the more common epidermal growth factor receptor mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ayllón, Blanca D; de Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Rodriguez, Carlos; Pernía, Olga; de Cáceres, Inmaculada Ibañez; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents approximately 85% of all lung cancers, which are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as erlotinib represent one therapeutic options presently recommended for tumors produced by activating mutations in the gene coding of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The aim of this study is the identification of possible biomarkers for tumor sensitivity to erlotinib in the absence of the main EGFR mutations. The erlotinib sensitivity of cells isolated from 41 untreated NSCLC patients was determined and compared with the presence of the more frequent EGFR mutations. Several patients had tumor cells highly sensitive to erlitinib in the absence of the EGFR mutations analyzed. The gene expression profile of 3 erlotinib-sensitive tumors was compared with that of 4 resistant tumors by DNA microarray hybridization. Sixteen genes were expressed at significantly higher levels in the resistant tumors than in the sensitive tumors. The possible correlation between erlotinib sensitivity and the expression of these genes was further analyzed using the data for the NSCLC, breast cancer and colon cancer cell lines of the NCI60 collection. The expression of these genes was correlated with the overall survival of 5 patients treated with erlotinib, according to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Overlapping groups of 7, 5 and 3 genes, including UGT1A6, TRIB3, MET, MMP7, COL17A1, LCN2 and PTPRZ1, whose expression correlated with erlotinib activity was identified. In particular, low MET expression levels showed the strongest correlation. PMID:26045797

  18. CRSMP Potential Harbor Borrow Sites 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Harbor locations as identified originally in the California Shoreline Database compiled by Noble Consultants (Jon Moore) for California Department of Boating and...

  19. Acquired EGFR C797S mutation mediates resistance to AZD9291 in non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR T790M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thress, Kenneth S; Paweletz, Cloud P; Felip, Enriqueta; Cho, Byoung Chul; Stetson, Daniel; Dougherty, Brian; Lai, Zhongwu; Markovets, Aleksandra; Vivancos, Ana; Kuang, Yanan; Ercan, Dalia; Matthews, Sarah E; Cantarini, Mireille; Barrett, J Carl; Jänne, Pasi A; Oxnard, Geoffrey R

    2015-06-01

    Here we studied cell-free plasma DNA (cfDNA) collected from subjects with advanced lung cancer whose tumors had developed resistance to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) AZD9291. We first performed next-generation sequencing of cfDNA from seven subjects and detected an acquired EGFR C797S mutation in one; expression of this mutant EGFR construct in a cell line rendered it resistant to AZD9291. We then performed droplet digital PCR on serial cfDNA specimens collected from 15 AZD9291-treated subjects. All were positive for the T790M mutation before treatment, but upon developing AZD9291 resistance three molecular subtypes emerged: six cases acquired the C797S mutation, five cases maintained the T790M mutation but did not acquire the C797S mutation and four cases lost the T790M mutation despite the presence of the underlying EGFR activating mutation. Our findings provide insight into the diversity of mechanisms through which tumors acquire resistance to AZD9291 and highlight the need for therapies that are able to overcome resistance mediated by the EGFR C797S mutation. PMID:25939061

  20. Acquired EGFR C797S mediates resistance to AZD9291 in advanced non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR T790M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thress, Kenneth S.; Paweletz, Cloud P.; Felip, Enriqueta; Cho, Byoung Chul; Stetson, Daniel; Dougherty, Brian; Lai, Zhongwu; Markovets, Aleksandra; Vivancos, Ana; Kuang, Yanan; Ercan, Dalia; Matthews, Sarah; Cantarini, Mireille; Barrett, J. Carl; Jänne, Pasi A.; Oxnard, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we studied cell-free plasma DNA (cfDNA) collected from subjects with advanced lung cancer whose tumors had developed resistance to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) AZD9291. We first performed next-generation sequencing of cfDNA from seven subjects and detected an acquired EGFR C797S mutation in one; expression of this mutant EGFR construct in a cell line rendered it resistant to AZD9291. We then performed droplet digital PCR on serial cfDNA specimens collected from 15 AZD9291-treated subjects. All were positive for T790M prior to treatment, but at resistance three molecular subtypes emerged: 6 cases acquired the C797S mutation, 5 cases maintained the T790M mutation but did not acquire the C797S mutation, and 4 cases lost the T790M mutation despite detecting of the underlying EGFR activating mutation. Our findings provide insight into the diversity of mechanisms through which tumors acquire resistance to AZD9291 and highlight the need for therapies able to overcome resistance mediated by EGFR C797S. PMID:25939061

  1. Impaired TGF-beta induced growth inhibition contributes to the increased proliferation rate of neural stem cells harboring mutant p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, P.; Naumann, U.; Aigner, L.;

    2015-01-01

    . In both, p53 signaling is often functionally impaired which may contribute to tumor formation. Also, TGF-beta, which under physiological conditions exerts a strong control on the proliferation of NPCs in the SVZ, is a potent mitogen on glioma cells. Here, we approach on the crosstalk between p53 and...... TGF-beta by loss of function experiments using NPCs derived from p53 mutant mice, as well as pharmacological inhibition of TGF-beta signaling using TGF-beta receptor inhibitors. NPC derived from p53 mutant mice showed increased clonogenicity and more rapid proliferation than their wildtype...... counterparts. Further, NPC derived from p53mut/mut mice were insensitive to TGF-beta induced growth arrest. Still, the canonical TGF-beta signaling pathway remained functional in the absence of p53 signaling and expression of key proteins as well as phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of SMAD2 were...

  2. 77 FR 39411 - Safety Zone; Village of Sackets Harbor, Lake Ontario, Sackets Harbor, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Village of Sackets Harbor, Lake Ontario... establishing a temporary safety zone on Lake Ontario, Sackets Harbor, NY. This zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Ontario during the Village of Sackets Harbor Fireworks display....

  3. Clinicopathologic characteristics andtherapeutic responses ofChinese patients withnon-small cell lung cancer who harbor an anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShaFu; HaiYunWang; FangWang; MaYanHuang; LingDeng; XiaoZhang; ZuLuYe; JianYong Shao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:The rearrangement of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene accounts for approximately 1%–6%of lung adenocarcinoma cases and deifnes a molecular subgroup of tumors characterized by clinical sensitivity toALK inhibitors such as crizotinib. This study aimed to identify the relationship betweenALK rearrangement and the clinico‑pathologic characteristics of non‑small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to analyze the therapeutic responses of crizotinib and conventional chemotherapy toALK rearrangement in NSCLC patients. Methods:A total of 487 lung cancer patients who underwent testing forALK rearrangement in our department were included in this study.ALK rearrangement was examined by using lfuorescence insitu hybridization (FISH) assay. Results:Among the 487 patients, 44 (9.0%) were diagnosed withALK rearrangement by using FISH assay. In 123 patients with adenocarcinoma who were non‑smokers and of a young age (≤58years old), the frequency ofALK rearrangement was 20.3% (25/123). Short overall survival (OS) was associated with non‑adenocarcinoma tumor type (P=0.006), poorly differentiated tumors (P=0.001), advanced‑stage tumors (P<0.001), smoking history (P=0.008), and wild‑type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (P=0.008). Moreover, patients with poorly differentiated and advanced‑stage tumors had a shorter time to cancer progression compared with those with well differentiated (P=0.023) and early‑stage tumors (P=0.001), respectively. Conclusions:ALK‑rearranged NSCLC tends to occur in younger individuals who are either non‑smokers or light smokers with adenocarcinoma. Patients withALK rearrangement might beneift fromALK inhibitor therapy.

  4. 33 CFR 117.603 - Manchester Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manchester Harbor. 117.603... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.603 Manchester Harbor. The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Bridge at mile 1.0 in Manchester, shall operate as follows: (a)...

  5. Establishment of retroviral packaging cells harboring Stra8 gene promoter%Stra8基因启动子逆转录病毒包装细胞株的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    漆正宇; 崔光辉; 郭新; 秦洁; 张艳敏; 桂耀庭; 蔡志明

    2011-01-01

    目的:建立小鼠Stra8基因启动子控制绿色荧光蛋白EGFP表达(P(stra8)-EGFP)的逆转录病毒包装细胞株,以方便地将P(stra8)-EGFP转导到目的细胞,为生殖细胞鉴定分选提供基础.方法:PCR扩增小鼠基因组DNA中的Stra8基因启动子片段,构建Stra8基因启动子控制表达的EGFP报告基因逆转录病毒质粒.将质粒脂质体法转染PT67病毒包装细胞,G418抗性筛选后,梯度稀释法将包装细胞单克隆化并扩增成多个细胞株.以包装细胞培养上清液感染NIH3T3细胞的所形成的G418抗性阳性细胞数定义病毒滴度,确定高滴度病毒包装细胞株.通过染毒小鼠骨髓间充质干细胞(mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells,MSCs)验证该细胞株的P(stra8)-EGFP转导效果.结果:所建立的病毒包装细胞株培养上清液滴度达到1.3×10(6) cfu/ml.MSC经包装细胞培养上清液感染后,在(retinoic acid,RA)诱导下能表达EGFP蛋白.结论:成功构建了将P(stra8)-EGFP转导到目的细胞的PT67逆转录病毒包装细胞株.%Objective To establish retroviral packaging cells which harbors coding regions of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under control of promoter regions of mouse Stra8 gene.Methods The promoter region of mouse Stra8 gene was amplified by PCR from mouse genomic DNA, and it was inserted into a retroviral vector with EGFP.Then the recombinant vector was transfected into packaging cells PT67.The stable virus-producing cell clones were selected by G418 in medium.The viral titer was determined by infecting NIH3T3 cells and the specificity of Stra8 promoter was detected by infecting mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs).Results The best viral titer is 1.3 × 106 cfu/ml.MSCs were infected by virus medium and then induced by retinoic acid (RA)for 2 days, they will express EGFP protein, which was observed by the fluorescence microscope.Conclusion A packaging ceil line which contains EGFP reporter gene regulated by mouse Stra8

  6. New Harbor in Kangerlussuaq, Western Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenstad, Jaran Gjerlandj; Eppeland, Kjetil Grødal; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The international airport of Greenland is located in Kangerlussuaq, making it an important connection point for tourists and transportation of goods. However, the existing harbor in Kangerlussuaq experiences major challenges in the form of extensive sedimentation of glaciofluvial sediments transp...

  7. Chignik small boat harbor planning aid report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Unless additional salmon use data would indicate otherwise, harbor site 3 is considered the environmentally preferred alternative for construction of a...

  8. 33 CFR 110.30 - Boston Harbor, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boston Harbor, Mass. 110.30... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.30 Boston Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of South Boston... the local Harbor Master, Hull, Mass. (m) Hingham Harbor Area 1. Beginning at position latitude...

  9. Harbor porpoise population (Estimates of harbor porpoise population size in the main basin of Puget Sound)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Estimates of harbor porpoise population size in the main basin of Puget Sound will be developed from analyses of small boat line transect visual surveys conducted...

  10. Modeling of Tsunami Currents in Harbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynett, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Extreme events, such as large wind waves and tsunamis, are well recognized as a damaging hazard to port and harbor facilities. Wind wave events, particularly those with long period spectral components or infragravity wave generation, can excite resonance inside harbors leading to both large vertical motions and strong currents. Tsunamis can cause great damage as well. The geometric amplification of these very long waves can create large vertical motions in the interior of a harbor. Additionally, if the tsunami is composed of a train of long waves, which it often is, resonance can be easily excited. These long wave motions create strong currents near the node locations of resonant motions, and when interacting with harbor structures such as breakwaters, can create intense turbulent rotational structures, typical in the form of large eddies or gyres. These gyres have tremendous transport potential, and have been observed to break mooring lines, and even cause ships to be trapped inside the rotation, moving helplessly with the flow until collision, grounding, or dissipation of the eddy (e.g. Okal et al., 2006). This presentation will introduce the traditional theory used to predict wave impacts on harbors, discussing both how these models are practically useful and in what types of situations require a more accurate tool. State-of-the-art numerical models will be introduced, with a focus on recent developments in Boussinesq-type modeling. The Boussinesq equations model can account the dispersive, turbulent and rotational flow properties frequently observed in nature. Also they have the ability to coupling currents and waves and can predict nonlinear wave propagation over uneven bottom from deep (or intermediate) water area to shallow water area. However, during the derivation of a 2D-horizontal equation set, some 3D flow features, such those driven by as the dispersive stresses and the effects of the unresolved small scale 3D turbulence, are excluded. Consequently

  11. Effects of growth, diving history, and high altitude on blood oxygen capacity in harbor seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, A. M.; Elsner, R.; Pace, N.

    1977-01-01

    Blood volume and body composition for diving and nondiving harbor seals were measured at six-week intervals during a 10-month period of captitivity. Whole body hematocrit, red cell volume per kg of lean body mass, and total circulating hemoglobin per kg lean body mass were significantly higher in the diving group, but relatively large blood volumes expressed in terms of body weight (11-12%) were found in both groups. A pair of harbor seals exposed to high altitude for about three months registered significant increases in red cell volume, blood hemoglobin levels, and blood volume expressed in terms of body weight; results of alveolar gas analyses indicate that hyperventilation also occurred. These typical mammalian responses to hypoxia suggest that the harbor seal's large blood volume and high hemoglobin content are an expression of phylogenetic control, and that in spite of its adaptability to apnea during its diving life, the animal cannot be considered preacclimatized to high altitude.

  12. Aerial Survey Units for Harbor Seals in Coastal Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial surveys of coastal Alaska are the primary method for estimating abundance of harbor seals. A particular challenge associated with aerial surveys of harbor...

  13. Akutan, Alaska bottomfish harbor study feasibility stage: Planning aid report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Six alternatives are presently being studied by the Corps of Engineers, in conjunction with facilitating construction of a bottomfish harbor at Akutan Harbor...

  14. 77 FR 25890 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Manchester Harbor, Manchester, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Manchester Harbor, Manchester, MA... of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Bridge across Manchester Harbor, mile 1.0, at Manchester... Transportation Bridge, across Manchester Harbor, mile 1.0, at Manchester, Massachusetts, has a vertical...

  15. A neurological comparative study of the harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walløe, Solveig; Eriksen, Nina; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2010-12-01

    The cetacean brain is well studied. However, few comparisons have been done with other marine mammals. In this study, we compared the harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and the harbor porpoise brain (Phocoena phocoena). Stereological methods were applied to compare three areas of interest: the entire neocortex and two subdivisions of the neocortex, the auditory and visual cortices. The total number of neurons and glial cells in the three regions was estimated. The main results showed that the harbor porpoise have an estimated 14.9 × 10(9) neocortical neurons and 34.8 × 10(9) neocortical glial cells, whereas the harp seal have 6.1 × 10(9) neocortical neurons and 17.5 × 10(9) neocortical glial cells. The harbor porpoise have significantly more neurons and glial cells in the auditory cortex than in the visual cortex, whereas the pattern was opposite for the harp seal. These results are the first to provide estimates of the number of neurons and glial cells in the neocortex of the harp seal and harbor porpoise brain and offer new data to the comparative field of mammalian brain evolution. PMID:21077171

  16. Sint1, a common integration site in SL3-3-induced T-cell lymphomas, harbors a putative proto-oncogene with homology to the septin gene family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A B; Lund, Anders Henrik; Ethelberg, S;

    2000-01-01

    overlapping genomic lambda clones spanning about 35 kb were isolated and used as a starting point for a search for genes in the neighborhood of the virus integration sites. A genomic fragment was used as a hybridization probe to isolate a 3-kb cDNA clone, the expression of which was upregulated in one of two...... tumors harboring a provirus in Sint1. The cDNA clone is predicted to encode a protein which shows 97.0% identity to a human septin-like protein encoded by a gene which has been found as a fusion partner gene of MLL in an acute myeloid leukemia with a t(11;17)(q23;q25). Together these findings raise the...

  17. Contiguous follicular lymphoma and follicular lymphoma in situ harboring N-glycosylated sites

    OpenAIRE

    Mamessier, Emilie; Drevet, Charlotte; Broussais-Guillaumot, Florence; Mollichella, Marie-Laure; Garciaz, Sylvain; Roulland, Sandrine; Benchetrit, Maxime; Nadel, Bertrand; Xerri, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma in situ (FLIS) is composed of a clonal B-cell population harboring the typical t(14;18) hallmark of follicular lymphoma (FL), forming unconventional BCL2 Bright CD10 + cell foci in an otherwise normal reactive lymph node (LN). The diagnosis of FLIS is made on the fortuitous discovery of unconventional BCL2 Bright CD10 + cell foci. 1 Several studies recently demonstrated that FLIS are already advanced precursors in follicular lymphomagene-sis, but not necessarily committed ...

  18. New world bats harbor diverse influenza A viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suxiang Tong

    Full Text Available Aquatic birds harbor diverse influenza A viruses and are a major viral reservoir in nature. The recent discovery of influenza viruses of a new H17N10 subtype in Central American fruit bats suggests that other New World species may similarly carry divergent influenza viruses. Using consensus degenerate RT-PCR, we identified a novel influenza A virus, designated as H18N11, in a flat-faced fruit bat (Artibeus planirostris from Peru. Serologic studies with the recombinant H18 protein indicated that several Peruvian bat species were infected by this virus. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that, in some gene segments, New World bats harbor more influenza virus genetic diversity than all other mammalian and avian species combined, indicative of a long-standing host-virus association. Structural and functional analyses of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase indicate that sialic acid is not a ligand for virus attachment nor a substrate for release, suggesting a unique mode of influenza A virus attachment and activation of membrane fusion for entry into host cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that bats constitute a potentially important and likely ancient reservoir for a diverse pool of influenza viruses.

  19. Estimated Particulate Emissions By Wind Erosion From the Indiana Harbor Confined Disposal Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Confined Disposal Facility (CDF) is being designed for contaminated sediments dredged from the Indiana Harbor Canal at East Chicago, IN. The sediment will be placed in two cells enclosed by earthern berms about 9 m tall and cover about 36 hectares. The purposes of this study were to a) determine...

  20. Safe Harbors for Quantity Discounts and Bundling

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis W. Carlton; Michael Waldman

    2008-01-01

    The courts and analysts continue to struggle to articulate safe harbors for a wide variety of common business pricing practices in which either a single product is sold at a discount if purchased in bulk or in which multiple products are bundled together at prices different from the ones that would emerge if the products were purchased separately. The phenomenon of tying in which the sale of one product is conditioned on the purchase of another is closely related to bundling. Its analysis rel...

  1. 3D measurements of buildings and environment for harbor simulators

    OpenAIRE

    Börlin, Niclas; Igasto, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Oryx Simulations develops and manufactures real-time physics simulators for training of harbor crane operator in several of the world’s major harbors. Currently, the modelling process is labor-intensive and a faster solution that can produce accurate, textured models of harbor scenes is desired. The accuracy requirements vary across the scene, and in some areas accuracy can be traded for speed. Due to the heavy equipment involved, reliable error estimates are important throughout the scene. T...

  2. 腺病毒介导蜂毒素基因转染对HepG2细胞生长及AFP表达的影响%Effect of recombinant adenovirus harboring melittin gene on growth of HepG2 cells and AFP expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李绍祥; 文军慧; 凌昌全

    2004-01-01

    目的:将蜂毒素基因置于甲胎蛋白(AFP)转录调控元件(rAFP)驱动之下,构件重组腺病毒载体,观察蜂毒素基因转染对肝癌细胞生长及AFP表达的影响.方法::将蜂毒素基因置于rAFP之后,用细菌内高效同源重组法将目的基因重组入腺病毒质粒中,将腺病毒质粒用PacⅠ酶切线性化后,用脂质体介导转染293细胞进行腺病毒的包装.携有蜂毒素基因的腺病毒感染肝癌细胞后,RT-PCR实验观察蜂毒素基因是否发生转录;MTT法测定蜂毒素基因转染对肝癌细胞增殖的影响;ELISA双抗体夹心法定量检测AFP.结果:RT-PCR实验表明蜂毒素基因转染肝癌细胞后可以被转录;蜂毒素基因在rAFP的控制下,可以特异性的抑制AFP阳性肝癌细胞的增殖,并降低其AFP的生成量.结论:蜂毒素基因转染对肝癌细胞的生长及AFP的表达具有抑制作用,可降低其恶性度.%Objective:To construct recombinant adenovirus harboring melittin gene under the control of AFP transcription regulatory element rAFP,and to observe its tumor inhibition effects in vitro as well as its effect on AFP expression in hepatocarcinoma cells.Methods:Melittin gene was driven by rAFP.The gene of interest was cloned into adenoviral backbone plasmid through a new simplified bacterial homologous recombinant system,then the recombinant adenoviral plasmids were linearized with PacⅠand then were used to transfect 293 cells (mediated by lipofectin) for generation of the desired recombinant adenoviruses.The resultant viruses harboring melittin gene was used to infect the AFP-positive HepG2 cells. Transcription of melittin gene was verified by RT-PCR,and its proliferation inhibition effect was observed by MTT assay. AFP was measured by ELISA double antibody sandwiched method.Results:Recombinant adenoviruses harboring melittin gene were successfully constructed and transfect hepatocarcinoma cells,and melittin gene was transcripted.Under the control of r

  3. Hazardous substances shipping at inland water harbors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety measures and regulations system covering the aspects of fire protection, professional and ecological safety are aimed to create a safe working environment, by detection and remedy of conditions that are potentially hazardous for the well-being of the employees or are leading to certain undesired events. Such unwanted incidents may result in different consequences: operating person's injury, environment pollution or material damage. This study attempts to illustrate the organization of work during hazardous matter loading and unloading at inland water harbors, based on legal provisions and decrees involving safety precautions, and in order to achieve constant enhancement of operating procedure, decreasing thereby the number of work-related injuries and various accidental situations. Fundamental precondition required to prevent possible accidents and to optimize general safety policy is to recognize and control any danger or potential hazard, as well as to be familiar with the legal provisions covering the inland waterway transport of harmful substances.(author)

  4. 49 CFR 578.7 - Criminal safe harbor provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal safe harbor provision. 578.7 Section 578... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) CIVIL AND CRIMINAL PENALTIES § 578.7 Criminal safe harbor provision. (a) Scope. This section sets forth the requirements regarding...

  5. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  6. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Floats for marking anchors in place will be allowed; stakes or mooring piles are prohibited. 33 CFR Ch. I... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  7. 78 FR 21597 - Marine Mammals: Alaska Harbor Seal Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... measures to protect glacially-associated harbor seal habitats in Alaska (78 FR 15669; March 12, 2013.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 12, 2013, NMFS published an ANPR in the Federal Register (78 FR 15669) to... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-BB71 Marine Mammals: Alaska Harbor Seal...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  9. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  10. 33 CFR 110.138 - Boston Harbor, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boston Harbor, Mass. 110.138 Section 110.138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.138 Boston Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1)...

  11. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  12. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  13. 33 CFR 110.32 - Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. 110.32 Section 110.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.32 Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. (a) Area...

  14. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  15. 33 CFR 110.26 - Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass. 110.26 Section 110.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mass. The area comprises that portion of the harbor lying between the extreme low water line...

  16. Comparison of repair of DNA double-strand breaks in identical sequences in primary human fibroblast and immortal hamster-human hybrid cells harboring a single copy of human chromosome 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladi, B.; Waldren, C. A.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We have optimized a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay that measures induction and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in specific regions of the genome (Lobrich et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 12050-12054, 1995). The increased sensitivity resulting from these improvements makes it possible to analyze the size distribution of broken DNA molecules immediately after the introduction of DSBs and after repair incubation. This analysis shows that the distribution of broken DNA pieces after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation is consistent with the distribution expected from randomly induced DSBs. It is apparent from the distribution of rejoined DNA pieces after repair incubation that DNA ends continue to rejoin between 3 and 24 h postirradiation and that some of these rejoining events are in fact misrejoining events, since novel restriction fragments both larger and smaller than the original fragment are generated after repair. This improved assay was also used to study the kinetics of DSB rejoining and the extent of misrejoining in identical DNA sequences in human GM38 cells and human-hamster hybrid A(L) cells containing a single human chromosome 11. Despite the numerous differences between these cells, which include species and tissue of origin, levels of TP53, expression of telomerase, and the presence or absence of a homologous chromosome for the restriction fragments examined, the kinetics of rejoining of radiation-induced DSBs and the extent of misrejoining were similar in the two cell lines when studied in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, DSBs were removed from the single-copy human chromosome in the hamster A(L) cells with similar kinetics and misrejoining frequency as at a locus on this hybrid's CHO chromosomes.

  17. Diving Related Changes in the Blood Oxygen Stores of Rehabilitating Harbor Seal Pups (Phoca vitulina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Thomas

    Full Text Available Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina pups begin diving within hours of birth, stimulating the development of the blood oxygen (O2 stores necessary to sustain underwater aerobic metabolism. Since harbor seals experience a brief nursing period, the early-life development of these blood O2 stores is necessary for successful post-weaning foraging. If mothers and pups become prematurely separated, the pup may be transported to a wildlife rehabilitation center for care. Previous studies suggest that the shallow pools and lack of diving in rehabilitation facilities may lead to under-developed blood O2 stores, but diving behavior during rehabilitation has not been investigated. This study aimed to simultaneously study the diving behaviors and blood O2 store development of rehabilitating harbor seal pups. Standard hematology measurements (Hct, Hb, RBC, MCV, MCH, MCHC were taken to investigate O2 storage capacity and pups were equipped with time-depth recorders to investigate natural diving behavior while in rehabilitation. Linear mixed models of the data indicate that all measured blood parameters changed with age; however, when compared to literature values for wild harbor seal pups, rehabilitating pups have smaller red blood cells (RBCs that can store less hemoglobin (Hb and subsequently, less O2, potentially limiting their diving capabilities. Wild pups completed longer dives at younger ages (maximum reported <25 days of age: 9 min in previous studies than the captive pups in this study (maximum <25 days of age: 2.86 min. However, captivity may only affect the rate of development, as long duration dives were observed (maximum during rehabilitation: 13.6 min at 89 days of age. Further, this study suggests that there may be a positive relationship between RBC size and the frequency of long duration dives. Thus, rehabilitating harbor seal pups should be encouraged to make frequent, long duration dives to prepare themselves for post-release foraging.

  18. Noddy, a mouse harboring a missense mutation in protocadherin-15, reveals the impact of disrupting a critical interaction site between tip-link cadherins in inner ear hair cells

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Ruishuang; Sotomayor, Marcos; Kinder, Kimberly; Gopal, Suhasini R.; Gerka-Stuyt, John; Chen, Daniel H.-C.; Hardisty-Hughes, Rachel E.; Ball, Greg; Parker, Andy; Gaudet, Rachelle; Furness, David; Brown, Steve D.; Corey, David P.; Kumar N Alagramam

    2013-01-01

    In hair cells of the inner ear, sound or head movement increases tension in fine filaments termed tip links, which in turn convey force to mechanosensitive ion channels to open them. Tip links are formed by a tetramer of two cadherin proteins: protocadherin 15 (PCDH15) and cadherin 23 (CDH23), which have 11 and 27 extracellular cadherin (EC) repeats, respectively. Mutations in either protein cause inner ear disorders in mice and humans. We showed recently that these two cadherins bind tip-to-...

  19. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  20. Boston Harbor and approaches samples (WILLETT72 shapefile

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Boston Harbor (and its approaches) is a glacially carved, tidally dominated estuary in western Massachusetts Bay. Characterized by low river discharge and...

  1. Sediments of Boston Harbor acquired in 1968 (MENCHER shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A study was made of the composition, grain-size distribution, and organic content of grab samples collected from Boston Harbor. In general, the coarsest mean sizes...

  2. Characterizing freshwater and nutrient fluxes to West Falmouth Harbor, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data present oceanographic and water-quality observations made at 4 locations in West Falmouth Harbor and 3 in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts. While both...

  3. Apra Harbor, Guam Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Apra Harbor, Guam Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  4. Pearl Harbor National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan CCP was written to guide management on Pearl Harbor National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  5. Bar Harbor, ME Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Bar Harbor, Maine Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  6. Ground-water status report, Pearl Harbor area, Hawaii, 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroos, Ronald L.; Ewart, Charles J.

    1979-01-01

    Increasing demand for freshwater in Hawaii has placed heavy stress on many of the State 's basal aquifer systems. The most heavily stressed of these systems is the Pearl Harbor on Oahu. The Pearl Harbor basal aquifer supplies as much as 277 million gallons per day. Since early in this century, spring discharge has been declining while pumpage has been increasing. Total ground-water discharge has remained steady despite short-term fluctuations. Some wells show general increases in chloride concentration while others remain steady. Chloride concentrations throughout the area show no apparent increase since 1970. Basal water head maps of the Pearl Harbor area clearly reflect the natural discharge points, which are the springs located along the shore near the center of Pearl Harbor. Basal-water hydrographs show a general decline of about 0.09 foot per year. This implies depletion of storage at a rate of about 25 million gallons per day. (USGS).

  7. Wake dynamics behind a harbor seal vibrissa: a comparative view by PIV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingzheng; Wang, Shaofei; Chen, Hanping

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive study was performed of wake dynamics behind a scaled-up model of harbor seal vibrissa, and the baseline configurations of circular cylinder, wavy cylinder and the elliptical cylinder were provided for comparison. A low-speed water channel and wind tunnel were employed for the model tests at the Reynolds number 102 ~ 104 based on diameter of the cylinder. A load cell and Particle Image Velocimetry were synchronized to measure the fluctuating lift/drag forces and the instantaneous flow field, respectively. By means of the comparative study, the unique three-dimensional wake characteristics in response to contour variations of the harbor seal vibrissa was elucidated through the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) analyses of the measured flow field, demonstrating the ability of the vibrissa to suppress the vortex-induced vibration.

  8. Evaluation of upland disposal of Oakland Harbor, California, sediment. Volume 2: Inner and outer harbor sediments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.R.; Brandon, D.L.; Tatem, H.E.; Simmers, J.W.; Skogerboe, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes testing and evaluation performed by the Environmental Laboratory of the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station on sediment from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbor, California. Test protocols from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Technical Framework for the Management of Dredged Material were used in the present evaluation to determine the potential for migration of contaminants into effluent, surface runoff, leachate, plants, and animals at an undetermined upland disposal site. One composite sediment each from Oakland Inner Harbor and Oakland Outer Harbor was tested. The composite sample consisted of sediment cores taken from the mud line to 44-ft depth. Both Oakland Harbor sediments had clayey sand textures. Total organic carbon concentrations in sediment from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors were 3,364 and 6,042 mg/kg, respectively. Based on test results, Oakland Harbor sediments will require management of suspended solids in effluent and surface runoff and a mixing zone of at least 20 to 1 to meet the strictest assumed water quality criteria or standards. Management controls should be considered at the upland site, since plants grew poorly and contained elevated cadmium, lead, and selenium and earthworms accumulated arsenic, cadmium, and nickel. Contaminant migration, Sediment testing, Contaminated sediments, Upland disposal, Dredged material.

  9. AIRE-Deficient Patients Harbor Unique High-Affinity Disease-Ameliorating Autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Steffen; Woodward, Martin; Hertel, Christina; Vlaicu, Philip; Haque, Yasmin; Kärner, Jaanika; Macagno, Annalisa; Onuoha, Shimobi C; Fishman, Dmytro; Peterson, Hedi; Metsküla, Kaja; Uibo, Raivo; Jäntti, Kirsi; Hokynar, Kati; Wolff, Anette S B; Krohn, Kai; Ranki, Annamari; Peterson, Pärt; Kisand, Kai; Hayday, Adrian

    2016-07-28

    APS1/APECED patients are defined by defects in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) that mediates central T cell tolerance to many self-antigens. AIRE deficiency also affects B cell tolerance, but this is incompletely understood. Here we show that most APS1/APECED patients displayed B cell autoreactivity toward unique sets of approximately 100 self-proteins. Thereby, autoantibodies from 81 patients collectively detected many thousands of human proteins. The loss of B cell tolerance seemingly occurred during antibody affinity maturation, an obligatorily T cell-dependent step. Consistent with this, many APS1/APECED patients harbored extremely high-affinity, neutralizing autoantibodies, particularly against specific cytokines. Such antibodies were biologically active in vitro and in vivo, and those neutralizing type I interferons (IFNs) showed a striking inverse correlation with type I diabetes, not shown by other anti-cytokine antibodies. Thus, naturally occurring human autoantibodies may actively limit disease and be of therapeutic utility. PMID:27426947

  10. Vaginal calculi in a juvenile harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Stephanie A; Garner, Michael M; Berta, Susan; Dubpernell, Sandra; Klope, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    A large number of vaginal calculi were observed in a juvenile harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) stranded on Whidbey Island, Washington. Vaginal calculi have been reported in other species, but not in harbor porpoises. Histologic examination of the urinary tract revealed mucosal hyperplasia most likely attributable to the calculi. The calculi were numerous (>30), composed completely of struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate), and on culture yielded Enterococcus spp., a bacterium not usually associated with struvite urolith formation in domestic animals. The only other lesion of note was severe hepatic lipidosis, and its relationship to the development of the vaginal calculi is unknown. PMID:22946417

  11. A Comparison of Microbial Water Quality and Diversity for Ballast and Tropical Harbor Waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Ng

    Full Text Available Indicator organisms and antibiotic resistance were used as a proxy to measure microbial water quality of ballast tanks of ships, and surface waters in a tropical harbor. The survival of marine bacteria in ballast tanks appeared to diminish over longer water retention time, with a reduction of cell viability observed after a week based on heterotrophic plate counts. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed distinct differences in microbial composition of ballast and harbor waters. The harbor waters had a higher abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs assigned to Cyanobacteria (Synechococcus spp. and α-proteobacteria (SAR11 members, while marine hydrocarbon degraders such as γ-proteobacteria (Ocenspirillaes spp., Thiotrchales spp. and Bacteroidetes (Flavobacteriales spp. dominated the ballast water samples. Screening of indicator organisms found Escherichia coli (E. coli, Enterococcus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa in two or more of the ballast and harbor water samples tested. Vibrio spp. and Salmonella spp. were detected exclusively in harbor water samples. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR, we screened for 13 antibiotic resistant gene (ARG targets and found higher abundances of sul1 (4.13-3.44 x 102 copies/mL, dfrA (0.77-1.80 x10 copies/mL and cfr (2.00-5.21 copies/mL genes compared to the other ARG targets selected for this survey. These genes encode for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim and chloramphenicol-florfenicol antibiotics, which are also known to persist in sediments of aquaculture farms and coastal environments. Among the ARGs screened, we found significant correlations (P<0.05 between ereA, ermG, cfr and tetO genes to one or more of the indicator organisms detected in this study, which may suggest that these members contribute to the environmental resistome. This study provides a baseline water quality survey, quantitatively assessing indicators of antibiotic resistance, potentially pathogenic organisms and a

  12. Dolphin Morbillivirus Infection in a Captive Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina)

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzariol, Sandro; Peletto, Simone; Mondin, Alessandra; Centelleghe, Cinzia; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Casalone, Cristina; Acutis, Pier Luigi

    2013-01-01

    During the second morbillivirus epidemic (2007 to 2011) in cetaceans along the Italian coastline, dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) was detected by molecular analyses in a captive harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), with pathological findings consistent with morbillivirus infection. This report confirms interspecies DMV transmission from cetaceans to pinnipeds.

  13. Conjoined Fetal Twins in a Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jennifer K; Gaydos, Joseph K; McKlveen, Tori; Poppenga, Robert; Wicinas, Kay; Anderson, Elizabeth; Raverty, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In July 2013, a stranded harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) died giving birth to conjoined fetuses. The twins were joined at the abdomen and thoracolumbar spine with the vertebral axis at 180°. The cause of this unique anomaly--a first for this species--was not identified. PMID:26528575

  14. 33 CFR 110.45a - Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass. 110.45a Section 110.45a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mattapoisett, Mass. (a) Area No. 1 beginning at a point on the shore at latitude 41°39′23″ N., longitude...

  15. Case study of small harbor excitation under storm and tsunami conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synolakis, Costas; Maravelakis, Nikos; Kalligeris, Nikos; Skanavis, Vassilios; Kanoglu, Utku; Yalciner, Ahmet; Lynett, Pat

    2016-04-01

    enough information to infer the resonant modes of the basins excited during storm conditions. The deployment position of the pressure gauges is based on numerical modeling results. We have employed the fully nonlinear Boussinesq module of COULWAVE using a high resolution (2m cell size) relief model and an idealized TMA directional wave spectrum. The wave field and low frequency energy distribution in the basin are captured by both numerical modeling and field measurements. The field measurements agree well with the numerical modeling analysis, providing insight as to the causes of severe disturbance and useful information that should be considered for an effective solution to the protection of the harbor. Our measurements appear the first ever nearshore measurements of waves and currents for a 2+ year period duration in Greece. The work is also being used for validation tsunami inundation models for civil defense applications in Crete. * This work was supported by the project ASTARTE, Grant no 603839 7th FP (ENV.213.6.4.3) to the Technical University of Crete and to the Middle East Technical University.

  16. Underwater noise from three types of offshore wind turbines: estimation of impact zones for harbor porpoises and harbor seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougaard, Jakob; Henriksen, Oluf Damsgaard; Miller, Lee A

    2009-06-01

    Underwater noise was recorded from three different types of wind turbines in Denmark and Sweden (Middelgrunden, Vindeby, and Bockstigen-Valar) during normal operation. Wind turbine noise was only measurable above ambient noise at frequencies below 500 Hz. Total sound pressure level was in the range 109-127 dB re 1 microPa rms, measured at distances between 14 and 20 m from the foundations. The 1/3-octave noise levels were compared with audiograms of harbor seals and harbor porpoises. Maximum 1/3-octave levels were in the range 106-126 dB re 1 microPa rms. Maximum range of audibility was estimated under two extreme assumptions on transmission loss (3 and 9 dB per doubling of distance, respectively). Audibility was low for harbor porpoises extending 20-70 m from the foundation, whereas audibility for harbor seals ranged from less than 100 m to several kilometers. Behavioral reactions of porpoises to the noise appear unlikely except if they are very close to the foundations. However, behavioral reactions from seals cannot be excluded up to distances of a few hundred meters. It is unlikely that the noise reaches dangerous levels at any distance from the turbines and the noise is considered incapable of masking acoustic communication by seals and porpoises. PMID:19507958

  17. Defined Map Units of the seafloor of Boston Harbor and Approaches (BOTTOMTYPE, UTM 19, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data is a qualitatively-derived interpretative polygon shapefile defining the bottom types of the seafloor from Boston Harbor and the harbor approaches,...

  18. bh_2mmbbath: Multibeam Bathymetry 2 meter/pixel of Boston Harbor and Approaches

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are high-resolution bathymetric measurements of the seafloor from Boston Harbor and the harbor approaches, Massachusetts. Approximately 170 km² of...

  19. Aerial Survey Counts of Harbor Seals in Coastal Alaska (2003-2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset supports efforts to estimate the abundance and trends in population size of Alaska harbor seals. Annual surveys of harbor seal populations are...

  20. Telemetry data from satellite tags deployed on harbor seals in Cook Inlet, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Between 2004 and 2006 we conducted four harbor seal tagging trips in Cook Inlet during the months of October and May. In total, we captured and released 93 harbor...

  1. Observed Haul-out Locations for Harbor Seals in Coastal Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial surveys of coastal Alaska are the primary method for estimating abundance of harbor seals. A particular challenge associated with aerial surveys of harbor...

  2. Submarine Groundwater Discharge in Stony Brook Harbor, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, J. M.; Young, C.; Wong, T.; Hanson, G. N.

    2012-12-01

    As nutrients can significantly impact coastal ecosystems, understanding their path to embayments and oceans is crucial. In Stony Brook Harbor (Long Island, NY), submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is the only significant contribution of freshwater and thus constitutes the main pathway for nutrients, which may eventually reach Long Island Sound. Subterranean estuaries have been shown to be highly reactive zones where nitrogen attenuation can occur. Understanding the fate of nitrogen in Stony Brook Harbor requires knowing the volume of groundwater entering the bay as well as the amount of denitrification, in the context of the hydrogeological framework. This is achieved by combining electrical resistivity survey, water sampling in piezometers, point conductivity and seepage measurements. A Trident probe inserted 60 cm deep into the sediments allows measuring the conductivity and temperature of the sediments and the overlying seawater. In spring 2011, five Trident transects spreading across the head of the harbor were used as a preliminary study to reveal potential locations for SGD. Locations with significant difference between sediment and seawater temperature and/or conductivities were further investigated using an AGI SuperSting 8-channel receiver resistivity meter. Two ultrasonic seepage meters were deployed in May and July 2011 about 20 m below the low tide mark. Five piezometers were aligned parallel to one resistivity survey. Our resistivity data indicate superficial mixing in the intertidal zone. The freshwater extends quite far under the seafloor, above 67 meters after the low tide mark for one location. The freshwater/saltwater interface seems to be almost horizontal. The piezometer data agree relatively well with the resistivity data. The preliminary average seepage rates observed vary from 3 to 60 cm/d. The resistivity sections reveal the presence of a thin layer of high conductivity above the low tide mark. This matches the observation of a superficial

  3. Social structure and underwater behavior of harbor seals in southern Monterey Bay, California

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholson, Teri Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    To understand harbor seal social and mating strategies, I examined site fidelity, seasonal abundance and distribution, herd integrity, and underwater behavior of individual harbor seals in southern Monterey Bay. Individual harbor seals (n = 444) were identified by natural markings and represented greater than 80% of an estimated 520 seals within this community. Year to year fidelity of individual harbor seals to southern Monterey Bay coastline was 84% (n = 388), and long-term association...

  4. 78 FR 13479 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... Regulations New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers,'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 1738). We received... Operation Regulations New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers,'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 75917... Regulation; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT,'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 1738)...

  5. 76 FR 20530 - Safety Zone; Boom Days, Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Boom Days, Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo... temporary safety zone in the Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo, NY for the Boom Days Fireworks. This zone is intended to restrict vessels from Doug's Dive, the NFTA small boat harbor and a portion of the...

  6. 75 FR 59078 - Safety Zone; Ledge Removal Project, Bass Harbor, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Ledge Removal Project, Bass Harbor, ME... temporary safety zone around a ledge removal project in Bass Harbor, Maine. The United States Army Corps of... and around Bass Harbor both to increase mooring capacity for fishing trawlers and recreational...

  7. 77 FR 43513 - Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd Inlet, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd Inlet, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard... Local Regulation, Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd Inlet, WA from 12 p.m. through 8 p.m. on... notice of enforcement of the Special Local Regulation for Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd...

  8. 33 CFR 165.765 - Regulated Navigation Area; Port Everglades Harbor, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Everglades Harbor, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 165.765 Section 165.765 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.765 Regulated Navigation Area; Port Everglades Harbor, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. (a) Location. The following area in Port Everglades harbor is a regulated navigation area: all waters of...

  9. Hydrocarbon pollutants shape bacterial community assembly of harbor sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Barbato, Marta

    2016-02-02

    Petroleum pollution results in co-contamination by different classes of molecules, entailing the occurrence of marine sediments difficult to remediate, as in the case of the Ancona harbor (Mediterranean Sea, Italy). Autochthonous bioaugmentation (ABA), by exploiting the indigenous microbes of the environment to be treated, could represent a successful bioremediation strategy. In this perspective we aimed to i) identify the main drivers of the bacterial communities\\' richness in the sediments, ii) establish enrichment cultures with different hydrocarbon pollutants evaluating their effects on the bacterial communities\\' composition, and iii) obtain a collection of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria potentially exploitable in ABA. The correlation between the selection of different specialized bacterial populations and the type of pollutants was demonstrated by culture-independent analyses, and by establishing a collection of bacteria with different hydrocarbon degradation traits. Our observations indicate that pollution dictates the diversity of sediment bacterial communities and shapes the ABA potential in harbor sediments.

  10. Hydrocarbon pollutants shape bacterial community assembly of harbor sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, Marta; Mapelli, Francesca; Magagnini, Mirko; Chouaia, Bessem; Armeni, Monica; Marasco, Ramona; Crotti, Elena; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara

    2016-03-15

    Petroleum pollution results in co-contamination by different classes of molecules, entailing the occurrence of marine sediments difficult to remediate, as in the case of the Ancona harbor (Mediterranean Sea, Italy). Autochthonous bioaugmentation (ABA), by exploiting the indigenous microbes of the environment to be treated, could represent a successful bioremediation strategy. In this perspective we aimed to i) identify the main drivers of the bacterial communities' richness in the sediments, ii) establish enrichment cultures with different hydrocarbon pollutants evaluating their effects on the bacterial communities' composition, and iii) obtain a collection of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria potentially exploitable in ABA. The correlation between the selection of different specialized bacterial populations and the type of pollutants was demonstrated by culture-independent analyses, and by establishing a collection of bacteria with different hydrocarbon degradation traits. Our observations indicate that pollution dictates the diversity of sediment bacterial communities and shapes the ABA potential in harbor sediments. PMID:26849913

  11. Building Energy Audit Report for Pearl Harbor, HI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Daryl R.; Chvala, William D.; De La Rosa, Marcus I.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2010-09-30

    A building energy audit was performed by a team of engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract to the Department of Energy/Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The effort used the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) model to determine how energy is consumed at selected Pearl Harbor buildings, identify cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings. This report documents the findings of that assessment.

  12. A novel porcine bocavirus harbors a variant NP gene

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Sung J; Sunwoo, Sun Young; Ko, Seong Sik; Je, Sang H; Lee, Dong Uk; Lyoo, Young S

    2015-01-01

    Background Porcine bocavirus is classified within the genus Bocaparvovirus, family Parvoviridae. Unlike other parvoviruses, the members of genus Bocaparvovirus (bocaparvoviruses) encode an additional open reading frame (NP1). Many strains of PBoVs have been identified in domestic pigs and recognized as a potential emerging pathogen causing respiratory and gastrointestinal disease. Findings A new strain of porcine bocavirus (PBoV) that harbored the shortest NP1 gene among all currently charact...

  13. Study on Variable Action Value Standard for Harbor Infrastructures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Xiaoping; Zhao, Qianyi; Jin, Weiliang

    2014-01-01

    To meet with different levels of requirements from proprietors and users and to offer a basis for variable action value to the designers, associated with the standards, this dissertation studied the value standard of load effect and environmental effect. For load effect, on the foundation of analyzing variable load effect model, we used equal exceeding probability principle to calculate the load adjustment coefficient for the cargo loading in harbor and river port under different designing se...

  14. PAH- and PCB-induced Alterations of Protein Tyrosine Kinase and Cytokine Gene Transcription in Harbor Seal (Phoca Vitulina PBMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C. C. Neale

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying in vitro immunomodulatory effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs were investigated in harbor seal peripheral leukocytes, via real-time PCR. We examined the relative genetic expression of the protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs Fyn and Itk, which play a critical role in T cell activation, and IL-2, a cytokine of central importance in initiating adaptive immune responses. IL-1, the macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity, was also included as a measure of macrophage function. Harbor seal PBMC were exposed to the prototypic immunotoxic PAH benzo[a]pyrene (BaP, 3,3',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-169, a model immunotoxic PCB, or DMSO (vehicle control. Exposure of Con A-stimulated harbor seal PBMC to both BaP and CB-169 produced significantly altered expression in all four targets relative to vehicle controls. The PTKs Fyn and Itk were both up-regulated following exposure to BaP and CB-169. In contrast, transcripts for IL-2 and IL-1 were decreased relative to controls by both treatments. Our findings are consistent with those of previous researchers working with human and rodent systems and support a hypothesis of contaminant-altered lymphocyte function mediated (at least in part by disruption of T cell receptor (TCR signaling and cytokine production.

  15. A case of lung adenocarcinoma harboring EGFR mutation and EML4-ALK fusion gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Hisashi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR - tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI is used for the patients with EGFR-mutant lung cancer. Recently, phase III studies in the patients with EGFR-mutant demonstrated that EGFR-TKI monotherapy improved progression-free survival compared with platinum-doublet chemotherapy. The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4 - anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK fusion oncogene represents one of the newest molecular targets in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Patients who harbor EML4-ALK fusions have been associated with a lack of EGFR or KRAS mutations. Case presentation We report a 39-year-old patient diagnosed as adenocarcinoma harboring EGFR mutation and EML4-ALK fusion gene. We treated this patient with erlotinib as the third line therapy, but no clinical benefit was obtained. Conclusion We experienced a rare case with EGFR mutation and EML4-ALK. Any clinical benefit using EGFR-TKI was not obtained in our case. The therapeutic choice for the patients with more than one driver mutations is unclear. We needs further understanding of the lung cancer molecular biology and the biomarker infomation.

  16. Immunization with avian metapneumovirus harboring chicken Fc induces higher immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Sarita; Easwaran, Maheswaran; Jang, Hyun; Jung, Ho-Kyoung; Kim, Joo-Hun; Shin, Hyun-Jin

    2016-07-15

    In this study, we evaluated the immune responses of avian metapneumovirus harboring chicken Fc molecule. Stable Vero cells expressing chicken Fc chimera on its surface (Vero-cFc) were established, and we confirmed that aMPV grown in Vero-cFc incorporated host derived chimera Fc into the aMPV virions. Immunization of chicken with aMPV-cFc induced higher level of antibodies and inflammatory cytokines; (Interferon (IFN)-γ and Interleukin (IL)-1β) compared to those of aMPV. The increased levels of antibodies and inflammatory cytokines in chicken immunized with aMPV-cFc were statistically significantly (p<0.05) to that of aMPV and control. The aMPV-cFc group also generated the highest neutralizing antibody response. After challenges, chickens immunized with aMPV-cFc showed much less pathological signs in nasal turbinates and trachea so that we could confirm aMPV-cFc induced higher protection than that of aMPV. The greater ability of aMPV harboring chicken Fc to that of aMPV presented it as a possible vaccine candidate. PMID:27130629

  17. Emergence of Fatal Avian Influenza in New England Harbor Seals

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony, S. J.; St. Leger, J. A.; Pugliares, K.; Ip, H S; Chan, J. M.; Carpenter, Z. W.; Navarrete-Macias, I.; Sanchez-Leon, M.; Saliki, J T; Pedersen, J; Karesh, W; Daszak, P; Rabadan, R.; Rowles, T.; Lipkin, W. I.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT From September to December 2011, 162 New England harbor seals died in an outbreak of pneumonia. Sequence analysis of postmortem samples revealed the presence of an avian H3N8 influenza A virus, similar to a virus circulating in North American waterfowl since at least 2002 but with mutations that indicate recent adaption to mammalian hosts. These include a D701N mutation in the viral PB2 protein, previously reported in highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses infecting people. L...

  18. Caffeine in Boston Harbor past and present, assessing its utility as a tracer of wastewater contamination in an urban estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sites throughout Boston Harbor were analyzed for caffeine to assess its utility as a tracer in identifying sources of sanitary wastewater. Caffeine ranged from 15 ng/L in the outer harbor to a high of 185 ng/L in the inner harbor. Inner harbor concentrations were a result of comb...

  19. Xenobiotic and Immune-Relevant Molecular Biomarkers in Harbor Seals as Proxies for Pollutant Burden and Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Kristina; Ronnenberg, Katrin; Weijs, Liesbeth; Covaci, Adrian; Das, Krishna; Hellwig, Veronika; Siebert, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Harbor seals are exposed to increasing pressure caused by anthropogenic activities in their marine environment. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and trace elements are hazardous contaminants that accumulate in tissues of harbor seals. POPs and trace elements can negatively affect the immune-system and have been reported, e.g., to increase susceptibility to viral infections in seals. Biomarkers of the xenobiotic metabolism, cytokines, and heat-shock protein as cell mediators of the immune-system were established to evaluate the impact of environmental stressors on harbor seals. Harbor seals (n = 54) were captured on sandbanks in the North Sea during 2009-2012. Health assessments, including hematology, were performed, and RNAlater blood samples were taken and analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Normalized transcript copy numbers were correlated to hematology and POP concentration in blood and trace metals in blood and fur. A significant correlation between xenobiotic markers and contaminant burden was found. Significant interrelationships between markers and POP compounds, as well as with season, weight, and hematology values, indicate that biomarkers reflect pollutant exposure and effects. A significant relationship between cortisol levels and heat-shock protein expression was observed indicating stress experienced during restraint of the seals. Interleukin-10 transcription showed significant correlations with trace elements in fur pointing toward immune regulatory effects of metal exposure. The molecular markers prove to be an important noninvasive tool that reflects contaminant exposure and the impact of anthropogenic stressors in seal species. The connection between interleukin-2, xenobiotic markers, and pollutants may indicate immune suppression in animals exposed to contaminants with subsequent susceptibility to inflammatory disease. PMID:26296438

  20. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF OSTEOARTHRITIS IN HARBOR SEALS (PHOCA VITULINA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Ana Rubio; Contreras, Guillermo J Sánchez; Acosta, Cristina Juliá; Lacave, Géraldine; Prins, Pier; Marck, Klaas

    2015-09-01

    In 2012, 543 harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and 124 grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) were admitted to the Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre in Pieterburen, The Netherlands. In 19 seals (3%), signs of infection in a hind flipper were observed. Initial treatment consisting of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs resolved the symptoms in 15 animals. In four harbor seals, estimated to be 3 to 4 mo old, a necrotizing infection developed that resulted in osteoarthritis of the tarsus or tibiotarsal joint or both. Bacterial culture revealed the presence of polymicrobial infection in three of the four animals. Treatment consisted of amputation of the hind flipper under general anesthesia combined with tumescent anesthesia in the operation field. Amputations were done at the diaphysis of the tibia and fibula. After resecting these bones, the flipper was discarded, leaving a good muscle-skin cuff to cover the edges of the bones and close the skin without tension. The estimated blood loss varied between land). PMID:26352960

  1. Emergence of fatal avian influenza in New England harbor seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, S.J.; St. Leger, J. A.; Pugliares, K.; Ip, H.S.; Chan, J.M.; Carpenter, Z.W.; Navarrete-Macias, I.; Sanchez-Leon, M.; Saliki, J.T.; Pedersen, J.; Karesh, W.; Daszak, P.; Rabadan, R.; Rowles, T.; Lipkin, W.I.

    2012-01-01

    From September to December 2011, 162 New England harbor seals died in an outbreak of pneumonia. Sequence analysis of postmortem samples revealed the presence of an avian H3N8 influenza A virus, similar to a virus circulating in North American waterfowl since at least 2002 but with mutations that indicate recent adaption to mammalian hosts. These include a D701N mutation in the viral PB2 protein, previously reported in highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses infecting people. Lectin staining and agglutination assays indicated the presence of the avian-preferred SAα-2,3 and mammalian SAα-2,6 receptors in seal respiratory tract, and the ability of the virus to agglutinate erythrocytes bearing either the SAα-2,3 or the SAα-2,6 receptor. The emergence of this A/harbor seal/Massachusetts/1/2011 virus may herald the appearance of an H3N8 influenza clade with potential for persistence and cross-species transmission.

  2. Harbor Seal Vibrissa Morphology Reduces Vortex-Induced Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem, Heather; Dahl, Jason; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Studies show that harbor seals are adept at tracking small movements in the water, such as those left in the wake of fish, by using their highly sensitive whiskers to detect fluid structures, even without auditory or visual cues. The present work investigates the intriguing claim that the unique morphology of the harbor seal whisker suppresses Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV). This implies that the geometry is specialized to reduce the background noise caused by the whisker's own wake in the detection of the upstream target. Forces on a rigid whisker model (scale: 50x) being towed steadily down a water tank while experiencing imposed oscillations are measured. A range of frequencies and amplitudes are tested, the hydrodynamic lift coefficient in phase with velocity (CL,v) is calculated for each, and values are combined in a contour plot. The region of positive CL,v peaks at an amplitude ratio of 0.1, indicating that the whisker's undulatory, asymmetric structure considerably reduces (but does not entirely suppress) regions where the structure experiences VIV in comparison with a standard cylinder, whose peak reaches an amplitude ratio of 0.8.

  3. Environmental Impact of Artificial Harbors in Tropic Pacific Oceanic Islands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Chunting; Russell Howorth; HE Chaoxiong

    2004-01-01

    For loading and unloading of boats or ships round the clock, the access channel and its expanded part-a port are excavated on the lagoon and ocean reef flats in the tropic Pacific oceanic islands. Without moles, the access channel-port traps sediment and further transports it to the ocean or lagoon, resulting in coastal erosion. The wide uneven reef flat with a large catchment area tends to cause the formation of tide currents in the channel-port, while strong waves on the narrow even reef flat can give rise to rip currents. An access channel-port with a mole on one side or two moles on both sides results in less erosion. A model is recommended as an artificial harbor on the ocean coast, which is an excavated port surrounded by a mole, connected with the ocean by an access channel and with the shore by a bridge-shaped pier.

  4. Jam Formation of Traffic Flow in Harbor Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a study concerning occurrence and growth of traffic jam in a harbor tunnel. The single-lane with three sections (downgrade, flat, and upgrade) is taken into account and they are characterized with different velocity limit. At the low density, the traffic current increases linearly with density and saturates at some values of immediately density. As the density increases, the traffic jam appears firstly before the upgrade section and then extends to the downgrade section. Additionally, the relationships of the velocity and headway against position in different densities are obtained from simulation. These results clearly clarify where and when the traffic jam appears. Finally, the critical densities are derived via the theoretical analysis before and after the discontinuous fronts and the theoretical results are consistent with the critical values of simulation results. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  5. Geographic, seasonal, and diurnal surface behavior of harbor porpoises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilmann, Jonas; Christiansen, C.T.; Kjellerup, Sanne;

    2013-01-01

    are essential information on the status and management of the species. Thirty-five free-ranging harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) were tracked in the region between the Baltic and the North Sea for 25-349 d using Argos satellite transmitters. No differences were found in surface behavior between...... geographical areas or the size of the animals. Slight differences were found between the two sexes and time of day. Surface time peaked in April, where 6% was spent with the transmitter above surface and 61.5% between 0 and 2 m depth, while the minimum values occurred in February (3.4% and 42.5%, respectively......). The analyses reveal that individual variation among porpoises is the most important factor in explaining variation in surface rates. However, the large number of animals documented in the present study covering a wide range of age and sex groups justifies the use of the seasonal average surface times...

  6. Environmental security of the port and harbors' sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obhodas, Jasmina; Valkovic, Vladivoj; Davorin, Sudac; Matika, Dario; Pavić, Ivica

    2009-05-01

    While polluted sediments present a threat to the health of the marine ecosystem and indirectly to the public health, ammunition dump sites being mostly unprotected and neglected, present a serious threat to human security, environmental security and could be possible objects of misuse. Of special interest are sediments in ports and marinas. Those are the places where any suspicious object needs to be analyzed for the presence of explosives and CW. After analyzing several hundreds of sediment samples collected along the Adriatic coast, it has been found that they could be grouped in 7 categories: bays, beaches, villages, ports, marinas - pier area, marina - service areas and others. We have shown that the sediments in ports and harbors contain increased values of elements present in antifouling paints (Cu, As, Zn and Pb). Their presence modifies the response of survey probes while screening the sea floor for the presence of explosives and CW.

  7. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Richmond Harbor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinza, M R; Ward, J A; Mayhew, H L; Word, J Q; Niyogi, D K; Kohn, N P [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-10-01

    During the summer of 1991, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was contracted to conduct sampling and testing of sediments proposed for dredging of Richmond Harbor, California. The MSL collected sediment cores to a depth of [minus]40 ft MLLW ([minus]38 ft + 2 ft overdepth) from 28 (12-in. core) and 30 (4-in. core) stations. The sediment cores were allocated to six composite samples referred to as sediment treatments, which were then subjected to physical, chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation testing. Physical and chemical parameters included grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), total volatile solids (TVS), oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyis (PCBs), priority pollutant metals, and butyltins. The results from the test treatments were compared to results from five reference treatments representative of potential in-bay and offshore disposal sites.

  8. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Richmond Harbor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the summer of 1991, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was contracted to conduct sampling and testing of sediments proposed for dredging of Richmond Harbor, California. The MSL collected sediment cores to a depth of -40 ft MLLW (-38 ft + 2 ft overdepth) from 28 (12-in. core) and 30 (4-in. core) stations. The sediment cores were allocated to six composite samples referred to as sediment treatments, which were then subjected to physical, chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation testing. Physical and chemical parameters included grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), total volatile solids (TVS), oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyis (PCBs), priority pollutant metals, and butyltins. The results from the test treatments were compared to results from five reference treatments representative of potential in-bay and offshore disposal sites

  9. NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN NY/NJ HARBOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Lelie, D.; Reid-Green, J. D.; Stern, E. A.

    2003-12-31

    We have investigated the feasibility of using natural attenuation methods for ecosystem restoration in New York/New Jersey Harbor. Measurements were made of the most probable number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in native sediments and in samples, which had been supplemented with an appropriate electron donor and electron acceptor. The results showed that the activity of the endogenous microbial population in the native sediment was high enough to make possible adequate chemical transformation rates. The bioavailability of the zinc in the sediments was measured using the BIOMET biosensor technique. The bioavailability of the zinc was effectively eliminated following the microbial activities. We concluded that natural attenuation could be used effectively in treating sediments from Newark Bay and surrounding waters and that the resultant materials could likely be used in environmental restoration projects of the type proposed for construction in South Kearny, NJ.

  10. 75 FR 5907 - Safety Zone; Dive Platform, Pago Pago Harbor, American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Dive Platform, Pago Pago Harbor, American... a temporary safety zone around a dive platform vessel in Pago Pago Harbor, American Samoa,...

  11. 75 FR 14493 - Safety Zone; Dive Platform, Pago Pago Harbor, American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ...; Dive Platform, Pago Pago Harbor, American Samoa in the Federal Register (75 FR 5907). We received no... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Dive Platform, Pago Pago Harbor, American... temporary safety zone around the USNS Sioux or M/V EL LOBO GRANDE II dive platform and the 332-foot...

  12. 33 CFR 117.213 - New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers. 117.213 Section 117.213 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers. The draws of the Tomlinson bridge, mile 0.0, the Ferry...

  13. 33 CFR 207.580 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.580 Section 207.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.580 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.;...

  14. Sedimentation and chronology of heavy metal pollution in Oslo harbor, Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepland, Aivo; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Lepland, Aave;

    2010-01-01

    indicate that propeller wash affects the seabed in the Oslo harbor. The propeller-induced turbulence causes erosion, and in places exposes and remobilizes contaminated sediments that accumulated in the harbor during previous decades. Such re-exposure of contaminated sediments could be detrimental to local...

  15. 76 FR 36311 - Special Local Regulation; Extreme Sailing Series Boston; Boston Harbor, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... Sailing Series Boston; Boston Harbor, Boston, Massachusetts, in the Federal Register (76 FR 20595). We... race area: All waters of Boston Harbor near Boston, MA, surface to bottom, encompassed by an area... participating in the Extreme Sailing Series event from entering the designated race area. DATES: This rule...

  16. 75 FR 21651 - Final Environmental Impact Statement; Prisoners Harbor Coastal Wetland Restoration Plan, Channel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... National Park Service Final Environmental Impact Statement; Prisoners Harbor Coastal Wetland Restoration... impacts of restoring the coastal wetland and lower riparian corridor at Prisoners Harbor on Santa Cruz... productivity by removing fill and restoring the historic wetland; (3) provide an enhanced visitor experience...

  17. 33 CFR 110.27 - Lynn Harbor in Broad Sound, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lynn Harbor in Broad Sound, Mass. 110.27 Section 110.27 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.27 Lynn Harbor in Broad Sound, Mass. North...

  18. 33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the harbor northward of the inner end of the entrance channel....

  19. 33 CFR 110.31 - Hull Bay and Allerton Harbor at Hull, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hull, Mass. 110.31 Section 110.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Hull, Mass. (a) Area No. 1 in Allerton Harbor. That area north of Hog Island beginning at latitude 42... jurisdiction, and at the discretion, of the local Harbor Master, Hull, Mass....

  20. 75 FR 53572 - Safety Zone; Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd Inlet, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd... establishing a temporary safety zone within the navigation channel in Budd Inlet, WA during Olympia Harbor Days... to restrict vessel traffic movement on specified waters of the Budd Inlet, WA during Olympia...

  1. 76 FR 30825 - Special Local Regulation; Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd Inlet, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... the Federal Register (76 FR 006). We did not receive any comments on the proposed rule. We did not... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat... and an area extending north of the channel in Budd Inlet, WA during the annual Olympia Harbor Days...

  2. 76 FR 1384 - Special Local Regulation; Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd Inlet, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat... annual Olympia Harbor Days tug boat races. This action is necessary to restrict vessel movement...

  3. Congress Investigates: Pearl Harbor and 9/11 Congressional Hearing Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackerby, Christine

    2011-01-01

    On the morning of December 7, 1941, Japanese bombers staged a surprise attack on U.S. military forces at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Sixty years after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States was attacked again. On the morning of September 11, 2001, four commercial airplanes hijacked by 19 terrorists killed nearly 3,000 people when they crashed…

  4. Receiving beam patterns in the horizontal plane of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastelein, R.A.; Janssen, M.; Verboom, W.C.; Haan, de D.

    2005-01-01

    Receiving beam patterns of a harbor porpoise were measured in the horizontal plane, using narrow-band frequency modulated signals with center frequencies of 16, 64, and 100 kHz. Total signal duration was 1000 ms, including a 200 ms rise time and 300 ms fall time. The harbor porpoise was trained to p

  5. 75 FR 38019 - Safety Zone; Fixed Mooring Balls, South of Barbers Pt. Harbor Channel, Oahu, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fixed Mooring Balls, South of Barbers Pt... placement of six fixed mooring balls in an area south of Barbers Pt. Harbor Channel, the Coast Guard is... Safety Zone; Fixed Mooring Balls, South of Barbers Pt Harbor Channel, Oahu, Hawaii. (a) Location....

  6. 78 FR 19158 - Safety Zone; USA Triathlon, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ...The Coast Guard proposes to establish a safety zone within Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This Zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Milwaukee Harbor due to the 2013 and 2014 Olympic and Sprint Distance National Championships. This proposed safety zone is necessary to protect the surrounding public and vessels from the hazards associated with the 2013 and 2014 Olympic......

  7. 33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.930 Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval...

  8. Tsunami Hazard Assessment in New Zealand Ports and Harbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, J. C.; Wotherspoon, L.; Power, W. L.; Goring, D.; Barberopoulou, A.; Melville, B.; Shamseldin, A.

    2012-12-01

    The New Zealand Ministry of Science and Innovation (MSI) has sponsored a 3-year collaborative project involving industry, government and university research groups to better assess and prepare for tsunami hazards in New Zealand ports and harbors. As an island nation, New Zealand is highly dependent on its maritime infrastructure for commercial and recreational interests. The recent tsunamis of 2009, 2010 and 2011 (Samoa, Chile and Japan) highlighted the vulnerability of New Zealand's marine infrastructure to strong currents generated by such far field events. These events also illustrated the extended duration of the effects from such tsunamis, with some of the strongest currents and highest water levels occurring many hours, if not days after the tsunami first arrival. In addition, New Zealand also sits astride the Tonga-Kermadec subduction zone, which given the events of recent years, cannot be underestimated as a major near field hazard. This presentation will discuss the modeling and research strategy that will be used to mitigate tsunami hazards in New Zealand ports and harbors. This will include a detailed time-series analysis (including Fourier and discrete Wavelet techniques) of water levels recorded throughout New Zealand form recent tsunami events (2009 Samoa, 2010 Chile and 2011 Japan). The information learned from these studies will guide detailed numerical modeling of tsunami induced currents at key New Zealand ports. The model results will then be used to guide a structural analysis of the relevant port structures in terms of hydrodynamic loads as well as mooring and impact loads due to vessel and/or debris. Ultimately the project will lead to an improvement in New Zealand's tsunami response plans by providing a decision making flow chart, targeted for marine facilities, to be used by emergency management officials during future tsunami events.Tsunami effects at Port Charles, New Zealand: (top) inundation into a neighborhood and (bottom left and right

  9. Development of potent ALK inhibitor and its molecular inhibitory mechanism against NSCLC harboring EML4-ALK proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chung Hyo [Bio & Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, PO Box 107, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jeong In [Bio & Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, PO Box 107, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwangho [Bio & Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, PO Box 107, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Medicinal & Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chong Ock; Lee, Heung Kyoung [Bio & Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, PO Box 107, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Chang-Soo; Hwang, Jong Yeon; Cho, Sung Yun; Jung, Heejung; Kim, Pilho [Bio & Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, PO Box 107, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Medicinal & Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jae Du; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Choi, Sang Un [Bio & Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, PO Box 107, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hye Gwang [College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Rae, E-mail: hyungrk@krict.re.kr [Bio & Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, PO Box 107, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chi Hoon, E-mail: chpark@krict.re.kr [Bio & Drug Discovery Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, PO Box 107, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Medicinal & Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-28

    Here, we show the newly synthesized and potent ALK inhibitor having similar scaffold to KRCA-0008, which was reported previously, and its molecular mechanism against cancer cells harboring EML4-ALK fusion protein. Through ALK wild type enzyme assay, we selected two compounds, KRCA-0080 and KRCA-0087, which have trifluoromethyl instead of chloride in R2 position. We characterized these newly synthesized compounds by in vitro and in vivo assays. Enzyme assay shows that KRCA-0080 is more potent against various ALK mutants, including L1196M, G1202R, T1151-L1152insT, and C1156Y, which are seen in crizotinib-resistant patients, than KRCA-0008 is. Cell based assays demonstrate our compounds downregulate the cellular signaling, such as Akt and Erk, by suppressing ALK activity to inhibit the proliferation of the cells harboring EML4-ALK. Interestingly, our compounds induced strong G1/S arrest in H3122 cells leading to the apoptosis, which is proved by PARP-1 cleavage. In vivo H3122 xenograft assay, we found that KRCA-0080 shows significant reduction in tumor size compared to crizotinib and KRCA-0008 by 15–20%. Conclusively, we report a potent ALK inhibitor which shows significant in vivo efficacy as well as excellent inhibitory activity against various ALK mutants. - Highlights: • We synthesized KRCA-0008 derivatives having trifluoromethyl instead of chloride. • KRCA-0080 shows superior activity against several ALK mutants to KRCA-0008. • Cellular assays show our ALK inhibitors suppress only EML4-ALK positive cells. • Our ALK inhibitors induce G1/S arrest to lead apoptosis in H3122 cells. • KRCA-0080 has superior in vivo efficacy to crizotinib and KRCA-0008 by 15–20%.

  10. Development of potent ALK inhibitor and its molecular inhibitory mechanism against NSCLC harboring EML4-ALK proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, we show the newly synthesized and potent ALK inhibitor having similar scaffold to KRCA-0008, which was reported previously, and its molecular mechanism against cancer cells harboring EML4-ALK fusion protein. Through ALK wild type enzyme assay, we selected two compounds, KRCA-0080 and KRCA-0087, which have trifluoromethyl instead of chloride in R2 position. We characterized these newly synthesized compounds by in vitro and in vivo assays. Enzyme assay shows that KRCA-0080 is more potent against various ALK mutants, including L1196M, G1202R, T1151-L1152insT, and C1156Y, which are seen in crizotinib-resistant patients, than KRCA-0008 is. Cell based assays demonstrate our compounds downregulate the cellular signaling, such as Akt and Erk, by suppressing ALK activity to inhibit the proliferation of the cells harboring EML4-ALK. Interestingly, our compounds induced strong G1/S arrest in H3122 cells leading to the apoptosis, which is proved by PARP-1 cleavage. In vivo H3122 xenograft assay, we found that KRCA-0080 shows significant reduction in tumor size compared to crizotinib and KRCA-0008 by 15–20%. Conclusively, we report a potent ALK inhibitor which shows significant in vivo efficacy as well as excellent inhibitory activity against various ALK mutants. - Highlights: • We synthesized KRCA-0008 derivatives having trifluoromethyl instead of chloride. • KRCA-0080 shows superior activity against several ALK mutants to KRCA-0008. • Cellular assays show our ALK inhibitors suppress only EML4-ALK positive cells. • Our ALK inhibitors induce G1/S arrest to lead apoptosis in H3122 cells. • KRCA-0080 has superior in vivo efficacy to crizotinib and KRCA-0008 by 15–20%

  11. Abstracts of papers presented at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on quantitative Biology: DNA and chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral and poster presentations made at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitles DNA & Chromosomes. The meeting was held June 2--June 9, 1993 at Cold Spring Harbor, New York.

  12. bh_1mBS.tif: Backscatter Imagery from Sidescan Sonar 1 meter/pixel of Boston Harbor and Approaches

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are high-resolution acoustic backscatter measurements of the seafloor from Boston Harbor and the harbor approaches, Massachusetts. Approximately 170 km²...

  13. Harbor seal whiskers synchronize with frequency of upstream wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem, Heather; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Harbor seals are able to use their whiskers to track minute water movements, such as those left in the wake of a fish. The current study is a simple representation of what the whiskers experience as the seal chases a fish. A scaled whisker model (average cross-flow diameter: dw) is first tested in a towing tank by itself and then towed behind a larger cylinder (dc = 2 . 5dw), which serves as a wake generator. A flexing plate attached to the model base allows the whisker to freely vibrate in response to the flow. Measurements from strain gages on the plate are calibrated to tip deflections. While in the cylinder wake, the whisker vibrates with an amplitude up to ten times higher than it does on its own (A /dw = 0 . 15). Also, the whisker synchronizes with the vortex shedding frequency (fs =0/. 2 U dc) of the upstream cylinder over the range of reduced velocities tested, whereas on its own, the whisker oscillates around its own natural frequency in water. Seals may use the difference in vibration amplitude and frequency between these two cases to help detect the presence of a vortex wake.

  14. Synanthropic Cockroaches (Blattidae: Periplaneta spp.) Harbor Pathogenic Leptospira in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Astudillo, Viviana; Bustamante-Rengifo, Javier A; Bonilla, Álvaro; Lehmicke, Anna Joy J; Castillo, Andrés; Astudillo-Hernández, Miryam

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis cases in Colombia are typically linked to peridomestic rodents; however, empirical data suggest that Leptospira-infected patients with no apparent exposure to these reservoirs are common. Cockroaches (Periplaneta spp.) have equal or greater interaction with humans than rodents, yet their potential role as carriers of Leptospira has not been assessed. We determined if pathogenic Leptospira is harbored by Periplaneta spp. in Cali (Colombia) and the variables influencing this relationship. Fifty-nine cockroaches were captured from seven sites and DNA was extracted from the body surface and digestive tract for a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, targeting genes secY and flaB. Logistic regression models and proportion tests showed a higher likelihood for Leptospira to be isolated from body surfaces (P > 0.001) and from individuals inside houses (six times more likely). These findings are the first to demonstrate an association between Periplaneta spp. and Leptospira, suggesting the need to investigate the potential for cockroaches to serve as reservoirs or transport hosts for Leptospira. PMID:26553295

  15. Explosion of white dwarfs harboring hybrid CONe cores

    CERN Document Server

    Bravo, E; Gutiérrez, J L; Doherty, C L

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been found that off-centre carbon burning in a subset of intermediate-mass stars does not propagate all the way to the center, resulting in a class of hybrid CONe cores. Here, we consider the possibility that stars hosting these hybrid CONe cores might belong to a close binary system and, eventually, become white dwarfs accreting from a non-degenerate companion at rates leading to a supernova explosion. We have computed the hydrodynamical phase of the explosion of Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs harboring hybrid cores, assuming that the explosion starts at the center, either as a detonation (as may be expected in some degenerate merging scenarios) or as a deflagration (that afterwards transitions into a delayed detonation). We assume these hybrid cores are made of a central CO volume, of mass M(CO), surrounded by an ONe shell. We show that, in case of a pure detonation, a medium-sized CO-rich region, M(CO)<0.4 Msun, results in the ejection of a small fraction of the mantle while leaving a ...

  16. Harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) can perceive optic flow under water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gläser, Nele; Mauck, Björn; Kandil, Farid I; Lappe, Markus; Dehnhardt, Guido; Hanke, Frederike D

    2014-01-01

    Optic flow, the pattern of apparent motion elicited on the retina during movement, has been demonstrated to be widely used by animals living in the aerial habitat, whereas underwater optic flow has not been intensively studied so far. However optic flow would also provide aquatic animals with valuable information about their own movement relative to the environment; even under conditions in which vision is generally thought to be drastically impaired, e. g. in turbid waters. Here, we tested underwater optic flow perception for the first time in a semi-aquatic mammal, the harbor seal, by simulating a forward movement on a straight path through a cloud of dots on an underwater projection. The translatory motion pattern expanded radially out of a singular point along the direction of heading, the focus of expansion. We assessed the seal's accuracy in determining the simulated heading in a task, in which the seal had to judge whether a cross superimposed on the flow field was deviating from or congruent with the actual focus of expansion. The seal perceived optic flow and determined deviations from the simulated heading with a threshold of 0.6 deg of visual angle. Optic flow is thus a source of information seals, fish and most likely aquatic species in general may rely on for e. g. controlling locomotion and orientation under water. This leads to the notion that optic flow seems to be a tool universally used by any moving organism possessing eyes. PMID:25058490

  17. Harbor seals (Phoca vitulina can perceive optic flow under water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele Gläser

    Full Text Available Optic flow, the pattern of apparent motion elicited on the retina during movement, has been demonstrated to be widely used by animals living in the aerial habitat, whereas underwater optic flow has not been intensively studied so far. However optic flow would also provide aquatic animals with valuable information about their own movement relative to the environment; even under conditions in which vision is generally thought to be drastically impaired, e. g. in turbid waters. Here, we tested underwater optic flow perception for the first time in a semi-aquatic mammal, the harbor seal, by simulating a forward movement on a straight path through a cloud of dots on an underwater projection. The translatory motion pattern expanded radially out of a singular point along the direction of heading, the focus of expansion. We assessed the seal's accuracy in determining the simulated heading in a task, in which the seal had to judge whether a cross superimposed on the flow field was deviating from or congruent with the actual focus of expansion. The seal perceived optic flow and determined deviations from the simulated heading with a threshold of 0.6 deg of visual angle. Optic flow is thus a source of information seals, fish and most likely aquatic species in general may rely on for e. g. controlling locomotion and orientation under water. This leads to the notion that optic flow seems to be a tool universally used by any moving organism possessing eyes.

  18. Evaluation of older bay mud sediment from Richmond Harbor, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.

    1996-09-01

    The older, bay mud (OBM) unit predates modem man and could act as a barrier to the downward transport of contaminants from the younger bay mud (YBM) because of its hard-packed consistency. However, its chemical and biological nature have not been well characterized. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted three independent studies of OBM sediment in January 1993, January 1994, and October 1994. These studies evaluated potential chemical contamination and biological effects of OBM that could occur as a result of dredging and disposal activities. These evaluations were performed by conducting chemical analysis, solid-phase toxicity tests, suspended- particulate-phase (SPP) toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation tests on the OBM sediment. If the sediment chemistry and toxicity results showed no or minimal contamination and toxicological responses, then either the OBM could be left exposed in Richmond Harbor after dredging the YBM without leaving a source of contamination, or if the project depths necessitate, the OBM would be acceptable for disposal at an appropriate disposal site.

  19. Atmospheric dispersion of PCB from a contaminated Lake Michigan harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Andres; Spak, Scott N.; Petrich, Nicholas T.; Hu, Dingfei; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Hornbuckle, Keri C.

    2015-12-01

    Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal (IHSC) in East Chicago is an industrial waterway on Lake Michigan and a source of PCBs to Lake Michigan and the overlying air. We hypothesized that IHSC is an important source of airborne PCBs to surrounding communities. We used AERMOD to model hourly PCB concentrations, utilizing emission fluxes from a prior study and hourly meteorology provided by the State of Indiana. We also assessed dispersion using hourly observed meteorology from a local airport and high resolution profiles simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model. We found that emissions from IHSC waters contributed about 15% of the observed ∑PCB concentrations close to IHSC when compared on an hourly basis and about 10% of observed annual concentrations at a nearby school. Concentrations at the school due to emissions from IHSC ranged from 0 to 18,000 pg m-3, up to 20 times higher than observed background levels, with an annual geometric mean (GSD) of 19 (31) pg m-3. Our findings indicate that IHSC is an important source of PCBs to East Chicago, but not the only source. Four observed enriched PCB3 samples suggest a nearby non-Aroclor source.

  20. Variability of Kepler Solar-Like Stars Harboring Small Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Steve B; Giampapa, Mark S; Everett, Mark E; Silva, David R; Szkody, Paula

    2015-01-01

    We examine Kepler light curve variability on habitable zone transit timescales for a large uniform sample of spectroscopically studied Kepler exoplanet host stars. The stars, taken from Everett et al. (2013) are solar-like in their properties and each harbors at least one exoplanet (or candidate) of radius $\\le$2.5\\re. The variability timescale examined is typical for habitable zone planets orbiting solar-like stars and we note that the discovery of the smallest exoplanets ($\\le$1.2\\re) with corresponding transit depths of less than $\\sim$0.18 mmag, occur for the brightest, photometrically quietest stars. Thus, these detections are quite rare in $Kepler$ observations. Some brighter and more evolved stars (subgiants), the latter which often show large radial velocity jitter, are found to be among the photometrically quietest solar-like stars in our sample and the most likely small planet transit hunting grounds. The Sun is discussed as a solar-like star proxy to provide insights into the nature and cause of ph...

  1. Public health assessment for Wyckoff Company/Eagle Harbor, Eagle Harbor Operable Units, Bainbridge Island, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD009248295. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-06

    The Wyckoff/Eagle Harbor site is a National Priorities List (NPL) site located on the east side of Bainbridge Island, Kitsap County, Washington. The harbor has become contaminated with heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the many years of ship repair and painting as well as from the application of creosote, pentachlorophenol, and other wood preservatives to pilings. The Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) states that the major human health concern is consumption of clam meat contaminated with PAHs. The public health assessment has determined that exposure to contaminants found in Eagle Harbor sediments, shellfish, fish, and crab is a health hazard for those people who ignore warnings.

  2. Aerial Survey Counts of Harbor Seals in Lake Iliamna, Alaska, 1984-2013 (NODC Accession 0123188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset provides counts of harbor seals from aerial surveys over Lake Iliamna, Alaska, USA. The data have been collated from three previously published sources...

  3. A Dataset of Aerial Survey Counts of Harbor Seals in Iliamna Lake, Alaska: 1984-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset provides counts of harbor seals from aerial surveys over Iliamna Lake, Alaska, USA. The data have been collated from three previously published sources...

  4. Critical wildlife areas in Port Etches and Constantine Harbor, Hinchinbrook Island, Prince William Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report documents critical wildlife areas in Port Etches and Constantine Harbor, Hinchinbrook Islands, and Prince William Sound during the 1976 and 1977....

  5. Gridded multibeam bathymetry of Apra Harbor, Guam U.S. Territory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry from Apra Harbor, Guam U.S. Territory. The netCDF and Arc ASCII grids include multibeam bathymetry from the Reson SeaBat 8125 multibeam sonar...

  6. Sedimentation and chronology of heavy metal pollution in Oslo harbor, Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratigraphic profiles of Cu, Cd and Hg in ten sediment cores from the Oslo harbor, Norway, combined with results of radiometric dating demonstrate that pollution by these metals peaked between 1940 and 1970. Dating results indicate that Hg discharges peaked between 1940 and 1950, Cd reached maximum ca. 1955-1960, and Cu has the highest concentration in sediment interval corresponding to ca. 1970. Geochemical profiles and maxima of Cu, Cd and Hg concentrations can be used as chronostratigraphic markers for sediment cores from the Oslo harbor. Acoustic backscatter and sediment core data indicate that propeller wash affects the seabed in the Oslo harbor. The propeller-induced turbulence causes erosion, and in places exposes and remobilizes contaminated sediments that accumulated in the harbor during previous decades. Such re-exposure of contaminated sediments could be detrimental to local ecosystems and offset remediation efforts, warranting further impact studies and potential mitigation strategies to prevent redistribution.

  7. Aerial Survey Trend Counts of Harbor Seals in Coastal Alaska (1984-2006) - ADF&G

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial surveys were conducted during 1983–2006 in the Ketchikan, Sitka, Kodiak, and Bristol Bay areas of Alaska to estimate trends in abundance of harbor seals.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a novel arenavirus harbored by Rodents and Shrews in Zhejiang province, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the biodiversity of arenaviruses in China, we captured and screened rodents and shrews in Wenzhou city, Zhejiang province, a locality where hemorrhagic fever diseases are endemic in humans. Accordingly, arenaviruses were detected in 42 of 351 rodents from eight species, and in 12 of 272 Asian house shrews (Suncus murinus), by RT-PCR targeting the L segment. From these, a single arenavirus was successfully isolated in cell culture. The virion particles exhibited a typical arenavirus morphology under transmission electron microscopy. Comparison of the S and L segment sequences revealed high levels of nucleotide (>32.2% and >39.6%) and amino acid (>28.8% and >43.8%) sequence differences from known arenaviruses, suggesting that it represents a novel arenavirus, which we designated Wenzhou virus (WENV). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all WENV strains harbored by both rodents and Asian house shrews formed a distinct lineage most closely related to Old World arenaviruses. - Highlights: • A novel arenavirus (Wenzhou virus) was identified in Zhejiang province, China. • The virus is highly circulating in five species of rats and one species of shrews • More efforts are needed to infer whether it is pathogenic to humans or not

  9. Uncovering potential downstream targets of oncogenic GRPR overexpression in prostate carcinomas harboring ETS rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Joana; Mesquita, Diana; Barros-Silva, João D; Jerónimo, Carmen; Henrique, Rui; Morais, António; Paulo, Paula; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2015-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is known to be overexpressed in several human malignancies, including prostate cancer, and has been implicated in multiple important neoplastic signaling pathways. We recently have shown that GRPR is an ERG and ETV1 target gene in prostate cancer, using a genome-wide scale and exon-level expression microarray platform. Due to its cellular localization, the relevance of its function and the availability of blocking agents, GRPR seems to be a promising candidate as therapeutic target. Our present work shows that effective knockdown of GRPR in LNCaP and VCaP cells attenuates their malignant phenotype by decreasing proliferation, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, while increasing apoptosis. Using an antibody microarray we were able to validate known and identify new targets of GRPR pathway, namely AKT1, PKCε, TYK2 and MST1. Finally, we show that overexpression of these GRPR targets is restricted to prostate carcinomas harboring ERG and/or ETV1 rearrangements, establishing their potential as therapeutic targets for these particular molecular subsets of the disease. PMID:26097883

  10. New England harbor seal H3N8 influenza virus retains avian-like receptor specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Islam T M; Krammer, Florian; Ma, Eric; Estrin, Michael; Viswanathan, Karthik; Stebbins, Nathan W; Quinlan, Devin S; Sasisekharan, Ram; Runstadler, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    An influenza H3N8 virus, carrying mammalian adaptation mutations, was isolated from New England harbor seals in 2011. We sought to assess the risk of its human transmissibility using two complementary approaches. First, we tested the binding of recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) proteins of seal H3N8 and human-adapted H3N2 viruses to respiratory tissues of humans and ferrets. For human tissues, we observed strong tendency of the seal H3 to bind to lung alveoli, which was in direct contrast to the human-adapted H3 that bound mainly to the trachea. This staining pattern was also consistent in ferrets, the primary animal model for human influenza pathogenesis. Second, we compared the binding of the recombinant HAs to a library of 610 glycans. In contrast to the human H3, which bound almost exclusively to α-2,6 sialylated glycans, the seal H3 bound preferentially to α-2,3 sialylated glycans. Additionally, the seal H3N8 virus replicated in human lung carcinoma cells. Our data suggest that the seal H3N8 virus has retained its avian-like receptor binding specificity, but could potentially establish infection in human lungs. PMID:26888262

  11. Postharvest Analysis of Lowland Transgenic Tomato Fruits Harboring hpRNAi-ACO1 Construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Behboodian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The plant hormone, ethylene, is an important regulator which involved in regulating fruit ripening and flower senescence. In this study, RNA interference (RNAi technology was employed to silence the genes involved in ethylene biosynthetic pathway. This was achieved by blocking the expression of specific gene encoding the ACC oxidase. Initially, cDNA corresponding to ACO1 of lowland tomato cultivar (MT1, which has high identity with ACO1 of Solanum lycopersicum in GenBank, was cloned through RT-PCR. Using a partial coding region of ACO1, one hpRNAi transformation vector was constructed and expressed ectopically under the 35S promoter. Results showed that transgenic lines harboring the hpRNA-ACO1 construct had lower ethylene production and a longer shelf life of 32 days as compared to 10 days for wild-type fruits. Changes in cell wall degrading enzyme activities were also investigated in cases where the transgenic fruits exhibited reduced rates of firmness loss, which can be associated with a decrease in pectin methylesterase (PME and polygalacturonase (PG activities. However, no significant change was detected in both transgenic and wild-type fruits in terms of β-galactosidase (β-Gal activity and levels of total soluble solid, titratable acid and ascorbic acid.

  12. "A Cold Spring Harbor in Europe." EURATOM, UNESCO and the Foundation of EMBO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassata, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    This article explores the problem of the foundation of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO), by reconstructing a broader institutional framework, which includes other international actors--EURATOM, UNESCO and the International Laboratory of Genetics and Biophysics (ILGB) in Naples--and a relevant, but still neglected figure, the Italian geneticist Adriano Buzzati-Traverso (1913-1983). The article considers the tension between centralized and federal models of organization in the field of life sciences not just as an EMBO internal controversy, but rather as a structural issue of European scientific cooperation in fundamental biology in the early 1960s. Along with EMBO, the article analyzes in particular the EURATOM Biology Division Program and the constitution of UNESCO International Cell Research Organization (ICRO). Adriano Buzzati-Traverso, as founder of ILGB and scientific consultant of EURATOM and UNESCO, played a crucial role in the complex negotiation which ultimately led to the foundation of EMBO. A synchronic treatment of ILGB, EURATOM, UNESCO-ICRO and EMBO opens a window on the early 1960s institutional configuration of molecular biology in Europe, showing how it basically incorporated the "Cold Spring Harbor" decentralized model rather than reproducing the "CERN" centralized model. PMID:25931208

  13. Isolation and characterization of a novel arenavirus harbored by Rodents and Shrews in Zhejiang province, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kun [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Department of Zoonoses, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou (China); Lin, Xian-Dan [Wenzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Wang, Wen [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Department of Zoonoses, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou (China); Shi, Mang [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Department of Zoonoses, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, Beijing (China); Wencheng Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Guo, Wen-Ping [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Department of Zoonoses, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Xiao-He [Wenzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Xing, Jian-Guang [Wencheng Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); and others

    2015-02-15

    To determine the biodiversity of arenaviruses in China, we captured and screened rodents and shrews in Wenzhou city, Zhejiang province, a locality where hemorrhagic fever diseases are endemic in humans. Accordingly, arenaviruses were detected in 42 of 351 rodents from eight species, and in 12 of 272 Asian house shrews (Suncus murinus), by RT-PCR targeting the L segment. From these, a single arenavirus was successfully isolated in cell culture. The virion particles exhibited a typical arenavirus morphology under transmission electron microscopy. Comparison of the S and L segment sequences revealed high levels of nucleotide (>32.2% and >39.6%) and amino acid (>28.8% and >43.8%) sequence differences from known arenaviruses, suggesting that it represents a novel arenavirus, which we designated Wenzhou virus (WENV). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all WENV strains harbored by both rodents and Asian house shrews formed a distinct lineage most closely related to Old World arenaviruses. - Highlights: • A novel arenavirus (Wenzhou virus) was identified in Zhejiang province, China. • The virus is highly circulating in five species of rats and one species of shrews • More efforts are needed to infer whether it is pathogenic to humans or not.

  14. Weighing and control of bulk material in ship-lading process at harbor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes a new weighing and control system for bulk material in ship-loading process at harbor. It adopts nuclear radiation measurement, computer control and digital signal process techniques to weigh the bulk material with no-touch with the advantages of stability and anti-jamming. The measure accuracy reaches to 0.5% - 1.0%. It is was applicable in the bad condition of ship-loading spot at harbor

  15. A Nonstationary Negative Binomial Time Series with Time-Dependent Covariates: Enterococcus Counts in Boston Harbor

    OpenAIRE

    E. Andres Houseman; Brent Coull; James Shine

    2004-01-01

    Boston Harbor has had a history of poor water quality, including by enteric pathogens. We conduct a statistical analysis of data collected by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) between 1996 and 2002 to evaluate the effects of court-mandated improvements in sewage treatment. We propose a negative binomial model for time series of Enterococcus counts in Boston Harbor, where nonstationarity and autocorrelation are modeled using a nonparametric smooth function of time in the predi...

  16. Assessment of toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Dong, Cheng-Di; Kao, Chih-Ming

    2013-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination and toxicity levels in the surface sediments of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan were evaluated using sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) and toxic equivalent factors. Eighty surface sediment samples were collected from twenty locations in Kaohsiung Harbor for PAH analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Concentrations of total PAHs varies from 34.0 to 16,700 ng/g with a mean concentration of 1490±2689 ng/g. The spatial distribution of PAHs reveals that PAH concentration is relatively higher in the river mouth regions, especially in the Salt River mouth where it gradually diminishes toward the harbor region. Distributions of PAHs, during both the wet and dry seasons, show that PAHs are more easily disbursed in the receiving sea water thereby leading to a wider range of chemical distribution. Hence, most of the chemicals accumulate in the harbor water channel. Diagnostic ratios show that the possible source of PAHs in the southern industrial area of the harbor could be coal combustion while in the other zones it could be petroleum combustion and/or a mixed sources. The toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQ(carc)) of PAHs varied from 3.9 to 1970 ng TEQ/g. The higher total TEQ(carc) values were found in the southern industrial area of the harbor. As compared with US sediment quality guidelines, the observed levels of PAHs in the industrial zone exceeded the effects range low (ERL), which will eventually cause acute biological damage. Based on the analyses using the SQGs, surface sediments from Kaohsiung Harbor were moderately contaminated and most samples have a low probability of toxicity pollution, except for the Salt River mouth situated in the south Kaohsiung Harbor area. This area has a medium to high probability of toxicity pollution. PMID:22818911

  17. Evaluation of Trichodysplasia Spinulosa-Associated Polyomavirus Capsid Protein as a New Carrier for Construction of Chimeric Virus-Like Particles Harboring Foreign Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Gedvilaite

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs represent a promising tool for protein engineering. Recently, trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV viral protein 1 (VP1 was efficiently produced in yeast expression system and shown to self-assemble to VLPs. In the current study, TSPyV VP1 protein was exploited as a carrier for construction of chimeric VLPs harboring selected B and T cell-specific epitopes and evaluated in comparison to hamster polyomavirus VP1 protein. Chimeric VLPs with inserted either hepatitis B virus preS1 epitope DPAFR or a universal T cell-specific epitope AKFVAAWTLKAAA were produced in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Target epitopes were incorporated either at the HI or BC loop of the VP1 protein. The insertion sites were selected based on molecular models of TSPyV VP1 protein. The surface exposure of the insert positions was confirmed using a collection of monoclonal antibodies raised against the intact TSPyV VP1 protein. All generated chimeric proteins were capable to self-assemble to VLPs, which induced a strong immune response in mice. The chimeric VLPs also activated dendritic cells and T cells as demonstrated by analysis of cell surface markers and cytokine production profiles in spleen cell cultures. In conclusion, TSPyV VP1 protein represents a new potential carrier for construction of chimeric VLPs harboring target epitopes.

  18. Stem cell biobanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardelli, Silvana

    2010-04-01

    Stem cells contribute to innate healing and harbor a promising role for regenerative medicine. Stem cell banking through long-term storage of different stem cell platforms represents a fundamental source to preserve original features of stem cells for patient-specific clinical applications. Stem cell research and clinical translation constitute fundamental and indivisible modules catalyzed through biobanking activity, generating a return of investment. PMID:20560026

  19. Stabilization and in situ management of radioactive contaminated sediments of Port Hope harbor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the findings of laboratory and field studies undertaken to assess the feasibility of in situ management of contaminated sediments in Port Hope harbor. The contaminated sediments stem from historic releases from an adjacent radium and uranium refinery, and uranium, arsenic, and radium are the most abundant contaminants. With improved emission controls, currently accumulating sediments have much lower levels of contamination, and the harbor waters currently meet water quality limits for the contaminants of concern. Within a few years, however, the continuing sedimentation will render the harbor unusable. Field tests have confirmed the dredging will result in incomplete removal of the contaminated sediments and that sediment suspension and the release of pores waters during dredging will produce harbor water contaminant concentrations that would require the treatment of large volumes of water. In addition, no remedial work can start until a site for the dredged material can be found. The local community inquired whether in situ burial of the sediments and abandonment of the harbor would provide safe disposal

  20. Mass balances on selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the New York-New Jersey Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenburg, Lisa A; Valle, Sandra N; Panero, Marta A; Muñoz, Gabriela R; Shor, Leslie M

    2010-01-01

    Mass balances on 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the New York-New Jersey Harbor (hereafter "the Harbor") were constructed using monitoring data from the water column, sediment, and atmosphere. Inputs considered included tributaries, atmospheric deposition, wastewater treatment plant discharges, combined sewer overflows (CSOs), and stormwater runoff. Removal processes examined included tidal exchange between the Harbor and the coastal Bight and Long Island Sound, volatilization, and accumulation or burial of sediment-bound PAHs in the Harbor. The PAHs investigated were fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, perylene, benzo[ghi]perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene. The results show inputs and outputs are fairly well balanced for most compounds, a finding that suggests aerobic biodegradation may not be a key loss process in this Harbor, as has been assumed in other systems. The main pathway for inputs of all PAHs is stormwater runoff. Atmospheric deposition is an important conveyor of PAHs with molecular weights sustainable management of urban water resources. PMID:20176837

  1. Fanconi anemia core complex gene promoters harbor conserved transcription regulatory elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Meier

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA gene family is a recent addition to the complex network of proteins that respond to and repair certain types of DNA damage in the human genome. Since little is known about the regulation of this novel group of genes at the DNA level, we characterized the promoters of the eight genes (FANCA, B, C, E, F, G, L and M that compose the FA core complex. The promoters of these genes show the characteristic attributes of housekeeping genes, such as a high GC content and CpG islands, a lack of TATA boxes and a low conservation. The promoters functioned in a monodirectional way and were, in their most active regions, comparable in strength to the SV40 promoter in our reporter plasmids. They were also marked by a distinctive transcriptional start site (TSS. In the 5' region of each promoter, we identified a region that was able to negatively regulate the promoter activity in HeLa and HEK 293 cells in isolation. The central and 3' regions of the promoter sequences harbor binding sites for several common and rare transcription factors, including STAT, SMAD, E2F, AP1 and YY1, which indicates that there may be cross-connections to several established regulatory pathways. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and siRNA experiments confirmed the shared regulatory responses between the prominent members of the TGF-β and JAK/STAT pathways and members of the FA core complex. Although the promoters are not well conserved, they share region and sequence specific regulatory motifs and transcription factor binding sites (TBFs, and we identified a bi-partite nature to these promoters. These results support a hypothesis based on the co-evolution of the FA core complex genes that was expanded to include their promoters.

  2. Geoarchaeology and geomorphology of Phoenicus ancient harbor, NW coast of Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Samah; Torab, Magdy

    2016-04-01

    Phoenicus Greek harbor located in SE coastline of Ras El Hekma area, west of Alexandria city for about 220 km. It is shaped as triangle with its headland extending into the Mediterranean Sea for about 15 km. It is occupied by sedimentary rocks belonging to the Tertiary and Quaternary Eras, the western coastline consists of Pleistocene, Separated polygons of limestone sheets and fossil lime stone, where there are coastal platforms, fluvial forms and solution holes. The location and description of Phoenicus ancient harbor were mentioned by some late writers (Fourtau,1893) & (Muller,1901), some geoarchaeological indicators were discovered by the authors such as fish tanks, well, remains of breakwater and wine press. The present work is mainly devoted to define the geomorphological and geoarchaelological indicators of Phoenicus Greek harbor site, based on detailed geomorphological and geoarchaelogical surveying, sampling, dating and mapping as well as satellite image interpretation and GIS techniques.

  3. Identifying best practices for "Safe Harbor" legislation to protect child sex trafficking victims: Decriminalization alone is not sufficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnert, Elizabeth S; Abrams, Susan; Azzi, Veronica F; Ryan, Gery; Brook, Robert; Chung, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Several states have recently enacted "Safe Harbor" laws to redirect child victims of commercial sexual exploitation and child sex trafficking from the criminal justice system and into the child welfare system. No comprehensive studies of Safe Harbor law implementation exist. The nine state Safe Harbor laws enacted by 2012 were analyzed to guide state legislators, health professionals, law enforcement agents, child welfare providers, and other responders to the commercial sexual exploitation of children on the development and implementation of state Safe Harbor laws. The authors conducted 32 semi-structured interviews with Safe Harbor experts in these states. Participants conveyed that Safe Harbor legislation signified a critical paradigm shift, treating commercially sexually exploited youth not as criminals but as vulnerable children in need of services. However, Safe Harbor legislation varied widely and significant gaps in laws exist. Such laws alone were considered insufficient without adequate funding for necessary services. As a result, many well-meaning providers were going around the Safe Harbor laws by continuing to incarcerate commercially sexually exploited youth in the juvenile justice system regardless of Safe Harbor laws in place. This was done, to act, in their view, in what was the best interest of the victimized children. With imperfect laws and implementation, these findings suggest an important role for local and state responders to act together to protect victims from unnecessary criminalization and potential further traumatization. PMID:26520827

  4. Multivariate analysis of heavy metal contaminations in seawater and sediments from a heavily industrialized harbor in Southern Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Kaohsiung Harbor is the largest international commercial port in Taiwan. • The metal distributions in the seawater and sediments were investigated. • Many metals exhibited higher levels of enrichment inside the harbor. • Multivariate statistical analysis was used to characterize the metal pollutions. • Two complex arrays of contamination behaviors exist inside and outside the harbor. -- Abstract: Heavy metal pollution, including chromium, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, mercury, copper, lead, and aluminum, in the largest industrial harbor in southern Taiwan was investigated. Increasing metal contamination was observed by monitoring heavy metal concentrations in seawater and sediments and estimating the enrichment factors, particularly those inside the harbor. Compared to other metal-polluted harbors worldwide, the presence of chromium in the sediments was relatively high. Excluding the background contribution, the harbor area was polluted by outflows from river mouths, wastewater discharging pipes, and point sources near industrial activities within the harbor. It is shown by principal component and cluster analyses that metal contamination was affected by a wide range of different and complex contamination mechanisms inside and outside the harbor, suggesting managing the pollution using straightforward strategies, i.e., solutions that only consider a single source or single pathway of metal emissions, is problematic

  5. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina concolor) from the northwestern Atlantic coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, S.D.; Brenner, D.; Bourakovsky, A. [Marine Environmental Research Inst. (MERI), Blue Hill, ME (United States); Mahaffey, C.A. [Coll. of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, ME (United States); Perkins, C.R. [Environmental Research Inst., Storrs, CT (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Since the 1970s, very little research has been conducted on levels and potential effects of POPs in harbor seals inhabiting the northwestern Atlantic coast. During 1979-1980, an outbreak of type A influenza virus occurred among these seals, spreading northward from Cape Cod into the Gulf of Maine and ultimately resulting in the deaths of more than 500 animals. A decade later, during the winter of 1991-1992, a morbillivirus epizootic of unknown magnitude was reported among harbor seals found stranded from southern Maine to Long Island, New York. A possible role of environmental chemicals (e.g., PCBs) in these outbreaks was not investigated, although data from the 1970s indicated that their PCBs and DDT burdens were approaching the 100 ppm range. The estimated threshold value for adverse effects in harbor seals including effects on immune function is {proportional_to}17{mu}g PCB/g lw in blubber. At present, there are an estimated 99,340 harbor seals (Phoca vitulina concolor) inhabiting New England waters from the Gulf of Maine along the Atlantic coast to New Jersey. Isolated from the deeper waters of the northeast Atlantic Ocean by Georges and Brown Banks and Nantucket Shoals, the northern portion of their range is a semi-enclosed sea with a principally estuarine circulation pattern receiving significant riverine, urban, agricultural, and industrial pollutant inputs from population centers in the Northeast as well as via long-range atmospheric transport. The harbor seal population has steadily increased since the early 1980s, although in recent years, pup production has sharply declined in southern and mid-coast Maine for reasons that are poorly understood. Here we report results of the first comprehensive analysis of organohalogen compounds in harbor seals along the northwestern Atlantic coast.

  6. Corneal topography, refractive state, and accommodation in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Frederike D; Dehnhardt, Guido; Schaeffel, Frank; Hanke, Wolf

    2006-03-01

    Corneal topography of a harbor seal measured with a Placido's disc shows a central flattened stripe in the vertical meridian. Together with a pupil that can form a vertical slit, the flat vertical meridian can minimize the optical effects caused by the transition from water to air. Using infrared (IR) photoretinoscopy, we analyzed the refractive state of harbor seals and revealed a high degree of myopia and astigmatism in air, but emmetropia or slight hyperopia with little astigmatism underwater. The brightness distribution in the pupils suggest the presence of a multifocal dioptric apparatus in air and underwater. We found a first indication for accommodation by dynamic recordings underwater. PMID:16256164

  7. Safe Harbor Legislation for Juvenile Victims of Sex Trafficking: A Myopic View of Improvements in Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Mehlman-Orozco

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Current social and political realties have focused attention on human trafficking in the United States. Although new mechanisms for criminalizing offenders and protecting victims are increasingly funded and implemented across the country, empirical exploration into the efficacy of these interventions is lacking. This article uses yearly count data on juvenile prostitution arrests aggregated at the state level to explore the criminalization of commercial sexually exploited children post safe harbor policy implementation. Preliminary data from four states suggests that the passage of safe harbor laws may not reduce the number of juveniles arrested for prostitution crimes. Implications for future research are discussed.

  8. The genome of chelonid herpesvirus 5 harbors atypical genes

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann, Mathias; Koriabine, Maxim; Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; de Jong, Pieter J; Lewis, Teresa D.; Schetle, Nelli; Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Leong, Ann C

    2012-01-01

    The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical ...

  9. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 51, Molecular biology of /ital Homo sapiens/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume is the second part of a collection of papers submitted by the participants to the 1986 Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitled Molecular Biology of /ital Homo sapiens/. The 49 papers included in this volume are grouped by subject into receptors, human cancer genes, and gene therapy. (DT)

  10. 50 CFR 229.33 - Harbor Porpoise Take Reduction Plan Regulations-New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations-New England. 229.33 Section 229.33 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE... Emergency Regulations § 229.33 Harbor Porpoise Take Reduction Plan Regulations—New England. (a) Restrictions... metric tons of landings. (5) Southern New England Management Area—(i) Area restrictions. From December...

  11. 75 FR 42069 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 152, Burns Harbor, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... Federal Register (74 FR 69329, 12/31/2009) and the application has been processed pursuant to the FTZ Act... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 152, Burns Harbor, Indiana Pursuant to...

  12. 77 FR 75917 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... Operation Regulation; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT,'' in the Federal Register (75 FR... Privacy Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the (73 FR 3316). 4... authorized a temporary test deviation (74 FR 27249) on June 9, 2009, to test the proposed changes to...

  13. 76 FR 12 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, New Haven, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, New Haven, CT AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from... Haven, Connecticut. The deviation allows the bridge to keep one lift span closed to facilitate...

  14. 77 FR 38482 - Safety Zone; Oswego Independence Celebration Fireworks, Oswego Harbor, Oswego, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Oswego Independence Celebration Fireworks... to restrict vessels from a portion of Oswego Harbor during the Oswego Independence...

  15. 33 CFR 162.165 - Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Engineers also has regulations dealing with these areas in 33 CFR Part 207. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo and Rochester Harbors... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.165...

  16. Side-scan imagery of Apra Harbor, Guam U.S. Territory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded side-scan imagery collected in Apra Harbor, Guam U.S. Territory, USA. The GeoTIFF and Arc ASCII file includes data that were collected using a Klein 3000...

  17. 75 FR 81556 - Solicitation of New Safe Harbors and Special Fraud Alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... solicitation notice for developing new safe harbors and Special Fraud Alerts on December 29, 2009 (74 FR 68762... certain non-abusive arrangements, while encouraging beneficial and innocuous arrangements'' (56 FR 35952... Fraud Alerts AGENCY: Office of Inspector General (OIG), HHS. ACTION: Notice of intent to...

  18. 77 FR 76434 - Solicitation of New Safe Harbors and Special Fraud Alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... solicitation notice for developing new safe harbors and Special Fraud Alerts on December 29, 2011 (76 FR 89104... non-abusive arrangements, while encouraging beneficial and innocuous arrangements'' (56 FR 35952, July... Fraud Alerts AGENCY: Office of Inspector General (OIG), HHS. ACTION: Notice of intent to...

  19. 76 FR 81904 - Solicitation of New Safe Harbors and Special Fraud Alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... new safe harbors and Special Fraud Alerts on December 28, 2010 (75 FR 81556). As required under... arrangements, while encouraging beneficial and innocuous arrangements'' (56 FR 35952, July 29, 1991). Health... Fraud Alerts AGENCY: Office of Inspector General (OIG), HHS. ACTION: Notice of intent to...

  20. 78 FR 78807 - Solicitation of New Safe Harbors and Special Fraud Alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... solicitation notice for developing new safe harbors and Special Fraud Alerts on December 28, 2012 (77 FR 76434... non-abusive arrangements, while encouraging beneficial and innocuous arrangements'' (56 FR 35952, July... Fraud Alerts AGENCY: Office of Inspector General (OIG), HHS. ACTION: Notice of intent to...

  1. PBDEs in serum and blubber of harbor, grey and harp seal pups from Eastern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouin, Héloïse; Lebeuf, Michel; Hammill, Mike; Sjare, Becky; Fournier, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Serum and blubber of pup harbor (Phoca vitulina), grey (Halichoerus grypus) and harp (Phoca groenlandica) seals from the Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence were analyzed for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Concentrations of ∑PBDEs (on lipid weight basis) in tissues of harbor seal pups inhabiting the St. Lawrence Estuary were about five times higher than in those from a colony located in the northern Gulf. Harp seal pups have the lowest levels of ∑PBDEs among the seal species born in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Lipid normalized concentrations of ∑PBDEs in serum and blubber were strongly correlated, suggesting that the blood collection as a less invasive method could be used to monitor ∑PBDEs in pups. This study shows that fluvial inputs of PBDEs are important to the St. Lawrence marine ecosystem and that inhabiting harbor seal pups have a substantial exposure to PBDEs at a critical developmental stage. In addition, the observed difference in PBDE levels between harp and grey or harbor seal pups from the Gulf of St. Lawrence is explained by the difference in diets of their mothers which is linked with their residency time in the Gulf and their seasonal migration pattern. PMID:21112068

  2. Physiological studies in aerobic batch cultivations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring the MEL1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Simon; Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Ronnow, B.;

    2000-01-01

    Physiological studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring the MEL1 gene were carried out in aerobic batch cultivations on glucose-galactose mixtures and on the disaccharide melibiose, which is hydrolyzed by the enzyme melibiase (Mel1, EC 3.2.1.22) into a glucose and a galactose moiety. ...

  3. Revisiting "Pearl Harbor": Resistance to Reel and Real Events in an English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Ardiss; Norton, Bonny

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we draw on disruptive scenes in a postsecondary classroom to examine a critical incident concerning conflicting readings of the film "Pearl Harbor" (2001). We raise crucial questions for pedagogical work with popular film: Who speaks for whom about the meaning of a given film? Under what conditions do students resist particular…

  4. The Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter Vector of Xylella fastidiosa Harbors a Phytoreovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) vector of Xylella fastidiosa harbors a phytoreovirus species designated as Homalodisca vitripennis reovirus (HoVRV). Double-shelled isometric virus particles purified from GWSS adults resembled those observed in thin sections of GWSS salivary glands by transmis...

  5. 78 FR 57319 - Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Safe Harbor Proposed Self-Regulatory Guidelines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ...; ] FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 312 RIN 3084-AB20 Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Safe... harbor provision of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule. DATES: Written comments must be... On October 20, 1999, the Commission issued its final Rule pursuant to the Children's Online...

  6. Application of heterogeneous multiple camera system with panoramic capabilities in a harbor environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Lensen, H.A.; Broek, S.P. van den; Hollander, R.J.M. den; Mark, W. van der; Bouma, H.; Kemp, R.A.W.

    2009-01-01

    In a harbor environment threats like explosives-packed rubber boats, mine-carrying swimmers and divers must be detected in an early stage. This paper describes the integration and use of a heterogeneous multiple camera system with panoramic observation capabilities for detecting these small vessels

  7. 78 FR 18931 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bass Harbor, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bass Harbor,...

  8. 78 FR 32355 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bass Harbor, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... Bass Harbor, ME (78 FR 18931). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory Evaluation...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p....

  9. Neuroanatomy of the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) from magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Lori; Sudheimer, Keith; Sarko, Diana; Sirpenski, Gayle; Johnson, John I

    2003-09-01

    Cetacean (dolphin, whale, and porpoise) brains are among the least-studied mammalian brains because of the formidability of collecting and histologically preparing such relatively rare and large specimens. Among cetaceans, there exist relatively few studies of the brain of the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a means of observing the internal structure of the brain when traditional histological procedures are not practical. Therefore, MRI has become a critical tool in the study of the brain of cetaceans and other large species. This article represents the first MRI-based anatomically labeled three-dimensional description of the harbor porpoise brain. Coronal plane sections of the brain of a young harbor porpoise were originally acquired and used to produce virtual digital scans in the other two orthogonal spatial planes. A sequential set of images in all three planes has been anatomically labeled and displays the proportions and positions of major neuroanatomical features. These images allow for the visualizing of the distinctive features of the harbor porpoise brain from various orientations by preserving the gross morphological structure of the specimen. PMID:12833372

  10. Novel B19-like parvovirus in the brain of a harbor seal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Bodewes (Rogier); A.R. García (Ana Rubio); L.C.M. Wiersma (Lidewij); S. Getu (Sarah); M. Beukers (Martijn); C.M.E. Schapendonk (Claudia); P.R.W.A. van Run (Peter); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); M.J. Poen (Marjolein); N. Osinga (Nynke); G.J. Sánchez Contreras (Guillermo); T. Kuiken (Thijs); S.L. Smits (Saskia); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractUsing random PCR in combination with next-generation sequencing, a novel parvovirus was detected in the brain of a young harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) with chronic non-suppurative meningo-encephalitis that was rehabilitated at the Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre (SRRC) in the Neth

  11. 76 FR 21862 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Harbor Activities Related to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... the same activities from 2002 to 2010, with the last IHA expiring on September 3, 2010 (74 FR 46742... for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS has received an application from United Launch Alliance (ULA), for an...), Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), and Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) hauled out...

  12. A neurological comparative study of the harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walløe, Solveig; Eriksen, Nina; Dabelsteen, Torben;

    2010-01-01

    The cetacean brain is well studied. However, few comparisons have been done with other marine mammals. In this study, we compared the harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and the harbor porpoise brain (Phocoena phocoena). Stereological methods were applied to compare three areas of interest: the ...

  13. 78 FR 79201 - Medicare and State Health Care Programs: Fraud and Abuse; Electronic Health Records Safe Harbor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... support for a permanent safe harbor because electronic health record technology adoption has been slower... electronic health records technology adoption, and suggested that maintaining the safe harbor through this... costs, often with an adverse impact on ] technology adoption and innovation. Still others asserted...

  14. 75 FR 55975 - Safety Zone; San Diego Harbor Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego Harbor Shark Fest Swim; San Diego... Shark Fest Swim, consisting of 600 swimmers swimming a predetermined course. The sponsor will provide 26...; San Diego Harbor Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA. (a) Location. The following area is...

  15. 77 FR 67563 - Regulated Navigation Area-New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac River, Mill River, New Haven, CT; Pearl...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... Harbor Memorial Bridge (Interstate 95) Construction, in the Federal Register (77 FR 47331). One comment... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area--New Haven Harbor,...

  16. 75 FR 35294 - Safety Zone; Marquette 4th of July Fireworks, Marquette Harbor, Lake Superior, Marquette, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... Harbor, Lake Superior, Marquette, MI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on Marquette Harbor, Lake Superior, Marquette, MI...: If you have questions on this temporary rule, call or e-mail BMC Gregory Ford, Marine...

  17. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico 165.776 Section 165.776 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico (a... zone described in paragraph (a) of this section unless authorized by the Captain of the Port San...

  18. 76 FR 45602 - Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for California Red-Legged Frog, at Swallow Creek Ranch, San Luis...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... Service's Safe Harbor Policy published in the Federal Register on June 17, 1999 (64 FR 32717), the Service... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for California Red-Legged Frog, at Swallow... the Federally threatened California red-legged frog (Rana draytonii), under the Endangered Species...

  19. Summary of oceanographic and water–quality measurements in West Falmouth Harbor and Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, 2009–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, Neil K.; Dickhudt, Patrick J.; Thomas, Jennifer A.; Borden, Jonathan; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Montgomery, Ellyn T.; Twomey, Erin R.; Martini, Marinna A.

    2011-01-01

    This data report presents oceanographic and water-quality observations made at six locations in West Falmouth Harbor and Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, from August 2009 to September 2010. Both Buzzards Bay and West Falmouth Harbor are estuarine embayments; the input of freshwater on the eastern margin of Buzzards Bay adjacent to Cape Cod and West Falmouth Harbor is largely due to groundwater. In West Falmouth Harbor, the groundwater that seeps into the harbor is characterized by relatively high levels of nitrate. This high nitrate load has modified the ecology of the harbor (Howes and others, 2006) and may be a significant source of nitrate to Buzzards Bay during seasons with low biological nitrate uptake. The U.S. Geological Survey undertook these measurements to improve understanding of circulation, residence time, and water quality in the harbor and bay. We set up and monitored multiple sites in both Buzzards Bay and West Falmouth Harbor, measuring depth, water velocity,salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll-a, and nitrate concentration. In this report we present the processed time-series data at these locations and provide access to the data and metadata. The results will be used to understand circulation mechanisms and verify numerical models of hydrodynamics and biogeochemistry.

  20. Current and historic mercury deposition to New Haven Harbor (CT, USA): Implications for industrial coastal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study quantifies historic and current mercury contamination in New Haven Harbor (New Haven, Connecticut, USA) through the analysis of sediment cores. The mercury concentration measured in surface sediment ranged from 320 to 1640 μg kg-1 with an average of 530 μg kg-1. The harbor is relatively small in area (6.6 km2) but displays a large range in concentrations, illustrating the important methodological issue that a large number of samples may be necessary to capture the variability in even a small area. Depth profiles of mercury reflect sedimentation over a range of 20 to 200 years and indicate a complex history of contamination. Mercury depth profiles were compared with lead, copper, cadmium, and silver concentrations and the metals generally covary. This trend indicates that the sources of mercury and heavy metals are linked and that regionally specific sources dominate the historic input of metals rather than large-scale atmospheric deposition patterns. Results also show there are large differences in absolute concentrations of metals among sites in the harbor. Differences in the abundance of Fe-rich, fine-grained sediment likely control the level of metals in various parts of the harbor. Proximity to current sources and the long, diverse industrial history of the harbor also influence the distribution pattern. All of the cores can be modeled as mixing between pre-industrial sediments and either one or two pollution endmembers. This study demonstrates the importance of riverine sources in the mass balance of mercury delivered to coastal areas and of watershed management to preserve coastal ecosystems.

  1. Phaeobacter inhibens from the Roseobacter clade has an environmental niche as a surface colonizer in harbors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram, Lone; Rasmussen, Bastian Barker; Wemheuer, Bernd; Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Porsby, Cisse H; Breider, Sven; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    Phaeobacter inhibens belongs to the marine Roseobacter clade and is important as a carbon and sulfur metabolizer, a biofilm former and producer of the antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA). The majority of cultured strains have been isolated from marine aquaculture sites, however, their niche in the environment is to date unknown. Here, we report on the repeated isolation of Phaeobacter inhibens strains from a marine environment (harbors) not related to aquaculture. Based on phenotype and 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, a total of 64 P. inhibens strains were identified from 35 samples (eukaryotic organisms or biofilms on inert surfaces) in Jyllinge Harbor during late summer and autumn, but not during winter and spring in 2009, 2011, and 2012. P. inhibens strains were also isolated from biofilms at three other Danish harbors (in 2012), but not from the surrounding seawater. Ten of the 14 samples from which P. inhibens was cultured contained bryozoans. DNA was extracted (in 2012) from 55 out of 74 Jyllinge Harbor samples, and 35 were positive for Phaeobacter using a genus-specific PCR. P. inhibens strains were isolated from nine of these samples. DNA and RNA were isolated from 13 random samples and used for amplification of 16S rRNA. P. inhibens was detected in five of these samples, all of which were biofilm samples, by pyrotag-sequencing at a prevalence of 0.02-0.68% of the prokaryotic community. The results indicated that P. inhibens had a niche in biofilms of fouled surfaces in harbor areas and that the population followed a seasonal fluctuation. PMID:26343311

  2. An Immunocompromised Child with Bloodstream Infection Caused by Two Escherichia coli Strains, One Harboring NDM-5 and the Other Harboring OXA-48-Like Carbapenemase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasassri, M Earth; Boyce, Thomas G; Norgan, Andrew; Cunningham, Scott A; Jeraldo, Patricio R; Weissman, Scott; Patel, Robin; Banerjee, Ritu; Pogue, Jason M; Kaye, Keith S

    2016-06-01

    We describe a 16-year-old neutropenic patient from the Middle East with bloodstream infection caused by two carbapenemase-producing Escherichia coli isolates that we characterized by whole-genome sequencing. While one displayed meropenem resistance and was blaNDM positive, the other demonstrated meropenem susceptibility yet harbored blaOXA181 (which encodes a blaOXA48-like enzyme). This report highlights the challenge of laboratory detection of blaOXA48-like enzymes and the clinical implications of genotypic resistance detection in carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27217442

  3. 1 meter resolution GeoTIFF image of the sidescan sonar backscatter imagery of Boston Harbor and Approaches (BH_1MBS.TIF, UTM 19, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are high-resolution acoustic backscatter measurements of the seafloor from Boston Harbor and the harbor approaches, Massachusetts. Approximately 170 km...

  4. ArcInfo Grid of the 30 meter pixel Composite Bathymetry of Boston Harbor and Approaches (BH_30MBATH, UTM 19, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are high-resolution bathymetric measurements of the seafloor from Boston Harbor and the harbor approaches, Massachusetts. Approximately 170 km square of...

  5. Nonindigenous Marine Species Introductions in the harbors of the South and West Shores of Oahu, Hawaii 1997-1998 (NODC Accession 0000324)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Despite the potential importance of Honolulu Harbor or other commercial harbors on Oahu as potential gateways for nonindigenous marine species to enter the Hawaiian...

  6. The genome of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 harbors atypical genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mathias; Koriabine, Maxim; Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; de Jong, Pieter J; Lewis, Teresa D; Schetle, Nelli; Work, Thierry M; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H; Leong, Jo-Ann C

    2012-01-01

    The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical for the varicellovirus genus within the alphaherpesvirinae. However, at least four genes that are atypical for an alphaherpesvirus genome were also detected, i.e. two members of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily (F-lec1, F-lec2), an orthologue to the mouse cytomegalovirus M04 (F-M04) and a viral sialyltransferase (F-sial). Four lines of evidence suggest that these atypical genes are truly part of the ChHV5 genome: (1) the pTARBAC insertion interrupted the UL52 ORF, leaving parts of the gene to either side of the insertion and suggesting that an intact molecule had been cloned. (2) Using FP-associated UL52 (F-UL52) as an anchor and the BAC-derived sequences as a means to generate primers, overlapping PCR was performed with tumor-derived DNA as template, which confirmed the presence of the same stretch of "atypical" DNA in independent FP cases. (3) Pyrosequencing of DNA from independent tumors did not reveal previously undetected viral sequences, suggesting that no apparent loss of viral sequence had happened due to the cloning strategy. (4) The simultaneous presence of previously known ChHV5 sequences and F-sial as well as F-M04 sequences was also confirmed in geographically distinct Australian cases of FP. Finally, transcripts of F-sial and F-M04 but not transcripts of lytic viral genes were detected in tumors from Hawaiian FP-cases. Therefore, we suggest that F-sial and F-M04 may play a role in FP pathogenesis. PMID:23056373

  7. The genome of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 harbors atypical genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mathias; Koriabine, Maxim; Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lewis, Teresa D.; Schetle, Nelli; Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical for the varicellovirus genus within the alphaherpesvirinae. However, at least four genes that are atypical for an alphaherpesvirus genome were also detected, i.e. two members of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily (F-lec1, F-lec2), an orthologue to the mouse cytomegalovirus M04 (F-M04) and a viral sialyltransferase (F-sial). Four lines of evidence suggest that these atypical genes are truly part of the ChHV5 genome: (1) the pTARBAC insertion interrupted the UL52 ORF, leaving parts of the gene to either side of the insertion and suggesting that an intact molecule had been cloned. (2) Using FP-associated UL52 (F-UL52) as an anchor and the BAC-derived sequences as a means to generate primers, overlapping PCR was performed with tumor-derived DNA as template, which confirmed the presence of the same stretch of "atypical" DNA in independent FP cases. (3) Pyrosequencing of DNA from independent tumors did not reveal previously undetected viral sequences, suggesting that no apparent loss of viral sequence had happened due to the cloning strategy. (4) The simultaneous presence of previously known ChHV5 sequences and F-sial as well as F-M04 sequences was also confirmed in geographically distinct Australian cases of FP. Finally, transcripts of F-sial and F-M04 but not transcripts of lytic viral genes were detected in tumors from Hawaiian FP-cases. Therefore, we suggest that F-sial and F-M04 may play a role in FP pathogenesis.

  8. The genome of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 harbors atypical genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mathias; Koriabine, Maxim; Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lewis, Teresa D.; Schetle, Nelli; Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical for the varicellovirus genus within thealphaherpesvirinae. However, at least four genes that are atypical for an alphaherpesvirus genome were also detected, i.e. two members of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily (F-lec1, F-lec2), an orthologue to the mouse cytomegalovirus M04 (F-M04) and a viral sialyltransferase (F-sial). Four lines of evidence suggest that these atypical genes are truly part of the ChHV5 genome: (1) the pTARBAC insertion interrupted the UL52 ORF, leaving parts of the gene to either side of the insertion and suggesting that an intact molecule had been cloned. (2) Using FP-associated UL52 (F-UL52) as an anchor and the BAC-derived sequences as a means to generate primers, overlapping PCR was performed with tumor-derived DNA as template, which confirmed the presence of the same stretch of “atypical” DNA in independent FP cases. (3) Pyrosequencing of DNA from independent tumors did not reveal previously undetected viral sequences, suggesting that no apparent loss of viral sequence had happened due to the cloning strategy. (4) The simultaneous presence of previously known ChHV5 sequences and F-sial as well as F-M04 sequences was also confirmed in geographically distinct Australian cases of FP. Finally, transcripts of F-sial and F-M04 but not transcripts of lytic viral genes were detected in tumors from Hawaiian FP-cases. Therefore, we suggest that F-sial and F-M04 may play a role in FP pathogenesis

  9. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  10. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in Cyanobacterial cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2016-04-19

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  11. Quarantine of Aeromonas salmonicida-harboring ebonyshell mussels (Fusconaia ebena) prevents transmission of the pathogen to brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starliper, C.E.

    2005-01-01

    Furunculosis, caused by the bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida, was artificially induced in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in an experimental tank. Ebonyshells (Fusconaia ebena) were placed to cohabit with these fish to acquire the pathogen through siphoning. After 2 wk of cohabitation, 10 of the mussels were assayed by bacterial culture and all were found to harbor A. salmonicida. The mean cell count from soft tissue homogenates was 1.84 ?? 105 cfu/g, which comprised an average 14.41% of the total bacteria isolated from tissues. From the fluids, a mean of 2.84 ?? 105 A. salmonicida cfu/mL was isolated, which comprised an average of 17.29% of the total bacterial flora. The mussels were removed from the cohabitation tank and distributed equally among five previously disinfected tanks, 35 per tank. The F. ebena in each tank were allowed to depurate A. salmonicida for various durations: 1, 5, 10, 15 or 30 days. After each group had depurated for their assigned time, 10 were assayed for bacteria, tank water was tested, and 20 pathogen-free bioindicator brook trout were added to cohabit with the remaining mussels. Depuration was considered successful if A. salmonicida was not isolated from tank water or the mussels, and there was no infection or mortality to bioindicator fish. After 1 day of depuration, A. salmonicida was not isolated from the soft tissues; however, it was isolated from one of the paired fluids (10% prevalence). The tank water tested positive, and the bioindicator fish became infected and died. From the 5-day depuration group, A. salmonicida was not isolated from soft tissues, but was isolated from three fluids (30%; mean = 1.56 ?? 102 cfu/mL). Tank water from the 5-day group was negative, and there was no mortality among the bioindicator fish. However, A. salmonicida was isolated from 2 of 20 fish at the end of the 14-day observation period. One F. ebena fluid sample was positive for A. salmonicida from the 10-day depuration group, but none of the

  12. 75 FR 25310 - Port Harbor Railroad, Inc.-Lease and Operation Exemption-Line of Tri-City Regional Port District

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Surface Transportation Board Port Harbor Railroad, Inc.--Lease and Operation Exemption--Line of Tri-City Regional Port District Port Harbor Railroad, Inc. (Port Harbor), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to lease from Tri- City Regional Port District (Tri-City), and...

  13. Biosonar, dive, and foraging activity of satellite tracked harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnenschmidt, Meike; Teilmann, Jonas; Akamatsu, Tomonari;

    2013-01-01

    This study presents bioacoustic recordings in combination with movements and diving behavior of three free-ranging harbor porpoises (a female and two males) in Danish waters. Each porpoise was equipped with an acoustic data logger (A-tag), a time-depth-recorder, a VHF radio transmitter, and a...... satellite transmitter. The units were programmed to release after 24 or 72 h. Possible foraging occurred mostly near the surface or at the bottom of a dive. The porpoises showed individual diversity in biosonar activity (<100 to >50,000 clicks per hour) and in dive frequency (6–179 dives per hour). We...... confirm that wild harbor porpoises use more intense clicks than captive animals. A positive tendency between number of dives and clicks per hour was found for a subadult male, which stayed near shore. It showed a distinct day-night cycle with low echolocation rates during the day, but five times higher...

  14. Vortex-induced vibration of a harbor-vibrissa-shaped cylinder: Experimental measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingzheng; Wang, Shaofei

    2015-11-01

    Influence of the unique surface variation of the harbor seal vibrissa on its vortex-induced vibration was extensively investigated in a low-speed wind tunnel. Toward this end, a scaled-up model of the harbor-vibrissa-shaped cylinder was employed for measurement, while a circular cylinder sharing the same hydraulic diameter, mass ratio and nature frequency was used as baseline case. Two configurations with and without the approaching Karman-vortex street were respectively tested for both cylinders at various free stream flow speeds. Here, the Karman-vortex street was generated by placing a circular cylinder far up stream. A laser displacement sensor having a high time-spatial resolution was used to capture the cross-stream displacement of the cylinders. The fluctuating pressure distribution on the surface and the wake flow pattern were captured by microphone array and the planar Particle Image Velocimetry, respectively. National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant nos. 51176108, and 11372189).

  15. Harbor seal whiskers synchronize with upstream wake over a range of distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem, Heather; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Harbor seal whiskers have been shown to exhibit unique vibration properties as they encounter vortex wakes. Seals may use this information to detect hydrodynamic trails left by fish prey. A scaled model, which captures the undulatory morphology of the harbor seal whisker and is designed to freely vibrate, is tested here to explore these properties in more detail. This model is towed downstream of a larger cylinder, which generates a vortex wake. Effects of downstream distance, lateral distance, and diameter ratio between the two objects are explored. Frequency measurements are collected simultaneously through use of a pressure sensor placed in the wake. Cross-correlation of the whisker motion and cylinder wake pressure provides evidence that frequency synchronization holds for a range of separation distances and wake generator sizes.

  16. Concurrent occipital bone malformation and atlantoaxial subluxation in a neonatal harbor seal (Phoca vitulina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Sophie E; Forrest, Lisa J; Fleetwood, Michelle L; Gulland, Frances M D

    2009-06-01

    A stranded male harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) neonate with progressive clinical signs of ataxia, tremors, and deteriorating consciousness was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging for suspected cerebellar brain disease prior to euthanasia because of grave prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging identified occipital bone dysplasia with cerebellar herniation and concurrent atlantoaxial subluxation with spinal cord compression. These imaging findings elucidated the cause of histopathology changes including gliosis of the cerebellum and axonal degeneration and dilation of myelin sheaths of the dorsal funiculus of the spinal cord. Occipital bone dysplasia and/ or atlantoaxial subluxation should be considered as differentials for abnormal neurologic signs in harbor seal neonates. Magnetic resonance imaging is a valuable modality for antemortem diagnosis. PMID:19569493

  17. Application of Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures for the characterization and management of dredged harbor sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, N; Belzunce-Segarra, M J; Gonzalez, J-L; Menchaca, I; Garmendia, J M; Etxebarria, N; Nieto, O; Franco, J

    2013-06-15

    This study refers to the performance of Phase I Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures to identify the contaminants (i.e. organic compounds, metals and ammonia) exerting toxicity in marine sediments from the Pasaia harbor (Oiartzun estuary, northern Spain). The effectiveness of the manipulations to reduce toxicity was proved with the marine amphipod survival test (whole-sediment) and the sea urchin embryo-larval assay (elutriates). By means of TIEs it was concluded that organic compounds were the major contaminants exerting toxicity, although toxic effects by metals was also demonstrated. Additionally, the combination of Phase I treatments allowed to investigate the toxicity changes associated to the mobility of contaminants during dredging activities. Therefore, the performance of TIE procedures as another line of evidence in the decision-making process is recommended. They show a great potential to be implemented at different steps of the characterization and management of dredged harbor sediments. PMID:23465571

  18. Dissemination of IncI2 Plasmids That Harbor the blaCTX-M Element among Clinical Salmonella Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Marcus Ho-Yin; Liu, Lizhang; Yan, Meiying; Chan, Edward Wai-Chi; Chen, Sheng

    2015-08-01

    The extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL) determinant CTX-M-55 is increasingly prevalent in Escherichia coli but remains extremely rare in Salmonella. This study reports the isolation of a plasmid harboring the blaCTX-M-55 element in a clinical Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium strain resistant to multiple antibiotics. This plasmid is genetically identical to several known IncI2-type elements harbored by E. coli strains recovered from animals. This finding indicates that IncI2 plasmids harboring the blaCTX-M genes may undergo cross-species migration among potential bacterial pathogens, with E. coli as the major source of such elements. PMID:26014934

  19. Cadmium- and mercury-resistant Bacillus strains from a salt marsh and from Boston Harbor.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahler, I; Levinson, H. S.; Wang, Y.; Halvorson, H O

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria resistant to cadmium or mercury or both were isolated from the Great Sippewissett Marsh (Cape Cod, Mass.) and from Boston Harbor. Many of these metal-resistant isolates were gram-positive aerobic sporeformers, although not necessarily isolated as spores. Although several of the isolated strains bore plasmids, cadmium and mercury resistances appeared to be, for the most part, chromosomally encoded. DNA sequence homology of the gram-positive cadmium- and mercury-resistant isolates was ...

  20. Mutations in SRCAP, Encoding SNF2-Related CREBBP Activator Protein, Cause Floating-Harbor Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hood, Rebecca L.; Lines, Matthew A.; Nikkel, Sarah M.; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Beaulieu, Chandree; Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J.M.; Allanson, Judith; Kim, Chong Ae; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Moilanen, Jukka S.; Lacombe, Didier; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Whiteford, Margo L.; Quaio, Caio Robledo D.C.; Gomy, Israel

    2012-01-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition characterized by short stature, delayed osseous maturation, expressive-language deficits, and a distinctive facial appearance. Occurrence is generally sporadic, although parent-to-child transmission has been reported on occasion. Employing whole-exome sequencing, we identified heterozygous truncating mutations in SRCAP in five unrelated individuals with sporadic FHS. Sanger sequencing identified mutations in SRCAP in eight more affected perso...

  1. Calculating background levels for ecological risk parameters in toxic harbor sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadon, C.J.; McDonnell, T.R.; Lear, J.; Barclift, D.

    2007-01-01

    Establishing background levels for biological parameters is necessary in assessing the ecological risks from harbor sediment contaminated with toxic chemicals. For chemicals in sediment, the term contaminated is defined as having concentrations above background and significant human health or ecological risk levels. For biological parameters, a site could be considered contaminated if levels of the parameter are either more or less than the background level, depending on the specific parameter. Biological parameters can include tissue chemical concentrations in ecological receptors, bioassay responses, bioaccumulation levels, and benthic community metrics. Chemical parameters can include sediment concentrations of a variety of potentially toxic chemicals. Indirectly, contaminated harbor sediment can impact shellfish, fish, birds, and marine mammals, and human populations. This paper summarizes the methods used to define background levels for chemical and biological parameters from a survey of ecological risk investigations of marine harbor sediment at California Navy bases. Background levels for regional biological indices used to quantify ecological risks for benthic communities are also described. Generally, background stations are positioned in relatively clean areas exhibiting the same physical and general chemical characteristics as nearby areas with contaminated harbor sediment. The number of background stations and the number of sample replicates per background station depend on the statistical design of the sediment ecological risk investigation, developed through the data quality objective (DQO) process. Biological data from the background stations can be compared to data from a contaminated site by using minimum or maximum background levels or comparative statistics. In Navy ecological risk assessments (ERA's), calculated background levels and appropriate ecological risk screening criteria are used to identify sampling stations and sites with contaminated

  2. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume XLVII, Part 1. Structures of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings for the 47th Annual Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology are presented. This symposium focused on the Structure of DNA. Topics presented covered research in the handedness of DNA, conformational analysis, chemically modified DNA, chemical synthesis of DNA, DNA-protein interactions, DNA within nucleosomes, DNA methylation, DNA replication, gyrases and topoisomerases, recombining and mutating DNA, transcription of DNA and its regulation, the organization of genes along DNA, repetitive DNA and pseudogenes, and origins of replication, centromeres, and teleomeres

  3. Fate of PCB congeners in an Industrial Harbor of Lake Michigan

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Andres; Wang, Kai; Hornbuckle, Keri C.

    2010-01-01

    We have quantified the release of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal (IHSC) to Lake Michigan and the atmosphere. Navigational dredging is planned for this system and there is concern that dredging will result in releases of PCBs. We have measured >158 PCBs in surficial sediment, water, suspended particles, and air. We predicted the release of PCBs from sediments to water and from water to air. To quantify the level of confidence in our calculations, we used a ...

  4. Potential for Polychlorinated Biphenyl Biodegradation in Sediments from Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Yi; Martinez, Andres; Hornbuckle, Keri C.; Mattes, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are carcinogenic, persistent, and bioaccumulative contaminants that pose risks to human and environmental health. In this study, we evaluated the PCB biodegradation of sediments from Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal (IHSC), a PCB-contaminated site (average PCB concentration = 12,570 ng/g d.w.). PCB congener profiles and bacterial community structure in a core sediment sample (4.57 m long) were characterized. Analysis of vertical PCB congener profile patterns in s...

  5. Polychlorinated biphenyls in the surficial sediment of Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal, Lake Michigan

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Andres; Norström, Karin; Wang, Kai; Hornbuckle, Keri C.

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of the first intensive survey of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the surficial sediment of the Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal (IHSC) in East Chicago, Indiana, a part of the Calumet River tributary of Lake Michigan that will be dredged to maintain depth for ship traffic. The tributary has previously been reported to be a large source of PCBs to Lake Michigan. PCB congeners were measured using tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode, a method that ...

  6. Surveillance for zoonotic and selected pathogens in harbor seals Phoca vitulina from central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Denise J; Gulland, Frances M D; Smith, Woutrina A; Conrad, Patricia A; Field, Cara L; Fleetwood, Michelle; Harvey, James T; Ip, Hon S; Jang, Spencer; Packham, Andrea; Wheeler, Elizabeth; Hall, Ailsa J

    2014-09-30

    The infection status of harbor seals Phoca vitulina in central California, USA, was evaluated through broad surveillance for pathogens in stranded and wild-caught animals from 2001 to 2008, with most samples collected in 2007 and 2008. Stranded animals from Mendocino County to San Luis Obispo County were sampled at a rehabilitation facility: The Marine Mammal Center (TMMC, n = 175); wild-caught animals were sampled at 2 locations: San Francisco Bay (SF, n = 78) and Tomales Bay (TB, n = 97), that differed in degree of urbanization. Low prevalences of Salmonella, Campylobacter, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium were detected in the feces of stranded and wild-caught seals. Clostridium perfringens and Escherichia coli were more prevalent in the feces of stranded (58% [78 out of 135] and 76% [102 out of 135]) than wild-caught (42% [45 out of 106] and 66% [68 out of 106]) seals, whereas Vibrio spp. were 16 times more likely to be cultured from the feces of seals from SF than TB or TMMC (p neurona, and type A influenza was only detected in the wild-caught harbor seals (post-weaning age classes), whereas antibody titers to Leptospira spp. were detected in stranded and wild-caught seals. No stranded (n = 109) or wild-caught (n = 217) harbor seals had antibodies to phocine distemper virus, although a single low titer to canine distemper virus was detected. These results highlight the role of harbor seals as sentinel species for zoonotic and terrestrial pathogens in the marine environment. PMID:25266897

  7. Tier 1 ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shreffler, D.K.; Thorn, R.M.; Walls, B.E.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99--662) authorized the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) -- San Francisco District, to accommodate larger, deeper draft vessels in Oakland inner and Outer Harbors by deepening and widening the existing navigation channel, and providing turning basins and maneuvering areas in Oakland inner Harbor. The suitability of the resulting dredged material for disposal into ocean waters was subject to the procedures of the 1991 Testing Manual, Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal, known as the ``Green Book``. The Green Book provides a tiered approach for testing the suitability of dredged materials through chemical, physical, and biological evaluations. The first level of investigation, or Tier 1 evaluation, is used to determine whether a decision on LPC compliance can be made on the basis of readily available information. The Tier 1 report primarily summarizes existing information on sediment contamination and toxicity potential, identifies contaminants of concern, and determines the need for further testing. To assist the USACE in determining the suitability of dredged material from Oakland inner and Outer Harbors for ocean disposal, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory prepared this Tier 1 report based upon information and data provided by USACE. Because this Tier 1 report originated well after an LPC determination was made to require testing of project sediments in Tier 3, the primary purpose of this report was to identify contaminants of concern (if any) in that particular dredged material. In addition, this Tier 1 report summarizes available information on chemical, physical, and biological characterization of the sediments in Oakland inner and Outer Harbors.

  8. Crosstalk and antibacterial molecules from endophytes harbored in Narcissus tazetta and Buxus sinica

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wen-Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Endophytic fungi and bacteria are microorganisms harbored in the plant tissues without causing any disease. They are proven to be a rich source of new anticancer and antimicrobial compounds as well as clinically valuable agents identified from plant materials. However, recent research encounters enormous difficulties, which reveals that endophytic systems are complex ecological communities maintained by inter-species and inter-kingdom interactions, including chemical crosstalk. Consequently, ...

  9. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients harboring T315I BCR-ABL mutated leukemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck Emmanuel; Basak, Grzegorz W; Soverini, Simona;

    2011-01-01

    , still alive]) for those with chronic myeloid leukemia in the blast phase and 7.4 months (range 1.4 months to not reached [ie, still alive]) for those with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia but has not yet been reached for those in the chronic and accelerated phases of chronic...

  10. Functional Insights into Sponge Microbiology by Single Cell Genomics

    KAUST Repository

    Hentschel, Ute

    2011-04-09

    Marine Sponges (Porifera) are known to harbor enormous amounts of microorganisms with members belonging to at least 30 different bacterial phyla including several candidate phyla and both archaeal lineages. Here, we applied single cell genomics to the mic

  11. Alaska harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) contaminants: A review with annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papa, R.S.; Becker, P.R.

    1998-10-01

    The numbers of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) have declined steadily and substantially over the last two decades in the Central and Western Gulf of Alaska, including Prince William Sound. Although the reasons for this decline have not been identified, hypotheses have included fishery interactions, changes in availability of food resources, human harvests, disease, increase in predation, increase in disturbance, and pollution. Although the presence of contaminants has been suggested as one possible causative factor in the decline of both the harbor seal and Steller sea lion, very little information is readily available on contaminant concentrations in these animals. As an initial step in the development of a database that can be used to define the types of studies needed to address the possible role of anthropogenic contaminants in the decline of this species, existing data and information on levels of contaminants in the harbor seals of Alaska, the contiguous U.S., and other areas of the world were reviewed. This report provides references and current scientific literature, as well as gray literature and unpublished databases. This report is divided into three sections: (1) a synthesis of information based on the review, (2) tables that summarize the published data, and (3) an annotated bibliography.

  12. Environmental evaluations for deepening of Richmond Harbor and Santa Fe Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B.; Kohn, N.P.; Crecelius, E.A.; Ward, J.A.; Bjornstad, B.N. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Richland, California is an important commercial port in San Francisco Bay. The San Francisco District of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) plans to increase the depth of Richmond Harbor and Santa Fe Channels to -38 feet Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW) to accommodate deep-draft commercial vessels. The total volume of dredged material is expected to be approximately 1.4 million cubic yards. The options for disposal of the dredged material are aquatic disposal and upland disposal. The purpose of this study was to develop a database on chemical compounds in the dredged material to assist with determination of disposal methods and the need for additional testing. This purpose was accomplished through an extensive field sampling program followed by chemical analysis of samples. Field sampling involved collection of core samples from Sante Fe and Richmond Harbor Channels. Cores were shipped to Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory, where they were subsampled for chemical analysis and/or archived by freezing. All sediment and water samples were analyzed for priority pollutants, including metals, organotins, base/neutral semivolatile organic compounds, chlorinated pesticides and PCBs, herbicide acids, and acidic phenols. Sediment samples were also analyzed for oil and grease and total organic carbon. Organophosphorus pesticides and dioxins and furans were measured in selected sediment samples from Richland Harbor Channel and from both sediment and water samples from Santa Fe Channel. 21 refs., 10 figs., 60 tabs.

  13. Effect of Development of Caofeidian Harbor Area in Bohai Bay on Hydrodynamic Sediment Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yong-jun; ZUO Li-qin; JI Rong-yao; XU Xiao; HUANG Jian-wei

    2008-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of waves, tidal currents, sediment and seabed evolution in the Caofeidian sea area in the Bohai Bay, a 2D sediment mathematical model of waves and tidal currents is employed to study the development schemes of the harbor. Verification of spring and neap tidal currents and sediment in the winter and summer of 2006 shows that the calculated values of tidal stages as well as flow velocities, flow directions and sediment concentration of 15 synchronous vertical lines are in good agreement with the measured data. Also, deposition and erosion of the sea area in front of Caofeidian ore terminal induced by suspended load under tidal currents and waves are verified; it shows that the calculated values of depth of deposition and erosion as well as their distribution are close to the measured data. Furthermore, effects of reclamation scheme of island in front of the land behind Caofeidian harbor on the hydrodynamic environment are studied, including changes of flow velocities in the deep channels at the south side of Caofeidian foreland and Laolonggou and in various harbor basins, as well as changes of deposition and erosion of seabed induced by the project.

  14. Using marine bioassays to classify the toxicity of Dutch harbor sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronkhorst, Joost; Schipper, Cor; Brils, Jos; Dubbeldam, Marco; Postma, Jaap; van de Hoeven, Nelly

    2003-07-01

    A procedure was developed to assess contaminated marine sediments from Dutch harbors for possible adverse biological effects using three laboratory bioassays: A 10-d survival test with the amphipod Corophium volutator, a 14-d survival test with the heart urchin Echinocardium cordatum (adults), and the bioluminescence inhibition test with the bacterium Vibrio fischeri (Microtox solid phase test LSP]). Microtox results were mathematically corrected for the modifying influence of fine sediment particles. After a validation procedure on test performance and modifying factors, respectively, 81%, 99%, and 90% of the amphipod, heart urchin, and Microtox results were approved. Lower and upper threshold limits for biological effects were set at respectively 24 and 30% mortality for C. volutator, 27 and 35% mortality for E. cordatum, and 24 and 48 toxic units for the Microtox SP based on significant differences with control sediment and the performance of reference sediments. The bioassays clearly distinguished harbor sediments that give rise to acute effects and those that do not. Threshold limits for the amphipods, heart urchins, and bacteria were exceeded in, respectively, 9 to 17%, 33 to 40%, and 23 to 50% of the sediment samples. Highest effects were observed in sediments from the northerly harbors; there was significantly less response in sediments from the Delta Region and the port of Rotterdam (The Netherlands). The procedure outlined in this paper can be used for routine screening of contaminated dredged material that is proposed for open water disposal. PMID:12836979

  15. Determining the experimental leachability of copper, lead, and zinc in a harbor sediment and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatain, Vincent; Blanc, Denise; Borschneck, Daniel; Delolme, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    The potential leaching of pollutants present in harbor sediments has to be evaluated in order to choose the best practices for managing them. Little is known about the speciation and mobility of heavy metals in these specific solid materials. The objective of this paper is to determine and model the leachability of copper, lead, and zinc present in harbor sediments in order to obtain essential new data. The mobility of inorganic contaminants in a polluted harbor sediment collected in France was investigated as a function of physicochemical conditions. The investigation relied mainly on the use of leaching tests performed in combination with mineralogical analysis and thermodynamic modeling using PHREEQC. The modeling phase was dedicated to both confirm the hypothesis formulated to explain the experimental results and improve the determination of the main physico-chemical parameters governing mobility. The experimental results and modeling showed that the release of copper, lead, and zinc is very low with deionized water which is due to the stability of the associated solid phases (organic matter, carbonate minerals, and/or iron sulfides) at natural slightly basic conditions. However, increased mobilization is observed under pH values below 6.0 and above 10.0. This methodology helped to consistently obtain the geochemical parameters governing the mobility of the contaminants studied. PMID:23086130

  16. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean Disposal from Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Borde, A.B.; Nieukirk, S.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of the Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Shoal harbor/Compton Creek Project Area in Belford and Monmouth, New Jersey to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. This was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project area consisted of bulk chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic and water-column acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation studies. Eleven core samples were analyzed or grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. Other sediments were evaluated for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

  17. Organochlorines in harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) tissues from the northern Gulf of Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, heptachlor and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) were analyzed in the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) tissues collected from the Gulf of Alaska during 2000-2001. ΣPCBs (16-728 ng/g lw) and ΣDDTs (14-368 ng/g lw) were the predominant pollutants followed by ΣHCHs (0.56-93 ng/g lw) and heptachlor (≤0.068-6.0 ng/g lw). Concentrations of the above organochlorines (OCs) in the liver, kidney and blubber tissues correlated with ages, sex, body weight and blubber thickness of the harbor seals. The OC concentrations were similar between the samples collected from two different regions - Prince William Sound, and Kodiak Island and Southern Alaska Peninsula. Mean levels of OCs in nursing female adults were much lower than those in male adults, which indicate that lactation transfer OCs from mother seals to newborns. - Σ28 PCB congeners, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDT, α-, β-, γ-, and δ-HCH and heptachlor in harbor seal tissues from the northern Gulf of Alaska are reported

  18. Medicare and state health care programs: fraud and abuse; clarification of the initial OIG safe harbor provisions and establishment of additional safe harbor provisions under the anti-kickback statute. Office of Inspector General (OIG), HHS. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-19

    This final rule serves both to add new safe harbor provisions under the Federal and State health care programs' anti-kickback statute, as authorized under section 14 of Public Law 100-93, the Medicare and Medicaid Patient and Program Protection Act of 1987, and to clarify various aspects of the original safe harbor provisions now codified in 42 CFR part 1001 (originally proposed in RIN 0991-AA74). Specifically, this final rule modifies the original set of final safe harbor provisions codified in 42 CFR 1001.952 to give greater clarity to that rulemaking's original intent. In addition, this final rule sets forth an expanded set of safe harbor provisions designed to protect additional payment and business practices from criminal prosecution or civil sanctions under the anti-kickback provisions of the statute. PMID:11010662

  19. Sediment profile image data from October 1994 in Lower Bay of New York/New Jersey Harbor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sediment profile images (SPI) of the sediment-water interface were collected using a sediment profiling camera at pre-determined locations in the harbor. Physical,...

  20. Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Island NWR and Huron Islands NWR: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Seney NWR, Huron Island NWR, and Harbor Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins...

  1. Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Islands National Wildlife Refuge, Huron Islands National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Seney NWR, Huron Islands and Harbor Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1988 calendar year. The report begins...

  2. Investigations of introduced species in Pearl Harbor; Oahu, Hawaii, from 11 January 1996 to 18 September 1996 (NODC Accession 0000330)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine and estuarine invertebrate and fish communities in Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii were surveyed between January and October, 1996. Samples were taken and...

  3. Puget Sound porpoise population - Estimates of harbor porpoise population size in the main basin of Puget Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Estimates of harbor porpoise population size in the main basin of Puget Sound. This abundance will be derived from established methodology for marine mammal...

  4. Sediment grab data from June 1995 in the inland bays of New York/New Jersey Harbor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sediment grab samples were collected using a Shipek grab at pre-determined locations in the harbor. Grain size distributions and organic content were measured and...

  5. Sediment profile image data from October 1995 in the inland bays of New York/New Jersey Harbor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sediment profile images (SPI) of the sediment-water interface were collected using a sediment profiling camera at pre-determined locations in the harbor. Physical,...

  6. Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Islands National Wildlife Refuge, Huron Islands National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Seney NWR, Huron Island NWR, and Harbor Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year. The report begins...

  7. Environmental assessment of proposed dredging and disposal activities at the St. George small boat harbor, reconnaissance stage: Planning aid report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Types of environmental impacts possibly resulting from dredging and disposal activities at the St. George Island small boat harbor include: 1) bottom topographic...

  8. Biodiversity of marine communities in Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii with observations in 1996 on introduced exotic species (NODC Accession 0000330)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine and estuarine invertebrate and fish communities in Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii were surveyed between January and October, 1996. Samples were taken and...

  9. Directional wave and temperature data from nine buoys in Gray's Harbor, Washington, 1994-2002 (NODC Accession 0000756)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave data were collected from 9 buoys in Grays Harbor, Washington, from 01 January 1994 to 24 July 2002. Data were collected as part of the Coastal Data Information...

  10. Expression analyses of the genes harbored by the type 2 diabetes and pediatric BMI associated locus on 10q23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jianhua

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that one of the key type 2 diabetes (T2D loci identified by GWAS exerts its influence early on in life through its impact on pediatric BMI. This locus on 10q23 harbors three genes, encoding hematopoietically expressed homeobox (HHEX, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE and kinesin family member 11 (KIF11, respectively. Methods We analyzed the impact of adipogeneis on the mRNA and protein expression levels of these genes in the human adipocyte Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS cell line in order to investigate which could be the culprit gene(s in this region of linkage disequilibrium. Results Following activation of differentiation with a PPARγ ligand, we observed ~20% decrease in IDE, ~40% decrease in HHEX and in excess of 80% decrease in KIF11 mRNA levels when comparing the adipocyte and pre-adipocyte states. We also observed decreases in KIF11 and IDE protein levels, but conversely we observed a dramatic increase in HHEX protein levels. Subsequent time course experiments revealed some marked changes in expression as early as three hours after activation of differentiation. Conclusion Our data suggest that the expression of all three genes at this locus are impacted during SGBS adipogenesis and provides insights in to the possible mechanisms of how the genes at this 10q23 locus could influence both adipocyte differentiation and susceptibility to T2D through insulin resistance.

  11. A defined chromosome 6q fragment (at D6S310) harbors a putative tumor suppressor gene for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, M; Seitz, S; Arnold, W; Jandrig, B; Frege, R; Schlag, P M; Haensch, W; Guski, H; Winzer, K J; Barrett, J C; Scherneck, S

    1996-08-15

    Recent evidence obtained by cytogenetic and molecular studies indicates that in breast cancer chromosome 6q is often affected by genetic changes suggesting the existence of putative tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). However the function of gene(s) on this chromosome in breast cancer suppression is not understood. To substantiate further the presence of breast cancer related TSGs at 6q and to define their location, we first performed microcell-mediated transfer of chromosome 6 to CAL51 breast cancer cells for studying possible suppression of malignant phenotype and secondly, we analysed DNAs from 46 primary breast cancers for loss of constitutive heterozygosity (LOH) using 24 poly-morphic microsatellite markers. The chromosome transfer resulted in loss of tumorigenicity and reversion of other neoplastic properties of the microcell hybrids. Polymorphism analysis of single hybrids revealed that they harbored only a small donor chromosome fragment defined by the marker D6S310 (6q23.3-q25) and flanked by D6S292 and D6S311. The LOH data suggest that four tumor suppressor gene loci mapped to the central and distal portion of 6q may be independently deleted in breast cancer. One of these regions corresponds to the region identified by chromosome transfer. PMID:8761288

  12. Manila clams from Hg polluted sediments of Marano and Grado lagoons (Italy) harbor detoxifying Hg resistant bacteria in soft tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mechanism of mercury detoxification has been suggested by a previous study on Hg bioaccumulation in Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) in the polluted Marano and Grado lagoons and in this study we demonstrate that this event could be partly related to the detoxifying activities of Hg-resistant bacteria (MRB) harbored in clam soft tissues. Therefore, natural clams were collected in six stations during two different periods (winter and spring) from Marano and Grado Lagoons. Siphons, gills and hepatopancreas from acclimatized clams were sterile dissected to isolate MRB. These anatomical parts were glass homogenized or used for whole, and they were lying on a solid medium containing 5 mg l−1 HgCl2 and incubated at 30 °C. A total of fourteen bacterial strains were isolated and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing and analysis, revealing that strains were representative of eight bacterial genera, four of which were Gram-positive (Enterococcus, Bacillus, Jeotgalicoccus and Staphylococcus) and other four were Gram-negative (Stenotrophomonas, Vibrio, Raoultella and Enterobacter). Plasmids and merA genes were found and their sequences determined. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique shows the presence of Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria by using different molecular probes in siphon and gills. Bacterial clumps inside clam flesh were observed and even a Gram-negative endosymbiont was disclosed by transmission electronic microscope inside clam cells. Bacteria harbored in cavities of soft tissue have mercury detoxifying activity. This feature was confirmed by the determination of mercuric reductase in glass-homogenized siphons and gills. -- Highlights: ► We isolated Gram-positive and Gram-negative Hg resistant strains from soft tissues of Ruditapes philippinarum. ► We identify 14 mercury resistant strains by 16S rRNA gene sequences. ► Bacteria in siphon and gill tissues of clams were observed by TEM and identified with different

  13. Manila clams from Hg polluted sediments of Marano and Grado lagoons (Italy) harbor detoxifying Hg resistant bacteria in soft tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldi, Franco, E-mail: baldi@unive.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Cà Foscari University of Venice, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Gallo, Michele; Marchetto, Davide [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Cà Foscari University of Venice, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Faleri, Claudia [Department of Environmental Science ‘G. Sarfatti’, University of Siena, 53100 Siena (Italy); Maida, Isabel; Fani, Renato [Dipartimento di Biologia Evoluzionistica, Via Romana, 17, University of Florence, 50125 Florence (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    A mechanism of mercury detoxification has been suggested by a previous study on Hg bioaccumulation in Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) in the polluted Marano and Grado lagoons and in this study we demonstrate that this event could be partly related to the detoxifying activities of Hg-resistant bacteria (MRB) harbored in clam soft tissues. Therefore, natural clams were collected in six stations during two different periods (winter and spring) from Marano and Grado Lagoons. Siphons, gills and hepatopancreas from acclimatized clams were sterile dissected to isolate MRB. These anatomical parts were glass homogenized or used for whole, and they were lying on a solid medium containing 5 mg l{sup −1} HgCl{sub 2} and incubated at 30 °C. A total of fourteen bacterial strains were isolated and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing and analysis, revealing that strains were representative of eight bacterial genera, four of which were Gram-positive (Enterococcus, Bacillus, Jeotgalicoccus and Staphylococcus) and other four were Gram-negative (Stenotrophomonas, Vibrio, Raoultella and Enterobacter). Plasmids and merA genes were found and their sequences determined. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique shows the presence of Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria by using different molecular probes in siphon and gills. Bacterial clumps inside clam flesh were observed and even a Gram-negative endosymbiont was disclosed by transmission electronic microscope inside clam cells. Bacteria harbored in cavities of soft tissue have mercury detoxifying activity. This feature was confirmed by the determination of mercuric reductase in glass-homogenized siphons and gills. -- Highlights: ► We isolated Gram-positive and Gram-negative Hg resistant strains from soft tissues of Ruditapes philippinarum. ► We identify 14 mercury resistant strains by 16S rRNA gene sequences. ► Bacteria in siphon and gill tissues of clams were observed by TEM and identified

  14. Dissemination of IncI2 Plasmids That Harbor the blaCTX-M Element among Clinical Salmonella Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Marcus Ho-yin; Liu, Lizhang; Yan, Meiying; Chan, Edward Wai-chi; Chen, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL) determinant CTX-M-55 is increasingly prevalent in Escherichia coli but remains extremely rare in Salmonella. This study reports the isolation of a plasmid harboring the blaCTX-M-55 element in a clinical Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium strain resistant to multiple antibiotics. This plasmid is genetically identical to several known IncI2-type elements harbored by E. coli strains recovered from animals. This finding indicates that IncI2 plasmids ...

  15. Factors determining the distribution of foraminiferal assemblages in Port Joinville Harbor (Ile d'Yeu, France): the influence of pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Debenay, Jean-Pierre; Tsakiridis, Erica; Soulard, René; Grossel, Hubert

    2001-01-01

    Port Joinville harbor is located on an island. Thus, it receives only a few freshwater inputs, contrary to most of the areas where the influence of pollution on foraminiferal assemblages has been studied. The pollution in the harbor mainly results from the boats, including cleaning, painting and outfall of oil and motor-fuel.A total of 59 sediment samples was collected at three sampling periods (November-December 1997, May 1998 and September 1998). These samplings were supplemented by the stu...

  16. An evaluation of the acquisition streamlining methods at the Fleet and Industrial Supply Center Pearl Harbor Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, Mark Charles

    1999-01-01

    Federal contracting officials are contending with a virtual barrage of reforms, involving new legislation, new contract vehicles, and new business practices - thus changing how agencies are to operate with respect to acquisition streamlining. This thesis evaluates the effectiveness of the Fleet and Industrial Supply Center (FISC) Pearl Harbor's implementation of acquisition streamlining initiatives and recommends viable methods of streamlining the acquisition process at FISC Pearl Harbor and ...

  17. Service Life Assessment of Harbor Structures - Case studies of chloride ingress into concrete and sheet piling corrosion rates

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The two most used building materials in harbor structures are undoubtedly steel and concrete. These two materials are often combined in the structures of wharfs and quays where the steel sheet pile walls often have cap beams of reinforced concrete. The degradation processes of these structures must be taken into account both when designing new structures and when inspecting existing harbor structures with the purpose of determining their remaining service life. Since the environmental loads o...

  18. An investigation of the feasibility of building a harbor on the West coast of South America using explosive power of nuclear weapons, a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zodtner, H. H.

    1971-12-31

    There is an interest in discovering the various peace time uses of nuclear explosives. One of the proposals is the building of harbors. There are several ports along the west coast of South America where lighterage is necessary. This implies a need for expanded harbor facilities. The problem is to find a good location for creating a harbor, and the feasibility of accomplishing this with the use of nuclear force. Feasibility includes blast effects, radiation hazards, the number of weapons needed, and economic considerations. Economic considerations include the cost of treating a harbor of sufficient depth and area, the building of harbor facilities, and the estimated savings and advantages of the new harbor. Several meetings were held with naval personnel of the Military Liaison group at UCRL to discuss the general problems of harbors. Thirty-three different ports were given a preliminary investigation.

  19. Selenium and mercury concentrations in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) from central California: Health implications in an urbanized estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Relatively high total mercury concentrations in central California harbor seals. • Males had greater total mercury concentrations than females. • Seals from a high mercury region had low total selenium concentrations. • Negative correlation between circulating concentrations of selenium and mercury. • Estuarine feeding resulted in greater total mercury concentrations in harbor seals. - Abstract: We measured total selenium and total mercury concentrations ([TSe] and [THg]) in hair (n = 138) and blood (n = 73) of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) from California to assess variation by geography and sex, and inferred feeding relationships based on carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur stable isotopes. Harbor seals from Hg-contaminated sites had significantly greater [THg], and lesser [TSe] and TSe:THg molar ratios than seals from a relatively uncontaminated site. Males had significantly greater [THg] than females at all locations. Sulfur stable isotope values explained approximately 25% of the variability in [THg], indicating increased Hg exposure for seals with a greater use of estuarine prey species. Decreased [TSe] in harbor seals from Hg-contaminated regions may indicate a relative Se deficiency to mitigate the toxic effects of Hg. Further investigation into the Se status and the potential negative impact of Hg on harbor seals from Hg-contaminated sites is warranted

  20. Behavior associated with forced copulation of juvenile Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) by southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Heather S.; Oates, Stori C.; Staedler, Michelle M.; Tinker, M. Tim; Jessup, David A.; Harvey, James T.; Miller, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    Nineteen occurrences of interspecific sexual behavior between male southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) and juvenile Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) were reported in Monterey Bay, California, between 2000 and 2002. At least three different male sea otters were observed harassing, dragging, guarding, and copulating with harbor seals for up to 7 d postmortem. Carcasses of 15 juvenile harbor seals were recovered, and seven were necropsied in detail by a veterinary pathologist. Necropsy findings from two female sea otters that were recovered dead from male sea otters exhibiting similar behavior are also presented to facilitate a comparison of lesions. The most frequent lesions included superficial skin lacerations; hemorrhage around the nose, eyes, flippers, and perineum; and traumatic corneal erosions or ulcers. The harbor seals sustained severe genital trauma, ranging from vaginal perforation to vagino-cervical transection, and colorectal perforations as a result of penile penetration. One harbor seal developed severe pneumoperitoneum subsequent to vaginal perforation, which was also observed in both female sea otters and has been reported as a postcoital lesion in humans. This study represents the first description of lesions resulting from forced copulation of harbor seals by sea otters and is also the first report of pneu-moperitoneum secondary to forced copulation in a nonhuman animal. Possible explanations for this behavior are discussed in the context of sea otter biology and population demographics.

  1. NSCLC harboring EGFR exon-20 insertions after the regulatory C-helix of kinase domain responds poorly to known EGFR inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mengmeng; Xu, Xiaoxi; Cai, Jie; Ning, Jinying; Wery, Jean Pierre; Li, Qi-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Anecdote clinical observations hint that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with exon-20 insertions might respond poorly to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), contrasting to those with classic mutations. Lack of patient-derived experimental models has been a major hurdle for the discovery of new treatment for the diseases. We established two NSCLC-PDXs harboring two different exon-20 insertions, LU0387-adenocarcinoma (ADC) with a nine-base insertion at 2319 (H773-V774insNPH) and LU3075-squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with a nine-base insertion at 2316 (P772-H773insDNP). Both insertions immediately follow the regulatory C-helix of the kinase domain. Contrary to the generally good responses to EGFR inhibitors observed in PDXs with classic mutations, both exon-20 insertions are largely resistant to cetuximab and TKIs in vivo, suggesting fundamental difference from the classic EGFR mutations, consistent with the poor response rate to TKI seen in anecdotal clinic reports. It is worth noting that although responses are generally poor, they differ between the two exon-20 mutants depending on the type of TKI. In vitro drug sensitivity assays using established primary cell lines from our two PDXs largely confirmed the in vivo data. Our data from patient-derived experimental models confirmed that exon-20 insertions in domain immediately following the C-helix confer poor response to all known EGFR inhibitors, and suggested that these models can be utilized to facilitate the discovery of new therapies targeting NSCLC harboring exon-20 insertions. PMID:26891175

  2. Collision tumor of kidney: A case of renal cell carcinoma with metastases of prostatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Vyas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous occurrence of prostatic adenocarcinoma and renal cell carcinoma is well documented in the literature. However, metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma in a kidney harboring a renal cell carcinoma (RCC is quite rare. Although renal cell carcinoma is the most common tumor that can harbor metastasis, metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma in a kidney harboring a RCC is quite rare. There are four cases in the literature showing metastasis of prostatic adenocarcinoma to RCC. However, as per our knowledge, this is the first case of a collision between RCC and metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma.

  3. Synovial Sarcoma Microvesicles Harbor the SYT-SSX Fusion Gene Transcript: Comparison of Different Methods of Detection and Implications in Biomarker Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, A; Ullrich, P V; Cimniak, A F V; Follo, M; Nestel, S; Heimrich, B; Nazarenko, I; Stark, G B; Bannasch, H; Braig, D; Eisenhardt, S U

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft-tissue malignancy. This study examines the presence of the SYT-SSX fusion transcript in synovial sarcoma microvesicles as well as its potential role as a biomarker for synovial sarcoma. Patients and Methods. Microvesicle release of synovial sarcoma cells was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RNA-content was analyzed by qPCR, nested PCR, nested qPCR, and droplet digital PCR to compare their sensitivity for detection of the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript. Whole blood RNA, RNA of mononuclear cells, and microvesicle RNA of synovial sarcoma patients were analyzed for the presence of the fusion gene transcripts. Results. Electron microscopic analysis revealed synovial sarcoma cells releasing membrane-enclosed microvesicles. In vitro, the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript was detected in both synovial sarcoma cells and microvesicles. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA. In contrast, the fusion gene transcript was not detected in peripheral blood cells and microvesicles of synovial sarcoma patients. Conclusion. Synovial sarcoma cells release microvesicles harboring the SYT-SSX fusion transcript. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA; however, more sensitive assays are needed to detect cancer-specific microvesicles in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. PMID:27069481

  4. A Sealed Preparation for Long-Term Observations of Cultured Cells

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Greenfield Sluder, Joshua J. Nordberg, Frederick J. Miller and Edward H. Hinchcliffe This protocol was adapted from “A Sealed Preparation for Long-Term Observations of Cultured Cells,” Chapter 18, in *Live Cell Imaging* (eds. Goldman and Spector). Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA, 2005. ### INTRODUCTION The continuous long-term observation of cultured cells on the microscope has always been a technically demanding undertaking. This protocol...

  5. Echocardiographic diagnosis and necropsy findings of a congenital ventricular septal defect in a stranded harbor porpoise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmári, Viktor; Bunskoek, Paulien; Kuiken, Thijs; van den Berg, Annemarie; van Elk, Cornelis

    2016-03-30

    A live-stranded harbor porpoise Phocoena phocoena was found on the west coast of the Dutch island Texel (North Sea) and transported to a rehabilitation center for small cetaceans, where it underwent a veterinary health check. Cardiac auscultation revealed a systolic cardiac murmur with the point of maximal intensity in the right hemithorax with an intensity of IV out of VI. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a congenital ventricular septal defect with left-to-right shunting. Because the left atrium was not dilated according to the reference range of canine left atrium to aortic ratio, the presence of congestive heart failure was considered very unlikely. Therefore, this congenital cardiac anomaly was thought to be a clinically non-relevant incidental finding and would not explain the weakness, coughing, anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. Because the animal was still unable to swim or eat by itself after 2 wk of supportive care, it was euthanized. Post-mortem examination confirmed the presence of a ventricular septal defect. The weight of the heart relative to the animal's length was greater than expected, using linear regression analysis on the lengths and cardiac weights of 71 other stranded wild harbor porpoises without macroscopic cardiac pathologic changes. This finding suggests that the left ventricle had an eccentric hypertrophy because of volume overload resulting from the intracardiac shunt. This is the first report of a congenital cardiac anomaly and its ante-mortem diagnosis in this species. Data presented for the other 71 harbor porpoises may provide reference values for this species. PMID:27025305

  6. Floating-Harbor syndrome and polycystic kidneys associated with SRCAP mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschen, Michael; Kini, Usha; Hood, Rebecca L; Boycott, Kym M; Hurst, Jane; O'Callaghan, Christopher A

    2012-12-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare genetic disorder recently shown to be caused by mutations in the Snf2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein gene (SRCAP). It comprises three key clinical features of characteristic facies, expressive and receptive speech impairment and short stature. We report on a patient with this syndrome associated with early adult-onset hypertension and bilateral polycystic kidneys. Family screening for polycystic kidney disease was negative and mutations in polycystic kidney disease 1 and 2 genes (PKD1 and PKD2) were absent. Sequencing of the SRCAP gene demonstrated a de novo mutation matching one of the known FHS-associated mutations. The patient required treatment with anti-hypertensives and will require lifelong renal monitoring. We suggest this patient's presentation may be due to the pleiotropic effects of SRCAP mutations. Further, the protein encoded by SRCAP is known to interact with CREB-binding protein, the product of the gene mutated in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, which is associated with renal abnormalities. A literature review of the renal findings in patients with Floating-Harbor syndrome identified another patient with possible polycystic kidneys, two patients with early onset hypertension, and a young patient with a ruptured intracranial aneurysm, which can be a feature of classic adult polycystic kidney disease. Collectively, these findings suggest that all patients with Floating-Harbor syndrome should undergo regular blood pressure monitoring and screening for polycystic kidneys by ultrasound at the time of the FHS diagnosis with imaging to be repeated during adulthood if a childhood ultrasound was negative. PMID:23165645

  7. Employing a communication payload on an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) for harbor monitoring and homeland defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jeffrey S.; Wurth, Timothy J.; Manning, Mark C.

    2004-09-01

    The Homeland Defense community is increasing its focus on port security and harbor protection. Rising to the challenge, the U.S. Coast Guard is tasked with monitoring and protecting our harbors where commercial container ships enter. Tracking of the onboard containers is of great concern to the protectors of the waterfront. A system capable of identifying the number of containers onboard the vessel, when the containers are added or removed, contents of the containers, etc., will significantly reduce the potential for a security problem by providing essential information to the Coast Guard or other port security so that they can decide whether or not pre-boarding is necessary. That is, boarding the ship and inspecting the cargo while still at a safe distance from the harbor. A conceptual pictorial of this concept is shown in Figure 1. This paper presents a system that utilizes transmitters embedded on the containers which incorporate unique ID codes identifying the container, its history, and other information. A Communication/Navigation Aid (C/NA) type vehicle/buoy concept, presently being developed by Sippican (under contract to the Office of Naval Research (ONR) as part of the Autonomous Operations -- Future Naval Capabilities (AO-FNC) program, positioned at sea, would include a payload of NuWaves" communication transceivers able to receive the cargo container"s transmitted ID and forward this information by RF link to a ground station. The Port Authority and/or the Coast Guard would then utilize the information to make an assessment of the vessel prior to port entry. Although, this paper illustrates a scenario applicable to the cargo shipping industry, it is also applicable to other homeland defense areas such as unattended open ocean force protection, drug and law enforcement, and environmental monitoring.

  8. Assessment of the impact of oil spill on Mumbai harbor bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 7 th August, 2010 two cargo ships MSC Chitra and MV Khalijia collided off Mumbai coast causing an oil spill that spread quickly through Maharashtra's coastline. MSC Chitra ruptured its tank when it hit incoming MV Khalijia. MSC Chitra tilted to about 80 degrees soon after the collision, spilling an estimated 400 to 500 tonnes of oil. The ship was loaded with an estimated 2,600 tonnes of oil, 300 tonnes of diesel and 70 tonnes of lubricating oil at the time of the accident. The oil spill has spreaded over an area of 25 square kilometers. MSC Chitra was carrying 1219 containers out of which 31 had hazardous chemicals like organophosphate pesticides. After the collision about 400 containers fall off into to the sea from the deck of MSC Chitra. The oil spill has resulted in severe environmental damage along the Mumbai coastline as well as to the marine life. In order to assess the impact of oil spill on the marine environment daily monitoring of oil and grease levels has been carried out at CIRUS Jetty. Additionally three field surveys have been carried out along the coast line of Mumbai harbor bay from Vashi Jetty to Uran collecting sea water samples. The samples collected at CIRUS Jetty and Mumbai harbor bay are analyzed for various water quality parameters apart from oil and grease. The results indicate the oil and grease levels in sea water at CIRUS Jetty reduced to background levels within 15 days. The filed survey along Mumbai harbor bay also shows a decreasing trend in the oil and grease levels in seawater. (author)

  9. Receiving beam patterns in the horizontal plane of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastelein, Ronald A.; Janssen, Mirjam; Verboom, Willem C.; de Haan, Dick

    2005-08-01

    Receiving beam patterns of a harbor porpoise were measured in the horizontal plane, using narrow-band frequency modulated signals with center frequencies of 16, 64, and 100 kHz. Total signal duration was 1000 ms, including a 200 ms rise time and 300 ms fall time. The harbor porpoise was trained to participate in a psychophysical test and stationed itself horizontally in a specific direction in the center of a 16-m-diameter circle consisting of 16 equally-spaced underwater transducers. The animal's head and the transducers were in the same horizontal plane, 1.5 m below the water surface. The go/no-go response paradigm was used; the animal left the listening station when it heard a sound signal. The method of constants was applied. For each transducer the 50% detection threshold amplitude was determined in 16 trials per amplitude, for each of the three frequencies. The beam patterns were not symmetrical with respect to the midline of the animal's body, but had a deflection of 3-7° to the right. The receiving beam pattern narrowed with increasing frequency. Assuming that the pattern is rotation-symmetrical according to an average of the horizontal beam pattern halves, the receiving directivity indices are 4.3 at 16 kHz, 6.0 at 64 kHz, and 11.7 dB at 100 kHz. The receiving directivity indices of the porpoise were lower than those measured for bottlenose dolphins. This means that harbor porpoises have wider receiving beam patterns than bottlenose dolphins for the same frequencies. Directivity of hearing improves the signal-to-noise ratio and thus is a tool for a better detection of certain signals in a given ambient noise condition.

  10. Zoo Animals as Reservoirs of Gram-Negative Bacteria Harboring Integrons and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Ashraf M.; Motoi, Yusuke; Sato, Maiko; Maruyama, Akito; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Fukumoto, Yukio; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2007-01-01

    A total of 232 isolates of gram-negative bacteria were recovered from mammals, reptiles, and birds housed at Asa Zoological Park, Hiroshima prefecture, Japan. Forty-nine isolates (21.1%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes and harbored at least one antimicrobial resistance gene. PCR and DNA sequencing identified class 1 and class 2 integrons and many β-lactamase-encoding genes, in addition to a novel AmpC β-lactamase gene, blaCMY-26. Furthermore, the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance g...

  11. Effects of an oil spill in a harbor assessed using biomarkers of exposure in eelpout

    OpenAIRE

    Sturve, Joachim; Balk, Lennart; Liewenborg, Birgitta; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Förlin, Lars; Carney Almroth, Bethanie

    2014-01-01

    Oil spills occur commonly, and chemical compounds originating from oil spills are widespread in the aquatic environment. In order to monitor effects of a bunker oil spill on the aquatic environment, biomarker responses were measured in eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) sampled along a gradient in Göteborg harbor where the oil spill occurred and at a reference site, 2 weeks after the oil spill. Eelpout were also exposed to the bunker oil in a laboratory study to validate field data. The results show...

  12. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609)

  13. Quantitative Measures of Anthropogenic Noise on Harbor Porpoises: Testing the Reliability of Acoustic Tag Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewska, Danuta M; Teilmann, Jonas; Hermannsen, Line; Johnson, Mark; Miller, Lee A; Siebert, Ursula; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several sound and movement recording tags have been developed to sample the acoustic field experienced by cetaceans and their reactions to it. However, little is known about how tag placement and an animal's orientation in the sound field affect the reliability of on-animal recordings as proxies for actual exposure. Here, we quantify sound exposure levels recorded with a DTAG-3 tag on a captive harbor porpoise exposed to vessel noise in a controlled acoustic environment. Results show that flow noise is limiting onboard noise recordings, whereas no evidence of body shading has been found for frequencies of 2-20 kHz. PMID:26611092

  14. Observation on the breeding activity of the shore barnacle chthamalus malayensis pilsbry in Bombay harbor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok A. Karande

    1963-01-01

    Full Text Available A prerequisite for rearing larval stages of barnacles which form an important group amongst the fouling organisms is adequate knowledge of the breeding habits and the time and duration of their reproductive phase. Such knowledge is also useful for assessing the results of the field toxicity tests. The present paper gives an account of the breeding behaviour of the shore barnacle, Chthamalus malayensis, which is found in great abundance along the Bombay coast. If the breeding behaviour of Ch. malayensis reported in the paper represents that of other barnacles in Bombay harbor, the seasonal variations in barnacle settlement reported by other workers can be understood.

  15. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  16. Muju Virus, Harbored by Myodes regulus in Korea, Might Represent a Genetic Variant of Puumala Virus, the Prototype Arvicolid Rodent-Borne Hantavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Goo; Gu, Se Hun; Baek, Luck Ju; Shin, Ok Sarah; Park, Kwang Sook; Kim, Heung-Chul; Klein, Terry A.; Yanagihara, Richard; Song, Jin-Won

    2014-01-01

    The genome of Muju virus (MUJV), identified originally in the royal vole (Myodes regulus) in Korea, was fully sequenced to ascertain its genetic and phylogenetic relationship with Puumala virus (PUUV), harbored by the bank vole (My. glareolus), and a PUUV-like virus, named Hokkaido virus (HOKV), in the grey red-backed vole (My. rufocanus) in Japan. Whole genome sequence analysis of the 6544-nucleotide large (L), 3652-nucleotide medium (M) and 1831-nucleotide small (S) segments of MUJV, as well as the amino acid sequences of their gene products, indicated that MUJV strains from different capture sites might represent genetic variants of PUUV, the prototype arvicolid rodent-borne hantavirus in Europe. Distinct geographic-specific clustering of MUJV was found in different provinces in Korea, and phylogenetic analyses revealed that MUJV and HOKV share a common ancestry with PUUV. A better understanding of the taxonomic classification and pathogenic potential of MUJV must await its isolation in cell culture. PMID:24736214

  17. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in commercially important marine fishes from Mumbai Harbor, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • AAS, ICP-OES were used to evaluate metal content in various marine fishes. • Heavy metal levels significantly (p < 0.05) varied within and between the fish species. • Heavy metal levels were lower than the permissible levels prescribed by the European Union. • Fish catchments from this region are still safe for human consumption. - Abstract: Seventeen commercially important marine fish species were caught in Mumbai Harbor using a trawl net and evaluated using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and ICP-OES. It was found that certain species of fish contained lower levels of all metals tested. J. elongatus and C. dussumieri had the highest levels of all 8 metals tested. The heavy metal concentrations were significantly varied within and between the studied fishes (p < 0.05). However, a significant correlation among heavy metals was observed. This investigation indicated that various levels of heavy metals exist in the fish species sampled, but those concentrations are within the maximum residual levels recommended by the European Union and FAO/WHO. Therefore, fish caught in Mumbai Harbor can be considered safe for human consumption

  18. Immunological impact of metals in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) of the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuschke, Antje; Valentine-Thon, Elizabeth; Griesel, Simone; Fonfara, Sonja; Siebert, Ursula; Prange, Andreas

    2005-10-01

    Environmental pollutants may affect the immune system of marine mammals in many areas of the industrialized world. This study provides the first evidence for metal-induced hypersensitivity in harbor seals and demonstrates a relationship between this immunopathy and the level of metals in blood. The concentrations of 20 essential and nonessential elements were analyzed in the blood of 13 harbor seals from the North Sea. In addition, their T-lymphocyte response to metals in terms of hypersensitivity was investigated using a lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) according to the MELISA (memory lymphocyte immuno-stimulation assay) modification. The results showed metal hypersensitivities in 7 of 11 seals investigated in MELISA (data from two seals could not be assessed), reflecting a positive or possible positive reaction in 13 of 154 total single tests. Four animals responded to one metal and three animals to multiple metals. The sensitizing metals were molybdenum (Mo), titanium (Ti), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), aluminum (Al), lead (Pb), and tin (Sn). Furthermore, the seals with a Ni-, Al-,.and Cr-sensibilization showed the highest concentrations of these metals in blood. In 8 of the 13 positive cases, elevated blood metal concentrations correlated with the hypersensitivity reaction. Summarizing, we demonstrate in this first pilot study the potential immunological impact of metals in seals, a topic rarely investigated previously. Our results show the value of a combined biological and effect-monitoring tool to investigate pollution-induced immunopathies in live animals. PMID:16245829

  19. Evaluation of upland disposal of Oakland Harbor, California, sediment; Volume I: Turning basin sediments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.R.; Tatem, H.E.; Simmers, J.W.; Skogerboe, J.G.; Folsom, B.L.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes testing and evaluation performed by the Environmental Laboratory of the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station on sediment from the turning basin of Oakland Inner Harbor, Oakland, CA. Test protocols from the Corps' Management Strategy for Disposal of Dredged Material were used in the present evaluation to determine the potential for migration of contaminants into effluent, surface runoff, leachates, plants, and animals at an upland disposal site. Two sediments from the turning basin of Oakland Inner Harbor were tested: a composite sample of cores taken from the surface to 38-ft depth (upper sediment) and a composite sample of cores taken from 38- to 45-ft depth (lower sediment). In addition, two potential disposal site soils were tested: Twitchell Island and 7th Street disposal site. Sediment characterization indicated that the Oakland upper sediment contained higher concentrations of most contaminants than the lower sediment. Metal concentrations in the Oakland lower sediment were in the range of values found at the Twitchell Island disposal site. The Oakland upper sediment contained levels of cadmium and arsenic similar to those in Twitchell Island levee soils, but higher levels of zinc, nickel, lead, and copper.... Contaminant migration, Sediment testing, Contaminated sediments, Upland disposal, Dredged material.

  20. Do Scarce Precious Metals Equate to Safe Harbor Investments? The Case of Platinum and Palladium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Francis T. Diaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research establishes the predictability and safe harbor properties of two scarce precious metals, namely, platinum and palladium. Utilizing their spot prices, the study concludes intermediate memory in the return structures of both precious metals, which implies the instability of platinum and palladium returns’ persistency in the long run. However, both the ARFIMA-FIGARCH and the ARFIMA-FIAPARCH models confirm long-memory properties in the volatility of the two spot prices. The leverage effects phenomenon is not also present based on the ARFIMA-APARCH and ARFIMA-FIAPARCH models, which may possibly conclude the resilience of both precious metals against increased volatility. However, further tests proved that only platinum has a symmetric volatility response to shocks with the presence of negative gamma parameter, which proves that only platinum can be considered a safe harbor investment, because negative and positive shocks have equal effects on their returns and volatilities. Comparing the four models utilized in this study, the combined ARFIMA-FIAPARCH models are the best fitting model to characterize both precious metals’ spot prices.

  1. Dungeness crab survey for the Southwest Ocean Disposal Site off Grays Harbor, Washington, June 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, B.J.; Pearson, W.H. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1991-09-01

    As part of the Grays Harbor Navigation Improvement Project, the Seattle District of the US Army Corps of Engineers has begun active use of the Southwest Ocean Disposal Site off Grays Harbor, Washington. This survey was to verify that the location of the area of high crab density observed during site selection surveys has not shifted into the Southeast Ocean Disposal Site. In June 1990, mean densities of juvenile Dungeness crab were 146 crab/ha within the disposal site and 609 crab/ha outside ad north of the disposal site. At nearshore locations outside the disposal site, juvenile crab density was 3275 crab/ha. Despite the low overall abundance, the spatial distribution of crab was such that the high crab densities in 1990 have remained outside the Southwest Ocean Disposal Site. The survey data have confirmed the appropriateness of the initial selection of the disposal site boundaries and indicated no need to move to the second monitoring tier. 8 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Integrated sediment decontamination for the New York/New Jersey Harbor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, W.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, New York, NY (United States); Donato, K.R. [Army Corps of Engineers, New York, NY (United States); Clesceri, N.L. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Jones, K.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Disposal of dredged material taken from the New York/New Jersey (NY/NJ) Harbor is problematic because of the presence of inorganic and organic contaminants that under revised testing criteria render it unsuitable for return to the ocean or for beneficial reuse. Decontamination of the dredged material followed by beneficial reuse is one attractive component of the overall comprehensive dredged material management plan being developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers New York District. A demonstration program to validate decontamination processes and to bring them into full-scale use in the NY/NJ Harbor is now in progress. Tests of selected technologies have been completed at the bench scale and pilot-scale (2--15 m{sup 3}) levels. Procedures for demonstration testing on scales from 750 m{sup 3} to 75,000 m{sup 3} are being developed with the goal of producing a useable decontamination system by the end of 1999. The overall project goals and present status of the project are reviewed here.

  3. Seasonal Variation of Harbor Seal's Diet from the Wadden Sea in Relation to Prey Availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille de la Vega

    Full Text Available The Wadden Sea has an important role for marine mammals in terms of resting, nursing and foraging. Harbor seal is the most abundant marine mammal species in this area. The use of the food resources of the Wadden Sea by seals is not clear, and previous studies showed that this species can travel kilometers away from their haul-outs to forage in the North Sea. In this study, we analyzed the stable isotopes of vibrissae from 23 dead harbor seals found on the island of Sylt to investigate their diet. The predator´s carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions were compared to the compositions of different potential prey items from the Sylt-Rømø Bight and from the North Sea in order to study seasonal pattern in the diet and in the foraging location. In parallel, seasonal variation of abundance and biomass of the potential prey items from the Sylt-Rømø Bight were studied and compare to their contribution to the seal´s diet. The results revealed a change in the seal´s diet from pelagic sources in spring to a benthic based diet in summer, and an increasing use of the North Sea resources in fall and winter in accordance with the seasonal variation of the availability of prey in the Sylt-Rømø Bight.

  4. Feeding kinematics, suction, and hydraulic jetting performance of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Christopher D; Wieskotten, Sven; Hanke, Wolf; Hanke, Frederike D; Marsh, Alyssa; Kot, Brian; Dehnhardt, Guido

    2014-01-01

    The feeding kinematics, suction and hydraulic jetting capabilities of captive harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) were characterized during controlled feeding trials. Feeding trials were conducted using a feeding apparatus that allowed a choice between biting and suction, but also presented food that could be ingested only by suction. Subambient pressure exerted during suction feeding behaviors was directly measured using pressure transducers. The mean feeding cycle duration for suction-feeding events was significantly shorter (0.15±0.09 s; Pseals occasionally alternated suction with hydraulic jetting, or used hydraulic jetting independently, to remove fish from the apparatus. Suction and biting feeding modes were kinematically distinct regardless of feeding location (in-water vs. on-land). Suction was characterized by a significantly smaller gape (1.3±0.23 cm; Pseals were able to jet water at food items using suprambient pressure, also known as hydraulic jetting. The maximum hydraulic jetting force recorded was 53.9 kPa. Suction and hydraulic jetting where employed 90.5% and 9.5%, respectively, during underwater feeding events. Harbor seals displayed a wide repertoire of behaviorally flexible feeding strategies to ingest fish from the feeding apparatus. Such flexibility of feeding strategies and biomechanics likely forms the basis of their opportunistic, generalized feeding ecology and concomitant breadth of diet. PMID:24475170

  5. An autonomous vehicle approach for quantifying bioluminescence in ports and harbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moline, Mark; Bissett, Paul; Blackwell, Shelley; Mueller, James; Sevadjian, Jeff; Trees, Charles; Zaneveld, Ron

    2005-05-01

    Bioluminescence emitted from marine organisms upon mechanical stimulation is an obvious military interest, as it provides a low-tech method of identifying surface and subsurface vehicles and swimmer tracks. Clearly, the development of a passive method of identifying hostile ships, submarines, and swimmers, as well as the development of strategies to reduce the risk of detection by hostile forces is relevant to Naval operations and homeland security. The measurement of bioluminescence in coastal waters has only recently received attention as the platforms and sensors were not scaled for the inherent small-scale nature of nearshore environments. In addition to marine forcing, many ports and harbors are influenced by freshwater inputs, differential density layering and higher turbidity. The spatial and temporal fluctuations of these optical water types overlaid on changes in the bioluminescence potential make these areas uniquely complex. The development of an autonomous underwater vehicle with a bioluminescence capability allows measurements on sub-centimeter horizontal and vertical scales in shallow waters and provides the means to map the potential for detection of moving surface or subsurface objects. A deployment in San Diego Bay shows the influence of tides on the distribution of optical water types and the distribution of bioluminescent organisms. Here, these data are combined to comment on the potential for threat reduction in ports and harbors.

  6. Unusual Mortality Events of Harbor Porpoise Strandings in North Carolina, 1997–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleta A. Hohn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A marked increase in the frequency of harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena stranded in North Carolina in 2005 was declared as an Unusual Mortality Event (UME. Strandings occurred in January through May when harbor porpoises are seasonally present. Increased stranding rates were measured relative to a threshold to determine that the UME was occurring. The threshold analysis also revealed elevated strandings during 1999, an undeclared UME year. Recovered carcasses during 1999 and 2005 accounted for 39% of 261 strandings during 1997–2009. During 2005, of 43 strandings, primary or secondary causes of mortality included fishery interactions, emaciation, and interspecific aggression. Apart from small but significant differences in timing and condition of strandings, composition of strandings during UME and non-UME years was similar, with most being young-of-the-year and occurring during March and April, north of Cape Hatteras. Porpoises had high levels of parasitic infestation typical for this species. However, no indication of infectious disease and no cause of the 2005 event were found from gross and histologic findings. Response to UMEs is challenging, particularly along the expanses of North Carolina beaches, requiring additional effort to obtain carcasses in sufficiently fresh condition to determine the cause of these events.

  7. Colonization potential of the genus Ulva (Chlorophyta, Ulvales in Comodoro Rivadavia Harbor (Chubut, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal and spatial changes in the coverage of five Ulva L. species (U. prolifera O.F. Müller, U. intestinalis L., U. hookeriana (Kützing Hayden et al., U. compressa L. and U. linza L. were analyzed on rocky substrata experimentally immersed in Comodoro Rivadavia Harbor (Argentina. Colonization was studied during an annual period at three levels: upper intertidal, middle intertidal and subtidal. Coverage was significantly higher in the middle intertidal and subtidal levels than in the upper intertidal level, where all species of Ulva were absent. Seasonal changes were also significant: coverage in summer and spring was significantly higher than in autumn and winter. Most species showed high spatial variability among replicates from the same level and season. Zonation patterns within the harbor differed from those observed in natural areas, probably due to low wave exposure and its interaction with herbivory and desiccation stress. Colonization patterns observed in this study indicate niche segregation in closely related species of the genus Ulva.

  8. Novel B19-like parvovirus in the brain of a harbor seal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier Bodewes

    Full Text Available Using random PCR in combination with next-generation sequencing, a novel parvovirus was detected in the brain of a young harbor seal (Phoca vitulina with chronic non-suppurative meningo-encephalitis that was rehabilitated at the Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre (SRRC in the Netherlands. In addition, two novel viruses belonging to the family Anelloviridae were detected in the lungs of this animal. Phylogenetic analysis of the coding sequence of the novel parvovirus, tentatively called Seal parvovirus, indicated that this virus belonged to the genus Erythrovirus, to which human parvovirus B19 also belongs. Although no other seals with similar signs were rehabilitated in SRRC in recent years, a prevalence study of tissues of seals from the same area collected in the period 2008-2012 indicated that the Seal parvovirus has circulated in the harbor seal population at least since 2008. The presence of the Seal parvovirus in the brain was confirmed by real-time PCR and in vitro replication. Using in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus was present in the Virchow-Robin space and in cerebral parenchyma adjacent to the meninges. These findings showed that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus can be involved in central nervous system infection and inflammation, as has also been suspected but not proven for human parvovirus B19 infection.

  9. High-resolution geophysical data collected within Red Brook Harbor, Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, in 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turecek, Aaron M.; Danforth, William W.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a high-resolution geophysical survey within Red Brook Harbor, Massachusetts, from September 28 through November 17, 2009. Red Brook Harbor is located on the eastern edge of Buzzards Bay, south of the Cape Cod Canal. The survey area was approximately 7 square kilometers, with depths ranging from 0 to approximately 10 meters. Data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey Research Vessel Rafael. The research vessel was equipped with a 234-kilohertz interferometric sonar system to collect bathymetry and backscatter data, a dual frequency (3.5- and 200-kilohertz) compression high-intensity radar pulse seismic reflection profiler to collect subbottom data, a sound velocity profiler to acquire speed of sound within the water column, and a sea floor sampling device to collect sediment samples, video, and photographs. The survey was part of an ongoing cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management to map the geology of the Massachusetts inner continental shelf. In addition to inclusion within the cooperative geologic mapping effort, these data will be used to assess the shallow-water mapping capability of the geophysical systems deployed for this project, with an emphasis on identifying resolution benchmarks for the interferometric sonar system.

  10. Insulin-producing Surrogate β-cells From Embryonic Stem Cells: Are We There Yet?

    OpenAIRE

    Naujok, Ortwin; Burns, Chris; Jones, Peter M; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) harbor the potential to generate every cell type of the body by differentiation. The use of hESCs holds great promise for potential cell replacement therapies for degenerative diseases including diabetes mellitus. The recently discovered induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) exhibit immense potential for regenerative medicine as they allow the generation of autologous cells tailored to the patients' immune system. Research for insulin-producing surrogate cells fro...

  11. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 2 of -42-foot project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Strand, J.A.; Kohn, N.P.; Squires, A.L. (Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, was authorized by the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 to deepen and widen the navigation channels of Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, California, to accommodate modern deep-draft vessels. The recommended plan consists of deepening the harbor channels from the presently authorized water depth of {minus}35 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) to {minus}42 ft MLLW and supplying the harbor with adequate turning basins and berthing areas. Offshore ocean disposal of the dredged sediment is being considered, provided there is no evident of harmful ecological effects. It harmful ecological effects are not evident then the appropriate certifications from state environmental quality agencies and concurrence from the Environmental Protection Agency can be obtained to allow disposal of sediment. To help provide the scientific basis for determining whether Oakland Harbor sediments are suitable for offshore disposal, the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) collected sediment cores from 23 stations in Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, evaluated these sediment cores geologically, performed chemical analyses for selected contaminants in sediments, conducted a series of solid phase toxicity tests with four sensitive marine invertebrates and assessed the bioaccumulation potential of sediment-associated contaminants in the tissues of Macoma Nasuta. 43 refs., 26 figs., 61 tabs.

  12. Commercial sexual exploitation of children and the emergence of safe harbor legislation: implications for policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Ryan T; Letourneau, Elizabeth J

    2015-03-01

    Commercial sexual exploitation of children is an enduring social problem that has recently become the focus of numerous legislative initiatives. In particular, recent federal- and state-level legislation have sought to reclassify youth involved in commercial sexual exploitation as victims rather than as offenders. So-called Safe Harbor laws have been developed and centered on decriminalization of "juvenile prostitution." In addition to or instead of decriminalization, Safe Harbor policies also include diversion, law enforcement training, and increased penalties for adults seeking sexual contact with minors. The purpose of this paper is to review the underlying rationale of Safe Harbor laws, examine specific policy responses currently enacted by the states, and consider the effects of policy variations. Directions for future research and policy are addressed. PMID:25652252

  13. Confirmatory sediment analyses and solid and suspended particulate phase bioassays on sediment from Oakland Inner Harbor, San Francisco, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Apts, C.W.; Woodruff, D.L.; Barrows, M.E.; Cullinan, V.I.; Hyland, J.L.; Campbell, J.F.

    1988-12-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, was authorized by the US Congress to deepen the navigation channels of Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, California. During review of the environmental impact statement required for this dredging and disposal project, a panel of national experts approved the open-water disposal of dredged sediment from selected areas within the Inner Harbor, subject to results of confirmatory solid phase bioassays. The San Francisco District of the Corps requested the Battle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to conduct these confirmatory studies. The studies provided technical data for an evaluation of the potential environmental impact of this project. Within extremely narrow time constraints, these studies provided chemical and biological information required by ocean dumping regulations to determine suitability of the Oakland Inner Harbor and turning basin sediment for ocean disposal. 23 refs., 18 figs., 45 tabs.

  14. A crisis in waste management, economic vitality, and a coastal marine environment: Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F. T.; Butman, B.

    1994-01-01

    Discharge of sewage sludge and effluent from 43 communities in the greater Boston metropolitan area has helped make the harbor one of the most polluted in the nation. As part of a court-mandated plan to end pollution of the harbor, effluent will no longer be discharged into the harbor, but instead, by 1995 it will be discharged into Massachusetts Bay through a record-long 15.34 km tunnel. By the year 2000 all of the sewage is scheduled to recive full secondary treatment. The public is concerned about long-term effects of the new ocean outfall on the environment, including Cape Cod Bay and Stellwagen Bank, which is an important habitat for whales and a newly designated national marine sanctuary. The bay has been additionally stressed by dumping of low-level radioactive and other hazardous wastes during the 1950s and 1960s. -from Authors

  15. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir; Sanjiv , Pritha; Ray

    2009-04-28

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  16. Response of benthic metabolism and nutrient cycling to reductions in wastewater loading to Boston Harbor, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jane; Giblin, Anne E.; Hopkinson, Charles S.; Kelsey, Samuel W.; Howes, Brian L.

    2014-12-01

    We describe the long-term response of benthic metabolism in depositional sediments of Boston Harbor, MA, to large reductions in organic matter and nutrient loading. Although Boston Harbor received very high loadings of nutrients and solids it differs from many eutrophic estuaries in that severe hypoxia was prevented by strong tidal flushing. Our study was conducted for 9 years during which a series of improvements to sewage treatment were implemented, followed by 10 years after the culminating step in the clean-up, which was to divert all wastewater effluent offshore. Counter to expectations, sediment oxygen demand and nutrient effluxes initially increased at some stations, reaching some of the highest rates recorded in the literature, and were spatially and temporally quite variable. Early increases were attributed to macrofaunal effects, as sediments at some sites were rapidly colonized by tube-building amphipods, Ampelisca spp., which dominated a dense macrofaunal mat community. As reductions in loading progressed, however, mean rates in oxygen uptake and release of ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate all decreased. At the point of outfall diversion, rates and variability had already decreased substantially. By the end of the study, average oxygen uptake had decreased from 74 to 41 mmol m-2 d-1 and spatial and temporal variability had decreased. Similarly, nutrient fluxes were less than half the rates measured at the start of the project and also less variable. Other evidence of improved conditions included a decrease in the carbon content of sediments at most stations and higher Eh values at all stations, illustrating less reducing conditions. Denitrification also showed an overall decrease from the beginning to the end of the 19-year study, but was highest during the intermediate phases of the cleanup, reaching 9 mmol N m-2 d-1. At the end of the study denitrification averaged for all sites was 2.2 mmol N m-2 d-1, but when compared to current loadings, had become

  17. Feeding kinematics, suction, and hydraulic jetting performance of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Marshall

    Full Text Available The feeding kinematics, suction and hydraulic jetting capabilities of captive harbor seals (Phoca vitulina were characterized during controlled feeding trials. Feeding trials were conducted using a feeding apparatus that allowed a choice between biting and suction, but also presented food that could be ingested only by suction. Subambient pressure exerted during suction feeding behaviors was directly measured using pressure transducers. The mean feeding cycle duration for suction-feeding events was significantly shorter (0.15±0.09 s; P<0.01 than biting feeding events (0.18±0.08 s. Subjects feeding in-water used both a suction and a biting feeding mode. Suction was the favored feeding mode (84% of all feeding events compared to biting, but biting comprised 16% of feeding events. In addition, seals occasionally alternated suction with hydraulic jetting, or used hydraulic jetting independently, to remove fish from the apparatus. Suction and biting feeding modes were kinematically distinct regardless of feeding location (in-water vs. on-land. Suction was characterized by a significantly smaller gape (1.3±0.23 cm; P<0.001 and gape angle (12.9±2.02°, pursing of the rostral lips to form a circular aperture, and pursing of the lateral lips to occlude lateral gape. Biting was characterized by a large gape (3.63±0.21 cm and gape angle (28.8±1.80°; P<0.001 and lip curling to expose teeth. The maximum subambient pressure recorded was 48.8 kPa. In addition, harbor seals were able to jet water at food items using suprambient pressure, also known as hydraulic jetting. The maximum hydraulic jetting force recorded was 53.9 kPa. Suction and hydraulic jetting where employed 90.5% and 9.5%, respectively, during underwater feeding events. Harbor seals displayed a wide repertoire of behaviorally flexible feeding strategies to ingest fish from the feeding apparatus. Such flexibility of feeding strategies and biomechanics likely forms the basis of their

  18. Overproduction of fission yeast eif3a subunit in saccharomyces cerevisiae results in aberrant cell morphology and g2/m delay

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janatová, Ivana; Koubek, Zdeněk; Malínská, Kateřina; Raková, Radka; Hašek, Jiří

    Cold Spring Harbor, New York, 2003, s. 23. [Meeting on Yeast Cell Biology /2003./. Cold Spring Harbor (US), 12.08.2003-17.08.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/02/1424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : facs * rpg1p Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  19. Draft genome sequences of two Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida isolates harboring plasmids conferring antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Antony T; Tanaka, Katherine H; Trudel, Melanie V; Frenette, Michel; Derome, Nicolas; Charette, Steve J

    2015-02-01

    The bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida is the etiological agent of furunculosis, a widespread fish disease causing important economic losses to the fish farming industry. Antibiotic treatments in fish farms may be challenging given the existence of multidrug-resistant isolates of this bacterium. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of the 2004-05MF26 and 2009-144K3 isolates, which harbor plasmids conferring antibiotic resistance. Both isolates also carry the large plasmid pAsa5, which is known to encode a type three secretion system (TTSS) and the pAsal1 plasmid which has the aopP gene producing a TTSS effector. These two isolates are good representatives of the plasmid diversity in A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida. PMID:25724776

  20. Numerical model for sedimentation in the access channel and harbor basin of Belawan Port

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hang Tuah. Salim

    2010-01-01

    Belawan is the largest port serving North Sumatra for the import and export.Port has facilities for handling container, CPO liquid bulk cargo,Oil,and other agriculture products.Its location is at the fiver mouth which is subjected to the heavy sedimentation especially after many deforestation activities in its catchment area. The numerical modeling was developed for predicting the rate of sediment caused by erosion in the catchment area for several scenarios.This predicted rate of sediment was applied as input to model of sedimentation in the ocean.Present condition of sedimentation data was used as calibrated data.This integrated model was used to simulate the sedimentation in Belawan access channel and harbor basin for several development plans.

  1. Aspects of employing continuously hauling stockpile equipment predominantly at bulk handling harbors and coal power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrae, H.J.

    1985-08-01

    Operation and specifications are reviewed for stackers and stacker-reclaimer series produced by TAKRAF in the GDR. The equipment is employed in open air coal and mineral stockpile facilities; its haulage capacity varies between 450 and 12,500 m/sup 3//h. Continuous haulage of bulk is based on belt conveyor systems with belt widths between 0.8 and 2.25 m; stacking booms are up to 40 m long. The combined stacker-reclaimer series operates with a reclaiming bucket wheel of 5600 m/sup 3//h maximum capacity. The performance of stockpile equipment series at large bulk handling harbors and at coal power plant storage yards is discussed.

  2. Development of Mammalian Cell Lines with lac Operator-Tagged Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Yuri G. Strukov and Andrew S. Belmont This protocol was adapted from “Development of Mammalian Cell Lines with lac Operator-Tagged Chromosomes,” Chapter 25, in[ *Live Cell Imaging* ](http://www.cshlpress.com/link/livecelp.htm)(eds. Goldman and Spector). Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA, 2005. ### INTRODUCTION The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins to label chromosomal proteins has yielded basic structural information as well as insig...

  3. Mineralogical study and leaching behavior of a stabilized harbor sediment with hydraulic binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatain, Vincent; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Loustau Cazalet, Marie; Bouzahzah, Hassan; Delolme, Cécile; Gautier, Mathieu; Blanc, Denise; de Brauer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The environmental assessment of potential effects of contaminated harbor sediments stabilized with hydraulic binders and the determination of remediation endpoints require the determination of pollutants leaching potentials. Moreover, little information about the speciation and mobility of inorganic contaminants in these specific solid matrices is available in the literature. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relationship between mineralogy and leachability of contaminants (copper, lead, and zinc) present in a French harbor sediment stabilized with quicklime and Portland cement. Batch equilibrium leaching tests at various pH, chemical analysis of leachates, and mineralogical studies (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform) have been combined in the present investigation. The acid neutralization capacity of the stabilized matrix studied is first controlled by the dissolution of portlandite (pH ~12), followed by the dissolution of C-S-H (pH ~11) and the dissolution of ettringite (pH ~10). Finally, a very high buffering capacity of this stabilized sediment is observed for pH values around 6. This equilibrium is mainly controlled by the dissolution of iron sulfides and carbonate minerals. Consequently, the mobilization of inorganic contaminants as a function of pH remains very low (<0.1 wt%) for pH values above 6 and significantly increases for pH below these values. This research confirms the importance of a combined methodology for the intrinsic characterization of potential mobilization of contaminants in a stabilized sediment and for a better understanding of geochemical processes that affect contaminant fate, transformation, and transport in the subsurface environment. PMID:22961487

  4. Restoration Science in New York Harbor: It takes a (large, diverse and engaged) village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, R.; Birney, L.; Janis, S.; Groome, M.; Palmer, M.; Bone, E.; O'Neil, J. M.; Hill, J.; Dennison, W.; Malinowski, P.; Kohne, L.; Molina, M.; Moore, G.; Woods, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Curriculum + Community Enterprise for Restoration Science (CCE-RS) facilitates partnerships between scientists and middle school educators on ecological restoration and environmental monitoring projects. The educational model is designed to wrap around the student, including classroom instruction, field science, after-school programs and engagement with the student's community. Its pillars include: a teacher training fellowship at Pace University, student curriculum, a digital platform, afterschool and summer mentoring, and community exhibits. The digital platform includes a tablet app tailored to the project's field protocols and linked to a database shared across schools and partnering institutions. Through the digital platform, data is integrated into a single citizen-science monitoring project, teachers share curriculum and best practices, and students link directly to their peers at other schools. Curriculum development has been collaborative between scientists, science education specialists, and secondary school teachers. The CCE-RS is rooted in project-based learning: the New York Harbor School has engaged high school students in environmental monitoring and oyster restoration in the Harbor for about the last decade. The science partners (U. of Maryland and Columbia) have been working with students and other citizen scientists in outdoor science over about the last decade. Local partners in outside-the-classroom education include the New York Academy of Sciences, The River Project, which will provide field education services, and Good Shepherd Services, which provides after-school programming in schools serving primarily poor families. Scientists on the project engage directly with teachers and informal educators in curriculum development and citizen-science outreach. We present the lessons learned from our first cohort of Fellows, the pedagogical model, and the digital platform, which is extensible to other ecological restoration settings.

  5. Haul-out behavior of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina in Hood Canal, Washington.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh M London

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to model haul-out behavior of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina in the Hood Canal region of Washington State with respect to changes in physiological, environmental, and temporal covariates. Previous research has provided a solid understanding of seal haul-out behavior. Here, we expand on that work using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM with temporal autocorrelation and a large dataset. Our dataset included behavioral haul-out records from archival and VHF radio tag deployments on 25 individual seals representing 61,430 seal hours. A novel application for increased computational efficiency allowed us to examine this large dataset with a GLMM that appropriately accounts for temporal autocorellation. We found significant relationships with the covariates hour of day, day of year, minutes from high tide and year. Additionally, there was a significant effect of the interaction term hour of day : day of year. This interaction term demonstrated that seals are more likely to haul out during nighttime hours in August and September, but then switch to predominantly daylight haul-out patterns in October and November. We attribute this change in behavior to an effect of human disturbance levels. This study also examined a unique ecological event to determine the role of increased killer whale (Orcinus orca predation on haul-out behavior. In 2003 and 2005 these harbor seals were exposed to unprecedented levels of killer whale predation and results show an overall increase in haul-out probability after exposure to killer whales. The outcome of this study will be integral to understanding any changes in population abundance as a result of increased killer whale predation.

  6. The bone marrow stem cell niche grows up: mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages move in (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Ehninger, A; Trumpp, A

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell niches are defined as the cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate stem cell function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. This includes control of the balance between quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation, as well as the engagement of specific programs in response to stress. In mammals, the best understood niche is that harboring bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Recent studies have expanded the number of cell types contributing to the HSC...

  7. Redox activity and chemical speciation of size fractioned PM in the communities of the Los Angeles-Long Beach harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S.; Polidori, A.; Arhami, M.; Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Cho, A.; Sioutas, C.

    2008-11-01

    In this study, two different types of assays were used to quantitatively measure the redox activity of PM and to examine its intrinsic toxicity: 1) in vitro exposure to rat alveolar macrophage (AM) cells using dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) as the fluorescent probe (macrophage ROS assay), and: 2) consumption of dithiothreitol (DTT) in a cell-free system (DTT assay). Coarse (PM10-2.5), accumulation (PM2.5-0.25), and quasi-ultrafine (quasi-UF, PM0.25) mode particles were collected weekly at five sampling sites in the Los Angeles-Long Beach harbor and at one site near the University of Southern California campus (urban site). All PM samples were analyzed for organic (total and water-soluble) and elemental carbon, organic species, inorganic ions, and total and water-soluble elements. Quasi-UF mode particles showed the highest redox activity at all Long Beach sites (on both a per-mass and per-air volume basis). A significant association (R2=0.61) was observed between the two assays, indicating that macrophage ROS and DTT levels are affected at least partially by similar PM species. Relatively small variation was observed for the DTT measurements across all size fractions and sites, whereas macrophage ROS levels showed more significant ranges across the three different particle size modes and throughout the sites (coefficients of variation, or CVs, were 0.35, 0.24 and 0.53 for quasi-UF, accumulation, and coarse mode particles, respectively). Association between the PM constituents and the redox activity was further investigated using multiple linear regression models. The results showed that OC was the most important component influencing the DTT activity of PM samples. The variability of macrophage ROS was explained by changes in OC concentrations and water-soluble vanadium (probably originating from ship emissions bunker oil combustion). The multiple regression models were used to predict the average diurnal DTT levels as a function of the OC concentration at

  8. Redox activity and chemical speciation of size fractioned PM in the communities of the Los Angeles – Long Beach Harbor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cho

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two different types of assays were used to quantitatively measure the redox activity of PM and to examine its intrinsic toxicity: 1 in vitro exposure to rat alveolar macrophage (AM cells using dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA as the fluorescent probe (macrophage ROS assay, and: 2 consumption of dithiothreitol (DTT in a cell-free system (DTT assay. Coarse (PM10–2.5, accumulation (PM2.5–0.25, and quasi-ultrafine (quasi-UF, PM0.25 mode particles were collected weekly at five sampling sites in the Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor and at one site near the University of Southern California campus (urban site. All PM samples were analyzed for organic (total and water-soluble and elemental carbon, organic species, inorganic ions, and total and water-soluble elements. Quasi-UF mode particles showed the highest redox activity at all Long Beach sites (on both a per-mass and per-air volume basis. A significant association (R2=0.61 was observed between the two assays, indicating that macrophage ROS and DTT levels are affected at least partially by similar PM species. Relatively small variation was observed for the DTT measurements across all size fractions and sites, whereas macrophage ROS levels showed more significant ranges across the three different particle size modes and throughout the sites (coefficients of variation, or CVs, were 0.35, 0.24 and 0.53 for quasi-UF, accumulation, and coarse mode particles, respectively. Association between the PM constituents and the redox activity was further investigated using multiple linear regression models. The results showed that OC was the most important component influencing the DTT activity of PM samples. The variability of macrophage ROS was explained by changes in OC concentrations and water-soluble vanadium (probably originating from ship emissions – bunker oil combustion. The multiple regression models were used to predict the average diurnal macrophage ROS and DTT levels as a

  9. 78 FR 11116 - Safety Zone; Mamaroneck Beach and Yacht Club Fireworks, Mamaroneck Harbor, Long Island Sound, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking COTP Captain of the Port A. Public... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may..., Mamaroneck Harbor, Long Island Sound, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed...

  10. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Phocine Distemper Virus Isolated from a Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina) during the 1988 North Sea Epidemic

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, Rory D.; Verburgh, R. Joyce; van de Bildt, Marco W.G.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; de Swart, Rik L.

    2013-01-01

    Phocine distemper virus (PDV) was identified as the cause of a large morbillivirus outbreak among harbor seals in the North Sea in 1988. PDV is a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, genus Morbillivirus. Until now, no full-genome sequence of PDV has been available.

  12. Anthropogenic contamination of metals in sediments of the Santa Rosalía harbor, Baja California peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilin, Evgueni; Jiménez-Illescas, Ángel Rafael; López-López, Silverio

    2013-03-01

    To know the environment impact on a harbor of the Santa Rosalía port on the Baja California peninsula, the concentrations of metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Pb, U and Zn) in harbor sediments were determined for 13 stations and compared with their average upper Earth´s crust abundance. The mean enrichment factors, calculated using Al as a normalizer, were higher than the unity for Ag, Ba, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, U, V and Zn. Concentrations of slightly enriched Cd in the sediments are below the effect range low (ERL) sediment quality guidelines value only at three stations. The levels of Pb in the harbor sediments at four stations (1, 6, 9 and 11) are between the ERL (46.7 mg kg(-1)) and the effect range medium (ERM) (218 mg kg(-1)), and Pb content in the rest of the sediment samples is higher than the ERM, demonstrating the high extent of the anthropogenic impact of this metal on the sedimentary environment. The total concentrations of the potentially toxic elements Cu (3,390 ± 804 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (1,916 ± 749 mg kg(-1)) very strongly exceed their ERM, showing a high possibility of toxicological danger for marine biota, living inside or entering the harbor. PMID:23277367

  13. 77 FR 47331 - Regulated Navigation Area-New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac River, Mill River, New Haven, CT; Pearl...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms COTP Captain of the Port DHS Department of Homeland Security FR... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area--New Haven Harbor,...

  14. The effect of a large Danish offshore wind farm on harbor and grey seal haul-out behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edrén, Susi Manuela Clermont; Andersen, Signe May; Teilmann, Jonas; Carstensen, Jakob; Harders, Pernille B.; Dietz, Rune; Miller, Lee

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the construction and operation of a large Danish offshore wind farm on harbor and gray seal haul-out behavior within a nearby (4 km) seal sanctuary. Time-lapse photography, visual monitoring, and aerial surveys were used to monitor the number of seals on lan...

  15. Bilateral directional asymmetry of the appendicular skeleton of the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galatius, Anders; Jespersen, Åse

    2005-01-01

    robust right humerii and ulnae may be designed for higher levels of mechanical stress. These DAs and the examples of lateralized behavior recorded in cetaceans, point to the existence of lateralized use of the flippers at the population level in harbor porpoises and possibly other cetacean species....

  16. The phenotype of Floating-Harbor syndrome: Clinical characterization of 52 individuals with mutations in exon 34 of SRCAP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Nikkel (Sarah); A. Dauber (Andrew); S. de Munnik (Sonja); M. Connolly (Meghan); R.L. Hood (Rebecca L); O. Caluseriu (Oana); J.A. Hurst (Jane); U. Kini (Usha); M.J.M. Nowaczyk; A. Afenjar (Alexandra); B. Albrecht; J.E. Allanson (Judith E); P. Balestri (Paolo); T. Ben-Omran (Tawfeg); F. Brancati (Fred); I. Cordeiro (Isabel); B.S. Da Cunha (Bruna Santos); P.F. Delaney (Peter); A. Destrée (Anne); D.R. Fitzpatrick (David); F. Forzano (Francesca); N. Ghali (Neeti); G. Gillies (Greta); J. Harwood; Y. Hendriks; D. Héron (Delphine); A. Hoischen (Alex); E.M. Honey (Engela Magdalena); E.H. Hoefsloot (Lies); J. Ibrahim (Jennifer); C. Jacob (Claire); S.G. Kant (Sarina); C.A. Kim (Chong); E.P. Kirk (Edwin P); N.V.A.M. Knoers (Nine); D. Lacombe (Denis); C. van der Lee (Christiaan); I.F.M. Lo (Ivan F M); L.S. Lucas (Luiza S); F. Mari (Francesca); V. Mericq (Veronica); J.S. Moilanen (Jukka S); S.T. Møller (Sanne Traasdahl); S. Moortgat (Stephanie); D.T. Pilz (Daniela); K. Pope (Kate); S. Price (Susan); A. Renieri (Alessandra); J. Sá (Joaquim); J. Schoots (Jeroen); E.L. Silveira (Elizabeth L); M.E.H. Simon (Marleen); A. Slavotinek (Anne); I.K. Temple; I. van der Burgt (Ineke); B.B.A. de Vries (Bert); J.D. Weisfeld-Adams (James D); M.L. Whiteford (Margo L); D. Wierczorek (Dagmar); J.M. Wit (Jan); C.F.O. Yee (Connie Fung On); P. Beaulieu (Patrick); S.M. White (Sue M); B. Bulman; E. Bongers (Ernie); H. Brunner (Han); M. Feingold (Murray); K.M. Boycott (Kym)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition characterized by short stature, delays in expressive language, and a distinctive facial appearance. Recently, heterozygous truncating mutations in SRCAP were determined to be disease-causing. With the availability of a DNA ba

  17. 76 FR 55413 - Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for California Red-legged Frog, California Tiger Salamander, Smith...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... Register on June 17, 1999 (64 FR 32717), the Service would issue a permit to the Applicant authorizing take... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for California Red-legged Frog, California... federally threatened California red-legged frog (Rana draytonii) and California tiger salamander...

  18. 33 CFR 334.1420 - Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. 334.1420 Section 334.1420..., Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. (a) The danger zone. The waters within an area delineated by...

  19. 78 FR 23489 - Safety Zone; V.I. Carnival Finale, St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S.V.I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... (78 FR 16208). The Coast Guard received no public comments in the docket and no requests for public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; V.I. Carnival Finale, St. Thomas Harbor;...

  20. Overview of the USDA-ARS marine finfish reproduction and larviculture research program at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    As is the case with most marine finfish species, development of captive breeding and larval production methods to ensure a consistent and reliable source of seed stock is essential to industry expansion. In 2004, USDA-ARS began work to establish a research program at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Ins...

  1. 75 FR 1734 - Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule Safe Harbor Proposed Self-Regulatory Guidelines; i-SAFE...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... CFR Part 312 Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Safe Harbor Proposed Self-Regulatory Guidelines... Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mamie Kresses, Attorney, (202...-regulatory guidelines that would implement the Rule's protections.\\3\\ \\1\\ 64 FR 59888 (1999). \\2\\ 16...

  2. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  3. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  4. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 of 38-Foot Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Kohn, N.P.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental studies were conducted by Battelle/Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) to evaluate the suitability of sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor for dredging and ocean disposal. During the Phase 3 38-Foot Project, sediment cores were collected from mudline to {minus}39 ft mean lower low water at various locations in Oakland Inner Harbor channel and allocated to six composite samples. These composites were evaluated through physical/chemical analyses, acute toxicity to sensitive marine organisms, and bioaccumulation potential. Sediment samples from individual locations were tested for physical/chemical parameters only. The results of toxicological and bioaccumulation testing may be used by USACE to determine the amount of potential dredged material from Oakland Inner Harbor channel acceptable for open-water disposal as defined by the Draft Implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990) and consistent with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662). This is Volume 2 of a two-volume data report that represents the data gathered during the Oakland Harbor Phase 3 38-Foot Project, conducted in the Fall of 1990. This data report does not include interpretation or statistical analysis of the 38-Foot data. Volume 1 includes the project background as well as data and results presented in Appendixes A through H. Volume 2 includes the remaining data presented in Appendixes I through L.

  5. Ecological evaluation of Oakland Harbor Phase 3-38-foot composites relative to the Alcatraz Island Environs (R-AM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayhew, H.L.; Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99--662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner Harbors to accommodate deeper-draft vessels. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted a study for USACE to determine whether potential dredged sediments in Oakland Inner Harbor were suitable for open-water disposal, following the guidelines of the Draft Ecological Evaluation of Proposed Discharge of Dredged Material into Ocean Waters, otherwise known as the implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990). This report summarizes the collection, chemical analysis, toxicity testing, and bioaccumulation analysis of sediments collected to {minus}38 ft relative to mean lower low water from Oakland Inner Harbor. Six dredged material composite samples (COMPs) were compared to reference sediment from the area surrounding Alcatraz Island and its dredged material disposal site, designated the Alcatraz Island Environs (R-AM). Examination of the results of toxicity tests and bioaccumulation analysis will assist USACE in determining the effects of in-bay disposal of the Oakland Inner Harbor dredged material on the Alcatraz Island Environs.

  6. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 of 38-Foot Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Kohn, N.P.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineering (USACE), environmental studies were conducted by Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to evaluate the suitability of sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor for dredging and ocean disposal. During the Phase 3 38-Foot Project, sediment cores were collected from mudline to {minus}39 ft mean lower low water at various locations in Oakland Inner Harbor channel and allocated to six composite samples. These composites were evaluated through physical/chemical analyses, acute toxicity to sensitive marine organisms, and bioaccumulation potential. Sediment samples from individual locations were tested for physical/chemical parameters only. The results of toxicological and bioaccumulation testing may be used by USACE to determine the amount of potential dredged material from Oakland Inner Harbor channel acceptable for open-water disposal as defined by the Draft Implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990) and consistent with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662). This is Volume 1 of a two-volume data report that presents the data gathered during the Oakland Harbor Phase 3 38-Foot Project, conducted in the Fall of 1990. This data report does not include interpretation or statistical analysis of the 38-Foot data. Volume 1 includes the project background as well as a full presentation of data and results in Appendixes A through H. Volume 2 contains the remaining data in Appendixes I through L.

  7. In vitro activities of 15 oral beta-lactams against Klebsiella pneumoniae harboring new extended-spectrum beta-lactamases.

    OpenAIRE

    Kitzis, M D; Liassine, N; Ferré, B.; Gutmann, L; Acar, J F; Goldstein, F.

    1990-01-01

    The activities of 15 oral beta-lactams against Klebsiella pneumoniae harboring new extended-spectrum beta-lactamases were studied. All compounds were affected by these enzymes, especially by the SHV derivatives. Except for ceftibuten, the compounds with the greatest intrinsic activity were more affected by the presence of these enzymes than were older compounds with moderate intrinsic activity.

  8. Expression of genes involved in the uptake of inorganic carbon in the gill of a deep-sea vesicomyid clam harboring intracellular thioautotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Yuki; Ikuta, Tetsuro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Shimamura, Shigeru; Shigenobu, Shuji; Maruyama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Takao

    2016-07-10

    Deep-sea vesicomyid clams, including the genus Phreagena (formerly Calyptogena), harbor thioautotrophic bacterial symbionts in the host symbiosome, which consists of cytoplasmic vacuoles in gill epithelial cells called bacteriocytes. The symbiont requires inorganic carbon (Ci), such as CO2, HCO3(-), and CO3(2-), to synthesize organic compounds, which are utilized by the host clam. The dominant Ci in seawater is HCO3(-), which is impermeable to cell membranes. Within the bacteriocyte, cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase (CA) from the host, which catalyzes the inter-conversion between CO2 and HCO3(-), has been shown to be abundant and is thought to supply intracellular CO2 to symbionts in the symbiosome. However, the mechanism of Ci uptake by the host gill from seawater is poorly understood. To elucidate the influx pathway of Ci into the bacteriocyte, we isolated the genes related to Ci uptake via the pyrosequencing of cDNA from the gill of Phreagena okutanii, and investigated their expression patterns. Using phylogenetic and amino acid sequence analyses, three solute carrier family 4 (SLC4) bicarbonate transporters (slc4co1, slc4co2, and slc4co4) and two membrane-associated CAs (mcaco1 and mcaco2) were identified as candidate genes for Ci uptake. In an in situ hybridization analysis of gill sections, the expression of mcaco1 and mcaco2 was detected in the bacteriocytes and asymbiotic non-ciliated cells, respectively, and the expression of slc4co1 and slc4co2 was detected in the asymbiotic cells, including the intermediate cells of the inner area and the non-ciliated cells of the external area. Although subcellular localizations of the products of these genes have not been fully elucidated, they may play an important role in the uptake of Ci into the bacteriocytes. These findings will improve our understanding of the Ci transport system in the symbiotic relationships of chemosynthetic bivalves. PMID:27016297

  9. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther; Sopper, Sieghart; Wolf, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems.

  10. Retail ready-to-eat food as a potential vehicle for Staphylococcus spp. harboring antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chajęcka-Wierzchowska, Wioleta; Zadernowska, Anna; Nalepa, Beata; Sierpińska, Magda; Laniewska-Trokenheim, Lucja

    2014-06-01

    Ready-to-eat (RTE) food, which does not need thermal processing before consumption, could be a vehicle for the spread of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. As part of general microbiological safety checks, staphylococci are routinely enumerated in these kinds of foods. However, the presence of antibiotic-resistant staphylococci in RTE food is not routinely investigated, and data are only available from a small number of studies. The present study evaluated the pheno- and genotypical antimicrobial resistance profile of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from 858 RTE foods (cheeses, cured meats, sausages, smoked fishes, salads). Of 113 strains isolated, S. aureus was the most prevalent species, followed by S. xylosus, S. saprophyticus, and S. epidermidis. More than half (54.9%) of the isolates were resistant to at least one class of tested antibiotic; of these, 35.4% of the strains were classified as multidrug resistant. Most of the isolates were resistant to cefoxitin (49.6%), followed by clindamycin (39.3%), tigecycline (27.4%), quinupristin-dalfopristin (22.2%), rifampin (20.5%), tetracycline (17.9%), and erythromycin (8.5%). All methicillin-resistant staphylococci harbored the mecA gene. Among the isolates resistant to at least one antibiotic, 38 harbored tetracycline resistance determinant tet (M), 24 harbored tet (L), and 9 harbored tet (K). Of the isolates positive for tet (M) genes, 34.2% were positive for the Tn916-Tn1545-like integrase family gene. Our results indicated that retail RTE food could be considered an important route for the transmission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria harboring multiple antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:24853524

  11. High Resolution Tsunami Modeling and Assessment of Harbor Resilience; Case Study in Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevdet Yalciner, Ahmet; Aytore, Betul; Gokhan Guler, Hasan; Kanoglu, Utku; Duzgun, Sebnem; Zaytsev, Andrey; Arikawa, Taro; Tomita, Takashi; Ozer Sozdinler, Ceren; Necmioglu, Ocal; Meral Ozel, Nurcan

    2014-05-01

    Ports and harbors are the major vulnerable coastal structures under tsunami attack. Resilient harbors against tsunami impacts are essential for proper, efficient and successful rescue operations and reduction of the loss of life and property by tsunami disasters. There are several critical coastal structures as such in the Marmara Sea. Haydarpasa and Yenikapi ports are located in the Marmara Sea coast of Istanbul. These two ports are selected as the sites of numerical experiments to test their resilience under tsunami impact. Cargo, container and ro-ro handlings, and short/long distance passenger transfers are the common services in both ports. Haydarpasa port has two breakwaters with the length of three kilometers in total. Yenikapi port has one kilometer long breakwater. The accurate resilience analysis needs high resolution tsunami modeling and careful assessment of the site. Therefore, building data with accurate coordinates of their foot prints and elevations are obtained. The high resolution bathymetry and topography database with less than 5m grid size is developed for modeling. The metadata of the several types of structures and infrastructure of the ports and environs are processed. Different resistances for the structures/buildings/infrastructures are controlled by assigning different friction coefficients in a friction matrix. Two different tsunami conditions - high expected and moderate expected - are selected for numerical modeling. The hybrid tsunami simulation and visualization codes NAMI DANCE, STOC-CADMAS System are utilized to solve all necessary tsunami parameters and obtain the spatial and temporal distributions of flow depth, current velocity, inundation distance and maximum water level in the study domain. Finally, the computed critical values of tsunami parameters are evaluated and structural performance of the port components are discussed in regard to a better resilience. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Support by EU 603839 ASTARTE Project, UDAP-Ç-12

  12. Geochemical evaluation of the land use and human activities at a Medieval harbor site, Masuda city, Shimane Prefecture, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalai, Banzragch; Ishiga, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Large-scale harbor and settlement sites from the latter half of the eleventh through sixteenth centuries have recently been discovered in the northern part of Masuda City, Shimane Prefecture, Japan. The sites were constructed at the river mouth delta of the Takatsu and Masuda rivers, facing the Sea of Japan. In former time, the mouths of the two rivers are thought to have formed a shallow lagoon connecting with the Sea of Japan. The harbor was thus well located for ships sailing along the sea coast, especially for conducting trade with the China mainland and the Korean peninsula. Archaeological investigations have identified over 800 construction pits, blacksmith hearths, harbor structures and numerous fragments of ceramic porcelain originating both from within Japan and from Asia (China, Korea, Vietnam and Thailand). It seems that the maritime trade network operated from this Medieval harbor site by the Masuda Clan was on an East Asian scale. Consequently, the harbor site can be expected to have received a considerable amount of ancient anthropogenic matter. Concentrations of 22 elements in 66 soil samples from the Nakazu Higashihara site were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, in order to identify the land use and human impacts on soil chemistry at the harbor site. The results show that significant differences in geochemical compositional exist between the northern and southern parts of the site due to differences in lithology and land use practice. The south area was a production area of this harbor site. Three different activity areas were recognized within this area (fire pit and charcoal area, building pillars, and a blacksmith furnace area), based on geochemical and archaeological information. Cluster analysis shows a strong relationship exists between As, Pb, Cu, Br, TS, MnO and P2O5 in the fire pit and charcoal area. These charcoal materials were likely derived from fuel used in firing and heating. Close relationships occur between Cr, Sr, Sc

  13. The Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project: Intersectoral collaboration to address sexual exploitation in Minnesota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea McDonald Marboe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract

    Objectives: To evaluate the Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project intersectoral collaboration to improve continuity and appropriateness of services for sexually exploited children and adolescents.

    Methods: An intensive single case study, drawing on interviews and focus groups with experiential youth (n=125, multisectoral stakeholders (n=196, documented activities, and repeated interviews with collaborating team members (n=29, teen clients (n=46 and parents (n=22. The collaboration was designed around an 8-step process for creating victim-centered protocols within and across organizations, altering services to bridge gaps in care, and creating training tools for the different sectors.

    Results: The initial needs assessment documented fragmented care and problematic communication across departments and sectors. The shared protocol development among decision makers from each agency, focused on best practices and evidence-based interventions, fostered trusting relationships, greater awareness of different roles and services, and speeded practice changes to remove barriers to care for sexually exploited youth.

    Conclusions: A task-focused collaboration with a shared community-wide protocol, increased transparency between services, and ongoing intersectoral training can help foster a meaningful response to sexually exploited youth.

  14. High bacterial biodiversity increases degradation performance of hydrocarbons during bioremediation of contaminated harbor marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated changes of bacterial abundance and biodiversity during bioremediation experiments carried out on oxic and anoxic marine harbor sediments contaminated with hydrocarbons. Oxic sediments, supplied with inorganic nutrients, were incubated in aerobic conditions at 20 °C and 35 °C for 30 days, whereas anoxic sediments, amended with organic substrates, were incubated in anaerobic conditions at the same temperatures for 60 days. Results reported here indicate that temperature exerted the main effect on bacterial abundance, diversity and assemblage composition. At higher temperature bacterial diversity and evenness increased significantly in aerobic conditions, whilst decreased in anaerobic conditions. In both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, biodegradation efficiencies of hydrocarbons were significantly and positively related with bacterial richness and evenness. Overall results presented here suggest that bioremediation strategies, which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity rather than the selection of specific taxa, may significantly increase the efficiency of hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated marine sediments. - Highlights: ► Bioremediation performance was investigated on hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. ► Major changes in bacterial diversity and assemblage composition were observed. ► Temperature exerted the major effect on bacterial assemblages. ► High bacterial diversity increased significantly biodegradation performance. This should be considered for sediment remediation by bio-treatments. - Bioremediation strategies which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity may significantly increase the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in contaminated marine sediments.

  15. Mutations in SRCAP, encoding SNF2-related CREBBP activator protein, cause Floating-Harbor syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Rebecca L; Lines, Matthew A; Nikkel, Sarah M; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Beaulieu, Chandree; Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J M; Allanson, Judith; Kim, Chong Ae; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Moilanen, Jukka S; Lacombe, Didier; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Whiteford, Margo L; Quaio, Caio Robledo D C; Gomy, Israel; Bertola, Debora R; Albrecht, Beate; Platzer, Konrad; McGillivray, George; Zou, Ruobing; McLeod, D Ross; Chudley, Albert E; Chodirker, Bernard N; Marcadier, Janet; Majewski, Jacek; Bulman, Dennis E; White, Susan M; Boycott, Kym M

    2012-02-10

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition characterized by short stature, delayed osseous maturation, expressive-language deficits, and a distinctive facial appearance. Occurrence is generally sporadic, although parent-to-child transmission has been reported on occasion. Employing whole-exome sequencing, we identified heterozygous truncating mutations in SRCAP in five unrelated individuals with sporadic FHS. Sanger sequencing identified mutations in SRCAP in eight more affected persons. Mutations were de novo in all six instances in which parental DNA was available. SRCAP is an SNF2-related chromatin-remodeling factor that serves as a coactivator for CREB-binding protein (CREBBP, better known as CBP, the major cause of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome [RTS]). Five SRCAP mutations, two of which are recurrent, were identified; all are tightly clustered within a small (111 codon) region of the final exon. These mutations are predicted to abolish three C-terminal AT-hook DNA-binding motifs while leaving the CBP-binding and ATPase domains intact. Our findings show that SRCAP mutations are the major cause of FHS and offer an explanation for the clinical overlap between FHS and RTS. PMID:22265015

  16. Efficacy of multimodal treatment for leptomeningeal metastases in a lung cancer harboring an EGFR mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morichika, Daisuke; Kubo, Toshio; Gotoda, Hiroko; Tamura, Tomoki; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tabata, Masahiro; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    For lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, the advent of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has prolonged survival rates. Even though disease sites have been well controlled by EGFR-TKIs, some patients develop carcinomatous meningitis, which reduces their quality of life drastically. Although multidisciplinary approaches have improved patient survival and quality of life, the outcomes are not yet satisfactory. We report the case of a 54-year-old Japanese woman diagnosed with leptomeningeal metastases (LM) from a lung adenocarcinoma harboring an EGFR exon 21 L858R point mutation. She was treated with gefitinib for 2 months, and symptoms of LM emerged during the treatment period. Although the treatment was switched to erlotinib, disturbance of consciousness worsened because of progressive hydrocephalus. Because all extracranial lesions remained responsive to treatment, and the exon 20 T790M point mutation was not detected in cerebrospinal fluid, we placed a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The patient’s disturbed consciousness improved dramatically after the shunt was placed; however, the optic and auditory nerve impairments due to direct invasion of LM lesions into nerve canals persisted. Administration of bevacizumab subsequent to whole-brain radiotherapy reduced the cranial nerve impairment, and the patient survived for 10 months. In conclusion, a combination of erlotinib and ventriculoperitoneal shunt was effective for hydrocephalus, and the immediate administration of additional therapies, including bevacizumab and radiation therapy, was useful in a patient suffering from LM. PMID:27042125

  17. Array measurement of echolocation signals on the melon of harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Whitlow; Benoit-Bird, Kelly; Kastelein, Ronald; Cranford, Ted

    2001-05-01

    The melon of odontocetes has been hypothesized to be a focusing body that channels echolocation signals produced within the nasal region of the animal's head into the water. The acoustic field of two echolocating harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) was measured at the melon's surface with an array of four broadband hydrophones embedded in suction cups. The clicks detected by each hydrophone were simultaneously digitized at a sampling rate of 500 kHz and stored on a PC. Digital still photographs of the array were taken before each echolocation trial to measure the hydrophone's position. The shape and dimensions of the melon were measured with a flexible shape-retaining measuring device. The axis of the echolocation beam was found to be approximately 5.6-6.1 cm from the edge of the animal's upper lip along the midline of the melon, which coincides with the axis of the low-density lipid core of the melon. Click amplitudes dropped off rapidly (12-14 dB) from the maximum at hydrophones 3.5 cm apart, providing support for the melon-focusing hypothesis. Changes in the waveform on consecutive hydrophones suggest that the porpoises can manipulate either the shape of the melon or the output of the sources within 0.086 s.

  18. Effects of Hypoxia on the Phylogenetic Composition and Species Distribution of Protists in a Subtropical Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Emma; Jing, Hongmei; Xia, Xiaomin; Liu, Hongbin

    2016-07-01

    Tolo Harbor, a subtropical semi-enclosed coastal water body, is surrounded by an expanding urban community, which contributes to large concentrations of nutrient runoff, leading to algal blooms and localized hypoxic episodes. Present knowledge of protist distributions in subtropical waters during hypoxic conditions is very limited. In this study, therefore, we combined parallel 454 pyrosequencing technology and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprint analyses to reveal the protist community shifts before, during, and after a 2-week hypoxic episode during the summer of 2011. Hierarchical clustering for DGGE demonstrated similar grouping of hypoxic samples separately from oxic samples. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and dissolved inorganic nitrogen:phosphate (DIN:PO4) concentrations significantly affected OTU distribution in 454 sequenced samples, and a shift toward a ciliate and marine alveolate clade II (MALV II) species composition occurred as waters shifted from oxic to hypoxic. These results suggest that protist community shifts toward heterotrophic and parasitic tendencies as well as decreased diversity and richness in response to hypoxic outbreaks. PMID:26979838

  19. Cryptococcus gattii Type VGIIa Infection in Harbor Seals ( Phoca vitulina ) in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Justin F; Haulena, Martin; Hoang, Linda M N; Morshed, Muhammad; Zabek, Erin; Raverty, Stephen A

    2016-07-01

    Cryptococcosis has been reported in marine mammals in the northeastern Pacific with increasing frequency in the last 15 yr. Although a variety of cetaceans have been diagnosed with cryptococcosis, Cryptococcus gattii has not been reported in pinnipeds. We document C. gattii VGIIa in a harbor seal ( Phoca vitulina ) pup and in an unrelated adult. Both animals were presented to Vancouver Aquarium's Marine Mammal Rescue Centre (VAMMRC) with generalized weakness, dehydration, respiratory compromise, minimally responsive mentation, and suboptimal body condition. Necropsy and histopathology findings were consistent in both animals and featured generalized lymphadenopathy, bronchopneumonia, and meningoencephalitis with intralesional yeast and fungemia. Cryptococcal serum antigen titers were ≥1,024 in both animals. Fungal culture of lung and lymph nodes confirmed C. gattii . Exposure was likely via inhalation prior to presentation to VAMMRC, and C. gattii infection was the proximate cause of death. This report expands the range of susceptible host species as C. gattii continues to emerge as a pathogen of concern in marine mammals in the northeastern Pacific. PMID:27243332

  20. Non-Human Primates Harbor Diverse Mammalian and Avian Astroviruses Including Those Associated with Human Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik A Karlsson

    Full Text Available Astroviruses (AstVs are positive sense, single-stranded RNA viruses transmitted to a wide range of hosts via the fecal-oral route. The number of AstV-infected animal hosts has rapidly expanded in recent years with many more likely to be discovered because of the advances in viral surveillance and next generation sequencing. Yet no study to date has identified human AstV genotypes in animals, although diverse AstV genotypes similar to animal-origin viruses have been found in children with diarrhea and in one instance of encephalitis. Here we provide important new evidence that non-human primates (NHP can harbor a wide variety of mammalian and avian AstV genotypes, including those only associated with human infection. Serological analyses confirmed that >25% of the NHP tested had antibodies to human AstVs. Further, we identified a recombinant AstV with parental relationships to known human AstVs. Phylogenetic analysis suggests AstVs in NHP are on average evolutionarily much closer to AstVs from other animals than are AstVs from bats, a frequently proposed reservoir. Our studies not only demonstrate that human astroviruses can be detected in NHP but also suggest that NHP are unique in their ability to support diverse AstV genotypes, further challenging the paradigm that astrovirus infection is species-specific.

  1. Invasive lionfish harbor a different external bacterial community than native Bahamian fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J. L.; Olson, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    The introduction and subsequent spread of lionfish into the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea has become a worldwide conservation issue. These highly successful invaders may also be capable of introducing non-native microorganisms to the invaded regions. This study compared the bacterial communities associated with lionfish external tissue to those of native Bahamian fishes and ambient water. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses demonstrated that lionfish bacterial communities were significantly different than those associated with three native Bahamian fishes. Additionally, all fishes harbored distinct bacterial communities from the ambient bacterioplankton. Analysis of bacterial clone libraries from invasive lionfish and native squirrelfish indicated that lionfish communities were more diverse than those associated with squirrelfish, yet did not contain known fish pathogens. Using microscopy and molecular genetic approaches, lionfish eggs were examined for the presence of bacteria to evaluate the capacity for vertical transmission. Eggs removed from the ovaries of gravid females were free of bacteria, suggesting that lionfish likely acquire bacteria from the environment. This study was the first examination of bacterial communities associated with the invasive lionfish and indicated that they support different communities of environmentally derived bacteria than Caribbean reef fishes.

  2. First isolation of Schizophyllum commune in a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafusa, Yasuko; Hirano, Yuzo; Watabe, Hirofumi; Hosaka, Kentaro; Ikezawa, Mitsutaka; Shibahara, Tomoyuki

    2016-07-01

    To date, Schizophyllum commune infection has been identified in only humans and dogs. A 7-year-old female harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) died after exhibiting corneal opacity, anorexia, and labored respiration. At necropsy, phthisis of the left eyeball was detected, and multiple nodular lesions were observed in the thoracic and abdominal regions, especially in the lung, heart, and lymph nodes. Histopathologically, numerous hyphae were seen in granulomatous lesions in the eyes, lung, heart, and lymph nodules. An isolate on potato dextrose agar from the eyes, lung, and sputum yielded a rapidly growing white woolly mycelia with basidiocarps (fruiting bodies) at 37°C. A suitable temperature for mycelial growth was obtained at 25°C, although sustained growth also occurred at 37°C. The fungal isolate, KH-JPN15-011, had distinctive features including hyphae bearing spicules and clamp connections, which were consistent with the characteristics of basidiomycete fungus. The sequence of the internal transcribed spacer region of nuclear ribosomal DNA showed 99.67% (617 bp) similarity with those of S. commune Phylogenetic analysis showed that the present isolate is most closely related to the samples from the Old World. This is the first report of a fatal disease caused by S. commune in exotic animals. Previously reported human and canine infections have not included granulomatous endophthalmitis and myocarditis. After considering these and previous findings, there is a possibility that S. commune from the Old World may include numerous highly pathogenic strains. PMID:26933208

  3. Contribution of live heartworms harboring in pulmonary arteries to pulmonary hypertension in dogs with dirofilariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, H; Sasaki, Y; Ishihara, K; Hirano, Y

    1990-12-01

    To investigate whether adult heartworms harboring in the pulmonary arteries contribute to pulmonary hypertension, we determined the cardio-pulmonary values immediately before and after removal of heartworms from the pulmonary arteries and before and after insertion of live worms in their place. In 10 heartworm-infected dogs, 8 to 46 worms were removed. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure fell significantly from 24.5 +/- 7.9 mmHg to 16.3 +/- 4.9 mmHg (p less than 0.01) immediately after removal. The right cardiac output decreased in 7 of the 10 cases. The total pulmonary resistance and right ventricular stroke work index also decreased. At 24 hours after removal, live heartworms were put back into the pulmonary arteries of their host dog. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure elevated significantly (p less than 0.01) immediately after insertion. The right cardiac output further decreased in 7 of the 10 dogs, and the total pulmonary resistance and right ventricular stroke work index increased. Separate from this, 12 to 42 heartworms were transplanted into the pulmonary arteries of 5 heartworm-free dogs. Immediately after transplantation, the pulmonary arterial pressure did not show any significant change. However, the stroke volume decreased, and the total pulmonary resistance increased. These facts suggest a contribution of live heartworms to the pulmonary hypertension, although there is a complicated interaction among the presence of heartworms, the pulmonary lesions and the pulmonary hypertension. PMID:2287128

  4. Harbor porpoise Phocoena phocoena strandings on the Dutch coast: No genetic structure, but evidence of inbreeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas-Duivesteijn, Suzanne J.; Smit, Femmie J. L.; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.; Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2015-03-01

    Conservation management in the North Sea is often motivated by the population size of marine mammals, like harbor porpoises Phocoena phocoena. In the Dutch part of the North Sea, sighting and stranding data are used to estimate population sizes, but these data give little insight into genetic structuring of the population. In this study we investigated genetic structure among animals stranded at different locations and times of year. We also tested whether there is a link between stranding and necropsy data, and genetic diversity. We made use of both mitochondrial (mtDNA) and microsatellite DNA analysis of samples from dead stranded porpoises along the Dutch coast during 2007. mtDNA analysis showed 6 variable positions in the control region, defining 3 different haplotypes. mtDNA haplotypes were not randomly distributed along the Dutch coastline. However, microsatellite analysis showed that these mtDNA haplotypes did not represent separate groups on a nuclear level. Furthermore, microsatellite analysis revealed no genotypic differences between seasons, locations or genders. The results of this study indicate that the Dutch population is panmictic. In contrast, heterozygosity levels were low, indicating some level of inbreeding in this population. However, this was not corroborated by other indices of inbreeding. This research provided insight into genetic structuring of stranded porpoises in 2007, but data from multiple years should be included to be able to help estimate population sizes.

  5. Discrete event simulation for petroleum transfers involving harbors, refineries and pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marcella S.R.; Lueders, Ricardo; Delgado, Myriam R.B.S. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays a great effort has been spent by companies to improve their logistics in terms of programming of events that affect production and distribution of products. In this case, simulation can be a valuable tool for evaluating different behaviors. The objective of this work is to build a discrete event simulation model for scheduling of operational activities in complexes containing one harbor and two refineries interconnected by a pipeline infrastructure. The model was developed in Arena package, based on three sub-models that control pier allocation, loading of tanks, and transfers to refineries through pipelines. Preliminary results obtained for a given control policy, show that profit can be calculated by taking into account many parameters such as oil costs on ships, pier using, over-stay of ships and interface costs. Such problem has already been considered in the literature but using different strategies. All these factors should be considered in a real-world operation where decision making tools are necessary to obtain high returns. (author)

  6. δ15N as a proxy for historic anthropogenic nitrogen loading in Charleston Harbor, SC, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, T. N.; Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Bivalve shell geochemistry can serve as a useful indicator of changes in coastal environments. There is increasing interest in developing paleoenvironmental proxies from mollusk shell organic components. Numerous studies have focused on how the δ15N obtained from bivalve tissues can be used to trace present-day wastewater input into estuaries. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to tracing the impact of anthropogenic nitrogen loading into estuaries over time. By measuring historic levels of δ15N in the organic fraction of oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica) from archaeological sites around Charleston Harbor and comparing those levels to the δ15N content of modern shells, it is possible to assess how nitrogen has fluctuated historically in the area. Whole-shell samples from the Late Archaic Period (~3000-4000 BP, Late Woodland Period (~1400-800 BP), 18th and 19th centuries, and modern controls were measured for %N and d15N. Evidence of increased anthropogenic input of N is expected to begin in the early historic period based on similar analysis in Chesapeake Bay. More ancient samples may give insight into baseline conditions prior to recent population growth and industrialization. This information could help understand how large-scale anthropogenic nitrogen loading has affected coastal ecosystems over time and guide future remediation. Furthermore, this project will help refine and improve this novel proxy of past environmental conditions.

  7. Virulence of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates harboring bla KPC-2 carbapenemase gene in a Caenorhabditis elegans model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Lavigne

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC is a carbapenemase increasingly reported worldwide in Enterobacteriaceae. The aim of this study was to analyze the virulence of several KPC-2-producing K. pneumoniae isolates. The studied strains were (i five KPC-2 clinical strains from different geographical origins, belonging to different ST-types and possessing plasmids of different incompatibility groups; (ii seven transformants obtained after electroporation of either these natural KPC plasmids or a recombinant plasmid harboring only the bla KPC-2 gene into reference strains K. pneumoniae ATCC10031/CIP53153; and (iii five clinical strains cured of plasmids. The virulence of K. pneumoniae isolates was evaluated in the Caenorhabditis elegans model. The clinical KPC producers and transformants were significantly less virulent (LT50: 5.5 days than K. pneumoniae reference strain (LT50: 4.3 days (p<0.01. However, the worldwide spread KPC-2 positive K. pneumoniae ST258 strains and reference strains containing plasmids extracted from K. pneumoniae ST258 strains had a higher virulence than KPC-2 strains belonging to other ST types (LT50: 5 days vs. 6 days, p<0.01. The increased virulence observed in cured strains confirmed this trend. The bla KPC-2 gene itself was not associated to increased virulence.

  8. Model-Based Detection of Radioactive Contraband for Harbor Defense Incorporating Compton Scattering Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V; Chambers, D H; Breitfeller, E F; Guidry, B L; Verbeke, J M; Axelrod, M A; Sale, K E; Meyer, A M

    2010-03-02

    The detection of radioactive contraband is a critical problem is maintaining national security for any country. Photon emissions from threat materials challenge both detection and measurement technologies especially when concealed by various types of shielding complicating the transport physics significantly. This problem becomes especially important when ships are intercepted by U.S. Coast Guard harbor patrols searching for contraband. The development of a sequential model-based processor that captures both the underlying transport physics of gamma-ray emissions including Compton scattering and the measurement of photon energies offers a physics-based approach to attack this challenging problem. The inclusion of a basic radionuclide representation of absorbed/scattered photons at a given energy along with interarrival times is used to extract the physics information available from the noisy measurements portable radiation detection systems used to interdict contraband. It is shown that this physics representation can incorporated scattering physics leading to an 'extended' model-based structure that can be used to develop an effective sequential detection technique. The resulting model-based processor is shown to perform quite well based on data obtained from a controlled experiment.

  9. Redesigning Recombinase Specificity for Safe Harbor Sites in the Human Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C Wallen

    Full Text Available Site-specific recombinases (SSRs are valuable tools for genetic engineering due to their ability to manipulate DNA in a highly specific manner. Engineered zinc-finger and TAL effector recombinases, in particular, are two classes of SSRs composed of custom-designed DNA-binding domains fused to a catalytic domain derived from the resolvase/invertase family of serine recombinases. While TAL effector and zinc-finger proteins can be assembled to recognize a wide range of possible DNA sequences, recombinase catalytic specificity has been constrained by inherent base requirements present within each enzyme. In order to further expand the targeted recombinase repertoire, we used a genetic screen to isolate enhanced mutants of the Bin and Tn21 recombinases that recognize target sites outside the scope of other engineered recombinases. We determined the specific base requirements for recombination by these enzymes and demonstrate their potential for genome engineering by selecting for variants capable of specifically recombining target sites present in the human CCR5 gene and the AAVS1 safe harbor locus. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that complementing functional characterization with protein engineering is a potentially powerful approach for generating recombinases with expanded targeting capabilities.

  10. Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima : an Ironic Comparison = Pearl Harbor ve Hiroşima Saldırilarının İronik bir Karşılaştırılması

    OpenAIRE

    Mahoney, Leo J.

    2005-01-01

    In the past century, veterans of America's wars have shown extraordinary human longevity in the postwar eras. As a result, contemporary public historical interpretations of the American second world war experience have been influenced by veterans' perceptions of historical issues for a longer time than was true of postwar eras before the twentieth centuıy. Public historical debates in the United States have recently focused on the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor (1941) and the American attack...

  11. Heterogeneous Stem Cells in Skin Homeostatis and Wound Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Meilana; Nurrani Mustika Dewi; Andi Wijaya

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The skin protects mammals from insults, infection and dehydration and enables thermoregulation and sensory perception. Various skin-resident cells carry out these diverse functions. Constant turnover of cells and healing upon injury necessitate multiple reservoirs of stem cells. The skin is a complex organ harboring several distinct populations of stem cells and a rich array of cell types. Advances in genetic and imaging tools have brought new findings about the lineage relationsh...

  12. Multiple-Pulse Sounds and Seals: Results of a Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina) Telemetry Study During Wind Farm Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Gordon D; Russell, Debbie J F; McConnell, Bernie; Thompson, Dave; Janik, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    Offshore construction and survey techniques can produce pulsed sounds with a high sound pressure level. In coastal waters, the areas in which they are produced are often also used by seals, potentially resulting in auditory damage or behavioral avoidance. Here, we describe a study on harbor seals during a wind farm installation off southeast England. The study used GPS/global system for mobile communication tags on 23 harbor seals that provided distribution and activity data; the closest range of individual seals to piling varied from 6.65 to 46.1 km. Furthermore, the maximum predicted received levels (RLs) at individual seals varied between 146.9 and 169.4 dB re 1 μPa peak to peak. PMID:26610987

  13. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Wilmington Harbor and Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, M.E.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (US)

    1993-07-01

    This report is intended to provide information required to address potential ecological effects of the proposed disposal of Wilmington Harbor and Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point (MOTSU), North Carolina, sediments in the ocean. The report is divided into five sections. Section 1.0 is the introduction containing a brief overview of the study and the study objectives. Section 2.0 describes the methods and materials used for sample collection, processing, toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, physical/chemical analysis of sediments and tissues, data analysis, and quality assurance procedures. Section 3.0 presents the results of field collections, sediment chemistry, toxicological testing, and tissue chemistry resulting from bioaccumulation exposures. Section 4.0 presents a discussion of the results and summary conclusions concerning the acceptability of the Wilmington Harbor and MOTSU dredged material for ocean disposal. Section 5.0 lists the literature cited in support of this document. A series of appendixes contain detailed data listings.

  14. Microbial Reductive Dechlorination of Aroclor 1260 in Baltimore Harbor Sediment Microcosms Is Catalyzed by Three Phylotypes within the Phylum Chloroflexi▿

    OpenAIRE

    Fagervold, Sonja K.; May, Harold D.; Sowers, Kevin R.

    2007-01-01

    The specific dechlorination pathways for Aroclor 1260 were determined in Baltimore Harbor sediment microcosms developed with the 11 most predominant congeners from this commercial mixture and their resulting dechlorination intermediates. Most of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were dechlorinated in the meta position, and the major products were tetrachlorobiphenyls with unflanked chlorines. Using PCR primers specific for the 16S rRNA genes of known PCB-dehalogenating bacteria, we...

  15. Baltic Sea underwater soundscape. Weather and ship induced sounds and the effect of shipping on harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) activity

    OpenAIRE

    Sairanen, Eeva Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Sound travels faster and further in water than in air while electromagnetic radiation, among it visible light, attenuates fast. Marine animals have adapted to use sound in foraging, predator avoidance, orientation and communication with conspecifics. The underwater soundscape of the Baltic Sea remains largely undiscovered. The area is a unique acoustic environment due to its variant hydrography, broken coastline, shallowness, low salinity and the resulting strong stratifications. The harbor p...

  16. Unexpected thymic hyperplasia in transgenic mice harboring a neuronal promoter fused with simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Botteri, F M; Van Putten, H.; Wong, D. F.; Sauvage, C A; Evans, R. M.

    1987-01-01

    The hypothalamic peptide growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) regulates the secretion and production of growth hormone from the anterior pituitary (M. C. Gelato and G. R. Merriam, Annu. Rev. Physiol. 48:569-591). To study GRF gene regulation, transgenic mice were generated that harbor the human GRF promoter fused to the coding sequences from the simian virus 40 early region. These mice had normal hypothalamic functions but unexpectedly suffered from severe thymic hyperplasia. Immunohistochem...

  17. Remediating Contaminated Sediments in the Ashtabula Harbor as Part of the Ashtabula River Area of Concern: A Collaboration Success Story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District (USACE), in close collaboration with the USEPA and members of an Ashtabula, Ohio, stakeholder advocacy group, were able to achieve major success in mitigating ecological impacts from contaminated sediments deposited in the lower Ashtabula River and Ashtabula Harbor after years of effort to obtain the federal funding needed to do so. The river and harbor were subject to unregulated discharges of hazardous chemicals, heavy metals, and low-level radiological contaminants from decades of operations by a variety of industrial, manufacturing, processing and production activities located near or adjacent to the river and harbor areas. Conditions in the ecosystem in and around the lower portion of the river deteriorated to the point that it was designated a Great Lakes Area of Concern (AOC) in 1983. The advocacy group known as the Ashtabula River Partnership (ARP), facilitated through efforts by both USACE and USEPA, developed an innovative plan to remediate the Ashtabula River AOC by conducting a two-phase project, completed with combined funding authorized under the Great Lakes Legacy Act (GLLA) of 2002, and Section 312(a) of the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 1990. Removal of nearly 527,000 m3 of contaminated sediments from the AOC would significantly reduce the contaminant source term and produce favorable conditions for re-establishing ecosystem balance. This would also be the first project in the nation completed by USACE under its authority to perform environmental dredging covered by WRDA Section 312(a). (authors)

  18. Spatial distribution and sources of polychlorinated biphenyls in surface sediments from the Zhoushan Archipelago and Xiangshan Harbor, East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Huanzhi; Zhou, Yongdong; Wu, Changwen; Kanchanopas-Barnette, Praparsiri

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated ambient concentrations and potential sources of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in surface sediments from the Zhoushan Archipelago and adjacent Xiangshan Harbor. The ∑18PCB (total 18 PCB) concentrations ranged between 1.48 and 7.94ng/g d.w., average at 4.20ng/g d.w., presenting a low adverse environmental risk. Penta-CB was the dominant congener, contributing 46.01%-86.44% of the total PCBs. Concentrations of PCBs were highest in the northeastern part of the Zhoushan Archipelago and Xiangshan Harbor. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that PCBs have a mixed origin; atmospheric deposition and PCB dispersion from paint flakings being the main sources of PCB pollution. Aroclor 1245 and Clophen A50 were the potential PCB sources in all sampling sites. This paper provides the first intensive survey and statistical analyses of PCB distributions and sources in the Zhoushan Archipelago and adjacent Xiangshan Harbor. This study may provide a reference to environmental protection and monitoring of PCB pollution in the East China Sea. PMID:26892201

  19. Microbial dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins, and -furans at the Portland Harbor Superfund site, Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenburg, Lisa A; Krumins, Valdis; Curran, Joanna Crowe

    2015-06-16

    The Portland Harbor (Oregon, USA) has been declared a "Superfund" site because it is impacted by a variety of contaminants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans (PCDD/Fs). Using data collected in the remedial investigation, concentrations of PCBs and PCDD/Fs in sediment and water were examined using positive matrix factorization to look for evidence that PCBs and PCDD/Fs are dechlorinated by anaerobic bacteria. This process has long been known to occur in sediments. Recently, it has been recognized that PCB and PCDD/F dechlorination may also occur in other anaerobic environments, such as in landfills, sewers, and groundwater. The results indicate that a factor related to the dechlorination of PCBs and PCDD/Fs was present in the water but not in the sediment. Spatial patterns in dechlorination products suggest that they come primarily from groundwater. Dechlorination products comprise 22% of the PCBs in the water. The Portland Harbor therefore represents the third major US watershed in which PCBs appear to undergo dechlorination in an environment other than sediment, suggesting that the microbial dechlorination of PCBs and PCDD/Fs is more common than previously assumed. In addition, the Portland Harbor is impacted by PCBs generated inadvertently during the production of pigments, such as PCB 11, which alone exceeded the 64 pg/L federal water quality standard for the sum of PCBs in two of 120 whole water samples. PMID:26010118

  20. Anthropogenic accumulation of metals and metalloids in carbonate-rich sediments: Insights from the ancient harbor setting of Tyre (Lebanon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmaleh, A.; Galy, A.; Allard, T.; Dairon, R.; Day, J. A.; Michel, F.; Marriner, N.; Morhange, C.; Couffignal, F.

    2012-04-01

    The Antique and Byzantine sediments of the northern harbor of Tyre (Lebanon) store high amounts of metals and metalloids as the result of a millennial anthropogenic contamination as well as of efficient trapping and immobilization processes. Geochemical and mineralogical analyses reveal the contrasted patterns for the accumulation of trace metal(loid)s in the sedimentary sequence recovered by coring the inner part, now emerged, of the ancient harbor. Lead, Sn, Cu and Ag concentrations can be as high as 3000, 150, 1000, and 1.2 μg/g, respectively. Enrichment factors were calculated with respect to (1) Th and (2) the chemistry of the substratum and appear to be driven by anthropogenic inputs. Indeed, a drastic change in both excess concentrations and concentration ratios is observed through Roman and Byzantine times, pointing to major intensification of the trade and use of metals in Tyre, coherent with historical data. Good preservation of the archeological signal, despite (1) sediment disturbances that have caused age depth inversions, and (2) the large time lapse since the time of deposition of anthropogenic trace metal(loid)s is probably due to the reducing character of the sediments. Tyre's sedimentary sequence provides an interesting analog for modern carbonate-rich harbor environments, in which a millenary accumulation of trace metal(loid)s has been overall well preserved and suggests a restricted mobility of anthropogenic contamination for a period of time in excess of 1500 years.

  1. Investigation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and cyclic terpenoid biomarkers in the sediments of fishing harbors in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Biomarkers in three fishing harbors were investigated and identified. • 17 terpanes, 10 steranes and 10 bicyclic sesquiterpanes were quantified. • Marine diesel and the three kinds of lubricants were studied. • The study can be applied to other harbors to identify oil products in sediments. - Abstract: Three fishing harbors were investigated to study the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the sediments and trace possible anthropogenic sources by identification of cyclic terpenoid biomarkers. Seventeen terpanes, 10 steranes and 10 bicyclic sesquiterpanes in the marine diesel and the three kinds of lubricants that are mainly used by fishing boats were identified and quantified. Eighteen biomarker diagnostic ratios are suggested and the correlation coefficients among the lubricants and sediment samples have the R2 value greater than 0.73. Analyzed 16 PAHs in the sediment shows non-normal distributions and the Kruskal Wallis Test shows the significant differences (p value smaller than 0.05) with the greatest variability in benzo[g,h,i]perylene which more than 84% of the effective size (E.S.) is accounted. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was applied and the Kruskal Wallis Test shows a significant difference (p value smaller than 0.05) among certain atoms with the effective size greater than 60%

  2. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Oakland Harbor intensive study, IC-1 and OC4-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Karle, L.M.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Oakland Harbor is located on the eastern shoreline of central San Francisco Bay in Alameda County, between the cities of Oakland and Alameda, California. Oakland Harbor and its access channels are no longer wide or deep enough to accommodate modern deeper-draft vessels. The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District to deepen and widen the navigation channels to {minus}44 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) ({minus}42 ft MLLW plus 2 ft of overdraft) in Oakland Harbor. Several options for disposal of the material from this dredging project are under consideration by USACE. Those options include disposal within San Francisco Bay, at open-ocean sites, or at upland disposal sites. Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, specifies that all proposed disposal of dredged material into open water be evaluated to determine the potential environmental impacts to those activities. To comply with those requirements, the potential environmental impacts of the dredged material must be evaluated by chemical characterization, toxicity testing, and bioaccumulation testing prior to dredging and disposal. Test results are described.

  3. Biological testing of sediment for the Olympia Harbor Navigation Improvement Project, 1988: Geoduck, amphipod, and echinoderm bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Antrim, L.D.

    1989-05-01

    The Olympia Harbor Navigation Improvement Project requires the dredging of approximately 330,000 cubic yards (cy) of sediment from the harbor entrance channel and 205,185 cy from the turning basin. Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA) partial characterization studies were used to plan a full sediment characterization in which chemical analyses and biological testing of sediments evaluated the suitability of the dredged material for unconfined, open-water disposal. The US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), Seattle District, contracted with NOAA/NMFS, Environmental Conservation Division, to perform the chemical analysis and Microtox bioassay tests, and with the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) in Sequim to perform flow-through solid-phase bioassays utilizing juvenile (8 to 10 mm) geoduck clams, Panopea generosa, and static solid phase bioassays using the phoxocephalid amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius, developing embryos and gametes of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and the larvae of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. When the results of the biological tests were evaluated under PSDDA guidelines, it was found that all the tested sediment treatments from Olympia Harbor are suitable for unconfined open-water disposal. 14 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Apra Harbor, Guam U.S. Territory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (1 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard the Survey Vessel Swamp Fox. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of change (in...

  5. Neuro-fuzzy and neural network techniques for forecasting sea level in Darwin Harbor, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Sepideh; Kisi, Ozgur; Shiri, Jalal; Makarynskyy, Oleg

    2013-03-01

    Accurate predictions of sea level with different forecast horizons are important for coastal and ocean engineering applications, as well as in land drainage and reclamation studies. The methodology of tidal harmonic analysis, which is generally used for obtaining a mathematical description of the tides, is data demanding requiring processing of tidal observation collected over several years. In the present study, hourly sea levels for Darwin Harbor, Australia were predicted using two different, data driven techniques, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and artificial neural network (ANN). Multi linear regression (MLR) technique was used for selecting the optimal input combinations (lag times) of hourly sea level. The input combination comprises current sea level as well as five previous level values found to be optimal. For the ANFIS models, five different membership functions namely triangular, trapezoidal, generalized bell, Gaussian and two Gaussian membership function were tested and employed for predicting sea level for the next 1 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. The used ANN models were trained using three different algorithms, namely, Levenberg-Marquardt, conjugate gradient and gradient descent. Predictions of optimal ANFIS and ANN models were compared with those of the optimal auto-regressive moving average (ARMA) models. The coefficient of determination, root mean square error and variance account statistics were used as comparison criteria. The obtained results indicated that triangular membership function was optimal for predictions with the ANFIS models while adaptive learning rate and Levenberg-Marquardt were most suitable for training the ANN models. Consequently, ANFIS and ANN models gave similar forecasts and performed better than the developed for the same purpose ARMA models for all the prediction intervals.

  6. The effects of experimentally induced hyperthyroidism on the diving physiology of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RusselDAndrews

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Many phocid seals are expert divers that remain submerged longer than expected based on estimates of oxygen storage and utilization. This discrepancy is most likely due to an overestimation of diving metabolic rate. During diving, a selective redistribution of blood flow occurs, which may result in reduced metabolism in the hypoperfused tissues and a possible decline in whole-body metabolism to below the resting level (hypometabolism. Thyroid hormones are crucial in regulation of energy metabolism in vertebrates and therefore their control might be an important part of achieving a hypometabolic state during diving. To investigate the effect of thyroid hormones on diving physiology of phocid seals, we measured oxygen consumption, heart rate, and post-dive lactate concentrations in five harbor seals (Phoca vitulina conducting 5 min dives on command, in both euthyroid and experimentally induced hyperthyroid states. Oxygen consumption during diving was significantly reduced (by 25 % in both euthyroid and hyperthyroid states, confirming that metabolic rate during diving falls below resting levels. Hyperthyroidism increased oxygen consumption (by 7-8 % when resting in water and during diving, compared with the euthyroid state, illustrating the marked effect of thyroid hormones on metabolic rate. Consequently, post-dive lactate concentrations were significantly increased in the hyperthyroid state, suggesting that the greater oxygen consumption rates forced seals to make increased use of anaerobic metabolic pathways. During diving, hyperthyroid seals also exhibited a more profound decline in heart rate than seals in the euthyroid state, indicating that these seals were pushed towards their aerobic limit and required a more pronounced cardiovascular response. Our results demonstrate the powerful role of thyroid hormones in metabolic regulation and support the hypothesis that thyroid hormones play a role in modulating the at-sea metabolism of phocid seals.

  7. MC1R variants increase risk of melanomas harboring BRAF mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Fargnoli, Maria Concetia; Pike, Kris; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Tsang, Shirley; Rozenblum, Ester; Munroe, David J; Golubeva, Yelena; Calista, Donato; Seidenari, Stefania; Massi, Daniela; Carli, Paolo; Bauer, Juergen; Elder, David E; Bastian, Boris C; Peris, Ketty; Landi, Maria T

    2008-10-01

    Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) variants have been associated with BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) mutations in non-CSD (chronic solar-damaged) melanomas in an Italian and an American population. We studied an independent Italian population of 330 subjects (165 melanoma patients and 165 controls) to verify and estimate the magnitude of this association and to explore possible effect modifiers. We sequenced MC1R in all subjects and exon 15 of BRAF in 92/165 melanoma patients. Patients with MC1R variants had a high risk of carrying BRAF mutations in melanomas (odds ratio (OR)=7.0, 95% confidence interval (CI)=2.1-23.8) that increased with the number of MC1R variants and variants associated with red hair color. Combining these subjects with the originally reported Italian population (513 subjects overall), MC1R variant carriers had a 5- to 15-fold increased risk of BRAF-mutant melanomas based on carrying one or two variants (P<0.0001, test for trend), and regardless of signs of chronic solar damage. In contrast, no association with BRAF-negative melanomas was found (OR=1.0, 95% CI=0.6-1.6). No characteristics of subjects or melanomas, including age, nevus count, pigmentation, and melanoma thickness or location on chronically or intermittently sun-exposed body sites, substantially modified this association, although results could be affected by the small numbers in some categories. This study confirms that the known MC1R-melanoma risk association is confined to subjects whose melanomas harbor BRAF mutations. PMID:18368129

  8. Hydrophobic organic contaminants in surficial sediments of Baltimore Harbor: Inventories and sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heavily urbanized and industrialized Baltimore Harbor/Patapsco River/Back River system is one of the most highly contaminated regions of the Chesapeake Bay. In June 1996, surficial sediments were collected at 80 sites throughout the subestuarine system, including historically undersampled creek sand embayments. The samples were analyzed for a suite of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) consisting of 32 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 113 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners. Total PAH and total PCB concentrations ranged from 90 to 46,200 and 8 to 2,150 ng/g dry weight, respectively. There was enormous spatial variability in the concentrations of HOCs, which was not well correlated to grain size or organic carbon content, suggesting nonequilibrium partitioning and/or proximity to sources as important factors explaining the observed spatial variability. High concentrations of both classes of HOCs were localized around major urban stormwater runoff discharges. Elevated PAH concentrations were also centered around the Sparrow's Point Industrial Complex, most likely a result of the pyrolysis of coal during the production of steel. All but 1 of the 80 sites exceeded the effects range-low (ERL) for total PCBs and, of those sites, 40% exceeded the effects range-medium (ERM), suggesting toxicity to marine benthic organisms would frequently occur. Using principal component analysis, differences in PAH signatures were discerned. Higher molecular weight PAHs were enriched in signatures from sediments close to suspected sources (i.e., urban stormwater runoff and steel production complexes) compared to those patterns observed at sites further from outfalls or runoff. Due to varying solubilities and affinities for organic matter of the individual PAHs, partitioning of the heavier weight PAHs may enrich settling particles with high molecular weight PAHs. Lower molecular weight PAHs, having lower affinity for particles, may travel from the source to a

  9. Sources and areal distribution of trace metals in recent sediments of Middle Loch, Pearl Harbor (Hawaii)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.

    1989-05-01

    The primary objective of this project was to determine whether current operations of the Naval Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility contribute significant trace metal contamination to Middle Loch of Pearl Harbor. Secondary objectives were (1) to identify and quantify all major sources of trace metal contamination in Middle Loch and (2) to determine if trace metal concentrations in Middle Loch have declined following termination of direct discharges from the Pearl City Sewage Treatment Plant. Sediment samples from ten locations within Middle Loch and from two locations in each of the two major streams entering the loch were analyzed for radioisotopes and metals. Major elements (aluminum and calcium) as well as organic and inorganic carbon were used to help characterize sediment composition and source. High aluminum-to-calcium ratios and high organic carbon concentrations are associated with terrigenous material carried into Middle Loch by the streams. The presence of the natural, short-lived (53-d half-life) radioisotope /sup 7/Be was used to identify sites where the sedimentary material was recently deposited (i.e., within the past 3 months) and to identify patterns of recent sediment accumulation. Beryllium-7 was detected at eight of the ten sample sites within Middle Loch and in all stream samples. High /sup 7/Be inventories beneath the ships and at the mouths of the streams suggest that these are areas of rapid sediment accumulation, or sediment focusing. The concentrations of /sup 7/Be closely match the expected input based on rain-bucket data. This suggests that Middle Loch effectively traps all the /sup 7/Be through adsorption onto suspended matter and deposition to the sediments. 14 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH INVESTIGATION OF RCW175: AN H II REGION HARBORING SPINNING DUST EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tibbs, C. T.; Compiegne, M.; Carey, S. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Paladini, R. [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dickinson, C.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Alves, M. I. R. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Universite Paris Sud XI, Batiment 121, 91405 Orsay (France); Flagey, N. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Shenoy, S. [Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Noriega-Crespo, A. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Casassus, S. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Molinari, S.; Elia, D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Schisano, E., E-mail: ctibbs@ipac.caltech.edu [INAF-Istituto Fisica Spazio Interplanetario, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2012-08-01

    Using infrared, radio continuum, and spectral observations, we performed a detailed investigation of the H II region RCW175. We determined that RCW175, which actually consists of two separate H II regions, G29.1-0.7 and G29.0-0.6, is located at a distance of 3.2 {+-} 0.2 kpc. Based on the observations we infer that the more compact G29.0-0.6 is less evolved than G29.1-0.7 and was possibly produced as a result of the expansion of G29.1-0.7 into the surrounding interstellar medium. We compute a star formation rate for RCW175 of (12.6 {+-} 1.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and identified six possible young stellar object candidates within its vicinity. Additionally, we estimate that RCW175 contains a total dust mass of 215 {+-} 53 M{sub Sun }. RCW175 has previously been identified as a source of anomalous microwave emission (AME), an excess of emission at centimeter wavelengths often attributed to electric dipole radiation from the smallest dust grains. We find that the AME previously detected in RCW175 is not correlated with the smallest dust grains (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or small carbonaceous dust grains), but rather with the exciting radiation field within the region. This is a similar result to that found in the Perseus molecular cloud, another region which harbors AME, suggesting that the radiation field may play a pivotal role in the production of this new Galactic emission mechanism. Finally, we suggest that these observations may hint at the importance of understanding the role played by the major gas ions in spinning dust models.

  11. Floristic Development Patterns in a Restored Elk River Estuarine Marsh, Grays Harbor, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thom, Ronald M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Zeigler, Robert (Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife); Borde, Amy B.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2002-09-15

    We describe the changes in the floral assemblage in a salt marsh after reconnection to estuarine tidal inundation. The Elk River marsh in Grays Harbor, Washington, was opened to tidal flushing in 1987 after being diked for approximately 70 years. The freshwater pasture assemblage dominated by Phalarais arundinacea (reed canary grass) converted to low salt marsh vegetation within 5 years, with the major flux in species occurring between years 1 and 4. The system continued to develop through the 11-year post-breach monitoring period, although change after year 6 was slower than in previous years. The assemblage resembles a low salt marsh community dominated by Distichlis spicata (salt grass) and Salicornia virginica (pickleweed). Because of subsidence of the system during the period of breaching, the restored system remains substantially different from the Deschamsia cespitosa (tufted hairgrass)-dominated reference march. Use of a similarity index to compare between years and also between reference and restored marshes in the same year revealed that similarity in floral composition between year 0 and subsequent years decreased with time. However, there was a period of dramatic dissimilarity during years 1 to 3 when the system was rapidly changing from a freshwater to estuarine condition. Similarity values between the reference and restored system generally increased with time. Somewhat surprisingly, the reference marsh showed considerable between-year variation in similarity, which indicated substantial year-to-year variability in species composition. Based on accretion rate date from previous studies we predict that full recovery of the system would take between 75 and 150 years.

  12. Ultra-High Foraging Rates of Harbor Porpoises Make Them Vulnerable to Anthropogenic Disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewska, Danuta Maria; Johnson, Mark; Teilmann, Jonas; Rojano-Doñate, Laia; Shearer, Jeanne; Sveegaard, Signe; Miller, Lee A; Siebert, Ursula; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2016-06-01

    The question of how individuals acquire and allocate resources to maximize fitness is central in evolutionary ecology. Basic information on prey selection, search effort, and capture rates are critical for understanding a predator's role in its ecosystem and for predicting its response to natural and anthropogenic disturbance. Yet, for most marine species, foraging interactions cannot be observed directly. The high costs of thermoregulation in water require that small marine mammals have elevated energy intakes compared to similar-sized terrestrial mammals [1]. The combination of high food requirements and their position at the apex of most marine food webs may make small marine mammals particularly vulnerable to changes within the ecosystem [2-4], but the lack of detailed information about their foraging behavior often precludes an informed conservation effort. Here, we use high-resolution movement and prey echo recording tags on five wild harbor porpoises to examine foraging interactions in one of the most metabolically challenged cetacean species. We report that porpoises forage nearly continuously day and night, attempting to capture up to 550 small (3-10 cm) fish prey per hour with a remarkable prey capture success rate of >90%. Porpoises therefore target fish that are smaller than those of commercial interest, but must forage almost continually to meet their metabolic demands with such small prey, leaving little margin for compensation. Thus, for these "aquatic shrews," even a moderate level of anthropogenic disturbance in the busy shallow waters they share with humans may have severe fitness consequences at individual and population levels. PMID:27238281

  13. A new species of Elasmopus (Amphipoda: Hadzioidea: Maeridae from Suape Harbor, Northeastern Brazilian coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André R. Senna

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A new amphipod species of the genus Elasmopus Costa, 1853 is described based on material collected from intertidal rocky shore, near the Suape Harbor, coast of the Brazilian state of Pernambuco. The new species may be recognized by the propodus of gnathopod 2 suboval, slightly tapering distally, palmar margin not defined by a stout seta, spine, or palmar corner, with a subdistal blunt tubercle, posterior margin covered by a dense fringe of plumose setae, and posterior margin of basis of pereopod 7 castelloserrate. This is the ninety-fifth species of the genus Elasmopus described worldwide, the most diverse genus in the family Maeridae Krapp-Schickel, 2008, and the eighth species recorded from Brazilian waters. An identification key to Brazilian species of Elasmopusis also provided.Uma nova espécie Amphipoda do gênero Elasmopus Costa, 1853 é descrita com base em material coletado da zona entre marés de um costão rochoso, próximo ao Porto de Suape, costado estado brasileiro de Pernambuco. A nova espécie pode ser reconhecida pelo própodo do gnatópo de 2 suboval, estreitando-se de forma suave distalmente, margem palmar não definida por uma cerda grossa, espinho, ou ângulo palmar, comum tubérculo subdistal não agudo, margem posterior coberta por uma franja densa de cerdas plumosas, e margem posterior da base do pereópodo 7 castelosserrado. Esta é a nonagésima quinta espécie do gênero Elasmopus descrita ao redor do mundo, o mais diverso gênero na família Maeridae Krapp-Schickel, 2008, e a oitava espécie registrada para as águas brasileiras. É fornecida também uma chave de identificação para as espécies brasileiras de Elasmopus.

  14. Treatment of rat gliomas with recombinant retrovirus harboring Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retrovirus vector containing Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene was constructed. The vector was transfected into the packaging cell line PG13. It was shown that individual transfected cells differ in the production of recombinant retrovirus and in their susceptibility to be killed by ganciclovir. Recombinant retrovirus with a gibbon envelope was able to transduced the HSVtk gene into rat glioma cells. In vivo studies confirmed the ability of intraperitoneal ganciclovir administration to influence subcutaneous and intracerebral tumors developed after injection of C6 rat glioma cells with subsequent injection of HSVtk retrovirus producing cells. (author)

  15. AFSC/NMML/CCEP: Characterizing and quantifying California sea lion and Pacific harbor seal use of offshore oil and gas platforms in California, 2013-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) use offshore oil and gas platforms as resting and foraging areas. Both...

  16. Assessement of nonindigenous marine species in harbors and nearby coral reefs on Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii, 2002-2003 (NODC Accession 0002270)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collections and observations in 2002-2003 at harbor and nearby reef sites at Nawilwili and Port Allen, Kauai; Hale O Lono and Kaunakakai, Molokai; Kahului and...

  17. Biodiversity of freshwater and estuarine communities in lower Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii with observations on introduced species: summary from fieldwork conducted in 1997 - 1998 (NODC Accession 0001114)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Pearl Harbor Biodiversity Project was funded by the Department of Defense Legacy Program, through the U. S. Navy. The project was performed in two phases. The...

  18. Biodiversity of Freshwater and Estuarine Communities in Lower Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii with Observations on Introduced Species: Summary from Fieldwork Conducted in 1997-1998 (NODC Accession 0001114)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Pearl Harbor Biodiversity Project was funded by the Department of Defense Legacy Program, through the U. S. Navy. The project was performed in two phases. Phase...

  19. Investigation of the marine communities of Midway Harbor and adjacent lagoon, Midway Atoll, Northwest Hawaiian Islands in 1998 (NODC Accession 0001098)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of the marine communities of Midway Atoll harbor and surrounding lagoon was conducted at 12 sites from September 5 to 9, 1998. The primary focus of these...

  20. Preliminary hard and soft bottom seafloor substrate map derived from gridded sidescan and bathymetry derivatives at Apra Harbor, Guam U.S. Territory.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Preliminary hard and soft seafloor substrate map classified from sidescan data and bathymetric derivatives at Apra Harbor, Guam U.S. Territory. The dataset was...

  1. Primary productivity in middle loch of Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii, collected by oceanography students from the Leeward Community College from 1975 to 1996 (NODC Accession 0000655)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primary productivity data were collected in middle loch of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, from 20 November 1975 to 27 November 1996. Data were collected by Leeward Community...

  2. Assessment of nonindigenous marine species in harbors and nearby coral reefs on Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii, 2002 - 2003 (NODC Accession 0002270)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collections and observations in 2002-2003 at harbor and nearby reef sites at Nawilwili and Port Allen, Kauai; Hale O Lono and Kaunakakai, Molokai; Kahului and...

  3. Coral baseline survey of Ma'alaea Harbor for light-draft vessels, Island of Maui, December 1997 - January 1998 (NODC Accession 9900025)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1968 the United States Congress approved funding for renovations to the existing harbor. Subsequently, a General Design Memorandum and Final Environmental Impact...

  4. Charlotte Harbor, FL (G050) Bathymetric Digital ElevationModel (30 meter resolution) Derived From Source Hydrographic SurveySoundings Collected by NOAA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry for Charlotte Harbor was derived from twenty-two surveyscontaining 256,940 soundings. No surveys were omitted. The averageseparation between soundings...

  5. Water quality in Pearl Harbor and feeder streams during 1971 - 2001 collected primarily by oceanography students from Leeward Community College (NODC Accession 0000590)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water quality data were collected in Pearl Harbor and surrounding feeder streams from 30 December 1971 to 24 August 2001. Data were collected by Leeward Community...

  6. Concentration of PCB Aroclors, Total Organic Carbon (TOC), and other parameters, Manistique Harbor, Lake Michigan, 2012-09-17 to 2012-09-21 (NCEI Accession 0151632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project was part of a team effort by NOAA, the EPA, the State of Michigan, and the USGS to collect samples of sediments within the Manistique Harbor Area of...

  7. Muju Virus, Harbored by Myodes regulus in Korea, Might Represent a Genetic Variant of Puumala Virus, the Prototype Arvicolid Rodent-Borne Hantavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Goo Lee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The genome of Muju virus (MUJV, identified originally in the royal vole (Myodes regulus in Korea, was fully sequenced to ascertain its genetic and phylogenetic relationship with Puumala virus (PUUV, harbored by the bank vole (My. glareolus, and a PUUV-like virus, named Hokkaido virus (HOKV, in the grey red-backed vole (My. rufocanus in Japan. Whole genome sequence analysis of the 6544-nucleotide large (L, 3652-nucleotide medium (M and 1831-nucleotide small (S segments of MUJV, as well as the amino acid sequences of their gene products, indicated that MUJV strains from different capture sites might represent genetic variants of PUUV, the prototype arvicolid rodent-borne hantavirus in Europe. Distinct geographic-specific clustering of MUJV was found in different provinces in Korea, and phylogenetic analyses revealed that MUJV and HOKV share a common ancestry with PUUV. A better understanding of the taxonomic classification and pathogenic potential of MUJV must await its isolation in cell culture.

  8. CHIRP survey of the submerged harbors of King Herod's Caesarea, offshore Israel - looking for evidence of ancient disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J. A.; Goodman-Tchernov, B.

    2012-12-01

    Caesarea Maritima, located on the Israel coast south of Haifa, is an ancient city/harbor site built ~2,000 years ago that continues to produce important insights into both the maritime livelihoods of antiquity and natural/anthropogenic influences on coastal structures/processes. The grandiose, three-basin harbor complex was built by Herod the Great. Today, the inner harbor basin is terrestrial, while the majority of the intermediate/outer harbors lies 1-7 m beneath the sea surface. Explanations for the harbor's destruction have included earthquakes, liquefaction, deterioration from erosion, storm undercutting and tsunami damage. Recently, evidence for tsunami events has been discovered offshore during excavation and coring expeditions, specifically trench exposures and pneumatic hammer cores. Stratigraphic horizons containing tsunamite signatures suggest the occurrence of at least three tsunamis in the past ~3,500 yrs. One may correspond with the catastrophic eruption of Santorini ~1500 BC; another appears to have done significant damage to Caesarea ~115 AD, and a third occurred within the period 5th-7th centuries AD. Extant combined bathymetric/magnetic surveys offshore also show unusual, anomalous features. Excavations in 2003 suggest that these features may be part of an ancient designated anchoring station, and support the existence of underlying man-made terrestrial structures from an earlier period when sea-level was lower. The primary goal of the current survey was to correlate recognized/potential tsunamigenic sediment layers throughout the proximal shelf offshore Caesarea, using extremely high-resolution geophysical images. Such surficial sub-bottom profiling will allow archaeologists to proceed with investigations of recognized anthropogenically-influenced submerged coastal features. The field survey was conducted in August 2011. Seismic data were collected using UTIG's portable Knudsen 320BP CHIRP (2.5-5.5 kHz) profiler, affixed to a metal pole mounted

  9. Health, disease, mortality and survival in wild and rehabilitated harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) in San Francisco Bay and along the central California coast

    OpenAIRE

    Greig, Denise J.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional methods for health assessment of wild-caught and stranded seals were used to describe the disease status of harbor seals in California. Clinical chemistry, infectious disease prevalence, immune function, and contaminant data were collected to evaluate harbor seal health with data collected from three groups of seals. Wild-caught seals of all ages were sampled at two locations: San Francisco Bay (a heavily urbanized estuary) and Tomales Bay (a less developed control site). Strande...

  10. Description and proposed life cycle of Maritrema novaezealandensis n. sp. (Microphallidae) parasitic in red-billed gulls, Larus novaehollandiae scopulinus, from Otago Harbor, South Island, New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martorelli, Sergio R; Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Mouritsen, Kim Nørgaard;

    2004-01-01

    Maritrema novaezealandensis n. sp. is described from Otago Harbor, South Island, New Zealand, on the basis of adult specimens collected from the Red-billed gull, Larus novaehollandiae scopulinus, and excysted metacercariae obtained from crabs. It belongs to the "eroliae group" and differs from...... metacercariae encysted in the body cavity of the crustacean host. Finally, the definitive host, the gull, L. n. scopulinus, harbors the adult worms in its intestine....

  11. Lesions and behavior associated with forced copulation of juvenile Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) by southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, H.S.; Oates, S.C.; Staedler, M.M.; Tinker, M.T.; Jessup, David A.; Harvey, J.T.; Miller, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Nineteen occurrences of interspecific sexual behavior between male southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) and juvenile Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) were reported in Monterey Bay, California, between 2000 and 2002. At least three different male sea otters were observed harassing, dragging, guarding, and copulating with harbor seals for up to 7 d postmortem. Carcasses of 15 juvenile harbor seals were recovered, and seven were necropsied in detail by a veterinary pathologist. Necropsy findings from two female sea otters that were recovered dead from male sea otters exhibiting similar behavior are also presented to facilitate a comparison of lesions. The most frequent lesions included superficial skin lacerations; hemorrhage around the nose, eyes, flippers, and perineum; and traumatic corneal erosions or ulcers. The harbor seals sustained severe genital trauma, ranging from vaginal perforation to vagino-cervical transection, and colorectal perforations as a result of penile penetration. One harbor seal developed severe pneumoperitoneum subsequent to vaginal perforation, which was also observed in both female sea otters and has been reported as a postcoital lesion in humans. This study represents the first description of lesions resulting from forced copulation of harbor seals by sea otters and is also the first report of pneumoperitoneum secondary to forced copulation in a nonhuman animal. Possible explanations for this behavior are discussed in the context of sea otter biology and population demographics.

  12. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteome harbors undiscovered multi-domain molecules with functional guanylyl cyclase catalytic centers

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-07-08

    Background: Second messengers link external cues to complex physiological responses. One such messenger, 3\\',5\\'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), has been shown to play a key role in many physiological responses in plants. However, in higher plants, guanylyl cyclases (GCs), enzymes that generate cGMP from guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) have remained elusive until recently. GC search motifs constructed from the alignment of known GCs catalytic centers form vertebrates and lower eukaryotes have led to the identification of a number of plant GCs that have been characterized in vitro and in vivo.Presentation of the hypothesis.Recently characterized GCs in Arabidopsis thaliana contributed to the development of search parameters that can identify novel candidate GCs in plants. We hypothesize that there are still a substantial number (> 40) of multi-domain molecules with potentially functional GC catalytic centers in plants that remain to be discovered and characterized. Testing the hypothesis. The hypothesis can be tested, firstly, by computational methods constructing 3D models of selected GC candidates using available crystal structures as templates. Homology modeling must include substrate docking that can provide support for the structural feasibility of the GC catalytic centers in those candidates. Secondly, recombinant peptides containing the GC domain need to be tested in in vitro GC assays such as the enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and/or in mass spectrometry based cGMP assays. In addition, quantification of in vivo cGMP transients with fluorescent cGMP-reporter assays in wild-type or selected mutants will help to elucidate the biological role of novel GCs.Implications of the hypothesis.If it turns out that plants do harbor a large number of functional GC domains as part of multi-domain enzymes, then major new insights will be gained into the complex signal transduction pathways that link cGMP to fundamental processes such as ion transport

  13. ATP citrate lyase knockdown impacts cancer stem cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Hanai, J-i; Doro, N; Seth, P; Sukhatme, V P

    2013-01-01

    ATP citrate lyase (ACL) knockdown (KD) causes tumor suppression and induces differentiation. We have previously reported that ACL KD reverses epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in lung cancer cells. Because EMT is often associated with processes that induce stemness, we hypothesized that ACL KD impacts cancer stem cells. By assessing tumorsphere formation and expression of stem cell markers, we showed this to be the case in A549 cells, which harbor a Ras mutation, and in two other non-sm...

  14. Specific differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells by small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Heesang; Chang, Woochul; Song, Byeong-Wook; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent, self-renewing cells harboring multi-lineage differentiation potential and immunosuppressive properties that make them an attractive candidate for biological cell-based regenerative medicine. In addition to its undoubted clinical interest, controlling the fate and behaviors of MSCs is a crucial prerequisite for their therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine. Stem cell differentiation and modulation of functional activities are generally c...

  15. DNA damage-induced ephrin-B2 reverse signaling promotes chemoresistance and drives EMT in colorectal carcinoma harboring mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, S K; Yadav, V K; Bajaj, S; Datta, A; Dutta, S K; Bhattacharyya, M; Bhattacharya, S; Debnath, S; Roy, S; Boardman, L A; Smyrk, T C; Molina, J R; Chakrabarti, S; Chowdhury, S; Mukhopadhyay, D; Roychoudhury, S

    2016-04-01

    Mutation in the TP53 gene positively correlates with increased incidence of chemoresistance in different cancers. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of chemoresistance and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in colorectal cancer involving the gain-of-function (GOF) mutant p53/ephrin-B2 signaling axis. Bioinformatic analysis of the NCI-60 data set and subsequent hub prediction identified EFNB2 as a possible GOF mutant p53 target gene, responsible for chemoresistance. We show that the mutant p53-NF-Y complex transcriptionally upregulates EFNB2 expression in response to DNA damage. Moreover, the acetylated form of mutant p53 protein is recruited on the EFNB2 promoter and positively regulates its expression in conjunction with coactivator p300. In vitro cell line and in vivo nude mice data show that EFNB2 silencing restores chemosensitivity in mutant p53-harboring tumors. In addition, we observed high expression of EFNB2 in patients having neoadjuvant non-responder colorectal carcinoma compared with those having responder version of the disease. In the course of deciphering the drug resistance mechanism, we also show that ephrin-B2 reverse signaling induces ABCG2 expression after drug treatment that involves JNK-c-Jun signaling in mutant p53 cells. Moreover, 5-fluorouracil-induced ephrin-B2 reverse signaling promotes tumorigenesis through the Src-ERK pathway, and drives EMT via the Src-FAK pathway. We thus conclude that targeting ephrin-B2 might enhance the therapeutic potential of DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents in mutant p53-bearing human tumors. PMID:26494468

  16. Isolation of Sphere-Forming Stem Cells from the Mouse Inner Ear

    OpenAIRE

    Oshima, Kazuo; Senn, Pascal; Heller, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear has very limited ability to regenerate lost sensory hair cells. This deficiency becomes apparent when hair cell loss leads to hearing loss as a result of either ototoxic insult or the aging process. Coincidently, with this inability to regenerate lost hair cells, the adult cochlea does not appear to harbor cells with a proliferative capacity that could serve as progenitor cells for lost cells. In contrast, adult mammalian vestibular sensory epithelia display a limited ...

  17. Construction of Recombinant Plasmid Harboring APP717 Mutation and Preliminary Study of APP Proteolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaoqing; XUE Zheng; ZHANG Suming

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and study the enzy-matic progress of amyloid precursor protein (APP), the fluorescent eukaryotic expression plasmid of C99 was constructed containing APP717 mutation. The fragment encoding the last 99-aa of APP(which was named C99 containing APP717 mutation), together with the fragment encoding yellow fluorescence protein (which was named YFP) were amplified by PCR. The two fragments (YFP andC99) were inserted into the vector pcDNA3.0. The recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.0-YFP-C99 was accomplished and its authenticity was confirmed by enzyme digestion and sequencing. Then SH-SY5Y cells were transiently transfected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.0-YFP-C99. The expression of the fusion gene was detected by laser confocalmicroscopy. Amyloid-β (Aβ) was de- tected by both microscopy and immunochemistry. The authenticity of the construct was confirmed by the endonuclease digestion and DNA sequencing. The YFP fluorescence could be seen and proved the expression of fusion gene. Aβ labeled by YFP was detected by confocalmicroscopy and confirmed by immunocytochemistry. It was found that Aβ accumulated and deposited in the intracytoplasm, mem-brane and outside of the cell. Furthermore, Aβ accumulated mainly within the cell ahead of the depo-sition in the cell space and the cell shape was rough. It was suggested that Aβ could be generatedwithin the cells. Aβ accumulated in the cell at the early stage before the deposition outside of the cells.Intracellular Aβ accumulation induced the secondary damage to the cells and caused the cell shape rough. Taken together, the recombinant plasmid, pcDNA3.0-YFP-C99 could be a useful tool to fur-ther study the cleavage mechanism of APP and to explore the pathogenesis of AD.

  18. The usefulness of molecular techniques to assess the presence of Aeromonas spp. harboring virulence markers in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Kingombe, César I; Huys, Geert; Howald, Denise; Luthi, Elisabeth; Swings, Jean; Jemmi, Thomas

    2004-07-15

    A total of 78 raw and 123 processed and ready-to-eat retail food samples were used to assess the presence of motile Aeromonas spp. harboring virulence genes (cytotoxic enterotoxin and hemolysin genes) using a recently described PCR method in comparison with the conventional cultivation method based on the use of Ampicillin-Dextrin Agar (ADA) medium. With the ADA-based method, 65/201 (32.3%) samples showed presumptive Aeromonas spp. colonies whereas the PCR method revealed the presence of Aeromonas spp. harboring the targeted virulence genes in 51/201 (25.4%) of the tested samples. The rate of contaminated samples and the presence of pathogenic Aeromonas were significantly lower with both methods for processed than in case of raw samples. A polyphasic identification approach including biochemical and molecular techniques was applied to a selection of 34 PCR-positive presumptive Aeromonas isolates. Following fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting, a total of 33 isolates (97%) could be identified to the DNA hybridization group (HG) level. The majority of these isolates belonged to the species Aeromonas hydrophila HG3 (50%) and Aeromonas veronii biovar sobria (HG8/10) (38%). Molecular characterization of PCR amplicons obtained from these strains by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) fingerprinting and PCR-Amplicon Sequence Analysis (PCR-ASA) allowed classification of all strains in a known PCR-RFLP and PCR-ASA type. In conclusion, the current findings demonstrate that the combined use of PCR-based virulence marker detection, PCR-RFLP and PCR-ASA offers a rapid, sensitive, and specific system to assess the presence and prevalence of Aeromonas spp. harboring virulence markers in food samples. PMID:15193799

  19. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 1 of -42-foot project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, was authorized by the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) to deepen and widen the navigation channels of Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, California, to accommodate modern deep-draft vessels. To help provide the scientific basis for determining whether Oakland Harbor sediments are suitable for offshore disposal, the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory collected sediment cores from 20 stations in Oakland Harbor, evaluated the cores geologically, analyzed sediment for selected contaminants, conducted a series of solid phase toxicity tests with four sensitive marine invertebrates (Macoma nasuta, Nephtys caecoides, Ampelisca abdita, and Rhepoxynius abronius), and assessed the bioaccumulation potential of sediment-associated contaminants in tissues of M. nasuta. Toxicological test results indicate that none of the sediment from the channel-area stations (CH-1 - CH-7), the Merritt Sand samples (MS-1 and MS-2), or the reference sediment sites (PR-C and PR-F) resulted in significant sediment toxicity to the four species tested. Sediment treatments showing no significant sediment toxicity as well as no significant bioaccumulation included CH-5, MS-1, MS-2, PR-coarse, and PR-fine. Stations that showed little or no significant sediment toxicity, but significant bioaccumulation included SS-2-L (PAHs); TS-1-L (Cu, PAHs, PCBs, tributyltin, and DDE); TS-1-U (tributyltin); TS-5-U (PAHs, PCBs, DDE, and tributyltin); SS-1-U (PB, PAHs, and PCBs); SS-5-L (PAHs, PCBs, and DDE); CH-6 and CH-7 (PAHs, PCBs, and DDE); Ch-4 and CH-1 (Cr); and CH-3 (DDE). 28 refs., 31 figs., 75 tabs

  20. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Richmond Harbor Deepening Project and the intensive study of the Turning Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Karle, L.M.; Kohn, N.P.; White, P.J.; Word, J.Q.; Michaels, L.L. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Richmond Harbor is on the eastern shoreline of central San Francisco Bay and its access channels and several of the shipping berths are no longer wide or deep enough to accommodate modem deeper-draft vessels. The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (PL99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District to deepen and widen the navigation channels in Richmond Harbor. Several options for disposal of the material from this dredging project are under consideration by USACE: disposal within San Francisco Bay, at open-ocean disposal sites, or at uplands disposal sites. Purpose of this study was to conduct comprehensive evaluations, including chemical, biological, and bioaccumulation testing of sediments in selected areas of Richmond Harbor. This information was required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and USACE. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory collected 20 core samples, both 4-in. and 12-in., to a project depth of -40 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) (-38 ft MLLW plus 2 ft of overdepth) using a vibratory-hammer core. These 20 field samples were combined to form five test composites plus an older bay mud (OBM) composite that were analyzed for physical/chemical parameters, biological toxicity, and tissue chemistry. Solid-phase tests were conducted with the amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius; the clam, Macoma nasuta; and the polychaete worm, Nephtys caecoides. Suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) tests were conducted with the sanddab, Citharichthys stigmaeus; the mysid, Holmesimysis costata; and the bivalve, Mytilus galloprovincialis. Bioaccumulation of contaminants was measured in tissues of Macoma nasuta and Nereis virens. Sediments from one ocean reference sediment, and two in-bay reference sediments, were tested concurrently. Results from analysis of the five test treatments were statistically compared with the reference sediment R-OS in the first five sections of this report.

  1. Polychlorinated naphthalenes and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls in tissues of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) from the northern Gulf of Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongli; Atkinson, Shannon; Hoover-Miller, Anne; Li, Qing X

    2007-05-01

    Blubber, liver and kidney samples of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) from the northern Gulf of Alaska were collected during 2000-2001 for the analysis of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (CoplPCBs). On the lipid weight (lw) base, the total concentrations of PCNs (Sigma PCNs) ranged from 0.3 to 27 ng/g lw, and the total concentrations of CoplPCBs (Sigma CoplPCBs) were 3.6-546 ng/g lw in all the tissue samples. Di-ortho PCBs and mono-ortho PCBs were dominant followed by non-ortho PCBs and PCNs. Sigma Mono-ortho PCBs and Sigma di-ortho PCBs in nursing seals were apparently lower than those in male adult seals, but Sigma PCNs and Sigma non-ortho PCBs in female adults were not significantly different from those in male adults. Differences in PCNs and CoplPCBs congener profiles in female and male adult seals are apparently related to their chemical structure and properties, animal's developmental stages and physiological conditions. A large quantity of mono-ortho and di-ortho PCBs might be transferred to newborns from the nursing seals during lactation, while non-ortho PCBs and PCNs were relatively accumulative in the mother seals. Sigma PCNs and Sigma CoplPCBs in the harbor seals correlated with ages, gender, body weight and blubber thickness, but the blubber Sigma PCNs and Sigma CoplPCBs in Kodiak Island and Southern Alaska Peninsula (KIAP) did not significantly differ from those in Prince William Sound (PWS). In addition to the new PCB data, this first report on PCN contamination in Alaskan harbor seal tissues is useful for the wildlife and ecosystem management and human health protection. PMID:17223166

  2. Complete genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas rubra SCSIO 6842, harboring a putative conjugative plasmid pMBL6842.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baiyuan; Wang, Pengxia; Zeng, Zhenshun; Cai, Xingsheng; Wang, Guanghua; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-04-20

    Pseudoalteromonas is a genus of Gram-negative and is ubiquitously distributed in the ocean. Many Pseudoalteromonas species are capable of producing pigments, which can serve as an alternative source to replace synthetic pigments used in the food industry. Prodigiosins belong to a family of secondary metabolite characterized by a common pyrrolyl pyrromethane skeleton, and have been successfully applied to yogurt, milk and carbonated drinks as substitutes for synthetic additives. The strain Pseudoalteromonas rubra SCSIO 6842 can produce cycloprodigiosin and harbors a conjugative plasmid. Here we report the complete genome of P. rubra SCSIO 6842 for a better understanding of the molecular basis of cycloprodigiosin production and regulation. PMID:26970053

  3. The ActA polypeptides of Listeria ivanovii and Listeria monocytogenes harbor related binding sites for host microfilament proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerstel, B; Gröbe, L; Pistor, S; Chakraborty, T.; Wehland, J

    1996-01-01

    The surface-bound ActA polypeptide of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes acts as a nucleator protein, generating the actin cytoskeleton around intracellularly motile bacteria. In this work, we examined the functional similarity of ActA from Listeria ivanovii (iActA) ATCC 19119 to its L. monocytogenes counterpart. The amino acid sequence of iActA predicts a molecular mass of 123 kDa and harbors eight proline-rich repeats. For functional analysis, various iActA derivati...

  4. Mapping the unseen: geoarchaeological prospection to the Stone Age heritage in the early Holocene delta deposits of the Rotterdam harbor area (the Netherlands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Mapping the unseen: geoarchaeological prospection to the Stone Age heritage in the early Holocene delta deposits of the Rotterdam harbor area (the Netherlands) Peter C. Vos1 & Dimitri Schiltmans2 1) Deltares, PO Box 85467, 3508 AL Utrecht, The Netherlands E-mail: peter.vos@deltares.nl 2) Bureau Oudheidkundig Onderzoek Rotterdam, Ceintuurbaan 213b, 3051 KC Rotterdam, The Netherlands E-mail: dea.schiltmans@Rotterdam.nl The Port of Rotterdam (PoR) is expanding the Rotterdam harbor area into the sea. A new channel, the Yangtze harbor, will be dug out to a depth of 20 m below sea level in order to connect the existing Maasvlakte harbor area with the new harbor area under construction. The upper part of the sediment, which was dredged out in order to create the new channel, consisted mainly of marine offshore sands. In the lower part, at a depth of about 17-22 m below the Dutch Ordnance Datum (NAP), Late Weichselian fluvial and aeolian sands and Early Holocene deltaic deposits of the Rhine - Meuse were present. From earlier dredging activities in the Maasvlakte area it was known that the Late Weichselian / Early Holocene deposits contain Late Paleolithic and Early Mesolithic artefacts. The deepening of the Yangtze harbor would affect the Late-Weichselian / Early Holocene deposits and destroy the archaeologically valuable objects in these layers. The aim of the archaeological Yangtze harbor project was to predict those locations where archaeological heritage from the Stone Age could be found. A geological-geogenetic approach was applied in order to determine the optimal palaeo-environmental locations for man to settle. A 3D palaeolandscape model was constructed of the harbor area; an area which was about 0.5 km wide and 3 km long. Given this palaeolandscape model, the potential archaeological sites were selected. The multidisciplinary prospection research was carried out in several steps. After each research step the strategy of the following research phase was determined

  5. Source characterization using compound composition and stable carbon isotope ratio of PAHs in sediments from lakes, harbor, and shipping waterway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular compositions and compound specific stable carbon isotope ratios of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) isolated from sediments were used to characterize possible sources of contamination at an urban lake, a harbor, a shipping waterway, and a relatively undisturbed remote lake in the northwest United States. Total PAH concentrations in urban lake sediments ranged from 66.0 to 16,500 μg g-1 dry wt. with an average of 2600 μg g-1, which is ∼ 50, 100, and 400 times higher on average than PAH in harbor (48 μg g-1 on average), shipping waterway (26 μg g-1), and remote lake (7 μg g-1) sediments, respectively. The PAH distribution patterns, methyl phenanthrene/phenanthrene ratios, and a pyrogenic index at the sites suggest a pyrogenic origin for PAHs. Source characterization using principal component analysis and various molecular indices including C2-dibenzothiophenes/C2-phenanthrenes, C3-dibenzothiophenes/C3-phenanthrenes, and C2-chrysenes/C2-phenanthrenes ratios, was able to differentiate PAH deposited in sediments from the four sites. The uniqueness of the source of the sediment PAHs from urban lake was also illustrated by compound specific stable carbon isotope analysis. It was concluded that urban lake sediments are accumulating PAH from sources that are unique from contamination detected at nearby sites in the same watershed

  6. Free living and plankton-associated vibrios: assessment in ballast water, harbor areas and coastal ecosystems in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Nelly G. Rivera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ballast water is a major transport vector of exotic aquatic species and pathogenic microorganisms. The wide-ranging spread of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 from harbor areas has been frequently ascribed to discharge of contaminated ballast water into eutrophic coastal environments, such as during the onset of the seventh cholera pandemic in South America in the early 1990s. To determine the microbiological hazards of ballast waters transported to Brazilian ports, we evaluated water and plankton samples taken from (i ballast water tanks of recently arrived ships, (ii port areas along the Brazilian coastline from ~1 to 32 oS and (iii three coastal areas in São Paulo State. Vibrio concentration and toxigenic V. cholerae O1 occurrence were analyzed. Plankton-associated vibrios were more abundant than free-living vibrios in all studied environments. Vibrio cholerae was found in 9.5% of ballast tanks and 24.2% of port samples, both as free-living and attached forms, and was absent off São Paulo State. Toxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolates (ctxA+, tcpA+, involved in cholera disease, were found in ballast water (2% and harbor (2% samples. These results confirm that ballast water is an important carrier of pathogenic organisms, and that monitoring of vibrios and other plankton-attached bacteria is of paramount importance in ballast water management programs.

  7. Dungeness crab survey for the Southwest Ocean Disposal Site and addtiional sites off Grays Harbor, Washington, June 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antrim, L.D.; Cullinan, V.I.; Pearson, W.H. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Grays Harbor Navigation Improvement Project, the US Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District (USACE), has made active use of the Southwest Ocean Disposal Site off Grays Harbor, Washington. Disposal site boundaries were established to avoid an area where high densities of Young-of-the-Year (YOY) Dungeness crab, Cancer magister, were observed during the site selection surveys. To monitor possible impacts of disposal operations on Dungeness crab at the site, USACE recommended a crab distribution survey prior to disposal operations in the February 1989 environmental impact statement supplement (EISS) as part of a tiered monitoring strategy for the site. According to the tiered monitoring strategy, a preliminary survey is conducted to determine if the disposal site contains an exceptionally high density of YOY Dungeness crab. The trigger for moving to a more intensive sampling effort is a YOY crab density within the disposal site that is 100 times higher than the density in the reference area to the north. This report concerns a 1991 survey that was designed to verify that the density of YOY Dungeness crab present at the disposal site was not exceptionally high. Another objective of the survey was to estimate Dungeness crab densities at nearshore areas that are being considered as sediment berm sites by USACE.

  8. Isolation, screening, and characterization of surface-active agent-producing, oil-degrading marine bacteria of Mumbai Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanram, Rajamani; Jagtap, Chandrakant; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-04-15

    Diverse marine bacterial species predominantly found in oil-polluted seawater produce diverse surface-active agents. Surface-active agents produced by bacteria are classified into two groups based on their molecular weights, namely biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers. In this study, surface-active agent-producing, oil-degrading marine bacteria were isolated using a modified Bushnell-Haas medium with high-speed diesel as a carbon source from three oil-polluted sites of Mumbai Harbor. Surface-active agent-producing bacterial strains were screened using nine widely used methods. The nineteen bacterial strains showed positive results for more than four surface-active agent screening methods; further, these strains were characterized using biochemical and nucleic acid sequencing methods. Based on the results, the organisms belonged to the genera Acinetobacter, Alcanivorax, Bacillus, Comamonas, Chryseomicrobium, Halomonas, Marinobacter, Nesterenkonia, Pseudomonas, and Serratia. The present study confirmed the prevalence of surface-active agent-producing bacteria in the oil-polluted waters of Mumbai Harbor. PMID:26912197

  9. Activities of a lagging DNA strand synthesis of nucleoprotein complexes harboring an extrachromosomal DNA closely related to avian myeloblastosis virus core-bound DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleoprotein (NP) complexes constituting the material of the post-microsomal sediment (POMS) and its three basic components (A, B, C), harboring an extrachromosomal DNA closely related to AMV DNA were found to.possess DNA- and RNA-synthesizing activities (SAs) reflecting the ability of this material to be intensely labelled for DNA and RNA, respectively. The types of these NA-SAs were compatible with those significant for a lagging DNA strand synthesis (LSS). The use of selective inhibitors and of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) disclosed a successive involvement of alpha DNA polymerase (pol) and PCNA-insensitive delta DNA pol in LSS. In this respect, we show gradual changes in the representation of activities (As) of both mentioned DNA pols in the NP complexes of the individual POMS components. Those of POMS component C contained alpha DNA pol As only, while a distinct portion of DNA SAs of POMS component B was represented on expense of alpha DNA pol As by PCNA-insensitive delta DNA pol (epsilon DNA pol), As which represented practically all the DNA SAs of POMS component A. The type of RNA SAs of this material represented mostly by primase (Pr) As corresponded well with the nature of LSS. An exception was represented by a minor portion of RNA-SAs of POMS component A which was alpha amanitine-sensitive like RNA pol II. Moreover, analyzing this natural model replication system, we found that the carbonyl diphosphonate (COMDP), a selective inhibitor of the PCNA-insensitive delta DNA pol, was a strong activator of Pr-As and/or Pr-alpha DNA pol As of NP complexes of POMS component C. (authors)

  10. Control of T cell infiltration and tumor rejection by regulatory T cells, basophils and macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Sektioglu, Ibrahim Murathan

    2015-01-01

    Most solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to immune rejection due to immunosuppressive mechanisms operative within the tumor microenvironment. Cancer patients frequently harbor elevated numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs), which inhibit efficient anti-tumor T cell responses. We employed different mouse models for Treg depletion in order to study the mechanisms that control tumor rejection. Depletion of about 99% Tregs in Foxp3DTR knock-in mice resulted in complete rejection of transplan...

  11. Role of Fetal Stem Cells in Maternal Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Jiang F; Weiner, Leslie P.

    2007-01-01

    Microchimerism refers to the status of harboring cells from another individual at low levels. It is well known that cells traffic bidirectionally between fetus and mother during pregnancy. This situation resembles a naturally occurring long lasting fetal stem cell transplantation. The fetus acts as the donor and the mother acts as the recipient. To study the role of microchimerism in tissue regeneration, we constructed a murine microchimerism model with wild type C57BL/6J female mice carrying...

  12. RESEARCH ON RED TIDE OCCURRENCES USING ENCLOSED EXPERIMENTAL ECOSYSTEMS IN WEST XIAMEN HARBOR, CHINA--RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VARIOUS FACTORS AND RED TIDE OCCURRENCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A series of enclosed ecosystem experiments were conducted in a land-based tank near the seaside of West Xiamen Harbor. The results of experiments conducted in different seasons and years showed a repeatable phytoplankton succession. In this relatively stable ecosystem with added nutrients and trace metals, diatoms dominated initially, dinoflagellates dominated in the later stage, and dinoflagellate red tides eventually occurred. Vitamin B12 enrichment may speed up this succession process. Stirring the water column could stop this process. Soluble Mn at a level of 3-4 μg/L in seawater, which also is the existing concentration of soluble Mn in Xiamen Harbor seawater, is sufficient for the multiplication of algae and occurrence of red tide. The present study showed that excessive soluble Mn in Xiamen Harbor cannot cause red tide, and that Fe was one of the important factors causing diatom red tide in this present study.

  13. Optimal fleetwide emissions reductions for passenger ferries: an application of a mixed-integer nonlinear programming model for the New York-New Jersey Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebrake, James J; Corbett, James J; Wang, Chengfeng; Farrell, Alexander E; Woods, Pippa

    2005-04-01

    Emissions from passenger ferries operating in urban harbors may contribute significantly to emissions inventories and commuter exposure to air pollution. In particular, ferries are problematic because of high emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from primarily unregulated diesel engines. This paper explores technical solutions to reduce pollution from passenger ferries operating in the New York-New Jersey Harbor. The paper discusses and demonstrates a mixed-integer, non-linear programming model used to identify optimal control strategies for meeting NOx and PM reduction targets for 45 privately owned commuter ferries in the harbor. Results from the model can be used by policy-makers to craft programs aimed at achieving least-cost reduction targets. PMID:15887889

  14. Cathepsin L maturation and activity is impaired in macrophages harboring M. avium and M. tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Rajeev M; Mampe, Stephanie; Shaffer, Brian; Erickson, Ann H; Bryant, Paula

    2006-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages demonstrate diminished capacity to present antigens via class II MHC molecules. Since successful class II MHC-restricted antigen presentation relies on the actions of endocytic proteases, we asked whether the activities of cathepsins (Cat) B, S and L-three major lysosomal cysteine proteases-are modulated in macrophages infected with pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. Infection of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with either Mycobacterium avium or M. tuberculosis had no obvious effect on Cat B or Cat S activity. In contrast, the activity of Cat L was altered in infected cells. Specifically, whereas the 24-kDa two-chain mature form of active Cat L predominated in uninfected cells, we observed an increase in the steady-state activity of the precursor single-chain (30 kDa) and 25-kDa two-chain forms of the enzyme in cells infected with either M. avium or M. tuberculosis. Pulse-chase analyses revealed that maturation of nascent, single-chain Cat L into the 25-kDa two-chain form was impaired in infected macrophages, and that maturation into the 24-kDa two-chain form did not occur. Consistent with these data, M. avium infection inhibited the IFNgamma-induced secretion of active two-chain Cat L by macrophages. Viable bacilli were not required to disrupt Cat L maturation, suggesting that a constitutively expressed mycobacterial component was responsible. The absence of the major active form of lysosomal Cat L in M. avium- and M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages may influence the types of T cell epitopes generated in these antigen-presenting cells, and/or the rate of class II MHC peptide loading. PMID:16636015

  15. A Continuous-Exchange Cell-Free Protein Synthesis System Based on Extracts from Cultured Insect Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Marlitt Stech; Quast, Robert B.; Rita Sachse; Corina Schulze; Wüstenhagen, Doreen A.; Stefan Kubick

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present a novel technique for the synthesis of complex prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins by using a continuous-exchange cell-free (CECF) protein synthesis system based on extracts from cultured insect cells. Our approach consists of two basic elements: First, protein synthesis is performed in insect cell lysates which harbor endogenous microsomal vesicles, enabling a translocation of de novo synthesized target proteins into the lumen of the insect vesicles or, in the case ...

  16. Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima : an Ironic Comparison = Pearl Harbor ve Hiroşima Saldırilarının İronik bir Karşılaştırılması

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo J. MAHONEY

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past century, veterans of America's wars have shown extraordinary human longevity in the postwar eras. As a result, contemporary public historical interpretations of the American second world war experience have been influenced by veterans' perceptions of historical issues for a longer time than was true of postwar eras before the twentieth centuıy. Public historical debates in the United States have recently focused on the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor (1941 and the American attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki (1945. These events may seem quite dated by now, but they have remarkable contemporary resonance in light of debates over proliferation of nuclear weapons and tactics of so-called pre-emptive warfare. Though the aerial attacks are often related in popular American perception, the truth is they were incommensurate events in terms of their military and political objectives, their physical scale and results, and the natures of their targets.

  17. A non-invasive approach to study lifetime exposure and bioaccumulation of PCBs in protected marine mammals: PBPK modeling in harbor porpoises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decade, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have increasingly been developed to explain the kinetics of environmental pollutants in wildlife. For marine mammals specifically, these models provide a new, non-destructive tool that enables the integration of biomonitoring activities and in vitro studies. The goals of the present study were firstly to develop PBPK models for several environmental relevant PCB congeners in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), a species that is sensitive to pollution because of its limited metabolic capacity for pollutant transformation. These models were tested using tissue data of porpoises from the Black Sea. Secondly, the predictive power of the models was investigated for time trends in the PCB concentrations in North Sea harbor porpoises between 1990 and 2008. Thirdly, attempts were made to assess metabolic capacities of harbor porpoises for the investigated PCBs. In general, results show that parameter values from other species (rodents, humans) are not always suitable in marine mammal models, most probably due to differences in physiology and exposure. The PCB 149 levels decrease the fastest in male harbor porpoises from the North Sea in a time period of 18 years, whereas the PCB 101 levels decrease the slowest. According to the models, metabolic breakdown of PCB 118 is probably of lesser importance compared to other elimination pathways. For PCB 101 and 149 however, the presence of their metabolites can be attributed to bioaccumulation of metabolites from the prey and to metabolic breakdown of the parent compounds in the harbor porpoises. - Highlights: → PBPK modeling was used to study the kinetics of several PCBs in a marine mammal. → Harbor porpoises are sensitive to pollution and therefore ideal model organisms. → Black Sea data were used for parameterization. → North Sea data for assessing temporal trends (1990-2008). → PBPK modeling is a non-invasive and non-destructive tool.

  18. Large-Scale Evaluation of Nickel Aluminide Rools In A Heat-Treat Furnace at Bethlehem Steel's (now ISG) Burns Harbor Plate Mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Mengel; Anthony Martocci; Larry Fabina; RObert Petrusha; Ronald Chango

    2003-09-01

    At Bethlehem Steel Burns Harbor Plate Division (now ISG Burns Harbor Plate Inc.)'s annealing furnace, new nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls provide greater high-temperature strength and wear resistance compared to the conventional H series cast austenitic alloys currently used in the industry, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem (ISG) partnered under a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology's Emerging Technology Deployment Program to demonstrate and evaluate the nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated energy efficient large commercial annealing furnace system.

  19. Estimating population size of Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) at Children's Pool Beach in La Jolla, California, using photo-identification

    OpenAIRE

    Linder, Traci A.

    2011-01-01

    Children's Pool Beach in La Jolla, CA is a Pacific harbor seal (Phoca vitulina richardsi) rookery at the center of a large legal controversy. Due to the heated contention surrounding this rookery, very few scientific studies have been done on the population of harbor seals that use this haul-out site. Maximum daily haul-out counts rarely exceed 200, and management decisions have been framed around the assumption of a largely resident population of no more than approximately 250 seals. In this...

  20. Adult Mouse Basal Forebrain Harbors Two Distinct Cholinergic Populations Defined By Their Electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge P Golowasch

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We performed whole-cell recordings from basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of choline acetyltransferase promoter. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons can be differentiated into two electrophysiologically identifiable subtypes: early and late firing neurons. Early firing neurons (70% are more excitable, show prominent spike frequency adaptation and more susceptible to depolarization blockade, a phenomenon characterized by complete silencing of the neuron following initial action potentials. Late firing neurons (30%, albeit being less excitable, could maintain a tonic discharge at low frequencies. In voltage clamp analysis, we have shown that early firing neurons have a higher density of low voltage activated calcium currents. These two cholinergic cell populations might be involved in distinct functions: the early firing group being more suitable for phasic changes in cortical acetylcholine release associated with attention while the late firing neurons could support general arousal by maintaining tonic acetylcholine level.

  1. A Preliminary Study of the Safety of Red Light Phototherapy of Tissues Harboring Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Myakishev-Rempel, Max; Stadler, Istvan; Brondon, Philip; Axe, David R.; Friedman, Mark; Nardia, Frances Barg; Lanzafame, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Red light phototherapy is known to stimulate cell proliferation in wound healing. This study investigated whether low-level light therapy (LLLT) would promote tumor growth when pre-existing malignancy is present. Background data: LLLT has been increasingly used for numerous conditions, but its use in cancer patients, including the treatment of lymphedema or various unrelated comorbidities, has been withheld by practitioners because of the fear that LLLT might result in initiation o...

  2. Solitary pulmonary metastasis from lung cancer harboring EML4-ALK after a 15-year disease-free interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Kenji; Ito, Simon; Suda, Kenichi; Fukui, Takayuki; Usami, Noriyasu; Hatooka, Shunzo; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-04-01

    It is often difficult to differentiate metachronous primary lung cancers from local pulmonary recurrences when the histopathological findings are similar. A 43-year-old man underwent right upper lobectomy with lymph node dissection for primary lung adenocarcinoma (p-T2aN0M0, stage IB). Fifteen years later, he developed a lung nodule in his right middle lobe. The tumor was preoperatively thought to be a metachronous second primary lung adenocarcinoma, and was surgically resected. Histopathological findings for both tumors were of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with mucus production. Both tumors also harbored the EML4 (echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4)-ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) fusion gene (variant 3a+b). Based on this molecular finding, the pulmonary nodule was considered to be a recurrence after very long latent period. PMID:23279872

  3. Harboring oil-degrading bacteria: a potential mechanism of adaptation and survival in corals inhabiting oil-contaminated reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dahash, Lulwa M; Mahmoud, Huda M

    2013-07-30

    Certain coral reef systems north of the Arabian Gulf are characterized by corals with a unique ability to thrive and flourish despite the presence of crude oil continuously seeping from natural cracks in the seabed. Harboring oil-degrading bacteria as a part of the holobiont has been investigated as a potential mechanism of adaptation and survival for corals in such systems. The use of conventional and molecular techniques verified a predominance of bacteria affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes in the mucus and tissues of Acropora clathrata and Porites compressa. These bacteria were capable of degrading a wide range of aliphatic (C9-C28) aromatic hydrocarbons (Phenanthrene, Biphenyl, Naphthalene) and crude oil. In addition, microcosms supplied with coral samples and various concentrations of crude oil shifted their bacterial population toward the more advantageous types of oil degraders as oil concentrations increased. PMID:23014479

  4. Ambient and potential denitrification rates in marsh soils of Northeast Creek and Bass Harbor Marsh watersheds, Mount Desert Island, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Thomas G.; Culbertson, Charles W.; Duff, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment from atmospheric deposition, agricultural activities, wildlife, and domestic sources is a concern at Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island, Maine, because of the potential problems of degradation of water quality and eutrophication in estuaries. Degradation of water quality has been observed at Bass Harbor Marsh estuary in the park but only minimally in Northeast Creek estuary. Previous studies at Acadia National Park have estimated nutrient inputs to estuaries from atmospheric deposition and surface-water runoff, and have identified shallow groundwater as an additional potential source of nutrients. Previous studies at Acadia National Park have assumed that a certain fraction of the nitrogen input was removed through microbial denitrification, but rates of denitrification (natural or maximum potential) in marsh soils have not been determined. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Acadia National Park, measured in-place denitrification rates in marsh soils in Northeast Creek and in Bass Harbor Marsh watersheds during summer 2008 and summer 2009. Denitrification was measured under ambient conditions as well as after additions of inorganic nitrogen and glucose. In-place denitrification rates under ambient conditions were similar to those reported for other coastal wetlands, although they were generally lower than those reported for salt marshes having high ambient concentrations of nitrate (NO3). Denitrification rates generally increased by at least an order of magnitude following NO3 additions, with or without glucose (as the carbohydrate) additions, compared with the ambient treatments that received no nutrient additions. The treatment that added both glucose and NO3 resulted in a variety of denitrification responses when compared with the addition of NO3 alone. In most cases, the addition of glucose to a given rate of NO3 addition resulted in higher rates of denitrification. These variable responses indicate that the amount of

  5. Effects of deposition of heavy-metal-polluted harbor mud on microbial diversity and metal resistance in sandy marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toes, Ann-Charlotte M; Finke, Niko; Kuenen, J Gijs;

    2008-01-01

    the finding that some groups of clones were shared between the metal-impacted sandy sediment and the harbor control, comparative analyses showed that the two sediments were significantly different in community composition. Consequences of redeposition of metal-polluted sediment were primarily underlined...... rRNA genes, whereas a minor, transient impact on the archaeal community was revealed. Phylogenetic analyses of bacterial 16S rRNA clone libraries showed an abundance of members of the Flavobacteriaceae, the alpha- and gamma-Proteobacteria, in both the muddy and the sandy sediments. Despite...... with cultivation-dependent techniques. Toxicity tests showed that the percentage of Cd- and Cu-tolerant aerobic heterotrophs was highest among isolates from the sandy sediment with metal-polluted mud on top....

  6. An ATP synthase harboring an atypical γ-subunit is involved in ATP synthesis in tomato fruit chromoplasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pateraki, Irini; Renato, Marta; Azcõn-Bieto, Joaquín;

    2013-01-01

    synthesis and accumulation of carotenoids. This transition renders chromoplasts unable to photochemically synthesize ATP, and therefore these organelles need to obtain the ATP required for anabolic processes through alternative sources. It is widely accepted that the ATP used for biosynthetic processes in...... non-photosynthetic plastids is imported from the cytosol or is obtained through glycolysis. In this work, however, we show that isolated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit chromoplasts are able to synthesize ATP de novo through a respiratory pathway using NADPH as an electron donor. We also report...... the involvement of a plastidial ATP synthase harboring an atypical γ-subunit induced during ripening, which lacks the regulatory dithiol domain present in plant and algae chloroplast γ-subunits. Silencing of this atypical γ-subunit during fruit ripening impairs the capacity of isolated chromoplast to...

  7. Speciation of arsenic in environmental samples of the Nha Trang Harbor, Vietnam, using HPLC coupled HG-AAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Lan Anh; Trinh, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Dinh Thuat; Bui, Minh Ly

    2011-04-01

    A coupled high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-atomic absorption spectroscopy system was used to determine the speciation of arsenic in samples from the Nha Trang Harbor, Vietnam. Concentrations of arsenic in seawater, pore water, suspended solid, and sediment were 4.12-9.81 μg/L, 13.10-24.32 μg/L, 1.87-6.42 μg/g, and 3.37-9.06 μg/g, respectively. Extraction using H(3)PO(4) + NH(2)OH·HCl and ultrasonic digestion was optimized to yield a 76-85% of total arsenic. Arsenic (III) was the most abundant species in suspended solids and sediments whereas arsenic (V) represented for 30-50% of arsenic (III) concentration. Monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid species were undetectable. PMID:21365299

  8. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells are essential for CD8+ T cell activation and anti-tumor responses after local immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine eKuhn; Jianping eYang; F eRonchese

    2015-01-01

    Tumors harbor several populations of dendritic cells with the ability to prime tumor-specific T cells. However, these T cells mostly fail to differentiate into armed effectors and are unable to control tumor growth. We have previously shown that treatment with immunostimulatory agents at the tumor site can activate anti-tumor immune responses, and is associated with the appearance of a population of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in the tumor and tumor-draining lymph node. Here we use dendr...

  9. McNary Dam, Ice Harbor Dam, and Lower Monumental Dam Smolt Monitoring Program; 1996 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillson, Todd; Lind, Sharon; Price, William (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1997-07-01

    The Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) assumed responsibility for the Smolt Monitoring Program at McNary Dam on the Columbia River in 1990 and at the new juvenile collection facility at Lower Monumental Dam on the Snake River in 1993. In 1996, Smolt Monitoring Program activities also began at the new juvenile collection facility located at Ice Harbor Dam. This report summarizes the 1996 Smolt Monitoring work at all three sites. The work at Ice Harbor consisted of Gas Bubble Trauma (GBT) monitoring only. In general, the 1996 passage season at both the McNary and Lower Monumental sites can be characterized by reduced passage of juveniles through the collection systems due to elevated river flows and spill, and low (<1%) overall facility mortality rates most likely resulting from cooler water temperatures. In accordance with the National Marine Fisheries Service recommendations (NMFS, 1995) all spring migrants were bypassed at McNary Dam in 1996. Mechanical problems within the McNary collection system resulted in collection and sampling activities being delayed until April 18 at this site, while sampling and collection began on the scheduled starting date of April 1 at Lower Monumental Dam. Monitoring operations were conducted through December 14 at McNary Dam and through October 28 at Lower Monumental Dam. An ongoing transportation evaluation summer migrant marking program was conducted at McNary Dam in 1996 by the NMFS. This necessitated the sampling of 394,211 additional fish beyond the recommended sampling guidelines. All total, 509,237 and 31,219 juvenile salmonids were anesthetized and individually counted, examined for scale loss, injuries, and brands by WDFW Smolt Monitoring personnel in 1996 at McNary Dam and Lower Monumental Dam, respectively.

  10. Shallow water models as tool for tsunami current predictions in ports and harbors. Validation with Tohoku 2011 field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Vida, J. M., Sr.; Macias Sanchez, J.; Castro, M. J.; Ortega, S.

    2015-12-01

    Model ability to compute and predict tsunami flow velocities is of importance in risk assessment and hazard mitigation. Substantial damage can be produced by high velocity flows, particularly in harbors and bays, even when the wave height is small. Besides, an accurate simulation of tsunami flow velocities and accelerations is fundamental for advancing in the study of tsunami sediment transport. These considerations made the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) proposing a benchmark exercise focused on modeling and simulating tsunami currents. Until recently, few direct measurements of tsunami velocities were available to compare and to validate model results. After Tohoku 2011 many current meters measurement were made, mainly in harbors and channels. In this work we present a part of the contribution made by the EDANYA group from the University of Malaga to the NTHMP workshop organized at Portland (USA), 9-10 of February 2015. We have selected three out of the five proposed benchmark problems. Two of them consist in real observed data from the Tohoku 2011 event, one at Hilo Habour (Hawaii) and the other at Tauranga Bay (New Zealand). The third one consists in laboratory experimental data for the inundation of Seaside City in Oregon. For this model validation the Tsunami-HySEA model, developed by EDANYA group, was used. The overall conclusion that we could extract from this validation exercise was that the Tsunami-HySEA model performed well in all benchmark problems proposed. The greater spatial variability in tsunami velocity than wave height makes it more difficult its precise numerical representation. The larger variability in velocities is likely a result of the behaviour of the flow as it is channelized and as it flows around bathymetric highs and structures. In the other hand wave height do not respond as strongly to chanelized flow as current velocity.

  11. Mechanical characteristics of harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) vibrissae under different circumstances and their implications on its sensing methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the mechanical properties of harbor seal vibrissae immersed in various solutions are investigated. As there are no nerves along the length of the vibrissae, all the perturbations have to be transmitted to their bases for sensing. Hence, quantification and understanding of the mechanical properties of the vibrissae are essential in determining the perturbations transmitted to the base of the vibrissae. Two experimental setups are devised for measurements of the different properties of the vibrissae. The first experimental setup is performed with a dynamic mechanical analysis machine. The measured properties in these experiments are the modulus of elasticity and the damping of the vibrissae. Dry, saline water-immersed, water-immersed and Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS)-immersed vibrissae are tested to determine the effects of these solutions on the properties of the vibrissae. Tests on the duration of immersion are also performed with saline water-immersed vibrissae. The second experimental setup is performed with a mini-shaker connected to a clamp, which rigidly holds the vibrissae at their bases. The measured properties in these experiments are the natural frequencies of the vibrissae. The results indicate that the moduli of elasticity of the vibrissae are found to decrease along their lengths. However, their damping does not vary along the lengths. HBSS-immersed and saline water-immersed vibrissae show similar characteristics on their properties. An analytical model for predicting the natural frequencies of the vibrissae is also derived. Strong agreement with previous studies on the underwater sensing principle of the harbor seal is also established. (paper)

  12. Combined "Infiltrating Astrocytoma/Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma" Harboring IDH1 R132H and BRAF V600E Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Seiji; Kipp, Benjamin R; Voss, Jesse S; Giannini, Caterina; Raghunathan, Aditya

    2016-02-01

    Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) has rarely been reported in combination with infiltrating glioma, historically interpreted as a "collision tumor." Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and BRAF V600E mutations are usually not concurrent. The former is typical of adult infiltrating gliomas, and the latter is identified in a variety of primary central nervous system neoplasms, including PXA, ganglioglioma, pilocytic astrocytoma, and rarely infiltrating gliomas. We report the case of a 56-year-old man presenting with seizures and headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large right temporal lobe mass with low T1 and high T2/FLAIR signal and a discrete contrast-enhancing focus. Histologically, the tumor showed 2 distinct components: an infiltrating astrocytoma harboring 5 mitoses/10 high-power fields and a relatively circumscribed focus, resembling PXA with, at most, 2 mitoses/10 high-power fields. No microvascular proliferation or necrosis was present in either component. The infiltrating astrocytoma component contained numerous axons, whereas the PXA-like component had sparse axons, as demonstrated by the neurofilament immunostain. Both components were positive for the mutant IDH1 R132H and showed loss of ATRX expression, whereas BRAF V600E was restricted to the PXA-like component. On sequencing of the 2 components separately after microdissection, both showed identical IDH1 R132H and TP53 R273C point mutations, whereas the BRAF V600E mutation was limited to the PXA-like component. These findings are consistent with clonal expansion of a morphologically distinct focus, harboring a private BRAF V600E mutation within an IDH1-mutant glioma. Intratumoral heterogeneity and clonal evolution, as seems to have occurred here, suggest reevaluation of "collision tumors" as a concept. PMID:26414224

  13. Benthic foraminifera distribution in high polluted sediments from Niterói Harbor (Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia G. Vilela

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Dockyards and harbors are recognized as being important locations where sediment-associated pollutants can accumulate, which constitutes an environmental risk to aquatic life due to potential uptake and accumulation of heavy metals in the biota. The aim of this paper is to assess the concentrations and the effects of some heavy metals in the benthic foraminifera assemblage in Niterói Harbor. Low concentrations in the benthic foraminifera as well as the dominance of indicative species such as Ammonia tepida, Buliminella elegantissima and Bolivina lowmani can be associated with an environment under stress. In addition, the occurrence of test abnormalities among foraminifera may represent a useful biomarker for evaluating long-term environmental impacts in a coastal region.Estaleiros e portos são locais reconhecidamente importantes onde poluentes associados a sedimentos podem acumular, constituindo um risco ambiental para a vida aquática devido ao potencial de captação e acumulação de metais pesados na biota. O propósito deste trabalho é avaliar as concentrações e os efeitos de alguns metais pesados na assembléia de foraminíferos bentônicos no Porto de Niterói. Baixas concentrações de foraminíferos bentônicos bem como a dominância de espécies indicativas como Ammonia tepida, Buliminella elegantissima e Bolivina lowmani podem ser associadas a um ambiente sob estresse. A ocorrência de anormalidades entre os foraminíferos pode representar um útil biomarcador para avaliação de impactos ambientais de longo termo em uma região costeira.

  14. Biased signaling through G-protein-coupled PROKR2 receptors harboring missense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbai, Oualid; Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Various missense mutations in the gene coding for prokineticin receptor 2 (PROKR2), a G-protein-coupled receptor, have been identified in patients with Kallmann syndrome. However, the functional consequences of these mutations on the different signaling pathways of this receptor have not been studied. We first showed that the wild-type PROKR2 can activate different G-protein subtypes (Gq, Gs, and Gi/o) and recruit β-arrestins in transfected HEK-293 cells. We then examined, for each of these signaling pathways, the effects of 9 mutations that did not significantly impair cell surface targeting or ligand binding of the receptor. Four mutant receptors showing defective Gq signaling (R85C, R85H, R164Q, and V331M) could still recruit β-arrestins on ligand activation, which may cause biased signaling in vivo. Conversely, the R80C receptor could activate the 3 types of G proteins but could not recruit β-arrestins. Finally, the R268C receptor could recruit β-arrestins and activate the Gq and Gs signaling pathways but could not activate the Gi/o signaling pathway. Our results validate the concept that mutations in the genes encoding membrane receptors can bias downstream signaling in various ways, possibly leading to pathogenic and, perhaps in some cases, protective (e.g., R268C) effects. PMID:24830383

  15. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accommodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site environments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 2 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains the Appendixes (A through N), which provide details of the data analyses and full presentation of the data and results.

  16. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 2, Appendixes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accommodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site environments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 2 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains the Appendixes (A through N), which provide details of the data analyses and full presentation of the data and results.

  17. 26 CFR 1.168(f)(8)-1T - Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). 1.168(f)(8)-1T Section 1.168(f)(8)-1T Internal Revenue... information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). In general. Form 6793,...

  18. Data Analysis and Data-Driven Decision-Making Strategies Implemented by Elementary Teachers in Selected Exited Program Improvement Safe Harbor Schools in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to investigate and describe how elementary teachers in exited Program Improvement-Safe Harbor schools acquire student achievement data through assessments, the strategies and reflections utilized to make sense of the data to improve student achievement, ensure curriculum and instructional goals are aligned,…

  19. COMPARISON OF PCB AND TRACE METAL BIOACCUMULATION IN THE BLUE MUSSEL, MYTILUS EDULIS, AND THE RIBBED MUSSEL, MODIOLUS DEMISSUS, IN NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, MASSACHUSETTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The accumulation of PCBs and trace metals was compared at 14-d intervals between two filter-feeding bivalves, the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and the ribbed mussel, Modiolus demissus, after deployment in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, for up to 56 d. Contaminant uptake in de...

  20. 33 CFR 211.6 - Rights which may be granted by the Secretary of the Army in river and harbor and flood control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the Secretary of the Army in river and harbor and flood control property. 211.6 Section 211.6... and flood control property. (a) Leases. (1) The Secretary of the Army is authorized, whenever he shall deem it to be advantageous to the Government, to lease such real property under the control of...

  1. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 of 38-Foot Project). Volume 1, Background and appendixes A through H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Kohn, N.P.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineering (USACE), environmental studies were conducted by Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to evaluate the suitability of sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor for dredging and ocean disposal. During the Phase 3 38-Foot Project, sediment cores were collected from mudline to {minus}39 ft mean lower low water at various locations in Oakland Inner Harbor channel and allocated to six composite samples. These composites were evaluated through physical/chemical analyses, acute toxicity to sensitive marine organisms, and bioaccumulation potential. Sediment samples from individual locations were tested for physical/chemical parameters only. The results of toxicological and bioaccumulation testing may be used by USACE to determine the amount of potential dredged material from Oakland Inner Harbor channel acceptable for open-water disposal as defined by the Draft Implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990) and consistent with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662). This is Volume 1 of a two-volume data report that presents the data gathered during the Oakland Harbor Phase 3 38-Foot Project, conducted in the Fall of 1990. This data report does not include interpretation or statistical analysis of the 38-Foot data. Volume 1 includes the project background as well as a full presentation of data and results in Appendixes A through H. Volume 2 contains the remaining data in Appendixes I through L.

  2. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 of 38-Foot Project). Volume 2, Appendixes I through L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Kohn, N.P.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental studies were conducted by Battelle/Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) to evaluate the suitability of sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor for dredging and ocean disposal. During the Phase 3 38-Foot Project, sediment cores were collected from mudline to {minus}39 ft mean lower low water at various locations in Oakland Inner Harbor channel and allocated to six composite samples. These composites were evaluated through physical/chemical analyses, acute toxicity to sensitive marine organisms, and bioaccumulation potential. Sediment samples from individual locations were tested for physical/chemical parameters only. The results of toxicological and bioaccumulation testing may be used by USACE to determine the amount of potential dredged material from Oakland Inner Harbor channel acceptable for open-water disposal as defined by the Draft Implementation Manual (EPA/USACE 1990) and consistent with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662). This is Volume 2 of a two-volume data report that represents the data gathered during the Oakland Harbor Phase 3 38-Foot Project, conducted in the Fall of 1990. This data report does not include interpretation or statistical analysis of the 38-Foot data. Volume 1 includes the project background as well as data and results presented in Appendixes A through H. Volume 2 includes the remaining data presented in Appendixes I through L.

  3. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.

  4. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 1, Analyses and discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.

  5. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chung-Ching; di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-01-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-de...

  6. Oncolytic reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cells, and synergizes with irinotecan

    OpenAIRE

    Maitra, Radhashree; Seetharam, Raviraja; Tesfa, Lydia; Augustine, Titto A.; Klampfer, Lidija; Coffey, Matthew C; Mariadason, John M.; Goel, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Reovirus is a double stranded RNA virus, with an intrinsic preference for replication in KRAS mutant cells. As 45% of human colorectal cancers (CRC) harbor KRAS mutations, we sought to investigate its efficacy in KRAS mutant CRC cells, and examine its impact in combination with the topoisimerase-1 inhibitor, irinotecan. Reovirus efficacy was examined in the KRAS mutant HCT116, and the isogenic KRAS WT Hke3 cell line, and in the non-malignant rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Apoptosis was ...

  7. Stem Cell Interaction with Somatic Niche May Hold the Key to Fertility Restoration in Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa Bhartiya; Kalpana Sriraman; Seema Parte

    2012-01-01

    The spontaneous return of fertility after bone marrow transplantation or heterotopic grafting of cryopreserved ovarian cortical tissue has surprised many, and a possible link with stem cells has been proposed. We have reviewed the available literature on ovarian stem cells in adult mammalian ovaries and presented a model that proposes that the ovary harbors two distinct populations of stem cells, namely, pluripotent, quiescent, very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), and slightly larger...

  8. High-resolution analyses of two different classes of tumor cells in situ tagged with alternative histochemical marker genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, W.C.; Pretlow, T. P.; Pretlow, T. G.; Culp, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate interactions of two different tumor cell classes during the establishment of micrometastases at the single-cell level, two different BALB/c 3T3 tumor cell derivatives were established that harbor different histochemical marker genes: bacterial lacZ in a EJ-Harvey ras transformant (abbreviated LZEJ cells) and human placental alkaline phosphatase (ALP) gene in a human c-sis transformant (APSI cells). Several different histochemical staining methods were evaluated, using the distinct...

  9. Long-term temporal-spatial dynamics of marine coastal water quality in the Tolo Harbor,Hong Kong,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Fu-liu; K. C. LAM; R. W. Dawson; TAO Shu; Y. D. CHEN

    2004-01-01

    The long-term temporal and spatial dynamics of marine coastal water quality in Tolo Harbor, Hong Kong were explored. The Harbor is divided into three zones represented as Harbor, Buffer, and Channel Subzones. The time range for the study covers the period from the 1970s to the 1990s. The selected indicators for the comprehensive assessment of water quality consist of physical, chemical and biological aspects, including suspended solids(SS), Secchi disk depth(SD), 5-day biochemical oxygen demand( BOD5 ), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus(TP), faecal coliform, chlorophyll-a(Chl-a), and the number of red tide occurrences. The results indicated the presence of obvious temporal and spatial trends with regard to changes in water quality. Spatially, water quality in the Channel Subzone is the best, while that in the Harbor Subzone is the worst. On a temporal basis, the average trend from bad to good was 1980s > 1990s >1970s as indicated by most of the selected water quality indicators. Water quality during the late 1980s reached its worst level with the lowest SD, the highest BOD5, TN, TP, Chl-a concentrations, and the number of red tide occurrences. These long-term temporal-spatial water quality trends were also found in other studies of the Tolo Harbor. The large quantity of pollutants produced as a result of increasing population, industrial and commercial actives, and urbanization and industrialization trends in both Shatin and Tai Po seem to be primarily responsible for the changes in marine coastal water quality.

  10. Abundance and diversity patterns of the sessile macrobenthic community associated with environmental gradients in Vitória Harbor, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Rosental Zalmon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Harbor terminals and urban sewage effluents affect the composition and distribution of epibenthic organisms. In this study, we hypothesized that the benthic community structure at the Vitoria Harbor changes spatially in a ~3 km scale, and that these changes are associated with environmental gradients resulting from point-source sewage and differences in the physical and chemical parameters of the water along the harbor access channel. Four sites, internal (PI, intermediate-internal (PMI, intermediate-external (PME and external (PE, varying from 0.5 to 4.0 km off the harbor, were sampled on five quadrats at six sampling dates (N = 30 per site. The epibenthic community on the shallow sublitoral rocky shore was sampled fortnightly from December 2005 to February 2006 by point-intersection method. A total of 27 taxa were registered with higher richness and diversity values at the external sites. The similarity analysis indicated two distinct systems, with the internal sites PI and PMI apart from the external PME and PE, which showed 97% of dissimilarity. While the internal sites presented some estuarine characteristics and a high coverage (> 60% of hydrozoans and bryozoans with silt/clay, the external ones showed coastal water influence and higher amounts of sedimentary material substrate (> 50%. This pattern reflects the estuarine gradient and the suspended sedimentary material at the internal sites, which is carried out to the external parts of the channel. The data showed two distinct benthic communities and support the hypothesis that the community structure varies along the harbor access channel in a gradient from the inner to the outer portion of the estuary.

  11. Uricase production by a recombinant Hansenula polymorpha strain harboring Candida utilis uricase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyu; Wang, Zhaoyue; He, Xiuping; Guo, Xuena; Li, Weiwei; Zhang, Borun

    2008-06-01

    Uricase is an important medical enzyme which can be used to determine urate in clinical analysis, to therapy gout, hyperuricemia, and tumor lysis syndrome. Uricase of Candida utilis was successfully expressed in Hansenula polymorpha under the control of methanol oxidase promoter using Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-factor signal peptide as the secretory sequence. Recombinant H. polymorpha MU200 with the highest extracellular uricase production was characterized with three copies of expression cassette and selected for process optimization for the production of recombinant enzyme. Among the parameters investigated in shaking flask cultures, the pH value of medium and inoculum size had great influence on the recombinant uricase production. The maximum extracellular uricase yield of 2.6 U/ml was obtained in shaking flask culture. The yield of recombinant uricase was significantly improved by the combined use of a high cell-density cultivation technique and a pH control strategy of switching culture pH from 5.5 to 6.5 in the induction phase. After induction for 58 h, the production of recombinant uricase reached 52.3 U/ml (about 2.1 g/l of protein) extracellularly and 60.3 U/ml (about 2.4 g/l) intracellularly in fed-batch fermentation, which are much higher than those expressed in other expression systems. To our knowledge, this is the first report about the heterologous expression of uricase in H. polymorpha. PMID:18437374

  12. Epithelial-Myoepithelial Carcinoma of the Salivary Gland Harboring HRAS Codon 61 Mutations With Lung Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Min-Shu; Chen, Jin-Shing; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Chou, Yueh-Hung

    2016-05-01

    Here, we report a case involving a 43-year-old man diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma in 2007. At the same time, 2 small lung nodules were incidentally found; however, they presented no indication of growth throughout the follow-up period. However, a 1.5-cm nodule located in the right parotid gland in 2010 gradually increased in size to 2.8 cm by 2012. A parotidectomy revealed an epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, characterized by biphasic tubular structures and solid areas presenting myoepithelial overgrowth. Tumor necrosis and regional lymph node invasion were also observed. During clinical follow-up in 2013, a new 1.3-cm nodule was identified in the left lower lobe of the lung, which enlarged to 3 cm by 2014. Wedge resection of the left lung nodules revealed round nodes with well-defined borders. Histologically, these lung tumors predominantly comprised spindle-shaped myoepithelial cells with occasional tubular structures. Numerous cleft-like spaces lined by entrapped TTF-1-immunoreactive pneumocytes were observed inside the nodules. The lung nodules were characterized by a morphology similar to that of the parotid cancer. Epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma with lung metastasis was confirmed by molecular testing, which revealed identical HRAS codon 61 (Q61K) mutations in the primary parotid tumor as well as in the lung metastases. PMID:26675036

  13. Transgenic Mice Harboring SV40 T-Antigen Genes Develop Characteristic Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinster, Ralph L.; Chen, Howard Y.; Messing, Albee; van Dyke, Terry; Levine, Arnold J.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A high percentage of transgenic mice developing from eggs microinjected with plasmids containing the SV40 early region genes and a metallothionein fusion gene develop tumors within the choroid plexus. A line of mice has been established in which nearly every affected animal succumbs to this brain tumor. Thymic hypertrophy and kidney pathology are also observed in some mice. SV40 T-antigen mRNA and protein are readily detected in affected tissues; however, SV40 T-antigen gene expression is barely detectable in unaffected tissues or in susceptible tissues prior to overt pathology, suggesting that tumorigenesis depends upon activation of the SV40 genes. Comparison of DNA from tumor tissue (or cell lines derived from tumors) with DNA from unaffected tissues reveals structural rearrangements as well as changes in DNA methylation of the foreign DNA. The SV40 genes are frequently amplified in tumor tissue, which further indicates that their expression is intimately involved in tumorigenesis in transgenic mice. PMID:6327063

  14. Physiological and Growth Responses of Tomato Progenies Harboring the Betaine Alhyde Dehydrogenase Gene to Salt Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Feng Zhou; Xian-Yang Chen; Xing-Ning Xue; Xin-Guo Zhang; Yin-Xin Li

    2007-01-01

    The responses of five transgenlc tomato (Lycoperslcon esculentum Mill) lines containing the betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) gene to salt stress were evaluated. Proline, betaine (N, N, N-trimethylglycine, hereafter betaine), chlorophyll and ion contents, BADH activity, electrolyte leakage (EL), and some growth parameters of the plants under 1.0% and 1.5% NaCl treatments were examined. The transgenic tomatoes had enhanced BADH activity and betaine content, compared to the wild type under stress conditions. Salt stress reduced chlorophyll contents to a higher extent in the wild type than in the transgenic plants. The wild type exhibited significantly higher proline content than the transgenic plants at 0.9% and 1.3% NaCl. Cell membrane of the wild type was severely damaged as determined by higher EL under salinity stress. K+ and Ca2+ contents of all tested lines decreased under salt stress,but the transgenic plants showed a significantly higher accumulation of K+ and Ca2+ than the wild type. In contrast,the wild type had significantly higher Cl- and Na+ contents than the transgenic plants under salt stress. Although yield reduction among various lines varied, the wild type had the highest yield reduction. Fruit quality of the transgenic plants was better in comparison with the wild type as shown by a low ratio of blossom end rot fruits.The results show that the transgenic plants have improved salt tolerance over the wild type.

  15. Site-specific integration in CHO cells mediated by CRISPR/Cas9 and homology-directed DNA repair pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jae Seong; Beuchert Kallehauge, Thomas; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup;

    2015-01-01

    gene integration into site-specific loci in CHO cells using CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system and compatible donor plasmid harboring a gene of interest (GOI) and short homology arms. This strategy has enabled precise insertion of a 3.7-kb gene expression cassette at defined loci in CHO cells following...

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Targeting with Surface-Engineered Lentiviral Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Els Verhoeyen and Francois-Loic Cosset Adapted from [*Gene Transfer: Delivery and Expression of DNA and RNA*](http://www.cshlpress.com/link/genetrnp.htm) (eds. Friedmann and Rossi). CSHL Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA, 2007. ### INTRODUCTION In the protocol presented here, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are specifically transduced with a vector displaying the HSC-activating polypeptides, stem cell factor (SCF) and thrombopoietin (TPO). Targeted HSC transduction is e...

  17. Identifying patients harboring extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae on hospital admission: derivation and validation of a scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumbarello, Mario; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Bassetti, Matteo; De Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe; Spanu, Teresa; Di Meco, Eugenia; Losito, Angela Raffaella; Parisini, Andrea; Pagani, Nicole; Cauda, Roberto

    2011-07-01

    Increases in community-acquired infections caused by extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae have important implications for hospital infection control and empirical antibiotic therapy protocols. We developed and validated a tool for identifying patients harboring these organisms at hospital admission. We retrospectively analyzed chart data for 849 adult inpatients. The derivation cohort included 339 patients admitted to a large hospital in Rome during 2008, with (n = 113) or without (n = 226) culture positivity for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., or Proteus mirabilis within 48 h after admission. Logistic-regression-based prediction scores were calculated based on variables independently associated with the outcome. The model was validated in a second cohort (n = 510) selected with identical criteria in hospitals in Genoa and Turin during 2009. Prediction scores were based on the following six variables (reported with odds ratio for study outcome and the 95% confidence intervals in brackets): recent (≤ 12 months before admission) hospitalization (5.69 [2.94 to 10.99]), transfer from another health care facility (5.61 [1.65 to 19.08]), Charlson comorbidity score ≥ 4 (3.80 [1.90 to 7.59]), recent (≤ 3 months before admission) β-lactam and/or fluoroquinolone treatment (3.68 [1.96 to 6.91]), recent urinary catheterization (3.52 [1.96 to 6.91]), and age ≥ 70 years (3.20 [1.79 to 5.70]). The model displayed good calibration and good-to-excellent discrimination in the derivation and validation sets (Hosmer-Lemshow χ(2) = 15.28 and 14.07; P = 0.17 and 0.23; areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, 0.83 and 0.92). It reliably identified patients likely to be harboring ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae at hospital admission who may need special infection control measures. Further study is needed to confirm this model's potential as a guide for prescribing empirical antibiotic therapy. PMID:21537020

  18. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, A.; Terrado, R.; Thaler, M.; Comeau, A.; Medrinal, E.; Lovejoy, C.

    2013-06-01

    The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL) in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8-20 μm cell diameter), mostly phagotrophic protists in the upper pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer, where light and nutrients are both available. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL from different water masses within the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada), targeting the surface, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer (SCM) and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1) to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly suggested that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate-driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  19. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Monier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8–20 μm cell diameter, mostly phagotrophic protists in the pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM layer. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL across a wide region, and down the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada, targeting the surface, the SCM and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1 to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly implied that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  20. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Monier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8–20 μm cell diameter, mostly phagotrophic protists in the upper pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer, where light and nutrients are both available. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL from different water masses within the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada, targeting the surface, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer (SCM and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1 to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly suggested that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate-driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.