WorldWideScience

Sample records for cells expression design

  1. Mind-controlled transgene expression by a wireless-powered optogenetic designer cell implant

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Folcher; Sabine Oesterle; Katharina Zwicky; Thushara Thekkottil; Julie Heymoz; Muriel Hohmann; Matthias Christen; Marie Daoud El-Baba; Peter Buchmann; Martin Fussenegger

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic devices for traceless remote control of gene expression may provide new treatment opportunities in future gene- and cell-based therapies. Here we report the design of a synthetic mind-controlled gene switch that enables human brain activities and mental states to wirelessly programme the transgene expression in human cells. An electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain–computer interface (BCI) processing mental state-specific brain waves programs an inductively linked wireless-powered...

  2. Mind-controlled transgene expression by a wireless-powered optogenetic designer cell implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folcher, Marc; Oesterle, Sabine; Zwicky, Katharina; Thekkottil, Thushara; Heymoz, Julie; Hohmann, Muriel; Christen, Matthias; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Buchmann, Peter; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic devices for traceless remote control of gene expression may provide new treatment opportunities in future gene- and cell-based therapies. Here we report the design of a synthetic mind-controlled gene switch that enables human brain activities and mental states to wirelessly programme the transgene expression in human cells. An electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) processing mental state-specific brain waves programs an inductively linked wireless-powered optogenetic implant containing designer cells engineered for near-infrared (NIR) light-adjustable expression of the human glycoprotein SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase). The synthetic optogenetic signalling pathway interfacing the BCI with target gene expression consists of an engineered NIR light-activated bacterial diguanylate cyclase (DGCL) producing the orthogonal second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), which triggers the stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-dependent induction of synthetic interferon-β promoters. Humans generating different mental states (biofeedback control, concentration, meditation) can differentially control SEAP production of the designer cells in culture and of subcutaneous wireless-powered optogenetic implants in mice. PMID:25386727

  3. Correlation of mRNA and protein levels: Cell type-specific gene expression of cluster designation antigens in the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deutsch Eric W

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Expression levels of mRNA and protein by cell types exhibit a range of correlations for different genes. In this study, we compared levels of mRNA abundance for several cluster designation (CD genes determined by gene arrays using magnetic sorted and laser-capture microdissected human prostate cells with levels of expression of the respective CD proteins determined by immunohistochemical staining in the major cell types of the prostate – basal epithelial, luminal epithelial, stromal fibromuscular, and endothelial – and for prostate precursor/stem cells and prostate carcinoma cells. Immunohistochemical stains of prostate tissues from more than 50 patients were scored for informative CD antigen expression and compared with cell-type specific transcriptomes. Results: Concordance between gene and protein expression findings based on 'present' vs. 'absent' calls ranged from 46 to 68%. Correlation of expression levels was poor to moderate (Pearson correlations ranged from 0 to 0.63. Divergence between the two data types was most frequently seen for genes whose array signals exceeded background (> 50 but lacked immunoreactivity by immunostaining. This could be due to multiple factors, e.g. low levels of protein expression, technological sensitivities, sample processing, probe set definition or anatomical origin of tissue and actual biological differences between transcript and protein abundance. Conclusion: Agreement between these two very different methodologies has great implications for their respective use in both molecular studies and clinical trials employing molecular biomarkers.

  4. Multi-gene gateway clone design for expression of multiple heterologous genes in living cells: modular construction of multiple cDNA expression elements using recombinant cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Takefumi; Yahata, Kazuhide; Sasaki, Yukari; Hotta, Junko; Kishine, Hiroe; Chesnut, Jonathan D; Imamoto, Fumio

    2008-09-10

    Much attention has been focused on manipulating multiple genes in living cells for analyzing protein function. In order to perform high-throughput generation of multi-gene expression clones, gateway cloning technology (which represents a high-throughput DNA transfer from vector to vector) can be anticipated. In the conventional strategy for gateway cloning, the construction of two or more expression elements into tandem elements on a single plasmid requires the recombination of multiple entry clones with a destination vector in a single reaction mixture. Use of increasing numbers of entry clones in a single reaction is inefficient due to the difficulty in successfully recognizing multiple pairs of matched att signals simultaneously. To address this problem, a "Modular Destination" vector has been devised and constructed, whereby cDNA inserts are sequentially introduced, resulting in a tandem structure with multiple inserts. Whereas the standard destination vector contains only Cm(R) and ccdB genes flanked by two attR signals, this destination vector contains, in addition, one or two cDNA expression elements. Here, we show the rapid construction of expression vectors containing three or four tandemly arrayed cDNA expression elements and their expression in mammalian cells.

  5. Fundamentals of Expression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Expression of proteins in mammalian cells is a key technology important for many functional studies on human and higher eukaryotic genes. Studies include the mapping of protein interactions, solving protein structure by crystallization and X-ray diffraction or solution phase NMR and the generation of antibodies to enable a range of studies to be performed including protein detection in vivo. In addition the production of therapeutic proteins and antibodies, now a multi billion dollar industry, has driven major advances in cell line engineering for the production of grams per liter of active proteins and antibodies. Here the key factors that need to be considered for successful expression in HEK293 and CHO cells are reviewed including host cells, expression vector design, transient transfection methods, stable cell line generation and cultivation conditions. PMID:27165328

  6. New Strategies for Designing Inexpensive but Selective Bioadsorbants for Environmental Pollutants: Selection of specific Ligands and Their Cell Surface Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent L. Iverson; George Georgiou; Mohammad M. Ataai; Richard R. Koepsel

    2001-02-22

    The Broad, long term objective of the research plan is to develop exquisitely selective polypeptide metal chelators for the remediation of aqueous systems. A variety of polypeptide chelators will be developed and optimized ranging from antibodies to small peptides. Then, through unique molecular engineering approaches developed in our laboratories, the polypeptide chelators will be anchored directly on the surface of the cells that produce them. Thus, instead of using isolated biomolecules we will employ inexpensive genetically engineered whole cell adsorbents. Following a simple, easily scaleable treatment, the engineered cells can be used to manufacture an inexpensive, particulate adsorbent for metal removal.

  7. Automating InDesign with Regular Expressions

    CERN Document Server

    Kahrel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    If you need to make automated changes to InDesign documents beyond what basic search and replace can handle, you need regular expressions, and a bit of scripting to make them work. This Short Cut explains both how to write regular expressions, so you can find and replace the right things, and how to use them in InDesign specifically.

  8. iVisDesigner: Expressive Interactive Design of Information Visualizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Donghao; Höllerer, Tobias; Yuan, Xiaoru

    2014-12-01

    We present the design, implementation and evaluation of iVisDesigner, a web-based system that enables users to design information visualizations for complex datasets interactively, without the need for textual programming. Our system achieves high interactive expressiveness through conceptual modularity, covering a broad information visualization design space. iVisDesigner supports the interactive design of interactive visualizations, such as provisioning for responsive graph layouts and different types of brushing and linking interactions. We present the system design and implementation, exemplify it through a variety of illustrative visualization designs and discuss its limitations. A performance analysis and an informal user study are presented to evaluate the system.

  9. Expression regulation of design process gene in product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lusheng; Li, Bo; Tong, Shurong;

    2011-01-01

    To improve the design process efficiency, this paper proposes the principle and methodology that design process gene controls the characteristics of design process under the framework of design process reuse and optimization based on design process gene. First, the concept of design process gene ...... with the example of design management gene. Last, the regulation mode that the regulator gene regulates the expression of the structural gene is established and it is illustrated by taking the design process management gene as an example. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications....

  10. Optogenetics for gene expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Konrad; Naumann, Sebastian; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-02-01

    Molecular switches that are controlled by chemicals have evolved as central research instruments in mammalian cell biology. However, these tools are limited in terms of their spatiotemporal resolution due to freely diffusing inducers. These limitations have recently been addressed by the development of optogenetic, genetically encoded, and light-responsive tools that can be controlled with the unprecedented spatiotemporal precision of light. In this article, we first provide a brief overview of currently available optogenetic tools that have been designed to control diverse cellular processes. Then, we focus on recent developments in light-controlled gene expression technologies and provide the reader with a guideline for choosing the most suitable gene expression system.

  11. Expressions: Embodiment in the experience of design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rompay, T.J.L.

    2005-01-01

    EXPRESSIONS: EMBODIMENT IN THE EXPERIENCE OF DESIGN Products are not just objects by means of which we get things done. Apart from bringing aesthetic pleasures, for instance, they may also embody values we hold dear, communicate our fine taste to others, and help us define who we are. These widely

  12. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Jiang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins.

  13. Investigation by microarray analysis of effects of cigarette design characteristics on gene expression in human lung mucoepidermoid cancer cells NCI-H292 exposed to cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Chikako; Fukano, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    The effects of tobacco leaf types and the presence or absence of charcoal in the cigarette filters on gene expression were investigated using cigarette prototypes made of either flue-cured (FC) leaf or burley (BLY) leaf and Kentucky Reference 2R4F as a representative blend cigarette with cellulose acetate filters or charcoal filters. NCI-H292, human lung mucoepidermoid carcinoma cell line, was exposed to the total particulate matter (TPM) and gas/vapor phase (GVP) from each prototype for 8h and then the changes in gene expression from microarray data were analyzed. A number of genes associated with oxidative stress, inflammation, DNA damage and xenobiotic response were modified by the two fractions, TPM and GVP, from the three prototypes with cellulose acetate filters. Both TPM and GVP fractions strongly enhanced the gene expression of HMOX1, which is encoding the limiting enzyme in heme degradation and a key regulator of oxidative stress and inflammatory process. Comparing the effects of TPM and GVP fraction, TPM strongly activated Nrf2 pathway-mediated anti-oxidative stress reaction, whereas GVP caused notable DNA damage response. In comparison of FC and BLY, TPM from FC more strongly induced the expression of histone family proteins than that from BLY. GVP from FC markedly induced gene expression associated with HSP70-mediated inflammation relative to that from BLY. Charcoal included in the filter strongly reduced the effects of GVP from each cigarette on gene expression. However, charcoal did not modified the effects of TPM. As a whole, charcoal is a useful material for reducing the biological effects of GVP.

  14. Global gene expression analysis for evaluation and design of biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutaka Hanagata, Taro Takemura and Takashi Minowa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive gene expression analysis using DNA microarrays has become a widespread technique in molecular biological research. In the biomaterials field, it is used to evaluate the biocompatibility or cellular toxicity of metals, polymers and ceramics. Studies in this field have extracted differentially expressed genes in the context of differences in cellular responses among multiple materials. Based on these genes, the effects of materials on cells at the molecular level have been examined. Expression data ranging from several to tens of thousands of genes can be obtained from DNA microarrays. For this reason, several tens or hundreds of differentially expressed genes are often present in different materials. In this review, we outline the principles of DNA microarrays, and provide an introduction to methods of extracting information which is useful for evaluating and designing biomaterials from comprehensive gene expression data.

  15. Transitional cell carcinoma express vitamin D receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    Recently, vitamin D analogues have shown antineoplastic effect in several diseases. Vitamin D analogues exert its effect by interacting with the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Studies of VDR in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) have not been reported. The purpose of the present study was therefore...... to examine whether human bladder tumor cells express VDR. Tumor biopsies were obtained from 26 patients with TCC. Expression of VDR was examined by immunohistochemical experiments. All tumors expressed VDR. Biopsies from advanced disease contained more VDR positive cells than low stage disease (p ....05). Similarly, also tumor grade appeared to be related to the number of cells expressing the receptor. Normal urothlium also expressed VDR but only with low intensity. Our study shows that TCC cells possess the VDR receptor which may make them capable to respond to stimulation with vitamin D, but functional...

  16. Human Neuroepithelial Cells Express NMDA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappell B

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, binds to both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In certain parts of the brain the BBB contains two normally impermeable barriers: 1 cerebral endothelial barrier and 2 cerebral epithelial barrier. Human cerebral endothelial cells express NMDA receptors; however, to date, human cerebral epithelial cells (neuroepithelial cells have not been shown to express NMDA receptor message or protein. In this study, human hypothalamic sections were examined for NMDA receptors (NMDAR expression via immunohistochemistry and murine neuroepithelial cell line (V1 were examined for NMDAR via RT-PCR and Western analysis. We found that human cerebral epithelium express protein and cultured mouse neuroepithelial cells express both mRNA and protein for the NMDA receptor. These findings may have important consequences for neuroepithelial responses during excitotoxicity and in disease.

  17. Rho GTPase expression in human myeloid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne F G van Helden

    Full Text Available Myeloid cells are critical for innate immunity and the initiation of adaptive immunity. Strict regulation of the adhesive and migratory behavior is essential for proper functioning of these cells. Rho GTPases are important regulators of adhesion and migration; however, it is unknown which Rho GTPases are expressed in different myeloid cells. Here, we use a qPCR-based approach to investigate Rho GTPase expression in myeloid cells.We found that the mRNAs encoding Cdc42, RhoQ, Rac1, Rac2, RhoA and RhoC are the most abundant. In addition, RhoG, RhoB, RhoF and RhoV are expressed at low levels or only in specific cell types. More differentiated cells along the monocyte-lineage display lower levels of Cdc42 and RhoV, while RhoC mRNA is more abundant. In addition, the Rho GTPase expression profile changes during dendritic cell maturation with Rac1 being upregulated and Rac2 downregulated. Finally, GM-CSF stimulation, during macrophage and osteoclast differentiation, leads to high expression of Rac2, while M-CSF induces high levels of RhoA, showing that these cytokines induce a distinct pattern. Our data uncover cell type specific modulation of the Rho GTPase expression profile in hematopoietic stem cells and in more differentiated cells of the myeloid lineage.

  18. HLA expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadee, A A; Paterson, A; Coplan, K A; Reddy, S G

    1994-08-01

    The present study undertook to investigate the biological significance of human leucocyte antigen expression in hepatocellular carcinoma and to elucidate the role of potential modulating agents on human leucocyte antigen expression. These studies used several hepatic tumour-derived cell lines as in vitro model systems. The cell lines included PLC/PRF/5 (Alexander cell line), Hep3B, HepG2, TONG PHC, HA22T/VGH, HA59T/VGH and Mahlavu. The cell lines K562 and Raji were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. K562, a B lymphoid-derived cell line, was shown to express negligible amounts of human leucocyte antigens, while Raji, an erythromyeloid-derived cell line, expressed both class I and class II human leucocyte antigens as well as their respective invariant chains, beta 2-microglobulin and Ii. Using an ELISA, experiments performed on these cell lines confirmed the natural expression of class I and class II antigens by the HA22T/VGH and HA59T/VGH cell lines, whereas PLC/PRF/5 displayed class II surface antigens only. The effects of modulating agents such as interferon-gamma sodium butyrate and clofazimine on human leucocyte antigen expression were investigated using the HA22T/VGH, HA59T/VGH and TONG PHC cell lines. These agents increased class II and class II human leucocyte antigen expression on HA22T/VGH and TONG PHC cells, but had no effect on the HA59T/VGH cell line. The results suggest a potential use for these agents as modulators of human leucocyte antigen expression by human heptocellular cell lines.

  19. Gene expression profile of renal cell carcinoma clear cell type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F. Dall’Oglio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The determination of prognosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC is based, classically, on stage and histopathological aspects. The metastatic disease develops in one third of patients after surgery, even in localized tumors. There are few options for treating those patients, and even the new target designed drugs have shown low rates of success in controlling disease progression. Few studies used high throughput genomic analysis in renal cell carcinoma for determination of prognosis. This study is focused on the identification of gene expression signatures in tissues of low-risk, high-risk and metastatic RCC clear cell type (RCC-CCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed the expression of approximately 55,000 distinct transcripts using the Whole Genome microarray platform hybridized with RNA extracted from 19 patients submitted to surgery to treat RCC-CCT with different clinical outcomes. They were divided into three groups (1 low risk, characterized by pT1, Fuhrman grade 1 or 2, no microvascular invasion RCC; (2 high risk, pT2-3, Fuhrman grade 3 or 4 with, necrosis and microvascular invasion present and (3 metastatic RCC-CCT. Normal renal tissue was used as control. RESULTS: After comparison of differentially expressed genes among low-risk, high-risk and metastatic groups, we identified a group of common genes characterizing metastatic disease. Among them Interleukin-8 and Heat shock protein 70 were over-expressed in metastasis and validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. CONCLUSION: These findings can be used as a starting point to generate molecular markers of RCC-CCT as well as a target for the development of innovative therapies.

  20. Foxp3 expression in human cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourgoulianis Konstantinos I

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3 specifically characterizes the thymically derived naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs. Limited evidence indicates that it is also expressed, albeit to a lesser extent, in tissues other than thymus and spleen, while, very recently, it was shown that Foxp3 is expressed by pancreatic carcinoma. This study was scheduled to investigate whether expression of Foxp3 transcripts and mature protein occurs constitutively in various tumor types. Materials and methods Twenty five tumor cell lines of different tissue origins (lung cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, melanoma, erythroid leukemia, acute T-cell leukemia were studied. Detection of Foxp3 mRNA was performed using both conventional RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR while protein expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, using different antibody clones. Results Foxp3 mRNA as well as Foxp3 protein was detected in all tumor cell lines, albeit in variable levels, not related to the tissue of origin. This expression correlated with the expression levels of IL-10 and TGFb1. Conclusion We offer evidence that Foxp3 expression, characterizes tumor cells of various tissue origins. The biological significance of these findings warrants further investigation in the context of tumor immune escape, and especially under the light of current anti-cancer efforts interfering with Foxp3 expression.

  1. Foxp3 expression in human cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gourgoulianis Konstantinos I; Barda Angeliki K; Kerenidi Theodora; Loules Gedeon; Kalala Fani; Zamanakou Maria; Speletas Matthaios; Karanikas Vaios; Germenis Anastasios E

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective Transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) specifically characterizes the thymically derived naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs). Limited evidence indicates that it is also expressed, albeit to a lesser extent, in tissues other than thymus and spleen, while, very recently, it was shown that Foxp3 is expressed by pancreatic carcinoma. This study was scheduled to investigate whether expression of Foxp3 transcripts and mature protein occurs constitutively i...

  2. Tracking neuronal marker expression inside living differentiating cells using molecular beacons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilieva, Mirolyuba; Della Vedova, Paolo; Hansen, Ole;

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression is an important tool for elucidating mechanisms of cellular function. In order to monitor gene expression during nerve cell development, molecular beacon (MB) probes targeting markers representing different stages of neuronal differentiation were designed and synthesized...

  3. Cell Architecture for Nanoelectronic Design

    OpenAIRE

    Martorell, F.; A. Rubio

    2007-01-01

    Submitted on behalf of EDA Publishing Association (http://irevues.inist.fr/handle/2042/5920) International audience Several nanoelectronic devices have been already proved. However, no architecture which makes use of them provides a feasible opportunity to build medium/large systems. Nanoarchitecture proposals only solve a small part of the problems needed to achieve a real design. In this paper, we propose and analyze a cell architecture that overcomes most of those at the gate level. ...

  4. CNPase Expression in Olfactory Ensheathing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Radtke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large body of work supports the proposal that transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs into nerve or spinal cord injuries can promote axonal regeneration and remyelination. Yet, some investigators have questioned whether the transplanted OECs associate with axons and form peripheral myelin, or if they recruit endogenous Schwann cells that form myelin. Olfactory bulbs from transgenic mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP under the control of the 2-3-cyclic nucleotide 3-phosphodiesterase (CNPase promoter were studied. CNPase is expressed in myelin-forming cells throughout their lineage. We examined CNPase expression in both in situ in the olfactory bulb and in vitro to determine if OECs express CNPase commensurate with their myelination potential. eGFP was observed in the outer nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. Dissociated OECs maintained in culture had both intense eGFP expression and CNPase immunostaining. Transplantation of OECs into transected peripheral nerve longitudinally associated with the regenerated axons. These data indicate that OECs in the outer nerve layer of the olfactory bulb of CNPase transgenic mice express CNPase. Thus, while OECs do not normally form myelin on olfactory nerve axons, their expression of CNPase is commensurate with their potential to form myelin when transplanted into injured peripheral nerve.

  5. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states.

  6. Pitx2 expression promotes p21 expression and cell cycle exit in neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldring, Nina; Joseph, Bertrand; Hermanson, Ola; Kioussi, Chrissa

    2012-11-01

    Cortical development is a complex process that involves many events including proliferation, cell cycle exit and differentiation that need to be appropriately synchronized. Neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from embryonic cortex are characterized by their ability of self-renewal under continued maintenance of multipotency. Cell cycle progression and arrest during development is regulated by numerous factors, including cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases and their inhibitors. In this study, we exogenously expressed the homeodomain transcription factor Pitx2, usually expressed in postmitotic progenitors and neurons of the embryonic cortex, in NSCs with low expression of endogenous Pitx2. We found that Pitx2 expression induced a rapid decrease in proliferation associated with an accumulation of NSCs in G1 phase. A search for potential cell cycle inhibitors responsible for such cell cycle exit of NSCs revealed that Pitx2 expression caused a rapid and dramatic (≉20-fold) increase in expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 (WAF1/Cip1). In addition, Pitx2 bound directly to the p21 promoter as assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in NSCs. Surprisingly, Pitx2 expression was not associated with an increase in differentiation markers, but instead the expression of nestin, associated with undifferentiated NSCs, was maintained. Our results suggest that Pitx2 promotes p21 expression and induces cell cycle exit in neural progenitors.

  7. Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells express neuronal phenotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨立业; 刘相名; 孙兵; 惠国桢; 费俭; 郭礼和

    2004-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) can be greatly expanded in vitro, and induced to differentiate into multiple mesenchymal cell types, including osteogenic, chondrogenic, myogenic, and adipogenic cells. This study was designed to investigate the possibility of ADSCs differentiating into neurons.Methods Adipose tissue from rats was digested with collagenase, and adherent stromal cells were cultured. A medium containing a low concentration of fetal bovine serum was adopted to induce the cells to differentiate. ADSCs were identified by immunocytochemistry, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR was applied to detect mRNA expression of neurofilament 1 (NF1), nestin, and neuron-specific enolase (NSE).Results Nestin-positive cells were found occasionally among ADSCs. ADSCs were found to express NSE mRNA and nestin mRNA, but not NF1 mRNA. ADSCs could differentiate into neuron-like cells in a medium composed of a low concentration of fetal bovine serum, and these differentiated cells displayed complicated neuron-like morphologies.Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that adipose tissue contains stem cells capable of differentiating into neurons. These stem cells can overcome their mesenchymal commitment, and may represent an alternative autologous stem cell source for CNS cell transplantation.

  8. New Strategies for Designing Inexpensive but Selective Bioadsorbants for Environmental Pollutants: Selection of specific Ligands and Their Cell Surface Expression; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Broad, long term objective of the research plan is to develop exquisitely selective polypeptide metal chelators for the remediation of aqueous systems. A variety of polypeptide chelators will be developed and optimized ranging from antibodies to small peptides. Then, through unique molecular engineering approaches developed in our laboratories, the polypeptide chelators will be anchored directly on the surface of the cells that produce them. Thus, instead of using isolated biomolecules we will employ inexpensive genetically engineered whole cell adsorbents. Following a simple, easily scaleable treatment, the engineered cells can be used to manufacture an inexpensive, particulate adsorbent for metal removal

  9. New strategies for designing inexpensive but selective bioadsorbants for environmental pollutants: Selection of specific ligands and their cell surface expression. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The broad, long term objective of the research plan is to develop exquisitely selective polypeptide metal chelators for the remediation of aqueous systems. A variety of polypeptide chelators will be developed and optimized ranging from antibodies to small peptides. Then, through unique molecular engineering approaches developed in the laboratories, the polypeptide chelators will be anchored directly on the surface of the cells that produce them. Thus, instead of using isolated biomolecules the authors will employ inexpensive genetically engineered whole cell adsorbents. Following a simple, easily scaleable treatment, the engineered cells can be used to manufacture an inexpensive, particulate adsorbent for metal removal. The authors are currently in year two of a three year program. Work has been focused on preparing the molecular biology constructs needed to carry out the optimization of a metal complex binding antibody, and on the isolation of a metal binding peptide.'

  10. New strategies for designing inexpensive but selective bioadsorbants for environmental pollutants: Selection of specific ligands and their cell surface expression. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iverson, B.L.; Georgiou, G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US); Ataai, M.M.; Koepsel, R.R. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (US)

    1998-06-01

    'The broad, long term objective of the research plan is to develop exquisitely selective polypeptide metal chelators for the remediation of aqueous systems. A variety of polypeptide chelators will be developed and optimized ranging from antibodies to small peptides. Then, through unique molecular engineering approaches developed in the laboratories, the polypeptide chelators will be anchored directly on the surface of the cells that produce them. Thus, instead of using isolated biomolecules the authors will employ inexpensive genetically engineered whole cell adsorbents. Following a simple, easily scaleable treatment, the engineered cells can be used to manufacture an inexpensive, particulate adsorbent for metal removal. The authors are currently in year two of a three year program. Work has been focused on preparing the molecular biology constructs needed to carry out the optimization of a metal complex binding antibody, and on the isolation of a metal binding peptide.'

  11. Tissue factor expression by endothelial cells in sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Solovey, A; Gui, L; Key, N. S.; Hebbel, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the vascular endothelium in activation of the coagulation system, a fundamental homeostatic mechanism of mammalian biology, is uncertain because there is little evidence indicating that endothelial cells in vivo express tissue factor (TF), the system's triggering mechanism. As a surrogate for vessel wall endothelium, we examined circulating endothelial cells (CEC) from normals and patients with sickle cell anemia, a disease associated with activation of coagulation. We find that s...

  12. Dental enamel cells express functional SOCE channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurbaeva, Meerim K; Eckstein, Miriam; Concepcion, Axel R; Smith, Charles E; Srikanth, Sonal; Paine, Michael L; Gwack, Yousang; Hubbard, Michael J; Feske, Stefan; Lacruz, Rodrigo S

    2015-10-30

    Dental enamel formation requires large quantities of Ca(2+) yet the mechanisms mediating Ca(2+) dynamics in enamel cells are unclear. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) channels are important Ca(2+) influx mechanisms in many cells. SOCE involves release of Ca(2+) from intracellular pools followed by Ca(2+) entry. The best-characterized SOCE channels are the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. As patients with mutations in the CRAC channel genes STIM1 and ORAI1 show abnormal enamel mineralization, we hypothesized that CRAC channels might be an important Ca(2+) uptake mechanism in enamel cells. Investigating primary murine enamel cells, we found that key components of CRAC channels (ORAI1, ORAI2, ORAI3, STIM1, STIM2) were expressed and most abundant during the maturation stage of enamel development. Furthermore, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) but not ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression was high in enamel cells suggesting that IP3Rs are the main ER Ca(2+) release mechanism. Passive depletion of ER Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin resulted in a significant raise in [Ca(2+)]i consistent with SOCE. In cells pre-treated with the CRAC channel blocker Synta-66 Ca(2+) entry was significantly inhibited. These data demonstrate that enamel cells have SOCE mediated by CRAC channels and implicate them as a mechanism for Ca(2+) uptake in enamel formation.

  13. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito;

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that tumors arising from tissues such as kidney, pancreas, liver and stomach are particularly refractory to treatment. Searching for new anticancer drugs using cells in culture has yielded some effective therapies, but these refractory tumors remain intractable. Studies that comp......It is well known that tumors arising from tissues such as kidney, pancreas, liver and stomach are particularly refractory to treatment. Searching for new anticancer drugs using cells in culture has yielded some effective therapies, but these refractory tumors remain intractable. Studies...... survival might, therefore, act through such a matrix-to-cell suppression of apoptosis. Indeed, correlative mining of gene expression and patient survival databases suggests that poor survival in patients with metastatic cancer correlates highly with tumor expression of a common theme: the genes involved...

  14. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  15. MEMBRANE LEc EXPRESSION IN BREAST CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. A. Udalova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Affine chromatography was used to isolate Lec antibodies from the sera of a healthy female donor with the high titers of these anti- bodies, which were labeled with biotin. The study enrolled 51 patients with primary breast cancer (BC. Antigen expression was found by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. With these two techniques being used, the detection rate of Lec expression in BC cells was 65% (33/51; the antigen was most frequently found by flow cytometry as compared with immunohistochemistry: 72 and 58% of cases, respectively.

  16. Establishment of a pig fibroblast-derived cell line for locus-directed transgene expression in cell cultures and blastocysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jannik E; Li, Juan; Moldt, Brian;

    2011-01-01

    We report the establishment of a spontaneously immortalized pig cell line designated Pig Flip-in Visualize (PFV) for locus-directed transgene expression in pig cells and blastocysts. The PFV cell line was isolated from pig ear fibroblasts transfected with a Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon...... transfer. PFV cells supported Flp mediated cassette exchange for transgene substitution of eGFP with dsRED, and the dsRED transgenic PFV cells generated blastocysts with transgene expression. Hence, the PFV cell line constitutes a valuable pig equivalent to transformed cell lines from other mammalian......-based docking vector harbouring a selection gene, an eGFP reporter gene, and an Flp recombinase site for locus-directed gene insertion. PFV cells have insertion of a single docking vector with stable eGFP expression and generated phenotypic normal blastocysts with transgene expression after somatic cell nuclear...

  17. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  18. Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in ovarian cancer cell lines,RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry were used to detect the expression of COX-2 in 5 ovarian cancer cell lines. The expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein was detected in all 5 cell lines. It is suggested that COX-2 is expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, which provides a basis for the chemoprevention of ovarian cancer.

  19. EXPRESSION OF Fas LIGAND IN HUMAN COLON CANCER CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建军; 丁尔迅; 王强; 陈学云; 付志仁

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the expression of Fas ligand in human colon carcinoma cell lines. Methods: A total of six human colon cancer cell lines were examined for the expression of Fas ligand mRNA and cell surface protein by using RT-PCR and flow cytometry respectively. Results: The results showed that Fas ligand mRNA was expressed in all of the six cancer cell lines and Fas ligand cell surface protein was expressed in part of them. Conclusion: These data suggest that Fas ligand was expressed, at least in part, in human colon cancer cell lines and might facilitate to escape from immune surveillance of the host.

  20. Direct cell lysis for single-cell gene expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eSvec

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The interest to analyze single and few cell samples is rapidly increasing. Numerous extraction protocols to purify nucleic acids are available, but most of them compromise severely on yield to remove contaminants and are therefore not suitable for the analysis of samples containing small numbers of transcripts only. Here, we evaluate 17 direct cell lysis protocols for transcript yield and compatibility with downstream reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR. Four endogenously expressed genes are assayed together with RNA and DNA spikes in the samples. We found bovine serum albumin (BSA to be the best lysis agent, resulting in efficient cell lysis, high RNA stability and enhanced reverse transcription efficiency. Furthermore, we found direct cell lysis with BSA superior to standard column based extraction methods, when analyzing from 1 up to 512 mammalian cells. In conclusion, direct cell lysis protocols based on BSA can be applied with most cell collection methods and are compatible with most analytical workflows to analyze single cells as well as samples composed of small numbers of cells.

  1. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  2. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses

  3. Forced Expression of ZNF143 Restrains Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimitoshi Kohno

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the transcription factor Zinc Finger Protein 143 (ZNF143 regulates the expression of genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, and that downregulation of ZNF143 induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M. To assess the function of ZNF143 expression in the cell cycle, we established two cells with forced expression of ZNF143 derived from PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. These cell lines overexpress genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, such as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1, aurora kinase B (AURKB and some minichromosome maintenance complex components (MCM. However, the doubling time of cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was approximately twice as long as its control counterpart cell line. Analysis following serum starvation and re-seeding showed that PC3 cells were synchronized at G1 in the cell cycle. Also, ZNF143 expression fluctuated, and was at its lowest level in G2/M. However, PC3 cells with forced expression of ZNF143 synchronized at G2/M, and showed lack of cell cycle-dependent fluctuation of nuclear expression of MCM proteins. Furthermore, G2/M population of both cisplatin-resistant PCDP6 cells over-expressing ZNF143 (derived from PC3 cells and cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was significantly higher than that of each counterpart, and the doubling time of PCDP6 cells is about 2.5 times longer than that of PC3 cells. These data suggested that fluctuations in ZNF143 expression are required both for gene expression associated with cell cycle and for cell division.

  4. Forced Expression of ZNF143 Restrains Cancer Cell Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Hiroto, E-mail: h-izumi@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kuma, Akihiro; Kitamura, Noriaki; Kohno, Kimitoshi [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-19

    We previously reported that the transcription factor Zinc Finger Protein 143 (ZNF143) regulates the expression of genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, and that downregulation of ZNF143 induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M. To assess the function of ZNF143 expression in the cell cycle, we established two cells with forced expression of ZNF143 derived from PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. These cell lines overexpress genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, such as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), aurora kinase B (AURKB) and some minichromosome maintenance complex components (MCM). However, the doubling time of cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was approximately twice as long as its control counterpart cell line. Analysis following serum starvation and re-seeding showed that PC3 cells were synchronized at G1 in the cell cycle. Also, ZNF143 expression fluctuated, and was at its lowest level in G2/M. However, PC3 cells with forced expression of ZNF143 synchronized at G2/M, and showed lack of cell cycle-dependent fluctuation of nuclear expression of MCM proteins. Furthermore, G2/M population of both cisplatin-resistant PCDP6 cells over-expressing ZNF143 (derived from PC3 cells) and cells with forced expression of ZNF143 was significantly higher than that of each counterpart, and the doubling time of PCDP6 cells is about 2.5 times longer than that of PC3 cells. These data suggested that fluctuations in ZNF143 expression are required both for gene expression associated with cell cycle and for cell division.

  5. Probe design for expression arrays using OligoWiz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Since all measurements from a DNA microarray is dependant on the probes used, a good choice of probes is of vital importa nce when designing custom micro-arrays. This chapter describes how to de sign expression arrays using the “ OligoWiz ” software suite. The general desired features of good...... probes and the issues which probe design must address are introduced and a conceptual (rather than mathematical) description of how OligoWiz scores the quality of th e potential probes is presented. This is followed by a detailed step-by-step guide to designing expression arrays with OligoWiz....

  6. Design elements of hot cell facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, D. K.; Lee, K. S.; Baek, S. Y.; Ahn, Y. S.; Choo, Y. S

    1997-06-01

    Hot cell facility is necessary for the post-irradiation examinations of nuclear fuels and materials. Therefore many hot cell facilities have been constructed and operating to support the research and development on the nuclear technology. In this report, the design elements of the hot cell facility is reviewed and discussed. (author). 3 tabs., 12 figs

  7. Graphics Innovation Design Based on Cell Intuition Simulation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhi-qiu; REN Na; ZHAO Ting-ting; CUI Lun-feng

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new cell intuition simulation method which is a combination of intuitive simulation calculation method and the operation of binary image, and applied it in the innovation of the graphic design process. First of all, we study how to express a variety of graphics, and establish the definition of cell intuitive model, work out the cell intuitive operation process and many new cellular operators such as a variety of matrix blocks crossover operator, a variety of matrix blocks mutation operator, matrix blocks replace operator, matrix blocks compression operator, matrix blocks extension operator. By choosing two or more cells and selecting the artificial selection or fitness selection, we can set up and visualize the design and pick the best design results .Finally, validation is made on this algorithm by an example, and a innovation graphic is also represented.

  8. Apoptosis-related gene expression in glioblastoma (LN-18) and medulloblastoma (Daoy) cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Wybranska, Iwona; Polus, Anna; Mikolajczyk, Magdalena; Knapp, Anna; Sliwa, Agnieszka; Zapala, Barbara; Staszel, Teresa; Dembinska-Kiec, Aldona

    2013-01-01

    The expression of apoptosis genes in a commercial pre-designed low-density array from Applied Biosystems was evaluated in two human brain cancer cell models, LN-18 and Daoy (HTB-186™) in comparison to the reference human primary endothelial cells under basic conditions. Analysis of the gene expression in the cancer cell lines compared to the normal control revealed features reflecting anti-apoptotic and inflammatory characteristics of the former. There was an overall downregulation of apoptos...

  9. Putative cis-regulatory elements in genes highly expressed in rice sperm cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Mohan B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The male germ line in flowering plants is initiated within developing pollen grains via asymmetric division. The smaller cell then becomes totally encased within a much larger vegetative cell, forming a unique "cell within a cell structure". The generative cell subsequently divides to give rise to two non-motile diminutive sperm cells, which take part in double fertilization and lead to the seed set. Sperm cells are difficult to investigate because of their presence within the confines of the larger vegetative cell. However, recently developed techniques for the isolation of rice sperm cells and the fully annotated rice genome sequence have allowed for the characterization of the transcriptional repertoire of sperm cells. Microarray gene expression data has identified a subset of rice genes that show unique or highly preferential expression in sperm cells. This information has led to the identification of cis-regulatory elements (CREs, which are conserved in sperm-expressed genes and are putatively associated with the control of cell-specific expression. Findings We aimed to identify the CREs associated with rice sperm cell-specific gene expression data using in silico prediction tools. We analyzed 1-kb upstream regions of the top 40 sperm cell co-expressed genes for over-represented conserved and novel motifs. Analysis of upstream regions with the SIGNALSCAN program with the PLACE database, MEME and the Mclip tool helped to find combinatorial sets of known transcriptional factor-binding sites along with two novel motifs putatively associated with the co-expression of sperm cell-specific genes. Conclusions Our data shows the occurrence of novel motifs, which are putative CREs and are likely targets of transcriptional factors regulating sperm cell gene expression. These motifs can be used to design the experimental verification of regulatory elements and the identification of transcriptional factors that regulate sperm cell

  10. Haemopedia: An Expression Atlas of Murine Hematopoietic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A. de Graaf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a multistage process involving the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells into distinct mature cell lineages. Here we present Haemopedia, an atlas of murine gene-expression data containing 54 hematopoietic cell types, covering all the mature lineages in hematopoiesis. We include rare cell populations such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and megakaryocytes, and a broad collection of progenitor and stem cells. We show that lineage branching and maturation during hematopoiesis can be reconstructed using the expression patterns of small sets of genes. We also have identified genes with enriched expression in each of the mature blood cell lineages, many of which show conserved lineage-enriched expression in human hematopoiesis. We have created an online web portal called Haemosphere to make analyses of Haemopedia and other blood cell transcriptional datasets easier. This resource provides simple tools to interrogate gene-expression-based relationships between hematopoietic cell types and genes of interest.

  11. Rational design of efficient modular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Cong T; Liu, Yan; Conner, David J

    2015-11-01

    The modular cell design principle is formulated to devise modular (chassis) cells. These cells can be assembled with exchangeable production modules in a plug-and-play fashion to build microbial cell factories for efficient combinatorial biosynthesis of novel molecules, requiring minimal iterative strain optimization steps. A modular cell is designed to be auxotrophic, containing core metabolic pathways that are necessary but insufficient to support cell growth and maintenance. To be functional, it must tightly couple with an exchangeable production module containing auxiliary metabolic pathways that not only complement cell growth but also enhance production of targeted molecules. We developed a MODCELL (modular cell) framework based on metabolic pathway analysis to implement the modular cell design principle. MODCELL identifies genetic modifications and requirements to construct modular cell candidates and their associated exchangeable production modules. By defining the degree of similarity and coupling metrics, MODCELL can evaluate which exchangeable production module(s) can be tightly coupled with a modular cell candidate. We first demonstrated how MODCELL works in a step-by-step manner for example metabolic networks, and then applied it to design modular Escherichia coli cells for efficient combinatorial biosynthesis of five alcohols (ethanol, propanol, isopropanol, butanol and isobutanol) and five butyrate esters (ethyl butyrate, propyl butyrate, isopropyl butyrate, butyl butyrate and isobutyl butyrate) from pentose sugars (arabinose and xylose) and hexose sugars (glucose, mannose, and galactose) under anaerobic conditions. We identified three modular cells, MODCELL1, MODCELL2 and MODCELL3, that can couple well with Group 1 of modules (ethanol, isobutanol, butanol, ethyl butyrate, isobutyl butyrate, butyl butyrate), Group 2 (isopropanol, isopropyl butyrate), and Group 3 (propanol, isopropanol), respectively. We validated the design of MODCELL1 for anaerobic

  12. Interleukin-2 expression and glioma cell proliferation following Vaceinia vector gene transfection in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaogang Wang; Xuezhong Wei; Jiangqiu Liu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of gene therapy is closely related to the efficiency of vector transfection and expression.OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to transfect a human brain glioma cell line with recombinant Vaccinia virus expressing the interleukin-2 (rVV-IL-2) gene, and to observe IL-2 expression and glioma cell proliferation potential after transfection. DESIGN: Experimental observation. SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, Shenyang Military Area Command of Chinese PLA. MATERIALS: The rVV-IL-2 vectors were obtained through homologous recombination and screening in the Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. The human brain glioma cell line and IL-2-dependent cells were produced by the Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. Human IL-2 was produced by Genzyme Corporation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: IL-2 expression at different time points after transfection of human brain glioma cells with varying MOI of Vaccinia viral vectors; in vitro proliferation capacity of human brain glioma cells among the 4 groups. RESULTS: IL-2 expression was detectable 4 hours after Vaccinia viral vector transfection and reached 300 kU/L by 8 hours. There was no significant difference in the proliferating rate of human brain glioma cells among the 4 groups (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: Vaccinia viral vectors can transfect human brain glioma cells in vitro and express high levels of IL-2. Vaccinia virus and high IL-2 expression do not influence the proliferation rate of human brain glioma cells in vitro.

  13. Tetracycline regulator expression alters the transcriptional program of mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hackl, Hubert; Rommer, Anna; Konrad, Torsten A; Nassimbeni, Christine; Wieser, Rotraud

    2010-01-01

    Tetracycline regulated ectopic gene expression is a widely used tool to study gene function. However, the tetracycline regulator (tetR) itself has been reported to cause certain phenotypic changes in mammalian cells. We, therefore, asked whether human myeloid U937 cells expressing the tetR in an autoregulated manner would exhibit alterations in gene expression upon removal of tetracycline.

  14. Quality cell therapy manufacturing by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitz, Yonatan Y; Timmins, Nicholas E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Transplantation of live cells as therapeutic agents is poised to offer new treatment options for a wide range of acute and chronic diseases. However, the biological complexity of cells has hampered the translation of laboratory-scale experiments into industrial processes for reliable, cost-effective manufacturing of cell-based therapies. We argue here that a solution to this challenge is to design cell manufacturing processes according to quality-by-design (QbD) principles. QbD integrates scientific knowledge and risk analysis into manufacturing process development and is already being adopted by the biopharmaceutical industry. Many opportunities to incorporate QbD into cell therapy manufacturing exist, although further technology development is required for full implementation. Linking measurable molecular and cellular characteristics of a cell population to final product quality through QbD is a crucial step in realizing the potential for cell therapies to transform healthcare.

  15. Fuel cells principles, design, and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Revankar, Shripad T

    2014-01-01

    ""This book covers all essential themes of fuel cells ranging from fundamentals to applications. It includes key advanced topics important for understanding correctly the underlying multi-science phenomena of fuel cell processes. The book does not only cope with traditional fuel cells but also discusses the future concepts of fuel cells. The book is rich on examples and solutions important for applying the theory into practical use.""-Peter Lund, Aalto University, Helsinki""A good introduction to the range of disciplines needed to design, build and test fuel cells.""-Nigel Brandon, Imperial Co

  16. Relationship between Meaning and Expression in Architecture Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiKun

    2002-01-01

    During the evolvement of architecture,the research on architectural form and structure as well as different ways to express and realize architectural thoughts is constantly the focus of many architects,This paper illustrates the mutual influence of the ways of expression and design of architecture to people's understanding of the meaning of architecture throughout the history of their efforts and exploration.the paper also discusses the extensive usage of virtual-realith approach through computer technology,It points out that the traditional architectural standpoint will undergo breakthrough by the emergence of new expression and design method.In this way,people's understanding of architecture will be more profound and lasting.

  17. Global gene expression analyses of hematopoietic stem cell-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundeberg Joakim

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 in murine hematopoietic cells allows for the generation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC-like cell lines. To address the molecular basis of Lhx2 function, we generated HSC-like cell lines where Lhx2 expression is regulated by a tet-on system and hence dependent on the presence of doxycyclin (dox. These cell lines efficiently down-regulate Lhx2 expression upon dox withdrawal leading to a rapid differentiation into various myeloid cell types. Results Global gene expression of these cell lines cultured in dox was compared to different time points after dox withdrawal using microarray technology. We identified 267 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the genes overlapping with HSC-specific databases were those down-regulated after turning off Lhx2 expression and a majority of the genes overlapping with those defined as late progenitor-specific genes were the up-regulated genes, suggesting that these cell lines represent a relevant model system for normal HSCs also at the level of global gene expression. Moreover, in situ hybridisations of several genes down-regulated after dox withdrawal showed overlapping expression patterns with Lhx2 in various tissues during embryonic development. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis of HSC-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression has identified genes putatively linked to self-renewal / differentiation of HSCs, and function of Lhx2 in organ development and stem / progenitor cells of non-hematopoietic origin.

  18. Concave cell design for FTIR measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Qin Lin; Zhi Xiang Zhang; Wan Qun Hu

    2011-01-01

    Wedged and V-shaped cells have advantages on depressing strong absorption bands and keeping the photo windows wide open without absorption block. Alternatively, this work presents a concave cell design, which is constructed by a plano-convex CaF2 lens in combination with a flat plate. Mathematical equations have been provided for data treatment with Matlab programs. The result indicates that the concave cell has advantages similar to the V-shaped cell. Reflection-absorption measurements of ethanol have been conducted on the cell in mid-IR region for demonstration. The spectrum obtained from the concave cell can easily be interpreted to regenerate its normal spectrum, which is fitting well with the spectrum taken in a conventional thin-layer cell. The concave cell is easier to construct and more convenient to operate, willing to have popular usages.

  19. High expression of markers of apoptosis in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bodil Laub; Lundegaard, Pia Rengtved; Bank, M I;

    2003-01-01

    53 and the number of cells in apoptosis detected with TUNEL. Langerhans cell histiocytosis cells showed strong expression of p53 and in some cases co-expression of Fas and Fas-L. The expression of Fas-L was significantly higher in infiltrates from patients with single-system disease. The actual...... number of pathological Langerhans cells in apoptosis as estimated by TUNEL was low. CONCLUSIONS: The low number of TUNEL-reactive cells can be explained by the rapid turnover of apoptotic cells in the tissue, not leaving the apoptotic cells long enough in the tissue to be detected. The co......-expression of Fas and Fas-L in some Langerhans cells can lead to an autocrine apoptotic shortcut, mediating the death of the double-positive cells. Our findings suggest that apoptosis mediated through the Fas/Fas-L pathway may contribute to the spontaneous regression of lesions in single-system disease. A delicate...

  20. Mammalian designer cells: Engineering principles and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingqi; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Biotechnology is a widely interdisciplinary field focusing on the use of living cells or organisms to solve established problems in medicine, food production and agriculture. Synthetic biology, the science of engineering complex biological systems that do not exist in nature, continues to provide the biotechnology industry with tools, technologies and intellectual property leading to improved cellular performance. One key aspect of synthetic biology is the engineering of deliberately reprogrammed designer cells whose behavior can be controlled over time and space. This review discusses the most commonly used techniques to engineer mammalian designer cells; while control elements acting on the transcriptional and translational levels of target gene expression determine the kinetic and dynamic profiles, coupling them to a variety of extracellular stimuli permits their remote control with user-defined trigger signals. Designer mammalian cells with novel or improved biological functions not only directly improve the production efficiency during biopharmaceutical manufacturing but also open the door for cell-based treatment strategies in molecular and translational medicine. In the future, the rational combination of multiple sets of designer cells could permit the construction and regulation of higher-order systems with increased complexity, thereby enabling the molecular reprogramming of tissues, organisms or even populations with highest precision.

  1. Renalase's expression and distribution in renal tissue and cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    Full Text Available To study renalase's expression and distribution in renal tissues and cells, renalase coded DNA vaccine was constructed, and anti-renalase monoclonal antibodies were produced using DNA immunization and hybridoma technique, followed by further investigation with immunological testing and western blotting to detect the expression and distribution of renalase among the renal tissue and cells. Anti-renalase monoclonal antibodies were successfully prepared by using DNA immunization technique. Further studies with anti-renalase monoclonal antibody showed that renalase expressed in glomeruli, tubule, mesangial cells, podocytes, renal tubule epithelial cells and its cells supernatant. Renalase is wildly expressed in kidney, including glomeruli, tubule, mesangial cells, podocytes and tubule epithelial cells, and may be secreted by tubule epithelial cells primarily.

  2. Effect of syncytiotrophoblast microvillous membrane treatment on gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Mette; Tannetta, D; Sargent, I;

    2006-01-01

    directly causes the endothelial cell dysfunction of pre-eclampsia. This study investigates the effect of STBM on endothelial cell gene expression. Design Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured in the presence and absence of STBM. At specified time points, total RNA was purified from...... the umbilical cords. Methods Gene expression was screened by Affymetrix GeneChips and confirmed with real-time polymerase chain reaction or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Main outcome measures Fold changes in gene expression levels between treated and control cultures were calculated from the microarray...

  3. Cell cycle and anti-estrogen effects synergize to regulate cell proliferation and ER target gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Dalvai

    Full Text Available Antiestrogens are designed to antagonize hormone induced proliferation and ERalpha target gene expression in mammary tumor cells. Commonly used drugs such as OH-Tamoxifen and ICI 182780 (Fulvestrant block cell cycle progression in G0/G1. Inversely, the effect of cell cycle stage on ER regulated gene expression has not been tested directly. We show that in ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 the estrogen receptor gene and downstream target genes are cell cycle regulated with expression levels varying as much as three-fold between phases of the cell cycle. Steroid free culture conditions commonly used to assess the effect of hormones or antiestrogens on gene expression also block MCF-7 cells in G1-phase when several ERalpha target genes are overexpressed. Thus, cell cycle effects have to be taken into account when analyzing the impact of hormonal treatments on gene transcription. We found that antiestrogens repress transcription of several ERalpha target genes specifically in S phase. This observation corroborates the more rapid and strong impact of antiestrogen treatments on cell proliferation in thymidine, hydroxyurea or aphidicolin arrested cells and correlates with an increase of apoptosis compared to similar treatments in lovastatin or nocodazol treated cells. Hence, cell cycle effects synergize with the action of antiestrogens. An interesting therapeutic perspective could be to enhance the action of anti-estrogens by associating hormone-therapy with specific cell cycle drugs.

  4. Rationally designed, heterologous S. cerevisiae transcripts expose novel expression determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yehezkel, Tuval; Atar, Shimshi; Zur, Hadas; Diament, Alon; Goz, Eli; Marx, Tzipy; Cohen, Rafael; Dana, Alexandra; Feldman, Anna; Shapiro, Ehud; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Deducing generic causal relations between RNA transcript features and protein expression profiles from endogenous gene expression data remains a major unsolved problem in biology. The analysis of gene expression from heterologous genes contributes significantly to solving this problem, but has been heavily biased toward the study of the effect of 5′ transcript regions and to prokaryotes. Here, we employ a synthetic biology driven approach that systematically differentiates the effect of different regions of the transcript on gene expression up to 240 nucleotides into the ORF. This enabled us to discover new causal effects between features in previously unexplored regions of transcripts, and gene expression in natural regimes. We rationally designed, constructed, and analyzed 383 gene variants of the viral HRSVgp04 gene ORF, with multiple synonymous mutations at key positions along the transcript in the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. Our results show that a few silent mutations at the 5′UTR can have a dramatic effect of up to 15 fold change on protein levels, and that even synonymous mutations in positions more than 120 nucleotides downstream from the ORF 5′end can modulate protein levels up to 160%–300%. We demonstrate that the correlation between protein levels and folding energy increases with the significance of the level of selection of the latter in endogenous genes, reinforcing the notion that selection for folding strength in different parts of the ORF is related to translation regulation. Our measured protein abundance correlates notably(correlation up to r = 0.62 (p=0.0013)) with mean relative codon decoding times, based on ribosomal densities (Ribo-Seq) in endogenous genes, supporting the conjecture that translation elongation and adaptation to the tRNA pool can modify protein levels in a causal/direct manner. This report provides an improved understanding of transcript evolution, design principles of gene expression regulation, and suggests simple

  5. Insights Gained from Testing Alternate Cell Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; G. K. Housley; M. S. Sohal; D. G. Milobar; Thomas Cable

    2009-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cell for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. The INL has been testing various solid oxide cell designs to characterize their electrolytic performance operating in the electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Some results presented in this report were obtained from cells, initially developed by the Forschungszentrum Jülich and now manufactured by the French ceramics firm St. Gobain. These cells have an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. They were initially developed as fuel cells, but are being tested as electrolytic cells in the INL test stands. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with ~10 µm thick yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes, ~1400 µm thick nickel-YSZ steam-hydrogen electrodes, and manganite (LSM) air-oxygen electrodes. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 to 0.6), gas flow rates, and current densities (0 to 0.6 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. On a molar basis, the steam consumption rate is equal to the hydrogen production rate. Cell performance was evaluated by performing DC potential sweeps at 800, 850, and 900°C. The voltage-current characteristics are presented, along with values of area-specific resistance as a function of current density. Long-term cell performance is also assessed to evaluate cell degradation. Details of the custom single-cell test apparatus developed for these experiments are also presented. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed another fuel cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. The NASA cell is structurally symmetrical, with both electrodes supporting the thin electrolyte and containing micro-channels for gas diffusion. This configuration is called a bi

  6. Expression of HOX C homeobox genes in lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, H J; Stage, K M; Mathews, C H; Detmer, K; Scibienski, R; MacKenzie, M; Migliaccio, E; Boncinelli, E; Largman, C

    1993-08-01

    The class I homeobox genes located in four clusters in mammalian genomes (HOX A, HOX B, HOX C, and HOX D) appear to play a major role in fetal development. Previous surveys of homeobox gene expression in human leukemic cell lines have shown that certain HOX A genes are expressed only in myeloid cell lines, whereas HOX B gene expression is largely restricted to cells with erythroid potential. We now report a survey of the expression patterns of 9 homeobox genes from the HOX C locus in a panel of 24 human and 7 murine leukemic cell lines. The most striking observation is the lymphoid-specific pattern of expression of HOX C4, located at the 3' end of the locus. A major transcript of 1.9 kilobases is observed in both T-cell and B-cell lines. HOX C4 expression is also detected in normal human marrow and peripheral blood lymphocytes, but not in mature granulocytes or monocytes. HOX C8 is also expressed in human lymphoid cells but is expressed in other blood cell types as well. However, the HOX C8 transcript pattern is lineage specific. These data, in conjunction with earlier findings, suggest that homeobox gene expression influences lineage determination during hematopoiesis.

  7. AMTEC radioisotope power system design and analysis for Pluto Express Fly-By

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pluto Express Fly-By program requires a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) to supply spacecraft power for various internal functions and mission instruments and experiments. AMTEC (Alkali-Metal Thermal-Electric Conversion) power conversion is the DOE-selected technology for an advanced, high-efficiency RPS to power the Pluto Express Fly-By spacecraft. An AMTEC-based RPS using the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) has been conceptually designed to satisfy the Pluto Express power requirements. Integrated AMTEC cell and system thermal/electrical design analyses, structural design analyses, and mass analyses were performed to define an optimum system design. Using fresh radioisotope fuel at beginning of mission, the RPS produces 102 watts of power, has a mass of 8.35 kg (specific power density = 12.2 watts/kg), with a system conversion efficiency of 20.3%. Mass/power scale-up estimates have also been generated, indicating that a 150-watt version of this RPS would weigh approximately 11.3 kg. This paper presents and discusses the key features of this RPS design, the design and analysis methodology, and the numerous system and AMTEC cell tradeoff studies establishing the optimum AMTEC-based RPS

  8. Freedom of expression: cell-type-specific gene profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Leo; Cheetham, Seth W; Brand, Andrea H

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate and behavior are results of differential gene regulation, making techniques to profile gene expression in specific cell types highly desirable. Many methods now enable investigation at the DNA, RNA and protein level. This review introduces the most recent and popular techniques, and discusses key issues influencing the choice between these such as ease, cost and applicability of information gained. Interdisciplinary collaborations will no doubt contribute further advances, including not just in single cell type but single-cell expression profiling.

  9. Direct fuel cell product design improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Significant milestones have been attained towards the technology development field testing and commercialization of direct fuel cell power plant since the 1994 Fuel Cell Seminar. Under a 5-year cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy signed in December 1994, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has been developing the design for a MW-scale direct fuel cell power plant with input from previous technology efforts and the Santa Clara Demonstration Project. The effort encompasses product definition in consultation with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group, potential customers, as well as extensive system design and packaging. Manufacturing process improvements, test facility construction, cell component scale up, performance and endurance improvements, stack engineering, and critical balance-of-plant development are also addressed. Major emphasis of this product design improvement project is on increased efficiency, compactness and cost reduction to establish a competitive place in the market. A 2.85 MW power plant with an efficiency of 58% and a footprint of 420 m{sup 2} has been designed. Component and subsystem testing is being conducted at various levels. Planning and preparation for verification of a full size prototype unit are in progress. This paper presents the results obtained since the last fuel cell seminar.

  10. Secretion of Interleukin-17 by CD8+ T Cells Expressing CD146 (MCAM)

    OpenAIRE

    Dagur, Pradeep K; Biancotto, Angélique; Stansky, Elena; Sen, H. Nida; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; McCoy, J. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune diseases. CD4+ T cells secreting IL-17 are termed Th17 cells. CD8+ T cells, designated Tc17 cells, are also capable of secreting IL-17. Here we describe a population of Tc17 cells characterized by the expression of surface CD146, an endothelial adhesion molecule. These cells display signatures of a human Tc17 genotype and phenotype. Circulating CD8+CD146+ T cells are present in low levels in healthy adults...

  11. Robust Inference of Cell-to-Cell Expression Variations from Single- and K-Cell Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Manikandan; Martins, Andrew J; Tsang, John S

    2016-07-01

    Quantifying heterogeneity in gene expression among single cells can reveal information inaccessible to cell-population averaged measurements. However, the expression level of many genes in single cells fall below the detection limit of even the most sensitive technologies currently available. One proposed approach to overcome this challenge is to measure random pools of k cells (e.g., 10) to increase sensitivity, followed by computational "deconvolution" of cellular heterogeneity parameters (CHPs), such as the biological variance of single-cell expression levels. Existing approaches infer CHPs using either single-cell or k-cell data alone, and typically within a single population of cells. However, integrating both single- and k-cell data may reap additional benefits, and quantifying differences in CHPs across cell populations or conditions could reveal novel biological information. Here we present a Bayesian approach that can utilize single-cell, k-cell, or both simultaneously to infer CHPs within a single condition or their differences across two conditions. Using simulated as well as experimentally generated single- and k-cell data, we found situations where each data type would offer advantages, but using both together can improve precision and better reconcile CHP information contained in single- and k-cell data. We illustrate the utility of our approach by applying it to jointly generated single- and k-cell data to reveal CHP differences in several key inflammatory genes between resting and inflammatory cytokine-activated human macrophages, delineating differences in the distribution of 'ON' versus 'OFF' cells and in continuous variation of expression level among cells. Our approach thus offers a practical and robust framework to assess and compare cellular heterogeneity within and across biological conditions using modern multiplexed technologies. PMID:27438699

  12. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    In the past decade, research on organic solar cells has gone through an important development stage leading to major enhancements in power conversion efficiency, from 4% to 9% in single-junction devices. During this period, there are many novel processing techniques and device designs that have been proposed and adapted in organic solar-cell devices. One well-known device architecture that helps maximize the solar cell efficiency is the multi-junction tandem solar-cell design. Given this design, multiple photoactive absorbers as subcells are stacked in a monolithic fashion and assembled via series connection into one complete device, known as the tandem solar cell. Since multiple absorbers with different optical energy bandgaps are being applied in one tandem solar-cell device, the corresponding solar cell efficiency is maximized through expanded absorption spectrum and reduced carrier thermalization loss. In Chapter 3, the architecture of solution-processible, visibly transparent solar cells is introduced. Unlike conventional organic solar-cell devices with opaque electrodes (such as silver, aluminum, gold and etc.), the semi-transparent solar cells rely on highly transparent electrodes and visibly transparent photoactive absorbers. Given these two criteria, we first demonstrated the visibly transparent single-junction solar cells via the polymer absorber with near-infrared absorption and the top electrode based on solution-processible silver nanowire conductor. The highest visible transparency (400 ˜ 700 nm) of 65% was achieved for the complete device structure. More importantly, power conversion efficiency of 4% was also demonstrated. In Chapter 4, we stacked two semi-transparent photoactive absorbers in the tandem architecture in order to realize the semi-transparent tandem solar cells. A noticeable performance improvement from 4% to 7% was observed. More importantly, we modified the interconnecting layers with the incorporation of a thin conjugated

  13. Advantages and Applications of CAR-Expressing Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang eGlienke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to donor T cells, natural killer (NK cells are known to mediate anti-cancer effects without the risk of inducing graft-versus-host disease (GvHD. In order to improve cytotoxicity against resistant cancer cells, auspicious efforts have been made with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR expressing T- and NK cells. These CAR-modified cells express antigen receptors against tumor-associated surface antigens, thus redirecting the effector cells and enhancing tumor-specific immunosurveillance. However, many cancer antigens are also expressed on healthy tissues, potentially leading to off tumor/ on target toxicity by CAR-engineered cells. In order to control such potentially severe side effects, the insertion of suicide genes into CAR-modified effectors can provide a means for efficient depletion of these cells. While CAR-expressing T cells have entered successfully clinical trials, experience with CAR-engineered NK cells is mainly restricted to pre-clinical investigations and predominantly to NK cell lines. In this review we summarize the data on CAR expressing NK cells focusing on the possible advantage using these short-lived effector cells and discuss the necessity of suicide switches. Furthermore, we address the compliance of such modified NK cells with regulatory requirements as a new field in cellular immunotherapy.

  14. HDAC1 Expression and Effect of Curcumin on Proliferation of Raji Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qing; CHEN Yan; LI Xinggang

    2006-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC1) has a high expression in many cancer cells and curcumin can inhibit the growth of cancer cells. This paper was designed to investigate the expression of HDAC1 of Raji cells and the effect of curcumin on their proliferation and apoptosis. Raji cells were treated with 3. 125-50 μmol/L curcumin for 8-48 h and the growth inhibition rates of Raji cells were measured by MTT. The expression of HDAC1 on Raji cells were examined by mRNA, Western blot at 24 h various concertrations (1.6-50 μmol/L). Curcumin could selectively inhibit the proliferation of Raji cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with the inhibition rate being 52.47 %-82.18%(P<0.01).The up-regulation of HDAC1 expression was observed within 24 h after the treatment with curcumin as shown by RT-PCR and Western blot. With the increase of concentration, the expression was down-regulated in a dose- dependent manner. It is concluded that the expression of HDAC1 plays an important role in the proliferation and apoptosis of Raji cells and curcumin can inhibit the growth of Raji cells at various concentrations and promote the apoptosis of Raji cells.

  15. Targeted repression of AXIN2 and MYC gene expression using designer TALEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We designed TALE–SID fusion proteins to target AXIN2 and MYC. • TALE–SIDs bound the chromosomal AXIN2 and MYC genes and repressed their expression. • TALE–SIDs repress β-cateninS45F-dependent AXIN2 and MYC transcription. - Abstract: Designer TALEs (dTALEs) are chimeric transcription factors that can be engineered to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Whether dTALEs can block gene transcription downstream of signal transduction cascades, however, has yet to be fully explored. Here we tested whether dTALEs can be used to target genes whose expression is controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TALE DNA binding domains were engineered to recognize sequences adjacent to Wnt responsive enhancer elements (WREs) that control expression of axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) and c-MYC (MYC). These custom DNA binding domains were linked to the mSin3A interaction domain (SID) to generate TALE–SID chimeric repressors. The TALE–SIDs repressed luciferase reporter activity, bound their genomic target sites, and repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in HEK293 cells. We generated a novel HEK293 cell line to determine whether the TALE–SIDs could function downstream of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treating these cells with doxycycline and tamoxifen stimulates nuclear accumulation of a stabilized form of β-catenin found in a subset of colorectal cancers. The TALE–SIDs repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in these cells, which suggests that dTALEs could offer an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer

  16. Targeted repression of AXIN2 and MYC gene expression using designer TALEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Scott, Samantha A.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We designed TALE–SID fusion proteins to target AXIN2 and MYC. • TALE–SIDs bound the chromosomal AXIN2 and MYC genes and repressed their expression. • TALE–SIDs repress β-catenin{sup S45F}-dependent AXIN2 and MYC transcription. - Abstract: Designer TALEs (dTALEs) are chimeric transcription factors that can be engineered to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Whether dTALEs can block gene transcription downstream of signal transduction cascades, however, has yet to be fully explored. Here we tested whether dTALEs can be used to target genes whose expression is controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TALE DNA binding domains were engineered to recognize sequences adjacent to Wnt responsive enhancer elements (WREs) that control expression of axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) and c-MYC (MYC). These custom DNA binding domains were linked to the mSin3A interaction domain (SID) to generate TALE–SID chimeric repressors. The TALE–SIDs repressed luciferase reporter activity, bound their genomic target sites, and repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in HEK293 cells. We generated a novel HEK293 cell line to determine whether the TALE–SIDs could function downstream of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treating these cells with doxycycline and tamoxifen stimulates nuclear accumulation of a stabilized form of β-catenin found in a subset of colorectal cancers. The TALE–SIDs repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in these cells, which suggests that dTALEs could offer an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  17. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 1% of CD4(+) T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4(+) T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6(+) and CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8(+) T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4(+) T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6(+) cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE.

  18. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothi Thyagabhavan Mony

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS. The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS. The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4+ T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells. Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4+ T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 7.7% of CD4+ T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8+ T cells. CD8+ T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4+ T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6+ and CXCR3+ CD4+ T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8+ T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4+ T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6+ cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE.

  19. Geometry of the Gene Expression Space of Individual Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Korem

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a revolution in the ability to analyze gene expression of single cells in a tissue. To understand this data we must comprehend how cells are distributed in a high-dimensional gene expression space. One open question is whether cell types form discrete clusters or whether gene expression forms a continuum of states. If such a continuum exists, what is its geometry? Recent theory on evolutionary trade-offs suggests that cells that need to perform multiple tasks are arranged in a polygon or polyhedron (line, triangle, tetrahedron and so on, generally called polytopes in gene expression space, whose vertices are the expression profiles optimal for each task. Here, we analyze single-cell data from human and mouse tissues profiled using a variety of single-cell technologies. We fit the data to shapes with different numbers of vertices, compute their statistical significance, and infer their tasks. We find cases in which single cells fill out a continuum of expression states within a polyhedron. This occurs in intestinal progenitor cells, which fill out a tetrahedron in gene expression space. The four vertices of this tetrahedron are each enriched with genes for a specific task related to stemness and early differentiation. A polyhedral continuum of states is also found in spleen dendritic cells, known to perform multiple immune tasks: cells fill out a tetrahedron whose vertices correspond to key tasks related to maturation, pathogen sensing and communication with lymphocytes. A mixture of continuum-like distributions and discrete clusters is found in other cell types, including bone marrow and differentiated intestinal crypt cells. This approach can be used to understand the geometry and biological tasks of a wide range of single-cell datasets. The present results suggest that the concept of cell type may be expanded. In addition to discreet clusters in gene-expression space, we suggest a new possibility: a continuum of states within a

  20. Calcitriol Inhibits Cervical Cancer Cell Proliferation Through Downregulation of HCCR1 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Lei, Lei; Zhao, Xixia; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Min; Nan, Kejun

    2014-01-01

    Calcitriol (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) has demonstrated anticancer activity against several tumors. However, the underlying mechanism for this activity is not yet fully understood. Our experiment was designed and performed to address one aspect of this issue in cervical cancer. HeLa S3 cells were cultured in media with various concentrations of calcitriol. Cell proliferation and cell cycle were assessed by spectrophotometry and flow cytometry, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression levels of human cervical cancer oncogene (HCCR-1) and p21 were determined by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Results indicated that calcitriol inhibited HeLa S3 cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Calcitriol decreased HCCR-1 protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, promoter activity analyses revealed that transcriptional regulation was involved in the inhibition of HCCR-1 expression. Overexpression of HCCR-1 in HeLa S3 cells reversed the inhibition of cell proliferation and G1 phase arrest that resulted from calcitriol treatment. In addition, calcitriol increased p21 expression and promoter activity. HCCR-1 overexpression decreased p21 expression and promoter activity. Thus, our results suggested that calcitriol inhibited HeLa S3 cell proliferation by decreasing HCCR-1 expression and increasing p21 expression. PMID:26629942

  1. Suppression of local immune response by GrB expression in gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周业江; 熊玉霞; 李昌平; 时德

    2004-01-01

    Little information is available so far on local anti-tumour immune response in gastric cancer (GC). Moreover, studies in malignant lymphomas demonstrated that neoplastic cells expressed cytotoxic proteins GrB.1,2 Studies here were designed to detect by immunohistochemistry the density of dendritic cells labelled by S-100 protein (S-100+DCs) and activated cytotoxic T lymphocyte and nature killer cells labelled by GrB (GrB+CTL, NK) and observe whether benign/malignant gastric epithelium cells also express GrB.

  2. Human thymic epithelial cells express functional HLA-DP molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Röpke, C; Nielsen, M;

    1996-01-01

    T lymphocytes, we examined whether human thymic epithelial cells (TEC) expressed HLA-DP molecules. We present evidence that TEC obtained from short time culture express low but significant levels of HLA-DP molecules. The expression of HLA-DP molecules was comparable to or higher than the expression...... of HLA-DP allospecific primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) CD4 T cell lines. IFN-gamma treatment strongly upregulated the HLA-DP allospecific PLT responses whereas other PLT responses remained largely unchanged. In conclusion, these data indicate that human thymus epithelial cells express significant levels......HLA-DP molecules function as restriction elements in the presentation of foreign antigens to T cells by antigen presenting cells and certain HLA-DP molecules confer susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Because HLA molecules play an essential role in thymic selection and elimination of autoreactive...

  3. Design of targeted B cell killing agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey V Stepanov

    Full Text Available B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of both systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Autoreactive B cells not only produce autoantibodies, but also are capable to efficiently present specific autoantigens to T cells. Furthermore, B cells can secrete proinflammatory cytokines and amplify the vicious process of self-destruction. B cell-directed therapy is a potentially important approach for treatment of various autoimmune diseases. The depletion of B cells by anti-CD20/19 monoclonal antibody Retuximab® used in autoimmune diseases therapy leads to systemic side effects and should be significantly improved. In this study we designed a repertoire of genetically engineered B cell killers that specifically affected one kind of cells carrying a respective B cell receptor. We constructed immunotoxins (ITs, fused with c-myc epitope as a model targeting sequence, based on barnase, Pseudomonas toxin, Shiga-like toxin E.coli and Fc domain of human antibody IgGγ1. C-MYC hybridoma cell line producing anti-c-myc IgG was chosen as a model for targeted cell depletion. C-myc sequence fused with toxins provided addressed delivery of the toxic agent to the target cells. We demonstrated functional activity of designed ITs in vitro and showed recognition of the fusion molecules by antibodies produced by targeted hybridoma. To study specificity of the proposed B cells killing molecules, we tested a set of created ITs ex vivo, using C-MYC and irrelevant hybridoma cell lines. Pseudomonas-containing IT showed one of the highest cytotoxic effects on the model cells, however, possessed promiscuous specificity. Shiga-like toxin construct demonstrated mild both cytotoxicity and specificity. Barnase and Fc-containing ITs revealed excellent balance between their legibility and toxic properties. Moreover, barnase and Fc molecules fused with c-myc epitope were able to selectively deplete c-myc-specific B cells and decrease production of anti

  4. Reduced CTGF expression promotes cell growth, migration, and invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of CTGF varies in different types of cancer. The purpose of this study is to investigate the involvement of CTGF in tumor progression and prognosis of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: CTGF expression levels were examined in NPC tissues and cells, nasopharynx (NP tissues, and NP69 cells. The effects and molecular mechanisms of CTGF expression on cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and cell cycle were also explored. RESULTS: NPC cells exhibited decreased mRNA expression of CTGF compared to immortalized human nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line NP69. Similarly, CTGF was observed to be downregulated in NPC compared to normal tissues at mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, reduced CTGF was negatively associated with the progression of NPC. Knocking down CTGF expression enhanced the colony formation, cell migration, invasion, and G1/S cell cycle transition. Mechanistic analysis revealed that CTGF suppression activated FAK/PI3K/AKT and its downstream signals regulating the cell cycle, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and MMPs. Finally, DNA methylation microarray revealed a lack of hypermethylation at the CTGF promoter, suggesting other mechanisms are associated with suppression of CTGF in NPC. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that reduced expression of CTGF promoted cell proliferation, migration, invasion and cell cycle progression through FAK/PI3K/AKT, EMT and MMP pathways in NPC.

  5. RNA interference by expression of short hairpin RNAs suppresses bcl-xL gene expression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang LIU; Cheng-wei HE; Yue-fei ZHANG; Ke-yuan ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate a new plasmid mediated RNA interference (RNAi) system and investigate whether knock-down of bcl-xL by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) can induce apoptosis of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell line CNE-2Z in vitro. Methods: The plasmid containing mU6 promoter was subcloned to yield the pmU6 plasmid, recombinant plasmid expressing shRNA targeting bcl-xL gene was designed and constructed, and were co-transfected cells with green fluorescence protein expressing plasmid. Flow cytometry was used to evaluate transfection efficiency, and RT-PCR and Western blot were applied to analyze bcl-xL mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Results: The shRNA expressed by the recombi nant plasmid efficiently suppressed bcl-xL gene expression and induced apoptosis .of NPC cells in vitro. Conclusion: The recombinant plasmid can sufficiently mediate RNAi in CNE-2Z cells, and knock-down of the bcl-xL expression by shRNA significantly induced apoptosis in CNE-2Z cells. The results suggest this new system, mediated RNAi can be used as a tool for the study of gene function and gene therapy.

  6. Differential expression and function of CD27 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells expressing ZAP-70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarge, Sandrine T; Hou, Sen; Pauls, Samantha D; Johnston, James B; Gibson, Spencer B; Marshall, Aaron J

    2015-07-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a malignancy driven by abberant B cell signaling and survival. Leukemic B cells accumulate in the peripheral blood and the lymphoid organs where contact with stromal cells and T cells provide critical survival signals. Clinical severity of CLL is associated with several prognostic markers including expression of the kinase ZAP-70. ZAP-70 expression enhances signaling via the B cell antigen receptor and is associated with increased cell adhesion and migration capacity. Here we report that ZAP-70-positive CLL patients display significantly higher expression of the TNF superfamily receptor and memory marker CD27 than do ZAP-70 negative patients. CD27 expression by CLL was acutely elevated upon BCR cross-linking, or upon ectopic expression of ZAP-70. CD27 expression correlated with functional capacity to adhere to stromal cells and antibody blockade of CD27 impaired CLL binding to stroma. These results provide the first evidence for differential expression of CD27 among CLL prognostic groups, suggest a role for ZAP-70 dependent signaling in CD27 induction and implicate CD27 in cell-cell interactions with the lymphoid tissue microenvironment.

  7. Probing the effect of promoters on noise in gene expression using thousands of designed sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Eilon; van Dijk, David; Kalma, Yael; Keren, Leeat; Manor, Ohad; Yakhini, Zohar; Segal, Eran

    2014-10-01

    Genetically identical cells exhibit large variability (noise) in gene expression, with important consequences for cellular function. Although the amount of noise decreases with and is thus partly determined by the mean expression level, the extent to which different promoter sequences can deviate away from this trend is not fully known. Here, we present a high-throughput method for measuring promoter-driven noise for thousands of designed synthetic promoters in parallel. We use it to investigate how promoters encode different noise levels and find that the noise levels of promoters with similar mean expression levels can vary more than one order of magnitude, with nucleosome-disfavoring sequences resulting in lower noise and more transcription factor binding sites resulting in higher noise. We propose a kinetic model of gene expression that takes into account the nonspecific DNA binding and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA, which occurs when transcription factors search for their target sites. We show that this assumption can improve the prediction of the mean-independent component of expression noise for our designed promoter sequences, suggesting that a transcription factor target search may affect gene expression noise. Consistent with our findings in designed promoters, we find that binding-site multiplicity in native promoters is associated with higher expression noise. Overall, our results demonstrate that small changes in promoter DNA sequence can tune noise levels in a manner that is predictable and partly decoupled from effects on the mean expression levels. These insights may assist in designing promoters with desired noise levels.

  8. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  9. Screening of differentially expressed genes related to differentiation and proliferation by gene expression profiling of different grade astrocytoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Zeng; Zhong Yang; Yangyun Han; Chao You

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The detection of differential gene expression in brain is possible by cDNA microarray technology, and the screening of differentially expressed genes might provide a biological basis for gene-targeted therapy for tumors. OBJECTIVE: To detect the differential expression of genes among astrocytoma SHG-44 (WHO grade IV), CHG-5 (WHO grade II), and ATRA-treated SHG-44 cell lines by cDNA microarray. DESIGN: Laboratory experiments in vitro.SETTING: Department of Neurobiology, the Third Military Medical University. MATERIALS: The experiment was performed at the Department of Neurobiology in the Third Military Medical University of the Chinese PLA from January to October 2007. The SHG-44 cell line (WHO grade Ⅳ) was established by Prof. Ziwei Du, and the CHG-5 cell line (WHO grade II) was set up by Prof. Xiuwu Bian from the Third Military Medical University of the Chinese PLA. The cDNA microarray containing 9182 known genes was prepared and provided by Dr. Yang Zhong at the City University of Hong Kong. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The identification of genes that were similarly regulated (overlapping) during tumor progression and differentiation, by comparison of gene expression profiles between CHG-5 and SHG-44 cells, and between SHG-44 cells with or without treatment with ATRA. RESULTS: Thirty-one overlapping genes were found to have similar regulatory effects on astrocytomas; among them, twenty genes were up-regulated and eleven were down-regulated in both comparisons between CHG-5 and SHG-44 cells, and between SHG-44 cells with or without treatment with ATRA. The four reported genes, SERPINF1, MAPK11, HIF1A and SOD2, were up-regulated in this study.CONCLUSION: The differentially expressed genes in different grade astrocytoma cell lines were revealed primarily by cDNA microarray; among them, five identified overlapping genes, SERPINF1, MAPK11, DCTN2, HIF1A and SOD2, were related to the malignant progression of astrocytoma cells.

  10. Intraclonal protein expression heterogeneity in recombinant CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Pilbrough

    Full Text Available Therapeutic glycoproteins have played a major role in the commercial success of biotechnology in the post-genomic era. But isolating recombinant mammalian cell lines for large-scale production remains costly and time-consuming, due to substantial variation and unpredictable stability of expression amongst transfected cells, requiring extensive clone screening to identify suitable high producers. Streamlining this process is of considerable interest to industry yet the underlying phenomena are still not well understood. Here we examine an antibody-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO clone at single-cell resolution using flow cytometry and vectors, which couple light and heavy chain transcription to fluorescent markers. Expression variation has traditionally been attributed to genetic heterogeneity arising from random genomic integration of vector DNA. It follows that single cell cloning should yield a homogeneous cell population. We show, in fact, that expression in a clone can be surprisingly heterogeneous (standard deviation 50 to 70% of the mean, approaching the level of variation in mixed transfectant pools, and each antibody chain varies in tandem. Phenotypic variation is fully developed within just 18 days of cloning, yet is not entirely explained by measurement noise, cell size, or the cell cycle. By monitoring the dynamic response of subpopulations and subclones, we show that cells also undergo slow stochastic fluctuations in expression (half-life 2 to 11 generations. Non-genetic diversity may therefore play a greater role in clonal variation than previously thought. This also has unexpected implications for expression stability. Stochastic gene expression noise and selection bias lead to perturbations from steady state at the time of cloning. The resulting transient response as clones reestablish their expression distribution is not ordinarily accounted for but can contribute to declines in median expression over timescales of up to 50

  11. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2005-03-01

    The program was designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE, formerly Energy Research Corporation) from an early state of development for stationary power plant applications. The current program efforts were focused on technology and system development, and cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, in Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where a hydrocarbon fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several sub-MW power plants based on the DFC design are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Several one-megawatt power plant design was verified by operation on natural gas at FCE. This plant is currently installed at a customer site in King County, WA under another US government program and is currently in operation. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and

  12. Fibronectin induces MMP2 expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Andrei; Delella, Flávia K; Lacorte, Lívia M; Deffune, Elenice; Felisbino, Sérgio L

    2013-01-25

    High-grade prostate cancers express high levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), major enzymes involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. However, the tumor cell lines commonly employed for prostate cancer research express only small amounts of MMPs when cultivated as monolayer cultures, in common culture media. The present study was conducted to ascertain whether culture conditions that include fibronectin can alter MMP2 and MMP9 expression by the human prostatic epithelial cell lines RWPE-1, LNCaP and PC-3. These cells were individually seeded at 2×10(4) cells/cm(2), cultivated until they reached 80% confluence, and then exposed for 4h to fibronectin, after which the conditioned medium was analyzed by gelatin zymography. Untreated cells were given common medium. Only RWPE-1 cells express detectable amounts of MMP9 when cultivated in common medium, whereas the addition of fibronectin induced high expression levels of pro and active forms of MMP2 in all tested cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that normal and tumor prostate cell lines express MMP2 activity when in contact with extracellular matrix components or blood plasma proteins such as fibronectin. Future studies of transcriptomes and proteomes in prostate cancer research using these cell lines should not neglect these important conclusions.

  13. Approaches to Optimizing Animal Cell Culture Process: Substrate Metabolism Regulation and Protein Expression Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanxing

    Some high value proteins and vaccines for medical and veterinary applications by animal cell culture have an increasing market in China. In order to meet the demands of large-scale productions of proteins and vaccines, animal cell culture technology has been widely developed. In general, an animal cell culture process can be divided into two stages in a batch culture. In cell growth stage a high specific growth rate is expected to achieve a high cell density. In production stage a high specific production rate is stressed for the expression and secretion of qualified protein or replication of virus. It is always critical to maintain high cell viability in fed-batch and perfusion cultures. More concern has been focused on two points by the researchers in China. First, the cell metabolism of substrates is analyzed and the accumulation of toxic by-products is decreased through regulating cell metabolism in the culture process. Second, some important factors effecting protein expression are understood at the molecular level and the production ability of protein is improved. In pace with the rapid development of large-scale cell culture for the production of vaccines, antibodies and other recombinant proteins in China, the medium design and process optimization based on cell metabolism regulation and protein expression improvement will play an important role. The chapter outlines the main advances in metabolic regulation of cell and expression improvement of protein in animal cell culture in recent years.

  14. A sensitive electrochemiluminescence cytosensor for quantitative evaluation of epidermal growth factor receptor expressed on cell surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yanjuan; Zhang, Shaolian; Wen, Qingqing; Huang, Hongxing; Yang, Peihui, E-mail: typh@jnu.edu.cn

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • EGF-cytosensor was used for evaluating EGFR expression level on cell surfaces. • CdSQDs and EGF were coated on magnetic beads (MBs) for ECL-probe. • Good sensitivity was achieved due to the signal amplification of ECL-probe. - Abstract: A sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) strategy for evaluating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression level on cell surfaces was designed by integrating the specific recognition of EGFR expressed on MCF-7 cell surfaces with an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-funtionalized CdS quantum dots (CdSQDs)-capped magnetic bead (MB) probe. The high sensitivity of ECL probe of EGF-funtionalized CdSQD-capped-MB was used for competitive recognition with EGFR expressed on cell surfaces with recombinant EGFR protein. The changes of ECL intensity depended on both the cell number and the expression level of EGFR receptor on cell surfaces. A wide linear response to cells ranging from 80 to 4 × 10{sup 6} cells mL{sup −1} with a detection limit of 40 cells mL{sup −1} was obtained. The EGF-cytosensor was used to evaluate EGFR expression levels on MCF-7 cells, and the average number of EGFR receptor on single MCF-7 cells was 1.35 × 10{sup 5} with the relative standard deviation of 4.3%. This strategy was further used for in-situ and real-time evaluating EGFR receptor expressed on cell surfaces in response to drugs stimulation at different concentration and incubation time. The proposed method provided potential applications in the detection of receptors on cancer cells and anticancer drugs screening.

  15. Cyclin Dl expression in B-cell non Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref, Salah; Mossad, Y; El-Khodary, T; Awad, M; El-Shahat, E

    2006-10-01

    Disorders of the cell cycle regulatory machinery play a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Over-expression of cyclin D1 protein has been reported in several solid tumors and certain lymphoid malignancies, but little is known about the effect of its expression on clinical behavior and outcome in B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In this study, we investigated the expression of cyclin Dl in group of patients with NHL and correlated the results with the clinical and laboratory data. The degree of expression of cyclin Dl protein was evaluated by flow cytometry in a group of NHL patients (n = 46) and in normal control group (n = 10). Cyclin Dl over expression was detected in 10 out of 46 (21.7%) patients; they were 5/5-mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (100%) and 5/28 large B-cell lymphoma (17.8%). All other NHL subtypes showed normal cyclin D1 expression. The clinical signs (hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and B-symptoms, clinical staging) and laboratory data (hemoglobin, white cell count (WBCs), platelet count, and bone marrow infiltration) were not significantly different between NHL subgroup with cyclin Dl over expression and that with normal cyclin Dl expression. Serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and lymphadenopathy were significantly higher in NHL group with cyclin D1 over expression as compared to those without. Also, cyclin D1 over expression is associated with poor outcome of NHL patients. Cyclin Dl over expression was evident among all cases of MCL and few cases of large B-cell lymphoma. Cyclin Dl over expression might be used as adjuvant tool for diagnosis of MCL; has role in NHL biology and is bad prognostic index in NHL. PMID:17607588

  16. Neurohypophysial Receptor Gene Expression by Thymic T Cell Subsets and Thymic T Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hansenne

    2004-01-01

    transcribed in thymic epithelium, while immature T lymphocytes express functional neurohypophysial receptors. Neurohypophysial receptors belong to the G protein-linked seven-transmembrane receptor superfamily and are encoded by four distinct genes, OTR, V1R, V2R and V3R. The objective of this study was to identify the nature of neurohypophysial receptor in thymic T cell subsets purified by immunomagnetic selection, as well as in murine thymic lymphoma cell lines RL12-NP and BW5147. OTR is transcribed in all thymic T cell subsets and T cell lines, while V3R transcription is restricted to CD4+ CD8+ and CD8+ thymic cells. Neither V1R nor V2R transcripts are detected in any kind of T cells. The OTR protein was identified by immunocytochemistry on thymocytes freshly isolated from C57BL/6 mice. In murine fetal thymic organ cultures, a specific OTR antagonist does not modify the percentage of T cell subsets, but increases late T cell apoptosis further evidencing the involvement of OT/OTR signaling in the control of T cell proliferation and survival. According to these data, OTR and V3R are differentially expressed during T cell ontogeny. Moreover, the restriction of OTR transcription to T cell lines derived from thymic lymphomas may be important in the context of T cell leukemia pathogenesis and treatment.

  17. Expression of core clock genes in colorectal tumour cells compared with normal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnes, S; Donatsky, A M; Gögenur, I

    2015-01-01

    correlation to clinicopathological features and survival. METHOD: A systematic review was conducted without meta-analysis according to the PRISMA guidelines on 24 March 2014 using PubMed and EMBASE. Eligibility criteria were: study design, original research article, English language, human subjects and gene...... expression of colorectal cancer cells compared with healthy mucosa cells from specimens analysed by real-time or quantitative real-time polymer chain reaction. The expression of the core clock genes Period, Cryptochrome, Bmal1 and Clock in colorectal tumours were compared with healthy mucosa and correlated...... with clinicopathological features and survival. RESULTS: Seventy-four articles were identified and 11 studies were included. Overall, gene expression of Period was significantly decreased in colorectal cancer cells compared with healthy mucosa cells. This tendency was also seen in the gene expression of Clock. Other core...

  18. Construction and expression of a Rev-dependent TNF-R1 expressing HIV-infected-cell injurious vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wei-min; Dean Baylis; Damian Purcell; Paul U Cameron

    2005-01-01

    Rev-expressed target cells by expression of TNF-R1. The new strategy based on manipulation of the regulatory protein of HIV may be valuable in design of new HIV vaccine.

  19. HCMV Infection Depress NGF Expression in Human Glioma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-tao WANG; Bin WANG; Zhi-jun LIU; Zhi-qiang BAI; Ling LI; Dong-meng QIAN; Zhi-yong YAN; Xu-xia SONG

    2009-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common cause of congenital infection, resulting in birth defects such as microcephaly. In this study, RT-PCR and Western Blotting were performed to quantify the regulation of endogenic nerve growth factor expression in neuroglia cells by HCMV infection. The results showed that basal, endogenous NGF expression in U251 was unchanged during early HCMV infection. NGF expression is strongly down-regulated during the latent phase of infection. These results suggest that HCMV can depress the NGF expression in U251 cells.

  20. CellMontage: similar expression profile search server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibuchi, Wataru; Kiseleva, Larisa; Taniguchi, Takeaki; Harada, Hajime; Horton, Paul

    2007-11-15

    The establishment and rapid expansion of microarray databases has created a need for new search tools. Here we present CellMontage, the first server for expression profile similarity search over a large database-69 000 microarray experiments derived from NCBI's; GEO site. CellMontage provides a novel, content-based search engine for accessing gene expression data. Microarray experiments with similar overall expression to a user-provided expression profile (e.g. microarray experiment) are computed and displayed-usually within 20 s. The core search engine software is downloadable from the site. PMID:17895274

  1. Regulated expression of erythropoietin by two human hepatoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, M.A.; Glass, G.A.; Cunningham, J.M.; Bunn, H.F.

    1987-11-01

    The development of a cell culture system that produces erythropoietin (Epo) in a regulated manner has been the focus of much effort. The authors have screened multiple renal and hepatic cell lines for either constitutive or regulated expression of Epo. Only the human hepatoma cell lines, Hep3B and HepG2, made significant amounts of Epo as measured both by radioimmunoassay and in vitro bioassay (as much as 330 milliunits per 10/sup 6/ cells in 24 hr). The constitutive production of Epo increased dramatically as a function of cell density in both cell lines. At cell densities < 3.3 x 10/sup 5/ cells per cm/sup 2/, there was little constitutive release of Epo in the medium. With Hep3B cells grown at low cell densities, a mean 18-fold increase in Epo expression was seen in response to hypoxia and a 6-fold increase was observed in response to incubation in medium containing 50 ..mu..M cobalt(II) chloride. At similar low cell densities, Epo production in HepG2 cells could be enhanced an average of about 3-fold by stimulation with either hypoxia or cobalt(II) chloride. Upon such stimulation, both cell lines demonstrated markedly elevated levels of Epo mRNA. Hence, both Hep3B and HepG2 cell lines provide an excellent in vitro system in which to study the physiological regulation of Epo expression.

  2. Expressed protein ligation for metalloprotein design and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kevin M; van der Donk, Wilfred A; Lu, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Metalloproteins contain highly specialized metal-binding sites that are designed to accept specific metal ions to maintain correct function. Although many of the sites have been modified with success, the relative paucity of functional group availability within proteinogenic amino acids can sometimes leave open questions about specific functions of the metal binding ligands. Attaining a more thorough analysis of individual amino acid function within metalloproteins has been realized using expressed protein ligation (EPL). Here we describe our recent efforts using EPL to incorporate nonproteinogenic cysteine and methionine analogues into the type 1 copper site found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin.

  3. A Guide to Transient Expression of Membrane Proteins in HEK-293 Cells for Functional Characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Amanda Siok Lee

    2016-07-19

    The human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells are commonly used as host for the heterologous expression of membrane proteins not least because they have a high transfection efficiency and faithfully translate and process proteins. In addition, their cell size, morphology and division rate, and low expression of native channels are traits that are particularly attractive for current-voltage measurements. Nevertheless, the heterologous expression of complex membrane proteins such as receptors and ion channels for biological characterization and in particular for single-cell applications such as electrophysiology remains a challenge. Expression of functional proteins depends largely on careful step-by-step optimization that includes the design of expression vectors with suitable identification tags, as well as the selection of transfection methods and detection parameters appropriate for the application. Here, we use the heterologous expression of a plant potassium channel, the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell outward-rectifying K+ channel, AtGORK (At5G37500) in HEK-293 cells as an example, to evaluate commonly used transfection reagents and fluorescent detection methods, and provide a detailed methodology for optimized transient transfection and expression of membrane proteins for in vivo studies in general and for single-cell applications in particular. This optimized protocol will facilitate the physiological and cellular characterization of complex membrane proteins.

  4. MicroRNA expression profiles in avian haemopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxiu eYao

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, abundant, non-coding RNAs that modulate gene expression by interfering with translation or stability of mRNA transcripts in a sequence-specific manner. A total of 734 precursor and 996 mature miRNAs have so far been identified in the chicken genome. A number of these miRNAs are expressed in a cell type-specific manner, and understanding their function requires detailed examination of their expression in different cell types. We carried out deep sequencing of small RNA populations isolated from stimulated or transformed avian haemopoietic cell lines to determine the changes in the expression profiles of these important regulatory molecules during these biological events. There were significant changes in the expression of a number of miRNAs, including miR-155, in chicken B cells stimulated with CD40 ligand. Similarly, avian leukosis virus (ALV-transformed DT40 cells also showed changes in miRNA expression in relation to the naïve cells. Embryonic stem cell line BP25 demonstrated a distinct cluster of upregulated miRNAs, many of which were shown previously to be involved in embryonic stem cell development. Finally, chicken macrophage cell line HD11 showed changes in miRNA profiles, some of which are thought to be related to the transformation by v-myc transduced by the virus. This work represents the first publication of a catalog of microRNA expression in a range of important avian cells and provides insights into the potential roles of miRNAs in the hematopoietic lineages of cells in a model non-mammalian species.

  5. Expression of CD44 in Cultured Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongguo Li; Hong Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Purpose:To determine whether cultured human trabecular meshwork cells express CD44 and to discuss their possible relationship with primary open angle glaucoma.Methods:Human trabecular meshwork cells were cultured in DMEM/F12 media. Total RNAs from the cells were extracted with Trizol reagent. Messenger RNA expression of CD44 in human trabecular meshwork cells was examined by using reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction ( RT-PCR ) analysis. Expression of CD44 was confirmed by Western-blotting and immunofiuorescent microscopy. Effect of CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide on adhesion of trabecular meshwork cells to hyaluronate was determined by MTT assay.Results:A single RT-PCR product whose size was 471bp was obtained.A band about 80kD was stained by Western-blot. Immunofiuorescent examination of expression of CD44 on the cell surface was positive and reactions were mainly localized in cell membranes.Adhesion of trabecular meshwork cells to hyaluronate was inhibited by CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide.Conclusions: Cultured human trabecular meshwork cells express CD44. CD44 may play a role in pathogenesis of primary open angle glaucoma. Eye Science 2004;20:52-56.

  6. Modulation of Vascular Cell Function by Bim Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E. Morrison

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis of vascular cells, including pericytes and endothelial cells, contributes to disease pathogenesis in which vascular rarefaction plays a central role. Bim is a proapoptotic protein that modulates not only apoptosis but also cellular functions such as migration and extracellular matrix (ECM protein expression. Endothelial cells and pericytes each make a unique contribution to vascular formation and function although the details require further delineation. Here we set out to determine the cell autonomous impact of Bim expression on retinal endothelial cell and pericyte function using cells prepared from Bim deficient (Bim−/− mice. Bim−/− endothelial cells displayed an increased production of ECM proteins, proliferation, migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression but, a decreased eNOS expression and nitric oxide production. In contrast, pericyte proliferation decreased in the absence of Bim while migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression were increased. In addition, we demonstrated that the coculturing of either wild-type or Bim−/− endothelial cells with Bim−/− pericytes diminished their capillary morphogenesis. Thus, our data further emphasizes the importance of vascular cell autonomous regulatory mechanisms in modulation of vascular function.

  7. Estrogen regulation of TRPM8 expression in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevestre Henri

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The calcium-permeable cation channel TRPM8 (melastatin-related transient receptor potential member 8 is over-expressed in several cancers. The present study aimed at investigating the expression, function and potential regulation of TRPM8 channels by ER alpha (estrogen receptor alpha in breast cancer. Methods RT-PCR, Western blot, immuno-histochemical, and siRNA techniques were used to investigate TRPM8 expression, its regulation by estrogen receptors, and its expression in breast tissue. To investigate the channel activity in MCF-7 cells, we used the whole cell patch clamp and the calcium imaging techniques. Results TRPM8 channels are expressed at both mRNA and protein levels in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Bath application of the potent TRPM8 agonist Icilin (20 μM induced a strong outwardly rectifying current at depolarizing potentials, which is associated with an elevation of cytosolic calcium concentration, consistent with established TRPM8 channel properties. RT-PCR experiments revealed a decrease in TRPM8 mRNA expression following steroid deprivation for 48 and 72 hours. In steroid deprived medium, addition of 17-beta-estradiol (E2, 10 nM increased both TRPM8 mRNA expression and the number of cells which respond to Icilin, but failed to affect the Ca2+ entry amplitude. Moreover, silencing ERα mRNA expression with small interfering RNA reduced the expression of TRPM8. Immuno-histochemical examination of the expression of TRPM8 channels in human breast tissues revealed an over-expression of TRPM8 in breast adenocarcinomas, which is correlated with estrogen receptor positive (ER+ status of the tumours. Conclusion Taken together, these results show that TRPM8 channels are expressed and functional in breast cancer and that their expression is regulated by ER alpha.

  8. Expression and clinical significance of sulfiredoxin expression in cervical squamous cell carcinoma tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yan CHEN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To inquire into the expression and its clinical significance of sulfiredoxin (Srx in cervical squamous cell carcinoma tissue. Methods SABC immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression levels of Srx in specimens of 104 cervical squamous cell carcinoma and the corresponding adjacent tissues, 15 cervical intraepithelial neoplasm (CIN Ⅲ, and 20 normal cervical squamous cell epithelium tissue. The relationship between the expression of Srx protein and clinical pathological parameters of the cancer was also analyzed. Results The positive expression rates of Srx in CIN Ⅲ and cervical squamous cell carcinoma [73.3%(11/15 and 82.7%(86/104, respectively] were significantly higher than that in normal cervical tissue [35.0%(7/20, χ2=17.778, P=0.000]. Meanwhile, Srx expression in cervical cancer specimens was significantly higher than that in normal adjacent tissues (χ2=56.224, P=0.000. The positive expression of Srx in cervical squamous cell carcinoma was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis, the depth of cancer invasion, and the infiltration of blood vessels (P0.05. Conclusion The higher expression of Srx protein might be a valuable marker for the early diagnosis and evaluation of prognosis in patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.08.11

  9. Expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Almeida, Maria Carolina Leal; Costa, Alessandra Scorse; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Serrano, Rodrigo Lorenzetti; Machado Filho, Carlos D'Apparecida Santos

    2016-01-01

    Background Heparanase is an enzyme that cleaves heparan sulfate chains. Oligosaccharides generated by heparanase induce tumor progression. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma comprise types of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Objectives Evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and expression of heparanase in two human cell lines established in culture, immortalized skin keratinocyte (HaCaT) and squamous cell carcinoma (A431) and also investigate the expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and eyelid skin of individuals not affected by the disease (control). Methods Glycosaminoglycans were quantified by electrophoresis and indirect ELISA method. The heparanase expression was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRTPCR). Results The A431 strain showed significant increase in the sulfated glycosaminoglycans, increased heparanase expression and decreased hyaluronic acid, comparing to the HaCaT lineage. The mRNA expression of heparanase was significantly higher in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma compared with control skin samples. It was also observed increased heparanase expression in squamous cell carcinoma compared to the Basal cell carcinoma. Conclusion The glycosaminoglycans profile, as well as heparanase expression are different between HaCaT and A431 cell lines. The increased expression of heparanase in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma suggests that this enzyme could be a marker for the diagnosis of such types of non-melanoma cancers, and may be useful as a target molecule for future alternative treatment.

  10. Adrenomedullin Expression by Gastric Epithelial Cells in Response to Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Robert P. Allaker; Kapas, Supriya

    2003-01-01

    Many surface epithelial cells express adrenomedullin, a multifunctional peptide found in a wide number of body and cell systems. Recently, we and others have proposed that adrenomedullin has an important novel role in host defense. This peptide has many properties in common with other cationic antimicrobial peptides, including the human β-defensins. Upon exposure of human gastric epithelial cells to viable cells of invasive or noninvasive strains of Helicobacter pylori, Escherichia coli, Salm...

  11. Salmonella induces PD-L1 expression in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella persists for a long time in B cells; however, the mechanism(s) through which infected B cells avoid effector CD8 T cell responses has not been characterized. In this study, we show that Salmonella infects and survives within all B1 and B2 cell subpopulations. B cells are infected with a Salmonella typhimurium strain expressing an ovalbumin (OVA) peptide (SIINFEKL) to evaluate whether B cells process and present Salmonella antigens in the context of MHC-I molecules. Our data showed that OVA peptides are presented by MHC class I K(b)-restricted molecules and the presented antigen is generated through proteasomal degradation and vacuolar processing. In addition, Salmonella-infected B cells express co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80, and CD86 as well as inhibitory molecules such as PD-L1. Thus, the cross-presentation of Salmonella antigens and the expression of activation molecules suggest that infected B cells are able to prime and activate specific CD8(+) T cells. However, the Salmonella infection-stimulated expression of PD-L1 suggests that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may be involved in turning off the cytotoxic effector response during Salmonella persistent infection, thereby allowing B cells to become a reservoir for the bacteria.

  12. Changes of number of cells expressing proliferation and progenitor cell markers with age in rabbit intervertebral discs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miersalijiang Yasen; Qinming Fei; William C Hutton; Jian Zhang; Jian Dong; Xiaoxing Jiang; Feng Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Basic knowledge about the normal regeneration process within the intervertebral disc (IVD) is important to the understanding of the underlying biology.The presence of progenitor and stem cells in IVD has been verified.However,changes of number of progenitor and stem cells with age are still unknown.In this study,changes of cell proliferation and progenitor cell markers with age in IVD cells from rabbits of two different ages were investigated using flow cytometry,immunohistochemistry,real-time polymerase chain reaction,and western blot analysis.Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was chosen as a marker for proliferation,and Notch1,Jagged1,C-KIT,CD166 were chosen as stem/progenitor cell markers.Cell cycle analysis showed that cell number in the G2/M phase of the young rabbits was significantly higher than that of mature rabbits.Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the expression of PCNA,C-KIT,CD166,Notch1,and Jagged1 in both young and mature annulus fibrosus (AF).Protein expressions of these cell markers in the young rabbits were all significantly higher than those in the mature rabbits.The expression levels of PCNA,CD166,C-KIT,Jagged1 were significantly higher in the AF,and PCNA,C-KIT in the nucleus pulposus from young rabbits than those from the mature rabbits.These findings demonstrated that both proliferation and progenitor cells exist in rabbit IVDs and the number of cells expressing proliferation and progenitor cell markers decreases with age in the rabbit IVD cells.Methods that are designed to maintain the endogenous progenitor cells and stimulate their proliferation could be successful in preventing or inhibiting degenerative disc disease.

  13. Expression of Bcl-2 in cells with different telomerase activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Both telomerase and Bcl-2 are important genes in controlling apoptosis. The activation of telomerase and the abnormal regulation of Bcl-2 are also closely related to carcinogenesis. However, little is known about the linkage between telomerase and Bcl-2. The effect of activated telomerase on the expression of Bcl-2 has been investigated. It is demonstrated that in tumor and transformed cells with higher telomerase activity, Bcl-2 expression is significantly lower than that in telomerase negative or less telomerose activity cells. Further study showed that in the telomerase gene-transformed 2BS-fibroblasts, Bcl-2 expression is inhibited significantly while the exogenous telomerase catalytic subunit gene is re-expressed in fibroblasts. Results indicated that there might be a certain linkage between the expression of telomerase and Bcl-2, and overexpression of exogenous telomerase gene might down regulate the expression of Bcl-2.

  14. Expression of aquaporin-1 in SMMC-7221 liver carcinoma cells promotes cell migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yongming; FENG Xuechao; YANG Hong; MA Tonghui

    2006-01-01

    Migration of tumor cells is a crucial step in tumor invasion and metastasis. Here we provide evidence that aquaporin expression is involved in tumor cell migration. RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis demonstrated the AQP1 protein expression on the plasma membrane of SMMC-7221 human hepatoma cells. SMMC-7221 cell clones with high (SMMC-7221hPf) and low (SMMC-7221/Pf) water permeability were identified by functional assays with corresponding high and low AQP1 expression. Cell migration rate was remarkably higher in SMMC-7221hPf cells than SMMC-7221/Pf cells, assessed by Boyden chamber and wound healing assays, whereas cell growth and adhesion were not different. Adenovirus-mediated AQP1 expression in SMMC-7221/Pf cells increased their water permeability and migration rate. These results provide the first evidence that aquaporin-mediated membrane water permeability enhances tumor cell migration and may be associated with tumor invasion and metastasis.

  15. Expression of EPO Receptor in Pancreatic Cells and Its Effect on Cell Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongxia SHUAI; Ji ZHANG; Yikai YU; Muxun ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    In order to explore the expression of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) in pancreatic cell ine NIT-1 and its effect on cell apoptosis after binding with erythropoietin (EPO), NIT-1 cells were cultured and expanded. The expression of EPOR was detected using electrophoresis. NIT-1 apoptosis was induced by cytokines and their effects on cell apoptosis and cell insulin secretion were assayed after binding of EPO to EPOR. The results showed that EPOR was expressed in NIT-1 cells. Recom- binant human EPO (rHuEPO) had no effect on cell apoptosis but significantly inhibited apoptosis in- duced by cytokines, rHuEPO had no effect on cell insulin secretion but significantly improved insulin secretion inhibited by cytokines. From these findings, it was concluded that EPOR was expressed in NIT-1 cells and EPO could protect N1T-1 cells from apoptosis induced by cytokines.

  16. Cytokine Expression in Homozygous Sickle Cell Anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnodim Johnkennedy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sickle cell anaemia is an inherited disease in which the red blood cells become rigid and sticky, and change from being disc-shaped to being crescent-shaped. The change in shape is due to the presence of an abnormal form of haemoglobin. This results in severe pain and damage to some organs. Aim and Objective: The study was carried out to determine the levels of cytokine in sickle cell anemia. Material and Methods: Thirty confirmed sickle cell patients in steady state (HbSS-SS and thirty persons with normal haemoglobin (HbAA as well as sixteen sickle cell disease in crises (HbSS-cr between the ages of 15 to 30 years were selected in this study. Cytokines including interleukin 1 beta (IL- 1β, interleukin 2 (IL- 2, interleukin (IL-6, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and interferon gamma (IFN- λ were measured by commercially available ELISA kits. Results: The results obtained showed that the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in sickle cell anaemia patients in crisis were significantly elevated when compared with sickle cell in steady state (P<0.05. Similarly, the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN- λ were significantly increased in sickle cell anaemia stable state when compared to HbAA subjects (P<0.05. Conclusion: This may probably implies that cytokine imbalance is implicated in the pathogenesis of sickle cell crisis. Also, cytokines could be used as an inflammatory marker as well as related marker in disease severity and hence therapeutic intervention.

  17. Ectopic ERK Expression Induces Phenotypic Conversion of C10 Cells and Alters DNA Methyltransferase Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2012-05-04

    In some model systems constitutive extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) activation is sufficient to promote an oncogenic phenotype. Here we investigate whether constitutive ERK expression influences phenotypic conversion in murine C10 type II alveolar epithelial cells. C10 cells were stably transduced with an ERK1-green fluorescent protein (ERK1-GFP) chimera or empty vector and ectopic ERK expression was associated with the acquisition of soft agar focus-forming potential in late passage, but not early passage cells. Late passage ERK1-GFP cells exhibited a significant increase in the expression of DNA methyl transferases (DNMT1 and 3b) and a marked increase in sensitivity to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC)-mediated toxicity, relative to early passage ERK1-GFP cells and vector controls. The expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) were significantly increased in late passage cells, suggesting enhanced DNA damage recognition and repair activity which we interpret as a reflection of genomic instability. Phospho-ERK levels were dramatically decreased in late passage ERK1-GFP cells, relative to early passage and vector controls, and phospho-ERK levels were restored by treatment with sodium orthovanadate, indicating a role for phosphatase activity in this response. Collectively these observations suggest that ectopic ERK expression promotes phenotypic conversion of C10 cells that is associated with latent effects on epigenetic programming and phosphatase activities.

  18. A thermophilic microbial fuel cell design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Sarah M.; Vuoriranta, Pertti; Tuovinen, Olli H.

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are reactors able to generate electricity by capturing electrons from the anaerobic respiratory processes of microorganisms. While the majority of MFCs have been tested at ambient or mesophilic temperatures, thermophilic systems warrant evaluation because of the potential for increased microbial activity rates on the anode. MFC studies at elevated temperatures have been scattered, using designs that are already established, specifically air-cathode single chambers and two-chamber designs. This study was prompted by our previous attempts that showed an increased amount of evaporation in thermophilic MFCs, adding unnecessary technical difficulties and causing excessive maintenance. In this paper, we describe a thermophilic MFC design that prevents evaporation. The design was tested at 57 °C with an anaerobic, thermophilic consortium that respired with glucose to generate a power density of 375 mW m -2 after 590 h. Polarization and voltage data showed that the design works in the batch mode but the design allows for adoption to continuous operation.

  19. Oral Rabies Vaccine Design for Expression in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ankit; Saxena, Gauri; Verma, Praveen C

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is the sensitization process of the immune system against any pathogen. Generally, recombinant subunit vaccines are considered safer than attenuated vaccines. As whole pathogenic organisms are used in the immunization process, the attenuated vaccines are considered more risky than subunit vaccines. Rabies is the oldest known zoonosis which spreads through a neurotropic Lyssavirus primarily mediated through infected canine bites. Rabies causes worldwide loss of more than 60,000 human lives every year. Animal vaccination is equally important to check the transmission of rabies into humans. Rabies oral vaccination can be a good alternative where multiple booster and priming regimens are required while the painful vaccination process can continue for long durations. Introduction of oral vaccines was made to ease the discomfort associated with the mode of introduction of conventional vaccines into the body. Although the rabies oral vaccine can substantially reduce the cost of vaccination in the developing countries, mass immunization programs need larger quantities of vaccines which should be delivered at nominal cost. Expression of recombinant antigen proteins in E. coli is often not viable because of lack of post-translational modifications and folding requirements. Though yeast and insect cell line expression systems have post-translational processing and modifications, significantly different immunological response against their post-translational modification pattern limits their deployment as an expression system. As an alternative, plants are emerging as a promising system to express and deliver wide range of functionally active biopharmaceutical product at lower cost for mass immunization programs. As generation of vaccine antigenic proteins in plant systems are cheaper, the strategy will benefit developing countries where this disease causes thousands of deaths every year. In this chapter, we will discuss about our efforts toward development of oral

  20. Gene expression-based risk score in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Bret, Caroline; Klein, Bernard; Moreaux, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    International audience Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and displays heterogeneous clinical and molecular characteristics. In this study, high throughput gene expression profiling of DLBCL tumor samples was used to design a 12-gene expression-based risk score (GERS) predictive for patient's overall survival. GERS allowed identifying a high-risk group comprising 46,4% of the DLBCL patients in two independent cohorts (n=414 and n=69). GERS...

  1. Low power and reliable SRAM memory cell and array design

    CERN Document Server

    Ishibashi, Koichiro

    2011-01-01

    Success in the development of recent advanced semiconductor device technologies is due to the success of SRAM memory cells. This book addresses various issues for designing SRAM memory cells for advanced CMOS technology. To study LSI design, SRAM cell design is the best materials subject because issues about variability, leakage and reliability have to be taken into account for the design.

  2. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  3. Gene expression analysis of in vivo fluorescent cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Khodosevich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The analysis of gene expression for tissue homogenates is of limited value because of the considerable cell heterogeneity in tissues. However, several methods are available to isolate a cell type of interest from a complex tissue, the most reliable one being Laser Microdissection (LMD. Cells may be distinguished by their morphology or by specific antigens, but the obligatory staining often results in RNA degradation. Alternatively, particular cell types can be detected in vivo by expression of fluorescent proteins from cell type-specific promoters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a technique for fixing in vivo fluorescence in brain cells and isolating them by LMD followed by an optimized RNA isolation procedure. RNA isolated from these cells was of equal quality as from unfixed frozen tissue, with clear 28S and 18S rRNA bands of a mass ratio of approximately 2ratio1. We confirmed the specificity of the amplified RNA from the microdissected fluorescent cells as well as its usefulness and reproducibility for microarray hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our technique guarantees the isolation of sufficient high quality RNA obtained from specific cell populations of the brain expressing soluble fluorescent marker, which is a critical prerequisite for subsequent gene expression studies by microarray analysis or qRT-PCR.

  4. HIV-1 induces DCIR expression in CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A Lambert

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin receptor DCIR, which has been shown very recently to act as an attachment factor for HIV-1 in dendritic cells, is expressed predominantly on antigen-presenting cells. However, this concept was recently challenged by the discovery that DCIR can also be detected in CD4(+ T cells found in the synovial tissue from rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Given that RA and HIV-1 infections share common features such as a chronic inflammatory condition and polyclonal immune hyperactivation status, we hypothesized that HIV-1 could promote DCIR expression in CD4(+ T cells. We report here that HIV-1 drives DCIR expression in human primary CD4(+ T cells isolated from patients (from both aviremic/treated and viremic/treatment naive persons and cells acutely infected in vitro (seen in both virus-infected and uninfected cells. Soluble factors produced by virus-infected cells are responsible for the noticed DCIR up-regulation on uninfected cells. Infection studies with Vpr- or Nef-deleted viruses revealed that these two viral genes are not contributing to the mechanism of DCIR induction that is seen following acute infection of CD4(+ T cells with HIV-1. Moreover, we report that DCIR is linked to caspase-dependent (induced by a mitochondria-mediated generation of free radicals and -independent intrinsic apoptotic pathways (involving the death effector AIF. Finally, we demonstrate that the higher surface expression of DCIR in CD4(+ T cells is accompanied by an enhancement of virus attachment/entry, replication and transfer. This study shows for the first time that HIV-1 induces DCIR membrane expression in CD4(+ T cells, a process that might promote virus dissemination throughout the infected organism.

  5. Expression and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. Carballosa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are prototypical ligand gated ion channels typically found in muscular and neuronal tissues. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, however, have also recently been identified on other cell types, including stem cells. Activation of these receptors by the binding of agonists like choline, acetylcholine, or nicotine has been implicated in many cellular changes. In regards to stem cell function, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation leads to changes in stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation potential. In this review we summarize the expression and function of known nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different classes of stem cells including: pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, periodontal ligament derived stem cells, and neural progenitor cells and discuss the potential downstream effects of receptor activation on stem cell function.

  6. Expression of cadherin and NCAM in human small cell lung cancer cell lines and xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Møller, C; Bock, E;

    1992-01-01

    Tumour cell adhesion, detachment and aggregation seem to play an important part in tumour invasion and metastasis, and numerous cell adhesion molecules are expressed by tumour cells. Several families of cell-cell adhesion molecules have been described, of which two groups are particularly well...... characterised, the cadherin family and the Ig superfamily member, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). We investigated expression of these two adhesion molecule families in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and xenografts by immunoblotting. Nineteen tumours established from 15 patients with SCLC were...... embryonic development, which may play a role in connection with tumour invasion and metastasis, was found in 14/18 NCAM expressing SCLC tumours. Individual tumours grown as cell lines and as nude mouse xenografts showed no qualitative differences in cadherin or NCAM expression....

  7. Efficient conditional gene expression following transplantation of retrovirally transduced bone marrow stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jie-Yu; Mackay, Fabienne; Alderuccio, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral gene therapy combined with bone marrow stem cell transplantation can be used to generate mice with ectopic gene expression in the bone marrow compartment in a quick and cost effective manner when compared to generating and maintaining transgenic mouse lines. However a limitation of this procedure is the lack of cell specificity in gene expression that is associated with the use of endogenous retroviral promoters. Restricting gene expression to specific cell subsets utilising tissue-specific promoter driven retroviral vectors is a challenge. Here we describe the generation of conditional expression of retrovirally encoded genes in specific bone marrow derived cell lineages utilising a Cre-dependent retroviral vector. By utilising Lck and CD19 restricted Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells, we generate chimeric animals with T or B lymphocyte restricted gene expression respectively. The design of the Cre-dependent retroviral vector enables expression of encoded MOG and GFP genes only in association with Cre mediated DNA inversion. Importantly this strategy does not significantly increase the size of the retroviral vector; as such we are able to generate bone marrow chimeric animals with significantly higher chimerism levels than previous studies utilising Cre-dependent retroviral vectors and Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells. This demonstrates that the use of Cre-dependent retroviral vectors is able to yield high chimerism levels for experimental use and represent a viable alternative to generating transgenic animals.

  8. Efficient conditional gene expression following transplantation of retrovirally transduced bone marrow stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jie-Yu; Mackay, Fabienne; Alderuccio, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral gene therapy combined with bone marrow stem cell transplantation can be used to generate mice with ectopic gene expression in the bone marrow compartment in a quick and cost effective manner when compared to generating and maintaining transgenic mouse lines. However a limitation of this procedure is the lack of cell specificity in gene expression that is associated with the use of endogenous retroviral promoters. Restricting gene expression to specific cell subsets utilising tissue-specific promoter driven retroviral vectors is a challenge. Here we describe the generation of conditional expression of retrovirally encoded genes in specific bone marrow derived cell lineages utilising a Cre-dependent retroviral vector. By utilising Lck and CD19 restricted Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells, we generate chimeric animals with T or B lymphocyte restricted gene expression respectively. The design of the Cre-dependent retroviral vector enables expression of encoded MOG and GFP genes only in association with Cre mediated DNA inversion. Importantly this strategy does not significantly increase the size of the retroviral vector; as such we are able to generate bone marrow chimeric animals with significantly higher chimerism levels than previous studies utilising Cre-dependent retroviral vectors and Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells. This demonstrates that the use of Cre-dependent retroviral vectors is able to yield high chimerism levels for experimental use and represent a viable alternative to generating transgenic animals. PMID:25445328

  9. CellCODE: a robust latent variable approach to differential expression analysis for heterogeneous cell populations

    OpenAIRE

    Chikina, Maria; Zaslavsky, Elena; Sealfon, Stuart C.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying alterations in gene expression associated with different clinical states is important for the study of human biology. However, clinical samples used in gene expression studies are often derived from heterogeneous mixtures with variable cell-type composition, complicating statistical analysis. Considerable effort has been devoted to modeling sample heterogeneity, and presently, there are many methods that can estimate cell proportions or pure cell-type expression from m...

  10. Microarray gene expression profiling and analysis in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhukhan Provash

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common cancer in adult kidney. The accuracy of current diagnosis and prognosis of the disease and the effectiveness of the treatment for the disease are limited by the poor understanding of the disease at the molecular level. To better understand the genetics and biology of RCC, we profiled the expression of 7,129 genes in both clear cell RCC tissue and cell lines using oligonucleotide arrays. Methods Total RNAs isolated from renal cell tumors, adjacent normal tissue and metastatic RCC cell lines were hybridized to affymatrix HuFL oligonucleotide arrays. Genes were categorized into different functional groups based on the description of the Gene Ontology Consortium and analyzed based on the gene expression levels. Gene expression profiles of the tissue and cell line samples were visualized and classified by singular value decomposition. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the expression alterations of selected genes in RCC. Results Selected genes were annotated based on biological processes and clustered into functional groups. The expression levels of genes in each group were also analyzed. Seventy-four commonly differentially expressed genes with more than five-fold changes in RCC tissues were identified. The expression alterations of selected genes from these seventy-four genes were further verified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Detailed comparison of gene expression patterns in RCC tissue and RCC cell lines shows significant differences between the two types of samples, but many important expression patterns were preserved. Conclusions This is one of the initial studies that examine the functional ontology of a large number of genes in RCC. Extensive annotation, clustering and analysis of a large number of genes based on the gene functional ontology revealed many interesting gene expression patterns in RCC. Most

  11. Expression of stromelysin 3 in basal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribier, B; Noacco, G; Peltre, B; Grosshans, E

    2001-01-01

    Stromelysin 3 is a member of the metalloproteinase family, which is expressed in various remodelling processes. The prognosis of breast cancers and squamous cell carcinomas is correlated to the level of expression of this protein. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the expression of stromelysin 3 in the major types of basal cell carcinomas. We selected cases of primary tumours that were fully excised, without previous biopsy: 40 Pinkus tumors, 40 superficial, 40 nodular, 38 morpheiform basal cell carcinomas and 10 cases showing deep subcutaneous or muscular invasion. Immunohistochemistry was carried out using monoclonal anti-ST3 antibodies (MC Rio, IGBMC Strasbourg), and evaluated on a semi-quantitative scale from 0 to 3. Positively stained cells were restricted to the periphery of the epithelial cells, which, by contrast, never expressed stromelysin 3. The global rate of expression was 27% in Pinkus tumors, 65% in superficial, 72.5% in nodular, 87% in morpheiform and 100% in deeply invasive carcinomas. The rates of tumours showing the highest number of positively stained cells (class 2 or 3) were respectively 7.5%, 20%, 45%, 63% and 100%. This systematic study of stromelysin3 expression in basal cell carcinomas confirms that it is a marker of poor prognosis, because the rate of positive tumours was much higher in aggressive carcinomas. Moreover, the majority of tumours showing an intense expression (i.e. the highest number of positively stained cells in their stroma) were of the morpheiform and deeply invasive types, which are of poor prognosis. Altogether, the studies performed on cutaneous tumours are consistent with the theory of stromelysin 3 playing an active role in tumour progression.

  12. Expression of GABAergic receptors in mouse taste receptor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Starostik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple excitatory neurotransmitters have been identified in the mammalian taste transduction, with few studies focused on inhibitory neurotransmitters. Since the synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is expressed in a subset of mouse taste cells, we hypothesized that other components of the GABA signaling pathway are likely expressed in this system. GABA signaling is initiated by the activation of either ionotropic receptors (GABA(A and GABA(C or metabotropic receptors (GABA(B while it is terminated by the re-uptake of GABA through transporters (GATs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analysis, we investigated the expression of different GABA signaling molecules in the mouse taste system. Taste receptor cells (TRCs in the circumvallate papillae express multiple subunits of the GABA(A and GABA(B receptors as well as multiple GATs. Immunocytochemical analyses examined the distribution of the GABA machinery in the circumvallate papillae. Both GABA(A-and GABA(B- immunoreactivity were detected in the peripheral taste receptor cells. We also used transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP in either the Type II taste cells, which can respond to bitter, sweet or umami taste stimuli, or in the Type III GAD67 expressing taste cells. Thus, we were able to identify that GABAergic receptors are expressed in some Type II and Type III taste cells. Mouse GAT4 labeling was concentrated in the cells surrounding the taste buds with a few positively labeled TRCs at the margins of the taste buds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of GABAergic receptors localized on Type II and Type III taste cells suggests that GABA is likely modulating evoked taste responses in the mouse taste bud.

  13. Regulation of osteoprotegerin expression by Notch signaling in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeeranan Manokawinchoke; Thanaphum Osathanon; Prasit Pavasant

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of Notch signaling on osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression in a human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line. Methods: Activation of Notch signaling was performed by seeding cells on Jagged1 immobilized surfaces. In other experiments, a γ-secretase inhibitor was added to the culture medium to inhibit intracellular Notch signaling. OPG mRNA and protein were determined by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Finally, publicly available microarray database analysis was performed using connection up- or down-regulation expression analysis of microarrays software. Results: Jagged1-treatment of HSC-4 cells enhanced HES1 and HEY1 mRNA expres-sion, confirming the intracellular activation of Notch signaling. OPG mRNA and protein levels were significantly suppressed upon Jagged1 treatment. Correspondingly, HSC-4 cells treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor resulted in a significant reduction of HES1 and HEY1 mRNA levels, and a marked increase in OPG protein expression was observed. These results implied that Notch signaling regulated OPG expression in HSC-4 cells. However, Jagged1 did not alter OPG expression in another human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line (HSC-5) or a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line (HN22). Conclusions: Notch signaling regulated OPG expression in an HSC-4 cell line and this mechanism could be cell line specific.

  14. Soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1: a biomarker for bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Determann; M. Weisfelt; J. de Gans; A. van der Ende; M.J. Schultz; D. van de Beek

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (sTREM-1) in CSF can serve as a biomarker for the presence of bacterial meningitis and outcome in patients with this disease. Design: Retrospective study of diagnostic accuracy. Setting and patients: CSF was coll

  15. Tff3 is Expressed in Neurons and Microglial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Fu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The trefoil factor family (TFF peptide TFF3 is typically secreted by mucous epithelia, but is also expressed in the immune system and the brain. It was the aim of this study to determine the cerebral cell types which express Tff3. Methods: Primary cultures from rat embryonic or neonatal cerebral cortex and hippocampus, respectively, were studied by means of RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Moreover, Tff3 expression was localized by immunocytochemistry in sections of adult rat cerebellum. Results: Tff3 transcripts were detectable in neural cultures of both the cortex and the hippocampus as well as in glial cell-enriched cultures. Tff3 peptide co-localized with Map2 indicating an expression in neurons in vitro. The neuronal expression was confirmed by immunofluorescence studies of adult rat cerebellum. Furthermore, Tff3 peptide showed also a clear co-localization with Iba-1 in vitro typical of activated microglial cells. Conclusion: The neuronal expression of Tff3 is in line with a function of a typical neuropeptide influencing, e.g., fear, memory, depression and motoric skills. The expression in activated microglial cells, which is demonstrated here for the first time, points towards a possible function for Tff3 in immune reactions in the CNS. This opens a plethora of additional possible functions for Tff3 including synaptic plasticity and cognition as well as during neuroinflammatory diseases and psychiatric disorders.

  16. Cell-specific expression of TLR9 isoforms in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kelly J; Highton, John; Hessian, Paul A

    2011-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key pattern recognition receptors during an immune response. With five isoforms of human TLR9 described, we hypothesised that differential expression of TLR9 isoforms in different cell types would result in variable contributions to the overall input from TLR9 during inflammation. We assessed the molecular expression of the TLR9 isoforms, TLR9-A, -C and -D. In normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, B-lymphocytes express ∼100-fold more TLR9-A transcript than monocytes or T-lymphocytes, which predominantly express the TLR9-C transcript. Switches in isoform predominance accompany B-lymphocyte development. TLR9 protein expression in rheumatoid inflammatory lesions reflected the TLR9 isoform expression by immune cells. Herein we suggest that B-lymphocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute the ∼3-fold higher TLR9-A transcript levels observed in inflamed synovium when compared to subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules. In contrast, macrophages and T-lymphocytes contribute the ∼4-fold higher TLR9-C transcript levels seen in nodules, compared to synovia. From protein sequence, predictions of subcellular localisation suggest TLR9-B may locate to the mitochondria, whereas TLR9-D adopts an opposing orientation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Consistent with this, structure models raise the possibility of alternative ligands for the TLR9-B and TLR9-D variants. Our results highlight differences in the expression of human TLR9 isoforms in normal and inflamed tissues, with differing contributions to inflammation.

  17. CD44 variant expression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orteu, C H; Li, W; Allen, M H; Smith, N P; Barker, J N; Whittaker, S J

    1997-07-01

    Expression of the lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 and its splice variants have been linked to tumour dissemination and poor prognosis in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Specifically, the in vitro expression of variant exon V6 confers metastatic potential in rat pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. In this study, we investigated the expression of CD44 splice variants in cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including patients with mycosis fungoides (MF), Sezary syndrome (SS), large-cell anaplastic lymphoma (LCAL) and HTLV1-associated cutaneous lymphoma. In addition, 4 involved lymph nodes from 2 patients with MF and 1 patient with SS were examined. Inflammatory dermatoses, lichen planus and psoriasis, and normal skin were also studied. Immunohistochemistry was performed using a panel of monoclonal antibodies, including those with specificity for CD44H (standard isoform) and variant exons V3, V6 and V8-9. Normal epidermal keratinocytes were consistently CD44H and CD44 V3, V6 and V8-9 positive. In all the different clinicopathological subtypes and stages of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including involved lymph nodes, tumour cells consistently expressed CD44H, but were CD44 V3 and V6 negative. CD44 V8-9 was expressed on a majority of tumour cells in 2/5 LCAL and on occasional tumour cells in 2/5 LCAL. Occasional V8-9 positive tumour cells were also identified in 6/13 MF, 1/4 SS and 3/4 HTLV1. In 2/3 lymph node samples from 2 patients with tumour-stage MF, CD44 V8-9 expression was found on a small percentage of atypical mononuclear cells. Scattered V8-9 positive dermal mononuclear cells were present in sections of lichen planus and psoriasis. We have found no evidence to suggest that the metastasis-associated CD44 variant exon (V6) is expressed in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, or that CD44H expression is associated with an adverse prognostic group. It is not clear whether the strong expression of CD44 V8-9 in 2 patients with CD30 positive LCAL reflects activation status or metastatic potential.

  18. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library adopting minimalist design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Naoki, E-mail: takeuchi-naoki-kx@ynu.jp [Institute of Advanced Sciences, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki [Institute of Advanced Sciences, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    We herein build an adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) cell library adopting minimalist design and a symmetric layout. In the proposed minimalist design, every logic cell is designed by arraying four types of building block cells: buffer, NOT, constant, and branch cells. Therefore, minimalist design enables us to effectively build and customize an AQFP cell library. The symmetric layout reduces unwanted parasitic magnetic coupling and ensures a large mutual inductance in an output transformer, which enables very long wiring between logic cells. We design and fabricate several logic circuits using the minimal AQFP cell library so as to test logic cells in the library. Moreover, we experimentally investigate the maximum wiring length between logic cells. Finally, we present an experimental demonstration of an 8-bit carry look-ahead adder designed using the minimal AQFP cell library and demonstrate that the proposed cell library is sufficiently robust to realize large-scale digital circuits.

  19. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library adopting minimalist design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We herein build an adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) cell library adopting minimalist design and a symmetric layout. In the proposed minimalist design, every logic cell is designed by arraying four types of building block cells: buffer, NOT, constant, and branch cells. Therefore, minimalist design enables us to effectively build and customize an AQFP cell library. The symmetric layout reduces unwanted parasitic magnetic coupling and ensures a large mutual inductance in an output transformer, which enables very long wiring between logic cells. We design and fabricate several logic circuits using the minimal AQFP cell library so as to test logic cells in the library. Moreover, we experimentally investigate the maximum wiring length between logic cells. Finally, we present an experimental demonstration of an 8-bit carry look-ahead adder designed using the minimal AQFP cell library and demonstrate that the proposed cell library is sufficiently robust to realize large-scale digital circuits

  20. Estrogen induces Vav1 expression in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-juan Du

    Full Text Available Vav1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF for Rho family GTPases, is a hematopoietic protein involved in a variety of cellular events. In recent years, aberrant expression of Vav1 has been reported in non-hematopoietic cancers including human breast cancer. It remains to be answered how Vav1 is expressed and what Vav1 does in its non-resident tissues. In this study, we aimed to explore the mechanism for Vav1 expression in breast cancer cells in correlation with estrogen-ER pathway. We not only verified the ectopic expression of Vav1 in human breast cancer cell lines, but also observed that Vav1 expression was induced by 17β-estradiol (E2, a typical estrogen receptor (ER ligand, in ER-positive cell lines. On the other hand, Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM, and ICI 182,780, an ER antagonist, suppressed the expression of Vav1. The estrogen receptor modulating Vav1 expression was identified to be α form, not β. Furthermore, treatment of E2 increased the transcription of vav1 gene by enhancing the promoter activity, though there was no recognizable estrogen response element (ERE. Nevertheless, two regions at the vav1 gene promoter were defined to be responsible for E2-induced activation of vav1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP analyses suggested that ERα might access to the vav1 promoter via interacting with transcription factors, c-Myb and ELF-1. Consequently, the enhanced expression of Vav1 led to the elevation of Cyclin D1 and the progression of cell cycle. The present study implies that estrogen-ER modulates the transcription and expression of Vav1, which may contribute to the proliferation of cancerous cells.

  1. Expression of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Gene in Ginseng Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hai-peng; XUE Yan; AN Wei; LIU Dan; HAO Shu-mei; SHENG Jun

    2009-01-01

    The recombinant plasmid pBIBSa containing the HBsAg DNA fragment was transferred into Agrobacte-rium tumefaciens strain LBA4404 directly. Ginseng cells were transfected with A. Tumefaciens carrying pBIBSa and the ginseng cell lines carrying HBsAg-S gene were obtained. The presence of target gene in the transfect cells was confirmed by PCR and RT-PCR. A clear band at the site of 700 bp was observed by agarose electrophoresis analysis of the samples containing the target gene. HBsAg expressed by the transgenic ginseng cells was detected by Western blot. Maximum expression levels of 184 ng HBsAg/g FW and 0. 009% of the total soluble proteins were observed by ELISA. HBsAg in ginseng cells was located both on the cell membrane and in the nuclei.

  2. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetty, Chandramu [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Dontula, Ranadheer [Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, 840 South Wood Street, Suite 820-E, Chicago, IL-60612 (United States); Ganji, Purnachandra Nagaraju [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Gujrati, Meena [Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Lakka, Sajani S., E-mail: slakka@uic.edu [Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, 840 South Wood Street, Suite 820-E, Chicago, IL-60612 (United States)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  3. The regulation of CD5 expression in murine T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzenberg Leonard A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD5 is a pan-T cell surface marker that is also present on a subset of B cells, B-1a cells.Functional and developmental subsets of T cells express characteristic CD5 levels that vary over roughly a 30-fold range. Previous investigators have cloned a 1.7 Kb fragment containing the CD5 promoter and showed that it can confer similar lymphocyte-specific expression pattern as observed for endogenous CD5 expression. Results We further characterize the CD5 promoter and identify minimal and regulatory regions on the CD5 promoter. Using a luciferase reporter system, we show that a 43 bp region on the CD5 promoter regulates CD5 expression in resting mouse thymoma EL4 T cells and that an Ets binding site within the 43 bp region mediates the CD5 expression. In addition, we show that Ets-1, a member of the Ets family of transcription factors, recognizes the Ets binding site in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. This Ets binding site is directly responsible for the increase in reporter activity when co-transfected with increasing amounts of Ets-1 expression plasmid. We also identify two additional evolutionarily-conserved regions in the CD5 promoter (CD5X and CD5Y and demonstrate the respective roles of the each region in the regulation of CD5 transcription. Conclusion Our studies define a minimal and regulatory promoter for CD5 and show that the CD5 expression level in T cells is at least partially dependent on the level of Ets-1 protein. Based on the findings in this report, we propose a model of CD5 transcriptional regulation in T cells.

  4. Sex-Dependent Gene Expression in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ronen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Males and females have a variety of sexually dimorphic traits, most of which result from hormonal differences. However, differences between male and female embryos initiate very early in development, before hormonal influence begins, suggesting the presence of genetically driven sexual dimorphisms. By comparing the gene expression profiles of male and X-inactivated female human pluripotent stem cells, we detected Y-chromosome-driven effects. We discovered that the sex-determining gene SRY is expressed in human male pluripotent stem cells and is induced by reprogramming. In addition, we detected more than 200 differentially expressed autosomal genes in male and female embryonic stem cells. Some of these genes are involved in steroid metabolism pathways and lead to sex-dependent differentiation in response to the estrogen precursor estrone. Thus, we propose that the presence of the Y chromosome and specifically SRY may drive sex-specific differences in the growth and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells.

  5. Heterogeneous Expression of Drosophila Gustatory Receptors in Enteroendocrine Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong-Ho Park; Jae Young Kwon

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is emerging as a major site of chemosensation in mammalian studies. Enteroendocrine cells are chemosensory cells in the gut which produce regulatory peptides in response to luminal contents to regulate gut physiology, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, among other possible functions. Increasing evidence shows that mammalian taste receptors and taste signaling molecules are expressed in enteroendocrine cells in the gut. Invertebrate models such as Drosophila can p...

  6. Engineering CAR-T Cells: Design Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shivani; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being empirically designed based on a simple understanding of TCR signaling, T cells engineered with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have been remarkably successful in treating patients with advanced refractory B cell malignancies. However, many challenges remain in improving the safety and efficacy of this therapy and extending it toward the treatment of epithelial cancers. Other aspects TCR signaling beyond those directly provided by CD3ζ and CD28 phosphorylation strongly influence a T cell’s ability to differentiate and acquire full effector functions. Here, we discuss how the principles of TCR recognition, including spatial constraints, Kon/Koff rates, and synapse formation, along with in-depth analysis of CAR signaling might be applied to develop safer and more effective synthetic tumor targeting receptors. PMID:26169254

  7. Human respiratory epithelial cells from nasal turbinate expressed stem cell genes even after serial passaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszymah, B H I; Izham, B A Azrul; Heikal, M Y Mohd; Khor, S F; Fauzi, M B; Aminuddin, B S

    2011-12-01

    Current development in the field of tissue engineering led to the idea of repairing and regenerating the respiratory airway through in vitro reconstruction using autologous respiratory epithelial (RE). To ensure the capability of proliferation, the stem cell property of RE cells from the nasal turbinate should be evaluated. Respiratory epithelial cells from six human nasal turbinates were harvested and cultured in vitro. The gene expression of FZD-9 and BST-1 were expressed in passage 2 (P2) and passage 4 (P4). The levels of expression were not significant between both passages. The RE cells exhibit the stem cell properties, which remains even after serial passaging.

  8. Design of cell phone for seniors

    OpenAIRE

    Čapák, Přemysl

    2012-01-01

    Předmětem této bakalářská práce je návrh mobilního telefonu pro seniory. Jejím cílem je analýza problému po stránce vývojové, technické a designové. Především se pak zabývá vlastním návrhem od variantních řešení po finální projekt. The subject of the bachelor's thesis is design of a cell phone for elderly people. It is based on historical and technical analysis and analysis of form. The work is aimed at the development of the design from variant proposals to the final project. D...

  9. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasko John EJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS, we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7 and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10 cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments.

  10. High epitope expression levels increase competition between T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almut Scherer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Both theoretical predictions and experimental findings suggest that T cell populations can compete with each other. There is some debate on whether T cells compete for aspecific stimuli, such as access to the surface on antigen-presenting cells (APCs or for specific stimuli, such as their cognate epitope ligand. We have developed an individual-based computer simulation model to study T cell competition. Our model shows that the expression level of foreign epitopes per APC determines whether T cell competition is mainly for specific or aspecific stimuli. Under low epitope expression, competition is mainly for the specific epitope stimuli, and, hence, different epitope-specific T cell populations coexist readily. However, if epitope expression levels are high, aspecific competition becomes more important. Such between-specificity competition can lead to competitive exclusion between different epitope-specific T cell populations. Our model allows us to delineate the circumstances that facilitate coexistence of T cells of different epitope specificity. Understanding mechanisms of T cell coexistence has important practical implications for immune therapies that require a broad immune response.

  11. Changes of TIZ expression in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Yu Zheng; Hong-Yu Zheng; Yun-Tao Zhou; En-Ling Liu; Jie Li; Yan-Mei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the change ofTIZ expression in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.Methods:HO8910 cells were transinfected with siRNA to inhibit the expression ofTIZ. pcDNA3.1-TIZ vectors were combined to increase theTIZ expression level.The cell viability, colony forming efficiency and cycle distribution ofHO8910,HO8910/NC,HO8910/pcDNA3.1-NC,HO8910/TIZ-573 andHO8910/pcDNA3.1-TIZ were compared, and the invasion rate, migration rate and adhesion rate between5 groups of cells were compared.Results:Compared with those ofHO8910,HO8910/NC andHO8910/pcDNA3.1-NC, the cell viability, colony forming efficiency and cell cycle distribution ofHO8910/TIZ-573 were increased, while the indexes ofHO8910/pcDNA3.1-NC were decreased with statistical significant difference(P0.05). Conclusions:The expression ofTIZ can inhibit the proliferation of epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

  12. Sorting live stem cells based on Sox2 mRNA expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans M Larsson

    Full Text Available While cell sorting usually relies on cell-surface protein markers, molecular beacons (MBs offer the potential to sort cells based on the presence of any expressed mRNA and in principle could be extremely useful to sort rare cell populations from primary isolates. We show here how stem cells can be purified from mixed cell populations by sorting based on MBs. Specifically, we designed molecular beacons targeting Sox2, a well-known stem cell marker for murine embryonic (mES and neural stem cells (NSC. One of our designed molecular beacons displayed an increase in fluorescence compared to a nonspecific molecular beacon both in vitro and in vivo when tested in mES and NSCs. We sorted Sox2-MB(+SSEA1(+ cells from a mixed population of 4-day retinoic acid-treated mES cells and effectively isolated live undifferentiated stem cells. Additionally, Sox2-MB(+ cells isolated from primary mouse brains were sorted and generated neurospheres with higher efficiency than Sox2-MB(- cells. These results demonstrate the utility of MBs for stem cell sorting in an mRNA-specific manner.

  13. Cardiomyocyte expression and cell-specific processing of procholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens P.; Johnsen, Anders H.; Kistorp, Caroline;

    2015-01-01

    Heart muscle cells produce peptide hormones such as natriuretic peptides. Developing hearts also express the gene for the classic intestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) in amounts similar to those in the intestine and brain. However, cardiac expression of peptides other than natriuretic peptides...... has only been suggested using transcriptional measures or methods, with the post-translational phase of gene expression unaddressed. In this study, we examined the cardiac expression of the CCK gene in adult mammals and its expression at the protein level. Using quantitative PCR, a library of sequence......-specific pro-CCK assays, peptide purification, and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that the mammalian heart expresses pro-CCK in amounts comparable to natriuretic prohormones and processes it to a unique, triple-sulfated, and N-terminally truncated product distinct from intestinal and cerebral CCK peptides...

  14. Hypergravity signal transduction and gene expression in cultured mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumei, Y.; Whitson, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted during space flight and with clinostats and centrifuges, suggesting that gravity effects the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian cells in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which mammalian cells respond to changes in gravitational stress. This paper summarizes studies designed to clarify the effects of hypergravity on the cultured human HeLa cells and to investigate the mechanism of hypergravity signal transduction in these cells.

  15. Melatonin modulates aromatase activity and expression in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-García, Virginia; González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Alonso-González, Carolina; Cos, Samuel

    2013-05-01

    Melatonin is known to suppress the development of endocrine-responsive breast cancers by interacting with the estrogen signaling pathways. Paracrine interactions between malignant epithelial cells and proximal stromal cells are responsible for local estrogen biosynthesis. In human breast cancer cells and peritumoral adipose tissue, melatonin downregulates aromatase, which transforms androgens into estrogens. The presence of aromatase on endothelial cells indicates that endothelial cells may contribute to tumor growth by producing estrogens. Since human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) express both aromatase and melatonin receptors, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of melatonin to regulate the activity and expression of aromatase on endothelial cells, thus, modulating local estrogen biosynthesis. In the present study, we demonstrated that melatonin inhibits the growth of HUVECs and reduces the local biosynthesis of estrogens through the downregulation of aromatase. These results are supported by three lines of evidence. Firstly, 1 mM of melatonin counteracted the testosterone-induced cell proliferation of HUVECs, which is dependent on the local biosynthesis of estrogens from testosterone by the aromatase activity of the cells. Secondly, we found that 1 mM of melatonin reduced the aromatase activity of HUVECs. Finally, by real‑time RT-PCR, we demonstrated that melatonin significantly downregulated the expression of aromatase as well as its endothelial-specific aromatase promoter region I.7. We conclude that melatonin inhibits aromatase activity and expression in HUVECs by regulating gene expression of specific aromatase promoter regions, thereby reducing the local production of estrogens. PMID:23450505

  16. Selective silencing of gene target expression by siRNA expression plasmids in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; De-la-O-Gómez, Faustino; Deas, Jessica; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria; Fierros-Zárate, Geny Del Socorro; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; Burguete-García, Ana; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Rodríguez-Dorantes, Mauricio; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference is a natural mechanism to silence post-transcriptional gene expression in eukaryotic cells in which microRNAs act to cleave or halt the translation of target mRNAs at specific target sequences. Mature microRNAs, 19-25 nucleotides in length, mediate their effect at the mRNA level by inhibiting translation, or inducing cleavage of the mRNA target. This process is directed by the degree of complementary nucleotides between the microRNAs and the target mRNA; perfect complementary base pairing induces cleavage of mRNA, whereas several mismatches lead to translational arrest. Biological effects of microRNAs can be manipulated through the use of small interference RNAs (siRNAs) generated by chemical synthesis, or by cloning in molecular vectors. The cloning of a DNA insert in a molecular vector that will be transcribed into the corresponding siRNAs is an approach that has been developed using siRNA expression plasmids. These vectors contain DNA inserts designed with software to generate highly efficient siRNAs which will assemble into RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC), and silence the target mRNA. In addition, the DNA inserts may be contained in cloning cassettes, and introduced in other molecular vectors. In this chapter we describe an attractive technology platform to silence cellular gene expression using specific siRNA expression plasmids, and evaluate its biological effect on target gene expression in human cervical cancer cells. PMID:25348304

  17. Computational design of a Zn2+ receptor that controls bacterial gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, M. A.; Looger, L. L.; Hellinga, H. W.

    2003-09-01

    The control of cellular physiology and gene expression in response to extracellular signals is a basic property of living systems. We have constructed a synthetic bacterial signal transduction pathway in which gene expression is controlled by extracellular Zn2+. In this system a computationally designed Zn2+-binding periplasmic receptor senses the extracellular solute and triggers a two-component signal transduction pathway via a chimeric transmembrane protein, resulting in transcriptional up-regulation of a -galactosidase reporter gene. The Zn2+-binding site in the designed receptor is based on a four-coordinate, tetrahedral primary coordination sphere consisting of histidines and glutamates. In addition, mutations were introduced in a secondary coordination sphere to satisfy the residual hydrogen-bonding potential of the histidines coordinated to the metal. The importance of the secondary shell interactions is demonstrated by their effect on metal affinity and selectivity, as well as protein stability. Three designed protein sequences, comprising two distinct metal-binding positions, were all shown to bind Zn2+ and to function in the cell-based assay, indicating the generality of the design methodology. These experiments demonstrate that biological systems can be manipulated with computationally designed proteins that have drastically altered ligand-binding specificities, thereby extending the repertoire of genetic control by extracellular signals.

  18. Fractalkine expression induces endothelial progenitor cell lysis by natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilyana Todorova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circulating CD34(+ cells, a population that includes endothelial progenitors, participate in the maintenance of endothelial integrity. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate their survival is crucial to improve their regenerative activity in cardiovascular and renal diseases. Chemokine-receptor cross talk is critical in regulating cell homeostasis. We hypothesized that cell surface expression of the chemokine fractalkine (FKN could target progenitor cell injury by Natural Killer (NK cells, thereby limiting their availability for vascular repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that CD34(+-derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFC can express FKN in response to TNF-α and IFN-γ inflammatory cytokines and that FKN expression by ECFC stimulates NK cell adhesion, NK cell-mediated ECFC lysis and microparticles release in vitro. The specific involvement of membrane FKN in these processes was demonstrated using FKN-transfected ECFC and anti-FKN blocking antibody. FKN expression was also evidenced on circulating CD34(+ progenitor cells and was detected at higher frequency in kidney transplant recipients, when compared to healthy controls. The proportion of CD34(+ cells expressing FKN was identified as an independent variable inversely correlated to CD34(+ progenitor cell count. We further showed that treatment of CD34(+ circulating cells isolated from adult blood donors with transplant serum or TNF-α/IFN-γ can induce FKN expression. CONCLUSIONS: Our data highlights a novel mechanism by which FKN expression on CD34(+ progenitor cells may target their NK cell mediated killing and participate to their immune depletion in transplant recipients. Considering the numerous diseased contexts shown to promote FKN expression, our data identify FKN as a hallmark of altered progenitor cell homeostasis with potential implications in better evaluation of vascular repair in patients.

  19. Pax4 Expression does not Transduce Pancreatic Alpha Cells to Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The lack of available beta cells greatly limits the use of beta cell transplantation as a therapy for diabetes. Thus, generation of beta cells from other sources is substantially required. Pax4 has been shown to induce reprograming of alpha cells into beta cells during embryogenesis. Nevertheless, whether expression of Pax4 in adult alpha cells could trigger this alpha-to-beta cell reprogramming is unknown. Methods: Here we generated an adeno-associated virus carrying Pax4 and GFP under a CMV promoter (AAV-Pax4. We used AAV-Pax4 to transduce a mouse alpha cell line in vitro, and to transduce primary alpha cells in diabetic mice. Reprogramming was examined by double immunostaining and by changes in beta cell number. The effects on blood glucose were evaluated by fasting blood glucose and glucose response. Results: In vitro, Pax4 overexpression neither induced insulin expression, nor suppressed glucagon expression in alpha cells. In vivo, Pax4 overexpression failed to increase beta cell number, and did not alter hyperglycemia and glucose response in diabetic mice. Conclusion: Pax4 expression is not sufficient to transduce pancreatic alpha cells into beta cells. Overexpression of Pax4 in alpha cells may not increase functional beta cell number in diabetic patients.

  20. Expression and Fuactional Role of HERG1, K+ Channels in Leukemic Cells and Leukemic Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Huiyu; LIU Liqiong; GUO Tiannan; ZHANG Jiahua; LI Xiaoqing; DU Wen; LIU Wei; CHEN Xiangjun; HUANG Shi'ang

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the expression and functional role of HERG1 K+ channels in leukemic cells and leukemic stem cells (LSCs), RT-PCR was used to detect the HERG1 K+ channels expression in leukemic cells and LSCs. The functional role of HERG1 K+ channels in leukemic cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. The results showed that herg mRNA was expressed in CD34+/CD38-, CD123+ LSCs but not in circulating CD34+ cells. Herg mRNA was also up-regulated in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60 as well as almost all the primary leukemic cells while not in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) and the expression of herg mRNA was not associated with the clinical and cytogenetic features of leukemia. In addition, leukemic cell proliferation was dramatically inhibited by HERG K+ channel special inhibitor E-4031. Moreover, E-4031 suppressed the cell growth by inducing a specific block at the G1/S transition phase of the cell cycle but had no effect on apoptosis in leukemic cells. The results suggested that HERG1 K+ channels could regulate leukemic cells proliferation and were necessary for leukemic cells to proceed with the cell cycle. HERG1 K+ channels may also have oncogenic potential and may be a biomarker for diagnosis of leukemia and a novel potential pharmacological target for leukemia therapy.

  1. Human Melanoma Cells Do Not Express Fas (Apo-1/CD95) Ligand

    OpenAIRE

    Chappell, Dale B.; Zaks, Tal Z.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P

    1999-01-01

    A recent report described the expression of Fas ligand (FasL) by melanoma cells as an important mechanism involved in the immune evasion by tumors [M. Hahne et al., Science (Washington DC), 274: 1363–1366, 1996]. To investigate the expression of FasL by melanomas, we screened a panel of early-passage cell lines by functional assay and reverse transcriptase-PCR. Using conditions designed to replicate those in the original report, we did not find functional FasL on any of the 19 human melanoma ...

  2. Nanostructured Semiconductor Device Design in Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hongmei

    We demonstrate the use of embedded CdS nanowires in improving spectral transmission loss and the low mechanical and electrical robustness of planar CdS window layer and thus enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability of the CdS-CdTe solar cells. CdS nanowire window layer enables light transmission gain at 300nm-550nm. A nearly ideal spectral response of quantum efficiency at a wide spectrum range provides an evidence for improving light transmission in the window layer and enhancing absorption and carrier generation in absorber. Nanowire CdS/CdTe solar cells with Cu/graphite/silver paste as back contacts, on SnO2/ITO-soda lime glass substrates, yield the highest efficiency of 12% in nanostructured CdS-CdTe solar cells. Reliability is improved by approximately 3 times over the cells with the traditional planar CdS counterpart. Junction transport mechanisms are delineated for advancing the basic understanding of device physics at the interface. Our results prove the efficacy of this nanowire approach for enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability in windowabsorber type solar cells (CdS-CdTe, CdS-CIGS and CdS-CZTSSe etc) and other optoelectronic devices. We further introduce MoO3-x as a transparent, low barrier back contact. We design nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cells on flexible foils of metals in a superstrate device structure, which makes low-cost roll-to-roll manufacturing process feasible and greatly reduces the complexity of fabrication. The MoO3 layer reduces the valence band offset relative to the CdTe, and creates improved cell performance. Annealing as-deposited MoO3 in N 2 reduces series resistance from 9.98 O/cm2 to 7.72 O/cm2, and hence efficiency of the nanowire solar cell is improved from 9.9% to 11%, which efficiency comparable to efficiency of planar counterparts. When the nanowire solar cell is illuminated from MoO 3-x /Au side, it yields an efficiency of 8.7%. This reduction in efficiency is attributed to decrease in Jsc from 25.5m

  3. Dynamic distribution and stem cell characteristics of Sox1-expressing cells in the cerebellar cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joelle Alcock; Virginie Sottile

    2009-01-01

    Bergmann glia cells are a discrete radial glia population surrounding Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex. Al-though Bergmann glia are essential for the development and correct arborization of Purkinje cells, little is known about the regulation of this cell population after the developmental phase. In an effort to characterize this population at the molecular level, we have analyzed marker expression and established that adult Bergmann glia express Soxl, Sox2 and Sox9, a feature otherwise associated with neural stem cells (NSCs). In the present study, we have further analyzed the developmental pattern of Soxl-expressing cells in the developing cerebellum. We report that before be-coming restricted to the Purkinje cell layer, Soxl-positive cells are present throughout the immature tissue, and that these cells show characteristics of Bergmann glia progenitors. Our study shows that these progenitors express Soxl, Sox2 and Sox9, a signature maintained throughout cerebellar maturation into adulthood. When isolated in culture, the Soxl-expressing cerebellar population exhibited neurosphere-forming ability, NSC-marker characteristics, and demonstrated multipotency at the clonal level. Our results show that the Bergmann glia population expresses Soxl during cerebellar development, and that these cells can be isolated and show stem cell characteristics in vitro, sug-gesting that they could hold a broader potential than previously thought.

  4. Connexin expression and gap-junctional intercellular communication in ES cells and iPS cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito eOyamada

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells, i.e., embryonic stem (ES and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells, can indefinitely proliferate without commitment and differentiate into all cell lineages. ES cells are derived from the inner cell mass of the preimplantation blastocyst, whereas iPS cells are generated from somatic cells by overexpression of a few transcription factors. Many studies have demonstrated that mouse and human iPS cells are highly similar but not identical to their respective ES cell counterparts. The potential to generate basically any differentiated cell types from these cells offers the possibility to establish new models of mammalian development and to create new sources of cells for regenerative medicine. ES cells and iPS cells also provide useful models to study connexin expression and gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC during cell differentiation and reprogramming. In 1996, we reported connexin expression and GJIC in mouse ES cells. Because a substantial number of papers on these subjects have been published since our report, this Mini Review summarizes currently available data on connexin expression and GJIC in ES cells and iPS cells during undifferentiated state, differentiation, and reprogramming.

  5. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-03-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically `leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs.

  6. Patterns of expression of cell wall related genes in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima D.U.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Our search for genes related to cell wall metabolism in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database (http://sucest.lbi.dcc.unicamp.br resulted in 3,283 reads (1% of the total reads which were grouped into 459 clusters (potential genes with an average of 7.1 reads per cluster. To more clearly display our correlation coefficients, we constructed surface maps which we used to investigate the relationship between cell wall genes and the sugarcane tissues libraries from which they came. The only significant correlations that we found between cell wall genes and/or their expression within particular libraries were neutral or synergetic. Genes related to cellulose biosynthesis were from the CesA family, and were found to be the most abundant cell wall related genes in the SUCEST database. We found that the highest number of CesA reads came from the root and stem libraries. The genes with the greatest number of reads were those involved in cell wall hydrolases (e.g. beta-1,3-glucanases, xyloglucan endo-beta-transglycosylase, beta-glucosidase and endo-beta-mannanase. Correlation analyses by surface mapping revealed that the expression of genes related to biosynthesis seems to be associated with the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses, pectin hydrolases being mainly associated with xyloglucan hydrolases. The patterns of cell wall related gene expression in sugarcane based on the number of reads per cluster reflected quite well the expected physiological characteristics of the tissues. This is the first work to provide a general view on plant cell wall metabolism through the expression of related genes in almost all the tissues of a plant at the same time. For example, developing flowers behaved similarly to both meristematic tissues and leaf-root transition zone tissues. Besides providing a basis for future research on the mechanisms of plant development which involve the cell wall, our findings will provide valuable tools for plant engineering in the

  7. Clinicopathological Significance of E-cadherin and PCNA Expression in Hunman Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianwei Ma; Kai Fan; Yanli Zhang; Dawei Song; Jianmei Ma

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study was designed to assess E-cadherin(E-cad) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression as well as their clinicopathological significance in hunman non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). Possible molecular mechanisms of differentiation and metastasis of NSCLCs are discussed.METHODS Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence double staining were performed to examine the expression of E-cad and PCNA in 68 primary NSCLCs cases.RESULTS The E-cad expression in squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas showed no significant difference. E-cad expression had a positive correlation with the histological-differentiated grade. A significant difference of Ecad expression was found between metastatic and non-metastatic groups. PCNA expression in squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas showed no significant difference. The PCNA expression had a reverse correlation with the histological-differentiated grade. A significant difference of PCNA expression was found between metastatic and non- metastatic groups. The E-cad and PCNA expression presented a reverse correlation.CONCLUSION E-cad expression is not associated with the histological type of NSCLC, but is associated with differentiation and metastasis of the cancer. Down-regulation of E-cad expression affects the proliferation of cancer cells. Conjoint analysis of E-cad and PCNA expression is a good way to evaluate tumor biological behavior.

  8. Human retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibit proliferation and IL2R expression of activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Jørgensen, Annette; Nielsen, Mette;

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on activated T cells. Activated T cells were cocultured with adult and foetal human RPE cells whereafter apoptosis and proliferation were determined by flow cytometry and (3)H......-Thymidine incorporation assay, respectively. T cells and RPE cells were cultured directly together or in a transwell system for determination of the effect of cell contact. The importance of cell surface molecules was examined by application of a panel of blocking antibodies (CD2, CD18, CD40, CD40L, CD54, CD58......) in addition to use of TCR negative T cell lines. The expression of IL2R-alpha -beta and -gamma chains of activated T cells was analysed by flow cytometry after incubation of T cells alone or with RPE cells. Human RPE cells were found to inhibit the proliferation of activated T cells by a cell contact...

  9. Designer cell signal processing circuits for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Robert W; Wang, Baojun

    2015-12-25

    Microorganisms are able to respond effectively to diverse signals from their environment and internal metabolism owing to their inherent sophisticated information processing capacity. A central aim of synthetic biology is to control and reprogramme the signal processing pathways within living cells so as to realise repurposed, beneficial applications ranging from disease diagnosis and environmental sensing to chemical bioproduction. To date most examples of synthetic biological signal processing have been built based on digital information flow, though analogue computing is being developed to cope with more complex operations and larger sets of variables. Great progress has been made in expanding the categories of characterised biological components that can be used for cellular signal manipulation, thereby allowing synthetic biologists to more rationally programme increasingly complex behaviours into living cells. Here we present a current overview of the components and strategies that exist for designer cell signal processing and decision making, discuss how these have been implemented in prototype systems for therapeutic, environmental, and industrial biotechnological applications, and examine emerging challenges in this promising field.

  10. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Expression in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amrita DOSANJH

    2006-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a cysteine-rich protein that promotes extracellular matrix deposition. CTGF is selectively induced by transforming growth factor β and des-Arg kallidin in lung fibroblasts and increases steady-state mRNA levels of α type I collagen, 5α-integrin and fibronectin in fibroblasts. Bronchial epithelial cells have been proposed to functionally interact with lung fibroblasts. We therefore investigated if bronchial epithelial cells are able to synthesize CTGF. Human bronchial epithelial cells were grown to subconfluence in standard growth media. Proliferating cells grown in small airway growth media were harvested following starvation for up to 24 h. Expression of CTGF transcripts was measured by PCR. Immunocytochemistry was also completed using a commercially available antibody.The cells expressed readily detectable CTGF transcripts. Starvation of these cells resulted in a quantitative decline of CTGF transcripts. Direct sequencing of the PCR product identified human CTGF. Immunocytochemistry confirmed intracellular CTGF in the cells and none in negative control cells. We conclude that bronchial epithelial cells could be a novel source of CTGF. Bronchial epithelial cell-derived CTGF could thus directly influence the deposition of collagen in certain fibrotic lung diseases.

  11. Cell-specific information processing in segregating populations of Eph receptor ephrin-expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Sherman, Andrew; Chen, Ginny I;

    2009-01-01

    information is processed in two interacting cell types remains a challenge. We implemented a proteomic strategy to systematically determine cell-specific signaling networks underlying EphB2- and ephrin-B1-controlled cell sorting. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of mixed populations of EphB2...... revealed that signaling between mixed EphB2- and ephrin-B1-expressing cells is asymmetric and that the distinct cell types use different tyrosine kinases and targets to process signals induced by cell-cell contact. We provide systems- and cell-specific network models of contact-initiated signaling between......- and ephrin-B1-expressing cells that were labeled with different isotopes revealed cell-specific tyrosine phosphorylation events. Functional associations between these phosphotyrosine signaling networks and cell sorting were established with small interfering RNA screening. Data-driven network modeling...

  12. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Gang Jiang; Dao-Wen Wang; Jiang-Bo Tang; Chun-Lian Chen; Bao-Xing Liu; Xiang-Ning Fu; Zhi-Hui Zhu; Wei Qu; Katherine Cianflone; Michael P. Waalkes

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was expressed in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.METHODS: Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blotting, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were used to assess the expression level of COX-2 in esophageal tissue.RESULTS: COX-2 mRNA levels were increased by >80-fold in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma when compared to adjacent noncancerous tissue. COX-2 protein was present in 21 of 30 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma tissues, but was undetectable in noncancerous tissue. Immunohistochemistry was performed to directly show expression of COX-2 in tumor tissue.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that COX-2 may be an important factor for esophageal cancer and inhibition of COX-2 may be helpful for prevention and possibly treatment of this cancer.

  13. Human Neural Cells Transiently Express Reelin during Olfactory Placode Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, M. Cristina; Samama, Brigitte; Ghandour, M. Said; Boehm, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    Reelin, an extracellular glycoprotein is essential for migration and correct positioning of neurons during development. Since the olfactory system is known as a source of various migrating neuronal cells, we studied Reelin expression in the two chemosensory olfactory systems, main and accessory, during early developmental stages of human foetuses/embryos from Carnegie Stage (CS) 15 to gestational week (GW) 14. From CS 15 to CS 18, but not at later stages, a transient expression of Reelin was detected first in the presumptive olfactory and then in the presumptive vomeronasal epithelium. During the same period, Reelin-positive cells detach from the olfactory/vomeronasal epithelium and migrate through the mesenchyme beneath the telencephalon. Dab 1, an adaptor protein of the Reelin pathway, was simultaneously expressed in the migratory mass from CS16 to CS17 and, at later stages, in the presumptive olfactory ensheathing cells. Possible involvements of Reelin and Dab 1 in the peripheral migrating stream are discussed. PMID:26270645

  14. Expression of ICAM-1 in colon epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vainer, Ben; Sørensen, Susanne; Seidelin, Jakob;

    2003-01-01

    Studies have suggested that in ulcerative colitis (UC), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is involved in migration of leukocytes toward the colonic epithelium. A suitable in vitro model of chronic colonic inflammation does not exist, and the role of the epithelium is based on monolayers...... of cancer cells. Conflicting results exist on epithelial ICAM-1 expression, and the aim of this study was to compare the expression in various models of colonic epithelium....

  15. Regulation of tyrosinase expression and activity in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abul-Hassan, K; Walmsley, R; Tombran-Tink, J; Boulton, M

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regulation of tyrosinase gene expression and activity in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The tyrosinase promoter (Ty.prom) region (400 bp) was PCR amplified and cloned into a modified mammalian expression vector (pcDNA3.1) upstream of a firefly luciferase (Luc) cDNA and was designated 'pcDNA3.1-Ty.prom.Luc'. The plasmid was co-transfected into RPE cells with a second mammalian expression plasmid (pRL-TK) containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter region upstream of Renilla Luc in a protocol designated the 'dual luciferase assay' (DLA). After co-transfection, cells were treated with a range of potential melanogenic agents; basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), methyl methane sulphonate, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, verapamil, phorbol myristate acetate, cholera toxin (CT), pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF), and L-tyrosine. The expression of tyrosinase promoter and enzymatic activities were determined 48 hr post-transfection using the DLA and DOPA oxidase assays, respectively. Tyrosinase activity could not be detected in RPE cells with any of the treatments. Tyrosinase promoter activity was significantly up-regulated in RPE cells treated with bFGF, PEDF, verapamil, CT and tyrosine compared with control cells. In conclusion, the tyrosinase gene is not only expressed but can be regulated in response to different chemicals in cultured human RPE cells. However, it appears that RPE cells in culture lack a post-transcriptional and/or translational modification point(s), which are necessary for tyrosinase enzymic activity. PMID:11153695

  16. Cloning and expression of human colon mast cell carboxypeptidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang-Quan Chen; Shao-Heng He

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone and express the human colon mast cell METHODS: Total RNA was extracted from colon tissue, and the cDNA encoding human colon mast cell carboxypeptidase was amplified by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The product cDNA was subcloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pMAL-c2x and eukaryotic expression vector pPIC9K to conrtruct prokaryotic expression vector pMAL/human MC-CP (hMC-CP) and eukaryotic pPIC9K/hMC-CP. The recombinant fusion protein expressed in E.coli was induced with IPTG and purified by amylose affinity chromatography. After digestion with factor Xa, recombinant hMC-CP was purified by heparin agarose chromatography. The recombinant hMC-CP expressed in Pichia pastoris (P.pastoris) was induced with methanol and analyzed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot, N-terminal amino acid RESULTS: The cDNA encoding the human colon mast cell carboxypeptidase was cloned, which had five nucleotide variations compared with skin MC-CP cDNA. The recombinant hMC-CP protein expressed in E.coli was purified with amylose affinity chromatography and heparin agarose chromatogphy.SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant protein expressed by E. coli had a molecular weight of 36 kDa and reacted to the anti-native hMC-CP monoclonal antibody (CA5). The N-terminal amino acid sequence confirmed further the product was hMC-CP. E. coli generated hMC-CP showed a very low level of enzymatic activity, but P. pastoris produced hMC-CP had a relatively high enzymatic activity towards a synthetic substrate hippuryl-L-phenylalanine.carboxypeptidase can be successfully cloned and expressed in E.coli and P. pastoris, which will contribute greatly to the fonctional study on hMC-CP.

  17. Immunglobulin Expression and Its Biological Significance in Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duosha Hu; Hui Zheng; Haidan Liu; Ming Li; Wei Ren; Wei Liao; Zhi Duan; Lili Li; Ya Cao

    2008-01-01

    It is generally believed that the expression of a gene iS restricted "within the right place and at the right time".This principle has long been considered applicable as well to the expression of immunoglobulin(Ig)lymphocytes of B cell lineage.However,increasing evidence has shown Ig "paradoxically" expressed in malignant tumors of epitheliaI origin.We reviewed the recent progress in the study of cancer-derived Ig,and also discussed its mechanisms and possible functions,trying to arouse interest and attention to those working in the field of immunology and oncology.

  18. Analysis of expression profiles of MAGE-A antigens in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reichert Torsten E

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immunological response to solid tumours is insufficient. Therefore, tumour specific antigens have been explored to facilitate the activation of the immune system. The cancer/testis antigen class of MAGE-A antigens is a possible target for vaccination. Their differential expression profiles also modulate the course of the cancer disease and its response to antineoplastic drugs. Methods The expression profiles of MAGE-A2, -A3, -A4, -A6 and -A10 in five own oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were characterised by rt-PCR, qrt-PCR and immunocytochemistry with a global MAGE-A antibody (57B and compared with those of an adult keratinocyte cell line (NHEK. Results All tumour cell lines expressed MAGE-A antigens. The antigens were expressed in groups with different preferences. The predominant antigens expressed were MAGE-A2, -A3 and -A6. MAGE-A10 was not expressed in the cell lines tested. The MAGE-A gene products detected in the adult keratinocyte cell line NHEK were used as a reference. Conclusion MAGE-A antigens are expressed in oral squamous cell carcinomas. The expression profiles measured facilitate distinct examinations in forthcoming studies on responses to antineoplastic drugs or radiation therapy. MAGE-A antigens are still an interesting aim for immunotherapy.

  19. Polyclonal T-Cells Express CD1a in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jennifer A.; Olsen, Sharon L.; Mitchell, Jenée M.; Priddle, Ross E.; Luke, Jennifer M.; Åkefeldt, Selma Olsson; Henter, Jan-Inge; Turville, Christopher; Kannourakis, George

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a complex and poorly understood disorder that has characteristics of both inflammatory and neoplastic disease. By using eight-colour flow cytometry, we have identified a previously unreported population of CD1a+/CD3+ T-cells in LCH lesions. The expression of CD1a is regarded as a hallmark of this disease; however, it has always been presumed that it was only expressed by pathogenic Langerhans cells (LCs). We have now detected CD1a expression by a range of T-cell subsets within all of the LCH lesions that were examined, establishing that CD1a expression in these lesions is no longer restricted to pathogenic LCs. The presence of CD1a+ T-cells in all of the LCH lesions that we have studied to date warrants further investigation into their biological function to determine whether these cells are important in the pathogenesis of LCH. PMID:25343480

  20. Polyclonal T-cells express CD1a in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A West

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a complex and poorly understood disorder that has characteristics of both inflammatory and neoplastic disease. By using eight-colour flow cytometry, we have identified a previously unreported population of CD1a(+/CD3(+ T-cells in LCH lesions. The expression of CD1a is regarded as a hallmark of this disease; however, it has always been presumed that it was only expressed by pathogenic Langerhans cells (LCs. We have now detected CD1a expression by a range of T-cell subsets within all of the LCH lesions that were examined, establishing that CD1a expression in these lesions is no longer restricted to pathogenic LCs. The presence of CD1a(+ T-cells in all of the LCH lesions that we have studied to date warrants further investigation into their biological function to determine whether these cells are important in the pathogenesis of LCH.

  1. Cloning and prokaryotic expression of rhTPO in prokaryotic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: Thrombopoietin (TPO) is a normal physiological hematopoietic factor which is able to stimulate the hematopoietic progenitor cells to proliferate and differentiate into megakaryocytes and to induce the production and release of platelets. In this study rhTPO was cloned to be potentially used for treatment of radiation-induced thrombocytopenia, the authors studied the prokaryotic expression of rhTPO. Methods: According to the cDNA sequence encoding hTPO published elsewhere, the authors designed two sets of PCR primers at first, and cloned hTPO gene from fetal liver mRNA by means of RT-PCR, then subcloned it into prokaryotic expression vector pBV220 to form recombinant expression plasmids pBV220/TPO, and to transfer it into prokaryotic cells escherichia coli, DH5α. Expression was induced by heat of 42 degree C. Results: The authors obtained the aimed prokaryotic expression of recombinant (r) hTPO by assessment of SDS-Page. Conclusion: hTPO can be expressed completely in prokaryotic cells. The prokaryotic expression of rhTPO might be a basis for the bio-treatment of radiation induced thrombocytopenia

  2. Expression of Neural Markers by Undifferentiated Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Foudah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous expression of neural markers by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been considered to be a demonstration of MSCs’ predisposition to differentiate towards neural lineages. In view of their application in cell therapy for neurodegenerative diseases, it is very important to deepen the knowledge about this distinctive biological property of MSCs. In this study, we evaluated the expression of neuronal and glial markers in undifferentiated rat MSCs (rMSCs at different culture passages (from early to late. rMSCs spontaneously expressed neural markers depending on culture passage, and they were coexpressed or not with the neural progenitor marker nestin. In contrast, the number of rMSCs expressing mesengenic differentiation markers was very low or even completely absent. Moreover, rMSCs at late culture passages were not senescent cells and maintained the MSC immunophenotype. However, their differentiation capabilities were altered. In conclusion, our results support the concept of MSCs as multidifferentiated cells and suggest the existence of immature and mature neurally fated rMSC subpopulations. A possible correlation between specific MSC subpopulations and specific neural lineages could optimize the use of MSCs in cell transplantation therapy for the treatment of neurological diseases.

  3. Gene expression profiling of chicken primordial germ cell ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Dajeong

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germ cells are the only cell type that can penetrate from one generation to next generation. At the early embryonic developmental stages, germ cells originally stem from primordial germ cells, and finally differentiate into functional gametes, sperm in male or oocyte in female, after sexual maturity. This study was conducted to investigate a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST analysis in chicken PGCs and compare the expression of the PGC ESTs with that of embryonic gonad. Results We constructed 10,851 ESTs from a chicken cDNA library of a collection of highly separated embryonic PGCs. After chimeric and problematic sequences were filtered out using the chicken genomic sequences, there were 5,093 resulting unique sequences consisting of 156 contigs and 4,937 singlets. Pearson chi-square tests of gene ontology terms in the 2nd level between PGC and embryonic gonad set showed no significance. However, digital gene expression profiling using the Audic's test showed that there were 2 genes expressed significantly with higher number of transcripts in PGCs compared with the embryonic gonads set. On the other hand, 17 genes in embryonic gonads were up-regulated higher than those in the PGC set. Conclusion Our results in this study contribute to knowledge of mining novel transcripts and genes involved in germline cell proliferation and differentiation at the early embryonic stages.

  4. Progesterone Upregulates Gene Expression in Normal Human Thyroid Follicular Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Santin Bertoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules are more prevalent in women than men, so female sex hormones may have an etiological role in these conditions. There are no data about direct effects of progesterone on thyroid cells, so the aim of the present study was to evaluate progesterone effects in the sodium-iodide symporter NIS, thyroglobulin TG, thyroperoxidase TPO, and KI-67 genes expression, in normal thyroid follicular cells, derived from human tissue. NIS, TG, TPO, and KI-67 mRNA expression increased significantly after TSH 20 μUI/mL, respectively: 2.08 times, P<0.0001; 2.39 times, P=0.01; 1.58 times, P=0.0003; and 1.87 times, P<0.0001. In thyroid cells treated with 20 μUI/mL TSH plus 10 nM progesterone, RNA expression of NIS, TG, and KI-67 genes increased, respectively: 1.78 times, P<0.0001; 1.75 times, P=0.037; and 1.95 times, P<0.0001, and TPO mRNA expression also increased, though not significantly (1.77 times, P=0.069. These effects were abolished by mifepristone, an antagonist of progesterone receptor, suggesting that genes involved in thyroid cell function and proliferation are upregulated by progesterone. This work provides evidence that progesterone has a direct effect on thyroid cells, upregulating genes involved in thyroid function and growth.

  5. Single-cell PCR profiling of gene expression in hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, José; Enver, Tariq; Pina, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis of gene expression offers the possibility of exploring cellular and molecular heterogeneity in stem and developmental cell systems, including cancer, to infer routes of cellular specification and their respective gene regulatory modules. PCR-based technologies, although limited to the analysis of a predefined set of genes, afford a cost-effective balance of throughput and biological information and have become a method of choice in stem cell laboratories. Here we describe an experimental and analytical protocol based on the Fluidigm microfluidics platform for the simultaneous expression analysis of 48 or 96 genes in multiples of 48 or 96 cells. We detail wet laboratory procedures and describe clustering, principal component analysis, correlation, and classification tools for the inference of cellular pathways and gene networks. PMID:25062620

  6. Expression changes of cell-cell adhesion-related genes in colorectal tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Bujko, Mateusz; KOBER, PAULINA; Mikula, Michal; Ligaj, Marcin; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Siedlecki, Janusz Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues achieve a highly organized structure due to cell-cell junction complexes. Carcinogenesis is accompanied by changes in cell interactions and tissue morphology, which appear in the early stages of benign tumors and progress along with invasive potential. The aim of the present study was to analyze the changes in expression levels of genes encoding intercellular junction proteins that have been previously identified to be differentially expressed in colorectal tumors compared ...

  7. IL-35 over-expression increases apoptosis sensitivity and suppresses cell growth in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jun; Zhang, Xulong; Wen, Mingjie; Kong, Qingli; Lv, Zhe; An, Yunqing; Wei, Xiao-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is a novel heterodimeric cytokine in the IL-12 family and is composed of two subunits: Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) and IL-12p35. IL-35 is expressed in T regulatory (Treg) cells and contributes to the immune suppression function of these cells. In contrast, we found that both IL-35 subunits were expressed concurrently in most human cancer cell lines compared to normal cell lines. In addition, we found that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulation led to increased IL-35 expression in human cancer cells. Furthermore, over-expression of IL-35 in human cancer cells suppressed cell growth in vitro, induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and mediated robust apoptosis induced by serum starvation, TNF-α, and IFN-γ stimulation through the up-regulation of Fas and concurrent down-regulation of cyclinD1, survivin, and Bcl-2 expression. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel functional role for IL-35 in suppressing cancer activity, inhibiting cancer cell growth, and increasing the apoptosis sensitivity of human cancer cells through the regulation of genes related to the cell cycle and apoptosis. Thus, this research provides new insights into IL-35 function and presents a possible target for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  8. Intraclonal Protein Expression Heterogeneity in Recombinant CHO Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pilbrough, Warren; Munro, Trent P.; Gray, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic glycoproteins have played a major role in the commercial success of biotechnology in the post-genomic era. But isolating recombinant mammalian cell lines for large-scale production remains costly and time-consuming, due to substantial variation and unpredictable stability of expression amongst transfected cells, requiring extensive clone screening to identify suitable high producers. Streamlining this process is of considerable interest to industry yet the underlying phenomena are...

  9. Glucocorticoids Enhance CD163 Expression in Placental Hofbauer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Zhonghua; Niven-Fairchild, Tracy; Tadesse, Serkalem; Errol R Norwitz; Buhimschi, Catalin S; Buhimschi, Irina A.; Guller, Seth

    2012-01-01

    Periplacental levels of glucocorticoid (GC) peak at parturition, and synthetic GC is administered to women at risk for preterm delivery. However, little is known concerning cell-type-specific effects of GC in placenta. Hofbauer cells (HBCs) are fetal macrophages that are located adjacent to fetal capillaries in placenta. The goal of the current study was to determine whether GC treatment altered HBC gene expression and function. Western blotting and flow cytometry revealed CD163 and folate re...

  10. Effects of Trichostatin A on HDAC8 Expression, Proliferation and Cell Cycle of Molt-4 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jing; LIU Hongli; CHEN Yan

    2006-01-01

    The effects of Trichostatin A (TSA) on histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) expression, proliferation and cell cycle arrest in T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Molt-4 cells in vitro were investigated. The effect of TSA on the growth of Molt-4 cells was studied by MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to examine the cell cycle. The expression of HDAC8 was detected by using immunocytochemistry and Western blot. The results showed that proliferation of Molt-4 cells was inhibited in TSA-treated group in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The IC50 of TSA exposures for 24 h and 36 h were 254.3236 and 199.257 μg/L respectively. The cell cycle analysis revealed that Molt-4 was mostly in G0/G1 phase, and after treatment with TSA from 50 to 400 μg/L for 24 h, the percents of G0/G1 cells were decreased and cells were arrested in G2/M phase. Treatment of TSA for 24 h could significantly inhibit the expression of HDAC8 protein in Molt-4 cells (P<0.01). It was concluded that TSA could decrease the expression of HDAC8 in Molt-4 cells, which contributed to the inhibition of proliferation and induction of cell cycle arrest in Molt-4 cells.

  11. Interleukin 21-induced granzyme B-expressing B cells infiltrate tumors and regulate T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Stefanie; Dahlke, Karen; Sontheimer, Kai; Hagn, Magdalena; Kaltenmeier, Christof; Barth, Thomas F E; Beyer, Thamara; Reister, Frank; Fabricius, Dorit; Lotfi, Ramin; Lunov, Oleg; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Simmet, Thomas; Kreienberg, Rolf; Möller, Peter; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Jahrsdörfer, Bernd

    2013-04-15

    The pathogenic impact of tumor-infiltrating B cells is unresolved at present, however, some studies suggest that they may have immune regulatory potential. Here, we report that the microenvironment of various solid tumors includes B cells that express granzyme B (GrB, GZMB), where these B cells can be found adjacent to interleukin (IL)-21-secreting regulatory T cells (Treg) that contribute to immune tolerance of tumor antigens. Because Tregs and plasmacytoid dendritic cells are known to modulate T-effector cells by a GrB-dependent mechanism, we hypothesized that a similar process may operate to modulate regulatory B cells (Breg). IL-21 induced outgrowth of B cells expressing high levels of GrB, which thereby limited T-cell proliferation by a GrB-dependent degradation of the T-cell receptor ζ-chain. Mechanistic investigations into how IL-21 induced GrB expression in B cells to confer Breg function revealed a CD19(+)CD38(+)CD1d(+)IgM(+)CD147(+) expression signature, along with expression of additional key regulatory molecules including IL-10, CD25, and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase. Notably, induction of GrB by IL-21 integrated signals mediated by surface immunoglobulin M (B-cell receptor) and Toll-like receptors, each of which were enhanced with expression of the B-cell marker CD5. Our findings show for the first time that IL-21 induces GrB(+) human Bregs. They also establish the existence of human B cells with a regulatory phenotype in solid tumor infiltrates, where they may contribute to the suppression of antitumor immune responses. Together, these findings may stimulate novel diagnostic and cell therapeutic approaches to better manage human cancer as well as autoimmune and graft-versus-host pathologies. PMID:23384943

  12. Improved expression systems for regulated expression in Salmonella infecting eukaryotic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Medina

    Full Text Available In this work we describe a series of improvements to the Salmonella-based salicylate-inducible cascade expression system comprised of a plasmid-borne expression module, where target gene expression is driven by the P(m promoter governed by the XylS2 regulator, and a genome-integrated regulatory module controlled by the nahR/P(sal system. We have constructed a set of high and low-copy number plasmids bearing modified versions of the expression module with a more versatile multiple cloning site and different combinations of the following elements: (i the nasF transcriptional attenuator, which reduces basal expression levels, (ii a strong ribosome binding site, and (iii the Type III Secretion System (TTSS signal peptide from the effector protein SspH2 to deliver proteins directly to the eukaryotic cytosol following bacterial infection of animal cells. We show that different expression module versions can be used to direct a broad range of protein production levels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficient reduction of basal expression by the nasF attenuator allows the cloning of genes encoding highly cytotoxic proteins such as colicin E3 even in the absence of its immunity protein. Additionally, we show that the Salmonella TTSS is able to translocate most of the protein produced by this regulatory cascade to the cytoplasm of infected HeLa cells. Our results indicate that these vectors represent useful tools for the regulated overproduction of heterologous proteins in bacterial culture or in animal cells, for the cloning and expression of genes encoding toxic proteins and for pathogenesis studies.

  13. Improved Expression Systems for Regulated Expression in Salmonella Infecting Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Santero, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    In this work we describe a series of improvements to the Salmonella-based salicylate-inducible cascade expression system comprised of a plasmid-borne expression module, where target gene expression is driven by the Pm promoter governed by the XylS2 regulator, and a genome-integrated regulatory module controlled by the nahR/Psal system. We have constructed a set of high and low-copy number plasmids bearing modified versions of the expression module with a more versatile multiple cloning site and different combinations of the following elements: (i) the nasF transcriptional attenuator, which reduces basal expression levels, (ii) a strong ribosome binding site, and (iii) the Type III Secretion System (TTSS) signal peptide from the effector protein SspH2 to deliver proteins directly to the eukaryotic cytosol following bacterial infection of animal cells. We show that different expression module versions can be used to direct a broad range of protein production levels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficient reduction of basal expression by the nasF attenuator allows the cloning of genes encoding highly cytotoxic proteins such as colicin E3 even in the absence of its immunity protein. Additionally, we show that the Salmonella TTSS is able to translocate most of the protein produced by this regulatory cascade to the cytoplasm of infected HeLa cells. Our results indicate that these vectors represent useful tools for the regulated overproduction of heterologous proteins in bacterial culture or in animal cells, for the cloning and expression of genes encoding toxic proteins and for pathogenesis studies. PMID:21829692

  14. Improved expression systems for regulated expression in Salmonella infecting eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Santero, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    In this work we describe a series of improvements to the Salmonella-based salicylate-inducible cascade expression system comprised of a plasmid-borne expression module, where target gene expression is driven by the P(m) promoter governed by the XylS2 regulator, and a genome-integrated regulatory module controlled by the nahR/P(sal) system. We have constructed a set of high and low-copy number plasmids bearing modified versions of the expression module with a more versatile multiple cloning site and different combinations of the following elements: (i) the nasF transcriptional attenuator, which reduces basal expression levels, (ii) a strong ribosome binding site, and (iii) the Type III Secretion System (TTSS) signal peptide from the effector protein SspH2 to deliver proteins directly to the eukaryotic cytosol following bacterial infection of animal cells. We show that different expression module versions can be used to direct a broad range of protein production levels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficient reduction of basal expression by the nasF attenuator allows the cloning of genes encoding highly cytotoxic proteins such as colicin E3 even in the absence of its immunity protein. Additionally, we show that the Salmonella TTSS is able to translocate most of the protein produced by this regulatory cascade to the cytoplasm of infected HeLa cells. Our results indicate that these vectors represent useful tools for the regulated overproduction of heterologous proteins in bacterial culture or in animal cells, for the cloning and expression of genes encoding toxic proteins and for pathogenesis studies. PMID:21829692

  15. PRL-3 expression in nasal sinus squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Hui Chen; Min-Ying Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between liver regeneration phosphatase-3 (PRL-3) with differentiation extent of nasal sinus squamous cell carcinoma, and molecular biological effects on the pathogenesis of nasal sinus squamous cell carcinoma to comprehend its relevance, so as to make early diagnosis of patients, and to give guidance to the prognosis. Methods:Immunohistochemistry was used to detect PRL-3 in 30 cases of different degrees of sinus nasal squamous cell carcinoma. 20 cases of normal nasal cavity of mucosa tissues were set as control. Results:The PRL-3 in all levels of sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma tissues, there was a significant difference compared with the normal nasal mucosa (P<0.05), squamous cell carcinoma and its expression increased with the grade with enhanced trend. Conclusions:PRL-3 expression increased significantly in sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma than in nasal polyp tissue, showed that it may be associated with squamous cell carcinoma of nasal sinus squamous cell carcinoma, may be the early event.

  16. Endothelial cells downregulate apolipoprotein D expression in mural cells through paracrine secretion and Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajaniappan, Mohanasundari; Glober, Nancy K; Kennard, Simone; Liu, Hua; Zhao, Ning; Lilly, Brenda

    2011-09-01

    Endothelial and mural cell interactions are vitally important for proper formation and function of blood vessels. These two cell types communicate to regulate multiple aspects of vessel function. In studying genes regulated by this interaction, we identified apolipoprotein D (APOD) as one gene that is downregulated in mural cells by coculture with endothelial cells. APOD is a secreted glycoprotein that has been implicated in governing stress response, lipid metabolism, and aging. Moreover, APOD is known to regulate smooth muscle cells and is found in abundance within atherosclerotic lesions. Our data show that the regulation of APOD in mural cells is bimodal. Paracrine secretion by endothelial cells causes partial downregulation of APOD expression. Additionally, cell contact-dependent Notch signaling plays a role. NOTCH3 on mural cells promotes the downregulation of APOD, possibly through interaction with the JAGGED-1 ligand on endothelial cells. Our results show that NOTCH3 contributes to the downregulation of APOD and by itself is sufficient to attenuate APOD transcript expression. In examining the consequence of decreased APOD expression in mural cells, we show that APOD negatively regulates cell adhesion. APOD attenuates adhesion by reducing focal contacts; however, it has no effect on stress fiber formation. These data reveal a novel mechanism in which endothelial cells control neighboring mural cells through the downregulation of APOD, which, in turn, influences mural cell function by modulating adhesion.

  17. Expression of caspase-3 gene in apoptotic HL-60 cell and different human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To research the expression of caspase-3 gene in the apoptotic and the control HL-60 cells and in the different human tumor cell lines. Methods: Caspase-3 mRNA in the control and γ-radiation-induced apoptotic HL-60 cells, and in the 6 types of human tumor cell lines, was analysed by Northern blot. Results: The caspase-3 gene transcript was more highly expressed in leukemia cells HL-60, CEM, K562 and neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y than in cervical adenocarcinoma HeLa and breast carcinoma MCF7, and more highly in the radiation-induced apoptotic HL-60 than in the control HL-60 cells. Conclusion: The high level of expression of caspase-3 may aid the efforts to understand the tumor cell sensitivity to radiation, apoptosis and its inherent ability to survive

  18. In vivo expression of immunosuppressive cytokines in human papillomavirus-transformed cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcocer-González, Juan Manuel; Berumen, Jaime; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes; Bermúdez-Morales, Víctor; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Moreno, José; Gariglio, Patricio; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    Genital human Papillomavirus infection is common and only a minor fraction of infected subjects develop progressing cervical epithelial lesions or cancer. Bypassing local immune responses is important for the development of cervical cancer. In this work we determined the cytokine pattern in samples from patients with cervical cancer. Thus, we examined the local mRNA expression profile of helper T cell type 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th3 cytokines in HPV-positive cervical cancer biopsies by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our data indicate that 80% of the tumors expressed low levels of CD4 mRNA, with all of them expressing higher CD8 mRNA levels. Most tumors expressed interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 mRNAs and, most importantly, all of them expressed transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 and interferon gamma mRNA. None of the tumors studied expressed IL-12, IL-6, or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mRNA. Immunohistochemical analysis identified IL-10 only in tumor cells and koilocytic cells, but not in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, suggesting that IL-10-producing cells are those transformed by HPV. We found a correlation between immunostaining for IL-10 protein and the level of IL-10 mRNA expression. Moreover, supernatants from HPV-transformed cell cultures contained IL-10 and TGF- beta1. Our findings indicate a predominant expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, which might help downregulate tumor-specific immune responses in the microenvironment of the tumor. This information may be useful for cervical cancer immunotherapies or for therapeutic vaccine design against Human Papillomavirus. PMID:16987066

  19. Impaired cell surface expression of HLA-B antigens on mesenchymal stem cells and muscle cell progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Nehlin, Jan; Sabir, Hardee Jawad;

    2010-01-01

    HLA class-I expression is weak in embryonic stem cells but increases rapidly during lineage progression. It is unknown whether all three classical HLA class-I antigens follow the same developmental program. In the present study, we investigated allele-specific expression of HLA-A, -B, and -C...... at the mRNA and protein levels on human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue as well as striated muscle satellite cells and lymphocytes. Using multicolour flow cytometry, we found high cell surface expression of HLA-A on all stem cells and PBMC examined. Surprisingly, HLA-B was either...... undetectable or very weakly expressed on all stem cells protecting them from complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) using relevant human anti-B and anti-Cw sera. IFNgamma stimulation for 48-72 h was required to induce full HLA-B protein expression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed that IFNgamma induced...

  20. Immune Killing Activity of Lymphocytes on Hela Cells Expressing Interleukin-12 In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiyan WANG; Suhua CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The killing effects of lymphocytes on Hela cells expressing intedeukin-12 (IL-12) in vitro were explored. By using gene transfection technique, full length IL-12 gene was transfected into Hela cells. The expression of IL-12 in Hela cells was detected quantitatively by ELISA; Changes in killing effects of lymphocytes on Hela cells expressing IL-12 were observed by MTT. It was found that Hela cells could express IL-12 between 24h and 72h after transfection. Killing activity of lymphocytes on Hela cells expressing IL-12 was significantly enhanced. It was concluded by cell transfection technique, Hela cells could express IL-12 and were more easily killed by lymphocytes.

  1. Bromelain treatment reduces CD25 expression on activated CD4+ T cells in vitro✩

    OpenAIRE

    Secor, Eric R.; Singh, Anurag; Guernsey, Linda A.; McNamara, Jeff T.; Zhan, Lijun; Maulik, Nilanjana; Thrall, Roger S.

    2009-01-01

    Bromelain (Br), an extract from pineapple stem with cysteine protease activity, exerts anti-inflammatory effects in a number of inflammatory models. We have previously shown that Br treatment decreased activated CD4+ T cells and has a therapeutic role in an ovalbumin-induced murine model of allergic airway disease. The current study was designed to determine the effect of Br on CD4+ T cell activation, specifically the expression of CD25 in vitro. CD25 is up regulated upon T cell activation, f...

  2. Enhancement of endothelial cell migration by constitutively active LPA{sub 1}-expressing tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitayoshi, Misaho; Kato, Kohei; Tanabe, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Kyohei; Fukui, Rie [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} stimulates cell migration of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF expressions are increased by mutated LPA{sub 1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} is involved in angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} promotes cancer cell progression. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors belong to G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors (LPA receptors; LPA{sub 1} to LPA{sub 6}). They indicate a variety of cellular response by the interaction with LPA, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Recently, we have reported that constitutive active mutated LPA{sub 1} induced the strong biological effects of rat neuroblastoma B103 cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of mutated LPA{sub 1} on the interaction between B103 cells and endothelial F-2 cells. Each LPA receptor expressing B103 cells were maintained in serum-free DMEM and cell motility assay was performed with a Cell Culture Insert. When F-2 cells were cultured with conditioned medium from Lpar1 and Lpar3-expressing cells, the cell motility of F-2 cells was significantly higher than control cells. Interestingly, the motile activity of F-2 cells was strongly induced by mutated LPA{sub 1} than other cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf)-A and Vegf-C. Pretreatment of LPA signaling inhibitors inhibited F-2 cell motility stimulated by mutated LPA{sub 1}. These results suggest that activation of LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} may play an important role in the promotion of angiogenesis in rat neuroblastoma cells.

  3. Identification of unique expression signatures and therapeutic targets in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wusheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC, the predominant histological subtype of esophageal cancer, is characterized by high mortality. Previous work identified important mRNA expression differences between normal and tumor cells; however, to date there are limited ex vivo studies examining expression changes occurring during normal esophageal squamous cell differentiation versus those associated with tumorigenesis. In this study, we used a unique tissue microdissection strategy and microarrays to measure gene expression profiles associated with cell differentiation versus tumorigenesis in twelve cases of patient-matched normal basal squamous epithelial cells (NB, normal differentiated squamous epithelium (ND, and squamous cell cancer. Class comparison and pathway analysis were used to compare NB versus tumor in a search for unique therapeutic targets. Results As a first step towards this goal, gene expression profiles and pathways were evaluated. Overall, ND expression patterns were markedly different from NB and tumor; whereas, tumor and NB were more closely related. Tumor showed a general decrease in differentially expressed genes relative to NB as opposed to ND that exhibited the opposite trend. FSH and IgG networks were most highly dysregulated in normal differentiation and tumorigenesis, respectively. DNA repair pathways were generally elevated in NB and tumor relative to ND indicating involvement in both normal and pathological growth. PDGF signaling pathway and 12 individual genes unique to the tumor/NB comparison were identified as therapeutic targets, and 10 associated ESCC gene-drug pairs were identified. We further examined the protein expression level and the distribution patterns of four genes: ODC1, POSTN, ASPA and IGF2BP3. Ultimately, three genes (ODC1, POSTN, ASPA were verified to be dysregulated in the same pattern at both the mRNA and protein levels. Conclusions These data reveal insight into genes and

  4. Human dental pulp stem cells express many pluripotency regulators and differentiate into neuronal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Behnam Ebrahimi; Mohammad Mehdi Yaghoobi; Ali Mohammadi Kamal-abadi; Maryam Raoof

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells were isolated from human dental pulp using an optimized method, in which pulp pieces were digested by enzymes and immobilized to enhance cell outgrowth. Stem cell marker expression was detected by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and differentiation markers were detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Results showed that dental pulp stem cells actively expressed nanog, oct4, nucleostemin slain-1, jmjd1a, jmjd2c, and cyclin D1. When stem cells were induced to differentiate into neurons, nucleostemin, nanog, and cyclin D1 expres-sion significantly decreased, whereas expression of neuronal markers, such as microtubule asso-ciated protein-2 and neurofilament-heavy, significantly increased. These results suggested that stem cells exited a pluripotent state and entered a neuronal differentiation pathway. In addition, results demonstrated that human dental pulp serves as a reservoir of stem cells that express defined stem cell markers; these cells were easily isolated and were induced to differentiate towards a desired cell lineage.

  5. Gene expression analysis of dendritic/Langerhans cells and Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rust, Renata; Kluiver, J.; Visser, Lydia; Harms, G.; Blokzijl, T.; Kamps, W.A.; Poppema, Sibrand; van den Berg, Anke

    2006-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a neoplastic disorder that results in clonal proliferation of cells with a Langerhans cell (LQ phenotype. The pathogenesis of LCH is still poorly understood. In the present study, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was applied to LCs generated from umbil

  6. LIF Upregulates Expression of NK-1R in NHBE Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ping Hu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, a cytokine at the interface between neurobiology and immunology, is mainly mediated through JAK/STAT pathway and MAPK/ERK pathway. Evidence suggested LIF is related to the higher expression of neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R in asthma. In this study, the immunohistochemistry stain showed the expressions of NK-1R, LIF, p-STAT3, and p-ERK1/2 in the lung tissues of allergic rats were increased compared with the controls, and the main positive cell type was airway epithelial cell. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells were treated with LIF in the presence or absence of AG490 (JAK2 inhibitor, PD98059 (MEK inhibitor, and the siRNA against STAT3. Western blot and RT-PCR indicated that LIF induced the expression of NK-1R, which was inhibited by the inhibitors mentioned above. No significant interaction was found between JAK/STAT pathway and MAPK/ERK pathway. In summary, bronchial epithelial cell changes in asthma are induced by LIF which promotes the expression of NK-1R, and JAK/STAT pathway and MAPK/ERK pathway may participate in this process.

  7. Expression of Bacterial β-Galactosidase in Animal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    An, Gynheung; Hidaka, Katsuhiko; Siminovitch, Louis

    1982-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing the gene for bacterial β-galactosidase, situated close to the simian virus 40 early promoter, has been constructed. Transfection of CHO, L, and COS-1 cells with this plasmid led to the expression and appearance of the enzyme. Using this system, we have developed a series of promoter cloning vehicles capable of accepting promoter signals for animal genes.

  8. Reduced expression of Slit2 in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Jie; Zhou, Yu; Lu, Dan; Dong, Dong; Tian, Xiao-Jun; Wen, Jie-Xi; Zhang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Slit2, initially identified as an important axon guidance molecule in the nervous system, was suggested to be involved in multiple cellular processes. Recently, Slit2 was reported to function as a potential tumor suppressor in diverse tumors. In this study, we systematically analyzed the expression level of Slit2 in renal cell carcinoma. Compared to paired adjacent non-malignant tissues, both Slit2 mRNA and protein expression were significantly down-regulated in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methylation-specific PCR showed that Slit2 promoter was methylated in two renal carcinoma cell lines. Pharmacologic demethylation dramatically induced Slit2 expression in cancer cell lines with weak expression of Slit2. Besides, bisulfite genomic sequencing confirmed that dense methylation existed in Slit2 promoter. Furthermore, in paired RCC samples, Slit2 methylation was observed in 8 out of 38 patients (21.1 %), which was well correlated with the down-regulation of Slit2 in RCC. Therefore, Slit2 may also be a potential tumor suppressor in RCC, which is down-regulated in RCC partially due to promoter methylation.

  9. Iterative experiment design guides the characterization of a light-inducible gene expression circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Jakob; Parise, Francesca; Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Khammash, Mustafa; Lygeros, John

    2015-06-30

    Systems biology rests on the idea that biological complexity can be better unraveled through the interplay of modeling and experimentation. However, the success of this approach depends critically on the informativeness of the chosen experiments, which is usually unknown a priori. Here, we propose a systematic scheme based on iterations of optimal experiment design, flow cytometry experiments, and Bayesian parameter inference to guide the discovery process in the case of stochastic biochemical reaction networks. To illustrate the benefit of our methodology, we apply it to the characterization of an engineered light-inducible gene expression circuit in yeast and compare the performance of the resulting model with models identified from nonoptimal experiments. In particular, we compare the parameter posterior distributions and the precision to which the outcome of future experiments can be predicted. Moreover, we illustrate how the identified stochastic model can be used to determine light induction patterns that make either the average amount of protein or the variability in a population of cells follow a desired profile. Our results show that optimal experiment design allows one to derive models that are accurate enough to precisely predict and regulate the protein expression in heterogeneous cell populations over extended periods of time.

  10. DUAL ROLES OF CANCER CELL-EXPRESSED IMMUNOGLOBULINS IN CANCER IMMUNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While the expression of immunoglobulins and T cell receptors on cancer cells has been well-established for decades, the potential roles and mechanisms of action of these cancerous antigen receptors have not been fully elucidated. A monoclonal antibody designated as RP215, which reacts specifically with the carbohydrate-associated epitope located on the heavy chain region of cancerous immunoglobulins and T cell receptors, was used as a unique probe to study the roles of antigen receptors in the immunology of cancer cells. Through extensive cell-based biological and immunological studies, it was found that both anti-antigen receptors and RP215 demonstrated similar actions on the gene regulations involved in the growth/proliferation of cancer cells, as well as on toll-like receptors involved in innate immunity. In addition, RP215-specific cancerous immunoglobulins are believed to capture or neutralize circulating antigen/antibodies which may be harmful to cancer cells within the human body. In contrast to normal B and T cells and their respective receptors in the conventional immune system, cancer cells co-express both immunoglobulins and T cell receptors and immune protection is exercised by unique mechanisms. For example, these cancer cell-expressed antigen receptors display a lack of class switching, limited hyper-mutation, aberrant glycosylations and a strong influence on the toll-like receptors of cancer cells. Therefore, it is hypothesized that both normal and cancerous immune systems may co-exist and operate simultaneously within the human body. The balance of these two immune factors for respective surveillance and protection may be relevant to the outcome of cancer immunotherapy in humans. A potential therapeutic strategy is being developed by using RP215 as a drug candidate to target cancer cells based on these observations.

  11. Induction of tumor necrosis factor expression and resistance in an human breast tumor cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a polypeptide cytokine that is cytotoxic to some but not all tumor cells. The basis for resistance to the cytotoxic effects of this agent remains unclear. We have studied the development of TNF resistance in human ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma cells. ZR-75-1 cells have undetectable levels of TNF RNA and protein. However, TNF transcripts are transiently induced in these cells by exposure to recombinant human TNF. This induction of TNF RNA is associated with production of TNF-like protein in cell lysates and culture supernatants. Stable resistance to TNF-induced cytotoxicity develops when ZR-75-1 cells are exposed to increased concentrations of TNF. The TNF-resistant cells, designated ZR-75-1R, continuously express TNF transcripts and a TNF-like protein. Furthermore, ZR-75-1R cell supernatants contain cytotoxic activity that is abrogated by polyclonal antibody against TNF. The ZR-75-1R cells also possess TNF receptors that are occupied or down-regulated by the TNF-like protein. These findings thus suggest that (i) TNF induces TNF transcripts and production of a TNF-like protein in ZR-75-1 cells and (ii) resistance to TNF-induced cytotoxicity is associated with stable TNF expression

  12. PROFILES OF GENE EXPRESSION ASSOCIATED WITH TETRACYCLINE OVER EXPRESSION OF HSP70 IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profiles of gene expression associated with tetracycline over expression of HSP70 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) protect cells from damage through their function as molecular chaperones. Some cancers reveal high levels of HSP70 expression in asso...

  13. Loss of B7-H1 expression by recipient parenchymal cells leads to expansion of infiltrating donor CD8+ T cells and persistence of GVHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Deng, Ruishu; He, Wei; Liu, Can; Wang, Miao; Young, James; Meng, Zhipeng; Du, Chantal; Huang, Wendong; Chen, Lieping; Chen, Yuan-Zhong; Martin, Paul; Forman, Stephen; Zeng, Defu

    2013-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have shown that acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is associated with two waves of donor CD8+ T cell expansion. In the current studies, we used in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI), in vivo BrdU-labeling, and three different experimental GVHD systems to show that B7-H1 expression by recipient parenchymal cells controls the second wave of alloreactive donor CD8+ T cell expansion and the associated second phase of GVHD. Loss of B7-H1 expression by parenchymal cells during the course of GVHD was associated with persistent proliferation of donor CD8+ T cells in GVHD target tissues and continued tissue injury, whereas persistent expression of B7-H1 expression by parenchymal cells led to reduced proliferation of donor CD8+ T cells in GVHD target tissues and resolution of GVHD. These studies demonstrate that parenchymal cell expression of B7-H1 is required for tolerizing infiltrating T cells and preventing the persistence of GVHD. Our results suggest that therapies designed to preserve or restore expression of B7-H1 expression by parenchymal tissues in the recipient could prevent or ameliorate GVHD in humans. PMID:22156590

  14. Target cell lysis by natural killer cells is influenced by beta 2-microglobulin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllbacher, A; King, N J

    1989-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells form part of the vertebrate defence against viruses and tumours, but show only limited specificity. The molecule(s) recognized by NK cells on target cells are at present unknown. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen concentration on target cells is inversely correlated with NK cell lysis. Here we show that MHC class I-unassociated beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-m) expression is involved in NK cell-target cell interaction. Two human MHC class I negative cell lines, Daudi and K562, are differentially susceptible to NK cell lysis. Daudi cells are beta 2-m-negative and resistant to NK lysis, K562 are beta 2-m-positive and highly susceptible to lysis by NK cells. Interferon (IFN) treatment augments beta 2-m expression and NK lysis of K562, but not in Daudi cells. NK cell lysis of K562, but not YAC-1 cells, can be inhibited by monoclonal anti-human beta 2-m antibody. Furthermore, susceptibility of mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) to NK lysis can be increased by infection with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the human beta 2-m gene.

  15. Isolation of genes predominantly expressed in guard cells and epidermal cells of Nicotiana glauca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, L B; Cameron, K D; Bennett, A B

    2000-04-01

    Guard cells are specialized and metabolically active cells which arise during the differentiation of the epidermis. Using Nicotiana glauca epidermal peels as a source of purified guard cells, we have constructed a cDNA library from guard cell RNA. In order to isolate genes that are predominantly expressed in guard cells, we performed a differential screen of this library, comparing the hybridization of a radiolabeled cDNA probe synthesized from guard cell RNA to that from a mesophyll cell cDNA probe. Sixteen clones were isolated based on their greater level of hybridization with the guard cell probe. Of these, eight had high homology to lipid transfer protein (LTP), two were similar to glycine-rich protein (GRP), and one displayed high homology to proline-rich proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPRP2, AtPRP4) and from potato guard cells (GPP). Northern analysis confirmed that one or more NgLTP genes, NgGRP1, and NgGPP1 are all differentially expressed, with highest levels in guard cells, and low or undetectable levels in mesophyll cells and in roots. In addition, all are induced to some degree in drought-stressed guard cells. NgLTP and NgGRP1 expression was localized by in situ hybridization to the guard cells and pavement cells in the epidermis. NgGRP1 expression was also detected in cells of the vasculature. Genomic Southern analysis indicated that LTP is encoded by a family of highly similar genes in N. glauca. This work has identified members of a subset of epidermis- and guard cell-predominant genes, whose protein products are likely to contribute to the unique properties acquired by guard cells and pavement cells during differentiation. PMID:10890533

  16. Prognostic value of CD25 expression on lymphocytes and tumor cells in squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loose, David; Signore, Alberto; Bonanno, Elena; Vermeersch, Hubert; Dierckx, Rudi; Deron, Philippe; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) T-cells play a central role in initiating and maintaining anticancer immune response. On the other hand, CD25(+) is also expressed on tumor cells, the meaning of which is currently unclear. Therefore, this study was designed to determine the prognostic value of the presence of CD4(+)CD

  17. Sequential Notch signalling at the boundary of fringe expressing and non-expressing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Troost

    Full Text Available Wing development in Drosophila requires the activation of Wingless (Wg in a small stripe along the boundary of Fringe (Fng expressing and non-expressing cells (FB, which coincides with the dorso-ventral (D/V boundary of the wing imaginal disc. The expression of Wg is induced by interactions between dorsal and ventral cells mediated by the Notch signalling pathway. It appears that mutual signalling from dorsal to ventral and ventral to dorsal cells by the Notch ligands Serrate (Ser and Delta (Dl respectively establishes a symmetric domain of Wg that straddles the D/V boundary. The directional signalling of these ligands requires the modification of Notch in dorsal cells by the glycosyltransferase Fng and is based on the restricted expression of the ligands with Ser expression to the dorsal and that of Dl to the ventral side of the wing anlage. In order to further investigate the mechanism of Notch signalling at the FB, we analysed the function of Fng, Ser and Dl during wing development at an ectopic FB and at the D/V boundary. We find that Notch signalling is initiated in an asymmetric fashion on only one side of the FB. During this initial asymmetric phase, only one ligand is required, with Ser initiating Notch-signalling at the D/V and Dl at the ectopic FB. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that Fng has also a positive effect on Ser signalling. Because of these additional properties, differential expression of the ligands, which has been a prerequisite to restrict Notch activation to the FB in the current model, is not required to restrict Notch signalling to the FB.

  18. Expression of Connexin43 in Rat Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To explore the role of connexin43 (Cx43) in gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and propagated sensation along meridians, the expression of Cx43 in the rat epithelial cells and fibroblasts was studied both in vitro and in vivo. With the in vitro study, the rat epithelial cells and fibroblasts were cultured together, and the localization of Cx43 was detected by immunohistochemistry and indirect immunofluorescent cytochemistry and under confocal microscopy . And the expression of Cx43 on the surface of the cells was examined by flow cytometry. With the in vivo examination, 20 SD rats were randomized into control group (n = 10) and electrical acupuncture group (EAgroup, n=10). EA ( 0.5-1.5 V, 4-16 Hz , 30 min) was applied to"Zusanli"acupoint for 30 min at rat's hind paw, the localization of Cx43 was immunohistochemically detected.The immunohistochemical staining and indirect immunfluorescent cytochemistry showed that Cx43was localized on the surface of the cells and in the cytoplasm. The relative expression level of Cx43on the cellular membrane surfaces of the rat epithelial cells and fibroblasts, as determined by FACS, were 13.91 % and 29.53 % respectively. Our studied suggested that Cx43 might be involved in GJIC and propagated sensation along meridians.

  19. Structure-based, rational design of T cell receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent eZoete

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive cell transfer using engineered T cells is emerging as a promising treatment for metastatic melanoma. Such an approach allows one to introduce TCR modifications that, while maintaining the specificity for the targeted antigen, can enhance the binding and kinetic parameters for the interaction pMHC. Using the well-characterized 2C TCR/SIYR/H-2K(b structure as a model system, we demonstrated that a binding free energy decomposition based on the MM-GBSA approach provides a detailed and reliable description of the TCR/pMHC interactions at the structural and thermodynamic levels. Starting from this result, we developed a new structure-based approach, to rationally design new TCR sequences, and applied it to the BC1 TCR targeting the HLA-A2 restricted NY-ESO-1157-165 cancer-testis epitope. 54% of the designed sequence replacements exhibited improved pMHC-binding as compared to the native TCR, with up to 150 fold increase in affinity, while preserving specificity. Genetically-engineered CD8+ T cells expressing these modified TCRs showed an improved functional activity compared to those expressing BC1 TCR. We measured maximum levels of activities for TCRs within the upper limit of natural affinity. Beyond the affinity threshold at KD < 1 μM we observed an attenuation in cellular function. We have also developed a homology modeling-based approach, TCRep 3D, to obtain accurate structural models of any TCR-pMHC complexes. We have complemented the approach with a simplified rigid method to predict the TCR orientation over pMHC. These methods potentially extend the use of our TCR engineering method to entire TCR repertoires for which no X-ray structure is available. We have also performed a steered molecular dynamics study of the unbinding of the TCR-pMHC complex to get a better understanding of how TCRs interact with pMHCs. This entire rational TCR design pipeline is now being used to produce rationally optimized TCRs for adoptive cell therapies of

  20. Expression of TIA-1 and TIA-2 in T cell malignancies and T cell lymphocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matutes, E; Coelho, E; Aguado, M J; Morilla, R; Crawford, A; Owusu-Ankomah, K; Catovsky, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the reactivity with TIA-1 and TIA-2, two monoclonal antibodies that recognise, respectively, granular structures in T lymphocytes and the T cell receptor chain in cells from a variety of T cell disorders. METHODS: Cytoplasmic staining with TIA-1 and TIA-2 was carried out by the immunoalkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique in 67 cases with a T cell disorder: 31 large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukaemia, nine T-prolymphocytic leukaemia (T-PLL), five Sezary syndrome, four peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL), 13 T cell lymphocytosis, and five T-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). All had over 75% abnormal T cells which were CD2+, CD3+, CD5+, CD7+, and negative with B cell markers. RESULTS: TIA-1 was positive in 77% cases of LGL leukaemia and half of the PTCL and T-ALL, whereas it was negative in all Sezary syndrome and most T-PLL (8/9) and reactive T-lymphocytosis (10/13). In LGL leukaemia, TIA-1 was positive irrespective of the membrane phenotype, whether CD8+, CD4- or CD4+, CD8-, and was more often positive in cases where cells were CD16+, CD56+, or CD57+. TIA-2 was positive in 60% of cases encompassing all diagnostic types of T cell disorder. There was no correlation between TIA-2 expression and that of other T cell markers, activation antigens, and natural killer markers. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of TIA-1 expression in T cell malignancies may help in the differential diagnosis among LGL leukaemia (high expression), T cell lymphocytosis and other T cell diseases (low expression). As TIA-2 is expressed in over 95% mature T lymphocytes and thymic cells, its assessment may be useful to demonstrate aberrant phenotypes which can be exploited for detecting minimal residual disease. Images PMID:8655683

  1. Knockdown of survivin gene expression by RNAi induces apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line SMMC-7721

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Quan Cheng; Wen-Liang Wang; Wei Yan; Qing-Long Li; Li Wang; Wen-Yong Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the survivin gene expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line SMMC-7721 and the effects of survivin gene RNA interference (RNAi) on cell apoptosis and biological behaviors of SMMC-7721 cells.METHODS: Eukaryotic expression vector of survivin gene RNAi and recombinant plasmid pSuppressorNeo-survivin (pSuNeo-SW), were constructed by ligating into the vector,pSupperssorNeo (pSuNeo) digested with restriction enzymes Xba I and Sa/I and the designed double-chain RNAi primers. A cell model of SMMC-7721 after treatment with RNAi was prepared by transfecting SMMC-7721 cells with the lipofectin transfection method. Strept-avidinbiotin-complex (SABC) immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR were used to detect survivin gene expressions in SMMC-7721 cells. Flow cytometry was used for the cell cycle analysis. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to determine whether RNAi induced cell apoptosis, and the method of measuring the cell growth curve was utilized to study the growth of SMMC-7721 cells before and after treatment with RNAi.RESULTS: The eukaryotic expression vector of survivin gene RNAi and pSuNeo-SW, were constructed successfully. The expression level of survivin gene in SMMC-7721 cells was observed. After the treatment of RNAi, the expression of survivin gene in SMMC-7721 cells was almost absent,apoptosis index was increased by 15.6%, and the number of cells was decreased in G2/M phase and the cell growth was inhibited.CONCLUSION: RNAi can exert a knockdown of survivin gene expression in SMMC-7721 cells, and induce apoptosis and inhibit the growth of carcinoma cells.

  2. Ammonia metabolism capacity of HepG2 cells with high expression of human glutamine synthetase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Hong Tang; Xiao-Qian Wang; Xiu-Jin Li; Yan-Ling Chen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Currently, one of the tough problems for the application of bioartiifcial liver (BAL) is the shortage of suitable hepatocytes. There are reports on different types of BAL assistance developed with porcine hepatocytes and HepG2 C3A cells, but their defects are obvious. In recent years, some studies focus more on liver cells with features of human origin and improved detoxiifcation. In this study, a hepatocyte line with high expression of human glutamine synthetase (hGS) was raised and its capacity for ammonia metabolism was investigated. METHODS:hGS cDNA and alpha-fetoprotein transcription regulatory element (AFP-TRE) were cloned with the designed primers. The eukaryotic expression vectors, pLNChGS and pLNAFhGS, were constructed and transfected into PA317 cells. Recombinant retroviruses (Retro-hGS and Retro-AFhGS) were produced and then infected into HepG2 cells. G418-resistant cell clones, HepG2/pLNChGS and HepG2/pLNAFhGS, were selected and ampliifed. Then hGS mRNA was measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR;hGS enzymatic activity and ammonia metabolism analysis in different concentration of NH4+were detected with a quantitative biochemistry kit. The cell proliferation was also detected by MTT chromatometry. RESULTS:The expression of hGS mRNA in HepG2/pLNChGS cells (8.306±0.336) and HepG2/pLNAFhGS cells (21.358±1.716) was much stronger than in control cells (P CONCLUSION:The constructed hepatocytes (HepG2 cells) with speciifc high-expression of hGS have a powerful ability to degrade ammonia in vitro, and provide necessary experimental data for the selection of biomaterials in BAL.

  3. Immunohistochemical analysis of Clara cell secretory protein expression in a transgenic model of mouse lung carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunohistochemical methods have been widely used to determine the histogenesis of spontaneous and chemically-induced mouse lung tumors. Typically, antigens for either alveolar Type II cells or bronchiolar epithelial Clara cells are studied. In the present work, the morphological and immunohistochemical phenotype of a transgenic mouse designed to develop lung tumors arising from Clara cells was evaluated. In this model, Clara cell-specific transformation is accomplished by directed expression of the SV40 large T antigen (TAg) under the mouse Clara cell secretory protein (CC10) promoter. In heterozygous mice, early lesions at 1 month of age consisted of hyperplastic bronchiolar epithelial cells. These progressed to adenoma by 2 months as proliferating epithelium extended into adjacent alveolar spaces. By 4 months, a large portion of the lung parenchyma was composed of tumor masses. Expression of constitutive CC10 was diminished in transgenic animals at all time points. Only the occasional cell or segment of the bronchiolar epithelium stained positively for CC10 by immunohistochemistry, and all tumors were found to be uniformly negative for staining. These results were corroborated by Western blotting, where CC10 was readily detectable in whole lung homogenate from nontransgenic animals, but not detected in lung from transgenic animals at any time point. Tumors were also examined for expression of surfactant apoprotein C (SPC), an alveolar Type II cell-specific marker, and found to be uniformly negative for staining. These results indicate that, in this transgenic model, expression of CC10, which is widely used to determine whether lung tumors arise from Clara cells, was reduced and subsequently lost during Clara cell tumor progression

  4. Hypertonic saline impedes tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction by reducing adhesion molecule and laminin expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypertonic saline infusion dampens inflammatory responses and suppresses neutrophil-endothelial interaction by reducing adhesion molecule expression. This study tested the hypothesis that hypertonic saline attenuates tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium through a similar mechanism. METHODS: Human colon cancer cells (LS174T) were transfected with green fluorescent protein and exposed to lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6 under hypertonic and isotonic conditions for 1 and 4 hours. Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells were similarly exposed. Cellular apoptosis and expression of adhesion molecules and laminin were measured by flow cytometry. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelium and laminin was assessed with fluorescence microscopy. Data are represented as mean +\\/- standard error of mean, and an ANOVA test was performed to gauge statistical significance, with P <.05 considered significant. RESULTS: Hypertonic exposure significantly reduced tumor cell adhesion despite the presence of the perioperative cell stressors (42 +\\/- 2.9 vs 172.5 +\\/- 12.4, P <.05), attenuated tumor cell beta-1 integrin (14.43 vs 23.84, P <.05), and endothelial cell laminin expression (22.78 +\\/- 2.2 vs 33.74 +\\/- 2.4, P <.05), but did not significantly alter cell viability. CONCLUSION: Hypertonic saline significantly attenuates tumor cell adhesion to endothelium by inhibiting adhesion molecule and laminin expression. This may halt the metastatic behavior of tumor cells shed at surgery.

  5. Porcine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Stem Cell Characteristics and Cell Activities While Enhancing the Expression of Liver-Specific Genes after Acute Liver Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxia Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute liver failure (ALF is a kind of complicated syndrome. Furthermore, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs can serve as a useful cell resource for autotransplantation due to their abundance and micro-invasive accessability. However, it is unknown how ALF will influence the characteristics of ADMSCs and whether ADMSCs from patients suffering from end-stage liver diseases are potential candidates for autotransplantation. This study was designed to compare various properties of ALF-derived ADMSCs with normal ADMSCs in pig models, with regard to their cellular morphology, cell proliferative ability, cell apoptosis, expression of surface antigens, mitochondrial and lysosomal activities, multilineage potency, and expression of liver-specific genes. Our results showed that ALF does not influence the stem cell characteristics and cell activities of ADMSCs. Intriguingly, the expression levels of several liver-specific genes in ALF-derived ADMSCs are higher than in normal ADMSCs. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the stem cell characteristics and cell activities of ADMSCs were not altered by ALF and these cells can serve as a new source for regenerative medicine.

  6. 'Fluorescent Cell Chip' for immunotoxicity testing: Development of the c-fos expression reporter cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fluorescent Cell Chip for in vitro immunotoxicity testing employs cell lines derived from lymphocytes, mast cells, and monocytes-macrophages transfected with various EGFP cytokine reporter gene constructs. While cytokine expression is a valid endpoint for in vitro immunotoxicity screening, additional marker for the immediate-early response gene expression level could be of interest for further development and refinement of the Fluorescent Cell Chip. We have used BW.5147.3 murine thymoma transfected with c-fos reporter constructs to obtain reporter cell lines expressing ECFP under the control of murine c-fos promoter. These cells upon serum withdrawal and readdition and incubation with heavy metal compounds showed paralleled induction of c-Fos expression as evidenced by Real-Time PCR and ECFP fluorescence as evidenced by computer-supported fluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, we developed fluorescent reporter cell lines that could be employed in a simple and time-efficient screening assay for possible action of chemicals on c-Fos expression in lymphocytes. The evaluation of usefulness of these cells for the Fluorescent Cell Chip-based detection of immunotoxicity will require additional testing with a larger number of chemicals

  7. Expression of myc family oncoproteins in small-cell lung-cancer cell lines and xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1993-01-01

    . WE examined the expression of myc proto-oncogenes at the mRNA and protein level in 23 cell lines or xenografts. In the cell lines, the doubling time and the cell-cycle distribution, as determined by flow-cytometric DNA analysis, were examined to establish whether the level of myc......A number of genes have altered activity in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), but especially genes of the myc family (c-myc, L-myc and N-myc) are expressed at high levels in SCLC. Most studies have explored expression at the mRNA level, whereas studies of myc family oncoprotein expression are sparse......-gene-family expression correlated with proliferative parameters. All tumours expressed at least one myc family member at the mRNA level. Exclusive c-myc mRNA expression was demonstrated in 8 tumours, L-myc in 7 and N-myc in I. Five tumours expressed both c-myc and L-myc, and 2 tumours expressed both c-myc and N-myc...

  8. GAPTrap: A Simple Expression System for Pluripotent Stem Cells and Their Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability to reliably express fluorescent reporters or other genes of interest is important for using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs as a platform for investigating cell fates and gene function. We describe a simple expression system, designated GAPTrap (GT, in which reporter genes, including GFP, mCherry, mTagBFP2, luc2, Gluc, and lacZ are inserted into the GAPDH locus in hPSCs. Independent clones harboring variations of the GT vectors expressed remarkably consistent levels of the reporter gene. Differentiation experiments showed that reporter expression was reliably maintained in hematopoietic cells, cardiac mesoderm, definitive endoderm, and ventral midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Similarly, analysis of teratomas derived from GT-lacZ hPSCs showed that β-galactosidase expression was maintained in a spectrum of cell types representing derivatives of the three germ layers. Thus, the GAPTrap vectors represent a robust and straightforward tagging system that enables indelible labeling of PSCs and their differentiated derivatives.

  9. Cell-surface expression of Hsp70 on hematopoietic cancer cells after inhibition of HDAC activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Andresen, Lars; Hansen, Karen Aagaard;

    2009-01-01

    We show that inhibition of HDAC activity leads to surface expression of Hsp70 on various hematopoietic cancer cells, an occurance that was not observed on naïve or activated peripheral blood cells. HDAC inhibitor-mediated Hsp70 surface expression was confined to the apoptotic Annexin V-positive c......We show that inhibition of HDAC activity leads to surface expression of Hsp70 on various hematopoietic cancer cells, an occurance that was not observed on naïve or activated peripheral blood cells. HDAC inhibitor-mediated Hsp70 surface expression was confined to the apoptotic Annexin V......-positive cells and blocked by inhibition of apoptosis. Other chemotherapeutic inducers of apoptosis such as etoposide and camptothecin also led to a robust induction of Hsp70 surface expression. Hsp70 expression was, however, not caused by induction of apoptosis per se, as activated CD4 T cells remained Hsp70...... surface-negative despite effective induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, inhibition of endolysosomes or normal ER/Golgi transport did not affect Hsp70 surface expression. Intracellular calcium and the transcription factor Sp1, which has been shown previously to be important for the intracellular stress...

  10. A Microchip for Integrated Single-Cell Gene Expression Profiling and Genotoxicity Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Sun, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics-based single-cell study is an emerging approach in personalized treatment or precision medicine studies. Single-cell gene expression holds a potential to provide treatment selections with maximized efficacy to help cancer patients based on a genetic understanding of their disease. This work presents a multi-layer microchip for single-cell multiplexed gene expression profiling and genotoxicity detection. Treated by three drug reagents (i.e., methyl methanesulfonate, docetaxel and colchicine) with varied concentrations and time lengths, individual human cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) are lysed on-chip, and the released mRNA templates are captured and reversely transcribed into single strand DNA. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), and aurora kinase A (AURKA) genes from single cells are amplified and real-time quantified through multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The microchip is capable of integrating all steps of single-cell multiplexed gene expression profiling, and providing precision detection of drug induced genotoxic stress. Throughput has been set to be 18, and can be further increased following the same approach. Numerical simulation of on-chip single cell trapping and heat transfer has been employed to evaluate the chip design and operation. PMID:27649175

  11. A Microchip for Integrated Single-Cell Gene Expression Profiling and Genotoxicity Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Sun, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics-based single-cell study is an emerging approach in personalized treatment or precision medicine studies. Single-cell gene expression holds a potential to provide treatment selections with maximized efficacy to help cancer patients based on a genetic understanding of their disease. This work presents a multi-layer microchip for single-cell multiplexed gene expression profiling and genotoxicity detection. Treated by three drug reagents (i.e., methyl methanesulfonate, docetaxel and colchicine) with varied concentrations and time lengths, individual human cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) are lysed on-chip, and the released mRNA templates are captured and reversely transcribed into single strand DNA. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), and aurora kinase A (AURKA) genes from single cells are amplified and real-time quantified through multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The microchip is capable of integrating all steps of single-cell multiplexed gene expression profiling, and providing precision detection of drug induced genotoxic stress. Throughput has been set to be 18, and can be further increased following the same approach. Numerical simulation of on-chip single cell trapping and heat transfer has been employed to evaluate the chip design and operation. PMID:27649175

  12. Expression of Hyaluronidase by Tumor Cells Induces Angiogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dacai; Pearlman, Eric; Diaconu, Eugenia; Guo, Kun; Mori, Hiroshi; Haqqi, Tariq; Markowitz, Sanford; Willson, James; Sy, Man-Sun

    1996-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the ``molecular saboteurs'' to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs.

  13. Expression of Aquaporin-6 in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sun Young; Lee, Eung Suk; Ohn, Young-Hoon; Park, Tae Kwann

    2016-08-01

    Several aquaporins (AQPs) have been identified to be present in the eyes, and it has been suggested that they are involved in the movement of water and small solutes. AQP6, which has low water permeability and transports mainly anions, was recently discovered in the eyes. In the present study, we investigate the localization of AQP6 in the rat retina and show that AQP6 is selectively localized to the ganglion cell layer and the outer plexiform layer. Along with the gradual decrease in retinal ganglion cells after a crushing injury of optic nerve, immunofluorescence signals of AQP6 gradually decreased. Confocal microscope images confirmed AQP6 expression in retinal ganglion cells and Müller cells in vitro. Therefore, AQP6 might participate in water and anion transport in these cells. PMID:26526333

  14. Boswellic acid inhibits expression of acid sphingomyelinase in intestinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Rui-Dong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boswellic acid is a type of triterpenoids with antiinflammatory and antiproliferative properties. Sphingomyelin metabolism generates multiple lipid signals affecting cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Upregulation of acid sphingomyelinase (SMase has been found in several inflammation-related diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Methods The present study is to examine the effect of 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acids (AKBA, a potent boswellic acid, on acid SMase activity and expression in intestinal cells. Both transformed Caco-2 cells and non-transformed Int407 cells were incubated with AKBA. After incubation, the change of acid SMase activity was assayed biochemically, the enzyme protein was examined by Western blot, and acid SMase mRNA was quantified by qPCR. Results We found that AKBA decreased acid SMase activity in both intestinal cell lines in dose and time dependent manners without affecting the secretion of the enzyme to the cell culture medium. The effect of AKBA was more effective in the fetal bovine serum-free culture medium. Among different types of boswellic acid, AKBA was the most potent one. The inhibitory effect on acid SMase activity occurred only in the intact cells but not in cell-free extract in the test tubes. At low concentration, AKBA only decreased the acid SMase activity but not the quantity of the enzyme protein. However, at high concentration, AKBA decreased both the mass of acid SMase protein and the mRNA levels of acid SMase in the cells, as demonstrated by Western blot and qPCR, respectively. Under the concentrations decreasing acid SMase activity, AKBA significantly inhibited cell proliferation. Conclusion We identified a novel inhibitory effect of boswellic acids on acid SMase expression, which may have implications in human diseases and health.

  15. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D' Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Bocco, Jose L., E-mail: jbocco@fcq.unc.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Koritschoner, Nicolas P. [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-02-10

    The mammalian Krueppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is involved in critical roles such as growth-related signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation, development, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Also, KLF6 appears to be an emerging key factor during cancer development and progression. Its expression is thoroughly regulated by several cell-damaging stimuli. DNA damaging agents at lethal concentrations induce a p53-independent down-regulation of the klf6 gene. To investigate the impact of external stimuli on human klf6 gene expression, its mRNA level was analyzed using a cancer cell line profiling array system, consisting in an assortment of immobilized cDNAs from multiple cell lines treated with several cell-damaging agents at growth inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}). Cell-damaging agents affected the klf6 expression in 62% of the cDNA samples, though the expression pattern was not dependent on the cell origin type. Interestingly, significant differences (p < 0.0001) in KLF6 mRNA levels were observed depending on the cellular p53 status upon cell damage. KLF6 expression was significantly increased in 63% of p53-deficient cells (122/195). Conversely, KLF6 mRNA level decreased nearly 4 fold in more than 70% of p53+/+ cells. In addition, klf6 gene promoter activity was down-regulated by DNA damaging agents in cells expressing the functional p53 protein whereas it was moderately increased in the absence of functional p53. Consistent results were obtained for the endogenous KLF6 protein level. Results indicate that human klf6 gene expression is responsive to external cell damage mediated by IC{sub 50} concentrations of physical and chemical stimuli in a p53-dependent manner. Most of these agents are frequently used in cancer therapy. Induction of klf6 expression in the absence of functional p53 directly correlates with cell death triggered by these compounds, whereas it is down-regulated in p53+/+ cells. Hence, klf6 expression level could represent a valuable

  16. Behavioral experience induces zif268 expression in mature granule cells but suppresses its expression in immature granule cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie A. Huckleberry

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of neurons are born each day in the dentate gyrus (DG, but many of these cells die before reaching maturity. Both death and survival of adult-born neurons are regulated by neuronal activity in DG. The immediate-early gene (IEG zif268 is an important mediator of these effects, as its expression is induced by neural activity and knockout of zif268 impairs survival of adult-born neurons (Veyrac et al., 2013. Despite the apparent importance of zif268 for adult neurogenesis, its behavior-induced expression has not been fully characterized in adult-born neurons. Here we characterize behavior-evoked expression of zif268 in mature and newborn dentate granule cells (DGCs. In the general granule cell population, zif268 expression peaked 1 hour after novel environment exposure and returned to baseline by 8 hours post-exposure. However, in the doublecortin-positive (DCX+ immature neurons, zif268 expression was suppressed relative to home cage for at least 8 hours post-exposure. We next determined that exposure to water maze training, an enriched environment, or a novel environment caused approximately equal suppression of zif268 expression in DCX+ cells and approximately equal activation of zif268 in the general DGC population and in 6-week-old adult-born neurons. Finally, we asked whether zif268 suppression varied as a function of age within the DCX+ population, which ranges in age from 0 to approximately 4 weeks. Novel environment exposure had no significant effect on zif268 expression in 2- or 4-week-old BrdU-labeled neurons, but it significantly suppressed zif268 expression in 3-week-old neurons. In summary, behavioral experience transiently activated expression of zif268 in mature DGCs but caused a more long-lasting suppression of zif268 expression in immature, adult-born DGCs. We hypothesize that zif268 suppression inhibits memory-related synaptic plasticity in immature DGCs or mediates learning-induced apoptosis of immature adult

  17. Cell-free protein expression based on extracts from CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brödel, Andreas K; Sonnabend, Andrei; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Protein expression systems are widely used in biotechnology and medicine for the efficient and economic production of therapeutic proteins. Today, cultivated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the market dominating mammalian cell-line for the production of complex therapeutic proteins. Despite this outstanding potential of CHO cells, no high-yield cell-free system based on translationally active lysates from these cells has been reported so far. To date, CHO cell extracts have only been used as a foundational research tool for understanding mRNA translation (Lodish et al., 1974; McDowell et al., 1972). In the present study, we address this fact by establishing a novel cell-free protein expression system based on extracts from cultured CHO cells. Lysate preparation, adaptation of in vitro reaction conditions and the construction of particular expression vectors are considered for high-yield protein production. A specific in vitro expression vector, which includes an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) from the intergenic region (IGR) of the Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), has been constructed in order to obtain optimal performance. The IGR IRES is supposed to bind directly to the eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunit thereby bypassing the process of translation initiation, which is often a major bottleneck in cell-free systems. The combination of expression vector and optimized CHO cell extracts enables the production of approximately 50 µg/mL active firefly luciferase within 4 h. The batch-type cell-free coupled transcription-translation system has the potential to perform post-translational modifications, as shown by the glycosylation of erythropoietin. Accordingly, the system contains translocationally active endogenous microsomes, enabling the co-translational incorporation of membrane proteins into biological membranes. Hence, the presented in vitro translation system is a powerful tool for the fast and convenient optimization of expression constructs, the

  18. Characterization of cell subpopulations expressing progenitor cell markers in porcine cardiac valves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Wang

    Full Text Available Valvular interstitial cells (VICs are the main population of cells found in cardiac valves. These resident fibroblastic cells play important roles in maintaining proper valve function, and their dysregulation has been linked to disease progression in humans. Despite the critical functions of VICs, their cellular composition is still not well defined for humans and other mammals. Given the limited availability of healthy human valves and the similarity in valve structure and function between humans and pigs, we characterized porcine VICs (pVICs based on expression of cell surface proteins and sorted a specific subpopulation of pVICs to study its functions. We found that small percentages of pVICs express the progenitor cell markers ABCG2 (~5%, NG2 (~5% or SSEA-4 (~7%, whereas another subpopulation (~5% expresses OB-CDH, a type of cadherin expressed by myofibroblasts or osteo-progenitors. pVICs isolated from either aortic or pulmonary valves express most of these protein markers at similar levels. Interestingly, OB-CDH, NG2 and SSEA-4 all label distinct valvular subpopulations relative to each other; however, NG2 and ABCG2 are co-expressed in the same cells. ABCG2(+ cells were further characterized and found to deposit more calcified matrix than ABCG2(- cells upon osteogenic induction, suggesting that they may be involved in the development of osteogenic VICs during valve pathology. Cell profiling based on flow cytometry and functional studies with sorted primary cells provide not only new and quantitative information about the cellular composition of porcine cardiac valves, but also contribute to our understanding of how a subpopulation of valvular cells (ABCG2(+ cells may participate in tissue repair and disease progression.

  19. Differential gene expression profiling of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during adipogenic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menssen Adriane

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipogenesis is the developmental process by which mesenchymal stem cells (MSC differentiate into pre-adipocytes and adipocytes. The aim of the study was to analyze the developmental strategies of human bone marrow MSC developing into adipocytes over a defined time scale. Here we were particularly interested in differentially expressed transcription factors and biochemical pathways. We studied genome-wide gene expression profiling of human MSC based on an adipogenic differentiation experiment with five different time points (day 0, 1, 3, 7 and 17, which was designed and performed in reference to human fat tissue. For data processing and selection of adipogenic candidate genes, we used the online database SiPaGene for Affymetrix microarray expression data. Results The mesenchymal stem cell character of human MSC cultures was proven by cell morphology, by flow cytometry analysis and by the ability of the cells to develop into the osteo-, chondro- and adipogenic lineage. Moreover we were able to detect 184 adipogenic candidate genes (85 with increased, 99 with decreased expression that were differentially expressed during adipogenic development of MSC and/or between MSC and fat tissue in a highly significant way (p PPARG, C/EBPA and RTXA. Several of the genes could be linked to corresponding biochemical pathways like the adipocyte differentiation, adipocytokine signalling, and lipogenesis pathways. We also identified new candidate genes possibly related to adipogenesis, such as SCARA5, coding for a receptor with a putative transmembrane domain and a collagen-like domain, and MRAP, encoding an endoplasmatic reticulum protein. Conclusions Comparing differential gene expression profiles of human MSC and native fat cells or tissue allowed us to establish a comprehensive differential kinetic gene expression network of adipogenesis. Based on this, we identified known and unknown genes and biochemical pathways that may be relevant for

  20. Resveratrol Represses Pokemon Expression in Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Overstreet, Anne-Marie; Zhan, Yiping; Shan, Dapeng; Li, Hui; Li, Hui; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Mengmeng; Yu, Chunjiang; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2016-03-01

    POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (Pokemon), an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that regulates the expression of many genes and plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Resveratrol (RSV), a natural polyphenolic compound, has many beneficial biological effects on health. In this study, we investigated the role of Pokemon in RSV-induced biological effects and the effect of RSV on the expression of Pokemon in glioma cells. We found that overexpression of Pokemon decreased RSV-induced cell apoptosis, senescence, and anti-proliferative effects. Moreover, we showed that RSV could efficiently decrease the activity of the Pokemon promoter and the expression of Pokemon. Meanwhile, RSV also inhibited Sp1 DNA binding activity to the Pokemon promoter; whereas, it did not influence the expression and nuclear translocation of Sp1. In addition, we found that RSV could increase the recruitment of HDAC1, but decreased p300 to the Pokemon promoter. Taken together, all these results extended our understanding on the anti-cancer mechanism of RSV in glioma cells. PMID:25875864

  1. Protein Expression in Insect and Mammalian Cells Using Baculoviruses in Wave Bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadwell, Sue H; Overton, Laurie K

    2016-01-01

    Many types of disposable bioreactors for protein expression in insect and mammalian cells are now available. They differ in design, capacity, and sensor options, with many selections available for either rocking platform, orbitally shaken, pneumatically mixed, or stirred-tank bioreactors lined with an integral disposable bag (Shukla and Gottschalk, Trends Biotechnol 31(3):147-154, 2013). WAVE Bioreactors™ were among the first disposable systems to be developed (Singh, Cytotechnology 30:149-158, 1999). Since their commercialization in 1999, Wave Bioreactors have become routinely used in many laboratories due to their ease of operation, limited utility requirements, and protein expression levels comparability to traditional stirred-tank bioreactors. Wave Bioreactors are designed to use a presterilized Cellbag™, which is attached to a rocking platform and inflated with filtered air provided by the bioreactor unit. The Cellbag can be filled with medium and cells and maintained at a set temperature. The rocking motion, which is adjusted through angle and rock speed settings, provides mixing of oxygen (and CO2, which is used to control pH in mammalian cell cultures) from the headspace created in the inflated Cellbag with the cell culture medium and cells. This rocking motion can be adjusted to prevent cell shear damage. Dissolved oxygen and pH can be monitored during scale-up, and samples can be easily removed to monitor other parameters. Insect and mammalian cells grow very well in Wave Bioreactors (Shukla and Gottschalk, Trends Biotechnol 31(3):147-154, 2013). Combining Wave Bioreactor cell growth capabilities with recombinant baculoviruses engineered for insect or mammalian cell expression has proven to be a powerful tool for rapid production of a wide range of proteins.

  2. CD117 expression on blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryainova N.V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to analyze the frequency of CD117 (c-KIT antigen expression on the blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, evaluation of the presence of the relationship between the expression of the c-KIT and leukemia according to the FAB classification and definition of co-expression of the antigen CD117, antigens CD33 and CD34. The data of 47 patients with AML were diagnosed. M0 AML variant was established in 3 (6% patients, M1 – in 2 (4%, M2 – in 9 (20%, M4 – in 22 (47% and M5 – in 11 (23%. For immunophenotypic stu¬dies monoclonal antibodies (mAb that detect antigens of anti-CD34, anti-CD33 and anti-CD117 (Becton Dickinson, USA were used. The presence of the antigen CD117 was detected in 39 people, accounting for 83% of all surveyed. Antigen c-KIT was present in 48.117.0% cells on average: in all 3 cases – AML M0, in2 cases of AML M1, in 6 cases – AML M2, 20 of 22 cases – AML M4 and in 8 of 11 AML M5 cases. Average levels of CD117 in investigated leukemia cases statistically differed significantly (p=0.0067. Among 39 CD117- positive patients in 25 (53% co-expression of CD117+/CD34+ was revealed. Expression of CD117+/CD34- was observed in 14 cases (30%, CD117-/CD34+ – in 4 cases (8,5%, CD117-/CD34- – in 4 cases (8.5%. CD34 had of 64% of cells of myeloid origin. A high positive cor¬relation between expression of CD117 and CD34 (r=+0,5169 was determined, being statistically significant (p0,0067.

  3. Exogenous Expression of N-Cadherin in Breast Cancer Cells Induces Cell Migration, Invasion, and Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Hazan, Rachel B.; Phillips, Greg R.; Qiao, Rui Fang; Norton, Larry; Aaronson, Stuart A.

    2000-01-01

    E- and N-cadherin are calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules that mediate cell–cell adhesion and also modulate cell migration and tumor invasiveness. The loss of E-cadherin–mediated adhesion has been shown to play an important role in the transition of epithelial tumors from a benign to an invasive state. However, recent evidence indicates that another member of the cadherin family, N-cadherin, is expressed in highly invasive tumor cell lines that lacked E-cadherin expression. These findin...

  4. Use of RUNX2 Expression to Identify Osteogenic Progenitor Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li Zou; Fahad K. Kidwai; Ross A. Kopher; Jason Motl; Cory A. Kellum; Jennifer J. Westendorf; Dan S. Kaufman

    2015-01-01

    Summary We generated a RUNX2-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) reporter system to study osteogenic development from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Our studies demonstrate the fidelity of YFP expression with expression of RUNX2 and other osteogenic genes in hESC-derived osteoprogenitor cells, as well as the osteogenic specificity of YFP signal. In vitro studies confirm that the hESC-derived YFP+ cells have similar osteogenic phenotypes to osteoprogenitor cells generated from bone-marrow me...

  5. Gene Expression Profiling Predicts Survival in Conventional Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conventional renal cell carcinoma (cRCC accounts for most of the deaths due to kidney cancer. Tumor stage, grade, and patient performance status are used currently to predict survival after surgery. Our goal was to identify gene expression features, using comprehensive gene expression profiling, that correlate with survival. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene expression profiles were determined in 177 primary cRCCs using DNA microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis segregated cRCC into five gene expression subgroups. Expression subgroup was correlated with survival in long-term follow-up and was independent of grade, stage, and performance status. The tumors were then divided evenly into training and test sets that were balanced for grade, stage, performance status, and length of follow-up. A semisupervised learning algorithm (supervised principal components analysis was applied to identify transcripts whose expression was associated with survival in the training set, and the performance of this gene expression-based survival predictor was assessed using the test set. With this method, we identified 259 genes that accurately predicted disease-specific survival among patients in the independent validation group (p < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, the gene expression predictor was a strong predictor of survival independent of tumor stage, grade, and performance status (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: cRCC displays molecular heterogeneity and can be separated into gene expression subgroups that correlate with survival after surgery. We have identified a set of 259 genes that predict survival after surgery independent of clinical prognostic factors.

  6. Multiple melanocortin receptors are expressed in bone cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qing; Sridhar, Supriya; Ruan, Ling; Ding, Ke-Hong; Xie, Ding; Insogna, Karl; Kang, Baolin; Xu, Jianrui; Bollag, Roni J.; Isales, Carlos M.

    2005-01-01

    Melanocortin receptors belong to the seven transmembrane domain, G-protein coupled family of receptors. There are five members of this receptor family labeled MC1R-MC5R. These receptors are activated by fragments derived from a larger molecule, proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and include ACTH, alpha beta and gamma-MSH and beta-endorphin. Because of in vitro and in vivo data suggesting direct effects of these POMC molecules on bone and bone turnover, we examined bone and bone derived cells for the presence of the various members of the melanocortin receptor family. We report that the five known melanocortin receptors are expressed to varying degrees in osteoblast-like and osteoclastic cells. POMC fragments increased proliferation and expression of a variety of genes in osteoblastic cells. Furthermore, POMC mRNA was detected in osteoclastic cells. These data demonstrate that POMC-derived peptide hormones acting through high affinity melanocortin receptors have specific effects on bone cells. Thus, in addition to the indirect effects of POMC-derived hormones on bone turnover through their modulation of steroid hormone secretion, POMC fragments may have direct and specific effects on bone cell subpopulations.

  7. Chondrogenic differentiation and lubricin expression of caprine infraspinatus tendon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, Tadanao; Spector, Myron

    2010-06-01

    Reparative strategies for the treatment of injuries to tendons, including those of the rotator cuff of the shoulder, need to address the formation of the cartilage which serves as the attachment apparatus to bone and which forms at regions undergoing compressive loading. Moreover, recent work indicates that cells employed for rotator cuff repair may need to synthesize a lubricating glycoprotein, lubricin, which has recently been found to play a role in tendon tribology. The objective of the present study was to investigate the chondrogenic differentiation and lubricin expression of caprine infraspinatus tendon cells in monolayer and three-dimensional culture, and to compare the behavior with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The results demonstrated that while tendon cells in various media, including chondrogenic medium, expressed lubricin, virtually none of the MSCs synthesized this important lubricating molecule. Also of interest was that the cartilage formation capacity of the tendon cells grown in pellet culture in chondrogenic medium was comparable with MSCs. These data inform the use of tendon cells for rotator cuff repair, including for fibrocartilaginous zones.

  8. Heterogeneous expression of Drosophila gustatory receptors in enteroendocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Ho; Kwon, Jae Young

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is emerging as a major site of chemosensation in mammalian studies. Enteroendocrine cells are chemosensory cells in the gut which produce regulatory peptides in response to luminal contents to regulate gut physiology, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, among other possible functions. Increasing evidence shows that mammalian taste receptors and taste signaling molecules are expressed in enteroendocrine cells in the gut. Invertebrate models such as Drosophila can provide a simple and genetically tractable system to study the chemosensory functions of enteroendocrine cells in vivo. To establish Drosophila enteroendocrine cells as a model for studying gut chemosensation, we used the GAL4/UAS system to examine the expression of all 68 Gustatory receptors (Grs) in the intestine. We find that 12 Gr-GAL4 drivers label subsets of enteroendocrine cells in the midgut, and examine colocalization of these drivers with the regulatory peptides neuropeptide F (NPF), locustatachykinin (LTK), and diuretic hormone 31 (DH31). RT-PCR analysis provides additional evidence for the presence of Gr transcripts in the gut. Our results suggest that the Drosophila Grs have chemosensory roles in the intestine to regulate physiological functions such as food uptake, nutrient absorption, or sugar homeostasis. PMID:22194978

  9. Heterogeneous expression of Drosophila gustatory receptors in enteroendocrine cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Ho Park

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract is emerging as a major site of chemosensation in mammalian studies. Enteroendocrine cells are chemosensory cells in the gut which produce regulatory peptides in response to luminal contents to regulate gut physiology, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, among other possible functions. Increasing evidence shows that mammalian taste receptors and taste signaling molecules are expressed in enteroendocrine cells in the gut. Invertebrate models such as Drosophila can provide a simple and genetically tractable system to study the chemosensory functions of enteroendocrine cells in vivo. To establish Drosophila enteroendocrine cells as a model for studying gut chemosensation, we used the GAL4/UAS system to examine the expression of all 68 Gustatory receptors (Grs in the intestine. We find that 12 Gr-GAL4 drivers label subsets of enteroendocrine cells in the midgut, and examine colocalization of these drivers with the regulatory peptides neuropeptide F (NPF, locustatachykinin (LTK, and diuretic hormone 31 (DH31. RT-PCR analysis provides additional evidence for the presence of Gr transcripts in the gut. Our results suggest that the Drosophila Grs have chemosensory roles in the intestine to regulate physiological functions such as food uptake, nutrient absorption, or sugar homeostasis.

  10. Efficient cell-free expression with the endogenous E. Coli RNA polymerase and sigma factor 70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireaux Vincent

    2010-06-01

    factor 70 are available that form a broad library of regulatory parts. In this work, cell-free expression is developed as a toolbox to design and to study synthetic gene circuits in vitro.

  11. New silicon cell design concepts for 20 percent AMI efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M.

    1982-01-01

    The basic design principles for obtaining high efficiency in silicon solar cells are reviewed. They critically involve very long minority carrier lifetimes, not so much to attain high collection efficiency, but primarily for increased output voltages. Minority carrier lifetime, however, is sensitive to radiation damage, and particularly in low resistivity silicon, on which the high efficiency design is based. Radiation resistant space cells will therefore have to follow differing design principles than high efficiency terrestrial cells.

  12. Identifying cell types from spatially referenced single-cell expression datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Pettit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Complex tissues, such as the brain, are composed of multiple different cell types, each of which have distinct and important roles, for example in neural function. Moreover, it has recently been appreciated that the cells that make up these sub-cell types themselves harbour significant cell-to-cell heterogeneity, in particular at the level of gene expression. The ability to study this heterogeneity has been revolutionised by advances in experimental technology, such as Wholemount in Situ Hybridizations (WiSH and single-cell RNA-sequencing. Consequently, it is now possible to study gene expression levels in thousands of cells from the same tissue type. After generating such data one of the key goals is to cluster the cells into groups that correspond to both known and putatively novel cell types. Whilst many clustering algorithms exist, they are typically unable to incorporate information about the spatial dependence between cells within the tissue under study. When such information exists it provides important insights that should be directly included in the clustering scheme. To this end we have developed a clustering method that uses a Hidden Markov Random Field (HMRF model to exploit both quantitative measures of expression and spatial information. To accurately reflect the underlying biology, we extend current HMRF approaches by allowing the degree of spatial coherency to differ between clusters. We demonstrate the utility of our method using simulated data before applying it to cluster single cell gene expression data generated by applying WiSH to study expression patterns in the brain of the marine annelid Platynereis dumereilii. Our approach allows known cell types to be identified as well as revealing new, previously unexplored cell types within the brain of this important model system.

  13. Transglutaminase 2 Expression and Its Prognostic Significance in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Min Jee; Baek, Hae Woon; Rhee, Ye-Young; Lee, Cheol; Park, Jeong Whan; Kim, Hwal Woong; Moon, Kyung Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background: A few recent studies have demonstrated a possible role of transglutaminase 2 (TG2) in tumorigenesis or progression of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The aim of this study was to examine TG2 expression and its clinicopathologic significance in a large number of human clear cell RCCs (CCRCCs). Methods: We analyzed 638 CCRCC patients who underwent partial or radical nephrectomy between 1995 and 2005. The expression of TG2 was determined by immunohistochemistry and categorized into four ...

  14. Global regulation of gene expression and cell differentiation in Caulobacter crescentus in response to nutrient availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Jennifer C; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T; Gober, James W

    2010-02-01

    In a developmental strategy designed to efficiently exploit and colonize sparse oligotrophic environments, Caulobacter crescentus cells divide asymmetrically, yielding a motile swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell. After a relatively fixed time period under typical culture conditions, the swarmer cell differentiates into a replicative stalked cell. Since differentiation into the stalked cell type is irreversible, it is likely that environmental factors such as the availability of essential nutrients would influence the timing of the decision to abandon motility and adopt a sessile lifestyle. We measured two different parameters in nutrient-limited chemostat cultures, biomass concentration and the ratio of nonstalked to stalked cells, over a range of flow rates and found that nitrogen limitation significantly extended the swarmer cell life span. The transcriptional profiling experiments described here generate the first comprehensive picture of the global regulatory strategies used by an oligotroph when confronted with an environment where key macronutrients are sparse. The pattern of regulated gene expression in nitrogen- and carbon-limited cells shares some features in common with most copiotrophic organisms, but critical differences suggest that Caulobacter, and perhaps other oligotrophs, have evolved regulatory strategies to deal distinctly with their natural environments. We hypothesize that nitrogen limitation extends the swarmer cell lifetime by delaying the onset of a sequence of differentiation events, which when initiated by the correct combination of external environmental cues, sets the swarmer cell on a path to differentiate into a stalked cell within a fixed time period.

  15. Secretion of interleukin-17 by CD8+ T cells expressing CD146 (MCAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagur, Pradeep K; Biancotto, Angélique; Stansky, Elena; Sen, H Nida; Nussenblatt, Robert B; McCoy, J Philip

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune diseases. CD4+ T cells secreting IL-17 are termed Th17 cells. CD8+ T cells, designated Tc17 cells, are also capable of secreting IL-17. Here we describe a population of Tc17 cells characterized by the expression of surface CD146, an endothelial adhesion molecule. These cells display signatures of a human Tc17 genotype and phenotype. Circulating CD8+CD146+ T cells are present in low levels in healthy adults. Elevations in CD8+CD146+ T cells are found in Behcet's disease and birdshot retinochoroidopathy, which have been reported to have HLA class I associations. Sarcoidosis does not have a class I association and displays an increase in CD4+ CD146+ T cells but not in CD8+CD146+ T cells. CD146 on these cells may facilitate their ability to bind to, and migrate through, endothelium, as has been reported for CD4+CD146+ T cells. PMID:24681356

  16. Mechanistic Contribution of Ubiquitous 15-Lipoxygenase-1 Expression Loss in Cancer Cells to Terminal Cell Differentiation Evasion

    OpenAIRE

    Moussalli, Micheline J.; Wu, Yuanqing; Zuo, Xiangsheng; Yang, Xiu L.; Wistuba, Ignacio Ivan; Raso, Maria G.; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Bowser, Jessica L.; Minna, John D.; Lotan, Reuben; SHUREIQI, IMAD

    2011-01-01

    Loss of terminal cell differentiation promotes tumorigenesis. 15-LOX-1 contributes to terminal cell differentiation in normal cells. The mechanistic significance of 15-LOX-1 expression loss in human cancers to terminal cell differentiation suppression is unknown. In a screen of 128 cancer cell lines representing more than 20 types of human cancer, we found that 15-LOX-1 mRNA expression levels were markedly lower than levels in terminally differentiated cells. Relative expression levels of 15-...

  17. ELK3 Expression Correlates With Cell Migration, Invasion, and Membrane Type 1-Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression in MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Sun-Hee; Lee, Je-Yong; Yang, Kyung-Min; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2015-01-01

    ELK3 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors. Its expression is associated with angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, and chondrogenesis. ELK3 inhibits endothelial migration and tube formation through the regulation of MT1-MMP transcription. This study assessed the function of ELK3 in breast cancer (BC) cells by comparing its expression between basal and luminal cells in silico and in vitro. In silico analysis showed that ELK3 expression was higher in the more aggressive basal BC cells than in luminal BC cells. Similarly, in vitro analysis showed that ELK3 mRNA and protein expression was higher in basal BC cells than in normal cells and luminal BC cells. To investigate whether ELK3 regulates basal cell migration or invasion, knockdown was achieved by siRNA in the basal BC cell line MDA-MB-231. Inhibition of ELK3 expression decreased cell migration and invasion and downregulated MT1-MMP, the expression of which is positively correlated with tumor cell invasion. In silico analysis revealed that ELK3 expression was associated with that of MT1-MMP in several BC cell lines (0.98 Pearson correlation coefficient). Though MT1-MMP expression was upregulated upon ELK3 nuclear translocation, ELK3 did not directly bind to the 1.3-kb promoter region of the MT1-MMP gene. These results suggest that ELK3 plays a positive role in the metastasis of BC cells by indirectly regulating MT1-MMP expression. PMID:26637400

  18. Ultrasound/Microbubble Enhances Foreign Gene Expression in ECV304 Cells and Murine Myocardium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongping GUO; Xiaorong LI; Xiaoyu LI; Ping SUN; Zhiguang WANG; Xiuying CHEN; Qi CHEN; Leming FAN; Bin ZHANG; Lizheng SHAO

    2004-01-01

    Although viral vectors are efficient systems to transfer foreign genes into cells or target tissues,safety issues remain in relation to human gene therapy. Microbubbles currently used as ultrasound contrast agents have been applied in transfection of genes. This study was designed to test the transfection efficiency and the expression of exogenous gene mediated by ultrasound irradiation enhanced air filled albumin microbubbles in ECV304 cell line in vitro and the heart of the mouse in vivo. Air filled microbubbles (2.0-4.0 μm in diameter) were created by sonicating the mixture of human albumin, glucose, mannitol and special additive that was designed for stabilization. Plasmid DNA loading the reporter genes was gently mixed with microbubbles. The mixture of plasmid DNA and microbubbles was administrated to cultured ECV304 cells and BALB/c mice (tail vein injection) under different ultrasound/microbubble conditions, and then the transfection and expression efficiency were examined. The results both in vivo and in vitro demonstrated that microbubble with ultrasound irradiation could significantly elevate the exogenous gene expression as compared with microbubble or ultrasound only. Overall, the present study showed that the ultrasound-target microbubble destruction method enhanced the exogenous gene expression in vivo and in vitro, and provided a gene therapy way not only efficient but also easy to be manipulated and carried out in clinical.

  19. Analysis of the regulation of fatty acid binding protein 7 expression in human renal carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiyama Takayuki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC will depend on the development of better biomarkers for predicting disease progression and aiding the design of appropriate therapies. One such marker may be fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7, also known as B-FABP and BLBP, which is expressed normally in radial glial cells of the developing central nervous system and cells of the mammary gland. Melanomas, glioblastomas, and several types of carcinomas, including RCC, overexpress FABP7. The abundant expression of FABP7 in primary RCCs compared to certain RCC-derived cell lines may allow the definition of the molecular components of FABP7's regulatory system. Results We determined FABP7 mRNA levels in six RCC cell lines. Two were highly expressed, whereas the other and the embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293 were weakly expressed FABP7 transcripts. Western blot analysis of the cell lines detected strong FABP7 expression only in one RCC cell line. Promoter activity in the RCC cell lines was 3- to 21-fold higher than that of HEK293. Deletion analysis demonstrated that three FABP7 promoter regions contributed to upregulated expression in RCC cell lines, but not in the HEK293 cell. Competition analysis of gel shifts indicated that OCT1, OCT6, and nuclear factor I (NFI bound to the FABP7 promoter region. Supershift experiments indicated that BRN2 (POU3F2 and NFI bound to the FABP7 promoter region as well. There was an inverse correlation between FABP7 promoter activity and BRN2 mRNA expression. The FABP7-positive cell line's NFI-DNA complex migrated faster than in other cell lines. Levels of NFIA mRNA were higher in the HEK293 cell line than in any of the six RCC cell lines. In contrast, NFIC mRNA expression was lower in the HEK293 cell line than in the six RCC cell lines. Conclusions Three putative FABP7 promoter regions drive reporter gene expression in RCC cell lines, but not in the HEK293 cell line. BRN2 and NFI may be key

  20. Malignant T cells express lymphotoxin alpha and drive endothelial activation in cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Britt; Christensen, Louise; Ralfkiaer, Ulrik;

    2015-01-01

    Lymphotoxin α (LTα) plays a key role in the formation of lymphatic vasculature and secondary lymphoid structures. Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is the most common primary lymphoma of the skin and in advanced stages, malignant T cells spreads through the lymphatic to regional lymph nodes...... to internal organs and blood. Yet, little is known about the mechanism of the CTCL dissemination. Here, we show that CTCL cells express LTα in situ and that LTα expression is driven by aberrantly activated JAK3/STAT5 pathway. Importantly, via TNF receptor 2, LTα functions as an autocrine factor by stimulating...... expression of IL-6 in the malignant cells. LTα and IL-6, together with VEGF promote angiogenesis by inducing endothelial cell sprouting and tube formation. Thus, we propose that LTα plays a role in malignant angiogenesis and disease progression in CTCL and may serve as a therapeutic target in this disease....

  1. Expression of Odontogenic Genes in Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Sara Bagheri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tooth loss is a common problem and since current tooth replacement methods cannot counter balance with biological tooth structures, regenerating natural tooth structures has become an ideal goal. A challenging problem in tooth regeneration is to find a proper clinically feasible cell to seed.This study was designed to investigate the odontogenic potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs for seeding in tooth regeneration.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, three pregnant Sprague Dawley (SD rats were used at the eleventh embryonic day and rat fetuses were removed surgically using semilunar flap under general anesthesia. The primary mandible was cut using a stereomicroscope. The epithelial and mesenchymal components were separated and the dissected oral epithelium was cultured for 3 days. We used flow cytometry analysis to confirm presence of mesenchymal stem cells and not hematopoietic cells and to demonstrate the presence of oral epithelium. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs and cultured oral epithelium were then co-cultured for 14 days. BMSCs cultured alone were used as controls. Expression of two odontogenic genes Pax9 and DMP1 was assessed using quantitative reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR.Results: Expression of two odontogenic genes, Pax9 and DMP1, were detected in BMSCs co-cultured with oral epithelium but not in the control group.Conclusion: Expression of Pax9 and DMP1 by human BMSCs in the proximity of odontogenic epithelium indicates odontogenic potential of these cells.

  2. Cambogin is preferentially cytotoxic to cells expressing PDGFR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Tian

    Full Text Available Platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs have been implicated in a wide array of human malignancies, including medulloblastoma (MB, the most common brain tumor of childhood. Although significant progress in MB biology and therapeutics has been achieved during the past decades, MB remains a horrible challenge to the physicians and researchers. Therefore, novel inhibitors targeting PDGFR signaling pathway may offer great promise for the treatment of MB. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and mechanisms of cambogin in Daoy MB cells. Our results show that cambogin triggers significant S phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via down regulation of cyclin A and E, and activation of caspases. More importantly, further mechanistic studies demonstrated that cambogin inhibits PDGFR signaling in Daoy and genetically defined mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF cell lines. These results suggest that cambogin is preferentially cytotoxic to cells expressing PDGFR. Our findings may provide a novel approach by targeting PDGFR signaling against MB.

  3. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • As2O3 inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As2O3 is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As2O3 induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As2O3 on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As2O3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As2O3 treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As2O3 is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer

  4. Liver-specific gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells is induced by liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudia Lange; Philipp Bassler; Michael V. Lioznov; Helge Bruns; Dietrich Kluth; Axel R. Zander; Henning C. Fiegel

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The origin of putative liver cells from distinct bone marrow stem cells, e.g. hematopoietic stem cells or multipotent adult progenitor cells was found in recent in vitro studies. Cell culture experiments revealed a key role of growth factors for the induction of liver-specific genes in stem cell cultures. We investigated the potential of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from bone marrow to differentiate into hepatocytic cells in vitro. Furthermore,we assessed the influence of cocultured liver cells on induction of liver-specific gene expression.METHODS: Mesenchymal stem cells were marked with green fluorescent protein (GFP) by retroviral gene transduction. Clonal marked MSC were either cultured under liver stimulating conditions using fibronectin-coated culture dishes and medium supplemented with SCF, HGF,EGF, and FGF-4 alone, or in presence of freshly isolated rat liver cells. Cells in cocultures were harvested and GFP+ or GFP- cells were separated using fluorescence activated cell sorting. RT-PCR analysis for the stem cell marker Thy1 and the hepatocytic markers CK-18, albumin, CK-19,and AFP was performed in the different cell populations.RESULTS: Under the specified culture conditions, rat MSC cocultured with liver cells expressed albumin-, CK-18,CK-19, and AFP-RNA over 3 weeks, whereas MSC cultured alone did not show liver specific gene expression.CONCLUSION: The results indicate that (1) rat MSC from bone marrow can differentiate towards hepatocytic lineage in vitro, and (2) that the microenvironment plays a decisive role for the induction of hepatic differentiation of rMSC.

  5. Gene expression profiles of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡庆柳; 朴英杰; 邹飞

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the gene expression profiles of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells.Methods Total RNA extracted from human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells underwent reverse transcription, and the products were labeled with α-32P dCTP. The cDNA probes of total RNA were hybridized to cDNA microarray with 1176 genes, and then the signals were analyzed by AtlasImage analysis software Version 1.01a.Results Fifteen genes associated with cell proliferation and signal transduction were up-regulated, and one gene that takes part in cell-to-cell adhesion was down-regulated in tendon cells.Conclusion The 15 up-regulated and one down-regulated genes may be beneficial to the orientational differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into tendon cells.

  6. Claudin-1, -3, -4 and -7 gene expression analyses in canine prostate carcinoma and mammary tissue derived cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, S C; Nagel, S; Junginger, J; Hewicker-Trautwein, M; Wagner, S; Heisterkamp, A; Ngezahayo, A; Nolte, I; Murua Escobar, H

    2016-01-01

    Claudins (CLDNs) are transmembrane proteins localised in the cell membrane of epithelial cells composing a structural and functional component of the tight junction protein complexes. In canine tumors deregulations of the CLDN expression patterns were described immunohistochemically. Targeting of claudin proteins has further been evaluated to establish novel therapeutic approaches by directed claudin binding. Precondition for the development of claudin targeting approaches in canine cells is the possibility to characterise claudin expression specifically and the availability of claudin positive cell lines. Herein PCR/qPCR assays were established allowing a rapid qualitative and quantitative characterisation of CLDN-1, -3, -4 and -7 gene expression in canine cell lines and tissues. Further commercially available antibodies were used to verify CLDN gene expression on protein level by Western blots. The developed assays were used to analyse six canine cell lines derived from mammary and prostate tissue for their CLDN-1, -3, -4 and -7 expressions. The canine cell line DT08/40 (prostate transitional cell carcinoma) was used for the establishment of specific CLDNs -1, -3, -4 and -7PCR/qPCR. The designed assays were verified by amplicon cloning and sequencing. Gene expressions were verified on protein level by Western blot. Additionally further cell lines were analysed for their CLDN-1, -3, -4 and -7 expression on mRNA and protein level (mammary derived cell lines: MTH53A (non-neoplastic), ZMTH3 (adenoma), MTH52C (carcinoma); prostate derived cell lines: DT08/46 and CT1258 (both adenocarcinoma).The screened cell lines showed expression for the CLDNs as follows: DT08/46 and DT08/40: CLDN-1, -3, -4 and -7 positive; CT1258: CLDN-1, -3, -4 and -7 negative; ZMTH3 and MTH52C: CLDN-1 and -7 positive, CLDN-3 and -4 negative; MTH53A: CLDN-1, -3 and -4 negative, CLDN-7 positive. Western blot analyses reflect the detected CLDN-1, -3, -4 and -7 expressions in the analysed cell

  7. Trichostatin A Regulates hGCN5 Expression and Cell Cycle on Daudi Cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hongli; CHEN Yan; CUI Guohui; WU Gang; WANG Tao; HU Jianli

    2006-01-01

    The expression of human general control of amino acid synthesis protein 5 (hGCN5) in human Burkitt's lymphoma Daudi cells in vitro, effects of Trichostatin A (TSA) on cell proliferation and apoptosis and the molecular mechanism of TSA inhibiting proliferation of Daudi cells were investigated. The effects of TSA on the growth of Daudi cells were studied by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The effect of TSA on the cell cycle of Daudi cells was assayed by a propidium iodide method. Immunochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the expression of hGCN5. The proliferation of Daudi cells was decreased in TSA-treated group with a 24 h IC50 value of 415.3979 μg/L. TSA induced apoptosis of Daudi cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment with TSA (200 and 400 μg/L) for 24 h, the apoptosis rates of Daudi cells were (14.74±2.04) % and (17.63±1.25) %, respectively. The cell cycle was arrested in G0/G1 phase (50, 100 μtg/L) and in G2/M phase (200 μg/L) by treatment with TSA for 24 h.The expression of hGCN5 protein in Daudi cells was increased in 24 h TSA-treated group by immunochemistry and Western blot (P<0.05). It was suggested that TSA as HDACIs could increase the expression of hGCN5 in Daudi cells, and might play an important role in regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of B-NHL cell line Daudi cells.

  8. EFFECT OF STAT3 SPECIFIC SHRNA EXPRESSION VECTOR ON PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS OF HUMAN PANCREATIC CANCER CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To construct signal transduction and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector and to investigate its inhibitory effects on STAT3 expression, cell proliferation and apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer. Methods Three pairs of hairpin-like oligonucleotide sequences specific for human STAT3 gene were designed and synthesized. The annealed oligonucleotide fragments were subcloned into pRNAT-U6.1/Neo plasmid. The STAT3 shRNA expressing vectors were confirmed by PCR and DNA sequencing. STAT3 mRNA and protein expression were examined by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. MTT assay and flow cytometry were performed to detect the state of cell proliferation and cell apoptosis, respectively. Results PCR and DNA sequencing showed that the oligonucleotide fragments were correctly inserted into pRNAT-U6.1/Neo plasmid. STAT3 expression and cell proliferation in the transfected cells was inhibited significantly by three STAT3 shRNA expressing vectors (P<0.05). ConclusionSTAT3 shRNA expression vector can effectively inhibit the expression of STAT3. Silencing of STAT3 with RNAi can significantly inhibit the proliferation and promotes the apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells and may provide a novel therapeutic target for treating pancreatic cancer.

  9. Characterization of PD-L1 Expression and Associated T cell Infiltrates in Metastatic Melanoma Samples from Variable Anatomic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Harriet M.; Zito, Christopher R.; Barr, Meaghan L.; Baine, Marina K.; Chiang, Veronica L.S.; Sznol, Mario; Rimm, David L.; Chen, Lieping; Jilaveanu, Lucia B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) tumor expression represents a mechanism of immune escape for melanoma cells. Drugs blocking PD-L1 or its receptor have shown unprecedented activity in melanoma, and our purpose was to characterize tumor PD-L1 expression and associated T-cell infiltration in metastatic melanomas. Experimental Design We used a tissue microarray (TMA) consisting of two cores from 95 metastatic melanomas characterized for clinical stage, outcome and anatomic site of disease. We assessed PD-L1 expression and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) content (total T cells and CD4/CD8 subsets) by quantitative immunofluorescence. Results High PD-L1 expression was associated with improved survival (P=0.02) and higher T cell content (P=0.0005). Higher T cell content (total and CD8 cells) were independently associated with improved overall survival; PD-L1 expression was not independently prognostic. High TIL content in extra-cerebral metastases was associated with increased time to developing brain metastases (P=0.03). Cerebral and dermal metastases had slightly lower PD-L1 expression than other sites, not statistically significant. Cerebral metastases had less T cells (P=0.01). Conclusions T cell infiltrated melanomas, particularly those with high CD8 T cell content, are more likely to be associated with PD-L1 expression in tumor cells, an improved prognosis, and increased time to development of brain metastases. Studies of T cell content and subsets should be incorporated into trials of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors to determine their predictive value. Furthermore, additional studies of anatomic sites with less PD-L1 expression and T cell infiltrate are needed to determine if discordant responses to PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors are seen at those sites. PMID:25788491

  10. Design-Based Learning for Biology: Genetic Engineering Experience Improves Understanding of Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefson, Michelle R.; Brinker, Rebecca A.; Vernacchio, Vincent J.; Schunn, Christian D.

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression is a difficult topic for students to learn and comprehend, at least partially because it involves various biochemical structures and processes occurring at the microscopic level. Designer Bacteria, a design-based learning (DBL) unit for high-school students, applies principles of DBL to the teaching of gene expression. Throughout…

  11. cDNA expression cloning in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, B J

    2001-05-01

    This unit contains protocols for expression cloning in mammalian cells. Either calcium phosphate- or liposome-mediated transfection of mammalian cells, or virus infection and liposome-mediated transfection are used to screen pools derived from a cDNA library. cDNA pools are prepared for cloning from library-transformed E. coli grown in liquid culture medium or on antibiotic-containing selection plates. Results of screening assays for expression can be detected using autoradiography of dishes of cultured cells to identify clones, direct visualization of radiolabeled cells on emulsion-coated and developed chamber slides, detection and quantification of gene activity by a functional (transport) assay with scintillation counting, or detection using a filter-based assay for binding of radioligand to membranes or whole cells. The most critical step of any cDNA cloning project is the establishment of the screening protocol. Therefore, the bioassay for the gene product must be established prior to executing any of these protocols, including construction of the cDNA library. PMID:18428491

  12. Recombinant genomes which express chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, C.M.; Moffat, L.F.; Howard, B.H.

    1982-09-01

    The authors constructed a series of recombinant genomes which directed expression of the enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in mammalian cells. The prototype recombinant in this series, pSV2-cat, consisted of the beta-lactamase gene and origin of replication from pBR322 coupled to a simian virus 40 (SV40) early transcription region into which CAT coding sequences were inserted. Readily measured levels of CAT accumulated within 48 h after the introduction of pSV2-cat DNA into African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Because endogenous CAT activity is not present in CV-1 or other mammalian cells, and because rapid, sensitive assays for CAT activity are available, these recombinants provided a uniquely convenient system for monitoring the expression of foreign DNAs in tissue culture cells. To demonstrate the usefulness of this system, we constructed derivatives of pSV2-cat from which part or all of the SV 40 promoter region was removed. Deletion of one copy of the 72-base-pair repeat sequence in the SV40 promoter caused no significant decrease in CAT synthesis in monkey kidney CV-1 cells; however, an additional deletion of 50 base pairs from the second copy of the repeats reduced CAT synthesis to 11% of its level in the wild type. They also constructed a recombinant, pSVO-cat, in which the entire SV40 promoter region was removed and a unique HindIII site was substituted for the insertion of other promoter sequences.

  13. Impact of methoxyacetic acid on mouse Leydig cell gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waxman David J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methoxyacetic acid (MAA is the active metabolite of the widely used industrial chemical ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, which is associated with various developmental and reproductive toxicities, including neural toxicity, blood and immune disorders, limb degeneration and testicular toxicity. Testicular toxicity is caused by degeneration of germ cells in association with changes in gene expression in both germ cells and Sertoli cells of the testis. This study investigates the impact of MAA on gene expression in testicular Leydig cells, which play a critical role in germ cell survival and male reproductive function. Methods Cultured mouse TM3 Leydig cells were treated with MAA for 3, 8, and 24 h and changes in gene expression were monitored by genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Results A total of 3,912 MAA-responsive genes were identified. Ingenuity Pathway analysis identified reproductive system disease, inflammatory disease and connective tissue disorder as the top biological functions affected by MAA. The MAA-responsive genes were classified into 1,366 early responders, 1,387 mid-responders, and 1,138 late responders, based on the time required for MAA to elicit a response. Analysis of enriched functional clusters for each subgroup identified 106 MAA early response genes involved in transcription regulation, including 32 genes associated with developmental processes. 60 DNA-binding proteins responded to MAA rapidly but transiently, and may contribute to the downstream effects of MAA seen for many mid and late response genes. Genes within the phosphatidylinositol/phospholipase C/calcium signaling pathway, whose activity is required for potentiation of nuclear receptor signaling by MAA, were also enriched in the set of early MAA response genes. In contrast, many of the genes responding to MAA at later time points encode membrane proteins that contribute to cell adhesion and membrane signaling. Conclusions These findings

  14. Classification of dendritic cell phenotypes from gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolezzi Francesca

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of relevant genes for sample classification is a common task in many gene expression studies. Although a number of tools have been developed to identify optimal gene expression signatures, they often generate gene lists that are too long to be exploited clinically. Consequently, researchers in the field try to identify the smallest set of genes that provide good sample classification. We investigated the genome-wide expression of the inflammatory phenotype in dendritic cells. Dendritic cells are a complex group of cells that play a critical role in vertebrate immunity. Therefore, the prediction of the inflammatory phenotype in these cells may help with the selection of immune-modulating compounds. Results A data mining protocol was applied to microarray data for murine cell lines treated with various inflammatory stimuli. The learning and validation data sets consisted of 155 and 49 samples, respectively. The data mining protocol reduced the number of probe sets from 5,802 to 10, then from 10 to 6 and finally from 6 to 3. The performances of a set of supervised classification models were compared. The best accuracy, when using the six following genes --Il12b, Cd40, Socs3, Irgm1, Plin2 and Lgals3bp-- was obtained by Tree Augmented Naïve Bayes and Nearest Neighbour (91.8%. Using the smallest set of three genes --Il12b, Cd40 and Socs3-- the performance remained satisfactory and the best accuracy was with Support Vector Machine (95.9%. These data mining models, using data for the genes Il12b, Cd40 and Socs3, were validated with a human data set consisting of 27 samples. Support Vector Machines (71.4% and Nearest Neighbour (92.6% gave the worst performances, but the remaining models correctly classified all the 27 samples. Conclusions The genes selected by the data mining protocol proposed were shown to be informative for discriminating between inflammatory and steady-state phenotypes in dendritic cells. The

  15. Gene expression profiles identify inflammatory signatures in dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Torri

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs constitute a heterogeneous group of antigen-presenting leukocytes important in activation of both innate and adaptive immunity. We studied the gene expression patterns of DCs incubated with reagents inducing their activation or inhibition. Total RNA was isolated from DCs and gene expression profiling was performed with oligonucleotide microarrays. Using a supervised learning algorithm based on Random Forest, we generated a molecular signature of inflammation from a training set of 77 samples. We then validated this molecular signature in a testing set of 38 samples. Supervised analysis identified a set of 44 genes that distinguished very accurately between inflammatory and non inflammatory samples. The diagnostic performance of the signature genes was assessed against an independent set of samples, by qRT-PCR. Our findings suggest that the gene expression signature of DCs can provide a molecular classification for use in the selection of anti-inflammatory or adjuvant molecules with specific effects on DC activity.

  16. Expression of hyaluronidase by tumor cells induces angiogenesis in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    D. Liu; Pearlman, E.; Diaconu, E.; Guo, K.; Mori, H.; Haqqi, T; Markowitz, S; Willson, J; Sy, M S

    1996-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorect...

  17. Developmental expression of BK channels in chick cochlear hair cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Mingjie

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cochlear hair cells are high-frequency sensory receptors. At the onset of hearing, hair cells acquire fast, calcium-activated potassium (BK currents, turning immature spiking cells into functional receptors. In non-mammalian vertebrates, the number and kinetics of BK channels are varied systematically along the frequency-axis of the cochlea giving rise to an intrinsic electrical tuning mechanism. The processes that control the appearance and heterogeneity of hair cell BK currents remain unclear. Results Quantitative PCR results showed a non-monotonic increase in BK α subunit expression throughout embryonic development of the chick auditory organ (i.e. basilar papilla. Expression peaked near embryonic day (E 19 with six times the transcript level of E11 sensory epithelia. The steady increase in gene expression from E11 to E19 could not explain the sudden acquisition of currents at E18-19, implicating post-transcriptional mechanisms. Protein expression also preceded function but progressed in a sequence from diffuse cytoplasmic staining at early ages to punctate membrane-bound clusters at E18. Electrophysiology data confirmed a continued refinement of BK trafficking from E18 to E20, indicating a translocation of BK clusters from supranuclear to subnuclear domains over this critical developmental age. Conclusions Gene products encoding BK α subunits are detected up to 8 days before the acquisition of anti-BK clusters and functional BK currents. Therefore, post-transcriptional mechanisms seem to play a key role in the delayed emergence of calcium-sensitive currents. We suggest that regulation of translation and trafficking of functional α subunits, near voltage-gated calcium channels, leads to functional BK currents at the onset of hearing.

  18. Construction of Eukaryotic Expression Plasmid of Human PRX3 and Its Expression in HEK-293FT Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯艳; 刘钊; 曹慧青; 孟宪敏; 瞿智玲; 熊密; 邓仲端

    2004-01-01

    To construct the eukaryotic expression plasmid of human PRX3 and measure its expression in the HEK-293FT cells, the full-length coding region of human PRX3 was cloned by PCR and inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA4-Xpress (A). HEK-293FT cells were transiently transfected with the recombinant plasmid. Western blot and immuofluorescence were used to detect the expression of the fusion protein. In the experiment, restriction analysis identified the construction of the recombinant plasmid and the inserted sequence was identical with that published on GenBank. Western blot and immunofluorescence confirmed the expression of the recombinant protein in transfected HEK-293FT cells. It was concluded that the eukaryotic expression plasmid of human PRX3 was constructed successfully and the recombinant could be expressed efficiently in HEK-293FT cells, which provides a sound basis for the further study on human PRX3.

  19. Weighted MMSE Beamforming Design for Weighted Sum-rate Maximization in Coordinated Multi-Cell MIMO Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Fan; De Carvalho, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a low-complexity design for the linear weighted MMSE (WMMSE) transmit filters of a coordinated multi-cell system with multiple users per cell. This design is based on a modified WMMSE approach applied to each transmitting base station individually incorporating the signals sent...... to the cell of interest and the signals leaked to the other cells. This novel design allows for closed-form expressions of the associated Lagrange multipliers and offers a lower computational complexity compared to known methods. In addition, we incorporate this design in an iterative algorithm to find...

  20. Design, Modeling, and Development of Microbial Cell Factories

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2014-03-26

    Using Metagenomic analysis, computational modeling, single cell and genome editing technologies, we will express desired microbial genes and their networks in suitable hosts for mass production of energy, food, and fine chemicals.

  1. Interfacial polymerization for colorimetric labeling of protein expression in cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob L Lilly

    Full Text Available Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium.

  2. Interfacial polymerization for colorimetric labeling of protein expression in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Jacob L; Sheldon, Phillip R; Hoversten, Liv J; Romero, Gabriela; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Berron, Brad J

    2014-01-01

    Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium.

  3. PEM Fuel Cells Redesign Using Biomimetic and TRIZ Design Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Keith Kin Kei

    Two formal design methodologies, biomimetic design and the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, TRIZ, were applied to the redesign of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Proof of concept prototyping was performed on two of the concepts for water management. The liquid water collection with strategically placed wicks concept demonstrated the potential benefits for a fuel cell. Conversely, the periodic flow direction reversal concepts might cause a potential reduction water removal from a fuel cell. The causes of this water removal reduction remain unclear. In additional, three of the concepts generated with biomimetic design were further studied and demonstrated to stimulate more creative ideas in the thermal and water management of fuel cells. The biomimetic design and the TRIZ methodologies were successfully applied to fuel cells and provided different perspectives to the redesign of fuel cells. The methodologies should continue to be used to improve fuel cells.

  4. Co-expression network analysis reveals transcription factors associated to cell wall biosynthesis in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Savio Siqueira; Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Poelking, Viviane Guzzo de Carli; Leite, Debora Chaves Coelho; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Barbosa, Marcio Henrique Pereira; Carneiro, Monalisa Sampaio; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2016-05-01

    Sugarcane is a hybrid of Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum, with minor contributions from other species in Saccharum and other genera. Understanding the molecular basis of cell wall metabolism in sugarcane may allow for rational changes in fiber quality and content when designing new energy crops. This work describes a comparative expression profiling of sugarcane ancestral genotypes: S. officinarum, S. spontaneum and S. robustum and a commercial hybrid: RB867515, linking gene expression to phenotypes to identify genes for sugarcane improvement. Oligoarray experiments of leaves, immature and intermediate internodes, detected 12,621 sense and 995 antisense transcripts. Amino acid metabolism was particularly evident among pathways showing natural antisense transcripts expression. For all tissues sampled, expression analysis revealed 831, 674 and 648 differentially expressed genes in S. officinarum, S. robustum and S. spontaneum, respectively, using RB867515 as reference. Expression of sugar transporters might explain sucrose differences among genotypes, but an unexpected differential expression of histones were also identified between high and low Brix° genotypes. Lignin biosynthetic genes and bioenergetics-related genes were up-regulated in the high lignin genotype, suggesting that these genes are important for S. spontaneum to allocate carbon to lignin, while S. officinarum allocates it to sucrose storage. Co-expression network analysis identified 18 transcription factors possibly related to cell wall biosynthesis while in silico analysis detected cis-elements involved in cell wall biosynthesis in their promoters. Our results provide information to elucidate regulatory networks underlying traits of interest that will allow the improvement of sugarcane for biofuel and chemicals production. PMID:26820137

  5. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  6. Prostate stromal cells express the progesterone receptor to control cancer cell mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reciprocal interactions between epithelium and stroma play vital roles for prostate cancer development and progression. Enhanced secretions of cytokines and growth factors by cancer associated fibroblasts in prostate tumors create a favorable microenvironment for cancer cells to grow and metastasize. Our previous work showed that the progesterone receptor (PR was expressed specifically in prostate stromal fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. However, the expression levels of PR and its impact to tumor microenvironment in prostate tumors are poorly understood. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry assays are applied to human prostate tissue biopsies. Cell migration, invasion and proliferation assays are performed using human prostate cells. Real-time PCR and ELISA are applied to measure gene expression at molecular levels. RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry assays showed that PR protein levels were decreased in cancer associated stroma when compared with paired normal prostate stroma. Using in vitro prostate stromal cell models, we showed that conditioned media collected from PR positive stromal cells inhibited prostate cancer cell migration and invasion, but had minor suppressive impacts on cancer cell proliferation. PR suppressed the secretion of stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and interlukin-6 (IL-6 by stromal cells independent to PR ligands. Blocking PR expression by siRNA or supplementation of exogenous SDF-1 or IL-6 to conditioned media from PR positive stromal cells counteracted the inhibitory effects of PR to cancer cell migration and invasion. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased expression of the PR in cancer associated stroma may contribute to the elevated SDF-1 and IL-6 levels in prostate tumors and enhance prostate tumor progression.

  7. A population of human brain cells expressing phenotypic markers of more than one lineage can be induced in vitro to differentiate into mesenchymal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proliferating astrocytic cells from germinal, as well as mature areas of brain parenchyma, have the characteristics of neural stem/progenitor cells and are capable of generating both neurons and glia. We previously reported that primary fetal human brain cells, designated as Normal Human Astrocytes (NHA), expressed, in addition to GFAP, Vimentin and Nestin, low levels of βIII-Tubulin, an early neuronal marker, and differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in vitro. Here, we showed that primary NHA cells co-express low levels of mesenchymal markers Fibronectin and Collagen-1 in culture. These cells transitioned into mesenchymal-like cells when cultured in adherent conditions in serum containing media. The mesenchymal-like derivatives of these cells were characterized based on their morphological changes, high expression of Vimentin and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, Collagen-1 and Fibronectin, and decline of neural markers. When incubated in osteogenic and adipogenic induction media, the mesenchymal-like cells differentiated into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Furthermore, NHA cells express markers of neural crest cells, SOX-10 and p75. These data support the idea of ectoderm-derived mesenchymal lineages. These findings suggest that a population of primitive fetal brain cells with neural/neural crest/mesenchymal phenotype, resembles the remarkable phenotypic plasticity of neural crest cells, and differentiates into adipocytes and osteocytes under the influence of environmental factors

  8. Alterations in integrin expression modulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors mediating the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through the extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. METHODS: In this study, sub-populations of the human pancreatic cancer cell line, MiaPaCa-2 were established which displayed differences in invasion, adhesion, anoikis, anchorage-independent growth and integrin expression. RESULTS: Clone #3 displayed higher invasion with less adhesion, while Clone #8 was less invasive with increased adhesion to ECM proteins compared to MiaPaCa-2. Clone #8 was more sensitive to anoikis than Clone #3 and MiaPaCa-2, and displayed low colony-forming efficiency in an anchorage-independent growth assay. Integrins beta 1, alpha 5 and alpha 6 were over-expressed in Clone #8. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), integrin beta1 knockdown in Clone #8 cells increased invasion through matrigel and fibronectin, increased motility, decreased adhesion and anoikis. Integrin alpha 5 and alpha 6 knockdown also resulted in increased motility, invasion through matrigel and decreased adhesion. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that altered expression of integrins interacting with different extracellular matrixes may play a significant role in suppressing the aggressive invasive phenotype. Analysis of these clonal populations of MiaPaCa-2 provides a model for investigations into the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma.

  9. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Expression on Intracellular Granule Movement in Pancreatic α Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokawa, Satoru; Furuno, Tadahide; Suzuki, Takahiro; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Hirashima, Naohide

    2016-09-01

    Although glucagon secreted from pancreatic α cells plays a role in increasing glucose concentrations in serum, the mechanism regulating glucagon secretion from α cells remains unclear. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), identified as an adhesion molecule in α cells, has been reported not only to communicate among α cells and between nerve fibers, but also to prevent excessive glucagon secretion from α cells. Here, we investigated the effect of CADM1 expression on the movement of intracellular secretory granules in α cells because the granule transport is an important step in secretion. Spinning disk microscopic analysis showed that granules moved at a mean velocity of 0.236 ± 0.010 μm/s in the mouse α cell line αTC6 that expressed CADM1 endogenously. The mean velocity was significantly decreased in CADM1-knockdown (KD) cells (mean velocity: 0.190 ± 0.016 μm/s). The velocity of granule movement decreased greatly in αTC6 cells treated with the microtubule-depolymerizing reagent nocodazole, but not in αTC6 cells treated with the actin-depolymerizing reagent cytochalasin D. No difference in the mean velocity was observed between αTC6 and CADM1-KD cells treated with nocodazole. These results suggest that intracellular granules in pancreatic α cells move along the microtubule network, and that CADM1 influences their velocity. PMID:27262873

  10. Enhanced protein expression in the baculovirus/insect cell system using engineered SUMO fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Spurrier, Joshua; Butt, Tauseef R; Strickler, James E

    2008-11-01

    Recombinant protein expression in insect cells varies greatly from protein to protein. A fusion tag that is not only a tool for detection and purification, but also enhances expression and/or solubility would greatly facilitate both structure/function studies and therapeutic protein production. We have shown that fusion of SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) to several test proteins leads to enhanced expression levels in Escherichia coli. In eukaryotic expression systems, however, the SUMO tag could be cleaved by endogenous desumoylase. In order to adapt SUMO-fusion technology to these systems, we have developed an alternative SUMO-derived tag, designated SUMOstar, which is not processed by native SUMO proteases. In the present study, we tested the SUMOstar tag in a baculovirus/insect cell system with several proteins, i.e. mouse UBP43, human tryptase beta II, USP4, USP15, and GFP. Our results demonstrate that fusion to SUMOstar enhanced protein expression levels at least 4-fold compared to either the native or His(6)-tagged proteins. We isolated active SUMOstar tagged UBP43, USP4, USP15, and GFP. Tryptase was active following cleavage with a SUMOstar specific protease. The SUMOstar system will make significant impact in difficult-to-express proteins and especially to those proteins that require the native N-terminal residue for function.

  11. Erythropoietin protects myocardin-expressing cardiac stem cells against cytotoxicity of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madonna, Rosalinda [The Center for Cardiovascular Biology and Atherosclerosis Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Texas (United States); Institute of Cardiology, and Center of Excellence on Aging, ' G. d' Annunzio' University, Chieti (Italy); Shelat, Harnath; Xue, Qun; Willerson, James T. [The Center for Cardiovascular Biology and Atherosclerosis Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Texas (United States); The Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); De Caterina, Raffaele [Institute of Cardiology, and Center of Excellence on Aging, ' G. d' Annunzio' University, Chieti (Italy); Geng, Yong-Jian, E-mail: yong-jian.geng@uth.tmc.edu [The Center for Cardiovascular Biology and Atherosclerosis Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Texas (United States); The Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Cardiac stem cells are vulnerable to inflammation caused by infarction or ischemic injury. The growth factor, erythropoietin (Epo), ameliorates the inflammatory response of the myocardium to ischemic injury. This study was designed to assess the role of Epo in regulation of expression and activation of the cell death-associated intracellular signaling components in cardiac myoblasts stimulated with the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. Cardiac myoblasts isolated from canine embryonic hearts characterized by expression of myocardin A, a promyogenic transcription factor for cardiovascular muscle development were pretreated with Epo and then exposed to TNF-{alpha}. Compared to untreated cells, the Epo-treated cardiac myoblasts exhibited better morphology and viability. Immunoblotting revealed lower levels of active caspase-3 and reductions in iNOS expression and NO production in Epo-treated cells. Furthermore, Epo pretreatment reduced nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B and inhibited phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B (I{kappa}B) in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated cardiac myoblasts. Thus, Epo protects cardiac myocyte progenitors or myoblasts against the cytotoxic effects of TNF-{alpha} by inhibiting NF-{kappa}B-mediated iNOS expression and NO production and by preventing caspase-3 activation.

  12. Short-chain ceramides depress integrin cell surface expression and function in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morad, Samy A F; Bridges, Lance C; Almeida Larrea, Alex D; Mayen, Anthony L; MacDougall, Matthew R; Davis, Traci S; Kester, Mark; Cabot, Myles C

    2016-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly metastatic, significantly so to liver, a characteristic that embodies one of the most challenging aspects of treatment. The integrin family of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion receptors plays a central role in migration and invasion, functions that underlie metastatic potential. In the present work we sought to determine the impact of ceramide, which plays a key modulatory role in cancer suppression, on integrin cell surface expression and function in CRC cells in order to reveal possible ceramide-centric effects on tumor cell motility. Human CRC cells LoVo, HT-29, and HCT-116 were employed, which represent lines established from primary and metastatic sites. A cell-permeable, short-chain analog, C6-ceramide, was used as ceramide mimic. Exposure of cells to C6-ceramide (24 h) promoted a dose-dependent (2.5-10 µM) decrease in the expression of cell surface β1 and β4 integrin subunits in all cell lines; at 10 µM C6-ceramide, the decreases ranged from 30 to 50% of the control. Expression of cell surface αVβ6 integrin, which is associated with advanced invasion in CRC, was also suppressed by C6-ceramide. Decreases in integrin expression translated to diminished cellular adhesion, 50% of the control at 5 µM C6-ceramide, and markedly reduced cellular migration, approximately 30-40% of the control in all cell lines. Physicochemical examination revealed potent efficacy of nano-formulated C6-ceramide, but inferior activity of dihydro-C6-ceramide and L-C6-ceramide, compared to the unsaturated counterpart and the natural d-enantiomer, respectively. These studies demonstrate novel actions of ceramides that may have application in suppression of tumor metastasis, in addition to their known tumor suppressor effects. PMID:27045476

  13. Expression of cell cycle regulating factor mRNA in small cell lung cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, M; Poulsen, H S; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    and CDK6 when in vitro and in vivo data were compared. Two of the cell lines that express the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein had no sign of a deregulated Rb pathway but further studies at the protein level are necessary to demonstrate whether these two cell lines should have a normal Rb pathway or whether...

  14. Expression of E-selectin ligands on circulating tumor cells: Cross-regulation with cancer stem cell regulatory pathways?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica M. Burdick

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Although significant progress has been made in the fight against cancer, successful treatment strategies have yet to be developed to combat those tumors that have metastasized to distant organs. Poor characterization of the molecular mechanisms of cancer spread is a major impediment to designing predictive diagnostics and effective clinical interventions against late stage disease. In hematogenous metastasis, it is widely suspected that circulating tumor cells (CTCs express specific adhesion molecules that actively initiate contact with the vascular endothelium lining the vessel walls of the target organ. This tethering is mediated by ligands expressed by CTCs that bind to E-selectin expressed by endothelial cells. However, it is currently unknown whether expression of functional E-selectin ligands on CTCs is related to cancer stem cell (CSC regulatory or maintenance pathways, particularly epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and the reverse, mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we explore the potential roles of these mechanisms on the dynamic regulation of selectin ligands mediating CTC trafficking during metastasis.

  15. Analysis of the regulation of fatty acid binding protein 7 expression in human renal carcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama Takayuki; Teratani Takumi; Takayama Tatsuya; Takaoka Naohisa; Mugiya Soichi; Ozono Seiichiro

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Improving the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) will depend on the development of better biomarkers for predicting disease progression and aiding the design of appropriate therapies. One such marker may be fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7), also known as B-FABP and BLBP, which is expressed normally in radial glial cells of the developing central nervous system and cells of the mammary gland. Melanomas, glioblastomas, and several types of carcinomas, including RCC,...

  16. An index for regular expression quering: Design and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Tsang, Dominic

    2011-01-01

    The like regular expression predicate has been part of the SQL standard since at least 1989. However, despite its popularity and wide usage, database vendors provide only limited indexing support for regular expression queries which almost always require a full table scan. In this paper we propose a rigorous and robust approach for providing indexing support for regular expression queries. Our approach consists of formulating the indexing problem as a combinatorial optimization problem. We begin with a database, abstracted as a collection of strings. From this data set we generate a query workload. The input to the optimization problem is the database and the workload. The output is a set of multigrams (substrings) which can be used as keys to records which satisfy the query workload. The multigrams can then be integrated with the data structure (like B+ trees) to provide indexing support for the queries. We provide a deterministic and a randomized approximation algorithm (with provable guarantees) to solve t...

  17. Conservation of spermatogonial stem cell marker expression in undifferentiated felid spermatogonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansandt, Lindsey M; Livesay, Janelle L; Dickson, Melissa Joy; Li, Lei; Pukazhenthi, Budhan S; Keefer, Carol L

    2016-09-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are distinct in their ability to self-renew, transmit genetic information, and persist throughout the life of an individual. These characteristics make SSCs a useful tool for addressing diverse challenges such as efficient transgenic production in nonrodent, biomedical animal models, or preservation of the male genome for species in which survival of frozen-thawed sperm is low. A requisite first step to access this technology in felids is the establishment of molecular markers. This study was designed to evaluate, in the domestic cat (Felis catus), the expression both in situ and following enrichment in vitro of six genes (GFRA1, GPR125, ZBTB16, POU5F1, THY1, and UCHL1) that had been previously identified as SSC markers in other species. Antibodies for surface markers glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor alpha 1, G protein-coupled receptor 125, and thymus cell antigen 1 could not be validated, whereas Western blot analysis of prepubertal, peripubertal, and adult cat testis confirmed protein expression for the intracellular markers ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase 1, zinc finger and BTB domain-containing protein 16, and POU domain, class 5, transcription factor 1. Colocalization of the markers by immunohistochemistry revealed that several cells within the subpopulation adjacent to the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules and identified morphologically as spermatogonia, expressed all three intracellular markers. Studies performed on cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) and Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) testis exhibited a conserved expression pattern in protein molecular weights, relative abundance, and localization of positive cells within the testis. The expression of the three intracellular SSC marker proteins in domestic and wild cat testes confirms conservation of these markers in felids. Enrichment of marker transcripts after differential plating was also observed. These markers will

  18. A versatile system for USER cloning-based assembly of expression vectors for mammalian cell engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mathilde Lund

    Full Text Available A new versatile mammalian vector system for protein production, cell biology analyses, and cell factory engineering was developed. The vector system applies the ligation-free uracil-excision based technique--USER cloning--to rapidly construct mammalian expression vectors of multiple DNA fragments and with maximum flexibility, both for choice of vector backbone and cargo. The vector system includes a set of basic vectors and a toolbox containing a multitude of DNA building blocks including promoters, terminators, selectable marker- and reporter genes, and sequences encoding an internal ribosome entry site, cellular localization signals and epitope- and purification tags. Building blocks in the toolbox can be easily combined as they contain defined and tested Flexible Assembly Sequence Tags, FASTs. USER cloning with FASTs allows rapid swaps of gene, promoter or selection marker in existing plasmids and simple construction of vectors encoding proteins, which are fused to fluorescence-, purification-, localization-, or epitope tags. The mammalian expression vector assembly platform currently allows for the assembly of up to seven fragments in a single cloning step with correct directionality and with a cloning efficiency above 90%. The functionality of basic vectors for FAST assembly was tested and validated by transient expression of fluorescent model proteins in CHO, U-2-OS and HEK293 cell lines. In this test, we included many of the most common vector elements for heterologous gene expression in mammalian cells, in addition the system is fully extendable by other users. The vector system is designed to facilitate high-throughput genome-scale studies of mammalian cells, such as the newly sequenced CHO cell lines, through the ability to rapidly generate high-fidelity assembly of customizable gene expression vectors.

  19. Simvastatin modulates mesenchymal stromal cell proliferation and gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Lucíola Zanette

    Full Text Available Statins are widely used hypocholesterolemic drugs that block the mevalonate pathway, responsible for the biosysnthesis of cholesterol. However, statins also have pleiotropic effects that interfere with several signaling pathways. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are a heterogeneous mixture of cells that can be isolated from a variety of tissues and are identified by the expression of a panel of surface markers and by their ability to differentiate in vitro into osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC were isolated from amniotic membranes and bone marrows and characterized based on ISCT (International Society for Cell Therapy minimal criteria. Simvastatin-treated cells and controls were directly assayed by CFSE (Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester staining to assess their cell proliferation and their RNA was used for microarray analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR. These MSC were also evaluated for their ability to inhibit PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation. We show here that simvastatin negatively modulates MSC proliferation in a dose-dependent way and regulates the expression of proliferation-related genes. Importantly, we observed that simvastatin increased the percentage of a subset of smaller MSC, which also were actively proliferating. The association of MSC decreased size with increased pluripotency and the accumulating evidence that statins may prevent cellular senescence led us to hypothesize that simvastatin induces a smaller subpopulation that may have increased ability to maintain the entire pool of MSC and also to protect them from cellular senescence induced by long-term cultures/passages in vitro. These results may be important to better understand the pleiotropic effects of statins and its effects on the biology of cells with regenerative potential.

  20. Expression of subtypes of somatostatin receptors in hepatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Han Song; Xi-Sheng Leng; Tao Li; Zhi-Zhong Qin; Ji-Run Peng; Li Zhao; Yu-Hua Wei; Xin Yu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the mechanism by which somatostatin and its analogue exert the influence on liver fibrosis, and to investigate the mRNA expression of somatostatin receptors subtypes (SSTRs) and the distribution of somatostatin analogue octreotide in rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs).METHODS: HSCs were isolated from Sprague Dawley (SD)rats byin situ perfusion and density gradient centrifugation.After several passages, the mRNA expression of 5 subtypes of SSTRs were assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). HSCs were planted on coverslip and co-cultured with octreotide tagged by FITC. Then the distribution of FITC fluorescence was observed under laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) in 12-24 h.RESULTS: There were mRNA expression of SSTR2, SSTR3and SSTR5 but not SSTR1 and SSTR4 in SD rat HSCs. The mRNA expression level of SSTR2 was significantly higher than that of other subtypes (P<0.01). FITC fluorescence of octreotide was clearly observed on the surface and in the cytoplasm, but not in the nuclei of HSCs under LSCM.CONCLUSION: The effect exerted by somatostatin and its analogues on HSCs may mainly depend on the expression of SSTR2, SSTR3 and SSTR5. Octreotide can perfectly combine with HSCs, and thereby exerts its biological activity on regulating the characters of active HSCs. This provides a potential prevention and management against liver fibrosis.

  1. Expression of T cell factor-4 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chun-yan; WANG Yan; CUI Ze-shi; WANG En-hua

    2005-01-01

    Background T cell factor- 4 (TCF- 4) plays an important role in development and carcinogenesis. Recently, the role of TCF- 4 has been described in colon cancer and other cancers. However, whether TCF- 4 plays a similar role in lung cancer is unknown. To answer this question, we studied the expression of TCF- 4 protein and mRNA in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the relation of TCF- 4 expression pattern to histological type and cell differentiation. Methods Tissue samples from sixty cases of pathologically diagnosed NSCLC and eight normal tissue samples were obtained between September 2001 and March 2003. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the distribution of TCF- 4 protein. The staining patterns of the tumors were divided into 4 categories: nuclear staining alone or nuclear staining greater than cytoplasmic staining; cytoplasmic staining or cytoplasmic staining greater than nuclear staining; equal nuclear and cytoplasmic staining; no nuclear staining or cytoplasmic staining. The integrated optical density (OD) values of all sections were analyzed by UIC MetaMorph image analysis software. The expression of TCF- 4 mRNA was detected by one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The integrated density values of the PCR products were analyzed semi-quantitatively.Results Immunohistochemistry showed that there was no expression of TCF- 4 in normal tissue. However, TCF- 4 was expressed in 86.7% (52/60) of NSCLC samples, mainly in the nuclei of tumor cells. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in TCF- 4 localization patterns between squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas (P<0.05). The integrated OD values of TCF- 4 expression was significantly higher in tumors with moderate-poor cell differentiation than in well differentiated tumors (51.63±6.67 vs 46.13±12.31, P<0.01). There was no TCF- 4 mRNA expression in normal tissue. However, 63.9% (23/36) of carcinoma samples expressed TCF- 4 mRNA. TCF- 4 mRNA expression was

  2. Down-Regulation of CXCR4 Expression by siRNA Inhibits Invasive Ability of Breast Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the efficiency of gene silencing by CXCR4-siRNAs (small interfering RNA), and to examine the invasive ability and the expression of other metastatic-associated genes in siRNA-treated breast cancer cells.METHODS Three siRNAs were designed and cloned into the pSilenc TM 3.1-H1 neo vector. The reconstructed plasmids were purified and transfected into the T47D breast cancer cell line, which highly expressed CXCR4.The amount of CXCR4 expression in the transfected cells was measured by flow cytometry and Real-time PCR. Cell invasive ability was evaluated using 24-well Matrigel invasion chambers. In addition, the expression of other metastatic-associated genes, such as E-cad, IGFBP-5, FN and MMP-2, was assessed by Real-time PCR.RESULTS The suppression rates of CXCR4 mRNA expression reached 95.7%, 85.9% and 98.3%compared with control-siRNA cells in the 3 CXCR4-siRNA T47D cells respectively. FCM assays for CXCR4 protein expression showed a similar inhibitory effect. The invasion indexes of these CXCR4-siRNA cells were 0.037, 0.290 and 0.188 respectively compared with control-siRNA cells. After treatment of the cells with CXCR4-siRNA, the expression of E-cad showed an upward tendency and that of IGFBP-5 had a downward trend, while alteration in expression of FN and MMP2 varied without a consistant effect.CONCLUSION CXCR4 plays an important role in modulating migration of human breast cancer cells. Small interfering RNA can significantly silence the CXCR4 gene in the human T47D breast cancer cell line. The results of this study strengthen the need for further research on novel gene therapy against breast cancer metastasis.

  3. Expression of stem cell markers in the human fetal kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Metsuyanim

    Full Text Available In the human fetal kidney (HFK self-renewing stem cells residing in the metanephric mesenchyme (MM/blastema are induced to form all cell types of the nephron till 34(th week of gestation. Definition of useful markers is crucial for the identification of HFK stem cells. Because wilms' tumor, a pediatric renal cancer, initiates from retention of renal stem cells, we hypothesized that surface antigens previously up-regulated in microarrays of both HFK and blastema-enriched stem-like wilms' tumor xenografts (NCAM, ACVRIIB, DLK1/PREF, GPR39, FZD7, FZD2, NTRK2 are likely to be relevant markers. Comprehensive profiling of these putative and of additional stem cell markers (CD34, CD133, c-Kit, CD90, CD105, CD24 in mid-gestation HFK was performed using immunostaining and FACS in conjunction with EpCAM, an epithelial surface marker that is absent from the MM and increases along nephron differentiation and hence can be separated into negative, dim or bright fractions. No marker was specifically localized to the MM. Nevertheless, FZD7 and NTRK2 were preferentially localized to the MM and emerging tubules (50% of HFK cells and predominantly co-express EpCAM(bright, indicating they are mostly markers of differentiation. Furthermore, localization of NCAM exclusively in the MM and in its nephron progenitor derivatives but also in stroma and the expression pattern of significantly elevated renal stem/progenitor genes Six2, Wt1, Cited1, and Sall1 in NCAM(+EpCAM(- and to a lesser extent in NCAM(+EpCAM(+ fractions confirmed regional identity of cells and assisted us in pinpointing the presence of subpopulations that are putative MM-derived progenitor cells (NCAM(+EpCAM(+FZD7(+, MM stem cells (NCAM(+EpCAM(-FZD7(+ or both (NCAM(+FZD7(+. These results and concepts provide a framework for developing cell selection strategies for human renal cell-based therapies.

  4. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development.

  5. Gene Expression Music Algorithm-Based Characterization of the Ewing Sarcoma Stem Cell Signature

    OpenAIRE

    Staege, Martin Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Gene Expression Music Algorithm (GEMusicA) is a method for the transformation of DNA microarray data into melodies that can be used for the characterization of differentially expressed genes. Using this method we compared gene expression profiles from endothelial cells (EC), hematopoietic stem cells, neuronal stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and defined a set of genes that can discriminate between the different stem cell types. We analyzed the behavior ...

  6. Design of virtual manufacturing cells : a mathematical programming approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slomp, J.; Chowdary, B.V.; Suresh, N.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of virtual cellular manufacturing (CM) system is considered, and a multi-objective design procedure is developed for designing such cells in real time. Retaining the functional layout, virtual cells are addressed as temporary groupings of machines, jobs and workers to reali

  7. Applications of ``PV Optics`` for solar cell and module design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Madjdpour, J.; Chen, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes some applications of a new optics software package, PV Optics, developed for the optical design of solar cells and modules. PV Optics is suitable for the analysis and design of both thick and thin solar cells. It also includes a feature for calculation of metallic losses related to contacts and back reflectors.

  8. Retinoic acid promotes the development of Arg1-expressing dendritic cells for the regulation of T-cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jinsam; Thangamani, Shankar; Kim, Myung H.; Ulrich, Benjamin; Morris, Sidney M.; Chang H Kim

    2013-01-01

    Arginase I (Arg1), an enzyme expressed by many cell types including myeloid cells, can regulate immune responses. Expression of Arg1 in myeloid cells is regulated by a number of cytokines and tissue factors that influence cell development and activation. Retinoic acid, produced from vitamin A, regulates the homing and differentiation of lymphocytes and plays important roles in the regulation of immunity and immune tolerance. We report here that optimal expression of Arg1 in dendritic cells re...

  9. Regulation of. beta. -cell glucose transporter gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ling; Alam, Tausif; Johnson, J.H.; Unger, R.H. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA) Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX (USA)); Hughes, S.; Newgard, C.B. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA))

    1990-06-01

    It has been postulated that a glucose transporter of {beta} cells (GLUT-2) may be important in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. To determine whether this transporter is constitutively expressed or regulated, the authors subjected conscious unrestrained Wistar rats to perturbations in glucose homeostasis and quantitated {beta}-cell GLUT-2 mRNA by in situ hybridization. After 3 hr of hypoglycemia, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA signal densities were reduced by 25% of the level in control rats. After 4 days, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA densities were reduced by 85% and 65%, respectively. After 12 days of hypoglycemia, the K{sub m} for 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport in isolated rat islets, normally 18-20 mM, was 2.5 mM. This provides functional evidence of a profound reduction of high K{sub m} glucose transporter in {beta} cells. In contrast, GLUT-2 was only slightly reduced by hypoglycemia in liver. To determine the effect of prolonged hyperglycemia, they also infused animals with 50% (wt/vol) glucose for 5 days. Hyperglycemic clamping increased GLUT-2 mRNA by 46% whereas proinsulin mRNA doubled. They conclude that GLUT-2 expression in {beta} cells, but not liver, is subject to regulation by certain perturbations in blood glucose homeostasis.

  10. Regulation of β-cell glucose transporter gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been postulated that a glucose transporter of β cells (GLUT-2) may be important in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. To determine whether this transporter is constitutively expressed or regulated, the authors subjected conscious unrestrained Wistar rats to perturbations in glucose homeostasis and quantitated β-cell GLUT-2 mRNA by in situ hybridization. After 3 hr of hypoglycemia, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA signal densities were reduced by 25% of the level in control rats. After 4 days, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA densities were reduced by 85% and 65%, respectively. After 12 days of hypoglycemia, the Km for 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport in isolated rat islets, normally 18-20 mM, was 2.5 mM. This provides functional evidence of a profound reduction of high Km glucose transporter in β cells. In contrast, GLUT-2 was only slightly reduced by hypoglycemia in liver. To determine the effect of prolonged hyperglycemia, they also infused animals with 50% (wt/vol) glucose for 5 days. Hyperglycemic clamping increased GLUT-2 mRNA by 46% whereas proinsulin mRNA doubled. They conclude that GLUT-2 expression in β cells, but not liver, is subject to regulation by certain perturbations in blood glucose homeostasis

  11. Co-Expression of Cancer Stem Cell Markers Corresponds to a Pro-Tumorigenic Expression Profile in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoda, Jan; Hermanova, Marketa; Loja, Tomas; Nemec, Pavel; Neradil, Jakub; Karasek, Petr; Veselska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. Its dismal prognosis is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that have been identified in PDAC using various markers. However, the co-expression of all of these markers has not yet been evaluated. Furthermore, studies that compare the expression levels of CSC markers in PDAC tumor samples and in cell lines derived directly from those tumors are lacking. Here, we analyzed the expression of putative CSC markers—CD24, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD133, and nestin—by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and quantitative PCR in 3 PDAC-derived cell lines and by immunohistochemistry in 3 corresponding tumor samples. We showed high expression of the examined CSC markers among all of the cell lines and tumor samples, with the exception of CD24 and CD44, which were enriched under in vitro conditions compared with tumor tissues. The proportions of cells positive for the remaining markers were comparable to those detected in the corresponding tumors. Co-expression analysis using flow cytometry revealed that CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells represented a significant population of the cells (range, 43 to 72%) among the cell lines. The highest proportion of CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells was detected in the cell line derived from the tumor of a patient with the shortest survival. Using gene expression profiling, we further identified the specific pro-tumorigenic expression profile of this cell line compared with the profiles of the other two cell lines. Together, CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells are present in PDAC cell lines derived from primary tumors, and their increased proportion corresponds with a pro-tumorigenic gene expression profile. PMID:27414409

  12. Co-Expression of Cancer Stem Cell Markers Corresponds to a Pro-Tumorigenic Expression Profile in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoda, Jan; Hermanova, Marketa; Loja, Tomas; Nemec, Pavel; Neradil, Jakub; Karasek, Petr; Veselska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. Its dismal prognosis is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that have been identified in PDAC using various markers. However, the co-expression of all of these markers has not yet been evaluated. Furthermore, studies that compare the expression levels of CSC markers in PDAC tumor samples and in cell lines derived directly from those tumors are lacking. Here, we analyzed the expression of putative CSC markers-CD24, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD133, and nestin-by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and quantitative PCR in 3 PDAC-derived cell lines and by immunohistochemistry in 3 corresponding tumor samples. We showed high expression of the examined CSC markers among all of the cell lines and tumor samples, with the exception of CD24 and CD44, which were enriched under in vitro conditions compared with tumor tissues. The proportions of cells positive for the remaining markers were comparable to those detected in the corresponding tumors. Co-expression analysis using flow cytometry revealed that CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells represented a significant population of the cells (range, 43 to 72%) among the cell lines. The highest proportion of CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells was detected in the cell line derived from the tumor of a patient with the shortest survival. Using gene expression profiling, we further identified the specific pro-tumorigenic expression profile of this cell line compared with the profiles of the other two cell lines. Together, CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells are present in PDAC cell lines derived from primary tumors, and their increased proportion corresponds with a pro-tumorigenic gene expression profile. PMID:27414409

  13. Restoration of p53 Expression in Human Cancer Cell Lines Upregulates the Expression of Notch1: Implications for Cancer Cell Fate Determination after Genotoxic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Following genotoxic stress, transcriptional activation of target genes by p53 tumor suppressor is critical in cell fate determination. Here we report that the restoration of p53 function in human cancer cell lines that are deficient in p53 function upregulated the expression of Notch1. Interestingly, the expression of wild-type p53 in human prostate and breast cancer cell lines correlated well with increased expression of Notch1. Furthermore, knockdown of p53 expression in cancer cells that express wild-type p53 resulted in reduced expression of Notch1. Importantly, genotoxic stress to cancer cells that resulted in activation of p53 also upregulated the expression of Notch1. Moreover, p53mediated induction of Notch1 expression was associated with stimulation of the activity of Notch-responsive reporters. Notably, p53 differentially regulated the expression of Notch family members: expression of Notch2 and Notch4 was not induced by p53. Significantly, treatment of cells with gamma secretase inhibitor, an inhibitor of Notch signaling, increased susceptibility to apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. Together, our observations suggest that p53mediated upregulation of Notch1 expression in human cancer cell lines contributes to cell fate determination after genotoxic stress.

  14. Impaired cell surface expression of HLA-B antigens on mesenchymal stem cells and muscle cell progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiba Isa

    Full Text Available HLA class-I expression is weak in embryonic stem cells but increases rapidly during lineage progression. It is unknown whether all three classical HLA class-I antigens follow the same developmental program. In the present study, we investigated allele-specific expression of HLA-A, -B, and -C at the mRNA and protein levels on human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue as well as striated muscle satellite cells and lymphocytes. Using multicolour flow cytometry, we found high cell surface expression of HLA-A on all stem cells and PBMC examined. Surprisingly, HLA-B was either undetectable or very weakly expressed on all stem cells protecting them from complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC using relevant human anti-B and anti-Cw sera. IFNgamma stimulation for 48-72 h was required to induce full HLA-B protein expression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed that IFNgamma induced a 9-42 fold increase of all six HLA-A,-B,-C gene transcripts. Interestingly, prior to stimulation, gene transcripts for all but two alleles were present in similar amounts suggesting that post-transcriptional mechanisms regulate the constitutive expression of HLA-A,-B, and -C. Locus-restricted expression of HLA-A, -B and -C challenges our current understanding of the function of these molecules as regulators of CD8(+ T-cell and NK-cell function and should lead to further inquiries into their expression on other cell types.

  15. Tetrahydrouridine inhibits cell proliferation through cell cycle regulation regardless of cytidine deaminase expression levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naotake Funamizu

    Full Text Available Tetrahydrouridine (THU is a well characterized and potent inhibitor of cytidine deaminase (CDA. Highly expressed CDA catalyzes and inactivates cytidine analogues, ultimately contributing to increased gemcitabine resistance. Therefore, a combination therapy of THU and gemcitabine is considered to be a potential and promising treatment for tumors with highly expressed CDA. In this study, we found that THU has an alternative mechanism for inhibiting cell growth which is independent of CDA expression. Three different carcinoma cell lines (MIAPaCa-2, H441, and H1299 exhibited decreased cell proliferation after sole administration of THU, while being unaffected by knocking down CDA. To investigate the mechanism of THU-induced cell growth inhibition, cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry was performed. This analysis revealed that THU caused an increased rate of G1-phase occurrence while S-phase occurrence was diminished. Similarly, Ki-67 staining further supported that THU reduces cell proliferation. We also found that THU regulates cell cycle progression at the G1/S checkpoint by suppressing E2F1. As a result, a combination regimen of THU and gemcitabine might be a more effective therapy than previously believed for pancreatic carcinoma since THU works as a CDA inhibitor, as well as an inhibitor of cell growth in some types of pancreatic carcinoma cells.

  16. Performance benchmarking of four cell-free protein expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagoski, Dejan; Polinkovsky, Mark E; Mureev, Sergey; Kunert, Anne; Johnston, Wayne; Gambin, Yann; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2016-02-01

    Over the last half century, a range of cell-free protein expression systems based on pro- and eukaryotic organisms have been developed and have found a range of applications, from structural biology to directed protein evolution. While it is generally accepted that significant differences in performance among systems exist, there is a paucity of systematic experimental studies supporting this notion. Here, we took advantage of the species-independent translation initiation sequence to express and characterize 87 N-terminally GFP-tagged human cytosolic proteins of different sizes in E. coli, wheat germ (WGE), HeLa, and Leishmania-based (LTE) cell-free systems. Using a combination of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis, we assessed the expression yields, the fraction of full-length translation product, and aggregation propensity for each of these systems. Our results demonstrate that the E. coli system has the highest expression yields. However, we observe that high expression levels are accompanied by production of truncated species-particularly pronounced in the case of proteins larger than 70 kDa. Furthermore, proteins produced in the E. coli system display high aggregation propensity, with only 10% of tested proteins being produced in predominantly monodispersed form. The WGE system was the most productive among eukaryotic systems tested. Finally, HeLa and LTE show comparable protein yields that are considerably lower than the ones achieved in the E. coli and WGE systems. The protein products produced in the HeLa system display slightly higher integrity, whereas the LTE-produced proteins have the lowest aggregation propensity among the systems analyzed. The high quality of HeLa- and LTE-produced proteins enable their analysis without purification and make them suitable for analysis of multi-domain eukaryotic proteins.

  17. Prion protein expression regulates embryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Miranda

    Full Text Available Cellular prion protein (PRNP is a glycoprotein involved in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs. Although the physiological function of PRNP is largely unknown, its key role in prion infection has been extensively documented. This study examines the functionality of PRNP during the course of embryoid body (EB differentiation in mouse Prnp-null (KO and WT embryonic stem cell (ESC lines. The first feature observed was a new population of EBs that only appeared in the KO line after 5 days of differentiation. These EBs were characterized by their expression of several primordial germ cell (PGC markers until Day 13. In a comparative mRNA expression analysis of genes playing an important developmental role during ESC differentiation to EBs, Prnp was found to participate in the transcription of a key pluripotency marker such as Nanog. A clear switching off of this gene on Day 5 was observed in the KO line as opposed to the WT line, in which maximum Prnp and Nanog mRNA levels appeared at this time. Using a specific antibody against PRNP to block PRNP pathways, reduced Nanog expression was confirmed in the WT line. In addition, antibody-mediated inhibition of ITGB5 (integrin αvβ5 in the KO line rescued the low expression of Nanog on Day 5, suggesting the regulation of Nanog transcription by Prnp via this Itgb5. mRNA expression analysis of the PRNP-related proteins PRND (Doppel and SPRN (Shadoo, whose PRNP function is known to be redundant, revealed their incapacity to compensate for the absence of PRNP during early ESC differentiation. Our findings provide strong evidence for a relationship between Prnp and several key pluripotency genes and attribute Prnp a crucial role in regulating self-renewal/differentiation status of ESC, confirming the participation of PRNP during early embryogenesis.

  18. Effect of Varying Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability & Protein Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun; Dozier, David; Triantafillu, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    Cancer stem cells cultured in vitro in stirred bioreactors are exposed to shear stress. By observing the effect of shear stress on cancer stem cell viability, laboratory cell growth could be optimized. In addition, metastasized cancer stem cells in vivo are naturally exposed to shear stress, a factor influencing stem cell differentiation, while circulating in the bloodstream. Changes in protein expression after exposure to shear stress could allow for identification and targeting of circulating cancer cells. In this study, blood flow through capillaries was simulated by using a syringe pump to inject suspensions of Kasumi-1 leukemia stem cells into model blood vessels composed of PEEK tubing 125 microns in diameter. The Hagen-Poisseuille equation was used to solve for operating flow rates based on specified amounts of shear stress. After exposure, cell counts and viabilities were observed using an optical microscope and proteins were analyzed using Western blotting. It was observed that at a one minute exposure to stress, cell viability increased as the amount of shear was increased from 10 to 60 dynes per square centimeter. Results from this research are applicable to optimization of large-scale stem cell growth in bioreactors as well as to the design of targeted cancer therapies. Funding from NSF REU grant #1062611 is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Lovastatin Decreases the Expression of CD133 and Influences the Differentiation Potential of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ade Kallas-Kivi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipophilic statin lovastatin decreases cholesterol synthesis and is a safe and effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Growing evidence points at antitumor potential of lovastatin. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanism of lovastatin function in different cell types is critical to effective therapy design. In this study, we investigated the effects of lovastatin on the differentiation potential of human embryonic stem (hES cells (H9 cell line. Multiparameter flow cytometric assay was used to detect changes in the expression of transcription factors characteristic of hES cells. We found that lovastatin treatment delayed NANOG downregulation during ectodermal and endodermal differentiation. Likewise, expression of ectodermal (SOX1 and OTX2 and endodermal (GATA4 and FOXA2 markers was higher in treated cells. Exposure of hES cells to lovastatin led to a minor decrease in the expression of SSEA-3 and a significant reduction in CD133 expression. Treated cells also formed fewer embryoid bodies than control cells. By analyzing hES with and without CD133, we discovered that CD133 expression is required for proper formation of embryoid bodies. In conclusion, lovastatin reduced the heterogeneity of hES cells and impaired their differentiation potential.

  20. Aquaporin-1 Expressed in Cultured Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingkai Lin; Jian Ge; Yehong Zhuo; Yuqing Lan; Keming Yu; Jianliang Zheng

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To determine if aquaporin-1 could be detected in cultures of human trabecularshwork cells. Methods: Using primers specific for aquaporin-1, reverse transcription combined withpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) yielded a product and its size with total RNAprepared from the human trabecular meshwork cells. SDS-PAGE and immunoblottingwere also used in this study to detect the specific water channel.Results: The presence of this product and its size (298 base pairs) are consistent withthat of an aquaporin-1 message in these cells. A band of 28 kD in agreement with themolecular size of aquaporin-1 was showed in a film by immunoblotting.Conclusion: The presence of aquaporin-1 in human trabecular meshwork cells, thepredominant cell-type of the primary outflow region of the human eye, suggests that waterchannels may be involved in the movement of aqueous fluid out of the eye. In addition,the existence of aquaporin-1 on cultures of human trabecular meshwork cells provides anin vitro model to study the endogenous expression of aquaporin-1 and its possible role inthe regulation of aqueous outflow.

  1. Tissue-specific designs of stem cell hierarchies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visvader, Jane E; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the field of stem cell biology suggests that there is no single design for an adult tissue stem cell hierarchy, and that different tissues employ distinct strategies to meet their self-renewal and repair requirements. Stem cells may be multipotent or unipotent, and can exist in quiesc

  2. Expression of lactoperoxidase in differentiated mouse colon epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Wook; Esworthy, R Steven; Hahn, Maria A; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Chu, Fong-Fong

    2012-05-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is known to be present in secreted fluids, such as milk and saliva. Functionally, LPO teams up with dual oxidases (DUOXs) to generate bactericidal hypothiocyanite in the presence of thiocyanate. DUOX2 is expressed in intestinal epithelium, but there is little information on LPO expression in this tissue. To fill the gap of knowledge, we have analyzed Lpo gene expression and its regulation in mouse intestine. In wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 (B6) mouse intestine, an appreciable level of mouse Lpo gene expression was detected in the colon, but not the ileum. However, in B6 mice deficient in glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1 and -2, GPx1/2-double-knockout (DKO), which had intestinal pathology, the colon Lpo mRNA levels increased 5- to 12-fold depending on mouse age. The Lpo mRNA levels in WT and DKO 129S1/SvlmJ (129) colon were even higher, 9- and 5-fold, than in B6 DKO colon. Higher levels of Lpo protein and enzymatic activity were also detected in the 129 mouse colon compared to B6 colon. Lpo protein was expressed in the differentiated colon epithelial cells, away from the crypt base, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Similar to human LPO mRNA, mouse Lpo mRNA had multiple spliced forms, although only the full-length variant 1 was translated. Higher methylation was found in the 129 than in the B6 strain, in DKO than in control colon, and in older than in juvenile mice. However, methylation of the Lpo intragenic CpG island was not directly induced by inflammation, because dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis did not increase DNA methylation in B6 DKO colon. Also, Lpo DNA methylation is not correlated with gene expression.

  3. Consolidated pretreatment and hydrolysis of plant biomass expressing cell wall degrading enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, R. Michael; Zhang, Dongcheng; Bougri, Oleg

    2016-02-02

    Methods for consolidated pretreatment and hydrolysis of genetically engineered plants expressing cell wall degrading enzymes are provided. Expression cassettes and vectors for making transgenic plants are described. Plants engineered to express one or more cell wall degrading enzymes using expression cassettes and vectors of the invention are also provided.

  4. A gold nanoparticle pentapeptide: gene fusion to induce therapeutic gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroski, Megan E; Morgan, Thomas J; Levenson, Cathy W; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2014-10-22

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been identified as having great potential as autologous cell therapeutics to treat traumatic brain injury and spinal injury as well as neuronal and cardiac ischemic events. All future clinical applications of MSC cell therapies must allow the MSC to be harvested, transfected, and induced to express a desired protein or selection of proteins to have medical benefit. For the full potential of MSC cell therapy to be realized, it is desirable to systematically alter the protein expression of therapeutically beneficial biomolecules in harvested MSC cells with high fidelity in a single transfection event. We have developed a delivery platform on the basis of the use of a solid gold nanoparticle that has been surface modified to produce a fusion containing a zwitterionic, pentapeptide designed from Bax inhibiting peptide (Ku70) to enhance cellular uptake and a linearized expression vector to induce enhanced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat-derived MSCs. Ku70 is observed to effect >80% transfection following a single treatment of femur bone marrow isolated rat MSCs with efficiencies for the delivery of a 6.6 kbp gene on either a Au nanoparticle (NP) or CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD). Gene expression is observed within 4 d by optical measurements, and secretion is observed within 10 d by Western Blot analysis. The combination of being able to selectively engineer the NP, to colocalize biological agents, and to enhance the stability of those agents has provided the strong impetus to utilize this novel class of materials to engineer primary MSCs. PMID:25198921

  5. Research development of designing flow cells for optical absorption detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sandong; Tang, Tao; Li, Tong; Wang, Fengyun; Hao, Qingli

    2016-02-01

    The optical absorption detector is one of the most commonly used detectors for high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). As a core part of this kind of detector, the designs of flow cells, where light passes through samples for acquiring samples information, will affect the performance of a detector. In order to enhance the signal to noise ratio of detectors and reduce the bands broadening that come from flow cells, it is necessary to design a flow cell with a longer optical path length and a less cell volume while maintaining the luminous flux. However the limitations of the machining capacity make it difficult to increase the optical path length, reduce the cell volume and keep or increase the luminous flux simultaneously. It is a challenge to optimize the designing and machining of flow cells so as to improve the performance of detectors. This review discusses the development of designing flow cells based on the detection principle in some aspects of increasing the optical path length, reducing the cell volume, taking the advantages of total reflection and so on. At the same time, some of the designs are illustrated in detail. These various ideas and structures are significant references for designing flow cells and developing optical absorption detectors. PMID:27382716

  6. Neuritin is expressed in Schwann cells and down-regulated in apoptotic Schwann cells under hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Shi; Jian-bo, Li; Hong-man, Zhang; Ling-fei, Yan; Min, Xie; Jia-wei, Chen

    2012-11-01

    We aimed to explore neuritin expression in Schwann cells under different glucose conditions. Expression of neuritin at the levels of transcription and translation in purified Schwann cells was detected and measured using reverse transcriptase (RT) (quantitative) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot. Apoptosis of Schwann cells was measured by flow cytometry using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter (FACS) analysis and caspase fluorometric assay. Neuritin mRNA and protein were detected in cultured primary Schwann cells. Neuritin was identified as cell membrane form of protein and predominately as secreted or solube form of protein. Neuritin was significantly lower in 150 mM glucose condition, and more significantly lower in 300 mM glucose, than 5.6 mM glucose condition at 36 hours and especially at 48 hours of the culture, respectively (P Neuritin and apoptosis were correlated in a power regression (P neuritin mRNA and protein were expressed and down-regulated in Schwann cells under high-glucose concentration and the down-regulation may contribute to apopotosis of Schwann cells. PMID:22782233

  7. RASSF1A expression inhibits cell growth and enhances cell chemosensitivity to mitomycin in BEL-7402 hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Hong-geng; XUE Wan-jiang; QIAN Hai-xin; ZHOU Xiao-jun; QIN Lei; LAN Jing

    2009-01-01

    Background The antitumor role of Ras association domain family 1A (RASSFIA) gene and its potential molecular mechanisms are not well understood. The objective of this study was to observe the antitumor ability of RASSFIA in hepatoceliular carcinoma, and study the mechanisms of cell apoptosis induced by RASSFIA.Methods After stably transfecting a RASSF1A (wild-type or mutant) expression vector into the BEL-7402 hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, RT-PCR and Westem blotting was used to detect the RASSF1A expression levels in recombinant cells. The effects of wild-type RASSF1A on cell growth were observed in vitro by analyzing cell proliferation rate, cell colony formation, and in vivo by analyzing tumorigenesis in nude mice. In addition, the effect of RASSF1A gene expression on the chemosensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to antitumor drugs was examined by inhibition of cell proliferation and the percentage of apoptotic cells.Results Wild-type RASSF1A, not the mutant, suppressed cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Re-expression of wild-type RASSF1A could enhance the inhibition of cell proliferation and the percentage of apoptotic cells following cell treatment with mitomycin, but had no significant effect when combined with adriamycin, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil and cisplatJn treatment.Conclusion Wild-type RASSF1A inhibits cell growth and enhances cell chemosensitivity to mitomycin in hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting that RASSF1A may serve as a new target for gene therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

  8. MicroRNA Expression in Alzheimer Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman M. Schipper

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Various coding genes representing multiple functional categories are downregulated in blood mononuclear cells (BMC of patients with sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD. Noncoding microRNAs (miRNA regulate gene expression by degrading messages or inhibiting translation. Using BMC as a paradigm for the study of systemic alterations in AD, we investigated whether peripheral miRNA expression is altered in this condition. MicroRNA levels were assessed using the microRNA microarray (MMChip containing 462 human miRNA, and the results validated by real time PCR. Sixteen AD patients and sixteen normal elderly controls (NEC were matched for ethnicity, age, gender and education. The expression of several BMC miRNAs was found to increase in AD relative to NEC levels, and may differ between AD subjects bearing one or two APOE4 alleles. As compared to NEC, miRNAs signifi cantly upregulated in AD subjects and confi rmed by qPCR were miR-34a and 181b. Predicted target genes downregulated in Alzheimer BMC that correlated with the upregulated miRNAs were largely represented in the functional categories of Transcription/Translation and Synaptic Activity. Several miRNAs targeting the same genes were within the functional category of Injury response/Redox homeostasis. Taken together, induction of microRNA expression in BMC may contribute to the aberrant systemic decline in mRNA levels in sporadic AD.

  9. Novel method for isolation of murine clara cell secretory protein-expressing cells with traces of stemness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yang Wang

    Full Text Available Clara cells are non-ciliated, secretory bronchiolar epithelial cells that serve to detoxify harmful inhaled substances. Clara cells also function as stem/progenitor cells for repair in the bronchioles. Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP is specifically expressed in pulmonary Clara cells and is widely used as a Clara cell marker. In addition CCSP promoter is commonly used to direct gene expression into the lung in transgenic models. The discovery of CCSP immunoreactivity in plasma membranes of airway lining cells prompted us to explore the possibility of enriching Clara cells by flow cytometry. We established a novel and simple method for the isolation of CCSP-expressing cell Clara cells using a combination of mechanical and enzymatic dissociation followed by flow cytometry sorting technology. We showed that ∼25% of dissociated cells from whole lung expressed CCSP. In the resulting preparation, up to 98% of cells expressed CCSP. Notably, we found that several common stem cell markers including CD44, CD133, Sca-1 and Sox2 were expressed in CCSP(+ cells. Moreover, CCSP(+ cells were able to form spheroid colonies in vitro with 0.97‰ efficiency. Parallel studies in vivo confirmed that a small population of CCSP(-expressing cells in mouse airways also demonstrates stem cell-like properties such as label retention and harboring rare bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs in terminal bronchioles (TBs. We conclude that CCSP(+ cells exhibit a number of stem cell-like features including stem cell marker expression, bronchosphere colony formation and self-renewal ability. Clara cell isolation by flow cytometry sorting is a useful method for investigating the function of primary Clara cells in stem cell research and mouse models.

  10. Sustained Arc expression in adult-generated granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meconi, Alicia; Lui, Erika; Marrone, Diano F

    2015-08-31

    The dentate gyrus (DG) plays a critical role in memory formation and maintenance. Fitting this specialized role, the DG has many unique characteristics. In addition to being one of the few places in which new neurons are continually added in adulthood, the region also shows a unique long-term sustained transcriptional response of the immediate-early gene Arc to sensory input. Although we know that adult-generated granule cells are reliably recruited into behaviorally-driven neuronal network, it remains unknown whether they display robust late-phase sustained transcription in response to activity like their developmentally-generated counterparts. Since this late-phase of transcription is required for enduring plasticity, knowing if sustained transcription appears as soon as these cells are incorporated provides information on their potential for plasticity. To address this question, adult F344 rats were injected with BrdU (50mg/kg/day for 5 days) and 4 weeks later explored a novel environment. Arc expression in both BrdU- and BrdU+ neurons was determined 0.5h, 1h, 2h, 6h, 8h, 12h, or 24h following this behavior. Recently-generated granule cells showed a robust sustained Arc expression following a discrete behavioral experience. These data provide information on a potential mechanism to sculpt the representations of events occurring within hours of each other to create uncorrelated representations of episodes despite a highly excitable population of neurons. PMID:26219984

  11. cDNA Expression Array Analysis of Gene Expression in Human Hepatocarcinoma Hep3B Cells Induced By BNIPL-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li XIE; Wen-Xin QIN; Jin-Jun LI; Xiang-Huo HE; Hui-Qun SHU; Gen-Fu YAO; Da-Fang WAN; Jian-Ren GU

    2005-01-01

    Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa interacting protein 2 like-1 (BNIPL-1) is a novel human protein identified in our laboratory, which can interact with Bcl-2 and Cdc42GAP and induce apoptosis via the BNIP-2 and Cdc42GAP homology (BCH) domain. In the present study, we established the Hep3B-Tet-on stable cell line in which expression of BNIPL-1 can be induced by doxycycline. The cell proliferation activity assay showed that the overexpression of BNIPL-1 suppresses Hep3B cell growth in vitro. The differential expression profiles of 588 known genes from BNIPL-1-transfected Hep3B-Tet-on and vector control cells were determined using the Atlas human cDNA expression array. Fifteen genes were differentially expressed between these two cell lines, among which seven genes were up-regulated and eight genes were down-regulated by BINPL-1. Furthermore, the differential expression result was confirmed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Among these differentially expressed genes, p16INK4, IL-12, TRAIL and the lymphotoxin β gene involved in growth suppression or cell apoptosis were up-regulated, and PTEN involved in cell proliferation was down-regulated by BNIPL-1. These results suggest that BNIPL-1 might inhibit cell growth though cell cycle arrest and/or apoptotic cell death pathway(s).

  12. Integrated cell and process engineering for improved transient production of a "difficult-to-express" fusion protein by CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Yusuf B; Estes, Scott D; Alves, Christina S; Sinacore, Marty S; James, David C

    2015-12-01

    Based on an optimized electroporation protocol, we designed a rapid, milliliter-scale diagnostic transient production assay to identify limitations in the ability of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to produce a model "difficult-to-express" homodimeric Fc-fusion protein, Sp35Fc, that exhibited very low volumetric titer and intracellular formation of disulfide-bonded oligomeric aggregates post-transfection. As expression of Sp35Fc induced an unfolded protein response in transfected host cells, we utilized the transient assay to compare, in parallel, multiple functionally diverse strategies to engineer intracellular processing of Sp35Fc in order to increase production and reduce aggregation as two discrete design objectives. Specifically, we compared the effect of (i) co-expression of ER-resident molecular chaperones (BiP, PDI, CypB) or active forms of UPR transactivators (ATF6c, XBP1s) at varying recombinant gene load, (ii) addition of small molecules known to act as chemical chaperones (PBA, DMSO, glycerol, betaine, TMAO) or modulate UPR signaling (PERK inhibitor GSK2606414) at varying concentration, (iii) a reduction in culture temperature to 32°C. Using this information, we designed a biphasic, Sp35Fc-specific transient manufacturing process mediated by lipofection that utilized CypB co-expression at an optimal Sp35Fc:CypB gene ratio of 5:1 to initially maximize transfected cell proliferation, followed by addition of a combination of PBA (0.5 mM) and glycerol (1% v/v) at the onset of stationary phase to maximize cell specific production and eliminate Sp35Fc aggregation. Using this optimal, engineered process transient Sp35Fc production was significantly increased sixfold over a 12 day production process with no evidence of disulfide-bonded aggregates. Finally, transient production in clonally derived sub-populations (derived from parental CHO host) screened for a heritably improved capability to produce Sp35Fc was also significantly improved by the optimized

  13. Efflux protein expression in human stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Juuti-Uusitalo

    Full Text Available Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells in the back of the eye nourish photoreceptor cells and form a selective barrier that influences drug transport from the blood to the photoreceptor cells. At the molecular level, ATP-dependent efflux transporters have a major role in drug delivery in human RPE. In this study, we assessed the relative expression of several ATP-dependent efflux transporter genes (MRP1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, p-gp, and BCRP, the protein expression and localization of MRP1, MRP4, and MRP5, and the functionality of MRP1 efflux pumps at different maturation stages of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESC and RPE derived from the hESC (hESC-RPE. Our findings revealed that the gene expression of ATP-dependent efflux transporters MRP1, -3, -4, -5, and p-gp fluctuated during hESC-RPE maturation from undifferentiated hESC to fusiform, epithelioid, and finally to cobblestone hESC-RPE. Epithelioid hESC-RPE had the highest expression of MRP1, -3, -4, and P-gp, whereas the most mature cobblestone hESC-RPE had the highest expression of MRP5 and MRP6. These findings indicate that a similar efflux protein profile is shared between hESC-RPE and the human RPE cell line, ARPE-19, and suggest that hESC-RPE cells are suitable in vitro RPE models for drug transport studies. Embryonic stem cell model might provide a novel tool to study retinal cell differentiation, mechanisms of RPE-derived diseases, drug testing and targeted drug therapy.

  14. Expression of ICAM-1 in colon epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vainer, Ben; Sørensen, Susanne; Seidelin, Jakob;

    2003-01-01

    Studies have suggested that in ulcerative colitis (UC), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is involved in migration of leukocytes toward the colonic epithelium. A suitable in vitro model of chronic colonic inflammation does not exist, and the role of the epithelium is based on monolayers ...... of cancer cells. Conflicting results exist on epithelial ICAM-1 expression, and the aim of this study was to compare the expression in various models of colonic epithelium.......Studies have suggested that in ulcerative colitis (UC), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is involved in migration of leukocytes toward the colonic epithelium. A suitable in vitro model of chronic colonic inflammation does not exist, and the role of the epithelium is based on monolayers...

  15. Caspases regulate VAMP-8 expression and phagocytosis in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yong Hou Sunny; Cai, Deyu Tarika; Huang, Dachuan; Wang, Cheng Chun; Wong, Siew Heng

    2009-09-18

    During an inflammation and upon encountering pathogens, immature dendritic cells (DC) undergo a maturation process to become highly efficient in presenting antigens. This transition from immature to mature state is accompanied by various physiological, functional and morphological changes including reduction of caspase activity and inhibition of phagocytosis in the mature DC. Caspases are cysteine proteases which play essential roles in apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that VAMP-8, (a SNARE protein of the early/late endosomes) which has been shown previously to inhibit phagocytosis in DC, is a substrate of caspases. Furthermore, we identified two putative conserved caspase recognition/cleavage sites on the VAMP-8 protein. Consistent with the up-regulation of VAMP-8 expression upon treatment with caspase inhibitor (CI), immature DC treated with CI exhibits lower phagocytosis activity. Thus, our results highlight the role of caspases in regulating VAMP-8 expression and subsequently phagocytosis during maturation of DC.

  16. MicroRNA expression profiling identifies activated B cell status in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqiang Li

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is thought to be a disease of resting lymphocytes. However, recent data suggest that CLL cells may more closely resemble activated B cells. Using microRNA (miRNA expression profiling of highly-enriched CLL cells from 38 patients and 9 untransformed B cells from normal donors before acute CpG activation and 5 matched B cells after acute CpG activation, we demonstrate an activated B cell status for CLL. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA identified statistically-significant similarities in miRNA expression between activated B cells and CLL cells including upregulation of miR-34a, miR-155, and miR-342-3p and downregulation of miR-103, miR-181a and miR-181b. Additionally, decreased levels of two CLL signature miRNAs miR-29c and miR-223 are associated with ZAP70(+ and IgV(H unmutated status and with shorter time to first therapy. These data indicate an activated B cell status for CLL cells and suggest that the direction of change of individual miRNAs may predict clinical course in CLL.

  17. Design of liposomal formulations for cell targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, E.; Gomes, Andreia C.; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes have gained extensive attention as carriers for a wide range of drugs due to being both nontoxic and biodegradable as they are composed of substances naturally occurring in biological membranes. Active targeting for cells has explored specific modification of the liposome surface by functionalizing it with specific targeting ligands in order to increase accumulation and intracellular uptake into target cells. None of the Food and Drug Administration-licensed liposomes or lipid nanop...

  18. Cancer cells: novel expression systems in pharmaceutical biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Shahabuddin Hoseini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "nEvery day, numerous medications are used worldwide to treat different kinds of diseases. A huge part of drug manufacturing - is done in pharmaceutical biotechnology companies. Scientists have developed a variety of methods to synthesize these substances. They can insert the gene or the cDNA of a desired protein into special expression systems and extract the resulted products using different methods. The paraneoplastic syndromes are signs and symptoms originated from cancer cell derived products and not because of direct invasion of tumor cells or metastasis. Cancer cells can secret a wide variety of products such as growth hormones, antibodies and so on. In an innovative route, these products may be processed further and eventually be used as useful biologic substances. In this manuscript, we described a process by which scientists can use cancer cells in order to produce various types of biological substances which can be used as medications, diagnostic substances and research materials. Our hypothesis has been inspired from autonomous production of biologic substances from those cancer cells that are responsible for manifestations of paraneoplastic syndromes.

  19. Expression of the human interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain in insect cells using a baculovirus expression vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raivio, E; Oetken, C; Oker-Blom, C; Engberg, C; Akerman, K; Lindqvist, C

    1995-04-01

    The gene encoding the gamma-chain of the human Interleukin-2 receptor was expressed in lepidopteran insect cells using the baculovirus expression vector system. The corresponding gene was inserted under the polyhedrin promoter of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus and expressed in the Spodoptera frugiperda insect cell line Sf9 during viral infection. The recombinant receptor protein was identified by immunoblotting in cell lysates, prepared from insect cells infected with the recombinant virus. At 40 h post infection the corresponding protein was detected as two major bands with apparent molecular weights of 50-60 kDa using a rabbit anti-human IL-2R gamma-receptor specific antiserum. Metabolic labelling with [35S]-methionine and SDS-PAGE analysis of the recombinant baculovirus infected insect cells verified the immunoblotting data. The expressed IL-2R gamma- protein could also be determined on the surface of infected insect cells by flow cytometer analysis. PMID:7899821

  20. Gene expression pattern of functional neuronal cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bron Dominique

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal tissue has limited potential to self-renew or repair after neurological diseases. Cellular therapies using stem cells are promising approaches for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, the clinical use of embryonic stem cells or foetal tissues is limited by ethical considerations and other scientific problems. Thus, bone marrow mesenchymal stomal cells (BM-MSC could represent an alternative source of stem cells for cell replacement therapies. Indeed, many studies have demonstrated that MSC can give rise to neuronal cells as well as many tissue-specific cell phenotypes. Methods BM-MSC were differentiated in neuron-like cells under specific induction (NPBM + cAMP + IBMX + NGF + Insulin. By day ten, differentiated cells presented an expression profile of real neurons. Functionality of these differentiated cells was evaluated by calcium influx through glutamate receptor AMPA3. Results Using microarray analysis, we compared gene expression profile of these different samples, before and after neurogenic differentiation. Among the 1943 genes differentially expressed, genes down-regulated are involved in osteogenesis, chondrogenesis, adipogenesis, myogenesis and extracellular matrix component (tuftelin, AGC1, FADS3, tropomyosin, fibronectin, ECM2, HAPLN1, vimentin. Interestingly, genes implicated in neurogenesis are increased. Most of them are involved in the synaptic transmission and long term potentialisation as cortactin, CASK, SYNCRIP, SYNTL4 and STX1. Other genes are involved in neurite outgrowth, early neuronal cell development, neuropeptide signaling/synthesis and neuronal receptor (FK506, ARHGAP6, CDKRAP2, PMCH, GFPT2, GRIA3, MCT6, BDNF, PENK, amphiregulin, neurofilament 3, Epha4, synaptotagmin. Using real time RT-PCR, we confirmed the expression of selected neuronal genes: NEGR1, GRIA3 (AMPA3, NEF3, PENK and Epha4. Functionality of these neuron-like cells was demonstrated by Ca2+ influx through glutamate

  1. Germ Cell Nuclear Factor (GCNF) Represses Oct4 Expression and Globally Modulates Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem (hES) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongran; Wang, Xiaohong; Xu, Xueping; Kyba, Michael; Cooney, Austin J

    2016-04-15

    Oct4 is considered a key transcription factor for pluripotent stem cell self-renewal. It binds to specific regions within target genes to regulate their expression and is downregulated upon induction of differentiation of pluripotent stem cells; however, the mechanisms that regulate the levels of human Oct4 expression remain poorly understood. Here we show that expression of human Oct4 is directly repressed by germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF), an orphan nuclear receptor, in hES cells. Knockdown of GCNF by siRNA resulted in maintenance of Oct4 expression during RA-induced hES cell differentiation. While overexpression of GCNF promoted repression of Oct4 expression in both undifferentiated and differentiated hES cells. The level of Oct4 repression was dependent on the level of GCNF expression in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA microarray analysis demonstrated that overexpression of GCNF globally regulates gene expression in undifferentiated and differentiated hES cells. Within the group of altered genes, GCNF down-regulated 36% of the genes, and up-regulated 64% in undifferentiated hES cells. In addition, GCNF also showed a regulatory gene pattern that is different from RA treatment during hES cell differentiation. These findings increase our understanding of the mechanisms that maintain hES cell pluripotency and regulate gene expression during the differentiation process.

  2. New strategies for designing inexpensive but selective bioadsorbants for environmental pollutants: Selection of specific ligands and their cell surface expression. Technical progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iverson, B.

    1997-01-01

    'Progress for the last twelve months has revolved around setting up an antibody engineering and surface display system for use with a metal-complex binding antibody. (1) The author has isolated genes for the V regions of the heavy and light chains for the Ru(bpy)3 specific monoclonal AC1106 (Shreder, K S., Hariman, A., and Iverson, B.L., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1996, 118, 3192-3201). This antibody binds Ru(bpy), derivatives with better than nanomolar affinity, and will serve as the generic metal-complex binding pocket. Cloning antibody genes from hybridomas is complicated by the fact that primers must be found that amplify the particular heavy and light chain genes in the hybridoma of interest. Antibody gene amplification primers are generally designed to amplify antibody repertoires from lymphocyte mRNA isolated from animals. While cloning repertoires from animals is routinely successful due to the diverse population of target m RNA, hybridomas have a single target sequence. Therefore, multiple primers and conditions must be tried before the correct primer combination is identified.'

  3. Design and Control of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    E-cient fuel cell systems have started to appear in many dierent commercial applications and large scale production facilities are already operating to supply fuel cells to support an ever growing market. Fuel cells are typically considered to replace leadacid batteries in applications where...... or life time losses. In order to evaluate the performance of using HTPEM fuel cells for electricity production in electrical applications, a 400 W fuel cell system is initially designed using a cathode air cooled 30 cell HTPEM stack. The stack runs on pure hydrogen in a deadend anode configuration...... that often during a normal driving cycle. The combination of batteries and super capacitors together with fuel cells can improve the system performance, lifetime and cost. Simple systems can be designed where the fuel cells and batteries are directly connected, but the introduction of power electronics can...

  4. Spirulina phycocyanin induces differential protein expression and apoptosis in SKOV-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ruowang; Lu, Rongmao; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Mei; Zhu, Wen; Yang, Rongrong; Zhang, Enyong; Ying, Jun; Xu, Teng; Yi, Huiguang; Li, Jinsong; Shi, Mengru; Zhou, Li; Xu, Zuyuan; Li, Peizhen; Bao, Qiyu

    2015-11-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effects of phycocyanin (PC) on Human ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells and the underlying molecular mechanisms of action. The inhibitory effects of PC on the cell proliferation were detected by MTT assay. The IC50 values of PC were 182.0μM and 133.6μM for 24h and 48h exposure, respectively. PC induced apoptosis in SKOV-3 cells was observed by electron microscopy and flow cytometry. The apoptosis rate was increased from 1.6% to 19.8% after PC exposure. The fluorescence intensity of ROS and the activities of Caspase-3, Caspase-8, and Caspase-9 were increased. Differentiated expression protein spots were selected and identified using proteomic techniques. There were 698±73 and 683±79 protein spots resolved in untreated and PC-treated cells, respectively. Forty five differential protein spots were analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS, including mtSSB, PSME3, and nucleolin. The mRNA expression profiles determined by RT-PCR were consistent with that of the two-dimensional electrophoresis. The decreased proteins such as HSP60, nucleolin, PPase, peroxiredoxin-4 and the increased protein (mtSSB) were identified in SKOV-3 cells after PC treatment, indicating that the effects of PC on tumor cell apoptosis may be relate to multiple target proteins. And the mitochondrial pathway may be the main pathway for PC-induced apoptosis. PMID:26410814

  5. HIPSTR and thousands of lncRNAs are heterogeneously expressed in human embryos, primordial germ cells and stable cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusov, Dinar; Anderson, Leticia; Dasilva, Lucas Ferreira; Wysocka, Joanna; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, R. Michael; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are transcribed into numerous regulatory long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Compared to mRNAs, lncRNAs display higher developmental stage-, tissue-, and cell-subtype-specificity of expression, and are generally less abundant in a population of cells. Despite the progress in single-cell-focused research, the origins of low population-level expression of lncRNAs in homogeneous populations of cells are poorly understood. Here, we identify HIPSTR (Heterogeneously expressed from the Intronic Plus Strand of the TFAP2A-locus RNA), a novel lncRNA gene in the developmentally regulated TFAP2A locus. HIPSTR has evolutionarily conserved expression patterns, its promoter is most active in undifferentiated cells, and depletion of HIPSTR in HEK293 and in pluripotent H1BP cells predominantly affects the genes involved in early organismal development and cell differentiation. Most importantly, we find that HIPSTR is specifically induced and heterogeneously expressed in the 8-cell-stage human embryos during the major wave of embryonic genome activation. We systematically explore the phenomenon of cell-to-cell variation of gene expression and link it to low population-level expression of lncRNAs, showing that, similar to HIPSTR, the expression of thousands of lncRNAs is more highly heterogeneous than the expression of mRNAs in the individual, otherwise indistinguishable cells of totipotent human embryos, primordial germ cells, and stable cell lines.

  6. HIPSTR and thousands of lncRNAs are heterogeneously expressed in human embryos, primordial germ cells and stable cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusov, Dinar; Anderson, Leticia; DaSilva, Lucas Ferreira; Wysocka, Joanna; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, R. Michael; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are transcribed into numerous regulatory long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Compared to mRNAs, lncRNAs display higher developmental stage-, tissue-, and cell-subtype-specificity of expression, and are generally less abundant in a population of cells. Despite the progress in single-cell-focused research, the origins of low population-level expression of lncRNAs in homogeneous populations of cells are poorly understood. Here, we identify HIPSTR (Heterogeneously expressed from the Intronic Plus Strand of the TFAP2A-locus RNA), a novel lncRNA gene in the developmentally regulated TFAP2A locus. HIPSTR has evolutionarily conserved expression patterns, its promoter is most active in undifferentiated cells, and depletion of HIPSTR in HEK293 and in pluripotent H1BP cells predominantly affects the genes involved in early organismal development and cell differentiation. Most importantly, we find that HIPSTR is specifically induced and heterogeneously expressed in the 8-cell-stage human embryos during the major wave of embryonic genome activation. We systematically explore the phenomenon of cell-to-cell variation of gene expression and link it to low population-level expression of lncRNAs, showing that, similar to HIPSTR, the expression of thousands of lncRNAs is more highly heterogeneous than the expression of mRNAs in the individual, otherwise indistinguishable cells of totipotent human embryos, primordial germ cells, and stable cell lines. PMID:27605307

  7. PD-1 expression on dendritic cells suppresses CD8+ T cell function and antitumor immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Tong Seng; Chew, Valerie; Sieow, Je Lin; Goh, Siting; Yeong, Joe Poh-Sheng; Soon, Ai Ling; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Programmed death one (PD-1) is a well-established co-inhibitory regulator that suppresses proliferation and cytokine production of T cells. Despite remarkable progress in delineating the functional roles of PD-1 on T lymphocytes, little is known about the regulatory role of PD-1 expressed on myeloid cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that CD8+ T cells can be more potently activated to secrete IL-2 and IFNγ by PD-1-deficient DCs compared to wild-type DCs. Adoptive transfer of P...

  8. Fuel cell design using a new heuristic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a new method for the pre-design of a typical fuel cell with a structural array of 10 x 10 fuel elements for a BWR is presented. The method is based on principles of maximum dispersion and minimum peaks of local power within the array of fuel elements. The pre-design of the fuel cells is made by simulation in two dimensions (2-D) through the cells physics code CASMO-4. For this purpose of pre-design the search process is guided by an objective function which is a combination of the main neutronic parameters of the fuel cell. The results show that the method is a promising tool that could be used for the design of fuel cells for use in a nuclear plant BWR. (Author)

  9. Runx-CBFβ complexes control Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rudra, Dipayan; Egawa, Takeshi; Chong, Mark M.W.; Treuting, Piper; Dan R. Littman; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2009-01-01

    Foxp3 plays an indispensable role in establishing stable transcriptional and functional programs of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Loss of Foxp3 expression in mature Treg cells results in a failure of suppressor function, yet the molecular mechanisms ensuring steady heritable Foxp3 expression in the Treg cell lineage remain unknown. Using Treg cell-specific gene targeting we found that Runx-CBFβ complexes were required for maintenance of Foxp3 mRNA and protein expression in Treg cells. Consequent...

  10. Novel insights of the gastric gland organization revealed by chief cell specific expression of moesin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lixin; Hatakeyama, Jason; Zhang, Bing; Makdisi, Joy; Ender, Cody; Forte, John G.

    2008-01-01

    ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) proteins play critical roles in epithelial and endothelial cell polarity, among other functions. In gastric glands, ezrin is mainly expressed in acid-secreting parietal cells, but not in mucous neck cells or zymogenic chief cells. In looking for other ERM proteins, moesin was found lining the lumen of much of the gastric gland, but it was not expressed in parietal cells. No significant radixin expression was detected in the gastric glands. Moesin showed an inc...

  11. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin

  12. Can engineered "designer" T cells outsmart chronic hepatitis B?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protzer, U; Abken, H

    2010-01-01

    More than 350 million people worldwide are persistently infected with human heptatitis B virus (HBV) and at risk to develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma making long-term treatment necessary. While a vaccine is available and new antiviral drugs are being developed, elimination of persistently infected cells is still a major issue. Recent efforts in adoptive cell therapy are experimentally exploring immunotherapeutic elimination of HBV-infected cells by means of a biological attack with genetically engineered "designer" T cells. PMID:21188203

  13. Eugenol suppresses cyclooxygenase-2 expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Suk; Oh, O-Jin; Min, Hye-Young; Park, Eun-Jung; Kim, Youngleem; Park, Hyen Joo; Nam Han, Yong; Lee, Sang Kook

    2003-06-01

    Inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2) has been implicated in the processes of inflammation and carcinogenesis. Thus, the potential COX-2 inhibitors have been considered as anti-inflammatory or cancer chemopreventive agents. In this study, the methanolic extract of the cortex of Eugenia caryophyllata Thunberg (Myrtaceae) was found to potently inhibit the prostaglandin E(2) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells (98.3% inhibition at the test concentration of 10 microg/ml). Further, hexane-soluble layer was the most active partition compared to ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water-soluble parts. By bioassay-guided fractionation of hexane-soluble partition, eugenol was isolated and exhibited a significant inhibition of PGE(2) production (IC(50) = 0.37 microM). In addition, eugenol suppressed the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression in LPS-stimulated mouse macrophage cells. On the line of COX-2 playing an important role in colon carcinogenesis further study was designed to investigate the effect of eugenol on the growth and COX-2 expression in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Eugenol inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells and the mRNA expression of COX-2, but not COX-1. This result suggests that eugenol might be a plausible lead candidate for further developing the COX-2 inhibitor as an anti-inflammatory or cancer chemopreventive agent.

  14. TALE activators regulate gene expression in a position- and strand-dependent manner in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde-Stone, Claudia; Cheung, Edna; Lu, Biao

    2014-01-24

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a class of transcription factors that are readily programmable to regulate gene expression. Despite their growing popularity, little is known about binding site parameters that influence TALE-mediated gene activation in mammalian cells. We demonstrate that TALE activators modulate gene expression in mammalian cells in a position- and strand-dependent manner. To study the effects of binding site location, we engineered TALEs customized to recognize specific DNA sequences located in either the promoter or the transcribed region of reporter genes. We found that TALE activators robustly activated reporter genes when their binding sites were located within the promoter region. In contrast, TALE activators inhibited the expression of reporter genes when their binding sites were located on the sense strand of the transcribed region. Notably, this repression was independent of the effector domain utilized, suggesting a simple blockage mechanism. We conclude that TALE activators in mammalian cells regulate genes in a position- and strand-dependent manner that is substantially different from gene activation by native TALEs in plants. These findings have implications for optimizing the design of custom TALEs for genetic manipulation in mammalian cells.

  15. Analysis of LINE-1 expression in human pluripotent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Garcia-Cañadas, Marta; Macia, Angela; Morell, Santiago; Garcia-Perez, Jose L

    2012-01-01

    Half of the human genome is composed of repeated DNA, and some types are mobile within our genome (transposons and retrotransposons). Despite their abundance, only a small fraction of them are currently active in our genome (Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1), Alu, and SVA elements). LINE-1 or L1 elements are a family of active non-LTR retrotransposons, the ongoing mobilization of which still impacts our genome. As selfish DNA elements, L1 activity is more prominent in early human development, where new insertions would be transmitted to the progeny. Here, we describe the conventional methods aimed to determine the expression level of LINE-1 elements in pluripotent human cells.

  16. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes.

  17. Rat visceral yolk sac cells: viability and expression of cell markers during maternal diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The function of the visceral yolk sac (VYS) is critical for embryo organogenesis until final fetal development in rats, and can be affected by conditions such as diabetes. In view of the importance of diabetes during pregnancy for maternal and neonatal health, the objective of this study was to assess fetal weight, VYS cell markers, and viability in female Wistar rats (200-250 g) with induced diabetes (alloxan, 37 mg/kg) on the 8th gestational day (gd 8). At gd 15, rats from control (n=5) and diabetic (n=5) groups were anesthetized and laparotomized to remove the uterine horns for weighing of fetuses and collecting the VYS. Flow cytometry was used for characterizing VYS cells, and for determining mitochondrial activity, cell proliferation, DNA ploidy, cell cycle phases, and caspase-3 activity. Fetal weight was reduced in the diabetic group. Expression of the cell markers CD34, VEGFR1, CD115, CD117, CD14, CCR2, CD90, CD44, STRO-1, OCT3/4, and Nanog was detected in VYS cells in both groups. In the diabetic group, significantly decreased expression of CD34 (P<0.05), CCR2 (P<0.001), and OCT3/4 (P<0.01), and significantly increased expression of CD90 (P<0.05), CD117 (P<0.01), and CD14 (P<0.05) were observed. VYS cells with inactive mitochondria, activated caspase-3, and low proliferation were present in the rats with diabetes. Severe hyperglycemia caused by maternal diabetes had negative effects on pregnancy, VYS cell viability, and the expression of cell markers

  18. Rat visceral yolk sac cells: viability and expression of cell markers during maternal diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Aires

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The function of the visceral yolk sac (VYS is critical for embryo organogenesis until final fetal development in rats, and can be affected by conditions such as diabetes. In view of the importance of diabetes during pregnancy for maternal and neonatal health, the objective of this study was to assess fetal weight, VYS cell markers, and viability in female Wistar rats (200-250 g with induced diabetes (alloxan, 37 mg/kg on the 8th gestational day (gd 8. At gd 15, rats from control (n=5 and diabetic (n=5 groups were anesthetized and laparotomized to remove the uterine horns for weighing of fetuses and collecting the VYS. Flow cytometry was used for characterizing VYS cells, and for determining mitochondrial activity, cell proliferation, DNA ploidy, cell cycle phases, and caspase-3 activity. Fetal weight was reduced in the diabetic group. Expression of the cell markers CD34, VEGFR1, CD115, CD117, CD14, CCR2, CD90, CD44, STRO-1, OCT3/4, and Nanog was detected in VYS cells in both groups. In the diabetic group, significantly decreased expression of CD34 (P<0.05, CCR2 (P<0.001, and OCT3/4 (P<0.01, and significantly increased expression of CD90 (P<0.05, CD117 (P<0.01, and CD14 (P<0.05 were observed. VYS cells with inactive mitochondria, activated caspase-3, and low proliferation were present in the rats with diabetes. Severe hyperglycemia caused by maternal diabetes had negative effects on pregnancy, VYS cell viability, and the expression of cell markers.

  19. Rat visceral yolk sac cells: viability and expression of cell markers during maternal diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aires, M.B. [Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Santos, J.R.A. [Departamento de Enfermagem, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Souza, K.S.; Farias, P.S. [Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Santos, A.C.V. [Departamento de Enfermagem, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Fioretto, E.T. [Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Maria, D.A. [Laboratório de Bioquímica e Biofísica, Instituto Butantan, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-10

    The function of the visceral yolk sac (VYS) is critical for embryo organogenesis until final fetal development in rats, and can be affected by conditions such as diabetes. In view of the importance of diabetes during pregnancy for maternal and neonatal health, the objective of this study was to assess fetal weight, VYS cell markers, and viability in female Wistar rats (200-250 g) with induced diabetes (alloxan, 37 mg/kg) on the 8th gestational day (gd 8). At gd 15, rats from control (n=5) and diabetic (n=5) groups were anesthetized and laparotomized to remove the uterine horns for weighing of fetuses and collecting the VYS. Flow cytometry was used for characterizing VYS cells, and for determining mitochondrial activity, cell proliferation, DNA ploidy, cell cycle phases, and caspase-3 activity. Fetal weight was reduced in the diabetic group. Expression of the cell markers CD34, VEGFR1, CD115, CD117, CD14, CCR2, CD90, CD44, STRO-1, OCT3/4, and Nanog was detected in VYS cells in both groups. In the diabetic group, significantly decreased expression of CD34 (P<0.05), CCR2 (P<0.001), and OCT3/4 (P<0.01), and significantly increased expression of CD90 (P<0.05), CD117 (P<0.01), and CD14 (P<0.05) were observed. VYS cells with inactive mitochondria, activated caspase-3, and low proliferation were present in the rats with diabetes. Severe hyperglycemia caused by maternal diabetes had negative effects on pregnancy, VYS cell viability, and the expression of cell markers.

  20. Glioblastoma formation from cell population depleted of Prominin1-expressing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nishide

    Full Text Available Prominin1 (Prom1, also known as CD133 in human has been widely used as a marker for cancer stem cells (CSCs, which self-renew and are tumorigenic, in malignant tumors including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. However, there is other evidence showing that Prom1-negative cancer cells also form tumors in vivo. Thus it remains controversial whether Prom1 is a bona fide marker for CSCs. To verify if Prom1-expressing cells are essential for tumorigenesis, we established a mouse line, whose Prom1-expressing cells can be eliminated conditionally by a Cre-inducible DTA gene on the Prom1 locus together with a tamoxifen-inducible CreER(TM, and generated glioma-initiating cells (GICs-LD by overexpressing both the SV40 Large T antigen and an oncogenic H-Ras(L61 in neural stem cells of the mouse line. We show here that the tamoxifen-treated GICs-LD (GICs-DTA form tumor-spheres in culture and transplantable GBM in vivo. Thus, our studies demonstrate that Prom1-expressing cells are dispensable for gliomagenesis in this mouse model.

  1. PD-1 expression on dendritic cells suppresses CD8+ T cell function and antitumor immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tong Seng; Chew, Valerie; Sieow, Je Lin; Goh, Siting; Yeong, Joe Poh-Sheng; Soon, Ai Ling; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Programmed death one (PD-1) is a well-established co-inhibitory regulator that suppresses proliferation and cytokine production of T cells. Despite remarkable progress in delineating the functional roles of PD-1 on T lymphocytes, little is known about the regulatory role of PD-1 expressed on myeloid cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that CD8+ T cells can be more potently activated to secrete IL-2 and IFNγ by PD-1-deficient DCs compared to wild-type DCs. Adoptive transfer of PD-1-deficient DCs demonstrated their superior capabilities in inducing antigen-specific CD8+ T cell proliferation in vivo. In addition, we provide first evidence demonstrating the existence of peripheral blood DCs and CD11c+ tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells that co-express PD-1 in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The existence of PD-1-expressing HCC-infiltrating DCs (HIDCs) was further supported in a mouse model of HCC. Intratumoral transfer of PD-1-deficient DCs rendered recipient mice resistant to the growth of HCC by promoting tumor-infiltrating CD8+ effector T cells to secrete perforin and granzyme B. This novel finding provides a deeper understanding of the role of PD-1 in immune regulation and has significant implications for cancer immunotherapies targeting PD-1. PMID:27141339

  2. Design Report for ACP Hot Cell Rear Door

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, J. H.; Kwon, K. C.; Choung, W. M.; Cho, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Lee, W. K.; You, G. S.; Lee, E. P.; Park, S. W

    2005-12-15

    A hot-cell facility was constructed at the IMEF building for the demonstrate ACP process. ACP hot-cell consists of process cell and maintenance cell, and each cell has rear door. Since this facility was constructed at basement floor, all process materials, equipment and radioactive materials are take in and out through the rear door. Also, this door can be an access route of workers for the maintenance works. Therefore ACP hot-cell rear doors must maintain the radiation shielding, sealing, mechanical and structural safety. This report presents design criteria, design contents of each part and driving part. It was confirmed that the rear doors sufficiently maintain the safety through the structural analysis and shielding analysis. Also, it was confirmed that the rear doors were constructed as designed by the gamma scanning test after the installation.

  3. Embryo quality predictive models based on cumulus cells gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devjak R

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of in vitro fertilization (IVF in clinical practice of infertility treatment, the indicators for high quality embryos were investigated. Cumulus cells (CC have a specific gene expression profile according to the developmental potential of the oocyte they are surrounding, and therefore, specific gene expression could be used as a biomarker. The aim of our study was to combine more than one biomarker to observe improvement in prediction value of embryo development. In this study, 58 CC samples from 17 IVF patients were analyzed. This study was approved by the Republic of Slovenia National Medical Ethics Committee. Gene expression analysis [quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR] for five genes, analyzed according to embryo quality level, was performed. Two prediction models were tested for embryo quality prediction: a binary logistic and a decision tree model. As the main outcome, gene expression levels for five genes were taken and the area under the curve (AUC for two prediction models were calculated. Among tested genes, AMHR2 and LIF showed significant expression difference between high quality and low quality embryos. These two genes were used for the construction of two prediction models: the binary logistic model yielded an AUC of 0.72 ± 0.08 and the decision tree model yielded an AUC of 0.73 ± 0.03. Two different prediction models yielded similar predictive power to differentiate high and low quality embryos. In terms of eventual clinical decision making, the decision tree model resulted in easy-to-interpret rules that are highly applicable in clinical practice.

  4. Differences in CART expression and cell cycle behavior discriminate sympathetic neuroblast from chromaffin cell lineages in mouse sympathoadrenal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wing Hei; Gonsalvez, David G; Young, Heather M; Southard-Smith, E Michelle; Cane, Kylie N; Anderson, Colin R

    2016-02-01

    Adrenal medullary chromaffin cells and peripheral sympathetic neurons originate from a common sympathoadrenal (SA) progenitor cell. The timing and phenotypic changes that mark this lineage diversification are not fully understood. The present study investigated the expression patterns of phenotypic markers, and cell cycle dynamics, in the adrenal medulla and the neighboring suprarenal ganglion of embryonic mice. The noradrenergic marker, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), was detected in both presumptive adrenal medulla and sympathetic ganglion cells, but with significantly stronger immunostaining in the former. There was intense cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide immunostaining in most neuroblasts, whereas very few adrenal chromaffin cells showed detectable CART immunostaining. This phenotypic segregation appeared as early as E12.5, before anatomical segregation of the two cell types. Cell cycle dynamics were also examined. Initially, 88% of Sox10 positive (+) neural crest progenitors were proliferating at E10.5. Many SA progenitor cells withdrew from the cell cycle at E11.5 as they started to express TH. Whereas 70% of neuroblasts (TH+/CART+ cells) were back in the cell cycle at E12.5, only around 20% of chromaffin (CART negative) cells were in the cell cycle at E12.5 and subsequent days. Thus, chromaffin cell and neuroblast lineages showed differences in proliferative behavior from their earliest appearance. We conclude that the intensity of TH immunostaining and the expression of CART permit early discrimination of chromaffin cells and sympathetic neuroblasts, and that developing chromaffin cells exhibit significantly lower proliferative activity relative to sympathetic neuroblasts.

  5. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  6. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells

  7. Gene expression profiling of dendritic cells in different physiological stages under Cordyceps sinensis treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yang Li

    Full Text Available Cordyceps sinensis (CS has been commonly used as herbal medicine and a health supplement in China for over two thousand years. Although previous studies have demonstrated that CS has benefits in immunoregulation and anti-inflammation, the precise mechanism by which CS affects immunomodulation is still unclear. In this study, we exploited duplicate sets of loop-design microarray experiments to examine two different batches of CS and analyze the effects of CS on dendritic cells (DCs, in different physiology stages: naïve stage and inflammatory stage. Immature DCs were treated with CS, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, or LPS plus CS (LPS/CS for two days, and the gene expression profiles were examined using cDNA microarrays. The results of two loop-design microarray experiments showed good intersection rates. The expression level of common genes found in both loop-design microarray experiments was consistent, and the correlation coefficients (Rs, were higher than 0.96. Through intersection analysis of microarray results, we identified 295 intersecting significantly differentially expressed (SDE genes of the three different treatments (CS, LPS, and LPS/CS, which participated mainly in the adjustment of immune response and the regulation of cell proliferation and death. Genes regulated uniquely by CS treatment were significantly involved in the regulation of focal adhesion pathway, ECM-receptor interaction pathway, and hematopoietic cell lineage pathway. Unique LPS regulated genes were significantly involved in the regulation of Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, systemic lupus erythematosus pathway, and complement and coagulation cascades pathway. Unique LPS/CS regulated genes were significantly involved in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation pathway. These results could provide useful information in further study of the pharmacological mechanisms of CS. This study also demonstrates that with a rigorous experimental design, the biological effects

  8. Effect of Interaction between Chromatin Loops on Cell-to-Cell Variability in Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuoqi Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available According to recent experimental evidence, the interaction between chromatin loops, which can be characterized by three factors-connection pattern, distance between regulatory elements, and communication form, play an important role in determining the level of cell-to-cell variability in gene expression. These quantitative experiments call for a corresponding modeling effect that addresses the question of how changes in these factors affect variability at the expression level in a systematic rather than case-by-case fashion. Here we make such an effort, based on a mechanic model that maps three fundamental patterns for two interacting DNA loops into a 4-state model of stochastic transcription. We first show that in contrast to side-by-side loops, nested loops enhance mRNA expression and reduce expression noise whereas alternating loops have just opposite effects. Then, we compare effects of facilitated tracking and direct looping on gene expression. We find that the former performs better than the latter in controlling mean expression and in tuning expression noise, but this control or tuning is distance-dependent, remarkable for moderate loop lengths, and there is a limit loop length such that the difference in effect between two communication forms almost disappears. Our analysis and results justify the facilitated chromatin-looping hypothesis.

  9. Growth hormone increases vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Troels Krarup; Fisker, Sanne; Dall, Rolf;

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the impact of GH administration on endothelial adhesion molecules, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin, in vivo and in vitro. Soluble VCAM-1, E-selectin, and C-reactive protein concentrations were measured before and after treatment in 25 healthy subjects...... and 25 adult GH-deficient (GHD) patients randomized to GH treatment or placebo. Furthermore, we studied the direct effect of GH and IGF-I and serum from GH-treated subjects on basal and TNF alpha-stimulated expression of VCAM-1 and E-selectin on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Baseline...... levels of VCAM-1, but not E-selectin, were significantly lower in GHD patients than in healthy subjects (362 +/- 15 microg/liter vs. 516 +/- 21 microg/liter, P treatment, compared with placebo [net difference between groups 151.8 microg/liter (95...

  10. Abnormal expressions of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and P27 protein in brain glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both proliferating cell nuclear antigen and P27 protein are important factors to regulate cell cycle. While, the combination of them can provide exactly objective markers to evaluate prognosis of patients with brain glioma needs to be further studied based on pathological level.OBJECTIVE: To observe the expressions of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and P27 protein in both injured and normal brain glioma tissues and analyze the effect of them on onset and development of brain glioma.DESIGN: Case contrast observation.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 63 patients with brain glioma were selected from Department of Neurosurgery,the Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University from July 1996 to June 2000. There were 38 males and 25 females and their ages ranged from 23 to 71 years. Based on pathological classification and grading standards of brain glioma, patients were divided into grade Ⅰ - tⅡ (n =30) and grade Ⅲ - Ⅳ (n =33). All cases received one operation but no radiotherapy and chemiotherapy before operation. Sample tissues were collected from tumor parenchyma. Non-neoplastic brain tissues were collected from another 12 non-tumor subjects who received craniocerebral trauma infra-decompression and regarded as the control group. There were 10 males and 2 females and their ages ranged from 16 to 54 years. The experiment had got confirmed consent from local ethic committee and the collection was provided confirmed consent from patients and their relatives. All samples were restained with HE staining so as to diagnose as the brain glioma.While, all patients with brain glioma received radiotherapy after operation and their survival periods were followed up.METHODS: Primary lesion wax of brain glioma was cut into serial sections and stained with S-P immunohistochemical staining. Brown substance which was observed in tumor nucleus was regarded as the

  11. NOTCH3 expression is induced in mural cells through an autoregulatory loop that requires endothelial-expressed JAGGED1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Kennard, Simone; Lilly, Brenda

    2009-02-27

    Endothelial cells and mural cells (smooth muscle cells, pericytes, or fibroblasts) are known to communicate with one another. Their interactions not only serve to support fully functional blood vessels but also can regulate vessel assembly and differentiation or maturation. In an effort to better understand the molecular components of this heterotypic interaction, we used a 3D model of angiogenesis and screened for genes, which were modulated by coculturing of these 2 different cell types. In doing so, we discovered that NOTCH3 is one gene whose expression is robustly induced in mural cells by coculturing with endothelial cells. Knockdown by small interfering RNA revealed that NOTCH3 is necessary for endothelial-dependent mural cell differentiation, whereas overexpression of NOTCH3 is sufficient to promote smooth muscle gene expression. Moreover, NOTCH3 contributes to the proangiogenic abilities of mural cells cocultured with endothelial cells. Interestingly, we found that the expression of NOTCH3 is dependent on Notch signaling, because the gamma-secretase inhibitor DAPT blocked its upregulation. Furthermore, in mural cells, a dominant-negative Mastermind-like1 construct inhibited NOTCH3 expression, and endothelial-expressed JAGGED1 was required for its induction. Additionally, we demonstrated that NOTCH3 could promote its own expression and that of JAGGED1 in mural cells. Taken together, these data provide a mechanism by which endothelial cells induce the differentiation of mural cells through activation and induction of NOTCH3. These findings also suggest that NOTCH3 has the capacity to maintain a differentiated phenotype through a positive-feedback loop that includes both autoregulation and JAGGED1 expression.

  12. Effects of cadmium on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and proto-oncogene expression in zebrafish liver cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying Ying; Zhu, Jin Yong; Chan, King Ming, E-mail: kingchan@cuhk.edu.hk

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Cd stimulated ZFL cell proliferation with decreasing apoptotic cell numbers. • Cd down regulated p53 and RAD51. • Cd up regulated immediate early cancer genes of GADD45 and growth factors. • Cd promoted tumorigenic effects in ZFL cells. - Abstract: Cadmium (Cd) is one of the major transitional metal that has toxic effects in aquatic organisms and their associated ecosystem; however, its hepatic toxicity and carcinogenicity are not very well characterized. We used a zebrafish liver (ZFL) cell line as a model to investigate the mechanism of Cd-induced toxicity on hepatocytes. Our results showed that Cd can be effectively accumulated in ZFL cells in our exposure experiments. Cell cytotoxicity assays and flow cytometer measurements revealed that Cd{sup 2+} stimulated ZFL cell proliferation with decreasing apoptotic cell numbers indicating potentially tumorigenic effects of Cd in ZFL cells. Gene expression profiles also indicated that Cd downregulated oncogenes p53 and rad51 and upregulated immediate response oncogenes, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible (gadd45) genes, and growth factors. We also found dramatic changes in the gene expression of c-jun and igf1rb at different exposure time points, supporting the notion that potentially tumorigenic of Cd-is involved in the activation of immediate early genes or genes related to apoptosis in cancer promotion.

  13. The Construction of a Mammalian Transfection Vector For Expression of Cytosine-5 Specific DNA Methyltransferase Gene M.Msp1 In Cultured Cells

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZDEMİR, Öztürk

    1998-01-01

    The expression vectors are designed for expression and purification of normal or recombi-nant gene of interest. There is a wide variety of stable and transferable selectable mammalian expres-sion vectors.The vector pCDM8 and its derivatives, pcDNAI/Ampicilline are widely used for cloning and analyzing of genes in higher eukaryotic cells. The vectors pRC/CMV, pcDNA3 and pRC/RSV are designed for high-level expression of recombinant genes in mammalian cells. In the present study, we have be...

  14. Effects of different ingredients of zedoary on gene expression of HSC-T6 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Jiang; Ze-Song Li; Fu-Sheng Jiang; Xin Deng; Cong-Shun Yao; Guang Nie

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of four different ingredients of zedoary (Curcuma aromatica oil, Curcumol,β-elemence, and Curcumin) on the gene expressions of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), and to explore the molecular mechanism of zedoary against hepatic fibrosis at gene network level.METHODS: We detected the mRNA sequences of 50 liver fibrosis-related genes in GenBank and designed oligonucleotide probes. We synthesized oligonucleotides with PE8909 DNA synthesizing instrument, and carried out oligonucleotide microarray with OGR-04 dropping instrument and aldehyded glass chip. Cultured HSC-T6cells were treated with different concentrations of Colchicine,Curcuma aromatica oil, Curcumol, β-elemence, and Curcumin. According to the experiment of cell toxicity,we took the appropriate concentrations of medicines that resulted in over 50% of cell survival as experiment concentrations. We collected the cells at 1, 6, 12, and 24 h, and extracted total RNA with TRIzol reagent, then labeled cDNAs with Cy3-dUTP and Cy5-dUTP. These labeled cDNAs were hybridized to an oligonucleotide microarray which was washed several times and scanned by scanner GenePix 4000B. Different gene expressions of HSC-T6 cells were analyzed by ImaGene 4.2 software.RESULTS: After HSC-T6 cells were cultured in a medium containing 6.25 μg/mL Colchicine for 12 h, expression of TIMP-1 decreased 2.2-folds. After HSC-T6 cells were cultured in a medium containing 78.125 μg/mL of Curcuma aromatica oil for 24 h, the expression of TIMP-2and IL-6 decreased 2.3- and 2.2-folds, respectively.Moreover, after HSC-T6 cells were cultured in a medium containing 1.5625 μg/mL of Curcumol for 12 h, the expression of TGFβ1 and P450a decreased 2.3- and 2.1-folds, respectively.CONCLUSION: Our results may show the possible molecular mechanism of Curcuma aromatica oil and Curcumol against hepatic fibrosis.

  15. Gene expression profile of HIV-1 Tat expressing cells: a close interplay between proliferative and differentiation signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Kaili

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression profiling holds great promise for rapid host genome functional analysis. It is plausible that host expression profiling in an infection could serve as a universal phenotype in virally infected cells. Here, we describe the effect of one of the most critical viral activators, Tat, in HIV-1 infected and Tat expressing cells. We utilized microarray analysis from uninfected, latently HIV-1 infected cells, as well as cells that express Tat, to decipher some of the cellular changes associated with this viral activator. Results Utilizing uninfected, HIV-1 latently infected cells, and Tat expressing cells, we observed that most of the cellular host genes in Tat expressing cells were down-regulated. The down-regulation in Tat expressing cells is most apparent on cellular receptors that have intrinsic receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK activity and signal transduction members that mediate RTK function, including Ras-Raf-MEK pathway. Co-activators of transcription, such as p300/CBP and SRC-1, which mediate gene expression related to hormone receptor genes, were also found to be down-regulated. Down-regulation of receptors may allow latent HIV-1 infected cells to either hide from the immune system or avoid extracellular differentiation signals. Some of the genes that were up-regulated included co-receptors for HIV-1 entry, translation machinery, and cell cycle regulatory proteins. Conclusions We have demonstrated, through a microarray approach, that HIV-1 Tat is able to regulate many cellular genes that are involved in cell signaling, translation and ultimately control the host proliferative and differentiation signals.

  16. Transgenic expression of the human growth hormone minigene promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baan, Mieke; Kibbe, Carly R; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Harris, Ted W; Sherman, Dawn S; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic mouse models are designed to study the role of specific proteins. To increase transgene expression the human growth hormone (hGH) minigene, including introns, has been included in many transgenic constructs. Until recently, it was thought that the hGH gene was not spliced, transcribed, and translated to produce functional hGH protein. We generated a transgenic mouse with the transcription factor Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) followed by the hGH minigene, under control of the mouse insulin promoter (MIP) to target expression specifically in the pancreatic β-cell. Expression of FoxM1 in isolated pancreatic islets in vitro stimulates β-cell proliferation. We aimed to investigate the effect of FoxM1 on β-cell mass in a mouse model for diabetes mellitus. However, we found inadvertent coexpression of hGH protein from a spliced, bicistronic mRNA. MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice had lower blood glucose and higher pancreatic insulin content, due to increased β-cell proliferation. hGH signals through the murine prolactin receptor, and expression of its downstream targets tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1), tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), and cytokine-inducible SH2 containing protein (Cish) was increased. Conversely, transcriptional targets of FoxM1 were not upregulated. Our data suggest that the phenotype of MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice is due primarily to hGH activity and that the FoxM1 protein remains largely inactive. Over the past decades, multiple transgenic mouse strains were generated that make use of the hGH minigene to increase transgene expression. Our work suggests that each will need to be carefully screened for inadvertent hGH production and critically evaluated for the use of proper controls. PMID:26202070

  17. Deficient Fas expression by CD4+ CCR5+ T cells in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julià, Eva; Montalban, Xavier; Al-Zayat, Hammad;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether T cells expressing CCR5 and CXCR3 from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are more resistant to apoptosis. METHODS: Expression of CD69, TNF-R1, Fas, FasL, bcl-2, and bax was investigated in 41 MS patients and 12 healthy controls by flow cytometry in CD4+ and CD8+ T...... cells expressing CCR5 and CXCR3. RESULTS: In MS patients, the percentage of CD69 was increased and Fas expression decreased in CD4+ CCR5+ T cells. INTERPRETATION: The lower Fas expression in activated CD4+ CCR5+ T cells might contribute to disease pathogenesis by prolonging cell survival and favoring...

  18. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongtao [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Gao, Peng [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Zheng, Jie, E-mail: jiezheng54@126.com [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  19. Analysis of cell growth and gene expression of porcine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells as nuclear donor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Rhee, Sang Ho; Lim, Sang Hyun; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2014-12-01

    In several laboratory animals and humans, adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC) are of considerable interest because they are easy to harvest and can generate a huge proliferation of cells from a small quantity of fat. In this study, we investigated: (i) the expression patterns of reprogramming-related genes in porcine ASC; and (ii) whether ASC can be a suitable donor cell type for generating cloned pigs. For these experiments, ASC, adult skin fibroblasts (AF) and fetal fibroblasts (FF) were derived from a 4-year-old female miniature pig. The ASC expressed cell-surface markers characteristic of stem cells, and underwent in vitro differentiation when exposed to specific differentiation-inducing conditions. Expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)1 in ASC was similar to that in AF, but the highest expression of the DNMT3B gene was observed in ASC. The expression of OCT4 was significantly higher in FF and ASC than in AF (P development rate of cloned embryos derived from ASC was comparable to the development of those derived using FF. Total cell numbers of blastocysts derived using ASC and FF were significantly higher than in embryos made with AF. The results demonstrated that ASC used for SCNT have a potential comparable to those of AF and FF in terms of embryo in vitro development and blastocyst formation.

  20. Choline acetyltransferase expressed by radial neuroglia cells in the development of telencephalon: A validated study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhou; Lingling Ding; Zhisuo Xiao; Yuanyuan Qin; Guibin Li

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholinergic neuron directly participants in human motion, learning and memory and is a target cell for multiple degenerative diseases of central nervous system.OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the mitotic cell is the radial glial cell expressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in ventricle zone (VZ) of telencephalon and whether cholinergic neuron is derived from radial glial cell in ventricle zone of telencephalon.DESIGN: Observational study.SETTING: Department of Histology and Embryology, Basic Medical College of Jilin University.MATERIALS: Nine healthy Wistar rats included 6 females and 3 male. Male and female rats were mated routinely, and the day when spermatozoa or vaginal plug were found was regarded as embryonic 0 (E0).Primary monoclonal antibodies ChAT and vimentin were provided respectively by Wuhan Boster Company,and Biogenex Company, USA.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Cell Culture and Immunohistochemistry,Department of Histology and Embryology from march 2002 to January 2003. Firstly, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to confirm the time of generation of cholinergic neuron; secondly,telencephalons of rats at embryonic 14 days (E14) were performed coronary sections, then immunohistochemistry double staining for vimentin (a protein marker of radial neuroglia cell) and ChAT (a protein marker of cholinergic neuron) were used to test whether ChAT was expressed in the radial neuroglia cells.results of immunohistochemistry double staining.RESULTS: It is confirmed using by flow cytometer that embryogenesis time of cholinergic neuron was at E12, and shown the population of cells in VZ of dorsal telencephalon of E14 rat co-expressed vimentin and ChAT through immunohistochemistry double staining. A lot of vimentin-positive cells and ChAT-positive cells respectively were observed in VZ of lateral ganglionic eminence.CONCLUSION: Cholinergic neuron in cerebral cortex is derived from radial glial cells in VZ

  1. IL-17A is not expressed by CD207+ cells in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Carl E.; McClain, Kenneth L.

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17A) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that has recently been implicated in pathogenesis of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH), a potentially fatal disease characterized by lesions including CD207+ (langerin +) histiocytes. However, in this study we were unable to identify IL-17A gene expression in Langerhans cell lesions, and plasma levels of IL-17A did not correlate with disease activity. Therefore, this study does not support a central role for IL-17A in LCH pathogenesis.

  2. Design Methodology of the Structure of Postal Express Mail Networks of Aviation Channels in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the postal area center office system, the continuous space approximation is used to study the structure of postal express mail networks of aviation channels in China. Tradeoffs among sorting, handling, transportation, administrative and facilities costs are examined. The optimizing design methodology proposed in this paper can be used to analyze and design the postal express mail network. The objective is to minimize the total system cost.

  3. Gene transfer and expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein in variant HT-29c cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Lars Boenicke; Bradley D. Howard; Ilka Vogel; Hoiger Kalthoff

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in retrovirally transduced variant HT29 cells.METHODS: The retroviral vector prkat EGFP/neo was constructed and transfected into the 293T cell using a standard calcium phosphate precipitation method. HT-29c cells (selected from HT-29 cells) were transduced by a retroviral vector encoding the GEFP gene. The fluorescence intensity of colorectal carcinoma HT-29c cells after transduced with the EGFP bearing retrovirus was visualized using fluorescence microscope and fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Multiple biological behaviors of transduced cells such as the proliferating potential and the expression of various antigens were comparatively analyzed between untransduced and transduced cells in vitro. EGFP expression of the fresh tumor tissue was assessed in vivo.RESULTS: After transduced, HT-29c cells displayed a stable and long-term EGFP expression under the nonselective conditionsin vitro. After cells were successively cultured to passage 50 in vitro, EGFP expression was still at a high level. Their biological behaviors, such as expression of tumor antigens, proliferation rate and aggregation capability were not different compared to untransduced parental cells in vitro. In subcutaneous tumors, EGFP was stable and highly expressed.CONCLUSION: An EGFP expressing retroviral vector was used to transduce HT-29c cells. The transduced cells show a stable and long-term EGFP expression in vitro and in vivo.These cells with EGFP are a valuable tool forin vivo research of tumor metastatic spread.

  4. Optimized expression vector for ion channel studies in Xenopus oocytes and mammalian cells using alfalfa mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalan, Srinivasan P; Bushman, Jeremy D; Mercado, José L; Sancar, Feyza; Christopherson, Kelly R; Boileau, Andrew J

    2007-04-01

    Plasmid vectors used for mammalian expression or for in vitro cRNA translation can differ substantially and are rarely cross-compatible. To make comparisons between mammalian and Xenopus oocyte expression systems, it would be advantageous to use a single vector without the need for shuttle vectors or subcloning. We have designed such a vector, designated pUNIV for universal, with elements that will allow for in vitro or ex vivo expression in multiple cell types. We tested the expression of pUNIV-based cDNA cassettes using enhanced green fluorescent protein and two forms of the type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A)R) and compared pUNIV to vectors optimized for expression in either Xenopus oocytes or mammalian cells. In HEK293 cells, radioligand binding was robust, and patch clamp experiments showed that subtle macroscopic GABA(A)R kinetics were indistinguishable from our previous results. In Xenopus oocytes, agonist median effective concentration measurements matched previous work using a vector optimized for oocyte expression. Furthermore, we found that expression using pUNIV was significantly enhanced in oocytes and was remarkably long-lasting in both systems. PMID:17146677

  5. Gum mastic increases maspin expression in prostate cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-lan HE; Wei-wen CHEN; Peng-ju ZHANG; An-li JIANG; Wei FAN; Hui-qing YUAN; Wen-wen LIU; Jian-ye ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To study whether gum mastic, a natural resin, can regulate maspin expres-sion in prostate cancer cells, and further investigate the mechanisms involved in this regulatory system. Methods: RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to detect maspin expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. Reporter gene assay was used to investigate the effect of gum mastic on the maspin promoter.The binding activity of negative androgen-responsive element (ARE) and posi-tive Sp1 element in the maspin promoter were studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Results: Gum mastic induced maspin mRNA and protein expression,and the maspin promoter activity was enhanced with gum mastic treatment. Finally,gum mastic inhibited the ARE binding activity and increased the Sp1 binding activity in the maspin promoter. Conclusion: Gum mastic enhances maspin pro-moter activity by suppressing ARE binding activity and enhancing Sp1 binding activity, and the increased activity in the maspin promoter finally leads to the up-regulation of both its mRNA and protein levels.

  6. Aspirin inhibits Chlamydia pneumoniae : Induced nuclear factor-kappa B activation, cytokine expression, and bacterial development in human endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiran, A; Gruber, HJ; Graier, WF; Wagner, AH; van Leeuwen, EBM; Tiran, B

    2002-01-01

    Objective-Chlamydia pneumoniae has been associated with atherosclerosis. Infection of vascular endothelial cells with C pneumoniae increases the expression of proatherogenic cytokines mediated by nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, a transcription factor. The present study was designed to test the effect of

  7. Families of microRNAs Expressed in Clusters Regulate Cell Signaling in Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Steven Servín-González

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells have developed advantages to acquire hallmarks of cancer like apoptosis resistance, increased proliferation, migration, and invasion through cell signaling pathway misregulation. The sequential activation of genes in a pathway is regulated by miRNAs. Loss or gain of miRNA expression could activate or repress a particular cell axis. It is well known that aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as an important step in the development of cancer. Individual miRNA expression is reported without considering that miRNAs are grouped in clusters and may have similar functions, such as the case of clusters with anti-oncomiRs (23b~27b~24-1, miR-29a~29b-1, miR-29b-2~29c, miR-99a~125b-2, miR-99b~125a, miR-100~125b-1, miR-199a-2~214, and miR-302s or oncomiRs activity (miR-1-1~133a-2, miR-1-2~133a-1, miR-133b~206, miR-17~92, miR-106a~363, miR183~96~182, miR-181a-1~181b-1, and miR-181a-2~181b-2, which regulated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K, NOTCH, proteasome-culling rings, and apoptosis cell signaling. In this work we point out the pathways regulated by families of miRNAs grouped in 20 clusters involved in cervical cancer. Reviewing how miRNA families expressed in cluster-regulated cell path signaling will increase the knowledge of cervical cancer progression, providing important information for therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic methodology design.

  8. Degradation of amyloid beta by human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived macrophages expressing Neprilysin-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koutaro Takamatsu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cell-derived macrophage-like cells for Alzheimer's disease (AD. In previous studies, we established the technology to generate macrophage-like myeloid lineage cells with proliferating capacity from human iPS cells, and we designated the cells iPS-ML. iPS-ML reduced the level of Aβ added into the culture medium, and the culture supernatant of iPS-ML alleviated the neurotoxicity of Aβ. We generated iPS-ML expressing the Fc-receptor-fused form of a single chain antibody specific to Aβ. In addition, we made iPS-ML expressing Neprilysin-2 (NEP2, which is a protease with Aβ-degrading activity. In vitro, expression of NEP2 but not anti-Aβ scFv enhanced the effect to reduce the level of soluble Aβ oligomer in the culture medium and to alleviate the neurotoxicity of Aβ. To analyze the effect of iPS-ML expressing NEP2 (iPS-ML/NEP2 in vivo, we intracerebrally administered the iPS-ML/NEP2 to 5XFAD mice, which is a mouse model of AD. We observed significant reduction in the level of Aβ in the brain interstitial fluid following administration of iPS-ML/NEP2. These results suggested that iPS-ML/NEP2 may be a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of AD.

  9. Ectopic expression of B-lymphoid kinase in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Vetter-Kauczok, Claudia S; Woetmann, Anders;

    2009-01-01

    B-lymphoid kinase (Blk) is exclusively expressed in B cells and thymocytes. Interestingly, transgenic expression of a constitutively active form of Blk in the T-cell lineage of mice results in the development of T-lymphoid lymphomas. Here, we demonstrate nuclear factor-kappa B (NF......-kappaB)-mediated ectopic expression of Blk in malignant T-cell lines established from patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Importantly, Blk is also expressed in situ in lesional tissue specimens from 26 of 31 patients with CTCL. Already in early disease the majority of epidermotropic T cells express Blk...... phosphorylated in malignant CTCL cell lines and spontaneously active in kinase assays. Furthermore, targeting Blk activity and expression by Src kinase inhibitors and small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibit the proliferation of the malignant T cells. In conclusion, this is the first report of Blk expression...

  10. Sequence and expression analyses of ethylene response factors highly expressed in latex cells from Hevea brasiliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyanuch Piyatrakul

    Full Text Available The AP2/ERF superfamily encodes transcription factors that play a key role in plant development and responses to abiotic and biotic stress. In Hevea brasiliensis, ERF genes have been identified by RNA sequencing. This study set out to validate the number of HbERF genes, and identify ERF genes involved in the regulation of latex cell metabolism. A comprehensive Hevea transcriptome was improved using additional RNA reads from reproductive tissues. Newly assembled contigs were annotated in the Gene Ontology database and were assigned to 3 main categories. The AP2/ERF superfamily is the third most represented compared with other transcription factor families. A comparison with genomic scaffolds led to an estimation of 114 AP2/ERF genes and 1 soloist in Hevea brasiliensis. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, functions were predicted for 26 HbERF genes. A relative transcript abundance analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR in various tissues. Transcripts of ERFs from group I and VIII were very abundant in all tissues while those of group VII were highly accumulated in latex cells. Seven of the thirty-five ERF expression marker genes were highly expressed in latex. Subcellular localization and transactivation analyses suggested that HbERF-VII candidate genes encoded functional transcription factors.

  11. FcRn expression, ligands binding properties and its regulation in human immune cells and hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Expression and diverse functions of MHC class I related neonatal Fc receptor in different tissues is continually reported. To contribute to the understanding of how the receptor functions according to cell type, we investigated the expression and ligands binding properties of FcRn in human immune cells and hepatocytes. Here, we report that heterodimeric FcRn is expressed in these cells as evidenced by RT-PCR, Western immunoblottting and flow cytometry. The receptor expression i...

  12. Enhanced cell-free protein expression by fusion with immunoglobulin Cκ domain

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Elizabeth; Liu, Hong; Khan, Farid; Taussig, Michael J; He, Mingyue

    2006-01-01

    While cell-free systems are increasingly used for protein expression in structural and functional studies, several proteins are difficult to express or expressed only at low levels in cell-free lysates. Here, we report that fusion of the human immunoglobulin κ light chain constant domain (Cκ) at the C terminus of four representative proteins dramatically improved their production in the Escherichia coli S30 system, suggesting that enhancement of cell-free protein expression by Cκ fusion will ...

  13. Broadband back grating design for thin film solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, design based on tapered circular grating structure was studied, to provide broadband enhancement in thin film amorphous silicon solar cells. In comparison to planar structure an absorption enhancement of ~ 7% was realized.

  14. Increased T cell expression of CD154 (CD40-ligand) in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J; Krakauer, M; Sellebjerg, F

    2001-01-01

    CD154 (CD40-ligand, gp39), expressed on activated T cells, is crucial in T cell-dependent immune responses and may be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied cerebro-spinal fluid and peripheral blood T cell expression of CD154 in MS by flow cytometry. Patients with sec......CD154 (CD40-ligand, gp39), expressed on activated T cells, is crucial in T cell-dependent immune responses and may be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied cerebro-spinal fluid and peripheral blood T cell expression of CD154 in MS by flow cytometry. Patients...

  15. Expression of P53, P21 in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cell Strains under Hypoxia Conditions and the Effect of TSA on Their Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宏; 张珍祥; 徐永健; 邵静芳

    2003-01-01

    This paper was designed to investigate the expression of p53, p21of A549 cell strains under hypoxic condition and the effect of trichostatin A (TSA), the inhibitor of histone deacetylasel (HDAC1) on their expression. The authors designed 1 normoxia group (control group) and 6 hypoxia groups (experiemntal group): hypoxia 6 h group (A), TSA+ hypoxia 6 h (B), hypoxia 12 h group (C) ,hypoxia 24 h group (D), TSA+hypoxia 24 h (E), hypoxia 48 h group (F). The expression of HDAC1 in A549 cells was examined by using Western blot and the expression of p53,p21 in A549 cells and the effect of TSA on them were determined by using immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The A value expressed by HDAC1 in A549 cell strains was 138±11 in the control group, 78±4, 86±5, 124±3, 120±9 in experimental groups A, C, D, F, respectively. The A value of the expression of the protein and mRNA of p53 in A549 cell strains were 0. 12±0.02, 0. 62±0.02 in the control group, 0. 10±0.03, 0.32±0.03; 0. 11±0.01, 0. 33±0.02; 0. 13±0.03, 0. 58±0.01; 0. 12±0. 02, 0. 56±0.02 in experimental group A, B, D, E, respectively. The A value of the expression of the protein and mRNA of p21 in A549 cell strains were 0. 17±0.03, 0. 62±0. 03 in the control group, 0. 16±0.02, 0. 50±0.02; 0. 14±0.02, 0. 36±0.02; 0. 15±0.03, 0. 49±0.03; 0. 13±0.02, 0. 33 ± 0. 02 in experimental groups A, B, D, E, respectively. These results indicate that the expression of HDAC1 is regulated by hypoxia and the effect of TSA is closely related to the expression of P21 under hypoxia condition.

  16. Designer nanoparticle: nanobiotechnology tool for cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimiri Govinda Raj, Deepak B.; Khan, Niamat Ali

    2016-09-01

    This article discusses the use of nanotechnology for subcellular compartment isolation and its application towards subcellular omics. This technology review significantly contributes to our understanding on use of nanotechnology for subcellular systems biology. Here we elaborate nanobiotechnology approach of using superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) optimized with different surface coatings for subcellular organelle isolation. Using pulse-chase approach, we review that SPMNPs interacted differently with the cell depending on its surface functionalization. The article focuses on the use of functionalized-SPMNPs as a nanobiotechnology tool to isolate high quality (both purity and yield) plasma membranes and endosomes or lysosomes. Such nanobiotechnology tool can be applied in generating subcellular compartment inventories. As a future perspective, this strategy could be applied in areas such as immunology, cancer and stem cell research.

  17. Forced expression of OCT4 influences the expression of pluripotent genes in human mesenchymal stem cells and fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, C S; Tannous, M A; Malta, T M; Russo, E M S; Covas, D T; Picanço-Castro, V

    2013-04-02

    Genetic reprogramming of adult cells to generate induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is a new and important step in sidestepping some of the ethical issues and risks involved in the use of embryonic stem cells. iPS cells can be generated by introduction of transcription factors, such as OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and CMYC. iPS cells resemble embryonic stem cells in their properties and differentiation potential. The mechanisms that lead to induced pluripotency and the effect of each transcription factor are not completely understood. We performed a critical evaluation of the effect of overexpressing OCT4 in mesenchymal stem cells and fibroblasts and found that OCT4 can activate the expression of other stemness genes, such as SOX2, NANOG, CMYC, FOXD3, KLF4, and βCATENIN, which are not normally or are very weakly expressed in mesenchymal stem cells. Transient expression of OCT4 was also performed to evaluate whether these genes are affected by its overexpression in the first 48 h. Transfected fibroblast cells expressed around 275-fold more OCT4 than non-transfected cells. In transient expression, in which cells were analyzed after 48 h, we detected only the up-regulation of FOXD3, SOX2, and KLF4 genes, suggesting that these genes are the earlier targets of OCT4 in this cellular type. We conclude that forced expression of OCT4 can alter cell status and activate the pluripotent network. Knowledge gained through study of these systems may help us to understand the kinetics and mechanism of cell reprogramming.

  18. CD11b expression as a marker to distinguish between recently activated effector CD8(+) T cells and memory cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Ørding Andreasen, Susanne; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard;

    2001-01-01

    subset. Polyclonal virus-specific effector and memory CD8(+) T cells from lymphocytic choriomeningitis- and vesicular stomatitis virus-infected mice were visualized through staining for intracellular IFN-gamma or binding of MHC-peptide tetramers, and Mac-1 expression was evaluated. Naive T cells and most......CD8(+) T cells in different activation states have been difficult to identify phenotypically. In this study we have investigated whether Mac-1 (CD11b) expression can be used as a criterion to distinguish between recently activated effector cells and memory cells belonging to the CD8(+) T cell...... virus-specific memory CD8(+) T cells express little or no Mac-1 independent of the virus model employed. In contrast, the majority of CD8(+) T cells present during acute infection express a significant level of Mac-1 and, similarly, Mac-1 expression is found on secondary effectors generated in response...

  19. Retinal pigment epithelial cells upregulate expression of complement factors after co-culture with activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Helene Bæk; Kaestel, Charlotte; Folkersen, Lasse;

    2011-01-01

    In this study we examined the effect of T cell-derived cytokines on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells with respect to expression of complement components. We used an in vitro co-culture system in which CD3/CD28-activated human T cells were separated from the human RPE cell line (ARPE-19......) by a membrane. Differential gene expression in the RPE cells of complement factor genes was identified using gene arrays, and selected gene transcripts were validated by q-RT-PCR. Protein expression was determined by ELISA and immunoblotting. Co-culture with activated T cells increased RPE mRNA and/or protein...... expression of complement components C3, factors B, H, H-like 1, CD46, CD55, CD59, and clusterin, in a dose-dependent manner. Soluble factors derived from activated T cells are capable of increasing expression of complement components in RPE cells. This is important for the further understanding...

  20. The Expression of p53 and Cox-2 in Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Actinic Keratosis Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülker KARAGECE YALÇIN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate p53 and COX-2 expressions in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, and to determine a possible relationship.Material and Method: 50 basal cell carcinoma, 45 squamous cell carcinoma and 45 actinic keratosis cases were evaluated. The type of tumor in basal cell carcinoma and tumor differentiation in squamous cell carcinoma were noted and the paraffin block that best represented the tumor was chosen. Immunostaining by p53 and COX-2 was performed on sections of the paraffin blocks.Results: p53 expression was observed in 98% of basal cell carcinoma, 88.9% of squamous cell carcinoma and all actinic keratosis cases. p53 expression was also noted in non-dysplastic appearing epithelium in actinic keratosis cases. COX-2 expression was seen in 90, 100 and 88.9% of the basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis groups, respectively. Skin appendages, inflammatory cells and vascular structures were also stained by COX-2 besides tumor tissue. COX-2 expression increased by the p53 expression increase in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. p53 and COX-2 expressions were not related in terms of tumor type in the BCC and were not related in terms of differentiation in SCC.Conclusion: The existence of p53 expression in actinic keratosis cases has supported the idea that p53 plays a role in the early steps of carcinogenesis in skin cancers. The fact that the expression of COX-2 increases in line with the increase of p53 expression in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cases indicates that COX-2 expression may be affected by p53

  1. Insect cell transformation vectors that support high level expression and promoter assessment in insect cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    A somatic transformation vector, pDP9, was constructed that provides a simplified means of producing permanently transformed cultured insect cells that support high levels of protein expression of foreign genes. The pDP9 plasmid vector incorporates DNA sequences from the Junonia coenia densovirus th...

  2. Carbon Ion Irradiation Inhibits Glioma Cell Migration Through Downregulation of Integrin Expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of carbon ion irradiation on glioma cell migration. Methods and Materials: U87 and Ln229 glioma cells were irradiated with photons and carbon ions. Migration was analyzed 24 h after irradiation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was performed in order to quantify surface expression of integrins. Results: Single photon doses of 2 Gy and 10 Gy enhanced ανβ3 and ανβ5 integrin expression and caused tumor cell hypermigration on both vitronectin (Vn) and fibronectin (Fn). Compared to integrin expression in unirradiated cells, carbon ion irradiation caused decreased integrin expression and inhibited cell migration on both Vn and Fn. Conclusion: Photon radiotherapy (RT) enhances the risk of tumor cell migration and subsequently promotes locoregional spread via photon induction of integrin expression. In contrast to photon RT, carbon ion RT causes decreased integrin expression and suppresses glioma cell migration on both Vn and Fn, thus promising improved local control.

  3. Model-directed engineering of "difficult-to-express" monoclonal antibody production by Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pybus, Leon P; Dean, Greg; West, Nathan R; Smith, Andrew; Daramola, Olalekan; Field, Ray; Wilkinson, Stephen J; James, David C

    2014-02-01

    Despite improvements in volumetric titer for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production processes using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, some "difficult-to-express" (DTE) MAbs inexplicably reach much lower process titers. These DTE MAbs require intensive cell line and process development activity, rendering them more costly or even unsuitable to manufacture. To rapidly and rationally identify an optimal strategy to improve production of DTE MAbs, we have developed an engineering design platform combining high-yielding transient production, empirical modeling of MAb synthesis incorporating an unfolded protein response (UPR) regulatory loop with directed expression and cell engineering approaches. Utilizing a panel of eight IgG1 λ MAbs varying >4-fold in volumetric titer, we showed that MAb-specific limitations on folding and assembly rate functioned to induce a proportionate UPR in host CHO cells with a corresponding reduction in cell growth rate. Derived from comparative empirical modeling of cellular constraints on the production of each MAb we employed two strategies to increase production of DTE MAbs designed to avoid UPR induction through an improvement in the rate/cellular capacity for MAb folding and assembly reactions. Firstly, we altered the transfected LC:HC gene ratio and secondly, we co-expressed a variety of molecular chaperones, foldases or UPR transactivators (BiP, CypB, PDI, and active forms of ATF6 and XBP1) with recombinant MAbs. DTE MAb production was significantly improved by both strategies, although the mode of action was dependent upon the approach employed. Increased LC:HC ratio or CypB co-expression improved cell growth with no effect on qP. In contrast, BiP, ATF6c and XBP1s co-expression increased qP and reduced cell growth. This study demonstrates that expression-engineering strategies to improve production of DTE proteins in mammalian cells should be product specific, and based on rapid predictive tools to assess the relative impact of

  4. Chemokine Expression in Retinal Pigment Epithelial ARPE-19 Cells in Response to Coculture with Activated T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Helene Bæk; Faber, Carsten; Udsen, Maja;

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effects of T-cell–derived cytokines on gene and protein expression of chemokines in a human RPE cell line (ARPE-19). Methods. We used an in vitro coculture system in which the RPE and CD3/CD28–activated T-cells were separated by a membrane. RPE cell expression of chemo...

  5. Manufacture of clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells stably expressing chimeric antigen receptor using Sleeping Beauty system and artificial antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjeet Singh

    Full Text Available Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28 that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC in the presence of interleukin (IL-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT. We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼10(10 T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion.

  6. Altered expression of epithelial cell surface glycoconjugates and intermediate filaments at the margins of mucosal wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Grøn, B; Mandel, U;

    1998-01-01

    Alterations in cell to cell adhesion are necessary to enable the type of cell movements that are associated with epithelial wound healing and malignant invasion. Several studies of transformed cells have related epithelial cell movement to changes in the cell surface expression of the carbohydrat...

  7. Differential expression of neural cell adhesion molecule and cadherins in pancreatic islets, glucagonomas, and insulinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, C J; Christgau, S; Williamson, M R;

    1992-01-01

    The endocrine cells of the pancreas develop from the endoderm and yet display several characteristics of a neuronal phenotype. During embryonic life, ductal epithelial cells give rise to first the glugagon-producing cells (alpha-cells) and then cells that express insulin (beta-cells), somatostati...

  8. Biphasic regulation of P-glycoprotein function and expression by NO donors in Caco-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru DUAN; Nan HU; Hai-yan LIU; Jia LI; Hai-fang GUO; Can LIU; Li LIU; Xiao-dong LIU

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effects of nitric oxide (NO) donors on the function and expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in Caco-2 cells.Methods:Caco-2 cells were exposed to NO donors for designated times.P-gp function and expression were assessed using Rhodamine123 uptake assay and Western blotting,respectively.Intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) and intracellular reactive nitrogen species (iRNS) levels were measured using ROS and RNS assay kits,respectively.Results:Exposure of Caco-2 cells to 0.1 or 2 mmol/L of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) affected the function and expression of P-gp in concentration- and time-dependent manners.A short-term (4 h) exposure reduced P-gp function and expression accompanied with significantly increased levels of iROS and iRNS.In contrast,a long-term (24 h) exposure stimulated the P-gp function and expression.The stimulatory effects of 2 mmol/L SNP was less profound as compared to those caused by 0.1 mmol/L SNP.The other NO donors SIN-1 and SNAP showed similar effects.Neither the NO scavenger PTIO (2 mmol/L) nor soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ (50 μmol/L) reversed the SNP-induced alteration of P-gp function.On the other hand,free radical scavengers ascorbate,glutathione and uric acid (2 mmol/L for each),PKC inhibitor chelerythrine (5 μmol/L),PI3K/Akt inhibitor wortmannin (1 pmol/L) and p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 (10 μmol/L) reversed the upregulation of P-gp function by the long-term exposure to SNP,but these agents had no effect on the impaired P-gp function following the short-term exposure to SNP.Conclusion:NO donors time-dependently regulate P-gp function and expression in Caco-2 cells:short-term exposure impairs P-gp function and expression,whereas long-term exposure stimulates P-gp function and expression.The regulation occurs via a NO-independent mechanism.

  9. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through the bAR. Since the signal generated by the bAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of bAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 uM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the bAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 uM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in (beta)AR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 uM. This increase in (beta)AR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of (beta)AR population. Clenbuterol and isoproterenol gave similar effects on bAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 UM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.

  10. Characterization of TLX Expression in Neural Stem Cells and Progenitor Cells in Adult Brains

    OpenAIRE

    Shengxiu Li; Guoqiang Sun; Kiyohito Murai; Peng Ye; Yanhong Shi

    2012-01-01

    TLX has been shown to play an important role in regulating the self-renewal and proliferation of neural stem cells in adult brains. However, the cellular distribution of endogenous TLX protein in adult brains remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used immunostaining with a TLX-specific antibody to show that TLX is expressed in both neural stem cells and transit-amplifying neural progenitor cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult mouse brains. Then, using a double thymidine analo...

  11. Expression of soluble triggering receptor expression on myeloid cells-1 in pleural effusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lu-ying; SHI Huan-zhong; LIANG Qiu-li; WU Yan-bin; QIN Xue-jun; CHEN Yi-qiang

    2008-01-01

    Background Tdggedng receptors expressed on myeloid cells(TREM)proteins are a family of cell surface receptors expressed broadly by cells of the myeloid lineage.The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of soluble TREM-1(sTREM-1)in pleural effusions,and to determine the effects of pneumonia on pleural sTREM-1 concentrations.Methods PleuraI fluid was collected from 109 patients who presented to the respiratory institute (35 with malignant pleural effusion,31 with tuberculous pleural effusion,21 with bacteriaI pleural effusion,and 22 with transudate).The concentrations of sTREM-1,tumor necrosis factor-o(TNF-α)and interleukin-1β(IL-1β)were determined jn effusion and serum samples by enzyme Iinked immunosorbent assay(ELISA).Results The concentrations of sTREM-1 in bacterial pleural effusion were significantly higher than those in malignant.tuberculous,and transudative groups(all P<0.001).An sTREM-1 cutoff value of 768.1 ng/L had a sensitivity of 86%and a specificity of 93%.Pleural sTREM-1 Ievels were positively correlated with Ievels of TNF-α and IL-1β.Patients with complicating bacterial pneumonia did not have elevated concentration of STREM-1 jn pleural effusion when compared with patients without pneumonia.Conclusions Determination of pleural sTREM-1 may improve the ability of clinicians to differentiate pleural effusion patients of bacterial origin from those with other etiologies.The occurrence of bacterial pneumonia did not affect pleural sTREM-1 concentrations.

  12. TCR repertoire and Foxp3 expression define functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ Treg cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Kuczma, Michal; Pawlikowska, Iwona; Kopij, Magdalena; Podolsky, Robert; Rempala, Grzegorz A.; Kraj, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Despite extensive research efforts to characterize peripheral regulatory T cells (Treg) expressing transcription factor Foxp3, their subset complexity, phenotypic characteristics, TCR repertoire and antigen specificities remain ambiguous. Here, we identify and define two subsets of peripheral Treg cells differing in Foxp3 expression level and TCR repertoires. Treg cells expressing a high level of Foxp3 and TCRs not utilized by naive CD4+ T cells present a stable suppressor phenotype and domin...

  13. Estradiol Receptors Regulate Differential Connexin 43 Expression in F98 and C6 Glioma Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Moinfar

    Full Text Available Glioma is the most common malignant primary brain tumour with male preponderance and poor prognosis. Glioma cells express variable amounts of connexin 43 (Cx43 and estrogen receptors (ERs. Both, Cx43 and ERs, play important roles in cell proliferation and migration. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 17-ß estradiol (E2 on Cx43 expression in two glioma cell lines with variable native expression of Cx43.F98 and C6 rat glioma cells were cultured for 24 h in the presence of 10 nM or 100 nM E2, and the E2-antagonist, Fulvestrant. An MTT assay was performed to evaluate cell viability. ERα, ERβ and Cx43 protein expressions were analysed by western blotting and Cx43 mRNA expression was analysed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To quantify cell migration, an exclusive zone migration assay was used. Functional coupling of cells via gap junctions was examined using whole-cell patch-clamp technique.E2 reduced Cx43 expression in C6 cells, but increased Cx43 expression in F98 cultures. These effects were mediated via ERs. Moreover, E2 promoted C6 cell migration, but it did not affect F98 cell migration. The expression level of ERα was found to be high in C6, but low in F98 cells. ERβ was exclusively expressed in C6 cells. In addition, E2 treatment induced a significant decrease of ERβ in C6 cultures, while it decreased ERα expression in F98 glioma cells.These findings show that E2 differentially modulates Cx43 expression in F98 and C6 glioma cells, likely due to the differential expression of ERs in each of these cell lines. Our findings point to the molecular mechanisms that might contribute to the gender-specific differences in the malignancy of glioma and could have implications for therapeutic strategies against glioma.

  14. Transporter Molecules influence the Gene Expression in HeLa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Waldeck, Ruediger Pipkorn, Bernhard Korn, Gabriele Mueller, Matthias Schick, Katalin Tóth, Manfred Wiessler, Bernd Didinger, Klaus Braun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Progresses in biology and pharmacology led to highly specific bioactive substances, but their poor bioavailability at the site of action is a result of their physico-chemical properties. Various design approaches for transport carrier molecules facilitating the cellular entry of bioactive substances could help to reach their molecular target in cells and tissues. The transfer efficacy and the subsequent pharmacological effects of the cargo molecules are well investigated, but the investigations of effects of the carrier molecules themselves on the target cells or tissues remain necessary. A special attention should be paid to the differential gene expression, particularly in the interpretation of the data achieved by highly specific active pharmaceutical products. After application of transmembrane transport peptides, particularly the pAnt and also the HIV-1 Tat, cells respond with a conspicuous altered gene expression of at least three genes. The PKN1 gene was induced and two genes (ZCD1 and BSG were slightly repressed. The genes and the chromosomes are described, the moderate differential gene expression graphed, and the ontology is listed.

  15. Transporter Molecules influence the Gene Expression in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldeck, Waldemar; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Korn, Bernhard; Mueller, Gabriele; Schick, Matthias; Tóth, Katalin; Wiessler, Manfred; Didinger, Bernd; Braun, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Progresses in biology and pharmacology led to highly specific bioactive substances, but their poor bioavailability at the site of action is a result of their physico-chemical properties. Various design approaches for transport carrier molecules facilitating the cellular entry of bioactive substances could help to reach their molecular target in cells and tissues. The transfer efficacy and the subsequent pharmacological effects of the cargo molecules are well investigated, but the investigations of effects of the carrier molecules themselves on the target cells or tissues remain necessary. A special attention should be paid to the differential gene expression, particularly in the interpretation of the data achieved by highly specific active pharmaceutical products. After application of transmembrane transport peptides, particularly the pAnt and also the HIV-1 Tat, cells respond with a conspicuous altered gene expression of at least three genes. The PKN1 gene was induced and two genes (ZCD1 and BSG) were slightly repressed. The genes and the chromosomes are described, the moderate differential gene expression graphed, and the ontology is listed. PMID:19214198

  16. Robots, pipelines, polyproteins: enabling multiprotein expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayachandran, Lakshmi Sumitra; Viola, Cristina; Garzoni, Frederic; Trowitzsch, Simon; Bieniossek, Christoph; Chaillet, Maxime; Schaffitzel, Christiane; Busso, Didier; Romier, Christophe; Poterszman, Arnaud; Richmond, Timothy J; Berger, Imre

    2011-08-01

    Multiprotein complexes catalyze vital biological functions in the cell. A paramount objective of the SPINE2 project was to address the structural molecular biology of these multiprotein complexes, by enlisting and developing enabling technologies for their study. An emerging key prerequisite for studying complex biological specimens is their recombinant overproduction. Novel reagents and streamlined protocols for rapidly assembling co-expression constructs for this purpose have been designed and validated. The high-throughput pipeline implemented at IGBMC Strasbourg and the ACEMBL platform at the EMBL Grenoble utilize recombinant overexpression systems for heterologous expression of proteins and their complexes. Extension of the ACEMBL platform technology to include eukaryotic hosts such as insect and mammalian cells has been achieved. Efficient production of large multicomponent protein complexes for structural studies using the baculovirus/insect cell system can be hampered by a stoichiometric imbalance of the subunits produced. A polyprotein strategy has been developed to overcome this bottleneck and has been successfully implemented in our MultiBac baculovirus expression system for producing multiprotein complexes.

  17. Human T24 Ha-ras cassette suitable for expression in eukaryotic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailleul, B.; Lang, J.; Wilkie, N.; Balmain, A.

    1988-01-11

    The T24 Ha-ras-1 oncogene is known to transform a wide range of eukaryotic cell types both in vivo and in vitro. Interpretation of the role played by ras genes in transformed cells would clearly by aided by employing a biological system capable of regulating ras p21 production. This can be achieved by substitution of the transcriptional control signals of Ha-ras with heterologous eukaryotic promoters. In this way, ras p21 may be expressed at high or low levels or inducibly expressed, depending on the promoter used. To facilitate construction of ras fusion genes, the authors have produced a T24 Ha-ras a cassette containing multiple cloning sites 5' to the Ha-ras coding exons. The polyadenylic site and the VTR region have been retained while the splice acceptor site upstream the ATG initiator codon has been deleted. The pR8-T24 construct should be useful for a variety of research applications, allowing insertion of any desired promoter into the 5' polylinker. In addition, potential regulatory elements could be inserted at the 3' end using the BamH1 site. This plasmid provides a great deal of flexibility in designing constructs which facilitate ras p21 expression in different cell types, either by transfection in vitro or in transgenic mice in vivo.

  18. Aristaless related homeobox gene, Arx, is implicated in mouse fetal Leydig cell differentiation possibly through expressing in the progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Miyabayashi

    Full Text Available Development of the testis begins with the expression of the SRY gene in pre-Sertoli cells. Soon after, testis cords containing Sertoli and germ cells are formed and fetal Leydig cells subsequently develop in the interstitial space. Studies using knockout mice have indicated that multiple genes encoding growth factors and transcription factors are implicated in fetal Leydig cell differentiation. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arx gene is implicated in this process. However, how ARX regulates Leydig cell differentiation remained unknown. In this study, we examined Arx KO testes and revealed that fetal Leydig cell numbers largely decrease throughout the fetal life. Since our study shows that fetal Leydig cells rarely proliferate, this decrease in the KO testes is thought to be due to defects of fetal Leydig progenitor cells. In sexually indifferent fetal gonads of wild type, ARX was expressed in the coelomic epithelial cells and cells underneath the epithelium as well as cells at the gonad-mesonephros border, both of which have been described to contain progenitors of fetal Leydig cells. After testis differentiation, ARX was expressed in a large population of the interstitial cells but not in fetal Leydig cells, raising the possibility that ARX-positive cells contain fetal Leydig progenitor cells. When examining marker gene expression, we observed cells as if they were differentiating into fetal Leydig cells from the progenitor cells. Based on these results, we propose that ARX acts as a positive factor for differentiation of fetal Leydig cells through functioning at the progenitor stage.

  19. Ghrelin regulates cell cycle-related gene expression in cultured hippocampal neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyunju; Park, Seungjoon

    2016-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ghrelin stimulates the cellular proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which ghrelin regulates cell cycle progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ghrelin on cell cycle regulatory molecules in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Ghrelin treatment increased proliferation assessed by CCK-8 proliferation assay. The expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell division control 2, well-known cell-proliferating markers, were also increased by ghrelin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that ghrelin promoted progression of cell cycle from G0/G1 to S phase, whereas this progression was attenuated by the pretreatment with specific inhibitors of MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Ghrelin-induced proliferative effect was associated with increased expression of E2F1 transcription factor in the nucleus, as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. We also found that ghrelin caused an increase in protein levels of positive regulators of cell cycle, such as cyclin A and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2. Moreover, p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) protein levels were reduced when cell were exposed to ghrelin, suggesting downregulation of CDK inhibitors may contribute to proliferative effect of ghrelin. Our data suggest that ghrelin targets both cell cycle positive and negative regulators to stimulate proliferation of cultured hippocampal NSCs. PMID:27325242

  20. Cell-surface expression of Hsp70 on hematopoietic cancer cells after inhibition of HDAC activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Andresen, Lars; Hansen, Karen Aagaard;

    small HSPs). Hsp70 belongs to the HSP70 family and is expressed at low levels in normal non-stressed cells. Its expression is however induced by different cellular stresses, such as heat shock and oxidative stress. The function of Hsp70 depends on its cellular location: Intracellular it has...... normal ER/Golgi transport did not affect Hsp70 surface expression. Intracellular Calcium and the transcription factor Sp1, that has previously been shown to be important for the intracellular stress mediated by HDAC-inhibitors, were not involved in Hsp70 surface expression. We also found that HDAC...... cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic functions, whereas it exerts immunostimulatory functions extracellularly. Secreted Hsp70 is for example involved in cross-presentation of cancer-derived antigenic peptides, a function which is currently explored in immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. Additionally...

  1. MGMT enrichment and second gene co-expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells using separate or dual-gene lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Justin C; Alberti, Michael O; Ismail, Mourad; Lingas, Karen T; Reese, Jane S; Gerson, Stanton L

    2015-01-22

    The DNA repair gene O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) allows efficient in vivo enrichment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Thus, linking this selection strategy to therapeutic gene expression offers the potential to reconstitute diseased hematopoietic tissue with gene-corrected cells. However, different dual-gene expression vector strategies are limited by poor expression of one or both transgenes. To evaluate different co-expression strategies in the context of MGMT-mediated HSC enrichment, we compared selection and expression efficacies in cells cotransduced with separate single-gene MGMT and GFP lentivectors to those obtained with dual-gene vectors employing either encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) or foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A elements for co-expression strategies. Each strategy was evaluated in vitro and in vivo using equivalent multiplicities of infection (MOI) to transduce 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+) (LSK)-enriched murine bone marrow cells (BMCs). The highest dual-gene expression (MGMT(+)GFP(+)) percentages were obtained with the FMDV-2A dual-gene vector, but half of the resulting gene products existed as fusion proteins. Following selection, dual-gene expression percentages in single-gene vector cotransduced and dual-gene vector transduced populations were similar. Equivalent MGMT expression levels were obtained with each strategy, but GFP expression levels derived from the IRES dual-gene vector were significantly lower. In mice, vector-insertion averages were similar among cells enriched after dual-gene vectors and those cotransduced with single-gene vectors. These data demonstrate the limitations and advantages of each strategy in the context of MGMT-mediated selection, and may provide insights into vector design with respect to a particular therapeutic gene or hematologic defect. PMID:25479595

  2. Expression, intracellular targeting and purification of HIV Nef variants in tobacco cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baschieri Selene

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants may represent excellent alternatives to classical heterologous protein expression systems, especially for the production of biopharmaceuticals and vaccine components. Modern vaccines are becoming increasingly complex, with the incorporation of multiple antigens. Approaches towards developing an HIV vaccine appear to confirm this, with a combination of candidate antigens. Among these, HIV-Nef is considered a promising target for vaccine development because immune responses directed against this viral protein could help to control the initial steps of viral infection and to reduce viral loads and spreading. Two isoforms of Nef protein can be found in cells: a full-length N-terminal myristoylated form (p27, 27 kDa and a truncated form (p25, 25 kDa. Here we report the expression and purification of HIV Nef from transgenic tobacco. Results We designed constructs to direct the expression of p25 and p27 Nef to either the cytosol or the secretory pathway. We tested these constructs by transient expression in tobacco protoplasts. Cytosolic Nef polypeptides are correctly synthesised and are stable. The same is not true for Nef polypeptides targeted to the secretory pathway by virtue of a signal peptide. We therefore generated transgenic plants expressing cytosolic, full length or truncated Nef. Expression levels were variable, but in some lines they averaged 0.7% of total soluble proteins. Hexahistidine-tagged Nef was easily purified from transgenic tissue in a one-step procedure. Conclusion We have shown that transient expression can help to rapidly determine the best cellular compartment for accumulation of a recombinant protein. We have successfully expressed HIV Nef polypeptides in the cytosol of transgenic tobacco plants. The proteins can easily be purified from transgenic tissue.

  3. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Optimization of grid design for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liu; Yueqiang, Li; Jianjun, Chen; Yanling, Chen; Xiaodong, Wang; Fuhua, Yang

    2010-01-01

    By theoretical simulation of two grid patterns that are often used in concentrator solar cells, we give a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the influence of the metal grid dimension and various losses directly associated with it during optimization of grid design. Furthermore, we also perform the simulation under different concentrator factors, making the optimization of the front contact grid for solar cells complete.

  4. Loss of glucocorticoid receptor expression by DNA methylation prevents glucocorticoid induced apoptosis in human small cell lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Kay

    Full Text Available Human small cell lung cancer (SCLC is highly aggressive, and quickly develops resistance to therapy. SCLC cells are typically insensitive to glucocorticoids due to impaired glucocorticoid receptor (GR expression. This is important as we have previously shown that expression of a GR transgene induces cell death in-vitro, and inhibits tumor growth in-vivo. However, the underlying mechanism for loss of GR expression is unknown. The SCLC cell line, DMS79, has low GR expression, compared to non-SCLC cell lines and normal bronchial epithelial cells. Retroviral GR expression in DMS79 cells caused activation of the apoptotic pathway as evidenced by marked induction of caspase-3 activity. Methylation analysis of the GR promoter revealed some methylation in the 1D, and 1E promoters of the GR gene, however the ubiquitous constitutively active 1C promoter was heavily methylated. In the 1C promoter there was a highly significant increase in DNA methylation in a panel of 14 human SCLC cell lines compared to a mixed panel of GR expressing, and non-expressing cell lines, and to peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, within the panel of SCLC cell lines there was a significant negative correlation seen between methylation of the 1C promoter, and GR protein expression. Reversal of GR gene methylation with DNA methyltransferase inhibition caused increased GR mRNA and protein expression in SCLC but not non-SCLC cells. This resulted in increased Gc sensitivity, decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased caspase-3 activity in SCLC cells. These data suggest that DNA methylation decreases GR gene expression in human SCLC cells, in a similar manner to that for conventional tumor suppressor genes.

  5. Expression of Telomerase Activity in Gastric Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between telomerase activity and biological behavior in human gastric cells and appraise the clinical significance of detecting telomerase activity. Methods The telomerase activity in 47 gastric cancer tissue samples,their matched nomal tissues,7 gastric ulcer and 2 gastric cancer cell lines was detected using a PCR-based non-radioisotopic telomeric repeat amplification protocol(TRAP) assay. Results None of the 47 samples from normal gastric tissues expressed telomerase activity.The 41 of 47 cases of gastric cancer presented telomerase activity with an 87.2% positive rate (P<0.001). 2/2 gastric cancer cell lines and 0/7 gastric ulcer line were also positive for telmerase activity.The activity of telomerase was associated with the pathological differentiation of gastric cancer. Conclusion Telomerase activity may be related to the biological behavior of gastric cancer and can help in assessing the malignant poten-tial of gastric cancer.Telomerase activity will be a good diagnostic marker for the detection of gastric cancer.

  6. Heterogeneity of aberrant immunoglobulin expression in cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duosha Hu; Ya Cao; Zhi Duan; Ming Li; Yiqun Jiang; Haidan Liu; Hui Zheng; Lili Li; Ann M Bode; Zigang Dong

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that immunoglobulin (Ig) is 'unexpectedly' expressed by epithelial cancer cells and that it can promote tumor growth.The main purpose of this study was to explore the components of the cancerous Ig and its possible function.The presence of cancerous Ig in the Golgi apparatus was confirmed by immunofluorescence,indirectly suggesting that the cancerous Ig was processed and packaged in cancer cells.Western blot analysis and ELISA results indicated that cancer cells produced membrane Ig and secreted Ig into the supernatant fraction.The cancerous Ig consists of an α heavy chain and a κ light chain.Finally,by analyzing the Ig components pulled down by protein A beads,the cancerous Ig was found to be structurally distinct from normal Ig.The cancerous Ig was truncated or aberrant.Although the underlying mechanism that causes the abnormalities has not been determined,our current discoveries strengthen our previous findings and promise fruitful future explorations.

  7. Use of RUNX2 Expression to Identify Osteogenic Progenitor Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We generated a RUNX2-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP reporter system to study osteogenic development from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. Our studies demonstrate the fidelity of YFP expression with expression of RUNX2 and other osteogenic genes in hESC-derived osteoprogenitor cells, as well as the osteogenic specificity of YFP signal. In vitro studies confirm that the hESC-derived YFP+ cells have similar osteogenic phenotypes to osteoprogenitor cells generated from bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells. In vivo studies demonstrate the hESC-derived YFP+ cells can repair a calvarial defect in immunodeficient mice. Using the engineered hESCs, we monitored the osteogenic development and explored the roles of osteogenic supplements BMP2 and FGF9 in osteogenic differentiation of these hESCs in vitro. Taken together, this reporter system provides a novel system to monitor the osteogenic differentiation of hESCs and becomes useful to identify soluble agents and cell signaling pathways that mediate early stages of human bone development.

  8. Gene Cloning of Murine α-Fetoprotein Gene and Construction of Its Eukaryotic Expression Vector and Expression in CHO Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易继林; 田耕

    2003-01-01

    To clone the murine α-fetoprotein (AFP) gene, construct the eukaryotic expression vector of AFP and express in CHO cells, total RNA were extracted from Hepa 1-6 cells, and then the murine α-fetoprotein gene was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1. The recombinant of vector was identified by restriction enzyme analysis and sequencing. A fter transient transfection of CHO cells with the vector, Western blotting was used to detect the expression of AFP. It is concluded that the 1.8kb murine α-fetoprotein gene was successfully cloned and its eukaryotic expression vector was successfully constructed.

  9. Effect of Dexamethasone on Expression of Glucocorticoid Receptor in Human Monocyte Cell Line THP-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effect of dexamethasone with differentconcentrations and different stimulating periods on the expression of glucocorticoid receptors (GRα, GRβ) protein was investigated in human monocyte cell line THP-1. The cultured human monocyte line THP-1 cells were stimulated by dexamethasone with different concentrations and different periods. The expression of GRα and GRβ protein was detected by Western blotting. The results showed that the expression of GRα and GRβ was detected in the THP-1 cells. The quantity of GRα expression was reduced by dexamethasone under the same concentration with the prolongation of the stimulating periods. The quantity of GRβ expression was increased by dexamethasone treatment in a time- and dose-dependent manner. It was concluded that dexamethasone stimulation time-dependently reduced the GRα expression in THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone stimulation time- and dose-dependently increased the GRβ expression in THP1 cells. The expression of GRα and GRβ was regulated by glucocorticoid.

  10. Uterine epithelial cell regulation of DC-SIGN expression inhibits transmitted/founder HIV-1 trans infection by immature dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O Ochiel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sexual transmission accounts for the majority of HIV-1 infections. In over 75% of cases, infection is initiated by a single variant (transmitted/founder virus. However, the determinants of virus selection during transmission are unknown. Host cell-cell interactions in the mucosa may be critical in regulating susceptibility to infection. We hypothesized in this study that specific immune modulators secreted by uterine epithelial cells modulate susceptibility of dendritic cells (DC to infection with HIV-1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that uterine epithelial cell secretions (i.e. conditioned medium, CM decreased DC-SIGN expression on immature dendritic cells via a transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β mechanism. Further, CM inhibited dendritic cell-mediated trans infection of HIV-1 expressing envelope proteins of prototypic reference. Similarly, CM inhibited trans infection of HIV-1 constructs expressing envelopes of transmitted/founder viruses, variants that are selected during sexual transmission. In contrast, whereas recombinant TGF- β1 inhibited trans infection of prototypic reference HIV-1 by dendritic cells, TGF-β1 had a minimal effect on trans infection of transmitted/founder variants irrespective of the reporter system used to measure trans infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide the first direct evidence for uterine epithelial cell regulation of dendritic cell transmission of infection with reference and transmitted/founder HIV-1 variants. These findings have immediate implications for designing strategies to prevent sexual transmission of HIV-1.

  11. Forced expression of the Oct-4 gene influences differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By transfecting an Oct-4 expression plasmid into embryonic stem cells (ES cells), the ES-O cell line was constructed, which sustained the expression of Oct-4 gene when induced by retinoic acid. Forced expression of Oct-4 gene could not sustain the stem property of ES-O cells without the differentiation inhibiting factor LIF, but if LIF exists,forced expression of Oct-4 gene could enhance the ability to sustain the undifferentiation state and inhibit cell differentiation induced by retinoic acid. It was indicated that Oct-4 must cooperate with LIF to sustain the undifferentiation state of ES cells. During the cell differentiation, ES-O cells tend to differentiate into neural cells, suggesting that forced expression of Oct-4 gene may be in relation with the differentiation of neuroderm.

  12. Construction of antisense Bmi-1 expression plasmid and its inhibitory effect on K562 cells proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xiu-xiang; LIU Wei-hong; LIU Dan-dan; ZHAO Xin-yu; SU Ben-li

    2005-01-01

    Background Bmi-1 gene determines the proliferative capacity of normal and leukemia stem cells. Expression of Bmi-1 has been found in all types of myeloid leukemia cells in both humans and mice. This study aimed at assessing the effect of antisense Bmi-1 expression on K562 cells proliferation and p16 protein (p16) expression.Results K562 cells transfected with antisense Bmi-1 plasmid grew significantly slower than that of controls (the parental K562 and cells transfected with empty plasmid). The colony forming ability of antisense Bmi-1 plasmid transfected cells decreased significantly (P<0.01) compared with controls. The p16 expression of cells transfected with antisense Bmi-1 was upgraded more apparently than that of controls.Conclusion The antisense Bmi-1 gene can inhibit the growth of K562 cell and upgrade expression of p16 in K562 cells.

  13. Persistent donor cell gene expression among human induced pluripotent stem cells contributes to differences with human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhumur Ghosh

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs generated by de-differentiation of adult somatic cells offer potential solutions for the ethical issues surrounding human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, as well as their immunologic rejection after cellular transplantation. However, although hiPSCs have been described as "embryonic stem cell-like", these cells have a distinct gene expression pattern compared to hESCs, making incomplete reprogramming a potential pitfall. It is unclear to what degree the difference in tissue of origin may contribute to these gene expression differences. To answer these important questions, a careful transcriptional profiling analysis is necessary to investigate the exact reprogramming state of hiPSCs, as well as analysis of the impression, if any, of the tissue of origin on the resulting hiPSCs. In this study, we compare the gene profiles of hiPSCs derived from fetal fibroblasts, neonatal fibroblasts, adipose stem cells, and keratinocytes to their corresponding donor cells and hESCs. Our analysis elucidates the overall degree of reprogramming within each hiPSC line, as well as the "distance" between each hiPSC line and its donor cell. We further identify genes that have a similar mode of regulation in hiPSCs and their corresponding donor cells compared to hESCs, allowing us to specify core sets of donor genes that continue to be expressed in each hiPSC line. We report that residual gene expression of the donor cell type contributes significantly to the differences among hiPSCs and hESCs, and adds to the incompleteness in reprogramming. Specifically, our analysis reveals that fetal fibroblast-derived hiPSCs are closer to hESCs, followed by adipose, neonatal fibroblast, and keratinocyte-derived hiPSCs.

  14. HMGB4 is expressed by neuronal cells and affects the expression of genes involved in neural differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhiainen, Ari; Zhao, Xiang; Vanttola, Päivi; Qian, Kui; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Gransalke, Kathleen; Grönholm, Mikaela; Unni, Emmanual; Meistrich, Marvin; Tian, Li; Auvinen, Petri; Rauvala, Heikki

    2016-09-01

    HMGB4 is a new member in the family of HMGB proteins that has been characterized in sperm cells, but little is known about its functions in somatic cells. Here we show that HMGB4 and the highly similar rat Transition Protein 4 (HMGB4L1) are expressed in neuronal cells. Both proteins had slow mobility in nucleus of living NIH-3T3 cells. They interacted with histones and their differential expression in transformed cells of the nervous system altered the post-translational modification statuses of histones in vitro. Overexpression of HMGB4 in HEK 293T cells made cells more susceptible to cell death induced by topoisomerase inhibitors in an oncology drug screening array and altered variant composition of histone H3. HMGB4 regulated over 800 genes in HEK 293T cells with a p-value ≤0.013 (n = 3) in a microarray analysis and displayed strongest association with adhesion and histone H2A -processes. In neuronal and transformed cells HMGB4 regulated the expression of an oligodendrocyte marker gene PPP1R14a and other neuronal differentiation marker genes. In conclusion, our data suggests that HMGB4 is a factor that regulates chromatin and expression of neuronal differentiation markers.

  15. Genotyping Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Copy Number Variability of the FCGRs Expressed on NK Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Amy K; Wang, Wei; Gallenberger, Mikayla; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are one of the main effector immune cells involved in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Upon recognition of cell-bound IgG antibodies, which occurs through Fc gamma receptors (FCGRs) expressed on the cell surface of NK cells, NK cells become activated and lyse target tumor or infected cells. The FCGRs, FCGR3A and FCGR2C, expressed on the surface of NK cells have single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that result in differential activity of NK cells. In addition to SNP genetic variation within each of these genes, the FCGRs are subject to copy number variation (CNV), which leads to variable protein expression levels on the cell surface. Studies have found that FCGR genotype for FCGR3A and FCGR2C is associated with variation in the response to immunotherapy.Due to high sequence homology within FCGR3 and FCGR2 families, there are difficulties associated with genotyping these specific receptors related to cross-amplification of non-targeted FCGRs. To improve specificity for both FCGR3A and FCGR2C, Rnase-H (RH) primers were designed to amplify specifically FCGR3A (while not co-amplifying FCGR3B) and FCGR2C (while not co-amplifying FCGR2B). In addition, fluorescently labeled locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes provide additional precision for determination of the SNPs within both FCGR3A and FCGR2C. For CNV determination, separate fluorescently labeled probes for FCGR3A, and for FCGR2C, can be used with the same RH primers for each gene. These probes can be combined in the same well with control primers/probe for a known diploid gene and used to calculate the copy number of both FCGR3A and FCGR2C. Here we provide new detailed methodology that allows for the specific amplification of these FCGRs in a single PCR reaction, allowing for genotyping of both the SNPs and CNVs using real-time PCR.

  16. Potential of optical design in tandem micromorph silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krc, J.; Campa, A.; Smole, F.; Topic, M.

    2006-04-01

    The potential of three advanced optical designs in tandem micromorph silicon solar cells are analysed by means of optical simulations: enhanced light scattering, intermediate reflector (interlayer) and antireflective coating (ARC) on glass. The effects on quantum efficiency, QE, and short circuit current density, J SC, of the top and bottom cell are investigated. In case of enhanced light scattering, the role of haze parameter and angular distribution function of scattered light is analysed separately. High haze parameter improves light trapping in top and bottom cell. However, the improvement in QE and J SC of the bottom cell is limited at higher haze parameters due to increased absorption in top cell and increased optical losses in realistic textured ZnO/Ag back contact. Broad ADF plays an important role for improving the performances of both, top and bottom cell. The role of refractive index of an interlayer between top and bottom cell is analysed. Significant increases in QE and J SC of the top cell are revealed for small refractive indexes of the interlayer (n cell is observed. Optimisation of thickness and refractive index of a single-layer ARC on glass is carried out in order to obtain maximal J SC either in top or in bottom cell. Moderate increases in J SC and QE are obtained for optimised ARC parameters. Among the three optical designs, the greatest potential, considering the improvements in both cells, is revealed for enhanced light scattering.

  17. Poor prognostic clinicopathologic features correlate with VEGF expression but not with PTEN expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karagoz Filiz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted in chromosome ten (PTEN, angiogenesis and clinicopathological parameters of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx. Methods We examined immunohistochemical expression of VEGF and PTEN and CD34 for microvessel density (MVD in sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue blocks of 140 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx. The intensity of VEGF and PTEN staining and the proportion of cells staining were scored. Results The tumor grade was not significantly related to PTEN expression, but it was to VEGF expression (p = 0.400; p = 0.015, respectively. While there was no significant relationship between PTEN expression and tumor size and cartilage invasion (p = 0.311, p = 0.128, there was a significant relationship between the severity of VEGF expression and tumor size (p = 0.006 and lymph node metastasis (p = 0.048 but not cartilage invasion (p = 0.129. MVD was significantly higher in high-grade tumors (p = 0.003 but had no significant relationship between MVD, lymph node metastasis, and cartilage invasion (p = 0.815, p = 0.204. There was also no significant relationship between PTEN and VEGF expression (p = 0.161 and between PTEN and VEGF expression and the MVD (p = 0.120 and p = 0.175, respectively. Conclusions Increased VEGF expression may play an important role in the outcome of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx. PTEN expression was not related to VEGF expression and clinicopathological features of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx.

  18. Bax expression measured by AQUAnalysis is an independent prognostic marker in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose Pinaki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer and proteins regulating apoptosis have been proposed as prognostic markers in several malignancies. However, the prognostic impact of apoptotic markers has not been consistently demonstrated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. This inconsistency in reported associations between apoptotic proteins and prognosis can be partly attributed to the intrinsic low resolution and misclassification associated with manual, semi-quantitative methods of biomarker expression measurement. The aim of this study was to examine the association between apoptosis-regulating proteins and clinical outcomes in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC using the quantitative fluorescence immunohistochemistry (IHC based AQUAnalysis technique. Methods Sixty-nine OSCC patients diagnosed between 1998–2005 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada were included in the study. Clinical data were obtained from the Alberta Cancer Registry and chart review. Tissue microarrays (TMAs were assembled from triplicate cores of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded pre-treatment tumour tissue. Bax, Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL protein expression was quantified using fluorescent IHC and AQUA technology in normal oral cavity squamous epithelium (OCSE and OSCC tumour samples. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier plots and the Cox proportional hazard model. Results Bax expression was predominantly nuclear in OCSE and almost exclusively cytoplasmic in OSCC. No similar differences in localization were observed for Bcl-2 or Bcl-XL. Only Bax expression associated with disease-specific survival (DSS, with 5-year survival estimates of 85.7% for high Bax versus 50.3% for low Bax (p = 0.006, in univariate analysis. High Bax expression was also significantly associated with elevated Ki67 expression, indicating that increased proliferation might lead to an improved response to radiotherapy in patients with elevated Bax expression. In multivariate analyses

  19. Bax expression measured by AQUAnalysis is an independent prognostic marker in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer and proteins regulating apoptosis have been proposed as prognostic markers in several malignancies. However, the prognostic impact of apoptotic markers has not been consistently demonstrated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). This inconsistency in reported associations between apoptotic proteins and prognosis can be partly attributed to the intrinsic low resolution and misclassification associated with manual, semi-quantitative methods of biomarker expression measurement. The aim of this study was to examine the association between apoptosis-regulating proteins and clinical outcomes in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using the quantitative fluorescence immunohistochemistry (IHC) based AQUAnalysis technique. Sixty-nine OSCC patients diagnosed between 1998–2005 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada were included in the study. Clinical data were obtained from the Alberta Cancer Registry and chart review. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) were assembled from triplicate cores of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded pre-treatment tumour tissue. Bax, Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL protein expression was quantified using fluorescent IHC and AQUA technology in normal oral cavity squamous epithelium (OCSE) and OSCC tumour samples. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier plots and the Cox proportional hazard model. Bax expression was predominantly nuclear in OCSE and almost exclusively cytoplasmic in OSCC. No similar differences in localization were observed for Bcl-2 or Bcl-XL. Only Bax expression associated with disease-specific survival (DSS), with 5-year survival estimates of 85.7% for high Bax versus 50.3% for low Bax (p = 0.006), in univariate analysis. High Bax expression was also significantly associated with elevated Ki67 expression, indicating that increased proliferation might lead to an improved response to radiotherapy in patients with elevated Bax expression. In multivariate analyses, Bax protein expression remained an independent

  20. Scutellarein inhibits hypoxia- and moderately-high glucose-induced proliferation and VEGF expression in human retinal endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong GAO; Bang-hao ZHU; Shi-bo TANG; Jiang-feng WANG; Jun REN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to examine the effect of scutellarein on high glu-cose- and hypoxia-stimulated proliferation of human retinal endothelial cells (HREC). Methods: HREC were cultured under normal glucose (NG), moderate, and high glucose (NG supplemented with 10 or 25 mmol/L D-glucose) and/or hypoxic (cobalt chloride treated) conditions. Cell proliferation was evaluated by a cell counting kit. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was assessed by Western blot analysis. Results: The proliferation of HREC was significantly elevated in response to moderately-high glucose and hypoxic conditions. The combination of high glucose and hypoxia did not have any additive effects on cell proliferation. Consistent with the proliferation data, the expression of VEGF was also upregulated under both moderately-high glucose and hypoxic conditions. The treatment with scutellarein (1 × 10-11-1 × 10-5 mol/L) significantly inhibited high glucose- or hypoxia-induced cell proliferation and VEGF expression. Conclusion: Both hypoxia and moderately-high glucose were potent stimuli for cell proliferation and VEGF expression in HREC without any significant additive effects. Scutellarein is capable of inhibiting the proliferation of HREC, which is possibly related to its ability to suppress the VEGF expression.

  1. Design Principles for Nickel/Hydrogen Cells and Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, Olga D.

    1987-01-01

    Individual-pressure-vessel (IPV) nickel/hydrogen cells and bipolar batteries developed for use as energy-storage subsystems for satelite applications. Design principles applied draw upon extensive background in separator technology, alkaline-fuel-cell technology and several alkaline-cell technology areas. Principals are rather straightforward applications of capillary-force formalisms, coupled with slowly developing data base resulting from careful post-test analyses. Based on preconceived assumptions relative to how devices work and how to be designed so they display longer cycle lives at deep discharge.

  2. Loss of DNAM-1 ligand expression by acute myeloid leukemia cells renders them resistant to NK cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Conor J; Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Darcy, Phillip K; Oliaro, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with poor natural killer (NK) cell function through aberrant expression of NK-cell-activating receptors and their ligands on tumor cells. These alterations are thought to promote formation of inhibitory NK-target cell synapses, in which killer cell degranulation is attenuated. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be effective in treating AML, through restoration of NK cell lytic activity. Similarly, agents that augment NK-cell-activating signals within the immunological synapse may provide some therapeutic benefit. However, the receptor-ligand interactions that critically dictate NK cell function in AML remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that CD112/CD155 expression is required for DNAM-1-dependent killing of AML cells. Indeed, the low, or absent, expression of CD112/CD155 on multiple AML cell lines resulted in failure to stimulate optimal NK cell function. Importantly, isolated clones with low CD112/155 expression were resistant to NK cell killing while those expressing abundant levels of CD112/155 were highly susceptible. Attenuated NK cell killing in the absence of CD112/CD155 originated from decreased NK-target cell conjugation. Furthermore, we reveal by time-lapse microscopy, a significant increase in NK cell 'failed killing' in the absence of DNAM-1 ligands. Consequently, NK cells preferentially lysed ligand-expressing cells within heterogeneous populations, driving clonal selection of CD112/CD155-negative blasts upon NK cell attack. Taken together, we identify reduced CD155 expression as a major NK cell escape mechanism in AML and an opportunity for targeted immunotherapy. PMID:27622064

  3. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is regulated by butyrate induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression in bovine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present evidence that butyrate induced histone acetylation regulates miRNA expression. MicroRNA expression microarray profiling revealed that 35 miRNA transcripts are significantly (p cells were treated with 10 mM butyrate. Among them, 11 transcripts are dif...

  4. Gene expression in epithelial cells in response to pneumovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg Helene F

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM are viruses of the family Paramyxoviridae, subfamily pneumovirus, which cause clinically important respiratory infections in humans and rodents, respectively. The respiratory epithelial target cells respond to viral infection with specific alterations in gene expression, including production of chemoattractant cytokines, adhesion molecules, elements that are related to the apoptosis response, and others that remain incompletely understood. Here we review our current understanding of these mucosal responses and discuss several genomic approaches, including differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR and gene array strategies, that will permit us to unravel the nature of these responses in a more complete and systematic manner.

  5. Controlled expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein and hepatitis B virus precore protein in mammalian cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel tetracycline regulation expression system was used to regulate the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and hepatitis B virus precore protein in the mammalian cell lines with lipofectAMINE. Flow cytometry assays showed that application of the system resulted in about 18-fold induction of EGFP expression in CHO cell lines and 5-fold induction in SSMC-7721 cells and about 2-fold in the HEK293 cells. Furthermore, the effective use of this system for the controlled expression of HBV precore protein gene in hepatocellular carcinoma cells was tested.

  6. Designing Cell-Compatible Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliktar, Dror

    2012-06-01

    Hydrogels are polymeric materials distinguished by high water content and diverse physical properties. They can be engineered to resemble the extracellular environment of the body’s tissues in ways that enable their use in medical implants, biosensors, and drug-delivery devices. Cell-compatible hydrogels are designed by using a strategy of coordinated control over physical properties and bioactivity to influence specific interactions with cellular systems, including spatial and temporal patterns of biochemical and biomechanical cues known to modulate cell behavior. Important new discoveries in stem cell research, cancer biology, and cellular morphogenesis have been realized with model hydrogel systems premised on these designs. Basic and clinical applications for hydrogels in cell therapy, tissue engineering, and biomedical research continue to drive design improvements using performance-based materials engineering paradigms.

  7. miR-150, a microRNA expressed in mature B and T cells, blocks early B cell development when expressed prematurely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Beiyan; Wang, Stephanie; Mayr, Christine; Bartel, David P; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-04-24

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of approximately 22-nt noncoding RNAs that can posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression. Several miRNAs are specifically expressed in hematopoietic cells. Here we show that one such miRNA, miR-150, is mainly expressed in the lymph nodes and spleen and is highly up-regulated during the development of mature T and B cells; expression of miR-150 is sharply up-regulated at the immature B cell stage. Overexpression of miR-150 in hematopoietic stem cells, followed by bone marrow transplantation, had little effect on the formation of either mature CD8- and CD4-positive T cells or granulocytes or macrophages, but the formation of mature B cells was greatly impaired. Furthermore, premature expression of miR-150 blocked the transition from the pro-B to the pre-B stage. Our results indicate that miR-150 most likely down-regulates mRNAs that are important for pre- and pro-B cell formation or function, and its ectopic expression in these cells blocks further development of B cells.

  8. Expression of cell cycle related genes in HL60 cells undergoing apoptosis by X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee [College of Medicine, Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Kyu [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-01

    To evaluate changes in expression of cell cycle related genes during apoptosis induced in HL60 cells by X-irradiation to understand molecular biologic aspects in mechanism of radiation therapy. HL-60 cell line (promyelocytic leukemia cell line was grown in culture media and irradiated with 8 Gy by linear accelerator (6 MV X-ray). At various times after irradiation, ranging from 3 to 48 hours were analyzed apoptotic DNA fragmentation assay for apoptosis and by western blot analysis and semi-quantitative RT-PCR for expression of cell cycle related genes (cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin C, cyclin D1, cyclin E, cdc2, CDK2, CDK4, p16{sup INK4a}, p21{sup WAF1}, p27K{sup IP1}, E2F, PCNA and Rb). X-irradiation (8 Gy) induced apoptosis in HL-60 cell line. Cycline A protein increased after reaching its peak 48 h after radiation delivery and cyclin E, E2F, CDK2 and RB protein increased then decreased after radiation. Radiation induced up-regulation of the expression of E2F is due to mostly increase of phosphorylated retinoblastoma proteins (ppRb). Cyclin D1, PCNA, CDC1, CDK4 and p16{sup INK4a} protein underwent no significant change at any times after irradiation. There was not detected p21{sup WAF1} and p27{sup KIP1} protein. Cyclin A, B, C, mRNA decreased immediately after radiation and then increased at 12 h after radiation. Cyclin D1 mRNA increased immediately and then decreased with the lapse of time. CDK2 mRNA decreased at 3 h and increased at 6 h after radiation. CDK4 mRNA rapidly increased at 6 to 12 h after radiation. There was no change of expression of p16{sup INK4a} and not detected in expressin of p21{sup WAF1} and p27{sup KIP1} mRNA. We suggest that entry into S phaso may contribute to apoptosis of HL60 cells induced by irradiation. Increase of ppRb and decrease of pRb protein are related with radiation induced apoptosis of HL60 cells and tosis of HL60 cells induced by irradiation. Increase of ppRb and decrease of pRb protein are related with radiation induced

  9. Design and performance of a prototype fuel cell powered vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, P.A.; Chamberlin, C.E. [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) is now engaged in the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project. The Project involves a consortium which includes the City of Palm Desert, SERC, the U.S. Department of Energy, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and Sandia and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Its goal to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community will be accomplished by producing a fleet of fuel cell vehicles, installing a refueling infrastructure utilizing hydrogen generated from solar and wind power, and developing and staffing a fuel cell service and diagnostic center. We will describe details of the project and performance goals for the fuel cell vehicles and associated peripheral systems. In the past year during the first stage in the project, SERC has designed and built a prototype fuel cell powered personal utility vehicle (PUV). These steps included: (1) Designing, building, and testing a 4.0 kW proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell as a power plant for the PUV. (2) Designing, building and testing peripherals including the air delivery, fuel storage/delivery, refueling, water circulation, cooling, and electrical systems. (3) Devising a control algorithm for the fuel cell power plant in the PUV. (4) Designing and building a test bench in which running conditions in the PUV could be simulated and the fuel cell and its peripheral systems tested. (5) Installing an onboard computer and associated electronics into the PUV (6) Assembling and road testing the PUV.

  10. Inferring single-cell gene expression mechanisms using stochastic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Bernie J.; Soltani, Mohammad; Petzold, Linda R.; Singh, Abhyudai

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Stochastic promoter switching between transcriptionally active (ON) and inactive (OFF) states is a major source of noise in gene expression. It is often implicitly assumed that transitions between promoter states are memoryless, i.e. promoters spend an exponentially distributed time interval in each of the two states. However, increasing evidence suggests that promoter ON/OFF times can be non-exponential, hinting at more complex transcriptional regulatory architectures. Given the essential role of gene expression in all cellular functions, efficient computational techniques for characterizing promoter architectures are critically needed. Results: We have developed a novel model reduction for promoters with arbitrary numbers of ON and OFF states, allowing us to approximate complex promoter switching behavior with Weibull-distributed ON/OFF times. Using this model reduction, we created bursty Monte Carlo expectation-maximization with modified cross-entropy method (‘bursty MCEM2’), an efficient parameter estimation and model selection technique for inferring the number and configuration of promoter states from single-cell gene expression data. Application of bursty MCEM2 to data from the endogenous mouse glutaminase promoter reveals nearly deterministic promoter OFF times, consistent with a multi-step activation mechanism consisting of 10 or more inactive states. Our novel approach to modeling promoter fluctuations together with bursty MCEM2 provides powerful tools for characterizing transcriptional bursting across genes under different environmental conditions. Availability and implementation: R source code implementing bursty MCEM2 is available upon request. Contact: absingh@udel.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25573914

  11. Gene expression profiling of human fibrocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (f-MDSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Maria Cristina Mazza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs have been shown to control self-reactive and anti-graft effector T-cells in autoimmunity and transplantation, but their therapeutic use is limited by their scarce availability in the peripheral blood of tumor-free donors. We isolated and characterized a novel population of myeloid suppressor cells, named fibrocytic MDSC (f-MDSC, which are differentiated from umbilical cord blood (UCB precursors (Zoso et al., 2014. This MDSC subset promotes regulatory T-cell expansion and induces normoglycemia in a xenogeneic model of type 1 diabetes. Here we describe in details the experimental design and the bioinformatics analyses of the gene expression dataset used to investigate the molecular mechanisms at the base of MDSC tolerogenic and suppressive properties. We also provide an R code to easily access the data and perform the quality controls and basic analyses relevant to this dataset. Raw and pre-processed data are available at Gene Expression Omnibus under accession GSE52376.

  12. Effects of resistin-like molecule β over-expression on gastric cancer cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Duan Zheng; Chun-Lei Yang; Teng Qi; Meng Qi; Ling Tong; Qiang-Song Tong

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effects of resistin-like molecule β (RELMβ) over-expression on the invasion,metastasis and angiogenesis of gastric cancer cells.METHODS:Human RELMβ encoding expression vector was constructed and transfected into the RELMβ lowly-expressed gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and MKN-45.Gene expression was measured by Western blotting,reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR.Cell proliferation was measured by 2-(4,5-dimethyltriazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide colorimetry,colony formation and 5-ethynyl-20-deoxyuridine incorporation assays.The in vitro migration,invasion and metastasis of cancer cells were measured by cell adhesion assay,scratch assay and matrigel invasion assay.The angiogenic capabilities of cancer cells were measured by tube formation of endothelial cells.RESULTS:Transfection of RELMβ vector into SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cells resulted in over-expression of RELMβ,which did not influence the cellular proliferation.However,over-expression of RELMβ suppressed the in vitro adhesion,invasion and metastasis of cancer cells,accompanied by decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9.Moreover,transfection of RELMβ attenuated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and in vitro angiogenic capabilities of cancer cells.CONCLUSION:Over-expression of RELMβ abolishes the invasion,metastasis and angiogenesis of gastric cancer cells in vitro,suggesting its potentials as a novel therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  13. Lineage-specific expression of bestrophin-2 and bestrophin-4 in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Ito

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs regulate the absorption and secretion of anions, such as HCO3(- or Cl(-. Bestrophin genes represent a newly identified group of calcium-activated Cl(- channels (CaCCs. Studies have suggested that, among the four human bestrophin-family genes, bestrophin-2 (BEST2 and bestrophin-4 (BEST4 might be expressed within the intestinal tissue. Consistently, a study showed that BEST2 is expressed by human colonic goblet cells. However, their precise expression pattern along the gastrointestinal tract, or the lineage specificity of the cells expressing these genes, remains largely unknown. Here, we show that BEST2 and BEST4 are expressed in vivo, each in a distinct, lineage-specific manner, in human IECs. While BEST2 was expressed exclusively in colonic goblet cells, BEST4 was expressed in the absorptive cells of both the small intestine and the colon. In addition, we found that BEST2 expression is significantly down-regulated in the active lesions of ulcerative colitis, where goblet cells were depleted, suggesting that BEST2 expression is restricted to goblet cells under both normal and pathologic conditions. Consistently, the induction of goblet cell differentiation by a Notch inhibitor, LY411575, significantly up-regulated the expression of not BEST4 but BEST2 in MUC2-positive HT-29 cells. Conversely, the induction of absorptive cell differentiation up-regulated the expression of BEST4 in villin-positive Caco-2 cells. In addition, we found that the up- or down-regulation of Notch activity leads to the preferential expression of either BEST4 or BEST2, respectively, in LS174T cells. These results collectively confirmed that BEST2 and BEST4 could be added to the lineage-specific genes of humans IECs due to their abilities to clearly identify goblet cells of colonic origin and a distinct subset of absorptive cells, respectively.

  14. Center for Intelligent Fuel Cell Materials Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santurri, P.R., (Chemsultants International); Hartmann-Thompson, C.; Keinath, S.E. (Michigan Molecular Inst.)

    2008-08-26

    The goal of this work was to develop a composite proton exchange membrane utilizing 1) readily available, low cost materials 2) readily modified and 3) easily processed to meet the chemical, mechanical and electrical requirements of high temperature PEM fuel cells. One of the primary goals was to produce a conducting polymer that met the criteria for strength, binding capability for additives, chemical stability, dimensional stability and good conductivity. In addition compatible, specialty nanoparticles were synthesized to provide water management and enhanced conductivity. The combination of these components in a multilayered, composite PEM has demonstrated improved conductivity at high temperatures and low humidity over commercially available polymers. The research reported in this final document has greatly increased the knowledge base related to post sulfonation of chemically and mechanically stable engineered polymers (Radel). Both electrical and strength factors for the degree of post sulfonation far exceed previous data, indicating the potential use of these materials in suitable proton exchange membrane architectures for the development of fuel cells. In addition compatible, hydrophilic, conductive nano-structures have been synthesized and incorporated into unique proton exchange membrane architectures. The use of post sulfonation for the engineered polymer and nano-particle provide cost effective techniques to produce the required components of a proton exchange membrane. The development of a multilayer proton exchange membrane as described in our work has produced a highly stable membrane at 170°C with conductivities exceeding commercially available proton exchange membranes at high temperatures and low humidity. The components and architecture of the proton exchange membrane discussed will provide low cost components for the portable market and potentially the transportation market. The development of unique components and membrane architecture

  15. Small-molecule inhibitors of ERK-mediated immediate early gene expression and proliferation of melanoma cells expressing mutated BRaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadani, Ramin; Zhang, Jun; Brophy, Amanda; Oashi, Taiji; Priyakumar, U Deva; Raman, E Prabhu; St John, Franz J; Jung, Kwan-Young; Fletcher, Steven; Pozharski, Edwin; MacKerell, Alexander D; Shapiro, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Constitutive activation of the extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) are central to regulating the proliferation and survival of many cancer cells. The current inhibitors of ERK1/2 target ATP binding or the catalytic site and are therefore limited in their utility for elucidating the complex biological roles of ERK1/2 through its phosphorylation and regulation of over 100 substrate proteins. To overcome this limitation, a combination of computational and experimental methods was used to identify low-molecular-mass inhibitors that are intended to target ERK1/2 substrate-docking domains and selectively interfere with ERK1/2 regulation of substrate proteins. In the present study, we report the identification and characterization of compounds with a thienyl benzenesulfonate scaffold that were designed to inhibit ERK1/2 substrates containing an F-site or DEF (docking site for ERK, FXF) motif. Experimental evidence shows the compounds inhibit the expression of F-site containing immediate early genes (IEGs) of the Fos family, including c-Fos and Fra1, and transcriptional regulation of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) complex. Moreover, this class of compounds selectively induces apoptosis in melanoma cells containing mutated BRaf and constitutively active ERK1/2 signalling, including melanoma cells that are inherently resistant to clinically relevant kinase inhibitors. These findings represent the identification and initial characterization of a novel class of compounds that inhibit ERK1/2 signalling functions and their potential utility for elucidating ERK1/2 and other signalling events that control the growth and survival of cancer cells containing elevated ERK1/2 activity. PMID:25695333

  16. Induction of pancreatic β cell gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrfarjam, Zahra; Esmaeili, Fariba; Shabani, Leila; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2016-05-01

    Transdifferentiattion potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) has been suggested recently. In our recent works, we demonstrated the high performance of mouse neonate pancreas extract (MPE) in the production of functional IPCs from carcinoma stem cells. In this study, MPE was used to generate IPCs from MSCs without any genetic manipulation. To this end, bone marrow MSCs were isolated and characterized. In order to differentiate, MSCs were induced by selection of nestin-expressing cells and treatment with 100 μg/mL MPE. Morphological features of the differenti-ated cells were confirmed by dithizone staining. Immunoreactivity to insulin receptor beta, proinsulin, insulin, and C-peptide was observed by immunoflourescence. We also quantified glucose-dependent insulin production and secretion by ELISA. Real-time PCR indicated the expressions of β cell-related genes, PDX-1, INS1, INS2, EP300, and CREB1, in IPC cells. Possible pathways governed by CREB1, EP300, and PDX-1 transcription factors in differentiation of MSCs to IPCs were determined based on Gene Set Enrichment (GSE) approach at P = 0.05. Pathway discovery highlighted the negative regulatory effects of MIR124-2, HDAC5 protein, REST, and NR0B2 transcription factors on expression of CREB1, EP300, and PDX-1 and inhabitation of IPC differentiations. In contrast, a crosstalk between FOXA2 and TCF7L2 transcription factors, DNA-PK complex, KAT2B protein positively interacting with PDX-1, CREB1, EP300 resulted in the induction of IPC and following insulin production. In conclusion, we report an efficient, simple, and easy method for production of functional IPCs from MSCs by MPE treatment. PMID:26634639

  17. Altered Gene Expressions and Cytogenetic Repair Efficiency in Cells with Suppressed Expression of XPA after Proton Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Gridley, Daila S.; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to damages from ionizing radiation (IR) exposure are influenced not only by the genes involved in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, but also by non- DSB repair genes. We demonstrated previously that suppressed expression of several non-DSB repair genes, such as XPA, elevated IR-induced cytogenetic damages. In the present study, we exposed human fibroblasts that were treated with control or XPA targeting siRNA to 250 MeV protons (0 to 4 Gy), and analyzed chromosome aberrations and expressions of genes involved in DNA repair. As expected, after proton irradiation, cells with suppressed expression of XPA showed a significantly elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations compared with control siRNA treated (CS) cells. Protons caused more severe DNA damages in XPA knock-down cells, as 36% cells contained multiple aberrations compared to 25% in CS cells after 4Gy proton irradiation. Comparison of gene expressions using the real-time PCR array technique revealed that expressions of p53 and its regulated genes in irradiated XPA suppressed cells were altered similarly as in CS cells, suggesting that the impairment of IR induced DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells is p53-independent. Except for XPA, which was more than 2 fold down regulated in XPA suppressed cells, several other DNA damage sensing and repair genes (GTSE1, RBBP8, RAD51, UNG and XRCC2) were shown a more than 1.5 fold difference between XPA knock-down cells and CS cells after proton exposure. The possible involvement of these genes in the impairment of DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells will be further investigated.

  18. Rapid construction of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosomal (BAC) expression vector using designer DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Zhao, Xinqing; Jin, Yingyu; Zhao, Zongbao Kent; Suh, Joo-Won

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomal (BAC) vectors are increasingly being used in cloning large DNA fragments containing complex biosynthetic pathways to facilitate heterologous production of microbial metabolites for drug development. To express inserted genes using Streptomyces species as the production hosts, an integration expression cassette is required to be inserted into the BAC vector, which includes genetic elements encoding a phage-specific attachment site, an integrase, an origin of transfer, a selection marker and a promoter. Due to the large sizes of DNA inserted into the BAC vectors, it is normally inefficient and time-consuming to assemble these fragments by routine PCR amplifications and restriction-ligations. Here we present a rapid method to insert fragments to construct BAC-based expression vectors. A DNA fragment of about 130 bp was designed, which contains upstream and downstream homologous sequences of both BAC vector and pIB139 plasmid carrying the whole integration expression cassette. In-Fusion cloning was performed using the designer DNA fragment to modify pIB139, followed by λ-RED-mediated recombination to obtain the BAC-based expression vector. We demonstrated the effectiveness of this method by rapid construction of a BAC-based expression vector with an insert of about 120 kb that contains the entire gene cluster for biosynthesis of immunosuppressant FK506. The empty BAC-based expression vector constructed in this study can be conveniently used for construction of BAC libraries using either microbial pure culture or environmental DNA, and the selected BAC clones can be directly used for heterologous expression. Alternatively, if a BAC library has already been constructed using a commercial BAC vector, the selected BAC vectors can be manipulated using the method described here to get the BAC-based expression vectors with desired gene clusters for heterologous expression. The rapid construction of a BAC-based expression vector facilitates

  19. Expression System Based on an MTIIa Promoter to Produce hPSA in Mammalian Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Anderson K; Parreira, Ricardo C; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2016-01-01

    Because of the limitations of standard culture techniques, the development of new recombinant protein expression systems with biotechnological potential is a key challenge. Ideally, such systems should be able to effectively and accurately synthesize a protein of interest with intrinsic metabolic capacity. Here, we describe such a system that was designed based on a plasmid vector containing promoter elements derived from the metallothionein MTIIa promoter, as well as processing and purification elements. This promoter can be induced by heavy metals in a culture medium to induce the synthesis of human prostate-specific antigen (hPSA), which has been modified to insert elements for purification, proteolysis, and secretion. We optimized hPSA production in this system by comparing the effects and contributions of ZnCl2, CdCl2, and CuSO4 in HEK293FT, HeLa, BHK-21, and CHO-K1 cells. We also compared the effectiveness of three different transfection agents: multi-walled carbon nanotubes, Lipofectamine 2000, and X-tremeGENE HP Reagent. hPSA production was confirmed via the detection of enhanced green fluorescent protein fluorescence, and cell viability was determined. The expression of hPSA was compared with that of the native protein produced by LNCaP cells, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. X-tremeGENE reagent, the BHK-21 cell line, and CuSO4 showed the highest hPSA production rates. Furthermore, BHK-21 cells were more resistant to the oxidative stress caused by 100 μM CuSO4. These results suggest that the proposed optimized inducible expression system can effectively produce recombinant proteins with desired characteristics for a wide range of applications in molecular biology. PMID:27582737

  20. Expression System Based on an MTIIa Promoter to Produce hPSA in Mammalian Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Anderson K.; Parreira, Ricardo C.; Resende, Rodrigo R.

    2016-01-01

    Because of the limitations of standard culture techniques, the development of new recombinant protein expression systems with biotechnological potential is a key challenge. Ideally, such systems should be able to effectively and accurately synthesize a protein of interest with intrinsic metabolic capacity. Here, we describe such a system that was designed based on a plasmid vector containing promoter elements derived from the metallothionein MTIIa promoter, as well as processing and purification elements. This promoter can be induced by heavy metals in a culture medium to induce the synthesis of human prostate-specific antigen (hPSA), which has been modified to insert elements for purification, proteolysis, and secretion. We optimized hPSA production in this system by comparing the effects and contributions of ZnCl2, CdCl2, and CuSO4 in HEK293FT, HeLa, BHK-21, and CHO-K1 cells. We also compared the effectiveness of three different transfection agents: multi-walled carbon nanotubes, Lipofectamine 2000, and X-tremeGENE HP Reagent. hPSA production was confirmed via the detection of enhanced green fluorescent protein fluorescence, and cell viability was determined. The expression of hPSA was compared with that of the native protein produced by LNCaP cells, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. X-tremeGENE reagent, the BHK-21 cell line, and CuSO4 showed the highest hPSA production rates. Furthermore, BHK-21 cells were more resistant to the oxidative stress caused by 100 μM CuSO4. These results suggest that the proposed optimized inducible expression system can effectively produce recombinant proteins with desired characteristics for a wide range of applications in molecular biology. PMID:27582737

  1. Expression system based on an MTIIa promoter to produce hPSA in mammalian cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson K Santos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Because of the limitations of standard culture techniques, the development of new recombinant protein expression systems with biotechnological potential is a key challenge. Ideally, such systems should be able to effectively and accurately synthesize a protein of interest with intrinsic